WorldWideScience

Sample records for 3-d tissue systems

  1. Micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing for complex tissue regeneration.

    Tarafder, Solaiman; Koch, Alia; Jun, Yena; Chou, Conrad; Awadallah, Mary R; Lee, Chang H

    2016-06-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing has emerged as an efficient tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, given its advantages for constructing custom-designed scaffolds with tunable microstructure/physical properties. Here we developed a micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffolds. PLGA microspheres (μS) were encapsulated with growth factors (GFs) and then embedded inside PCL microfibers that constitute custom-designed 3D scaffolds. Given the substantial difference in the melting points between PLGA and PCL and their low heat conductivity, μS were able to maintain its original structure while protecting GF's bioactivities. Micro-precise spatial control of multiple GFs was achieved by interchanging dispensing cartridges during a single printing process. Spatially controlled delivery of GFs, with a prolonged release, guided formation of multi-tissue interfaces from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs). To investigate efficacy of the micro-precise delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffold, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc scaffolds were fabricated with micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery of CTGF and TGFβ3, mimicking native-like multiphase fibrocartilage. In vitro, TMJ disc scaffolds spatially embedded with CTGF/TGFβ3-μS resulted in formation of multiphase fibrocartilaginous tissues from MSCs. In vivo, TMJ disc perforation was performed in rabbits, followed by implantation of CTGF/TGFβ3-μS-embedded scaffolds. After 4 wks, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly improved healing of the perforated TMJ disc as compared to the degenerated TMJ disc in the control group with scaffold embedded with empty μS. In addition, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly prevented arthritic changes on TMJ condyles. In conclusion, our micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing may serve as an efficient tool to regenerate complex and inhomogeneous tissues. PMID

  2. Adipose tissue engineering. Development of a 3-D model system of adipogenesis

    Fischbach, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    Engineered adipose tissue equivalents are increasingly acknowledged to serve for both fat grafting and basic research of obesity. As the current approaches do not allow for the formation of the desired coherent constructs, this thesis focused on the establishment of a fat-like model system capable of overcoming the present limitations. The 3-D model system was composed of the preadipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 and commercially available polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber meshes as polymeric cell ca...

  3. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space a...

  4. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  5. A system for 3-D absorbed dose measurements with tissue-equivalence for thermal neutrons

    A ferrous sulphate gel with a proper composition to thermalise epithermal neutrons with tissue equivalence with brain tissue gives the possibility of making phantoms which act as a continuous dosimeter for the gamma radiation, with the possibility of 3-D dose determination. If in the phantom a volume of gel containing 10B (in the amount typical for BNCT) is set, information on the absorbed dose in the tumour site may also be drawn. ((orig.))

  6. Computer-aided multiple-head 3D printing system for printing of heterogeneous organ/tissue constructs

    Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Recently, much attention has focused on replacement or/and enhancement of biological tissues via the use of cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with an architecture that mimics the tissue matrix, and with the desired three-dimensional (3D) external geometry. However, mimicking the heterogeneous tissues that most organs and tissues are formed of is challenging. Although multiple-head 3D printing systems have been proposed for fabricating heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds, to date only the simple exterior form has been realized. Here we describe a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for this application. We aim to develop an algorithm to enable easy, intuitive design and fabrication of a heterogeneous cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a free-form 3D geometry. The printing paths of the scaffold are automatically generated from the 3D CAD model, and the scaffold is then printed by dispensing four materials; i.e., a frame, two kinds of cell-laden hydrogel and a support. We demonstrated printing of heterogeneous tissue models formed of hydrogel scaffolds using this approach, including the outer ear, kidney and tooth tissue. These results indicate that this approach is particularly promising for tissue engineering and 3D printing applications to regenerate heterogeneous organs and tissues with tailored geometries to treat specific defects or injuries.

  7. A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity.

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Ko, In Kap; Kengla, Carlos; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    A challenge for tissue engineering is producing three-dimensional (3D), vascularized cellular constructs of clinically relevant size, shape and structural integrity. We present an integrated tissue-organ printer (ITOP) that can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue constructs of any shape. Mechanical stability is achieved by printing cell-laden hydrogels together with biodegradable polymers in integrated patterns and anchored on sacrificial hydrogels. The correct shape of the tissue construct is achieved by representing clinical imaging data as a computer model of the anatomical defect and translating the model into a program that controls the motions of the printer nozzles, which dispense cells to discrete locations. The incorporation of microchannels into the tissue constructs facilitates diffusion of nutrients to printed cells, thereby overcoming the diffusion limit of 100-200 μm for cell survival in engineered tissues. We demonstrate capabilities of the ITOP by fabricating mandible and calvarial bone, cartilage and skeletal muscle. Future development of the ITOP is being directed to the production of tissues for human applications and to the building of more complex tissues and solid organs. PMID:26878319

  8. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    Richards, Dylan Jack; Tan, Yu; Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host ...

  9. Studies of ionising radiation induced bystander effects in 3D artificial tissue system and applications for radiation protection

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. The bystander effect cannot be comprehensively explained on the basis of a single cell reaction. It is well known that an organism is composed of different cell types that interact as functional units in a way to maintain normal tissue function. Therefore the radiation response is not simply the sum of cellular responses as assumed in classical radiobiology, predominantly from studies using cell cultures. Experimental models, which maintain tissue-like intercellular cell signalling and 3D structure, are essential for proper understanding of the bystander effect. Our work relates to experimentation with novel 3D artificial human tissue systems available from MatTek Corporation (Boston, USA). Air-liquid interface culture technique is used to grow artificial tissues, which allow to model conditions present in vivo. The Gray Cancer Institute (Northwood, UK) charged particle microbeam was used to irradiate tissue samples in a known pattern with a known number of 3He2+ particles or protons. After irradiation, the tissues models were incubated for 3 days, fixed in 10 % NBF, paraffin embedded and then sliced into 5 μm histological sections located at varying distances from the plane of the irradiated cells. We studied in situ apoptosis and markers of differentiation. Significantly elevated bystander induced apoptosis was observed with 3'-OH DNA end-labelling based technique in 3D artificial tissue systems. Our results also suggested an importance of proliferation and differentiation status for bystander

  10. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Jonathan J Campbell

    Full Text Available Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM in three dimensional (3D space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  11. Studies of Bystander Effects in 3-D Tissue Systems Using a Low-LET Microbeam

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-17

    frequency was also observed. When cells were cultured in medium donated from cells exposed to 5 Gy X-rays, a significant bystander effect was observed for clonogenic survival. When cells were cultured for 5 h with supernatant from donor cells exposed to 2 cGy and were then irradiated with 4 Gy X-rays, they failed to show an increase in survival compared with cells directly irradiated with 4 Gy. However, a twofold reduction in the oncogenic transformation frequency was seen. An adaptive dose of X-rays cancelled out the majority of the bystander effect produced by alpha-particles. For oncogenic transformation, but not cell survival, radioadaption can occur in unirradiated cells via a transmissible factor(s). A pilot study was undertaken to observe the bystander effect in a realistic multicellular three-dimensional morphology. We found bystander responses in a three-dimensional, normal human-tissue system. Endpoints were induction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells. A charged-particle microbeam was used, allowing irradiation of cells in defined locations in the tissue yet guaranteeing that no cells located more than a few micrometers away receive any radiation exposure. Unirradiated cells up to 1 mm distant from irradiated cells showed a significant enhancement in effect over background, with an average increase in effect of 1.7-fold for micronuclei and 2.8-fold for apoptosis. The surprisingly long range of bystander signals in human tissue suggests that bystander responses may be important in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemiologically accessible doses down to very low doses where nonhit bystander cells will predominate. Finally, it would be of great benefit to develop a reproducible tissue system suitable for critical radiobiological assays. We have developed a reliable protocol to harvest cells from tissue samples and to investigate the damage induced on a single cell basis. In order to result in a valid tool for bystander experiments, the method

  12. The Use of Silk as a Scaffold for Mature, Sustainable Unilocular Adipose 3D Tissue Engineered Systems.

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Wang, Rebecca Y; Reagan, Michaela R; Chen, Ying; Borowsky, Francis E; Zieba, Adam; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Ghobrial, Irene M; Kaplan, David L

    2016-07-01

    There is a critical need for monitoring physiologically relevant, sustainable, human adipose tissues in vitro to gain new insights into metabolic diseases. To support long-term culture, a 3D silk scaffold assisted culture system is developed that maintains mature unilocular adipocytes ex vivo in coculture with preadipocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells obtained from small volumes of liquefied adipose samples. Without the silk scaffold, adipose tissue explants cannot be sustained in long-term culture (3 months) due to their fragility. Adjustments to media components are used to tune lipid metabolism and proliferation, in addition to responsiveness to an inflammatory stimulus. Interestingly, patient specific responses to TNFα stimulation are observed, providing a proof-of-concept translational technique for patient specific disease modeling in the future. In summary, this novel 3D scaffold assisted approach is required for establishing physiologically relevant, sustainable, human adipose tissue systems from small volumes of lipoaspirate, making this methodology of great value to studies of metabolism, adipokine-driven diseases, and other diseases where the roles of adipocytes are only now becoming uncovered. PMID:27197588

  13. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  14. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Wolff, Anders; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2016-01-01

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing of the PVA mould was combined with a salt leaching process. In this case, the sacrificial PVA mould, defining a structured network- architecture of micro-channels, was filled with salt crystals to defin...

  15. 3D Bioprinting of Tissue/Organ Models.

    Pati, Falguni; Gantelius, Jesper; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2016-04-01

    In vitro tissue/organ models are useful platforms that can facilitate systematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigations of drugs/chemicals. The primary objective when developing tissue/organ models is to reproduce physiologically relevant functions that typically require complex culture systems. Bioprinting offers exciting prospects for constructing 3D tissue/organ models, as it enables the reproducible, automated production of complex living tissues. Bioprinted tissues/organs may prove useful for screening novel compounds or predicting toxicity, as the spatial and chemical complexity inherent to native tissues/organs can be recreated. In this Review, we highlight the importance of developing 3D in vitro tissue/organ models by 3D bioprinting techniques, characterization of these models for evaluating their resemblance to native tissue, and their application in the prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing, and as disease/tumor models. PMID:26895542

  16. 3D Nanoprinting Technologies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Jin Woo Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering recovers an original function of tissue by replacing the damaged part with a new tissue or organ regenerated using various engineering technologies. This technology uses a scaffold to support three-dimensional (3D tissue formation. Conventional scaffold fabrication methods do not control the architecture, pore shape, porosity, or interconnectivity of the scaffold, so it has limited ability to stimulate cell growth and to generate new tissue. 3D printing technologies may overcome these disadvantages of traditional fabrication methods. These technologies use computers to assist in design and fabrication, so the 3D scaffolds can be fabricated as designed and standardized. Particularly, because nanofabrication technology based on two-photon absorption (2PA and on controlled electrospinning can generate structures with submicron resolution, these methods have been evaluated in various areas of tissue engineering. Recent combinations of 3D nanoprinting technologies with methods from molecular biology and cell dynamics have suggested new possibilities for improved tissue regeneration. If the interaction between cells and scaffold system with biomolecules can be understood and controlled and if an optimal 3D environment for tissue regeneration can be realized, 3D nanoprinting will become an important tool in tissue engineering.

  17. Bone tissue engineering using 3D printing

    Susmita Bose

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of additive manufacturing technologies in the mid 1980s, many applications benefited from the faster processing of products without the need for specific tooling or dies. However, the application of such techniques in the area of biomedical devices has been slow due to the stringent performance criteria and concerns related to reproducibility and part quality, when new technologies are in their infancy. However, the use of additive manufacturing technologies in bone tissue engineering has been growing in recent years. Among the different technology options, three dimensional printing (3DP is becoming popular due to the ability to directly print porous scaffolds with designed shape, controlled chemistry and interconnected porosity. Some of these inorganic scaffolds are biodegradable and have proven ideal for bone tissue engineering, sometimes even with site specific growth factor/drug delivery abilities. This review article focuses on recent advances in 3D printed bone tissue engineering scaffolds along with current challenges and future directions.

  18. 3D-Printed Biopolymers for Tissue Engineering Application

    Xiaoming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing technology has recently gained substantial interest for potential applications in tissue engineering due to the ability of making a three-dimensional object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D-printed biopolymers, which combine the 3D printing technology and biopolymers, have shown great potential in tissue engineering applications and are receiving significant attention, which has resulted in the development of numerous research programs regarding the material systems which are available for 3D printing. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of biopolymer materials, including natural biopolymer-based materials and synthetic biopolymer-based materials prepared using 3D printing technology, and some future challenges and applications of this technology are discussed.

  19. 3D soft tissue predictions with a tetrahedral mass tensor model for a maxillofacial planning system: a quantitative validation study

    Mollemans, W.; Schutyser, F.; Nadjmi, N.; Maes, F.; Suetens, P.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we present an extensive quantitative validation on 3D facial soft tissue simulation for maxillofacial surgery planning. The study group contained 10 patients. In previous work we presented a new Mass Tensor Model to simulate the new facial appearance after maxillofacial surgery in a fast way. 10 patients were preoperatively CT-scanned and the surgical intervention was planned. 4 months after surgery, a post-operative control CT was acquired. In this study, the simulated facial outlook is compared with post-operative image data. After defining corresponding points between the predicted and actual post-operative facial skin surface, using a variant of the non-rigid TPS-RPM algorithm, distances between these correspondences are quantified and visualized in 3D. As shown, the average median distance measures only 0.60 mm and the average 90% percentile stays below 1.5 mm. We can conclude that our model clearly provides an accurate prediction of the real post-operative outcome and is therefore suitable for use in clinical practice.

  20. 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering produced by microfabrication technology

    Carletti, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Rapid prototyping techniques (RP) hold great promise for designing 3-dimensional (3-D) regular and ordered scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. With these techniques, good architecture reproducibility as well as porosity control of the structure can be obtained. This work dealt with the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with regular micrometric geometry by using an in-house built microfabrication system. Poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLA), poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid...

  1. A Multifunctional 3D Co-Culture System for Studies of Mammary Tissue Morphogenesis and Stem Cell Biology

    Campbell, Jonathan J.; Davidenko, Natalia; Caffarel, Maria M.; Cameron, Ruth E.; Watson, Christine J

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM) in three dimensional (3D) space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this sc...

  2. 3D biometrics systems and applications

    Zhang, David

    2013-01-01

    Includes discussions on popular 3D imaging technologies, combines them with biometric applications, and then presents real 3D biometric systems Introduces many efficient 3D feature extraction, matching, and fusion algorithms Techniques presented have been supported by experimental results using various 3D biometric classifications

  3. Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    Wu, Geng-Hsi; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue ...

  4. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed. PMID:27086202

  5. 3D printing of functional biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Xuanyi; Gou, Maling; Mei, Deqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-08-01

    3D printing is emerging as a powerful tool for tissue engineering by enabling 3D cell culture within complex 3D biomimetic architectures. This review discusses the prevailing 3D printing techniques and their most recent applications in building tissue constructs. The work associated with relatively well-known inkjet and extrusion-based bioprinting is presented with the latest advances in the fields. Emphasis is put on introducing two relatively new light-assisted bioprinting techniques, including digital light processing (DLP)-based bioprinting and laser based two photon polymerization (TPP) bioprinting. 3D bioprinting of vasculature network is particularly discussed for its foremost significance in maintaining tissue viability and promoting functional maturation. Limitations to current bioprinting approaches, as well as future directions of bioprinting functional tissues are also discussed. PMID:27043763

  6. Generation of 3D synthetic breast tissue

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are an emergent approach for the rapid evaluation and comparison of various breast imaging technologies and techniques using computer-based modeling tools. A fundamental requirement of this approach for mammography is the use of realistic looking breast anatomy in the studies to produce clinically relevant results. In this work, a biologically inspired approach has been used to simulate realistic synthetic breast phantom blocks for use in virtual clinical trials. A variety of high and low frequency features (including Cooper's ligaments, blood vessels and glandular tissue) have been extracted from clinical digital breast tomosynthesis images and used to simulate synthetic breast blocks. The appearance of the phantom blocks was validated by presenting a selection of simulated 2D and DBT images interleaved with real images to a team of experienced readers for rating using an ROC paradigm. The average areas under the curve for 2D and DBT images were 0.53+/-.04 and 0.55+/-.07 respectively; errors are the standard errors of the mean. The values indicate that the observers had difficulty in differentiating the real images from simulated images. The statistical properties of simulated images of the phantom blocks were evaluated by means of power spectrum analysis. The power spectrum curves for real and simulated images closely match and overlap indicating good agreement.

  7. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell–cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. (paper)

  8. 3D printing facilitated scaffold-free tissue unit fabrication.

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan J; Trusk, Thomas C; Visconti, Richard P; Yost, Michael J; Kindy, Mark S; Drake, Christopher J; Argraves, William Scott; Markwald, Roger R; Mei, Ying

    2014-06-01

    Tissue spheroids hold great potential in tissue engineering as building blocks to assemble into functional tissues. To date, agarose molds have been extensively used to facilitate fusion process of tissue spheroids. As a molding material, agarose typically requires low temperature plates for gelation and/or heated dispenser units. Here, we proposed and developed an alginate-based, direct 3D mold-printing technology: 3D printing microdroplets of alginate solution into biocompatible, bio-inert alginate hydrogel molds for the fabrication of scaffold-free tissue engineering constructs. Specifically, we developed a 3D printing technology to deposit microdroplets of alginate solution on calcium containing substrates in a layer-by-layer fashion to prepare ring-shaped 3D hydrogel molds. Tissue spheroids composed of 50% endothelial cells and 50% smooth muscle cells were robotically placed into the 3D printed alginate molds using a 3D printer, and were found to rapidly fuse into toroid-shaped tissue units. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the cells secreted collagen type I playing a critical role in promoting cell-cell adhesion, tissue formation and maturation. PMID:24717646

  9. Partially Nanofibrous Architecture of 3D Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    An ideal tissue-engineering scaffold should provide suitable pores and appropriate pore surface to induce desired cellular activities and to guide 3D tissue regeneration. In the present work, we have developed macroporous polymer scaffolds with varying pore wall architectures from smooth (solid), microporous, partially nanofibrous, to entirely nanofibrous ones. All scaffolds are designed to have well-controlled interconnected macropores, resulting from leaching sugar sphere template. We exami...

  10. Advanced 3D Object Identification System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optra will build an Advanced 3D Object Identification System utilizing three or more high resolution imagers spaced around a launch platform. Data from each imager...

  11. Networked 3D Virtual Museum System

    2003-01-01

    Virtual heritage has become increasingly important in the conservation, preservation, and interpretation of our cultural and natural history. Moreover, rapid advances in digital technologies in recent years offer virtual heritage new direction. This paper introduces our approach toward a networked 3D virtual museum system, especially, how to model, manage, present virtual heritages and furthermore how to use computer network for the share of virtual heritage in the networked virtual environment. This paper first addresses a 3D acquisition and processing technique for virtual heritage modeling and shows some illustrative examples. Then, this paper describes a management of virtual heritage assets that are composed by various rich media. This paper introduces our schemes to present the virtual heritages, which include 3D virtual heritage browser system, CAVE system, and immersive VR theater. Finally, this paper presents the new direction of networked 3D virtual museum of which main idea is remote guide of the virtual heritage using the mixed reality technique.

  12. Automatic extraction of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images using model driven analysis

    This paper presents an automatic extraction system (called TOPS-3D : Top Down Parallel Pattern Recognition System for 3D Images) of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images by using model driven analysis algorithm. As the construction of system TOPS we developed, two concepts have been considered in the design of system TOPS-3D. One is the system having a hierarchical structure of reasoning using model information in higher level, and the other is a parallel image processing structure used to extract plural candidate regions for a destination entity. The new points of system TOPS-3D are as follows. (1) The TOPS-3D is a three-dimensional image analysis system including 3D model construction and 3D image processing techniques. (2) A technique is proposed to increase connectivity between knowledge processing in higher level and image processing in lower level. The technique is realized by applying opening operation of mathematical morphology, in which a structural model function defined in higher level by knowledge representation is immediately used to the filter function of opening operation as image processing in lower level. The system TOPS-3D applied to 3D MRI head images consists of three levels. First and second levels are reasoning part, and third level is image processing part. In experiments, we applied 5 samples of 3D MRI head images with size 128 x 128 x 128 pixels to the system TOPS-3D to extract the regions of soft tissues such as cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. From the experimental results, the system is robust for variation of input data by using model information, and the position and shape of soft tissues are extracted corresponding to anatomical structure. (author)

  13. Mobile 3D Viewer Supporting RFID System

    Kim, J. J.; Yang, S. W.; Choi, Y. [Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As hardware capabilities of mobile devices are being rapidly enhanced, applications based upon mobile devices are also being developed in wider areas. In this paper, a prototype mobile 3D viewer with the object identification through RFID system is presented. To visualize 3D engineering data such as CAD data, we need a process to compute triangulated data from boundary based surface like B-rep solid or trimmed surfaces. Since existing rendering engines on mobile devices do not provide triangulation capability, mobile 3D programs have focused only on an efficient handling with pre-tessellated geometry. We have developed a light and fast triangulation process based on constrained Delaunay triangulation suitable for mobile devices in the previous research. This triangulation software is used as a core for the mobile 3D viewer on a PDA with RFID system that may have potentially wide applications in many areas.

  14. Mobile 3D Viewer Supporting RFID System

    As hardware capabilities of mobile devices are being rapidly enhanced, applications based upon mobile devices are also being developed in wider areas. In this paper, a prototype mobile 3D viewer with the object identification through RFID system is presented. To visualize 3D engineering data such as CAD data, we need a process to compute triangulated data from boundary based surface like B-rep solid or trimmed surfaces. Since existing rendering engines on mobile devices do not provide triangulation capability, mobile 3D programs have focused only on an efficient handling with pre-tessellated geometry. We have developed a light and fast triangulation process based on constrained Delaunay triangulation suitable for mobile devices in the previous research. This triangulation software is used as a core for the mobile 3D viewer on a PDA with RFID system that may have potentially wide applications in many areas

  15. Replication of the 3D architecture of tissues

    R. Perez-Castillejos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological tissues are ensembles of various types of cells and extracellular molecules. Functionality in tissues arises from their components (cells and extracellular molecules as well as from the location of those components relative to each other. The organization of the constituents of a tissue is known as histoarchitecture. As cell culture reaches beyond flat, rigid surfaces, several approaches have been published that attempt to re-create in vitro the three-dimensional (3D histoarchitecture found in vivo. In these approaches, researchers use scaffolding molecules (extracellular matrix, ECM of natural or synthetic origin to support cell growth1. Scaffolds harvested from tissues replicate precisely the in vivo ECM but they may be limited by its biologic variability2. Conversely, synthetic scaffolds3,4 provide tailored, defined, repeatable ECM but lack the chemical signaling completeness provided by biological scaffolds. Here we will review methods for replicating in vitro the 3D histoarchitecture of live tissues, focusing on those approaches that use (or are compatible with tissue-harvested scaffolds.

  16. 3D Printing of Personalized Organs and Tissues

    Ye, Kaiming

    2015-03-01

    Authors: Kaiming Ye and Sha Jin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000 Abstract: Creation of highly organized multicellular constructs, including tissues and organs or organoids, will revolutionize tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The development of these technologies will enable the production of individualized organs or tissues for patient-tailored organ transplantation or cell-based therapy. For instance, a patient with damaged myocardial tissues due to an ischemic event can receive a myocardial transplant generated using the patient's own induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Likewise, a type-1 diabetic patient can be treated with lab-generated islets to restore his or her physiological insulin secretion capability. These lab-produced, high order tissues or organs can also serve as disease models for pathophysiological study and drug screening. The remarkable advances in stem cell biology, tissue engineering, microfabrication, and materials science in the last decade suggest the feasibility of generating these tissues and organoids in the laboratory. Nevertheless, major challenges still exist. One of the critical challenges that we still face today is the difficulty in constructing or fabricating multicellular assemblies that recapitulate in vivo microenvironments essential for controlling cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and assembly into a biologically functional tissue or organoid structure. These challenges can be addressed through developing 3D organ and tissue printing which enables organizing and assembling cells into desired tissue and organ structures. We have shown that human pluripotent stem cells differentiated in 3D environments are mature and possess high degree of biological function necessary for them to function in vivo.

  17. Volumetric motion quantification by 3D tissue phase mapped CMR

    Lutz Anja; Paul Jan; Bornstedt Axel; Nienhaus G; Etyngier Patrick; Bernhardt Peter; Rottbauer Wolfgang; Rasche Volker

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was the quantification of myocardial motion from 3D tissue phase mapped (TPM) CMR. Recent work on myocardial motion quantification by TPM has been focussed on multi-slice 2D acquisitions thus excluding motion information from large regions of the left ventricle. Volumetric motion assessment appears an important next step towards the understanding of the volumetric myocardial motion and hence may further improve diagnosis and treatments in patien...

  18. Gene Electrotransfer in 3D Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer into the skin is of particular interest for the development of medical applications including DNA vaccination, cancer treatment, wound healing or treatment of local skin disorders. However, such clinical applications are currently limited due to poor understanding of the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer within human tissue. Nowadays, most studies are carried out in rodent models but rodent skin varies from human skin in terms of cell composition and architecture. We used a tissue-engineering approach to study gene electrotransfer mechanisms in a human tissue context. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were cultured according to the self-assembly method to produce 3D reconstructed human dermal tissue. In this study, we showed that cells of the reconstructed cutaneous tissue were efficiently electropermeabilized by applying millisecond electric pulses, without affecting their viability. A reporter gene was successfully electrotransferred into this human tissue and gene expression was detected for up to 48h. Interestingly, the transfected cells were solely located on the upper surface of the tissue, where they were in close contact with plasmid DNA solution. Furthermore, we report evidences that electrotransfection success depends on plasmid mobility within tissue- rich in collagens, but not on cell proliferation status. In conclusion, in addition to proposing a reliable alternative to animal experiments, tissue engineering produces valid biological tool for the in vitro study of gene electrotransfer mechanisms in human tissue. PMID:27029947

  19. 3D scanning and printing skeletal tissues for anatomy education.

    Thomas, Daniel B; Hiscox, Jessica D; Dixon, Blair J; Potgieter, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Detailed anatomical models can be produced with consumer-level 3D scanning and printing systems. 3D replication techniques are significant advances for anatomical education as they allow practitioners to more easily introduce diverse or numerous specimens into classrooms. Here we present a methodology for producing anatomical models in-house, with the chondrocranium cartilage from a spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and the skeleton of a cane toad (Rhinella marina) as case studies. 3D digital replicas were produced using two consumer-level scanners and specimens were 3D-printed with selective laser sintering. The fidelity of the two case study models was determined with respect to key anatomical features. Larger-scale features of the dogfish chondrocranium and frog skeleton were all well-resolved and distinct in the 3D digital models, and many finer-scale features were also well-resolved, but some more subtle features were absent from the digital models (e.g. endolymphatic foramina in chondrocranium). All characters identified in the digital chondrocranium could be identified in the subsequent 3D print; however, three characters in the 3D-printed frog skeleton could not be clearly delimited (palatines, parasphenoid and pubis). Characters that were absent in the digital models or 3D prints had low-relief in the original scanned specimen and represent a minor loss of fidelity. Our method description and case studies show that minimal equipment and training is needed to produce durable skeletal specimens. These technologies support the tailored production of models for specific classes or research aims. PMID:27146106

  20. 3D simulation of plant and living tissue superficial lesions

    Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Sindyaeva, Alexandra R.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2008-06-01

    The analytic schemes of calculated absorbed and scattered radiation spatial distribution in multilayer plant and living tissues and diagnostic of their physical state are presented. The correct realization of these tasks was obtained with 3D Monte Carlo simulation of optical radiation propagation through multiple scattering medium in TracePro environment. Analysis of simulation data was made by differential backscattering method, which allows to investigate general backscattered radiation dependences on optical and geometrical parameters of living tissue. It was shown that obtained results formed the basis for developing an algorithm of optical superficial inhomogeneous registration and spatial localization. Such diagnosis can be executed in tissues of any arbitrary surface structure. Designed scheme is intended to utilize in contactless macro diagnostics device. The same approach was used for simulation of optical spectra of healthy and diseased virtual leaves for plant tissue pathological changes revealing.

  1. Volumetric motion quantification by 3D tissue phase mapped CMR

    Lutz Anja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was the quantification of myocardial motion from 3D tissue phase mapped (TPM CMR. Recent work on myocardial motion quantification by TPM has been focussed on multi-slice 2D acquisitions thus excluding motion information from large regions of the left ventricle. Volumetric motion assessment appears an important next step towards the understanding of the volumetric myocardial motion and hence may further improve diagnosis and treatments in patients with myocardial motion abnormalities. Methods Volumetric motion quantification of the complete left ventricle was performed in 12 healthy volunteers and two patients applying a black-blood 3D TPM sequence. The resulting motion field was analysed regarding motion pattern differences between apical and basal locations as well as for asynchronous motion pattern between different myocardial segments in one or more slices. Motion quantification included velocity, torsion, rotation angle and strain derived parameters. Results All investigated motion quantification parameters could be calculated from the 3D-TPM data. Parameters quantifying hypokinetic or asynchronous motion demonstrated differences between motion impaired and healthy myocardium. Conclusions 3D-TPM enables the gapless volumetric quantification of motion abnormalities of the left ventricle, which can be applied in future application as additional information to provide a more detailed analysis of the left ventricular function.

  2. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  3. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  4. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  5. Engineered Polymeric Hydrogels for 3D Tissue Models

    Sujin Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric biomaterials are widely used in a wide range of biomedical applications due to their unique properties, such as biocompatibility, multi-tunability and easy fabrication. Specifically, polymeric hydrogel materials are extensively utilized as therapeutic implants and therapeutic vehicles for tissue regeneration and drug delivery systems. Recently, hydrogels have been developed as artificial cellular microenvironments because of the structural and physiological similarity to native extracellular matrices. With recent advances in hydrogel materials, many researchers are creating three-dimensional tissue models using engineered hydrogels and various cell sources, which is a promising platform for tissue regeneration, drug discovery, alternatives to animal models and the study of basic cell biology. In this review, we discuss how polymeric hydrogels are used to create engineered tissue constructs. Specifically, we focus on emerging technologies to generate advanced tissue models that precisely recapitulate complex native tissues in vivo.

  6. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    Yahui Liu

    Full Text Available The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  7. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  8. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Shahini A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aref Shahini,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,2 Kenneth J Walker,2 Margaret A Eastman,3 Hamed Hatami-Marbini,4 Brenda J Smith,5 John L Ricci,6 Sundar V Madihally,2 Daryoosh Vashaee,1 Lobat Tayebi2,7 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, 2School of Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, 4School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 6Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA Abstract: Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene poly(4-styrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent

  9. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters r...

  10. Bio-inspired 3D microenvironments: a new dimension in tissue engineering.

    Magin, Chelsea M; Alge, Daniel L; Anseth, Kristi S

    2016-04-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been a foundational element of the tissue engineering paradigm since the inception of the field. Over the years there has been a progressive move toward the rational design and fabrication of bio-inspired materials that mimic the composition as well as the architecture and 3D structure of tissues. In this review, we chronicle advances in the field that address key challenges in tissue engineering as well as some emerging applications. Specifically, a summary of the materials and chemistries used to engineer bio-inspired 3D matrices that mimic numerous aspects of the extracellular matrix is provided, along with an overview of bioprinting, an additive manufacturing approach, for the fabrication of engineered tissues with precisely controlled 3D structures and architectures. To emphasize the potential clinical impact of the bio-inspired paradigm in biomaterials engineering, some applications of bio-inspired matrices are discussed in the context of translational tissue engineering. However, focus is also given to recent advances in the use of engineered 3D cellular microenvironments for fundamental studies in cell biology, including photoresponsive systems that are shedding new light on how matrix properties influence cell phenotype and function. In an outlook for future work, the need for high-throughput methods both for screening and fabrication is highlighted. Finally, microscale organ-on-a-chip technologies are highlighted as a promising area for future investment in the application of bio-inspired microenvironments. PMID:26942469

  11. Design of 3D integrated circuits and systems

    Sharma, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration of microsystems and subsystems has become essential to the future of semiconductor technology development. 3D integration requires a greater understanding of several interconnected systems stacked over each other. While this vertical growth profoundly increases the system functionality, it also exponentially increases the design complexity. Design of 3D Integrated Circuits and Systems tackles all aspects of 3D integration, including 3D circuit and system design, new processes and simulation techniques, alternative communication schemes for 3D circuits and sys

  12. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  13. 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of optical phantoms simulating heterogeneous biological tissue

    Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    The performance of biomedical optical imaging devices heavily relies on appropriate calibration. However, many of existing calibration phantoms for biomedical optical devices are based on homogenous materials without considering the multi-layer heterogeneous structures observed in biological tissue. Using such a phantom for optical calibration may result in measurement bias. To overcome this problem, we propose a 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of tissue simulating phantoms with multilayer heterogeneous structure. The phantom simulates not only the morphologic characteristics of biological tissue but also absorption and scattering properties. The printing system is based on a 3D motion platform with coordinated control of the DC motors. A special jet nozzle is designed to mix base, scattering, and absorption materials at different ratios. 3D tissue structures are fabricated through layer-by-layer printing with selective deposition of phantom materials of different ingredients. Different mixed ratios of base, scattering and absorption materials have been tested in order to optimize the printing outcome. A spectrometer and a tissue spectrophotometer are used for characterizing phantom absorption and scattering properties. The goal of this project is to fabricate skin tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for the calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  14. Microfluidic Bioprinting of Heterogeneous 3D Tissue Constructs Using Low-Viscosity Bioink.

    Colosi, Cristina; Shin, Su Ryon; Manoharan, Vijayan; Massa, Solange; Costantini, Marco; Barbetta, Andrea; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Dentini, Mariella; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-27

    A novel bioink and a dispensing technique for 3D tissue-engineering applications are presented. The technique incorporates a coaxial extrusion needle using a low-viscosity cell-laden bioink to produce highly defined 3D biostructures. The extrusion system is then coupled to a microfluidic device to control the bioink arrangement deposition, demonstrating the versatility of the bioprinting technique. This low-viscosity cell-responsive bioink promotes cell migration and alignment within each fiber organizing the encapsulated cells. PMID:26606883

  15. Multiscale 3D bioimaging: from cell, tissue to whole organism

    Lau, S. H.; Wang, Ge; Chandrasekeran, Margam; Fan, Victor; Nazrul, Mohd; Chang, Hauyee; Fong, Tiffany; Gelb, Jeff; Feser, Michael; Yun, Wenbing

    2009-05-01

    While electron microscopes and AFMs are capable of high resolution imaging to molecular levels, there is an ongoing problem in integrating these results into the larger scale structure and functions of tissue and organs within a complex organism. Imaging biological samples with optical microscopy is predominantly done with histology and immunohistochemistry, which can take up to a several weeks to prepare, are artifact prone and only available as individual 2D images. At the nano resolution scale, the higher resolution electron microscopy and AFM are used, but again these require destructive sample preparation and data are in 2D. To bridge this gap, we describe a rapid non invasive hierarchical bioimaging technique using a novel lab based x-ray computed tomography to characterize complex biological organism in multiscale- from whole organ (mesoscale) to calcified and soft tissue (microscale), to subcellular structures, nanomaterials and cellular-scaffold interaction (nanoscale). While MicroCT (micro x-ray computed tomography) is gaining in popularity for non invasive bones and tissue imaging, contrast and resolution are still vastly inadequate compared to histology. In this study we will present multiscale results from a novel microCT and nanoCT (nano x-ray tomography system). The novel MicroCT can image large specimen and tissue sample at histology resolution of submicron voxel resolution, often without contrast agents, while the nanoCT using x-ray optics similar to those used in synchrotron radiation facilities, has 20nm voxel resolution, suitable for studying cellular, subcellular morphology and nanomaterials. Multiscale examples involving both calcified and soft tissue will be illustrated, which include imaging a rat tibia to the individual channels of osteocyte canaliculli and lacunae and an unstained whole murine lung to its alveoli. The role of the novel CT will also be discussed as a possible means for rapid virtual histology using a biopsy of a human

  16. Hyper bio assembler for 3D cellular systems

    Arai, Fumihito; Yamato, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyper Bio Assembler for Cellular Systems is the first book to present a new methodology for measuring and separating target cells at high speed and constructing 3D cellular systems in vitro. This book represents a valuable resource for biologists, biophysicists and robotic engineers, as well as researchers interested in this new frontier area, offering a better understanding of the measurement, separation, assembly, analysis and synthesis of complex biological tissue, and of the medical applications of these technologies. This book is the outcome of the new academic fields of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology’s Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research in Japan.

  17. Random-Profiles-Based 3D Face Recognition System

    Joongrock Kim; Sunjin Yu; Sangyoun Lee

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a noble nonintrusive three-dimensional (3D) face modeling system for random-profile-based 3D face recognition is presented. Although recent two-dimensional (2D) face recognition systems can achieve a reliable recognition rate under certain conditions, their performance is limited by internal and external changes, such as illumination and pose variation. To address these issues, 3D face recognition, which uses 3D face data, has recently received much attention. However, the perf...

  18. 3D Viewer Platform of Cloud Clustering Management System: Google Map 3D

    Choi, Sung-Ja; Lee, Gang-Soo

    The new management system of framework for cloud envrionemnt is needed by the platfrom of convergence according to computing environments of changes. A ISV and small business model is hard to adapt management system of platform which is offered from super business. This article suggest the clustering management system of cloud computing envirionments for ISV and a man of enterprise in small business model. It applies the 3D viewer adapt from map3D & earth of google. It is called 3DV_CCMS as expand the CCMS[1].

  19. 3D Tissue Scaffold Printing On Custom Artificial Bone Applications

    Betül ALDEMİR

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of defect-matching scaffolds is the most critical step in custom artificial bone applications. Three dimensional printing (3DP is one of the best techniques particularly for custom designs on artificial bone applications because of the high controllability and design independency. Our long-term aim is to implant an artificial custom bone that is cultured with patient's own mesenchymal stem cells after determining defect architecture on patient's bone by using CT-scan and printing that defect-matching 3D scaffold with appropriate nontoxic materials. In this study, preliminary results of strength and cytotoxicity measurements of 3D printed scaffolds with modified calcium sulfate compositepowder (MCSCP were presented. CAD designs were created and MCSCP were printed by a 3D printer (3DS, Visijet, PXL Core. Some samples were covered with salt solution in order to harden the samples. MCSCP and salt coated MCSCP were the two experimental groups in this study. Cytotoxicity and mechanical experiments were performed after surface examination withscanning electron microscope (SEM and light microscope. Tension tests were performed for MCSCP and salt coated MCSCP samples. The 3D scaffolds were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas sterilizer, ventilated and conditioned with DMEM (10% FBS. L929 mouse fibroblast cells were cultured on scaffolds (3 repetitive and cell viability was determined using MTT analysis. According to the mechanical results, the MCSCP group stands until average 71,305 N, while salt coated MCSCP group stands until 21,328N. Although the strength difference between two groups is statistically significant (p=0.001, Mann-Whitney U, elastic modulus is not (MCSCP=1,186Pa, salt coated MCSCP=1,169Pa, p=0.445. Cell viability (MTT analysis results on day 1, 3, and 5 demonstrated thatscaffolds hadno toxic effect to the L929 mouse fibroblast cells. Consequently, 3D printed samples with MCSCP could potentially be a strong alternative

  20. A 3D CAMPUS INFORMATION SYSTEM – INITIAL STUDIES

    Kahraman, I.; I. R. Karas; Alizadehasharfi, B.; Abdul-Rahman, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the method of developing Campus Information System. The system can handle 3D spatial data within desktop and web environment. The method consists of texturing of building facades for 3D building models and modeling 3D Campus Information System. In this paper, some of these steps are carried out; modelling 3D buildings, toggling these models on the terrain and ortho-photo, integration with a geo-database, transferring to the CityServer3D environment by using CityG...

  1. Embryonic staging using a 3D virtual reality system

    C.M. Verwoerd-Dikkeboom (Christine); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); N. Exalto (Niek); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to demonstrate that Carnegie Stages could be assigned to embryos visualized with a 3D virtual reality system. METHODS: We analysed 48 3D ultrasound scans of 19 IVF/ICSI pregnancies at 7-10 weeks' gestation. These datasets were visualized as 3D 'holog

  2. Expert System for 3D Collar Intelligent Design

    LIU Yan; GENG Zhao-feng

    2004-01-01

    A method to set up 3D collar prototype is developed in this paper by using the technique of cubic spline and bicubic surface patch. Then the relationship between the parameters of 3D collar prototype and different collar styles are studied. Based on the relationship, we can develop some algorithms of transferring style requirements to the parameters value of the collar prototype, and obtain some generation rules for the design of 3D collar style. As such, the knowledge base can be constructed, and the intelligent design system of 3D collar style is built. Using the system, various 3D collar styles can be designed automatically to satisfy various style requirements.

  3. Random-Profiles-Based 3D Face Recognition System

    Joongrock Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a noble nonintrusive three-dimensional (3D face modeling system for random-profile-based 3D face recognition is presented. Although recent two-dimensional (2D face recognition systems can achieve a reliable recognition rate under certain conditions, their performance is limited by internal and external changes, such as illumination and pose variation. To address these issues, 3D face recognition, which uses 3D face data, has recently received much attention. However, the performance of 3D face recognition highly depends on the precision of acquired 3D face data, while also requiring more computational power and storage capacity than 2D face recognition systems. In this paper, we present a developed nonintrusive 3D face modeling system composed of a stereo vision system and an invisible near-infrared line laser, which can be directly applied to profile-based 3D face recognition. We further propose a novel random-profile-based 3D face recognition method that is memory-efficient and pose-invariant. The experimental results demonstrate that the reconstructed 3D face data consists of more than 50 k 3D point clouds and a reliable recognition rate against pose variation.

  4. 3D - Acquisition systems - test in Chooz B nuclear plant

    EDF needs 3D-acquisition systems to get the precise geometry of critical nuclear spaces in order to prepare computer simulations of operations in these areas. The simulations must lead to an increase of the efficiency of the operation. The acquisition of the 3-D geometry can be done using 3D-acquisition systems. To answer the needs of the Construction Division, four different systems are compared by the Research Division in Chooz B nuclear plant in order to determine the right solution for each 3D-acquisition problem

  5. Automatic extraction of soft tissues from 3D MRI images of the head

    This paper presents an automatic extraction method of soft tissues from 3D MRI images of the head. A 3D region growing algorithm is used to extract soft tissues such as cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. Four information sources are used to control the 3D region growing. Model of each soft tissue has been constructed in advance and provides a 3D region growing space. Head skin area which is automatically extracted from input image provides an unsearchable area. Zero-crossing points are detected by using Laplacian operator, and by examining sign change between neighborhoods. They are used as a control condition in the 3D region growing process. Graylevels of voxels are also directly used to extract each tissue region as a control condition. Experimental results applied to 19 samples show that the method is successful. (author)

  6. 3D Printing of Scaffold for Cells Delivery: Advances in Skin Tissue Engineering

    Deepti Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury or damage to tissue and organs is a major health problem, resulting in about half of the world’s annual healthcare expenditure every year. Advances in the fields of stem cells (SCs and biomaterials processing have provided a tremendous leap for researchers to manipulate the dynamics between these two, and obtain a skin substitute that can completely heal the wounded areas. Although wound healing needs a coordinated interplay between cells, extracellular proteins and growth factors, the most important players in this process are the endogenous SCs, which activate the repair cascade by recruiting cells from different sites. Extra cellular matrix (ECM proteins are activated by these SCs, which in turn aid in cellular migrations and finally secretion of growth factors that can seal and heal the wounds. The interaction between ECM proteins and SCs helps the skin to sustain the rigors of everyday activity, and in an attempt to attain this level of functionality in artificial three-dimensional (3D constructs, tissue engineered biomaterials are fabricated using more advanced techniques such as bioprinting and laser assisted printing of the organs. This review provides a concise summary of the most recent advances that have been made in the area of polymer bio-fabrication using 3D bio printing used for encapsulating stem cells for skin regeneration. The focus of this review is to describe, in detail, the role of 3D architecture and arrangement of cells within this system that can heal wounds and aid in skin regeneration.

  7. Influence of electrical stimulation on 3D-cultures of Adipose Tissue Derived Progenitor Cells (ATDPCs) behavior

    Castells-Sala, C.; Sánchez Terrones, Benjamín; Recha-Sancho, L.; V. Puig; Bragós Bardia, Ramon; C. E. Semino

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has a fundamental role in regenerative medicine. Still today, the major motivation for cardiac regeneration is to design a platform that enables the complete tissue structure and physiological function regeneration of injured myocardium areas. Although tissue engineering approaches have been generally developed for two-dimensional (2D) culture systems, three-dimensional (3D) systems are being spotlighted as the means to mimic better in vivo cellular conditions. This manuscr...

  8. 3D stacked chips from emerging processes to heterogeneous systems

    Fettweis, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    This book explains for readers how 3D chip stacks promise to increase the level of on-chip integration, and to design new heterogeneous semiconductor devices that combine chips of different integration technologies (incl. sensors) in a single package of the smallest possible size.  The authors focus on heterogeneous 3D integration, addressing some of the most important challenges in this emerging technology, including contactless, optics-based, and carbon-nanotube-based 3D integration, as well as signal-integrity and thermal management issues in copper-based 3D integration. Coverage also includes the 3D heterogeneous integration of power sources, photonic devices, and non-volatile memories based on new materials systems.   •Provides single-source reference to the latest research in 3D optoelectronic integration: process, devices, and systems; •Explains the use of wireless 3D integration to improve 3D IC reliability and yield; •Describes techniques for monitoring and mitigating thermal behavior in 3D I...

  9. High Speed Laser 3D Measurement System

    SONG Yuan-he; FAN Chang-zhou; GUO Ying; LI Hong-wei; ZHAO Hong

    2003-01-01

    Using the method of line structure light produced by a laser diode,three dimensional profile measurement is deeply researched.A hardware circuit developed is used to get the center position of light section for the improvement of the measurement speed.A double CCD compensation technology is used to improve the measurement precision. An easy and effective calibration method of the least squares to fit the parameter of system structure is used to get the relative coordinate relationship of objects and images of light section in the directions of height and axis. Sensor scanning segment by segment and layer by layer makes the measurement range expand greatly.

  10. Performance evaluation of 3D-TV systems

    kaptein, R.G.; Kuijsters, A.; Lambooij, M.T.M.; IJsselsteijn, W.A.; Heynderickx, I.

    2008-01-01

    The image quality circle is a commonly accepted framework to model the relation between the technology variables of a display and the resulting image quality. 3D-TV systems, however, go beyond the concept of image quality. Research has shown that, although 3D scenes are clearly more appreciated by s

  11. 3-D template simulation system in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    In Total Hip Arthroplastry, 2D template on Plain X-ray is usually used for preoperative planning. But deformity and contracture can cause malposition and measurement error. To reduce those problems, a 3D preoperative simulation system was developed. Three methods were compared in this study. One is to create very accurate AP and ML images which can use for standard 2D template. One is fully 3D preoperative template system using computer graphics. Last one is substantial simulation using stereo-lithography model. 3D geometry data of the bone was made from Helical 3-D CT data. AP and ML surface cutting 3D images of the femur were created using workstation (Advantage Workstation; GE Medical Systems). The extracted 3D geometry was displayed on personal computer using Magics (STL data visualization software), then 3D geometry of the stem was superimposed in it. The full 3D simulation system made it possible to observe the bone and stem geometry from any direction and by any section view. Stereo-lithography model was useful for detailed observation of the femur anatomy. (author)

  12. Detection of Connective Tissue Disorders from 3D Aortic MR Images Using Independent Component Analysis

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Honghai;

    2006-01-01

    A computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) method is reported that allows the objective identification of subjects with connective tissue disorders from 3D aortic MR images using segmentation and independent component analysis (ICA). The first step to extend the model to 4D (3D + time) has also been taken....... ICA is an effective tool for connective tissue disease detection in the presence of sparse data using prior knowledge to order the components, and the components can be inspected visually. 3D+time MR image data sets acquired from 31 normal and connective tissue disorder subjects at end-diastole (R......-wave peak) and at 45\\$\\backslash\\$% of the R-R interval were used to evaluate the performance of our method. The automated 3D segmentation result produced accurate aortic surfaces covering the aorta. The CAD method distinguished between normal and connective tissue disorder subjects with a classification...

  13. Laser-Micro/Nanofabricated 3D Polymers for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Danilevičius, P.; Žukauskas, A.; Bičkauskaitė, G.; Purlys, V.; Rutkauskas, M.; Gertus, T.; Paipulas, D.; Matukaitė, J.; Baltriukienė, D.; Malinauskas, M.

    2011-01-01

    A multi-photon polymerization system has been designed based on a pulsed irradiation light source (diode-pumped solid state femtosecond laser Yb:KGW, 300 fs, 1030 nm, 1-200 kHz) in combination with large working area and high precision linear motor driven stages (100×100×50 mm3). The system is intended for high resolution and throughput 3D micro- and nanofabrication and enables manufacturing the polymeric templates up to 1 cm2 areas with sub-micrometer resolution. These can be used for producing 3D artificial polymeric scaffolds to be applied for growing cells, specifically, in the tissue engineering. The bio-compatibility of different acrylate, hybrid organic-inorganic and biodegradable polymeric materials is evaluated experimentally in vitro. Variously sized and shaped polymeric scaffolds of biocompatible photopolymers with intricate 3D geometry were successfully fabricated. Proliferation tests for adult rabbit myogenic stem cells have shown the applicability of artificial scaffolds in biomedicine practice.

  14. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W.; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold arc...

  15. A Review of 3D Printing Techniques and the Future in Biofabrication of Bioprinted Tissue.

    Patra, Satyajit; Young, Vanesa

    2016-06-01

    3D printing has been around in the art, micro-engineering, and manufacturing worlds for decades. Similarly, research for traditionally engineered skin tissue has been in the works since the 1990s. As of recent years, the medical field also began to take advantage of the untapped potential of 3D printing for the biofabrication of tissue. To do so, researchers created a set of goals for fabricated tissues based on the characteristics of natural human tissues and organs. Fabricated tissue was then measured against this set of standards. Researchers were interested in not only creating tissue that functioned like natural tissues but in creating techniques for 3D printing that would print tissues quickly, efficiently, and ultimately result in the ability to mass produce fabricated tissues. Three promising methods of 3D printing emerged from their research: thermal inkjet printing with bioink, direct-write bioprinting, and organ printing using tissue spheroids. This review will discuss all three printing techniques, as well as their advantages, disadvantages, and the possibility of future advancements in the field of tissue fabrication. PMID:27193609

  16. Surface modelling in 3D city information system

    Igor Petz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Geographical information systems deal with terrain, cartographical and urban information; these systems allow gathering, maintaining and presentation of the included data. The approach of combininggeographical information systems with visualization methods of virtual reality is presented in this article. Virtual 3D City Information System is a project which purpose is to model parts of the city to 3D graphics using polygonal modelling for modelling objects by representing their surfaces using polygons. Realappearance is provided by using textures. Usually 3D exterior contains large data set of polygons. Presented system contains three parts: editor (modelling part, database and visualisation part. Thesystem is controlled by script (Python language using too. In conclusion are described some results of visualization of 3D scene that is represented as Košice city part.

  17. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  18. Thermal Protection System Materials (TPSM): 3D MAT Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 3D MAT Project seeks to design and develop a game changing Woven Thermal Protection System (TPS) technology tailored to meet the needs of the Orion...

  19. A Primitive-Based 3D Object Recognition System

    Dhawan, Atam P.

    1988-08-01

    A knowledge-based 3D object recognition system has been developed. The system uses the hierarchical structural, geometrical and relational knowledge in matching the 3D object models to the image data through pre-defined primitives. The primitives, we have selected, to begin with, are 3D boxes, cylinders, and spheres. These primitives as viewed from different angles covering complete 3D rotation range are stored in a "Primitive-Viewing Knowledge-Base" in form of hierarchical structural and relational graphs. The knowledge-based system then hypothesizes about the viewing angle and decomposes the segmented image data into valid primitives. A rough 3D structural and relational description is made on the basis of recognized 3D primitives. This description is now used in the detailed high-level frame-based structural and relational matching. The system has several expert and knowledge-based systems working in both stand-alone and cooperative modes to provide multi-level processing. This multi-level processing utilizes both bottom-up (data-driven) and top-down (model-driven) approaches in order to acquire sufficient knowledge to accept or reject any hypothesis for matching or recognizing the objects in the given image.

  20. Construction and myogenic differentiation of 3D myoblast tissues fabricated by fibronectin-gelatin nanofilm coating.

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chun-Yen; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ∼76 μm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. PMID:27125461

  1. 3D-printed fluidic networks as vasculature for engineered tissue.

    Kinstlinger, Ian S; Miller, Jordan S

    2016-05-24

    Fabrication of vascular networks within engineered tissue remains one of the greatest challenges facing the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering. Historically, the structural complexity of vascular networks has limited their fabrication in tissues engineered in vitro. Recently, however, key advances have been made in constructing fluidic networks within biomaterials, suggesting a strategy for fabricating the architecture of the vasculature. These techniques build on emerging technologies within the microfluidics community as well as on 3D printing. The freeform fabrication capabilities of 3D printing are allowing investigators to fabricate fluidic networks with complex architecture inside biomaterial matrices. In this review, we examine the most exciting 3D printing-based techniques in this area. We also discuss opportunities for using these techniques to address open questions in vascular biology and biophysics, as well as for engineering therapeutic tissue substitutes in vitro. PMID:27173478

  2. Construction and Myogenic Differentiation of 3D Myoblast Tissues Fabricated by Fibronectin-Gelatin Nanofilm Coating

    Gribova, Varvara; Liu, Chen Yun; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Matsusaki, Michiya; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a recently developed approach of coating the cells with fibronectin-gelatin nanofilms to build 3D skeletal muscle tissue models. We constructed the microtissues from C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently differentiated them to form muscle-like tissue. The thickness of the constructs could be successfully controlled by altering the number of seeded cells. We were able to build up to ~ 76 µm thick 3D constructs that formed multinucleated myotubes. We also found that Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 improved myotube formation in thick constructs. Our approach makes it possible to rapidly form 3D muscle tissues and is promising for the in vitro construction of physiologically relevant human skeletal muscle tissue models. PMID:27125461

  3. 3D Modelling of Biological Systems for Biomimetics

    Shujun Zhang; Kevin Hapeshi; Ashok K. Bhattacharya

    2004-01-01

    With the advanced development of computer-based enabling technologies, many engineering, medical, biology,chemistry, physics and food science etc have developed to the unprecedented levels, which lead to many research and development interests in various multi-discipline areas. Among them, biomimetics is one of the most promising and attractive branches of study. Biomimetics is a branch of study that uses biological systems as a model to develop synthetic systems.To learn from nature, one of the fundamental issues is to understand the natural systems such animals, insects, plants and human beings etc. The geometrical characterization and representation of natural systems is an important fundamental work for biomimetics research. 3D modeling plays a key role in the geometrical characterization and representation, especially in computer graphical visualization. This paper firstly presents the typical procedure of 3D modelling methods and then reviews the previous work of 3D geometrical modelling techniques and systems developed for industrial, medical and animation applications. Especially the paper discusses the problems associated with the existing techniques and systems when they are applied to 3D modelling of biological systems. Based upon the discussions, the paper proposes some areas of research interests in 3D modelling of biological systems and for Biomimetics.

  4. Advanced 3D Sensing and Visualization System for Unattended Monitoring

    Carlson, J.J.; Little, C.Q.; Nelson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to create a reliable, 3D sensing and visualization system for unattended monitoring. The system provides benefits for several of Sandia's initiatives including nonproliferation, treaty verification, national security and critical infrastructure surety. The robust qualities of the system make it suitable for both interior and exterior monitoring applications. The 3D sensing system combines two existing sensor technologies in a new way to continuously maintain accurate 3D models of both static and dynamic components of monitored areas (e.g., portions of buildings, roads, and secured perimeters in addition to real-time estimates of the shape, location, and motion of humans and moving objects). A key strength of this system is the ability to monitor simultaneous activities on a continuous basis, such as several humans working independently within a controlled workspace, while also detecting unauthorized entry into the workspace. Data from the sensing system is used to identi~ activities or conditions that can signi~ potential surety (safety, security, and reliability) threats. The system could alert a security operator of potential threats or could be used to cue other detection, inspection or warning systems. An interactive, Web-based, 3D visualization capability was also developed using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The intex%ace allows remote, interactive inspection of a monitored area (via the Internet or Satellite Links) using a 3D computer model of the area that is rendered from actual sensor data.

  5. AR based ornament design system for 3D printing

    Hiroshi Aoki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, 3D printers have become popular as a means of outputting geometries designed on CAD or 3D graphics systems. However, the complex user interfaces of standard 3D software can make it difficult for ordinary consumers to design their own objects. Furthermore, models designed on 3D graphics software often have geometrical problems that make them impossible to output on a 3D printer. We propose a novel AR (augmented reality 3D modeling system with an air-spray like interface. We also propose a new data structure (octet voxel for representing designed models in such a way that the model is guaranteed to be a complete solid. The target shape is based on a regular polyhedron, and the octet voxel representation is suitable for designing geometrical objects having the same symmetries as the base regular polyhedron. Finally, we conducted a user test and confirmed that users can intuitively design their own ornaments in a short time with a simple user interface.

  6. A Hydrogel Model Incorporating 3D-Plotted Hydroxyapatite for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering

    Michal Bartnikowski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of biphasic or multi-layered compound scaffolds has been explored within numerous studies in the context of cartilage and osteochondral regeneration. To date, no system has been identified that stands out in terms of superior chondrogenesis, osteogenesis or the formation of a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC. Herein we present a 3D plotted scaffold, comprising an alginate and hydroxyapatite paste, cast within a photocrosslinkable hydrogel made of gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA, or GelMA with hyaluronic acid methacrylate (HAMA. We hypothesized that this combination of 3D plotting and hydrogel crosslinking would form a high fidelity, cell supporting structure that would allow localization of hydroxyapatite to the deepest regions of the structure whilst taking advantage of hydrogel photocrosslinking. We assessed this preliminary design in terms of chondrogenesis in culture with human articular chondrocytes, and verified whether the inclusion of hydroxyapatite in the form presented had any influence on the formation of the ZCC. Whilst the inclusion of HAMA resulted in a better chondrogenic outcome, the effect of HAP was limited. We overall demonstrated that formation of such compound structures is possible, providing a foundation for future work. The development of cohesive biphasic systems is highly relevant for current and future cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. Validation of Continuously Tagged MRI for the Measurement of Dynamic 3D Skeletal Muscle Tissue Deformation

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-01-01

    A SPAMM tagged MRI methodology is presented allowing continuous (3.3-3.6 Hz) sampling of 3D dynamic soft tissue deformation using non-segmented 3D acquisitions. The 3D deformation is reconstructed by the combination of 3 mutually orthogonal tagging directions, thus requiring only 3 repeated motion cycles. In addition a fully automatic post-processing framework is presented employing Gabor scale-space and filter-bank analysis for tag extrema segmentation and triangulated surface fitting aided by Gabor filter bank derived surface normals. Deformation is derived following tracking of tag surface triplet triangle intersections. The dynamic deformation measurements were validated using indentation tests (~20 mm deep at 12 mm/s) on a silicone gel soft tissue phantom containing contrasting markers which provide a reference measure of deformation. In addition, the techniques were evaluated in-vivo for dynamic skeletal muscle tissue deformation measurement during indentation of the biceps region of the upper arm in a ...

  8. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R. [Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States); Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  9. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution

  10. 3D resolution enhancement of deep-tissue imaging based on virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy.

    Su, I-Cheng; Hsu, Kuo-Jen; Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-07-25

    During the last decades, several resolution enhancement methods for optical microscopy beyond diffraction limit have been developed. Nevertheless, those hardware-based techniques typically require strong illumination, and fail to improve resolution in deep tissue. Here we develop a high-speed computational approach, three-dimensional virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy (3D-vSPOM), which immediately solves the strong-illumination issue. By amplifying only the spatial frequency component corresponding to the un-scattered point-spread-function at focus, plus 3D nonlinear value selection, 3D-vSPOM shows significant resolution enhancement in deep tissue. Since no iteration is required, 3D-vSPOM is much faster than iterative deconvolution. Compared to non-iterative deconvolution, 3D-vSPOM does not need a priori information of point-spread-function at deep tissue, and provides much better resolution enhancement plus greatly improved noise-immune response. This method is ready to be amalgamated with two-photon microscopy or other laser scanning microscopy to enhance deep-tissue resolution. PMID:27464077

  11. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications—A Review

    Manuel Vázquez-Arellano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture.

  12. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications-A Review.

    Vázquez-Arellano, Manuel; Griepentrog, Hans W; Reiser, David; Paraforos, Dimitris S

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D) sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture. PMID:27136560

  13. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications—A Review

    Vázquez-Arellano, Manuel; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Reiser, David; Paraforos, Dimitris S.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D) sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture. PMID:27136560

  14. 3D Visualization and Simulation of the Human Navigation System

    Hjelle, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate how 3D visualizations and virtual reality can be used to make the human navigation system understandable for the general public. To do this, a 3D visualization of the human navigation systems components in the brain was created using Second Life. In addition, a simulation of how the cells in this system works was created with the same platform. These two types of visualization were used to see if they gave any learning outcome in relation to the ...

  15. A web-based 3D geological information visualization system

    Song, Renbo; Jiang, Nan

    2013-03-01

    Construction of 3D geological visualization system has attracted much more concern in GIS, computer modeling, simulation and visualization fields. It not only can effectively help geological interpretation and analysis work, but also can it can help leveling up geosciences professional education. In this paper, an applet-based method was introduced for developing a web-based 3D geological information visualization system. The main aims of this paper are to explore a rapid and low-cost development method for constructing a web-based 3D geological system. First, the borehole data stored in Excel spreadsheets was extracted and then stored in SQLSERVER database of a web server. Second, the JDBC data access component was utilized for providing the capability of access the database. Third, the user interface was implemented with applet component embedded in JSP page and the 3D viewing and querying functions were implemented with PickCanvas of Java3D. Last, the borehole data acquired from geological survey were used for test the system, and the test results has shown that related methods of this paper have a certain application values.

  16. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Wolff, Anders; Emnéus, Jenny; Aspegren, Anders; Dufva, Martin

    A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due to...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  17. Laser 3D micro/nanofabrication of polymers for tissue engineering applications

    Danilevičius, P.; Rekštytė, S.; Balčiūnas, E.; Kraniauskas, A.; Širmenis, R.; Baltriukienė, D.; Bukelskienė, V.; Gadonas, R.; Sirvydis, V.; Piskarskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we applied a constructed multi-photon polymerization system based on diode-pumped solid state femtosecond Yb:KGW laser used as pulsed irradiation light source (300 fs, 1030 nm, 200 kHz) in combination with large area high sample translation velocity (up to 300 mm/s) linear motor-driven stages (100×100×50 mm3) designed for high resolution and throughput 3D micro/nanofabrication. It enables rapid prototyping out of most polymers up to cm in scale with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. This can be used for production of three-dimensional artificial polymeric scaffolds applied for cell growth and expansion experiments as well as tissue engineering. Biocompatibilities of different acrylate, hybrid organic-inorganic and biodegradable polymeric materials were evaluated experimentally in vitro. Various in size and form scaffolds of biocompatible photopolymers were successfully fabricated having intricate 3D geometry, thus demonstrating the potential of the applied method. Adult rabbit myogenic stem cell proliferation tests show artificial scaffolds to be applicable for biomedical practice. Additionally, a micromolding technique was used for a rapid multiplication of adequate laser manufactured structures.

  18. 3D multi-spectrum sensor system with face recognition.

    Kim, Joongrock; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Ig-Jae; Lee, Sangyoun

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel three-dimensional (3D) multi-spectrum sensor system, which combines a 3D depth sensor and multiple optical sensors for different wavelengths. Various image sensors, such as visible, infrared (IR) and 3D sensors, have been introduced into the commercial market. Since each sensor has its own advantages under various environmental conditions, the performance of an application depends highly on selecting the correct sensor or combination of sensors. In this paper, a sensor system, which we will refer to as a 3D multi-spectrum sensor system, which comprises three types of sensors, visible, thermal-IR and time-of-flight (ToF), is proposed. Since the proposed system integrates information from each sensor into one calibrated framework, the optimal sensor combination for an application can be easily selected, taking into account all combinations of sensors information. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system, a face recognition system with light and pose variation is designed. With the proposed sensor system, the optimal sensor combination, which provides new effectively fused features for a face recognition system, is obtained. PMID:24072025

  19. 3D Multi-Spectrum Sensor System with Face Recognition

    Joongrock Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel three-dimensional (3D multi-spectrum sensor system, which combines a 3D depth sensor and multiple optical sensors for different wavelengths. Various image sensors, such as visible, infrared (IR and 3D sensors, have been introduced into the commercial market. Since each sensor has its own advantages under various environmental conditions, the performance of an application depends highly on selecting the correct sensor or combination of sensors. In this paper, a sensor system, which we will refer to as a 3D multi-spectrum sensor system, which comprises three types of sensors, visible, thermal-IR and time-of-flight (ToF, is proposed. Since the proposed system integrates information from each sensor into one calibrated framework, the optimal sensor combination for an application can be easily selected, taking into account all combinations of sensors information. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system, a face recognition system with light and pose variation is designed. With the proposed sensor system, the optimal sensor combination, which provides new effectively fused features for a face recognition system, is obtained.

  20. Controllability of the 3D compressible Euler system

    Nersisyan, Hayk

    2009-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the controllability problem for 3D compressible Euler system. The control is a finite-dimensional external force acting only on the velocity equation. We show that the velocity and density of the fluid are simultaneously controllable. In particular, the system is approximately controllable and exactly controllable in projections

  1. Development of 3-D Hydrogel Culture Systems With On-Demand Cell Separation

    Hamilton, Sharon K.; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C.; Massad, Christopher S.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3-D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate 2 cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3-D hydrogel co-culture system...

  2. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology

  3. Object Recognition Using a 3D RFID System

    Roh, Se-gon; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol

    2009-01-01

    Up to now, object recognition in robotics has been typically done by vision, ultrasonic sensors, laser ranger finders etc. Recently, RFID has emerged as a promising technology that can strengthen object recognition. In this chapter, the 3D RFID system and the 3D tag were presented. The proposed RFID system can determine if an object as well as other tags exists, and also can estimate the orientation and position of the object. This feature considerably reduces the dependence of the robot on o...

  4. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation

    Mangano, F. G.; Picciocchi, G.; Park, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time. PMID:27298621

  5. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    Derek H. Rosenzweig

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS and polylactic acid (PLA scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo.

  6. Bioactive polymeric–ceramic hybrid 3D scaffold for application in bone tissue regeneration

    The regeneration of large bone defects remains a challenging scenario from a therapeutic point of view. In fact, the currently available bone substitutes are often limited by poor tissue integration and severe host inflammatory responses, which eventually lead to surgical removal. In an attempt to address these issues, herein we evaluated the importance of alginate incorporation in the production of improved and tunable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HA) three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds to be used as temporary templates for bone regeneration. Different bioceramic combinations were tested in order to investigate optimal scaffold architectures. Additionally, 3D β-TCP/HA vacuum-coated with alginate, presented improved compressive strength, fracture toughness and Young's modulus, to values similar to those of native bone. The hybrid 3D polymeric–bioceramic scaffolds also supported osteoblast adhesion, maturation and proliferation, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that a 3D scaffold produced with this combination of biomaterials is described. Altogether, our results emphasize that this hybrid scaffold presents promising characteristics for its future application in bone regeneration. - Graphical abstract: B-TCP:HA–alginate hybrid 3D porous scaffolds for application in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The produced hybrid 3D scaffolds are prone to be applied in bone tissue engineering. • Alginate coated 3D scaffolds present high mechanical and biological properties. • In vitro assays for evaluation of human osteoblast cell attachment in the presence of the scaffolds • The hybrid 3D scaffolds present suitable mechanical and biological properties for use in bone regenerative medicine

  7. 3D printing of tissue-simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for biomedical optical measurement

    Dong, Erbao; Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Han, Yilin; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Optical phantoms are commonly used to validate and calibrate biomedical optical devices in order to ensure accurate measurement of optical properties in biological tissue. However, commonly used optical phantoms are based on homogenous materials that reflect neither optical properties nor multi-layer heterogeneities of biological tissue. Using these phantoms for optical calibration may result in significant bias in biological measurement. We propose to characterize and fabricate tissue simulating phantoms that simulate not only the multi-layer heterogeneities but also optical properties of biological tissue. The tissue characterization module detects tissue structural and functional properties in vivo. The phantom printing module generates 3D tissue structures at different scales by layer-by-layer deposition of phantom materials with different optical properties. The ultimate goal is to fabricate multi-layer tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for optimal calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  8. On-chip clearing of arrays of 3-D cell cultures and micro-tissues.

    Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Poon, T; Roskelley, C; Cheung, K C

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures are beneficial models for mimicking the complexities of in vivo tissues, especially in tumour studies where transport limitations can complicate response to cancer drugs. 3-D optical microscopy techniques are less involved than traditional embedding and sectioning, but are impeded by optical scattering properties of the tissues. Confocal and even two-photon microscopy limit sample imaging to approximately 100-200 μm depth, which is insufficient to image hypoxic spheroid cores. Optical clearing methods have permitted high-depth imaging of tissues without physical sectioning, but they are difficult to implement for smaller 3-D cultures due to sample loss in solution exchange. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for high-throughput on-chip optical clearing of breast cancer spheroids using the SeeDB, Clear(T2), and ScaleSQ clearing methods. Although all three methods are able to effectively clear the spheroids, we find that SeeDB and ScaleSQ more effectively clear the sample than Clear(T2); however, SeeDB induces green autofluorescence while ScaleS causes sample expansion. Our unique on-chip implementation permits clearing arrays of 3-D cultures using perfusion while monitoring the 3-D cultures throughout the process, enabling visualization of the clearing endpoint as well as monitoring of transient changes that could induce image artefacts. Our microfluidic device is compatible with on-chip 3-D cell culture, permitting the use of on-chip clearing at the endpoint after monitoring the same spheroids during their culture. This on-chip method has the potential to improve readout from 3-D cultures, facilitating their use in cell-based assays for high-content drug screening and other applications. PMID:27493703

  9. Confocal fluorometer for diffusion tracking in 3D engineered tissue constructs

    Daly, D.; Zilioli, A.; Tan, N.; Buttenschoen, K.; Chikkanna, B.; Reynolds, J.; Marsden, B.; Hughes, C.

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the development of a non-contacting instrument, called fScan, based on scanning confocal fluorometry for assessing the diffusion of materials through a tissue matrix. There are many areas in healthcare diagnostics and screening where it is now widely accepted that the need for new quantitative monitoring technologies is a major pinch point in patient diagnostics and in vitro testing. With the increasing need to interpret 3D responses this commonly involves the need to track the diffusion of compounds, pharma-active species and cells through a 3D matrix of tissue. Methods are available but to support the advances that are currently only promised, this monitoring needs to be real-time, non-invasive, and economical. At the moment commercial meters tend to be invasive and usually require a sample of the medium to be removed and processed prior to testing. This methodology clearly has a number of significant disadvantages. fScan combines a fiber based optical arrangement with a compact, free space optical front end that has been integrated so that the sample's diffusion can be measured without interference. This architecture is particularly important due to the "wet" nature of the samples. fScan is designed to measure constructs located within standard well plates and a 2-D motion stage locates the required sample with respect to the measurement system. Results are presented that show how the meter has been used to evaluate movements of samples through collagen constructs in situ without disturbing their kinetic characteristics. These kinetics were little understood prior to these measurements.

  10. Superelastic, superabsorbent and 3D nanofiber-assembled scaffold for tissue engineering.

    Chen, Weiming; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Lei; Morsi, Yosry; Ei-Hamshary, Hany; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of 3D scaffold to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the nature extracellular matrix (ECM) with appropriate mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility, remain an important technical challenge in tissue engineering. The present study reports the strategy to fabricate a 3D nanofibrous scaffold with similar structure to collagen in ECM by combining electrospinning and freeze-drying technique. With the technique reported here, a nanofibrous structure scaffold with hydrophilic and superabsorbent properties can be readily prepared by Gelatin and Polylactic acid (PLA). In wet state the scaffold also shows a super-elastic property, which could bear a compressive strain as high as 80% and recovers its original shape afterwards. Moreover, after 6 days of culture, L-929 cells grow, proliferate and infiltrated into the scaffold. The results suggest that this 3D nanofibrous scaffold would be promising for varied field of tissue engineering application. PMID:26954082

  11. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  12. Stereoscopic contents authoring system for 3D DMB data service

    Lee, BongHo; Yun, Kugjin; Hur, Namho; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, SooIn

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a stereoscopic contents authoring system that covers the creation and editing of stereoscopic multimedia contents for the 3D DMB (Digital Multimedia Broadcasting) data services. The main concept of 3D DMB data service is that, instead of full 3D video, partial stereoscopic objects (stereoscopic JPEG, PNG and MNG) are stereoscopically displayed on the 2D background video plane. In order to provide stereoscopic objects, we design and implement a 3D DMB content authoring system which provides the convenient and straightforward contents creation and editing functionalities. For the creation of stereoscopic contents, we mainly focused on two methods: CG (Computer Graphics) based creation and real image based creation. In the CG based creation scenario where the generated CG data from the conventional MAYA or 3DS MAX tool is rendered to generate the stereoscopic images by applying the suitable disparity and camera parameters, we use X-file for the direct conversion to stereoscopic objects, so called 3D DMB objects. In the case of real image based creation, the chroma-key method is applied to real video sequences to acquire the alpha-mapped images which are in turn directly converted to stereoscopic objects. The stereoscopic content editing module includes the timeline editor for both the stereoscopic video and stereoscopic objects. For the verification of created stereoscopic contents, we implemented the content verification module to verify and modify the contents by adjusting the disparity. The proposed system will leverage the power of stereoscopic contents creation for mobile 3D data service especially targeted for T-DMB with the capabilities of CG and real image based contents creation, timeline editing and content verification.

  13. 3D flexible needle steering in soft-tissue phantoms using fiber bragg grating sensors

    Abayazid, Momen; Kemp, Marco; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Needle insertion procedures are commonly used for surgical interventions. In this paper, we develop a three-dimensional (3D) closed-loop control algorithm to robotically steer flexible needles with an asymmetric tip towards a target in a soft-tissue phantom. Twelve Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors

  14. Fabrication of scalable and structured tissue engineering scaffolds using water dissolvable sacrificial 3D printed moulds

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Larsen, Layla Bashir; Trifol Guzman, Jon;

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in producing large scale engineered tissue is the lack of ability to create large highly perfused scaffolds in which cells can grow at a high cell density and viability. Here, we explore 3D printed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a sacrificial mould in a polymer casting...

  15. Validation of SPAMM tagged MRI based measurement of 3D soft tissue deformation

    K.M. Moerman; A.M.J. Sprengers; C.K. Simms; R.M. Lamerichs; J. Stoker; A.J. Nederveen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents and validates a novel (non-ECG-triggered) MRI sequence based on spatial modulation of the magnetization (SPAMM) to noninvasively measure 3D (quasistatic) soft tissue deformations using only six acquisitions (three static and three indentations). In the current SPAMM tagged MRI ap

  16. Enhanced 3D face processing using an active vision system

    Lidegaard, Morten; Larsen, Rasmus; Kraft, Dirk; Jessen, Jeppe Barsøe; Beck, Richard; Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Gramkow, Claus; Neckelmann, Ole; Haustad, Jonas; Krüger, Norbert

    We present an active face processing system based on 3D shape information extracted by means of stereo information. We use two sets of stereo cameras with different field of views (FOV): One with a wide FOV is used for face tracking, while the other with a narrow FOV is used for face identificati...

  17. ACCURACY OF A 3D VISION SYSTEM FOR INSPECTION

    Carmignato, Simone; Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT. This paper illustrates an experimental method to assess the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) vision system for the inspection of complex geometry. The aim is to provide a procedure to evaluate task related measurement uncertainty for virtually any measurement task. The key element of...

  18. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  19. Affordable immersive projection system for 3d interaction

    Andújar Gran, Carlos Antonio; Fairén González, Marta; Brunet Crosa, Pere

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an affordable Virtual Reality system designed and developed by a group of researchers at the Polytechnic University of Catalunya (UPC). The system allows direct selection and manipulation of virtual 3D objects. The interaction is based on stereoscopic images projected over the user’s working space and on devices tracking the user’s natural movements. The system includes a screen being adjustable both in orientation and height, sensors tracking the head and hand movemen...

  20. Super pipe lining system for 3-D CT imaging

    A new idea for 3-D CT image reconstruction system is introduced. For the network has very important improvement in recently years, it realizes that network computing replace the traditional serial system processing. CT system's works are carried in a multi-level fashion, it will make the tedious works processed by many computers linked by local network in the same time. So greatly improve the reconstruction speed

  1. View Synthesis for Advanced 3D Video Systems

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Interest in 3D video applications and systems is growing rapidly and technology is maturating. It is expected that multiview autostereoscopic displays will play an important role in home user environments, since they support multiuser 3D sensation and motion parallax impression. The tremendous data rate cannot be handled efficiently by representation and coding formats such as MVC or MPEG-C Part 3. Multiview video plus depth (MVD is a new format that efficiently supports such advanced 3DV systems, but this requires high-quality intermediate view synthesis. For this, a new approach is presented that separates unreliable image regions along depth discontinuities from reliable image regions, which are treated separately and fused to the final interpolated view. In contrast to previous layered approaches, our algorithm uses two boundary layers and one reliable layer, performs image-based 3D warping only, and was generically implemented, that is, does not necessarily rely on 3D graphics support. Furthermore, different hole-filling and filtering methods are added to provide high-quality intermediate views. As a result, high-quality intermediate views for an existing 9-view auto-stereoscopic display as well as other stereo- and multiscopic displays are presented, which prove the suitability of our approach for advanced 3DV systems.

  2. View Synthesis for Advanced 3D Video Systems

    Müller Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interest in 3D video applications and systems is growing rapidly and technology is maturating. It is expected that multiview autostereoscopic displays will play an important role in home user environments, since they support multiuser 3D sensation and motion parallax impression. The tremendous data rate cannot be handled efficiently by representation and coding formats such as MVC or MPEG-C Part 3. Multiview video plus depth (MVD is a new format that efficiently supports such advanced 3DV systems, but this requires high-quality intermediate view synthesis. For this, a new approach is presented that separates unreliable image regions along depth discontinuities from reliable image regions, which are treated separately and fused to the final interpolated view. In contrast to previous layered approaches, our algorithm uses two boundary layers and one reliable layer, performs image-based 3D warping only, and was generically implemented, that is, does not necessarily rely on 3D graphics support. Furthermore, different hole-filling and filtering methods are added to provide high-quality intermediate views. As a result, high-quality intermediate views for an existing 9-view auto-stereoscopic display as well as other stereo- and multiscopic displays are presented, which prove the suitability of our approach for advanced 3DV systems.

  3. Development of 3D VR plant digital information system

    Currently, there are many ongoing efforts to shorten the plant refueling and maintenance outage durations, and it is expected to become more active as the time goes on. Improved training and education system are required for the personnel to perform efficient inspection on time. This work is focused on establishing virtual Nuclear Power Plant system which will help train the personnel to understand the system characteristics of the plant by creating navigation enabled 3D plant mockups. Furthermore, this project is aimed at constructing information management system over the whole plant area, by integrating safety related data and combining it with web based GUI technology, to make search and management activities easy. This project spans three years. The forst year was spent in 3D mockup modeling of most part of the plant, and prototyping the web based VR plant digital information system. Plant environment, buildings, reactor structure, steam generator, pressurizer, fuel assemblies, pressurizer safety valve, main steamline safety valve, reactor coolant system, main steamline system, auxiliary and main coolant supply system were modeled into 3D mockups. Control functions such as magnification, rotation, movement, transparency, location detection, cross-cut view, full screen toggle and screen capture were implemented to facilitate manipulation of and navigation through the VR mockups. It is expected that the VR plant will serve as an effective support system for power plant regulation and inspection

  4. 3D vision system for intelligent milking robot automation

    Akhloufi, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    In a milking robot, the correct localization and positioning of milking teat cups is of very high importance. The milking robots technology has not changed since a decade and is based primarily on laser profiles for teats approximate positions estimation. This technology has reached its limit and does not allow optimal positioning of the milking cups. Also, in the presence of occlusions, the milking robot fails to milk the cow. These problems, have economic consequences for producers and animal health (e.g. development of mastitis). To overcome the limitations of current robots, we have developed a new system based on 3D vision, capable of efficiently positioning the milking cups. A prototype of an intelligent robot system based on 3D vision for real-time positioning of a milking robot has been built and tested under various conditions on a synthetic udder model (in static and moving scenarios). Experimental tests, were performed using 3D Time-Of-Flight (TOF) and RGBD cameras. The proposed algorithms permit the online segmentation of teats by combing 2D and 3D visual information. The obtained results permit the teat 3D position computation. This information is then sent to the milking robot for teat cups positioning. The vision system has a real-time performance and monitors the optimal positioning of the cups even in the presence of motion. The obtained results, with both TOF and RGBD cameras, show the good performance of the proposed system. The best performance was obtained with RGBD cameras. This latter technology will be used in future real life experimental tests.

  5. 3D Geological Model for "LUSI" - a Deep Geothermal System

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Mazzini, Adriano; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal applications require the correct simulation of flow and heat transport processes in porous media, and many of these media, like deep volcanic hydrothermal systems, host a certain degree of fracturing. This work aims to understand the heat and fluid transport within a new-born sedimentary hosted geothermal system, termed Lusi, that began erupting in 2006 in East Java, Indonesia. Our goal is to develop conceptual and numerical models capable of simulating multiphase flow within large-scale fractured reservoirs such as the Lusi region, with fractures of arbitrary size, orientation and shape. Additionally, these models can also address a number of other applications, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), CO2 sequestration (Carbon Capture and Storage CCS), and nuclear waste isolation. Fractured systems are ubiquitous, with a wide-range of lengths and scales, making difficult the development of a general model that can easily handle this complexity. We are developing a flexible continuum approach with an efficient, accurate numerical simulator based on an appropriate 3D geological model representing the structure of the deep geothermal reservoir. Using previous studies, borehole information and seismic data obtained in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126), we present here the first 3D geological model of Lusi. This model is calculated using implicit 3D potential field or multi-potential fields, depending on the geological context and complexity. This method is based on geological pile containing the geological history of the area and relationship between geological bodies allowing automatic computation of intersections and volume reconstruction. Based on the 3D geological model, we developed a new mesh algorithm to create hexahedral octree meshes to transfer the structural geological information for 3D numerical simulations to quantify Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) physical processes.

  6. High-Resolution 3-D Imaging and Tissue Differentiation with Transmission Tomography

    Marmarelis, V. Z.; Jeong, J.; Shin, D. C.; Do, S.

    A three-dimensional High-resolution Ultrasonic Transmission Tomography (HUTT) system has been developed recently under the sponsorship of the Alfred Mann Institute at the University of Southern California that holds the promise of early detection of breast cancer (mm-size lesions) with greater sensitivity (true positives) and specificity (true negatives) than current x-ray mammograghy. In addition to sub-mm resolution in 3-D, the HUTT system has the unique capability of reliable tissue classification by means of the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics of individual voxels that are extracted from the tomographic data through novel signal processing methods. These methods yield "multi-band signatures" of the various tissue types that are utilized to achieve reliable tissue differentiation via novel segmentation and classification algorithms. The unparalleled high-resolution and tissue differentiation capabilities of the HUTT system have been demonstrated so far with man-made and animal-tissue phantoms. Illustrative results are presented that corroborate these claims, although several challenges remain to make HUTT a clinically acceptable technology. The next critical step is to collect and analyze data from human subjects (female breasts) in order to demonstrate the key capability of the HUTT system to detect breast lesions early (at the mm-size stage) and to differentiate between malignant and benign lesions in a manner that is far superior (in terms of sensitivity and specificity) to the current x-ray mammography. The key initial application of the HUTT imaging technology is envisioned to be the early (at the mm-size) detection of breast cancer, which represents a major threat to the well-being of women around the world. The potential impact is estimated in hundreds of thousands lives saved, millions of unnecessary biopsies avoided, and billions of dollars saved in national health-care costs every year - to say nothing of the tens of thousands of

  7. 3D gel printing for soft-matter systems innovation

    Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Kawakami, Masaru; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Saito, Azusa

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, several high-strength gels have been developed, especially from Japan. These gels are expected to use as a kind of new engineering materials in the fields of industry and medical as substitutes to polyester fibers, which are materials of artificial blood vessels. We consider if various gel materials including such high-strength gels are 3D-printable, many new soft and wet systems will be developed since the most intricate shape gels can be printed regardless of the quite softness and brittleness of gels. Recently we have tried to develop an optical 3D gel printer to realize the free-form formation of gel materials. We named this apparatus Easy Realizer of Soft and Wet Industrial Materials (SWIM-ER). The SWIM-ER will be applied to print bespoke artificial organs, including artificial blood vessels, which will be possibly used for both surgery trainings and actual surgery. The SWIM-ER can print one of the world strongest gels, called Double-Network (DN) gels, by using UV irradiation through an optical fiber. Now we also are developing another type of 3D gel printer for foods, named E-Chef. We believe these new 3D gel printers will broaden the applications of soft-matter gels.

  8. 3D simulation of CANDU reactor regulating system

    Present paper shows the evaluation of the performance of the 3-D modal synthesis based reactor kinetic model in a closed-loop environment in a MATLAB/SIMULINK based Reactor Regulating System (RRS) simulation platform. A notable advantage of the 3-D model is the level of details that it can reveal as compared to the coupled point kinetic model. Using the developed RRS simulation platform, the reactor internal behaviours can be revealed during load-following tests. The test results are also benchmarked against measurements from an existing (CANDU) power plant. It can be concluded that the 3-D reactor model produces more realistic view of the core neutron flux distribution, which is closer to the real plant measurements than that from a coupled point kinetic model. It is also shown that, through a vectorization process, the computational load of the 3-D model is comparable with that of the 14-zone coupled point kinetic model. Furthermore, the developed Graphical User Interface (GUI) software package for RRS implementation represents a user friendly and independent application environment for education training and industrial utilizations. (authors)

  9. 3D printed nervous system on a chip.

    Johnson, Blake N; Lancaster, Karen Z; Hogue, Ian B; Meng, Fanben; Kong, Yong Lin; Enquist, Lynn W; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-04-12

    Bioinspired organ-level in vitro platforms are emerging as effective technologies for fundamental research, drug discovery, and personalized healthcare. In particular, models for nervous system research are especially important, due to the complexity of neurological phenomena and challenges associated with developing targeted treatment of neurological disorders. Here we introduce an additive manufacturing-based approach in the form of a bioinspired, customizable 3D printed nervous system on a chip (3DNSC) for the study of viral infection in the nervous system. Micro-extrusion 3D printing strategies enabled the assembly of biomimetic scaffold components (microchannels and compartmented chambers) for the alignment of axonal networks and spatial organization of cellular components. Physiologically relevant studies of nervous system infection using the multiscale biomimetic device demonstrated the functionality of the in vitro platform. We found that Schwann cells participate in axon-to-cell viral spread but appear refractory to infection, exhibiting a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.4 genomes per cell. These results suggest that 3D printing is a valuable approach for the prototyping of a customized model nervous system on a chip technology. PMID:26669842

  10. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    Sandra Hofmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing.

  11. Small metal soft tissue foreign body extraction by using 3D CT guidance: A reliable method

    Tao, Kai, E-mail: davidtaothree@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu, Sen, E-mail: hubeixusen@163.com [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, 83 Wenhua Steet, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016, Liaoning Province (China); Liu, Xiao-yan, E-mail: kk-lxy@sohu.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Liang, Jiu-long, E-mail: liangjiulong@sohu.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qiu, Tao, E-mail: anthonyqueen@vip.sina.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tan, Jia-nan, E-mail: tanjianan@sina.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Che, Jian-hua, E-mail: chejianhua@163.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Zi-hua, E-mail: rockstar520@163.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To introduce a useful and accurate technique for the locating and removal of small metal foreign bodies in the soft tissues. Methods: Eight patients presented with suspected small metal foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Under local anesthesia, 3-6 pieces of 5 ml syringe needles or 1 ml syringe needles were induced through three different planes around the entry point of the foreign bodies. Using these finders, the small metal FBs were confirmed under 3D CT guidance. Based on the CT findings, the soft tissues were dissected along the path of the closest needle and the FBs were easily found and removed according to the relation with the closest needle finder. Results: Eight metal foreign bodies (3 slices, 3 nails, 1 fish hook, 1 needlepoint) were successfully removed under 3D CT guidance in all patients. The procedures took between 35 min and 50 min and the operation times took between 15 min and 25 min. No complications arose after the treatment. Conclusion: 3D CT-guided technique is a good alternative for the removal of small metal foreign body retained in the soft tissues as it is relatively accurate, reliable, quick, carries a low risk of complications and can be a first-choice procedure for the extraction of small metal foreign body.

  12. Small metal soft tissue foreign body extraction by using 3D CT guidance: A reliable method

    Objective: To introduce a useful and accurate technique for the locating and removal of small metal foreign bodies in the soft tissues. Methods: Eight patients presented with suspected small metal foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Under local anesthesia, 3–6 pieces of 5 ml syringe needles or 1 ml syringe needles were induced through three different planes around the entry point of the foreign bodies. Using these finders, the small metal FBs were confirmed under 3D CT guidance. Based on the CT findings, the soft tissues were dissected along the path of the closest needle and the FBs were easily found and removed according to the relation with the closest needle finder. Results: Eight metal foreign bodies (3 slices, 3 nails, 1 fish hook, 1 needlepoint) were successfully removed under 3D CT guidance in all patients. The procedures took between 35 min and 50 min and the operation times took between 15 min and 25 min. No complications arose after the treatment. Conclusion: 3D CT-guided technique is a good alternative for the removal of small metal foreign body retained in the soft tissues as it is relatively accurate, reliable, quick, carries a low risk of complications and can be a first-choice procedure for the extraction of small metal foreign body.

  13. Optimisation of Ionic Models to Fit Tissue Action Potentials: Application to 3D Atrial Modelling

    Amr Al Abed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D model of atrial electrical activity has been developed with spatially heterogeneous electrophysiological properties. The atrial geometry, reconstructed from the male Visible Human dataset, included gross anatomical features such as the central and peripheral sinoatrial node (SAN, intra-atrial connections, pulmonary veins, inferior and superior vena cava, and the coronary sinus. Membrane potentials of myocytes from spontaneously active or electrically paced in vitro rabbit cardiac tissue preparations were recorded using intracellular glass microelectrodes. Action potentials of central and peripheral SAN, right and left atrial, and pulmonary vein myocytes were each fitted using a generic ionic model having three phenomenological ionic current components: one time-dependent inward, one time-dependent outward, and one leakage current. To bridge the gap between the single-cell ionic models and the gross electrical behaviour of the 3D whole-atrial model, a simplified 2D tissue disc with heterogeneous regions was optimised to arrive at parameters for each cell type under electrotonic load. Parameters were then incorporated into the 3D atrial model, which as a result exhibited a spontaneously active SAN able to rhythmically excite the atria. The tissue-based optimisation of ionic models and the modelling process outlined are generic and applicable to image-based computer reconstruction and simulation of excitable tissue.

  14. Building intuitive 3D interfaces for virtual reality systems

    Vaidya, Vivek; Suryanarayanan, Srikanth; Seitel, Mathias; Mullick, Rakesh

    2007-03-01

    An exploration of techniques for developing intuitive, and efficient user interfaces for virtual reality systems. Work seeks to understand which paradigms from the better-understood world of 2D user interfaces remain viable within 3D environments. In order to establish this a new user interface was created that applied various understood principles of interface design. A user study was then performed where it was compared with an earlier interface for a series of medical visualization tasks.

  15. 3D temperature field reconstruction using ultrasound sensing system

    Liu, Yuqian; Ma, Tong; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    3D temperature field reconstruction is of practical interest to the power, transportation and aviation industries and it also opens up opportunities for real time control or optimization of high temperature fluid or combustion process. In our paper, a new distributed optical fiber sensing system consisting of a series of elements will be used to generate and receive acoustic signals. This system is the first active temperature field sensing system that features the advantages of the optical fiber sensors (distributed sensing capability) and the acoustic sensors (non-contact measurement). Signals along multiple paths will be measured simultaneously enabled by a code division multiple access (CDMA) technique. Then a proposed Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (GRBF)-based approach can approximate the temperature field as a finite summation of space-dependent basis functions and time-dependent coefficients. The travel time of the acoustic signals depends on the temperature of the media. On this basis, the Gaussian functions are integrated along a number of paths which are determined by the number and distribution of sensors. The inversion problem to estimate the unknown parameters of the Gaussian functions can be solved with the measured times-of-flight (ToF) of acoustic waves and the length of propagation paths using the recursive least square method (RLS). The simulation results show an approximation error less than 2% in 2D and 5% in 3D respectively. It demonstrates the availability and efficiency of our proposed 3D temperature field reconstruction mechanism.

  16. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    K. Yüksek

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform (DTP with spatial data and query processing capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GIS, multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized Directional Replacement Policy (DRP based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in Digital Surface Modeling (DSM and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g. X3-D and VRML and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  17. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    Yüksek, K.; Alparslan, M.; Mendi, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform with spatial data and query processing capabilities of geographic information systems, multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized directional replacement policy (DRP) based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in digital surface modeling and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g., X3-D and VRML) and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  18. A 3D Electroactive Polypyrrole-Collagen Fibrous Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    Kam W. Leong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibers that can provide topographical, biochemical and electrical cues would be attractive for directing the differentiation of stem cells into electro-responsive cells such as neuronal or muscular cells. Here we report on the fabrication of polypyrrole-incorporated collagen-based fibers via interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC. The mean ultimate tensile strength of the fibers is 304.0 ± 61.0 MPa and the Young’s Modulus is 10.4 ± 4.3 GPa. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are cultured on the fibers in a proliferating medium and stimulated with an external electrical pulse generator for 5 and 10 days. The effects of polypyrrole in the fiber system can be observed, with hMSCs adopting a neuronal-like morphology at day 10, and through the upregulation of neural markers, such as noggin, MAP2, neurofilament, β tubulin III and nestin. This study demonstrates the potential of this fiber system as an attractive 3D scaffold for tissue engineering, where collagen is present on the fiber surface for cellular adhesion, and polypyrrole is encapsulated within the fiber for enhanced electrical communication in cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions.

  19. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  20. LATIS3D The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    London, R A; Gentile, N A; Kim, B M; Makarewicz, A M; Vincent, L; Yang, Y B

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  1. LATIS3D: The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    London, R.A.; Makarewicz, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Gentile, N.A.; Yang, Y.B.; Brlik, M.; Vincent, L.

    2000-02-29

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  2. 3D Space Radiation Transport in a Shielded ICRU Tissue Sphere

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  3. 3D Structural Patterns in Scalable, Elastomeric Scaffolds Guide Engineered Tissue Architecture

    Kolewe, Martin E.; Park, Hyoungshin; Gray, Caprice; Ye, Xiaofeng; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfabricated elastomeric scaffolds with 3D structural patterns are created by semi-automated layer-by-layer assembly of planar polymer sheets with through-pores. The meso-scale interconnected pore architectures governed by the relative alignment of layers are shown to direct cell and muscle-like fiber orientation in both skeletal and cardiac muscle, enabling scale up of tissue constructs towards clinically relevant dimensions.

  4. Laser Fabrication of 3D Gelatin Scaffolds for the Generation of Bioartificial Tissues

    Mathias Wilhelmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the two-photon polymerization (2PP technique was applied to develop precisely defined biodegradable 3D tissue engineering scaffolds. The scaffolds were fabricated via photopolymerization of gelatin modified with methacrylamide moieties. The results indicate that the gelatin derivative (GelMod preserves its enzymatic degradation capability after photopolymerization. In addition, the developed scaffolds using 2PP support primary adipose-derived stem cell (ASC adhesion, proliferation and differentiation into the anticipated lineage.

  5. Validation of SPAMM Tagged MRI Based Measurement of 3D Soft Tissue Deformation

    Kevin M. Moerman; Sprengers, Andre M. J.; Ciaran K. Simms; Lamerichs, Rolf M.; Stoker, Jaap; Aart J. Nederveen

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a novel (non-ECG-triggered) MRI sequence based on SPAtial Modulation of the Magnetization (SPAMM) to non-invasively measure 3D (quasi-static) soft tissue deformations using only six acquisitions (three static and three indentations). In current SPAMM tagged MRI approaches data is typically constructed from many repeated motion cycles. This has so far restricted its application to the measurement of highly repeatable and periodic movements (e.g. cardiac deform...

  6. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system

  7. Omnidirectional vision systems calibration, feature extraction and 3D information

    Puig, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on central catadioptric systems, from the early step of calibration to high-level tasks such as 3D information retrieval. The book opens with a thorough introduction to the sphere camera model, along with an analysis of the relation between this model and actual central catadioptric systems. Then, a new approach to calibrate any single-viewpoint catadioptric camera is described.  This is followed by an analysis of existing methods for calibrating central omnivision systems, and a detailed examination of hybrid two-view relations that combine images acquired with uncalibrated

  8. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  9. Quantitative wound healing measurement and monitoring system based on an innovative 3D imaging system

    Yi, Steven; Yang, Arthur; Yin, Gongjie; Wen, James

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel three-dimensional (3D) wound imaging system (hardware and software) under development at Technest Inc. System design is aimed to perform accurate 3D measurement and modeling of a wound and track its healing status over time. Accurate measurement and tracking of wound healing enables physicians to assess, document, improve, and individualize the treatment plan given to each wound patient. In current wound care practices, physicians often visually inspect or roughly measure the wound to evaluate the healing status. This is not an optimal practice since human vision lacks precision and consistency. In addition, quantifying slow or subtle changes through perception is very difficult. As a result, an instrument that quantifies both skin color and geometric shape variations would be particularly useful in helping clinicians to assess healing status and judge the effect of hyperemia, hematoma, local inflammation, secondary infection, and tissue necrosis. Once fully developed, our 3D imaging system will have several unique advantages over traditional methods for monitoring wound care: (a) Non-contact measurement; (b) Fast and easy to use; (c) up to 50 micron measurement accuracy; (d) 2D/3D Quantitative measurements;(e) A handheld device; and (f) Reasonable cost (< $1,000).

  10. Validation of SPAMM Tagged MRI Based Measurement of 3D Soft Tissue Deformation

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a novel (non-ECG-triggered) MRI sequence based on SPAtial Modulation of the Magnetization (SPAMM) to non-invasively measure 3D (quasi-static) soft tissue deformations using only six acquisitions (three static and three indentations). In current SPAMM tagged MRI approaches data is typically constructed from many repeated motion cycles. This has so far restricted its application to the measurement of highly repeatable and periodic movements (e.g. cardiac deformation). In biomechanical applications where soft tissue deformation is artificially induced, often by indentation, significant repeatability constraints exist and, for clinical applications, discomfort and health issues generally preclude a large number of repetitions.

  11. Towards artificial tissue models: past, present, and future of 3D bioprinting.

    Arslan-Yildiz, Ahu; El Assal, Rami; Chen, Pu; Guven, Sinan; Inci, Fatih; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-03-01

    Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering have seen unprecedented growth in the past decade, driving the field of artificial tissue models towards a revolution in future medicine. Major progress has been achieved through the development of innovative biomanufacturing strategies to pattern and assemble cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensions (3D) to create functional tissue constructs. Bioprinting has emerged as a promising 3D biomanufacturing technology, enabling precise control over spatial and temporal distribution of cells and ECM. Bioprinting technology can be used to engineer artificial tissues and organs by producing scaffolds with controlled spatial heterogeneity of physical properties, cellular composition, and ECM organization. This innovative approach is increasingly utilized in biomedicine, and has potential to create artificial functional constructs for drug screening and toxicology research, as well as tissue and organ transplantation. Herein, we review the recent advances in bioprinting technologies and discuss current markets, approaches, and biomedical applications. We also present current challenges and provide future directions for bioprinting research. PMID:26930133

  12. 3D printing of composite tissue with complex shape applied to ear regeneration

    In the ear reconstruction field, tissue engineering enabling the regeneration of the ear's own tissue has been considered to be a promising technology. However, the ear is known to be difficult to regenerate using traditional methods due to its complex shape and composition. In this study, we used three-dimensional (3D) printing technology including a sacrificial layer process to regenerate both the auricular cartilage and fat tissue. The main part was printed with poly-caprolactone (PCL) and cell-laden hydrogel. At the same time, poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG) was also deposited as a sacrificial layer to support the main structure. After complete fabrication, PEG can be easily removed in aqueous solutions, and the procedure for removing PEG has no effect on the cell viability. For fabricating composite tissue, chondrocytes and adipocytes differentiated from adipose-derived stromal cells were encapsulated in hydrogel to dispense into the cartilage and fat regions, respectively, of ear-shaped structures. Finally, we fabricated the composite structure for feasibility testing, satisfying expectations for both the geometry and anatomy of the native ear. We also carried out in vitro assays for evaluating the chondrogenesis and adipogenesis of the cell-printed structure. As a result, the possibility of ear regeneration using 3D printing technology which allowed tissue formation from the separately printed chondrocytes and adipocytes was demonstrated. (paper)

  13. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  14. 3D Massive MIMO Systems: Modeling and Performance Analysis

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-07-30

    Multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems of current LTE releases are capable of adaptation in the azimuth only. Recently, the trend is to enhance system performance by exploiting the channel’s degrees of freedom in the elevation, which necessitates the characterization of 3D channels. We present an information-theoretic channel model for MIMO systems that supports the elevation dimension. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy, which enables us to determine the distribution of the channel matrix consistent with the prior information on the angles. Based on this model, we provide analytical expression for the cumulative density function (CDF) of the mutual information (MI) for systems with a single receive and finite number of transmit antennas in the general signalto- interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) regime. The result is extended to systems with finite receive antennas in the low SINR regime. A Gaussian approximation to the asymptotic behavior of MI distribution is derived for the large number of transmit antennas and paths regime. We corroborate our analysis with simulations that study the performance gains realizable through meticulous selection of the transmit antenna downtilt angles, confirming the potential of elevation beamforming to enhance system performance. The results are directly applicable to the analysis of 5G 3D-Massive MIMO-systems.

  15. Toward high-speed 3D nonlinear soft tissue deformation simulations using Abaqus software.

    Idkaidek, Ashraf; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2015-12-01

    We aim to achieve a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a porcine liver deformation under a surgical tool pressure using the commercial finite element software Abaqus. The liver geometry is obtained using magnetic resonance imaging, and a nonlinear constitutive law is employed to capture large deformations of the tissue. Effects of implicit versus explicit analysis schemes, element type, and mesh density on computation time are studied. We find that Abaqus explicit and implicit solvers are capable of simulating nonlinear soft tissue deformations accurately using first-order tetrahedral elements in a relatively short time by optimizing the element size. This study provides new insights and guidance on accurate and relatively fast nonlinear soft tissue simulations. Such simulations can provide force feedback during robotic surgery and allow visualization of tissue deformations for surgery planning and training of surgical residents. PMID:26530842

  16. ACCURACY OF A 3D VISION SYSTEM FOR INSPECTION

    Carmignato, Simone; Savio, Enrico; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    ABSTRACT. This paper illustrates an experimental method to assess the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) vision system for the inspection of complex geometry. The aim is to provide a procedure to evaluate task related measurement uncertainty for virtually any measurement task. The key element of...... purpose to establish traceability. Accuracy performances of optical digitisation systems are assessed on the basis of deviations existing between acquired cloud points and the CMM measurements. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method, the procedure is applied to an industrial case study....

  17. 3D Massive MIMO Systems: Channel Modeling and Performance Analysis

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-03-01

    Multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems of current LTE releases are capable of adaptation in the azimuth only. More recently, the trend is to enhance the system performance by exploiting the channel\\'s degrees of freedom in the elevation through the dynamic adaptation of the vertical antenna beam pattern. This necessitates the derivation and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) channels. Over the years, channel models have evolved to address the challenges of wireless communication technologies. In parallel to theoretical studies on channel modeling, many standardized channel models like COST-based models, 3GPP SCM, WINNER, ITU have emerged that act as references for industries and telecommunication companies to assess system-level and link-level performances of advanced signal processing techniques over real-like channels. Given the existing channels are only two dimensional (2D) in nature; a large effort in channel modeling is needed to study the impact of the channel component in the elevation direction. The first part of this work sheds light on the current 3GPP activity around 3D channel modeling and beamforming, an aspect that to our knowledge has not been extensively covered by a research publication. The standardized MIMO channel model is presented, that incorporates both the propagation effects of the environment and the radio effects of the antennas. In order to facilitate future studies on the use of 3D beamforming, the main features of the proposed 3D channel model are discussed. A brief overview of the future 3GPP 3D channel model being outlined for the next generation of wireless networks is also provided. In the subsequent part of this work, we present an information-theoretic channel model for MIMO systems that supports the elevation dimension. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy, which enables us to determine the distribution of the channel matrix consistent with the prior information on the angles of departure and

  18. Highly Concentrated Alginate-Gellan Gum Composites for 3D Plotting of Complex Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Ashwini Rahul Akkineni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering, additive manufacturing (AM technologies have brought considerable progress as they allow the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D structures with defined architecture. 3D plotting is a versatile, extrusion-based AM technology suitable for processing a wide range of biomaterials including hydrogels. In this study, composites of highly concentrated alginate and gellan gum were prepared in order to combine the excellent printing properties of alginate with the favorable gelling characteristics of gellan gum. Mixtures of 16.7 wt % alginate and 2 or 3 wt % gellan gum were found applicable for 3D plotting. Characterization of the resulting composite scaffolds revealed an increased stiffness in the wet state (15%–20% higher Young’s modulus and significantly lower volume swelling in cell culture medium compared to pure alginate scaffolds (~10% vs. ~23%. Cytocompatibility experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC revealed that cell attachment was improved—the seeding efficiency was ~2.5–3.5 times higher on the composites than on pure alginate. Additionally, the composites were shown to support hMSC proliferation and early osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, print fidelity of highly concentrated alginate-gellan gum composites was comparable to those of pure alginate; after plotting and crosslinking, the scaffolds possessed improved qualities regarding shape fidelity, mechanical strength, and initial cell attachment making them attractive for tissue engineering applications.

  19. Role of nanotopography in the development of tissueengineered 3D organs and tissues using mesenchymal stemcells

    Shima Salmasi; Deepak M Kalaskar; Wai-Weng Yoon; Gordon W Blunn; Alexander M Seifalian

    2015-01-01

    Recent regenerative medicine and tissue engineeringstrategies (using cells, scaffolds, medical devicesand gene therapy) have led to fascinating progressof translation of basic research towards clinicalapplications. In the past decade, great deal of researchhas focused on developing various three dimensional(3D) organs, such as bone, skin, liver, kidney and ear,using such strategies in order to replace or regeneratedamaged organs for the purpose of maintaining orrestoring organs' functions that may have been lost dueto aging, accident or disease. The surface properties ofa material or a device are key aspects in determining thesuccess of the implant in biomedicine, as the majorityof biological reactions in human body occur on surfacesor interfaces. Furthermore, it has been established inthe literature that cell adhesion and proliferation are,to a great extent, influenced by the micro- and nanosurfacecharacteristics of biomaterials and devices. Inaddition, it has been shown that the functions of stemcells, mesenchymal stem cells in particular, could beregulated through physical interaction with specificnanotopographical cues. Therefore, guided stem cellproliferation, differentiation and function are of greatimportance in the regeneration of 3D tissues and organsusing tissue engineering strategies. This review willprovide an update on the impact of nanotopography onmesenchymal stem cells for the purpose of developinglaboratory-based 3D organs and tissues, as well as themost recent research and case studies on this topic.

  20. A Novel Qualitative and Quantitative Biofilm Assay Based on 3D Soft Tissue

    Bodil Hakonen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of predictable in vitro methods to analyze antimicrobial activity could play a role in the development of resistance to antibiotics. Current used methods analyze planktonic cells but for the method to be clinically relevant, biofilm in in vivo like conditions ought to be studied. Hence, our group has developed a qualitative and quantitative method with in vivo like 3D tissue for prediction of antimicrobial activity in reality. Devices (wound dressings were applied on top of Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated Muller-Hinton (MH agar or 3D synthetic soft tissues (SST and incubated for 24 hours. The antibacterial activity was then analyzed visually and by viable counts. On MH agar two out of three silver containing devices showed zone of inhibitions (ZOI and on SST, ZOI were detected for all three. Corroborating results were found upon evaluating the bacterial load in SST and shown to be silver concentration dependent. In conclusion, a novel method was developed combining visual rapid screening and quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity in both tissue and devices. It uses tissue allowing biofilm formation thus mimicking reality closely. These conditions are essential in order to predict antimicrobial activity of medical devices in the task to prevent device related infections.

  1. Photolithography and micromolding techniques for the realization of 3D polycaprolactone scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    Limongi, Tania

    2015-06-01

    Material science, cell biology, and engineering are all part of the research field of tissue engineering. It is the application of knowledge, methods and instrumentations of engineering and life science to the development of biocompatible solutions for repair and/or replace tissues and damaged organs. Last generation microfabrication technologies utilizing natural and synthetic biomaterials allow the realization of scaffolds resembling tissue-like structures as skin, brain, bones, muscles, cartilage and blood vessels. In this work we describe an effective and simple micromolding fabrication process allowing the realization of 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for human neural stem cells (hNSC) culture. Scanning Electron Microscopy has been used to investigate the micro and nano features characterizing the surface of the device. Immunofluorescence analysis showed how, after seeding cells onto the substrate, healthy astrocytes grew up in a well-organized 3D network. Thus, we proposed this effective fabrication method for the production of nanopatterned PCL pillared scaffold providing a biomimetic environment for the growth of hNSC, a promising and efficient means for future applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Camera Based 3D Mine-Shaft Inspection System

    Wohlfeil, Jürgen; Spreckels, Volker; Strackenbrock, Bernhard; Schlienkamp, Andreas; Choinowski, André

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an Optical 3D Shaft Inspection System needed for the survey and monitoring of Water Handling Shafts in the German Ruhrgebiet. The development is part of the RAG R&D project “ABSMon”. The end of the German hard coal mining at the end of 2018 has been determined with the Steinkohlefinanzierungsgesetz (SteinkohleFinG) from 2007-12-20. About three hundred years before now the near surface hard coal mining began in the southern Ruhr Area an...

  3. Chitosan-g-lactide copolymers for fabrication of 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Demina, T. S.; Zaytseva-Zotova, D. S.; Timashev, P. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Bardakova, K. N.; Sevrin, Ch; Svidchenko, E. A.; Surin, N. M.; Markvicheva, E. A.; Grandfils, Ch; Akopova, T. A.

    2015-07-01

    Chitosan-g-oligo (L, D-lactide) copolymers were synthesized and assessed to fabricate a number of 3D scaffolds using a variety of technologies such as oil/water emulsion evaporation technique, freeze-drying and two-photon photopolymerization. Solid-state copolymerization method allowed us to graft up to 160 wt-% of oligolactide onto chitosan backbone via chitosan amino group acetylation with substitution degree reaching up to 0.41. Grafting of hydrophobic oligolactide side chains with polymerization degree up to 10 results in chitosan amphiphilic properties. The synthesized chitosan-g-lactide copolymers were used to design 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering such as spherical microparticles and macroporous hydrogels.

  4. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach.

  5. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  6. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications

    Cox, Sophie C.; Thornby, John A.; Gibbons, Gregory J., E-mail: G.J.Gibbons@warwick.ac.uk; Williams, Mark A.; Mallick, Kajal K.

    2015-02-01

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6 h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). - Highlights: • Flowability of HA and PVOH powders corresponded to scaffold printability. • Anisotropic behaviour of 3D printed scaffolds was highlighted by compressive tests. • Maximum compressive strength of 3D printed 55% porous scaffolds was 0.88 MPa. • Imperfect packing of precursors resulted in a rough surface and microporosity. • A CT method was designed and used to quantify designed and non-designed porosity.

  7. 3D printing of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds intended for use in bone tissue engineering applications

    A systematic characterisation of bone tissue scaffolds fabricated via 3D printing from hydroxyapatite (HA) and poly(vinyl)alcohol (PVOH) composite powders is presented. Flowability of HA:PVOH precursor materials was observed to affect mechanical stability, microstructure and porosity of 3D printed scaffolds. Anisotropic behaviour of constructs and part failure at the boundaries of interlayer bonds was highlighted by compressive strength testing. A trade-off between the ability to facilitate removal of PVOH thermal degradation products during sintering and the compressive strength of green parts was revealed. The ultimate compressive strength of 55% porous green scaffolds printed along the Y-axis and dried in a vacuum oven for 6 h was 0.88 ± 0.02 MPa. Critically, the pores of 3D printed constructs could be user designed, ensuring bulk interconnectivity, and the imperfect packing of powder particles created an inherent surface roughness and non-designed porosity within the scaffold. These features are considered promising since they are known to facilitate osteoconduction and osteointegration in-vivo. Characterisation techniques utilised in this study include two funnel flow tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), compressive strength testing and computed tomography (CT). - Highlights: • Flowability of HA and PVOH powders corresponded to scaffold printability. • Anisotropic behaviour of 3D printed scaffolds was highlighted by compressive tests. • Maximum compressive strength of 3D printed 55% porous scaffolds was 0.88 MPa. • Imperfect packing of precursors resulted in a rough surface and microporosity. • A CT method was designed and used to quantify designed and non-designed porosity

  8. Image-Based 3D Face Modeling System

    Vladimir Vezhnevets

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an automatic system for 3D face modeling using frontal and profile images taken by an ordinary digital camera. The system consists of four subsystems including frontal feature detection, profile feature detection, shape deformation, and texture generation modules. The frontal and profile feature detection modules automatically extract the facial parts such as the eye, nose, mouth, and ear. The shape deformation module utilizes the detected features to deform the generic head mesh model such that the deformed model coincides with the detected features. A texture is created by combining the facial textures augmented from the input images and the synthesized texture and mapped onto the deformed generic head model. This paper provides a practical system for 3D face modeling, which is highly automated by aggregating, customizing, and optimizing a bunch of individual computer vision algorithms. The experimental results show a highly automated process of modeling, which is sufficiently robust to various imaging conditions. The whole model creation including all the optional manual corrections takes only 2∼3 minutes.

  9. Perfusion-based three dimensional (3D) tissue engineering platform with integrated bioimpedance sensing

    Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2014-01-01

    We present an 8-channel bioreactor array with integrated bioimpedance sensors, which enables perfusion culture of cells seeded onto porous 3D scaffolds. Results show the capability of the system for monitoring cell proliferation within the scaffolds through a culture period of 19 days....

  10. Perfusion-based three dimensional (3D) tissue engineering platform with integrated bioimpedance sensing

    Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Emnéus, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    We present an 8-channel bioreactor array with integrated bioimpedance sensors, which enables perfusion culture of cells seeded onto porous 3D scaffolds. Results show the capability of the system for monitoring cell proliferation within the scaffolds through a culture period of 19 days.

  11. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning.

    Diaz, Estefania Munoz

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  12. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application. PMID:25609254

  13. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs

    Michael Cornforth

    2012-03-26

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

  14. Preparation and mechanical property of a novel 3D porous magnesium scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Porous magnesium has been recently recognized as a biodegradable metal for bone substitute applications. A novel porous Mg scaffold with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected pores and with a porosity of 33–54% was produced by the fiber deposition hot pressing (FDHP) technology. The microstructure and morphologies of the porous Mg scaffold were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the effects of porosities on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the porous Mg were investigated. Experimental results indicate that the measured Young's modulus and compressive strength of the Mg scaffold are ranged in 0.10–0.37 GPa, and 11.1–30.3 MPa, respectively, which are fairly comparable to those of cancellous bone. Such a porous Mg scaffold having a 3D interconnected network structure has the potential to be used in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel porous Mg was produced by a fiber deposition hot pressing technology. • The porous Mg has a 3D interconnected network structure with a porosity of 33-54%. • Mechanical properties of the porous Mg are comparable to those of cancellous bone

  15. 3D Additive Construction with Regolith for Surface Systems

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surface exploration on Asteroids, the Moon, Mars and Martian Moons will require the stabilization of loose, fine, dusty regolith to avoid the effects of vertical lander rocket plume impingement, to keep abrasive and harmful dust from getting lofted and for dust free operations. In addition, the same regolith stabilization process can be used for 3 Dimensional ( 3D) printing, additive construction techniques by repeating the 2D stabilization in many vertical layers. This will allow in-situ construction with regolith so that materials will not have to be transported from Earth. Recent work in the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Surface Systems Office (NE-S) Swamp Works and at the University of Southern California (USC) under two NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) awards have shown promising results with regolith (crushed basalt rock) materials for in-situ heat shields, bricks, landing/launch pads, berms, roads, and other structures that could be fabricated using regolith that is sintered or mixed with a polymer binder. The technical goals and objectives of this project are to prove the feasibility of 3D printing additive construction using planetary regolith simulants and to show that they have structural integrity and practical applications in space exploration.

  16. AVS 3D Video Coding Technology and System

    Siwei Ma; Shiqi Wang; Wen Gao

    2012-01-01

    Following the success of the audio video standard (AVS) for 2D video coding, in 2008, the China AVS workgroup started developing 3D video (3DV) coding techniques. In this paper, we discuss the background, technical features, and applications of AVS 3DV coding technology. We introduce two core techniques used in AVS 3DV coding: inter-view prediction and enhanced stereo packing coding. We elaborate on these techniques, which are used in the AVS real-time 3DV encoder. An application of the AVS 3DV coding system is presented to show the great practical value of this system. Simulation results show that the advanced techniques used in AVS 3DV coding provide remarkable coding gain compared with techniques used in a simulcast scheme.

  17. Bioengineering a 3D integumentary organ system from iPS cells using an in vivo transplantation model.

    Takagi, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Junko; Sugawara, Ayaka; Toyoshima, Koh-Ei; Ishida, Kentaro; Ogawa, Miho; Sakakibara, Kei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Kashiwakura, Akitoshi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Minamide, Ryohei; Sato, Akio; Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Egusa, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The integumentary organ system is a complex system that plays important roles in waterproofing, cushioning, protecting deeper tissues, excreting waste, and thermoregulation. We developed a novel in vivo transplantation model designated as a clustering-dependent embryoid body transplantation method and generated a bioengineered three-dimensional (3D) integumentary organ system, including appendage organs such as hair follicles and sebaceous glands, from induced pluripotent stem cells. This bioengineered 3D integumentary organ system was fully functional following transplantation into nude mice and could be properly connected to surrounding host tissues, such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscles, and nerve fibers, without tumorigenesis. The bioengineered hair follicles in the 3D integumentary organ system also showed proper hair eruption and hair cycles, including the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. Potential applications of the 3D integumentary organ system include an in vitro assay system, an animal model alternative, and a bioengineered organ replacement therapy. PMID:27051874

  18. Carbon nanotubes leading the way forward in new generation 3D tissue engineering.

    Hopley, Erin Leigh; Salmasi, Shima; Kalaskar, Deepak M; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Statistics from the NHS Blood and Transplant Annual Review show that total organ transplants have increased to 4213 in 2012, while the number of people waiting to receive an organ rose to 7613 that same year. Human donors as the origin of transplanted organs no longer meet the ever-increasing demand, and so interest has shifted to synthetic organ genesis as a form of supply. This focus has given rise to new generation tissue and organ engineering, in the hope of one day designing 3D organs in vitro. While research in this field has been conducted for several decades, leading to the first synthetic trachea transplant in 2011, scaffold design for optimising complex tissue growth is still underexplored and underdeveloped. This is mostly the result of the complexity required in scaffolds, as they need to mimic the cells' native extracellular matrix. This is an intricate nanostructured environment that provides cells with physical and chemical stimuli for optimum cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Carbon nanotubes are a popular addition to synthetic scaffolds and have already begun to revolutionise regenerative medicine. Discovered in 1991, these are traditionally used in various areas of engineering and technology; however, due to their excellent mechanical, chemical and electrical properties their potential is now being explored in areas of drug delivery, in vivo biosensor application and tissue engineering. The incorporation of CNTs into polymer scaffolds displays a variety of structural and chemical enhancements, some of which include: increased scaffold strength and flexibility, improved biocompatibility, reduction in cancerous cell division, induction of angiogenesis, reduced thrombosis, and manipulation of gene expression in developing cells. Moreover CNTs' tensile properties open doors for dynamic scaffold design, while their thermal and electrical properties provide opportunities for the development of neural, bone and cardiac tissue constructs

  19. Effects of pore size in 3-D fibrous matrix on human trophoblast tissue development.

    Ma, T; Li, Y; Yang, S T; Kniss, D A

    2000-12-20

    The effects of pore size in a 3-D polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven fibrous matrix on long-term tissue development of human trophoblast ED27 cells were studied. Thermal compression was used to modify the porosity and pore size of the PET matrix. The pore size distributions in PET matrices were quantified using a liquid extrusion method. Cell metabolic activities, estradiol production, and cell proliferation and differentiation were studied for ED27 cells cultured in the thermally compressed PET matrices with known pore structure characteristics. In general, metabolic activities and proliferation rate were higher initially for cultures grown in the low-porosity (LP) PET matrix (porosity of 0.849, average pore size of 30 microm in diameter) than those in the high-porosity (HP) matrix (porosity of 0.896, average pore size of 39 microm in diameter). However, 17beta-estradiol production and cell differentiation activity in the HP matrix surpassed those in the LP matrix after 12 days. The expression levels of cyclin B1 and p27kip1 in cells revealed progressively decreasing proliferation and increasing differentiation activities for cells grown in PET matrices. Also, difference in pore size controlled the cell spatial organization in the PET matrices and contributed to the tissue development in varying degrees of proliferation and differentiation. It was also found that cells grown on the 2-D surface behaved differently in cell cycle progression and did not show increased differentiation activities after growth had stopped and proliferation activities had lowered to a minimal level. The results from this study suggest that the 3-D cell organization guided by the tissue scaffold is important to tissue formation in vitro. PMID:11064329

  20. Tracking topological entity changes in 3D collaborative modeling systems

    ChengYuan; He Fazhi; HuangZhiyong; Cai Xiantao; and Zhang Dejun

    2012-01-01

    One of the key problems in collaborative geometric modeling systems is topological entity correspondence when topolog- ical structure of geometry models on collaborative sites changes, ha this article, we propose a solution for tracking topological entity alterations in 3D collaborative modeling environment. We firstly make a thorough analysis and detailed categorization on the altera- tion properties and causations for each type of topological entity, namely topological face and topological edge. Based on collabora- tive topological entity naming mechanism, a data structure called TEST (Topological Entity Structure Tree) is introduced to track the changing history and current state of each topological entity, to embody the relationship among topological entities. Rules and algo- rithms are presented for identification of topological entities referenced by operations for correct execution and model consistency. The algorithm has been verified within the prototype we have implemented with ACIS.

  1. A Prototypical 3D Graphical Visualizer for Object-Oriented Systems

    1996-01-01

    is paper describes a framework for visualizing object-oriented systems within a 3D interactive environment.The 3D visualizer represents the structure of a program as Cylinder Net that simultaneously specifies two relationships between objects within 3D virtual space.Additionally,it represents additional relationships on demand when objects are moved into local focus.The 3D visualizer is implemented using a 3D graphics toolkit,TOAST,that implements 3D Widgets 3D graphics to ease the programming task for 3D visualization.

  2. Adipogenic differentiation of laser-printed 3D tissue grafts consisting of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Gruene, M; Deiwick, A; Koch, L; Schlie, S; Unger, C; Chichkov, B N [Nanotechnology Department, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., Hollerithallee 8, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Pflaum, M; Wilhelmi, M; Haverich, A, E-mail: m.gruene@lzh.de [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Laser-assisted bioprinting (LaBP) allows the realization of computer-generated 3D tissue grafts consisting of cells embedded in a hydrogel environment. In this study, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were printed in a free-scalable 3D grid pattern by means of LaBP. We demonstrate that neither the proliferation ability nor the differentiation behaviour of the stem cells was affected by the LaBP procedure. Furthermore, the 3D grafts were differentiated down the adipogenic lineage pathway for 10 days. We verify by quantitative assessments of adipogenic markers that the 3D grafts resemble cell lineages present in natural adipose tissue. Additionally, we provide the proof that even pre-differentiated hASCs could be utilized for the generation of 3D tissue grafts. These results indicate that the biofabrication of living grafts resembling their complex native origin is within reach.

  3. Adipogenic differentiation of laser-printed 3D tissue grafts consisting of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Laser-assisted bioprinting (LaBP) allows the realization of computer-generated 3D tissue grafts consisting of cells embedded in a hydrogel environment. In this study, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were printed in a free-scalable 3D grid pattern by means of LaBP. We demonstrate that neither the proliferation ability nor the differentiation behaviour of the stem cells was affected by the LaBP procedure. Furthermore, the 3D grafts were differentiated down the adipogenic lineage pathway for 10 days. We verify by quantitative assessments of adipogenic markers that the 3D grafts resemble cell lineages present in natural adipose tissue. Additionally, we provide the proof that even pre-differentiated hASCs could be utilized for the generation of 3D tissue grafts. These results indicate that the biofabrication of living grafts resembling their complex native origin is within reach.

  4. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    Burleson, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z [Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies.

  5. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies

  6. Feasibility analysis of high resolution tissue image registration using 3-D synthetic data

    Yachna Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Registration of high-resolution tissue images is a critical step in the 3D analysis of protein expression. Because the distance between images (~4-5μm thickness of a tissue section is nearly the size of the objects of interest (~10-20μm cancer cell nucleus, a given object is often not present in both of two adjacent images. Without consistent correspondence of objects between images, registration becomes a difficult task. This work assesses the feasibility of current registration techniques for such images. Methods: We generated high resolution synthetic 3-D image data sets emulating the constraints in real data. We applied multiple registration methods to the synthetic image data sets and assessed the registration performance of three techniques (i.e., mutual information (MI, kernel density estimate (KDE method [1], and principal component analysis (PCA at various slice thicknesses (with increments of 1μm in order to quantify the limitations of each method. Results: Our analysis shows that PCA, when combined with the KDE method based on nuclei centers, aligns images corresponding to 5μm thick sections with acceptable accuracy. We also note that registration error increases rapidly with increasing distance between images, and that the choice of feature points which are conserved between slices improves performance. Conclusions: We used simulation to help select appropriate features and methods for image registration by estimating best-case-scenario errors for given data constraints in histological images. The results of this study suggest that much of the difficulty of stained tissue registration can be reduced to the problem of accurately identifying feature points, such as the center of nuclei.

  7. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    Yannick M Staedler

    Full Text Available Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of

  8. A 3D Finite Element Method for Flexible Multibody Systems

    An efficient finite element (FE) formulation for the simulation of multibody systems is derived from Hamilton's principle. According to the classical assumptions of multibody systems, a large rotation formulation has been chosen, where large rotations and large displacements, but only small deformations of the single bodies are taken into account. The strain tensor is linearized with respect to a co-rotated frame. The present approach uses absolute coordinates for the degrees of freedom and forms an alternative to the floating frame of reference formulation that is based on relative coordinates and describes deformation with respect to a co-rotated frame. Due to the modified strain tensor, the present formulation distinguishes significantly from standard nodal based nonlinear FE methods. Constraints are defined in integral form for every pair of surfaces of two bodies. This leads to a small number of constraint equations and avoids artificial stress singularities. The resulting mass and stiffness matrices are constant apart from a transformation based on a single rotation matrix for each body. The particular structure of this transformation allows to prevent from the usually expensive factorization of the system Jacobian within implicit time--integration methods. The present method has been implemented and tested with the FE-package NGSolve and specific 3D examples are verified with a standard beam formulation

  9. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  10. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 ± 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 ± 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 ± 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 ± 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 ± 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 ± 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 ± 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask systems with 3D

  11. Characterization of HDR Ir-192 source for 3D planning system

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D., E-mail: gabriel.fonseca@usp.b, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rubo, Rodrigo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia; Minamisawa, Renato A., E-mail: renato.minamisawa@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Ferreira, Louise A. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy treatment involves surgical or cavitary insertion of radioactive sources for diseases treatments, such as: lung, gynecologic or prostate cancer. This technique has great ability to administer high doses to the tumor, with adjacent normal tissue preservation equal or better than external beam radiation therapy. Several innovations have been incorporated in this treatment technique, such as, 3D treatment planning system and computer guided sources. In detriment to scientific advances there are no protocols that relate dose with tumor volume, organs or A point, established by ICRU38 and used to prescribe dose in treatment planning system. Several international studies, like as EMBRACE, the multicentre international study, has been trying to correlate the dose volume using 3D planning systems and medical images, as those obtained by CT or MRI, to establish treatment protocols. With the objective of analyzing the 3D dose distribution, a micro Selectron-HDR remote afterloading device for high dose-rate (HDR) was characterized in the present work. Through the data provided by the manufacturer the source was simulated, using the MCNP5 code to calculate American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 report (AAPM TG43) specified parameters. The simulations have shown great agreement when compared to the ONCENTRA planning system results and those provided by literature. The micro Selectron-HDR remote afterloading device will be utilized to simulate 3D dose distribution through CT images processed by an auxiliary software which process DICOM images. (author)

  12. Development of an accurate 3D blood vessel searching system using NIR light

    Mizuno, Yoshifumi; Katayama, Tsutao; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2010-02-01

    Health monitoring system (HMS) and drug delivery system (DDS) require accurate puncture by needle for automatic blood sampling. In this study, we develop a miniature and high accurate automatic 3D blood vessel searching system. The size of detecting system is 40x25x10 mm. Our searching system use Near-Infrared (NIR) LEDs, CMOS camera modules and image processing units. We employ the stereo method for searching system to determine 3D blood vessel location. Blood vessel visualization system adopts hemoglobin's absorption characterization of NIR light. NIR LED is set behind the finger and it irradiates Near Infrared light for the finger. CMOS camera modules are set in front of the finger and it captures clear blood vessel images. Two dimensional location of the blood vessel is detected by luminance distribution of the image and its depth is calculated by the stereo method. 3D blood vessel location is automatically detected by our image processing system. To examine the accuracy of our detecting system, we carried out experiments using finger phantoms with blood vessel diameters, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0mm, at the depths, 0.5 ~ 2.0 mm, under the artificial tissue surface. Experimental results of depth obtained by our detecting system showed good agreements with given depths, and the availability of this system is confirmed.

  13. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  14. Characterization of a novel bioreactor system for 3D cellular mechanobiology studies.

    Cook, Colin A; Huri, Pinar Y; Ginn, Brian P; Gilbert-Honick, Jordana; Somers, Sarah M; Temple, Joshua P; Mao, Hai-Quan; Grayson, Warren L

    2016-08-01

    In vitro engineering systems can be powerful tools for studying tissue development in response to biophysical stimuli as well as for evaluating the functionality of engineered tissue grafts. It has been challenging, however, to develop systems that adequately integrate the application of biomimetic mechanical strain to engineered tissue with the ability to assess functional outcomes in real time. The aim of this study was to design a bioreactor system capable of real-time conditioning (dynamic, uniaxial strain, and electrical stimulation) of centimeter-long 3D tissue engineered constructs simultaneously with the capacity to monitor local strains. The system addresses key limitations of uniform sample loading and real-time imaging capabilities. Our system features an electrospun fibrin scaffold, which exhibits physiologically relevant stiffness and uniaxial alignment that facilitates cell adhesion, alignment, and proliferation. We have demonstrated the capacity for directly incorporating human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells into the fibers during the electrospinning process and subsequent culture of the cell-seeded constructs in the bioreactor. The bioreactor facilitates accurate pre-straining of the 3D constructs as well as the application of dynamic and static uniaxial strains while monitoring bulk construct tensions. The incorporation of fluorescent nanoparticles throughout the scaffolds enables in situ monitoring of local strain fields using fluorescent digital image correlation techniques, since the bioreactor is imaging compatible, and allows the assessment of local sample stiffness and stresses when coupled with force sensor measurements. In addition, the system is capable of measuring the electromechanical coupling of skeletal muscle explants by applying an electrical stimulus and simultaneously measuring the force of contraction. The packaging of these technologies, biomaterials, and analytical methods into a single bioreactor system has produced a

  15. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    Zhu Xuping; Reese, Timothy G.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; El Fakhri, Georges [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, 149 Thirteenth Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 100 Blossom Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O/C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O/C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O/C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.6-2.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 deg. C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions.

  16. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O/C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O/C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O/C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.6-2.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 deg. C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions.

  17. Improved MAGIC gel for higher sensitivity and elemental tissue equivalent 3D dosimetry

    Zhu, Xuping; Reese, Timothy G.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Polymer-based gel dosimeter (MAGIC type) is a preferable phantom material for PET range verification of proton beam therapy. However, improvement in elemental tissue equivalency (specifically O∕C ratio) is very desirable to ensure realistic time-activity measurements. Methods: Glucose and urea was added to the original MAGIC formulation to adjust the O∕C ratio. The dose responses of the new formulations were tested with MRI transverse relaxation rate (R2) measurements. Results: The new ingredients improved not only the elemental composition but also the sensitivity of the MAGIC gel. The O∕C ratios of our new gels agree with that of soft tissue within 1%. The slopes of dose response curves were 1.6–2.7 times larger with glucose. The melting point also increased by 5 °C. Further addition of urea resulted in a similar slope but with an increased intercept and a decreased melting point. Conclusions: Our improved MAGIC gel formulations have higher sensitivity and better elemental tissue equivalency for 3D dosimetry applications involving nuclear reactions. PMID:20175480

  18. 3D Print and Play Payload (P3) Systems Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will make a dramatic improvement in a) size, weight and power based on a transformative approach to manufacturer 3D electronics as well as 2)...

  19. 3D spectral imaging system for anterior chamber metrology

    Anderson, Trevor; Segref, Armin; Frisken, Grant; Frisken, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Accurate metrology of the anterior chamber of the eye is useful for a number of diagnostic and clinical applications. In particular, accurate corneal topography and corneal thickness data is desirable for fitting contact lenses, screening for diseases and monitoring corneal changes. Anterior OCT systems can be used to measure anterior chamber surfaces, however accurate curvature measurements for single point scanning systems are known to be very sensitive to patient movement. To overcome this problem we have developed a parallel 3D spectral metrology system that captures simultaneous A-scans on a 2D lateral grid. This approach enables estimates of the elevation and curvature of anterior and posterior corneal surfaces that are robust to sample movement. Furthermore, multiple simultaneous surface measurements greatly improve the ability to register consecutive frames and enable aggregate measurements over a finer lateral grid. A key element of our approach has been to exploit standard low cost optical components including lenslet arrays and a 2D sensor to provide a path towards low cost implementation. We demonstrate first prototypes based on 6 Mpixel sensor using a 250 μm pitch lenslet array with 300 sample beams to achieve an RMS elevation accuracy of 1μm with 95 dB sensitivity and a 7.0 mm range. Initial tests on Porcine eyes, model eyes and calibration spheres demonstrate the validity of the concept. With the next iteration of designs we expect to be able to achieve over 1000 simultaneous A-scans in excess of 75 frames per second.

  20. NFkB disrupts tissue polarity in 3D by preventing integration of microenvironmental signals.

    Becker-Weimann, Sabine; Xiong, Gaofeng; Furuta, Saori; Han, Ju; Kuhn, Irene; Akavia, Uri-David; Pe'er, Dana; Bissell, Mina J; Xu, Ren

    2013-11-01

    The microenvironment of cells controls their phenotype, and thereby the architecture of the emerging multicellular structure or tissue. We have reported more than a dozen microenvironmental factors whose signaling must be integrated in order to effect an organized, functional tissue morphology. However, the factors that prevent integration of signaling pathways that merge form and function are still largely unknown. We have identified nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) as a transcriptional regulator that disrupts important microenvironmental cues necessary for tissue organization. We compared the gene expression of organized and disorganized epithelial cells of the HMT-3522 breast cancer progression series: the non-malignant S1 cells that form polarized spheres ('acini'), the malignant T4-2 cells that form large tumor-like clusters, and the 'phenotypically reverted' T4-2 cells that polarize as a result of correction of the microenvironmental signaling. We identified 180 genes that display an increased expression in disorganized compared to polarized structures. Network, GSEA and transcription factor binding site analyses suggested that NFkB is a common activator for the 180 genes. NFkB was found to be activated in disorganized breast cancer cells, and inhibition of microenvironmental signaling via EGFR, beta1 integrin, MMPs, or their downstream signals suppressed its activation. The postulated role of NFkB was experimentally verified: Blocking the NFkB pathway with a specific chemical inhibitor or shRNA induced polarization and inhibited invasion of breast cancer cells in 3D cultures. These results may explain why NFkB holds promise as a target for therapeutic intervention: Its inhibition can reverse the oncogenic signaling involved in breast cancer progression and integrate the essential microenvironmental control of tissue architecture. PMID:24243820

  1. 3D characterization of the Astor Pass geothermal system, Nevada

    Mayhew, Brett [NBMG; Faulds, James E

    2013-10-19

    The Astor Pass geothermal system resides in the northwestern part of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, on the margins of the Basin and Range and Walker Lane tectonic provinces in northwestern Nevada. Seismic reflection interpretation, detailed analysis of well cuttings, stress field analysis, and construction of a 3D geologic model have been used in the characterization of the stratigraphic and structural framework of the geothermal area. The area is primarily comprised of middle Miocene Pyramid sequence volcanic and sedimentary rocks, nonconformably overlying Mesozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks. Wells drilled at Astor Pass show a ~1 km thick section of highly transmissive Miocene volcanic reservoir with temperatures of ~95°C. Seismic reflection interpretation confirms a high fault density in the geothermal area, with many possible fluid pathways penetrating into the relatively impermeable Mesozoic basement. Stress field analysis using borehole breakout data reveals a complex transtensional faulting regime with a regionally consistent west-northwest-trending least principal stress direction. Considering possible strike-slip and normal stress regimes, the stress data were utilized in a slip and dilation tendency analysis of the fault model, which suggests two promising fault areas controlling upwelling geothermal fluids. Both of these fault intersection areas show positive attributes for controlling geothermal fluids, but hydrologic tests show the ~1 km thick volcanic section is highly transmissive. Thus, focused upwellings along discrete fault conduits may be confined to the Mesozoic basement before fluids diffuse into the Miocene volcanic reservoir above. This large diffuse reservoir in the faulted Miocene volcanic rocks is capable of sustaining high pump rates. Understanding this type of system may be helpful in examining large, permeable reservoirs in deep sedimentary basins of the eastern Basin and Range and the highly fractured volcanic geothermal

  2. Linking Microscopic Spatial Patterns of Tissue Destruction in Emphysema to Macroscopic Decline in Stiffness Using a 3D Computational Model

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with e...

  3. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    Harikrishnan Parameswaran; Arnab Majumdar; Béla Suki

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with e...

  4. Experience of percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system

    We performed percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system Arcadis Orbic 3D+Stealth Station Navigation System for vertebral fractures expressing instability. From April 2007 to December 2007, we performed percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system on 31 unstable fractures. Progress was good in all cases, indicating that percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system is effective for vertebral fractures expressing instability. (author)

  5. Analysis of quality of experience in 3D video systems

    Gutiérrez Sánchez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Esta tesis presenta un estudio exhaustivo sobre la evaluación de la calidad de experiencia (QoE, del inglés Quality of Experience) percibida por los usuarios de sistemas de vídeo 3D, analizando el impacto de los efectos introducidos por todos los elementos de la cadena de procesamiento de vídeo 3D. Por lo tanto, se presentan varias pruebas de evaluación subjetiva específicamente diseñadas para evaluar los sistemas considerados, teniendo en cuenta todos los factores perceptuales relacionados c...

  6. Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells.

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    Direct-write printing of stem cells within biomaterials presents an opportunity to engineer tissue for in vitro modeling and regenerative medicine. Here, a first example of constructing neural tissue by printing human neural stem cells that are differentiated in situ to functional neurons and supporting neuroglia is reported. The supporting biomaterial incorporates a novel clinically relevant polysaccharide-based bioink comprising alginate, carboxymethyl-chitosan, and agarose. The printed bioink rapidly gels by stable cross-linking to form a porous 3D scaffold encapsulating stem cells for in situ expansion and differentiation. Differentiated neurons form synaptic contacts, establish networks, are spontaneously active, show a bicuculline-induced increased calcium response, and are predominantly gamma-aminobutyric acid expressing. The 3D tissues will facilitate investigation of human neural development, function, and disease, and may be adaptable for engineering other 3D tissues from different stem cell types. PMID:27028356

  7. Commissioning and acceptance testing of Cadplan plus- a 3D treatment planning system

    3D treatment planning systems are finding wide acceptance in the radiotherapy community due to their improved dose calculation accuracy as well as the 3D visualization tools. Cadplan plus, a 3D treatment planning system from Varian, has been commissioned at the Tata Memorial Hospital in accordance to various international guidelines

  8. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  9. Direct electrospinning of 3D auricle-shaped scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    Walser, Jochen; Stok, Kathryn S; Caversaccio, Marco D; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-two poly(ε)caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds have been produced by electrospinning directly into an auricle-shaped mould and seeded with articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine ankle joints. After seeding, the auricle shaped constructs were cultured in vitro and analysed at days 1, 7, 14 and 21 for regional differences in total DNA, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen (COL) content as well as the expression of aggrecan (AGG), collagen type I and type II (COL1/2) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 and 13 (MMP3/13). Stress-relaxation indentation testing was performed to investigate regional mechanical properties of the electrospun constructs. Electrospinning into a conductive mould yielded stable 3D constructs both initially and for the whole in vitro culture period, with an equilibrium modulus in the MPa range. Rapid cell proliferation and COL accumulation was observed until week 3. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed an initial increase in AGG, no change in COL2, a persistent increase in COL1, and only a slight decrease initially for MMP3. Electrospinning of fibrous scaffolds directly into an auricle-shape represents a promising option for auricular tissue engineering, as it can reduce the steps needed to achieve an implantable structure. PMID:27171651

  10. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    Cornforth, Michael N. [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-05-03

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

  11. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'

  12. Adaptive geometric tessellation for 3D reconstruction of anisotropically developing cells in multilayer tissues from sparse volumetric microscopy images.

    Anirban Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The need for quantification of cell growth patterns in a multilayer, multi-cellular tissue necessitates the development of a 3D reconstruction technique that can estimate 3D shapes and sizes of individual cells from Confocal Microscopy (CLSM image slices. However, the current methods of 3D reconstruction using CLSM imaging require large number of image slices per cell. But, in case of Live Cell Imaging of an actively developing tissue, large depth resolution is not feasible in order to avoid damage to cells from prolonged exposure to laser radiation. In the present work, we have proposed an anisotropic Voronoi tessellation based 3D reconstruction framework for a tightly packed multilayer tissue with extreme z-sparsity (2-4 slices/cell and wide range of cell shapes and sizes. The proposed method, named as the 'Adaptive Quadratic Voronoi Tessellation' (AQVT, is capable of handling both the sparsity problem and the non-uniformity in cell shapes by estimating the tessellation parameters for each cell from the sparse data-points on its boundaries. We have tested the proposed 3D reconstruction method on time-lapse CLSM image stacks of the Arabidopsis Shoot Apical Meristem (SAM and have shown that the AQVT based reconstruction method can correctly estimate the 3D shapes of a large number of SAM cells.

  13. Development of monocular and binocular multi-focus 3D display systems using LEDs

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Son, Jung-Young; Kwon, Yong-Moo

    2008-04-01

    Multi-focus 3D display systems are developed and a possibility about satisfaction of eye accommodation is tested. The multi-focus means the ability of monocular depth cue to various depth levels. By achieving the multi-focus function, we developed 3D display systems for one eye and both eyes, which can satisfy accommodation to displayed virtual objects within defined depth. The monocular accommodation and the binocular convergence 3D effect of the system are tested and a proof of the satisfaction of the accommodation and experimental result of the binocular 3D fusion are given as results by using the proposed 3D display systems.

  14. 3D X-Ray imaging of bone tissue from micro to nano scale and associated inverse problems

    Peyrin, F.; Toma, A; Sixou, B.; Denis, L.; Wang, L.(Universität Bochum, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Bochum, 44780, Germany); WEBER,L; Langer, M. (Marco); Cloetens, P.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging bone tissue from the organ to the cellular level is a major goal in bone research to understand, diagnose and predict bone fragility associated to bone disease such as osteoporosis. In this presentation, we show that X-ray CT is particularly well adapted to image bone in 3D up to the nanometer scale. After recalling the principles of 3D CT, we describe advances in bone CT imaging and the needs in associated inverse problems. Clinical X-ray CT is daily used to image skeletal tissue at ...

  15. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  16. System and method for 3D printing of aerogels

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Duoss, Eric; Kuntz, Joshua; Spadaccini, Christopher; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-03-08

    A method of forming an aerogel. The method may involve providing a graphene oxide powder and mixing the graphene oxide powder with a solution to form an ink. A 3D printing technique may be used to write the ink into a catalytic solution that is contained in a fluid containment member to form a wet part. The wet part may then be cured in a sealed container for a predetermined period of time at a predetermined temperature. The cured wet part may then be dried to form a finished aerogel part.

  17. Development of in vitro 3D TissueFlex® islet model for diabetic drug efficacy testing.

    Zhaohui Li

    Full Text Available Increasing individuals diagnosed with type II diabetes pose a strong demand for the development of more effective anti-diabetic drugs. However, expensive, ethically controversial animal-based screening for anti-diabetic compounds is not always predictive of the human response. The use of in vitro cell-based models in research presents obviously ethical and cost advantages over in vivo models. This study was to develop an in vitro three-dimensional (3D perfused culture model of islets (Islet TF for maintaining viability and functionality longer for diabetic drug efficacy tests. Briefly fresh isolated rat islets were encapsulated in ultrapure alginate and the encapsulated islets were cultured in TissueFlex(®, a multiple, parallel perfused microbioreactor system for 7 days. The encapsulated islets cultured statically in cell culture plates (3D static and islets cultured in suspension (2D were used as the comparisons. In this study we demonstrate for the first time that Islet TF model can maintain the in vitro islet viability, and more importantly, the elevated functionality in terms of insulin release and dynamic responses over a 7-day culture period. The Islet TF displays a high sensitivity in responding to drugs and drug dosages over conventional 2D and 3D static models. Actual drug administration in clinics could be simulated using the developed Islet TF model, and the patterns of insulin release response to the tested drugs were in agreement with the data obtained in vivo. Islet TF could be a more predictive in vitro model for routine short- and long-term anti-diabetic drug efficacy testing.

  18. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. PMID:24636868

  19. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  20. Synthesis and 3D printing of biodegradable polyurethane elastomer by a water-based process for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    Hung, Kun-Che; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable materials that can undergo degradation in vivo are commonly employed to manufacture tissue engineering scaffolds, by techniques including the customized 3D printing. Traditional 3D printing methods involve the use of heat, toxic organic solvents, or toxic photoinitiators for fabrication of synthetic scaffolds. So far, there is no investigation on water-based 3D printing for synthetic materials. In this study, the water dispersion of elastic and biodegradable polyurethane (PU) nanoparticles is synthesized, which is further employed to fabricate scaffolds by 3D printing using polyethylene oxide (PEO) as a viscosity enhancer. The surface morphology, degradation rate, and mechanical properties of the water-based 3D-printed PU scaffolds are evaluated and compared with those of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) scaffolds made from the solution in organic solvent. These scaffolds are seeded with chondrocytes for evaluation of their potential as cartilage scaffolds. Chondrocytes in 3D-printed PU scaffolds have excellent seeding efficiency, proliferation, and matrix production. Since PU is a category of versatile materials, the aqueous 3D printing process developed in this study is a platform technology that can be used to fabricate devices for biomedical applications. PMID:24729580

  1. Coculture System with an Organotypic Brain Slice and 3D Spheroid of Carcinoma Cells

    Chuang, Han-Ning; Lohaus, Raphaela; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cerebral metastasis of carcinomas have a poor prognosis. However, the process at the metastatic site has barely been investigated, in particular the role of the resident (stromal) cells. Studies in primary carcinomas demonstrate the influence of the microenvironment on metastasis, even on prognosis1,2. Especially the tumor associated macrophages (TAM) support migration, invasion and proliferation3. Interestingly, the major target sites of metastasis possess tissue-specific macrophages, such as Kupffer cells in the liver or microglia in the CNS. Moreover, the metastatic sites also possess other tissue-specific cells, like astrocytes. Recently, astrocytes were demonstrated to foster proliferation and persistence of cancer cells4,5. Therefore, functions of these tissue-specific cell types seem to be very important in the process of brain metastasis6,7. Despite these observations, however, up to now there is no suitable in vivo/in vitro model available to directly visualize glial reactions during cerebral metastasis formation, in particular by bright field microscopy. Recent in vivo live imaging of carcinoma cells demonstrated their cerebral colonization behavior8. However, this method is very laborious, costly and technically complex. In addition, these kinds of animal experiments are restricted to small series and come with a substantial stress for the animals (by implantation of the glass plate, injection of tumor cells, repetitive anaesthesia and long-term fixation). Furthermore, in vivo imaging is thus far limited to the visualization of the carcinoma cells, whereas interactions with resident cells have not yet been illustrated. Finally, investigations of human carcinoma cells within immunocompetent animals are impossible8. For these reasons, we established a coculture system consisting of an organotypic mouse brain slice and epithelial cells embedded in matrigel (3D cell sphere). The 3D carcinoma cell spheres were placed directly next to the brain

  2. 3D Riesz-wavelet based Covariance descriptors for texture classification of lung nodule tissue in CT.

    Cirujeda, Pol; Muller, Henning; Rubin, Daniel; Aguilera, Todd A; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian; Binefa, Xavier; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present a novel technique for characterizing and classifying 3D textured volumes belonging to different lung tissue types in 3D CT images. We build a volume-based 3D descriptor, robust to changes of size, rigid spatial transformations and texture variability, thanks to the integration of Riesz-wavelet features within a Covariance-based descriptor formulation. 3D Riesz features characterize the morphology of tissue density due to their response to changes in intensity in CT images. These features are encoded in a Covariance-based descriptor formulation: this provides a compact and flexible representation thanks to the use of feature variations rather than dense features themselves and adds robustness to spatial changes. Furthermore, the particular symmetric definite positive matrix form of these descriptors causes them to lay in a Riemannian manifold. Thus, descriptors can be compared with analytical measures, and accurate techniques from machine learning and clustering can be adapted to their spatial domain. Additionally we present a classification model following a "Bag of Covariance Descriptors" paradigm in order to distinguish three different nodule tissue types in CT: solid, ground-glass opacity, and healthy lung. The method is evaluated on top of an acquired dataset of 95 patients with manually delineated ground truth by radiation oncology specialists in 3D, and quantitative sensitivity and specificity values are presented. PMID:26738126

  3. Probe into Key Techniques of Regional-Oriented 3D GIS On the key techniques of 3D GIS used for regional Geological Information System

    ZHU Liang-feng; WU Xin-cai; PAN Xin

    2005-01-01

    Regional Geological Information System combines the multi-dimensional and dynamic spatial information into an integrated spatial information system. 3D geological modeling and its preprocessing or post-processing are the most difficult problems for constructing the system. Based on the current 3D GIS technique, some basic problems in establishing the system are discussed in this paper, including 3D spatial data model, 3D geological modeling, and visualization of 3D geological data. A kind of 3D vector data model based on boundary representation for geological object and its topology was developed in order to model and visualize complex geological structures. In addition, some key techniques are pointed out for further study.

  4. Audit of 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    Background. Treatment planning systems (TPSs) are an essential part of modern radiotherapy equipment where radiation dose distribution and number of Monitor Units (MU) necessary to achieve it are calculated. Therefore, proper commissioning, implementation and application of TPSs are essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient, and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. IAEA is supporting national and sub-regional TPS audit activities as a new initiative to improve the quality and safety of radiotherapy in Member States. The audit methodology is based on the outcome of the IAEA coordinated research project E2.40.13 'Development of procedures for quality assurance for dosimetry calculation in radiotherapy'. The pilot runs have been conducted in the Baltic States and Hungarian hospitals. Methodology. The methodology for the audit focuses on the dosimetric aspects of the treatment planning and delivery processes of radiotherapy, for high-energy photon beams. It assesses the important part of the external beam radiotherapy workflow - from patient data acquisition and treatment planning to dose delivery. The audit procedure is based on the use of a CIRS thorax phantom Model 002LFC (Norfolk, VA). The phantom has a body made of plastic water, lung equivalent material and bone equivalent material sections and has 10 holes to hold interchangeable rod inserts for an ionization chamber. The phantom has a set of calibrated electron density reference plugs that enable the verification of the Hounsfield units/electron density (HU/ ED) conversion procedure. Computed tomography (CT) is used to image the phantom and the images are transferred to a TPS where planning and dose calculations take place. The clinical test cases cover a range of basic treatment techniques used in 3D conformal radiotherapy (CRT). The tests are structured so that at first, the dose distributions for single beams are considered, then standard multiple field techniques are used, and

  5. “SP-G”, a Putative New Surfactant Protein – Tissue Localization and 3D Structure

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putativ...

  6. Framework system and research flow of uncertainty in 3D geological structure models

    2010-01-01

    Uncertainty in 3D geological structure models has become a bottleneck that restricts the development and application of 3D geological modeling.In order to solve this problem during periods of accuracy assessment,error detection and dynamic correction in 3D geological structure models,we have reviewed the current situation and development trends in 3D geological modeling.The main context of uncertainty in 3D geological structure models is discussed.Major research issues and a general framework system of unce...

  7. Tissue reconstruction in 3D-spheroids from rodent retina in a motion-free, bioreactor-based microstructure.

    Rieke, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich; Layer, Paul Gottlob

    2008-12-01

    While conventional rotation culture-based retinal spheroids are most useful to study basic processes of retinogenesis and tissue regeneration, they are less appropriate for an easy and inexpensive mass production of histotypic 3-dimensional tissue spheroids, which will be of utmost importance for future bioengineering, e.g. for replacement of animal experimentation. Here we compared conventionally reaggregated spheroids derived from dissociated retinal cells from neonatal gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) with spheroids cultured on a novel microscaffold cell chip (called cf-chip) in a motion-free bioreactor. Reaggregation and developmental processes leading to tissue formation, e.g. proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation were observed during the first 10 days in vitro (div). Remarkably, in each cf-chip micro-chamber, only one spheroid developed. In both culture systems, sphere sizes and proliferation rates were almost identical. However, apoptosis was only comparably high up to 5 div, but then became negligible in the cf-chip, while it up-rose again in the conventional culture. In both systems, immunohistochemical characterisation revealed the presence of Müller glia cells, of ganglion, amacrine, bipolar and horizontal cells at a highly comparable arrangement. In both systems, photoreceptors were detected only in spheroids from P3 retinae. Benefits of the chip-based 3D cell culture were a reliable sphere production at enhanced viability, the feasibility of single sphere observation during cultivation time, a high reproducibility and easy control of culture conditions. Further development of this approach should allow high-throughput systems not only for retinal but also other types of histotypic spheroids, to become suitable for environmental monitoring and biomedical diagnostics. PMID:19023488

  8. Virtual 3D interactive system with embedded multiwavelength optical sensor array and sequential devices

    Wang, Guo-Zhen; Huang, Yi-Pai; Hu, Kuo-Jui

    2012-06-01

    We proposed a virtual 3D-touch system by bare finger, which can detect the 3-axis (x, y, z) information of finger. This system has multi-wavelength optical sensor array embedded on the backplane of TFT panel and sequentail devices on the border of TFT panel. We had developed reflecting mode which can be worked by bare finger for the 3D interaction. A 4-inch mobile 3D-LCD with this proposed system was successfully been demonstrated already.

  9. A compact mechatronic system for 3D ultrasound guided prostate interventions

    Purpose: Ultrasound imaging has improved the treatment of prostate cancer by producing increasingly higher quality images and influencing sophisticated targeting procedures for the insertion of radioactive seeds during brachytherapy. However, it is critical that the needles be placed accurately within the prostate to deliver the therapy to the planned location and avoid complications of damaging surrounding tissues. Methods: The authors have developed a compact mechatronic system, as well as an effective method for guiding and controlling the insertion of transperineal needles into the prostate. This system has been designed to allow guidance of a needle obliquely in 3D space into the prostate, thereby reducing pubic arch interference. The choice of needle trajectory and location in the prostate can be adjusted manually or with computer control. Results: To validate the system, a series of experiments were performed on phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric error, which was less than 0.4 mm. Needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error of bead placement was less then 1.6 mm along parallel needle paths that were within 1.2 mm of the intended target and 1 deg. from the preplanned trajectory. At oblique angles of up to 15 deg. relative to the probe axis, beads were placed to within 3.0 mm along a trajectory that were within 2.0 mm of the target with an angular error less than 2 deg. Conclusions: By combining 3D TRUS imaging system to a needle tracking linkage, this system should improve the physician's ability to target and accurately guide a needle to selected targets without the need for the computer to directly manipulate and insert the needle. This would be beneficial as the physician has complete control of the system and can safely maneuver the needle guide around obstacles such as previously placed needles.

  10. Diagnostic System for 3D Ultrasonography Based on Gabor Filter

    Wei-Ming Chen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 0 2 false false false EN-US ZH-TW X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 With the development of the times, people's lifestyle and eating habits are changed a lot. Worldwide, breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer after lung cancer and the fifth most common cause of cancer death. Diagnostic ultrasound (US of breast cancer is currently the major clinical detection method. It is recognized as a safe, effective, and highly flexible imaging modality capable of providing clinically relevant information about most parts of the body in a rapid and cost-effective fashion. However, ultrasound imaging usually contains a large number of noises and speckles. That will impact greatly on diagnosis by physicians. Therefore, we proposed a method to enhance the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD of the breast cancer tumors and to reduce detection time and error rate. Experimental investigations demonstrated that the texture variance of 3D ultrasound were effective and useful for differential diagnosis of breast tumors. Texture extraction with proposed method can find malignant more accurate than auto-correlation.

  11. Combination of Virtual Tours, 3d Model and Digital Data in a 3d Archaeological Knowledge and Information System

    Koehl, M.; Brigand, N.

    2012-08-01

    The site of the Engelbourg ruined castle in Thann, Alsace, France, has been for some years the object of all the attention of the city, which is the owner, and also of partners like historians and archaeologists who are in charge of its study. The valuation of the site is one of the main objective, as well as its conservation and its knowledge. The aim of this project is to use the environment of the virtual tour viewer as new base for an Archaeological Knowledge and Information System (AKIS). With available development tools we add functionalities in particular through diverse scripts that convert the viewer into a real 3D interface. By beginning with a first virtual tour that contains about fifteen panoramic images, the site of about 150 times 150 meters can be completely documented by offering the user a real interactivity and that makes visualization very concrete, almost lively. After the choice of pertinent points of view, panoramic images were realized. For the documentation, other sets of images were acquired at various seasons and climate conditions, which allow documenting the site in different environments and states of vegetation. The final virtual tour was deducted from them. The initial 3D model of the castle, which is virtual too, was also joined in the form of panoramic images for completing the understanding of the site. A variety of types of hotspots were used to connect the whole digital documentation to the site, including videos (as reports during the acquisition phases, during the restoration works, during the excavations, etc.), digital georeferenced documents (archaeological reports on the various constituent elements of the castle, interpretation of the excavations and the searches, description of the sets of collected objects, etc.). The completely personalized interface of the system allows either to switch from a panoramic image to another one, which is the classic case of the virtual tours, or to go from a panoramic photographic image

  12. COMBINATION OF VIRTUAL TOURS, 3D MODEL AND DIGITAL DATA IN A 3D ARCHAEOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AND INFORMATION SYSTEM

    M. Koehl

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The site of the Engelbourg ruined castle in Thann, Alsace, France, has been for some years the object of all the attention of the city, which is the owner, and also of partners like historians and archaeologists who are in charge of its study. The valuation of the site is one of the main objective, as well as its conservation and its knowledge. The aim of this project is to use the environment of the virtual tour viewer as new base for an Archaeological Knowledge and Information System (AKIS. With available development tools we add functionalities in particular through diverse scripts that convert the viewer into a real 3D interface. By beginning with a first virtual tour that contains about fifteen panoramic images, the site of about 150 times 150 meters can be completely documented by offering the user a real interactivity and that makes visualization very concrete, almost lively. After the choice of pertinent points of view, panoramic images were realized. For the documentation, other sets of images were acquired at various seasons and climate conditions, which allow documenting the site in different environments and states of vegetation. The final virtual tour was deducted from them. The initial 3D model of the castle, which is virtual too, was also joined in the form of panoramic images for completing the understanding of the site. A variety of types of hotspots were used to connect the whole digital documentation to the site, including videos (as reports during the acquisition phases, during the restoration works, during the excavations, etc., digital georeferenced documents (archaeological reports on the various constituent elements of the castle, interpretation of the excavations and the searches, description of the sets of collected objects, etc.. The completely personalized interface of the system allows either to switch from a panoramic image to another one, which is the classic case of the virtual tours, or to go from a panoramic

  13. Single event monitoring system based on Java 3D and XML data binding

    Online single event monitoring is important to BESIII DAQ System. Java3D is extension of Java Language in 3D technology, XML data binding is more efficient to handle XML document than SAX and DOM. This paper mainly introduce the implementation of BESIII single event monitoring system with Java3D and XML data binding, and interface for track fitting software with JNI technology. (authors)

  14. A Jones matrix formalism for simulating 3D Polarised Light Imaging of brain tissue

    Menzel, Miriam; De Raedt, Hans; Reckfort, Julia; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The neuroimaging technique 3D Polarised Light Imaging (3D-PLI) provides a high-resolution reconstruction of nerve fibres in human post-mortem brains. The orientations of the fibres are derived from birefringence measurements of histological brain sections assuming that the nerve fibres - consisting of an axon and a surrounding myelin sheath - are uniaxial birefringent and that the measured optic axis is oriented in direction of the nerve fibres (macroscopic model). Although experimental studies support this assumption, the molecular structure of the myelin sheath suggests that the birefringence of a nerve fibre can be described more precisely by multiple optic axes oriented radially around the fibre axis (microscopic model). In this paper, we compare the use of the macroscopic and the microscopic model for simulating 3D-PLI by means of the Jones matrix formalism. The simulations show that the macroscopic model ensures a reliable estimation of the fibre orientations as long as the polarimeter does not resolve ...

  15. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2016-01-01

    fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random...... pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing...

  16. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae

    Itoh, Manabu; Nakayama, Koichi; Noguchi, Ryo; Kamohara, Keiji; Furukawa, Kojirou; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Toda, Shuji; Oyama, Jun-ichi; Node, Koichi; Morita, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Background Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS) using a “Bio-3D printer”-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional struc...

  17. From tissue to silicon to plastic: 3D printing in comparative anatomy and physiology

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Nørgård, Mathias Ørum;

    2016-01-01

    to produce digital models of animal anatomy well suited to be printed on low cost 3D printers. In this communication we report how to apply such technology in comparative anatomy and physiology to aid discovery, description, comprehension and communication, and we seek to inspire fellow researchers...... modelling has entered the scene. However, comprehending complex anatomical structures is hampered by reproduction on flat inherently two-dimensional screens. One way to circumvent this problem is in the production of 3D printed scale models. We have applied computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging...

  18. A hand-held 3D laser scanning with global positioning system of subvoxel precision

    In this paper we propose a hand-held 3D laser scanner composed of an optical head device to extract 3D local surface information and a stereo vision system with subvoxel precision to measure the position and orientation of the 3D optical head. The optical head is manually scanned over the surface object by the operator. The orientation and position of the 3D optical head is determined by a phase-sensitive method using a 2D regular intensity pattern. This phase reference pattern is rigidly fixed to the optical head and allows their 3D location with subvoxel precision in the observation field of the stereo vision system. The 3D resolution achieved by the stereo vision system is about 33 microns at 1.8 m with an observation field of 60cm x 60cm.

  19. D3D augmented reality imaging system: proof of concept in mammography

    Douglas, David B; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to present images from simulated breast microcalcifications and assess the pattern of the microcalcifications with a technical development called “depth 3-dimensional (D3D) augmented reality”. Materials and methods A computer, head display unit, joystick, D3D augmented reality software, and an in-house script of simulated data of breast microcalcifications in a ductal distribution were used. No patient data was used and no statistical analysis was performed. Results The D3D augmented reality system demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception by presenting a unique image to each eye, focal point convergence, head position tracking, 3D cursor, and joystick fly-through. Conclusion The D3D augmented reality imaging system offers image viewing with depth perception and focal point convergence. The D3D augmented reality system should be tested to determine its utility in clinical practice. PMID:27563261

  20. 3D scanning and 3D printing as innovative technologies for fabricating personalized topical drug delivery systems.

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Det-Amornrat, Usanee; Wang, Jie; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-07-28

    Acne is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease with high prevalence. In this work, the potential of 3D printing to produce flexible personalised-shape anti-acne drug (salicylic acid) loaded devices was demonstrated by two different 3D printing (3DP) technologies: Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA). 3D scanning technology was used to obtain a 3D model of a nose adapted to the morphology of an individual. In FDM 3DP, commercially produced Flex EcoPLA™ (FPLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) filaments were loaded with salicylic acid by hot melt extrusion (HME) (theoretical drug loading - 2% w/w) and used as feedstock material for 3D printing. Drug loading in the FPLA-salicylic acid and PCL-salicylic acid 3D printed patches was 0.4% w/w and 1.2% w/w respectively, indicating significant thermal degradation of drug during HME and 3D printing. Diffusion testing in Franz cells using a synthetic membrane revealed that the drug loaded printed samples released <187μg/cm(2) within 3h. FPLA-salicylic acid filament was successfully printed as a nose-shape mask by FDM 3DP, but the PCL-salicylic acid filament was not. In the SLA printing process, the drug was dissolved in different mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) that were solidified by the action of a laser beam. SLA printing led to 3D printed devices (nose-shape) with higher resolution and higher drug loading (1.9% w/w) than FDM, with no drug degradation. The results of drug diffusion tests revealed that drug diffusion was faster than with the FDM devices, 229 and 291μg/cm(2) within 3h for the two formulations evaluated. In this study, SLA printing was the more appropriate 3D printing technology to manufacture anti-acne devices with salicylic acid. The combination of 3D scanning and 3D printing has the potential to offer solutions to produce personalised drug loaded devices, adapted in shape and size to individual patients. PMID:27189134

  1. Mobile viewer system for virtual 3D space using infrared LED point markers and camera

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Taneji, Shoto

    2006-09-01

    The authors have developed a 3D workspace system using collaborative imaging devices. A stereoscopic display enables this system to project 3D information. In this paper, we describe the position detecting system for a see-through 3D viewer. A 3D display system is useful technology for virtual reality, mixed reality and augmented reality. We have researched spatial imaging and interaction system. We have ever proposed 3D displays using the slit as a parallax barrier, the lenticular screen and the holographic optical elements(HOEs) for displaying active image 1)2)3)4). The purpose of this paper is to propose the interactive system using these 3D imaging technologies. The observer can view virtual images in the real world when the user watches the screen of a see-through 3D viewer. The goal of our research is to build the display system as follows; when users see the real world through the mobile viewer, the display system gives users virtual 3D images, which is floating in the air, and the observers can touch these floating images and interact them such that kids can make play clay. The key technologies of this system are the position recognition system and the spatial imaging display. The 3D images are presented by the improved parallax barrier 3D display. Here the authors discuss the measuring method of the mobile viewer using infrared LED point markers and a camera in the 3D workspace (augmented reality world). The authors show the geometric analysis of the proposed measuring method, which is the simplest method using a single camera not the stereo camera, and the results of our viewer system.

  2. Analyzing Biological Performance of 3D-Printed, Cell-Impregnated Hybrid Constructs for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chang, Tuanjie; Kulyk, William; Chen, Xiongbiao; Eames, B Frank

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting of hybrid constructs is a promising biofabrication method for cartilage tissue engineering because a synthetic polymer framework and cell-impregnated hydrogel provide structural and biological features of cartilage, respectively. During bioprinting, impregnated cells may be subjected to high temperatures (caused by the adjacent melted polymer) and process-induced mechanical forces, potentially compromising cell function. This study addresses these biofabrication issues, evaluating the heat distribution of printed polycaprolactone (PCL) strands and the rheological property and structural stability of alginate hydrogels at various temperatures and concentrations. The biocompatibility of parameters from these studies was tested by culturing 3D hybrid constructs bioprinted with primary cells from embryonic chick cartilage. During initial two-dimensional culture expansion of these primary cells, two morphologically and molecularly distinct cell populations ("rounded" and "fibroblastic") were isolated. The biological performance of each population was evaluated in 3D hybrid constructs separately. The cell viability, proliferation, and cartilage differentiation were observed at high levels in hybrid constructs of both cell populations, confirming the validity of these 3D bioprinting parameters for effective cartilage tissue engineering. Statistically significant performance variations were observed, however, between the rounded and fibroblastic cell populations. Molecular and morphological data support the notion that such performance differences may be attributed to the relative differentiation state of rounded versus fibroblastic cells (i.e., differentiated chondrocytes vs. chondroprogenitors, respectively), which is a relevant issue for cell-based tissue engineering strategies. Taken together, our study demonstrates that bioprinting 3D hybrid constructs of PCL and cell-impregnated alginate hydrogel is a promising approach for

  3. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class. PMID:23094088

  4. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    Felix Rausch

    Full Text Available Surfactant proteins (SP are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  5. The choice of optimal radiotherapy technique for locally advanced maxillary carcinoma using 3d treatment planning system

    Mileusnić Dušan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the isodose distribution of three radiotherapy techniques for locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma and analyze the potential of three-dimensional (3D conformal radiotherapy planning in order to determine the optimal technique for target dose delivery, and spare uninvolved healthy tissue structures. Methods. Computed tomography (CT scans of fourteen patients with T3-T4, N0, M0 maxillary sinus carcinoma were acquired and transferred to 3D treatment planning system (3D-TPS. The target volume and uninvolved dose limiting structures were contoured on axial CT slices throughout the volume of interest combining three variants of treatment plans (techniques for each patient: 1. A conventional two-dimensional (2D treatment plan with classically shaped one anterior two lateral opposite fields and two types of 3D conformal radiotherapy plans were compared for each patient. 2. Three-dimensional standard (3D-S plan one anterior + two lateral opposite coplanar fields, which outlines were shaped with multileaf collimator (MLC according to geometric information based on 3D reconstruction of target volume and organs at risk as seen in the beam eye's view (BEV projection. 3. Three-dimensional non-standard (3D-NS plan: one anterior + two lateral noncoplanar fields, which outlines were shaped in the same manner as in 3D-S plans. The planning parameters for target volumes and the degree of neurooptic structures and parotid glands protection were evaluated for all three techniques. Comparison of plans and treatment techniques was assessed by isodose distribution, dose statistics and dose-volume histograms. Results. The most enhanced conformity of the dose delivered to the target volume was achieved with 3D-NS technique, and significant differences were found comparing 3D-NS vs. 2D (Dmax: p<0,05 Daver: p<0,01; Dmin: p<0,05; V90: p<0,05, and V95: p<0,01, as well as 3D-NS vs. 3D-S technique (Dmin: p<0,05; V90: p<0,05, and V95: p<0,01, while there

  6. BladePro: 3D Automatic Grade Control System

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Currently most of the methods to control grading equipment to achieve the required production accuracy are based on conventional surveying, such as grade stakes and stringlines. BladePro System, developed by Spectra Precision in 1998, is a dual automatic blade control system that uses advance computer technology and user friendly operator controls. This system provides contractors a three dimensional machine control system for roads, railway beds and airport runway construction.

  7. Imaging system for creating 3D block-face cryo-images of whole mice

    Roy, Debashish; Breen, Michael; Salvado, Olivier; Heinzel, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot; Wilson, David

    2006-03-01

    We developed a cryomicrotome/imaging system that provides high resolution, high sensitivity block-face images of whole mice or excised organs, and applied it to a variety of biological applications. With this cryo-imaging system, we sectioned cryo-preserved tissues at 2-40 μm thickness and acquired high resolution brightfield and fluorescence images with microscopic in-plane resolution (as good as 1.2 μm). Brightfield images of normal and pathological anatomy show exquisite detail, especially in the abdominal cavity. Multi-planar reformatting and 3D renderings allow one to interrogate 3D structures. In this report, we present brightfield images of mouse anatomy, as well as 3D renderings of organs. For BPK mice model of polycystic kidney disease, we compared brightfield cryo-images and kidney volumes to MRI. The color images provided greater contrast and resolution of cysts as compared to in vivo MRI. We note that color cryo-images are closer to what a researcher sees in dissection, making it easier for them to interpret image data. The combination of field of view, depth of field, ultra high resolution and color/fluorescence contrast enables cryo-image volumes to provide details that cannot be found through in vivo imaging or other ex vivo optical imaging approaches. We believe that this novel imaging system will have applications that include identification of mouse phenotypes, characterization of diseases like blood vessel disease, kidney disease, and cancer, assessment of drug and gene therapy delivery and efficacy and validation of other imaging modalities.

  8. UNIQUIMER 3D, a software system for structural DNA nanotechnology design, analysis and evaluation

    Zhu, Jinhao; Wei, Bryan; Yuan, Yuan; Mi, Yongli

    2009-01-01

    A user-friendly software system, UNIQUIMER 3D, was developed to design DNA structures for nanotechnology applications. It consists of 3D visualization, internal energy minimization, sequence generation and construction of motif array simulations (2D tiles and 3D lattices) functionalities. The system can be used to check structural deformation and design errors under scaled-up conditions. UNIQUIMER 3D has been tested on the design of both existing motifs (holiday junction, 4 × 4 tile, double crossover, DNA tetrahedron, DNA cube, etc.) and nonexisting motifs (soccer ball). The results demonstrated UNIQUIMER 3D's capability in designing large complex structures. We also designed a de novo sequence generation algorithm. UNIQUIMER 3D was developed for the Windows environment and is provided free of charge to the nonprofit research institutions. PMID:19228709

  9. Evaluation of 3-D Power Distribution Synthesis Method for SMART Core Monitoring System

    A 3-dimensional power distribution synthesis method, named DPCM3D has been developed by KAERI. SMART core monitoring system, SCOMS adopted this method instead of Fourier expansion method for the digital monitoring system of conventional PWRs. The DPCM3D method produces a synthetic 3-D power distribution by coupling a neutronics code and measured in-core detector signals. In DPCM3D, instrumented node powers are determined from the detector powers by using power sharing factors and the un-instrumented node powers are determined by using power connection factors. A coefficient library for the 3-D power synthesis is functionalized as a function of the burnup, core power and control rod position. In this paper, performance of SCOMS 3-D power distribution synthesis method for SMART initial core was evaluated

  10. Time-Domain Analysis for 3-D Moored Systems

    肖越; 王言英

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, a comprehensive numerical study on the moored system is performed in time domain. The moored system, which is composed of the floating body sub-system and the mooring line sub-system, is calculated as a whole system by coupling. A time-domain method is applied to the analysis of the mooring line sub-system, and at the same time, an indirect time-domain method translated from frequency-domain to time-domain is developed to calculate the floating body sub-system. In the end, an FPSO vessel is calculated as a numerical example by the present method. A comparison of the result of the model test and that of the numerical method indicates that the present method is exact and effective.