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Sample records for 2la chromosomal inversion

  1. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  2. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  3. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  4. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 12; a three family study

    Haagerup, A; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1992-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 12 has been followed in three large independently ascertained Danish families. Out of a total number of 52 persons examined, 25 were found to carry the inversion. The breakpoints in all three families were localized to p13 and q13, resulting in more than one...... segregation rate is calculated to be 0.58, which is not significantly different from an expected segregation rate of 0.5. In family 3, an additional inversion of a chromosome 9 has been found in 4 individuals. Our results are discussed in relation to previous findings and with respect to the genetic...... counselling of families with pericentric inversions....

  5. Chromosome inversions, adaptive cassettes and the evolution of species' ranges.

    Kirkpatrick, Mark; Barrett, Brian

    2015-05-01

    A chromosome inversion can spread when it captures locally adapted alleles or when it is introduced into a species by hybridization with adapted alleles that were previously absent. We present a model that shows how both processes can cause a species range to expand. Introgression of an inversion that carries novel, locally adapted alleles is a particularly powerful mechanism for range expansion. The model supports the earlier proposal that introgression of an inversion triggered a large range expansion of a malaria mosquito. These results suggest a role for inversions as cassettes of genes that can accelerate adaptation by crossing species boundaries, rather than protecting genomes from introgression. PMID:25583098

  6. De Novo Pericentric Inversion of Chromosome 9 in Congenital Anomaly

    Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Bo-Young; Yu, Jae Eun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 is one of the most common structural balanced chromosomal variations and has been found in both normal populations and patients with various abnormal phenotypes and diseases. The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the clinical impact of inv(9)(p11q13). Materials and Methods We studied the karyotypes of 431 neonates with congenital anomalies at the Pediatric Clinic in Ajou University Hospital between 2004 and 2008 and retrospectively reviewed...

  7. A Dysmorphic Child with a Pericentric Inversion of Chromosome 8

    Venkateshwari Ananthapur; Srilekha Avvari; Sujatha Madireddi; Pratibha Nallari; Jyothy Akka

    2012-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy was referred to our institute with dysmorphic features such as mild lupus, micrognathia, low hair line, hypoplasia, hemi atrophy of left side of the face, abnormal size of ears, hypothenar, hypoplasia of chin, and tongue tie. MRI scan was found to be normal and EEG suggestive of generalized seizure disorder. Cytogenetic evaluation of the proband revealed a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8 with 46, XY, and inv 8 (p11.2; q21.2) karyotype.

  8. Independent intrachromosomal recombination events underlie the pericentric inversions of chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 16

    Goidts, Violaine; Szamalek, Justyna M.; de Jong, Pieter J; Cooper, David N.; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Hameister, Horst; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolution of the hominoids can reveal much about the mutational mechanisms underlying primate chromosome evolution. We characterized the breakpoints of the pericentric inversion of chimpanzee chromosome 18 (PTR XVI), which is homologous to human chromosome 16 (HSA 16). A conserved 23-kb inverted repeat composed of satellites, LINE and Alu elements was identified near the breakpoints and could have mediated the inversion by b...

  9. A Dysmorphic Child with a Pericentric Inversion of Chromosome 8

    Venkateshwari Ananthapur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old boy was referred to our institute with dysmorphic features such as mild lupus, micrognathia, low hair line, hypoplasia, hemi atrophy of left side of the face, abnormal size of ears, hypothenar, hypoplasia of chin, and tongue tie. MRI scan was found to be normal and EEG suggestive of generalized seizure disorder. Cytogenetic evaluation of the proband revealed a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8 with 46, XY, and inv 8 (p11.2; q21.2 karyotype.

  10. A dysmorphic child with a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8.

    Ananthapur, Venkateshwari; Avvari, Srilekha; Madireddi, Sujatha; Nallari, Pratibha; Akka, Jyothy

    2012-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy was referred to our institute with dysmorphic features such as mild lupus, micrognathia, low hair line, hypoplasia, hemi atrophy of left side of the face, abnormal size of ears, hypothenar, hypoplasia of chin, and tongue tie. MRI scan was found to be normal and EEG suggestive of generalized seizure disorder. Cytogenetic evaluation of the proband revealed a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8 with 46, XY, and inv 8 (p11.2; q21.2) karyotype. PMID:22606536

  11. The genetic content of chromosomal inversions across a wide latitudinal gradient.

    Pedro Simões

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence regarding the role of chromosomal inversions in relevant biological processes such as local adaptation and speciation. A classic example of the adaptive role of chromosomal polymorphisms is given by the clines of inversion frequencies in Drosophila subobscura, repeatable across continents. Nevertheless, not much is known about the molecular variation associated with these polymorphisms. We characterized the genetic content of ca. 600 individuals from nine European populations following a latitudinal gradient by analysing 19 microsatellite loci from two autosomes (J and U and the sex chromosome (A, taking into account their chromosomal inversions. Our results clearly demonstrate the molecular genetic uniformity within a given chromosomal inversion across a large latitudinal gradient, particularly from Groningen (Netherlands in the north to Málaga (Spain in the south, experiencing highly diverse environmental conditions. This low genetic differentiation within the same gene arrangement across the nine European populations is consistent with the local adaptation hypothesis for th evolutionof chromosomal polymorphisms. We also show the effective role of chromosomal inversions in maintaining different genetic pools within these inverted genomic regions even in the presence of high gene flow. Inversions represent thus an important barrier to gene flux and can help maintain specific allelic combinations with positive effects on fitness. Consistent patterns of microsatellite allele-inversion linkage disequilibrium particularly in loci within inversions were also observed. Finally, we identified areas within inversions presenting clinal variation that might be under selection.

  12. Recombinant Chromosome 4 from a Familial Pericentric Inversion: Prenatal and Adulthood Wolf-Hirschhorn Phenotypes

    Francesca Malvestiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 can give rise to recombinant chromosomes by duplication or deletion of 4p. We report on a familial case of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome characterized by GTG-banding karyotypes, FISH, and array CGH analysis, caused by a recombinant chromosome 4 with terminal 4p16.3 deletion and terminal 4q35.2 duplication. This is an aneusomy due to a recombination which occurred during the meiosis of heterozygote carrier of cryptic pericentric inversion. We also describe the adulthood and prenatal phenotypes associated with the recombinant chromosome 4.

  13. Chromosome Inversions, Genomic Differentiation and Speciation in the African Malaria Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Lee, Yoosook; Collier, Travis C.; Sanford, Michelle R.; Marsden, Clare D.; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Cornel, Anthony J.; Lanzaro, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    The African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, is characterized by multiple polymorphic chromosomal inversions and has become widely studied as a system for exploring models of speciation. Near complete reproductive isolation between different inversion types, known as chromosomal forms, has led to the suggestion that A. gambiae is in early stages of speciation, with divergence evolving in the face of considerable gene flow. We compared the standard chromosomal arrangement (Savanna form) with genomes homozygous for j, b, c, and u inversions (Bamako form) in order to identify regions of genomic divergence with respect to inversion polymorphism. We found levels of divergence between the two sub-taxa within some of these inversions (2Rj and 2Rb), but at a level lower than expected and confined near the inversion breakpoints, consistent with a gene flux model. Unexpectedly, we found that the majority of diverged regions were located on the X chromosome, which contained half of all significantly diverged regions, with much of this divergence located within exons. This is surprising given that the Bamako and Savanna chromosomal forms are both within the S molecular form that is defined by a locus near centromere of X chromosome. Two X-linked genes (a heat shock protein and P450 encoding genes) involved in reproductive isolation between the M and S molecular forms of A. gambiae were also significantly diverged between the two chromosomal forms. These results suggest that genes mediating reproductive isolation are likely located on the X chromosome, as is thought to be the case for the M and S molecular forms. We conclude that genes located on the sex chromosome may be the major force driving speciation between these chromosomal forms of A. gambiae. PMID:23526957

  14. Chromosome inversions, genomic differentiation and speciation in the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Yoosook Lee

    Full Text Available The African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, is characterized by multiple polymorphic chromosomal inversions and has become widely studied as a system for exploring models of speciation. Near complete reproductive isolation between different inversion types, known as chromosomal forms, has led to the suggestion that A. gambiae is in early stages of speciation, with divergence evolving in the face of considerable gene flow. We compared the standard chromosomal arrangement (Savanna form with genomes homozygous for j, b, c, and u inversions (Bamako form in order to identify regions of genomic divergence with respect to inversion polymorphism. We found levels of divergence between the two sub-taxa within some of these inversions (2Rj and 2Rb, but at a level lower than expected and confined near the inversion breakpoints, consistent with a gene flux model. Unexpectedly, we found that the majority of diverged regions were located on the X chromosome, which contained half of all significantly diverged regions, with much of this divergence located within exons. This is surprising given that the Bamako and Savanna chromosomal forms are both within the S molecular form that is defined by a locus near centromere of X chromosome. Two X-linked genes (a heat shock protein and P450 encoding genes involved in reproductive isolation between the M and S molecular forms of A. gambiae were also significantly diverged between the two chromosomal forms. These results suggest that genes mediating reproductive isolation are likely located on the X chromosome, as is thought to be the case for the M and S molecular forms. We conclude that genes located on the sex chromosome may be the major force driving speciation between these chromosomal forms of A. gambiae.

  15. Not para-, not peri-, but centric inversion of chromosome 12

    Silahtaroglu, A N; Hacihanefioglu, S; Güven, G S; Cenani, A; Wirth, J; Tommerup, Niels; Tümer, Z

    1998-01-01

    A 39 year old male with primary infertility was diagnosed as having Klinefelter syndrome by conventional cytogenetic analysis, which also showed an abnormal chromosome 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of the aberrant chromosome using a 12 specific centromeric probe showed a...

  16. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus.

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila Fc; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan Kr; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe Ac; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo Fp; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-05-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  17. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila FC; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan KR; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe AC; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo FP; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  18. Chromosomal inversion polymorphism in Drosophila mediopunctata: seasonal, altitudinal, and latitudinal variation

    Ananina Galina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The most polymorphic chromosome for inversions in Drosophila mediopunctata is the chromosome II, where 17 inversions have been found, eight of which occurring in the distal region and nine in the proximal region. We present an analysis of the chromosome II inversion polymorphism with respect to seasonal, altitudinal and latitudinal variation. In D. mediopunctata from the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia (southeastern Brazil, the frequencies of three of the distal inversions (namely DA, DS, and DP vary seasonally. These inversions also show altitudinal clines in their frequencies. This microgeographic pattern was not observed on a macrogeographic scale. D. mediopunctata from Porto Alegre are less polymorphic for inversions than other populations, the most remarkable reduction occurring in the proximal region of chromosome II. There is a considerable difference between D. mediopunctata from Campinas and specimens from Serra do Japi, which are separated by only 50 km. In contrast, D. mediopunctata from Serra do Japi are much more similar to specimens from the Parque Nacional do Itatiaia, which is 200 km far.

  19. Normal psychomotor development in a child with mosaic trisomy and pericentric inversion of chromosome 9.

    Frydman, M; Shabtal, F; Halbrecht, I; Elian, E

    1981-01-01

    A female infant with trisomy 9 in 58% of her cells is reported. Multiple congenital malformations were present, but she had normal psychomotor development. A pericentric inversion involving a portion of the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 9 was identified in the patient and her mother. This variant chromosome 9 was present in duplicate in the trisomic line. Since similar variants of 9qh have been found repeatedly in this syndrome, we feel that this association may be a non-random one.

  20. Recombinant chromosome 9 possibly derived from breakage and reunion of sister chromatids within a paracentric inversion loop.

    Phelan, M C; Stevenson, R E; Anderson, E V

    1993-05-15

    Chromosomally unbalanced offspring resulting from the recombination of parental paracentric inversions are uncommon. We report on a 20-month-old boy with a partial duplication of 9p due to the recombination of a paternal paracentric inversion. The patient's recombinant chromosome was designated rec(9)(p13-->p24::p12-->p24::p12-->qter). The patient's father and paternal aunt have a paracentric inversion of chromosome 9:inv(9)(p13p24). Although several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the chromosome imbalance generated from paracentric inversions, none of the previously described mechanisms can account for the structure of the recombinant chromosome observed in the propositus. We propose an unusual mechanism of formation involving breakage and unequal reunion of sister chromatids within the inversion loop to explain the structure of the patient's recombinant chromosome. PMID:8488876

  1. Differential occurrence of chromosome inversion polymorphisms among Muller's elements in three species of the tripunctata group of Drosophila, including a species with fast chromosomal evolution.

    Brianti, Mitsue T; Ananina, Galina; Klaczko, Louis B

    2013-01-01

    Detailed chromosome maps with reliable homologies among chromosomes of different species are the first step to study the evolution of the genetic architecture in any set of species. Here, we present detailed photo maps of the polytene chromosomes of three closely related species of the tripunctata group (subgenus Drosophila): Drosophila mediopunctata, D. roehrae, and D. unipunctata. We identified Muller's elements in each species, using FISH, establishing reliable chromosome homologies among species and D. melanogaster. The simultaneous analysis of chromosome inversions revealed a distribution pattern for the inversion polymorphisms among Muller's elements in the three species. Element E is the most polymorphic, with many inversions in each species. Element C follows; while the least polymorphic elements are B and D. While interesting, it remains to be determined how general this pattern is among species of the tripunctata group. Despite previous studies showing that D. mediopunctata and D. unipunctata are phylogenetically closer to each other than to D. roehrae, D. unipunctata shows rare karyotypic changes. It has two chromosome fusions: an additional heterochromatic chromosome pair and a pericentric inversion in the X chromosome. This especial conformation suggests a fast chromosomal evolution that deserves further study. PMID:23379335

  2. Widespread Impact of Chromosomal Inversions on Gene Expression Uncovers Robustness via Phenotypic Buffering.

    Naseeb, Samina; Carter, Zorana; Minnis, David; Donaldson, Ian; Zeef, Leo; Delneri, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    The nonrandom gene organization in eukaryotes plays a significant role in genome evolution and function. Chromosomal structural changes impact meiotic fitness and, in several organisms, are associated with speciation and rapid adaptation to different environments. Small sized chromosomal inversions, encompassing few genes, are pervasive in Saccharomyces "sensu stricto" species, while larger inversions are less common in yeasts compared with higher eukaryotes. To explore the effect of gene order on phenotype, reproductive isolation, and gene expression, we engineered 16 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying all possible paracentric and pericentric inversions between Ty1 elements, a natural substrate for rearrangements. We found that 4 inversions were lethal, while the other 12 did not show any fitness advantage or disadvantage in rich and minimal media. At meiosis, only a weak negative correlation with fitness was seen with the size of the inverted region. However, significantly lower fertility was seen in heterozygote invertant strains carrying recombination hotspots within the breakpoints. Altered transcription was observed throughout the genome rather than being overrepresented within the inversions. In spite of the large difference in gene expression in the inverted strains, mitotic fitness was not impaired in the majority of the 94 conditions tested, indicating that the robustness of the expression network buffers the deleterious effects of structural changes in several environments. Overall, our results support the notion that transcriptional changes may compensate for Ty-mediated rearrangements resulting in the maintenance of a constant phenotype, and suggest that large inversions in yeast are unlikely to be a selectable trait during vegetative growth. PMID:26929245

  3. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Chromosomal inversions among insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi Liston, a malaria mosquito.

    Shetty, N J; Hariprasad, T P N; Sanil, D; Zin, T

    2013-11-01

    Polytene chromosomes were prepared from the ovarian nurse cells of semi-gravid females of ten insecticide-resistant strains of Anopheles stephensi. Altogether, 16 heterozygous paracentric inversions, namely b/+ (11D-16C) in alphamethrin; i/+ (14B-18A) and h/+ (27B-28A) in DDT; j/+ (14A-16B) in chlorpyrifos; k/+ (11D-16B) in cyfluthrin; l/+ (11A-16C) in deltamethrin; m/+ (14B-15C) and e/+ (32A-33B) in bifenthrin; n/+ (12D-14B), f/+ (33A-36A) and g/+ (33C-34A) in propoxur; o/+ (11A-12D), h/+ (37A-37C) and i/+ (31C-32C) in temephos; d/+ (33D-35C) in carbofuran and a/+ (41C-43B) in neem strains, were reported. No inversions were observed in X chromosome so far. The frequency of inversions in different insecticides was found to be highest in the 2R arm, followed by the 3R arm. Such inversions were not reported in the corresponding susceptible strains or in the parental stocks. PMID:23982309

  5. Constitutional mosaicism for a chromosome 9 inversion resulting in recombinant aneusomy in an offspring

    Shapira, S.K.; Gagos, S.; Shaffer, L.G. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-14

    We report on a case of constitutional mosaicism for a large pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 in a man whose daughter had recombinant aneusomy resulting in partial 9q duplication and partial 9p deletion. At age 6 months, the girl was evaluated because of dysmorphic congenital animal features and developmental delay. Chromosomal analysis on this infant showed a derivative chromosome 9 which was later determined to be a recombinant chromosome with trisomy of 9q34.1{r_arrow}qter and monosomy of pter{r_arrow}9p24. Chromosomal analysis in her father showed the presence of two cell lines; 75% of lymphocytes had a 46,XY pattern, and 25% had a 46,XY,inv(9)(p24q34.1) karyotype. The infant`s physical findings represent a composite of the reported cases of both trisomy 9q34.1{r_arrow}qter and monosomy pter{r_arrow}p24. The infant`s father was phenotypically and cognitively normal. This case broadens the spectrum of reported cases of mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement generating unbalanced gametes, and further supports the tenet that constitutional mosaicism has clinical relevance for genetic counseling. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  7. The influence of pericentric inversion in 10th chromosome on aggressive behavior and hyperactivity

    Nilgun Tanriverdi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior and hyperactivity are neurodevelopmental diseases with unknown pathogenesis. Pericentric inv(10(p11.2;q21.2 mutation is frequently encountered in cytogenetic laboratories. This mutation is accepted as a polymorphic variant and is phenotypically silent, but in some cases it has been associated with neurodevelopmental diseases like autism. After blood culturing, standard chromosome obtaining procedure was applied to patients. In this study, clinical and cytogenetical findings of a boy with developmental delay, mental and motor retardation, attention deficit and hyperactivity have been reported. As a result of chromosome analysis, on chromosome 10, a large pericentric inversion between p11.1 and q22.q bands has been found. Karyotype analysis was also performed to mother, father and siblings of the patient and they have been found to have normal karyotype. It is plausible to consider a relation between inv(10 and some behavioral problems. Additionally, molecular studies targeting 10p-q critical region will be more informative for the true identification of this disease. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 108-113

  8. Third Chromosome Balancer Inversions Disrupt Protein-Coding Genes and Influence Distal Recombination Events in Drosophila melanogaster

    Danny E. Miller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Balancer chromosomes are multiply inverted chromosomes that suppress meiotic crossing over and prevent the recovery of crossover products. Balancers are commonly used in Drosophila melanogaster to maintain deleterious alleles and in stock construction. They exist for all three major chromosomes, yet the molecular location of the breakpoints and the exact nature of many of the mutations carried by the second and third chromosome balancers has not been available. Here, we precisely locate eight of 10 of the breakpoints on the third chromosome balancer TM3, six of eight on TM6, and nine of 11 breakpoints on TM6B. We find that one of the inversion breakpoints on TM3 bisects the highly conserved tumor suppressor gene p53—a finding that may have important consequences for a wide range of studies in Drosophila. We also identify evidence of single and double crossovers between several TM3 and TM6B balancers and their normal-sequence homologs that have created genetic diversity among these chromosomes. Overall, this work demonstrates the practical importance of precisely identifying the position of inversion breakpoints of balancer chromosomes and characterizing the mutant alleles carried by them.

  9. Localized remodeling of the Escherichia coli chromosome: the patchwork of segments refractory and tolerant to inversion near the replication terminus.

    Guijo, M I; Patte, J; del Mar Campos, M; Louarn, J M; Rebollo, J E

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of chromosomal inversions in Escherichia coli depends upon the region they affect. Regions flanking the replication terminus have been termed nondivisible zones (NDZ) because inversions ending in the region were either deleterious or not feasible. This regional phenomenon is further analyzed here. Thirty segments distributed between 23 and 29 min on the chromosome map have been submitted to an inversion test. Twenty-five segments either became deleterious when inverted or were noninvertible, but five segments tolerated inversion. The involvement of polar replication pause sites in this distribution was investigated. The results suggest that the Tus/pause site system may forbid some inversion events, but that other constraints to inversion, unrelated to this system, exist. Our current model for deleterious inversions is that the segments involved carry polar sequences acting in concert with other polar sequences located outside the segments. The observed patchwork of refractory and tolerant segments supports the existence of several NDZs in the 23- to 29-min region. Microscopic observations revealed that deleterious inversions are associated with high frequencies of abnormal nucleoid structure and distribution. Combined with other information, the data suggest that NDZs participate in the organization of the terminal domain of the nucleoid. PMID:11290700

  10. Characterization of the chromosomal inversion associated with the Koa mutation in the mouse revealed the cause of skeletal abnormalities

    Suzuki Hiroetsu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Koala (Koa is a dominant mutation in mice causing bushy muzzle and pinna, and is associated with a chromosomal inversion on the distal half of chromosome 15. To identify the gene responsible for the Koa phenotypes, we investigated phenotypes of Koa homozygous mice and determined the breakpoints of the inversion with a genetic method using recombination between two different chromosomal inversions. Results Skeletal preparation of Koa homozygotes showed marked deformity of the ribs and a wider skull with extended zygomatic arches, in addition to a general reduction in the lengths of long bones. They also had open eyelids at birth caused by a defect in the extension of eyelid anlagen during the embryonic stages. The proximal and distal breakpoints of the Koa inversion were determined to be 0.8-Mb distal to the Trsps1 gene and to 0.1-Mb distal to the Hoxc4 gene, respectively, as previously reported. The phenotypes of mice with the recombinant inverted chromosomes revealed the localization of the gene responsible the Koa phenotype in the vicinity of the proximal recombinant breakpoint. Expression of the Trsps1 gene in this region was significantly reduced in the Koa homozygous and heterozygous embryos. Conclusion While no gene was disrupted by the chromosomal inversion, an association between the Koa phenotype and the proximal recombinant breakpoint, phenotypic similarities with Trps1-deficient mice or human patients with TRSP1 mutations, and the reduced expression of the Trsps1 gene in Koa mice, indicated that the phenotypes of the Koa mice are caused by the altered expression of the Trps1 gene.

  11. The Population Genomics of Trans-Specific Inversion Polymorphisms in Anopheles gambiae

    White, Bradley J.; Cheng, Changde; Sangaré, Djibril; Lobo, Neil F.; Collins, Frank H.; Besansky, Nora J

    2009-01-01

    In the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae polymorphic chromosomal inversions may play an important role in adaptation to environmental variation. Recently, we used microarray-based divergence mapping combined with targeted resequencing to map nucleotide differentiation between alternative arrangements of the 2La inversion. Here, we applied the same technique to four different polymorphic inversions on the 2R chromosome of An. gambiae. Surprisingly, divergence was much lower between alternativ...

  12. Population structure of newly established Anopheles funestus populations in the Senegal River basin using paracentric chromosomal inversions.

    Dia, Ibrahima; Samb, Badara; Konate, Lassana; Fontenille, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Anopheles funestus is one of the major vectors of malaria in sub-saharan Africa. Because of several cycles of recurrent drought events that have occurred in the sahelian zone, this species had disappeared from this area since the 1970s following a disappearance of its specific breeding sites. Its comeback was, however, recently observed particularly in the Senegal River basin following the implementation of two dams. Because the implementation of hydro-agricultural and irrigation settings are suspected to be involved in the reestablishment of An. funestus populations and that paracentric inversions are involved in the adaptation to various environments, the present study was undertaken in 3 villages of the Senegal River basin (Keur Mbaye, Mbilor and Gankette Balla), (i) to study the chromosomal polymorphism of the newly established An. funestus populations in the Senegal River basin using paracentic inversions from ovarian nurse cells and (ii) their relationship with other populations of this species located in different environmental contexts (Dielmo in sudanian zone, Sankagne and Kouvar in northern sudano-guinean zone and Ngari in southern sudano-guinean zone) in order to know the key factors leading to their reestablishment in this area. Our results showed that the newly established An. funestus populations' exhibit low level of chromosomal polymorphism with two chromosomal inversions (the fixed 2Rs and the polymorphic 3La) out of the 9 paracentric inversions described up to now in An. funestus in Senegal. At population level, no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for almost all inversions. Furthermore, significant genetic differentiation was revealed between the populations from the Senegal River basin and those from the sudanian and southern sudano-guinean zones and was not linked to geographical distance. However, the populations from the Senegal River basin were close or slightly differentiated to those from the northern

  13. Down syndrome due to a recombination of a chromosome 21 paracentric inversion in 1 of 2 cases with a review of paracentric recombinants

    Jewett, T.; Rao, P.N.; Berry, M. [Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We recently identified 2 paracentric inversions (PAI) of chromosome 21. Case 1 was identified prenatally and paternally inherited: 46,XY,inv(21)(q21.2q22.13). The outcome is pending. Case 2 was a newborn male infant with clinical features of Down syndrome and an apparent inversion-duplication within chromosome 21. Parental chromosome analysis showed a maternal PAI: 46,XX,inv(21)(q21.2q22.3). The resulting child`s karyotype was: 46,XY,rec(21)(pter{yields}q21.2::q22.3{yields}q21.2::q22.3{yields}pter). Duplication of chromosome region q22.3{yields}qter was confirmed by FISH using a Down syndrome region specific probe (Cambio). Cytologically, the cornerstone of meiotic recombination from a paracentric inversion is the {open_quotes}reverse loop{close_quotes} model. In this model, a crossover event in the inversion loop results in the formation of gametes carrying either a dicentric chromatid, an acentric fragment, a normal chromatid or a chromatid with an inversion. However, a literature review of 326 PAI identified only 2 dicentrics and 15 other recombinants: 1 duplication/deletion; 6 deletions; 8 duplications. A U-type exchange model during meiosis within the inversion loop may best account for duplication/deletion recombinants. In contrast, the recombination in our case 2 would have occurred outside the loop. It is possible that no single explanation for PAI recombination may account for all outcomes. Alternative models of PAI recominational events will be presented. The literature suggests a low risk for prenatal loss due to abnormal PAI recombinants. In our review, viable offspring with recombinant chromosomes occurred in 3.8% of the PAI. Considering the potential for an increased incidence of recombination, prenatal diagnosis for all PAI carriers is warranted.

  14. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 2 associated with cryptic duplication of 2q14 and deletion of 2q37 in a patient with autism.

    Devillard, Françoise; Guinchat, Vincent; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Gruchy, Nicolas; Guillem, Pascale; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Leporrier, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Lespinasse, James; Betancur, Catalina

    2010-01-01

    We describe a patient with autism and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 2q14.2q37.3, with a concurrent duplication of the proximal breakpoint at 2q14.1q14.2 and a deletion of the distal breakpoint at 2q37.3. The abnormality was derived from his mother with a balanced paracentric inversion. The inversion in the child appeared to be cytogenetically balanced but subtelomere FISH revealed a cryptic deletion at the 2q37.3 breakpoint. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array confirm...

  15. Chromosome inversions in lymphocytes of prostate cancer patients treated with X-rays and carbon ions

    Background and purpose: To investigate the cytogenetic damage of the intrachange type in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for prostate cancer with different radiation qualities. Material and methods: Prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a clinical trial based at the Heidelberg University Hospital and at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in 2006. Patients were treated either with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or with a carbon-ion boost followed by IMRT. Blood samples were collected at the end of the therapy and the mBAND technique was used to investigate the cytogenetic damage of the inter and intrachange types. Moreover, the mBAND analysis was performed on healthy donor cells irradiated in vitro with X-rays or C-ions. Results: Our results show no statistically significant differences in the yield and the spectrum of chromosome aberrations among patients treated only with IMRT and patients receiving the combined treatment when similar target volumes and doses to the target are compared. Conclusion: The study suggests that the risks of normal tissue late effects and second malignancies in prostate cancer patients are comparable when heavy ions or IMRT radiotherapy are applied

  16. Clarification of anomalies in the application of a 2La molecular karyotyping method for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    Knols Bart GJ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been considered to be potentially important barriers to gene flow in many groups of animals through their effect on recombination suppression in heterokaryotypic individuals. Inversions can also enhance local adaptation in different groups of organisms and may often represent species-specific differences among closely related taxa. We conducted a study to characterize the 2La inversion karyotypes of An. gambiae sensu stricto mosquitoes sampled from the Kilombero Valley (Tanzania using a newly designed PCR assay. Results We frequently encountered a (687 bp fragment which was only present in the Kilombero Valley populations. Laboratory crossing between An. gambiae s.s. from Njage (Tanzania and Kisumu (Western Kenya populations resulted in F1 offspring carrying the observed fragment. Karyotype analysis did not indicate differences in 2La region chromosome morphology between individuals carrying the PCR fragments, the 207 bp fragment, or the 687 bp fragement. Conclusion The observed insertion/deletion polymorphism within the region amplified by the 2La PCR diagnostic test may confound the interpretation of this assay and should be well considered in order to maintain an acceptable level of reliability in studies using this assay to describe the distribution and frequency of the 2La inversion among natural populations of An. gambiae s.s.

  17. Are submicroscopic chromosomal inversions predisposing factors for the t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) translocation in chronic myeloid leukemia?

    González García, Juan Ramón; Cruz, Martín Daniel Domínguez; Gutiérrez, César Borjas

    2015-01-01

    A complex chromosomal rearrangement observed in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia was explained as the consequence of a multistep process. The explanation involved an initial t(9;22) translocation with breakpoints distant from the BCR and ABL1 genes followed by genomic deletions that produced the BCR-ABL1 hybrid gene. We present an alternative model that fits the origin of the patient’s rearrangement better. The present model links submicroscopic inversions with the occurrence of the t(...

  18. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  19. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(q21.2q22)) in a newborn with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Kuforjii, T.A.; Pillers, D.M.; Silberbach, M. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe congenital heart disease that is uniformly fatal without surgical intervention. Fetal echocardiography allows prenatal diagnosis, but this condition may not become apparent until after the mid-second trimester. We report a term baby with severe HLHS who had an 18 week fetal ultrasound that reportedly demonstrated a normal heart. There was no family history of congenital heart disease. She was phenotypically female with no dysmorphic features. Physical examination was otherwise normal. She expired at 48 hours of age. The autopsy was noncontributory. The karyotype was 46,XX, but there was an apparently balanced paracentric inversion of the long arm of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(q21.2q22)). The mother`s chromosome study was normal without any inversion, and the father was not available for study. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome has been associated with extracardiac anomalies and chromosomal abnormalities including 45,XO,11q-, and trisomy 18. It has also been reported in 5 members spanning 3 generations of a family with a spectrum of left heart defects suggesting an autosomal dominant pattern with high penetrance. First-degree relatives of infants with HLHS have a thirteen percent incidence of related cardiovascular malformations, a frequency higher than predicted by a multifactorial model of inheritance, suggesting that at least a portion of HLHS have a genetic basis. Karyotype analysis, including high resolution banding, may help define the etiology of this condition. Chromosome 7 has not been implicated in HLHS. This case emphasizes the need for genetic analysis, including a pedigree, of affected families. It also underscores the importance of screening by karyotype analysis to determine whether defects of the long arm of chromosome 7 are important in the pathogenesis of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

  20. Twin Pregnancy Obtention of Patient with Nonmosaic Klinefelter’s Syndrome and His Wife with Chromosome 9 Inversion by ICSI Treatment

    Yueyue Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old man was diagnosed with klinefelter’s syndrome (KS and his wife wasfound to have an inversion on chromosome 9-46, XX, inv (9 (p11q21- because of infertility.Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI was performed for fertilization after fluorescencein-situ hybridization (FISH was used to analyze the aneuploidy rate of the Xand Y chromosomes of the ejaculated sperms of the patient, and 99 sperms were haploidamong 100 sperms that were to be analyzed. A twin pregnancy was achieved. The chromosomesof the two fetuses were identified as 46, XY and 46, XY, inv (9(p11q21 after aprenatal diagnosis at 18 weeks gestation. Two healthy twins were born through caesareansection at 32 weeks gestation because of premature rupture of membranes (PROM.

  1. Linkage disequilibrium network analysis (LDna) gives a global view of chromosomal inversions, local adaptation and geographic structure

    Kemppainen, Petri; Knight, C. G.; Sarma, D. K.; Hlaing, T.; Prakash, A.; Maung, Y. N. M.; Somboon, P.; Mahanta, J.; Walton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 5 (2015), s. 1031-1045. ISSN 1755-098X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Anopheles dirus * Anopheles gambiae * chromosomal rearrangement * graph theory * landscape genomics * R package Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.712, year: 2014

  2. Inference of chromosomal inversion dynamics from Pool-Seq data in natural and laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Kapun, Martin; van Schalkwyk, Hester; McAllister, Bryant; Flatt, Thomas; Schlötterer, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Sequencing of pools of individuals (Pool-Seq) represents a reliable and cost-effective approach for estimating genome-wide SNP and transposable element insertion frequencies. However, Pool-Seq does not provide direct information on haplotypes so that, for example, obtaining inversion frequencies has not been possible until now. Here, we have developed a new set of diagnostic marker SNPs for seven cosmopolitan inversions in Drosophila melanogaster that can be used to infer inversion frequencies from Pool-Seq data. We applied our novel marker set to Pool-Seq data from an experimental evolution study and from North American and Australian latitudinal clines. In the experimental evolution data, we find evidence that positive selection has driven the frequencies of In(3R)C and In(3R)Mo to increase over time. In the clinal data, we confirm the existence of frequency clines for In(2L)t, In(3L)P and In(3R)Payne in both North America and Australia and detect a previously unknown latitudinal cline for In(3R)Mo in North America. The inversion markers developed here provide a versatile and robust tool for characterizing inversion frequencies and their dynamics in Pool-Seq data from diverse D. melanogaster populations. PMID:24372777

  3. Family paracentric inversion of the short arm of chromosome X (Xp21.2p11.23 and connection with autism spectrum disorders

    Pejović-Milovančević Milica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of complex pervasive developmental disorders characterized by impairments in communication, social interaction and behavior. In most cases autism is caused by a combination of genetic factors and environmental risk factors. In 10% to 20% of cases it has been shown that the cause of ASD is genetic. Case Outline. We are describing a 2-year-old boy who was referred to genetic counseling because of speech delay and certain autism-like behavior. By cytogenetic analysis the karyotype 46, inv(X,Y was obtained. The boy was a carrier of a paracentric inversion of the short arm of the chromosome X. After cytogenetic analysis of parental blood, it was detected that mother was a carrier of identical aberration, but had no clinical signs. The method of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH yielded the precise breakpoint in the region (p21.2p11.23. Mother and son were carriers of identical X chromosome. Conclusion. Breakpoints are located in the regions that have already been linked to autism, which indicates that the positional effect of the gene could have been a possible cause of the patient’s genotype. In addition to positional effects, in order to better understand the etiology of autism other genetic and environmental factors should be always taken into consideration. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON175013

  4. The population genomics of trans-specific inversion polymorphisms in Anopheles gambiae.

    White, Bradley J; Cheng, Changde; Sangaré, Djibril; Lobo, Neil F; Collins, Frank H; Besansky, Nora J

    2009-09-01

    In the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae polymorphic chromosomal inversions may play an important role in adaptation to environmental variation. Recently, we used microarray-based divergence mapping combined with targeted resequencing to map nucleotide differentiation between alternative arrangements of the 2La inversion. Here, we applied the same technique to four different polymorphic inversions on the 2R chromosome of An. gambiae. Surprisingly, divergence was much lower between alternative arrangements for all 2R inversions when compared to the 2La inversion. For one of the rearrangements, 2Ru, we successfully mapped a very small region (approximately 100 kb) of elevated divergence. For the other three rearrangements, we did not identify any regions of significantly high divergence, despite ample independent evidence from natural populations of geographic clines and seasonal cycling, and stable heterotic polymorphisms in laboratory populations. If these inversions are the targets of selection as hypothesized, we suggest that divergence between rearrangements may have escaped detection due to retained ancestral polymorphism in the case of the youngest 2R rearrangements and to extensive gene flux in the older 2R inversion systems that segregate in both An. gambiae and its sibling species An. arabiensis. PMID:19581444

  5. A Chromosome 7 Pericentric Inversion Defined at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Diagnostic Whole Genome Sequencing in a Patient with Hand-Foot-Genital Syndrome.

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Harrison, Sally M; Lascelles, Carolina; Antanaviciute, Agne; Carr, Ian M; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing methodologies are facilitating the rapid characterisation of novel structural variants at nucleotide resolution. These approaches are particularly applicable to variants initially identified using alternative molecular methods. We report a child born with bilateral postaxial syndactyly of the feet and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. This was presumed to be an autosomal recessive syndrome, due to the family history of consanguinity. Karyotype analysis revealed a homozygous pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(p15q21)x2) which was confirmed to be heterozygous in both unaffected parents. Since the resolution of the karyotype was insufficient to identify any putatively causative gene, we undertook medium-coverage whole genome sequencing using paired-end reads, in order to elucidate the molecular breakpoints. In a two-step analysis, we first narrowed down the region by identifying discordant read-pairs, and then determined the precise molecular breakpoint by analysing the mapping locations of "soft-clipped" breakpoint-spanning reads. PCR and Sanger sequencing confirmed the identified breakpoints, both of which were located in intergenic regions. Significantly, the 7p15 breakpoint was located 523 kb upstream of HOXA13, the locus for hand-foot-genital syndrome. By inference from studies of HOXA locus control in the mouse, we suggest that the inversion has delocalised a HOXA13 enhancer to produce the phenotype observed in our patient. This study demonstrates how modern genetic diagnostic approach can characterise structural variants at nucleotide resolution and provide potential insights into functional regulation. PMID:27272187

  6. A Chromosome 7 Pericentric Inversion Defined at Single-Nucleotide Resolution Using Diagnostic Whole Genome Sequencing in a Patient with Hand-Foot-Genital Syndrome.

    Christopher M Watson

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing methodologies are facilitating the rapid characterisation of novel structural variants at nucleotide resolution. These approaches are particularly applicable to variants initially identified using alternative molecular methods. We report a child born with bilateral postaxial syndactyly of the feet and bilateral fifth finger clinodactyly. This was presumed to be an autosomal recessive syndrome, due to the family history of consanguinity. Karyotype analysis revealed a homozygous pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7(p15q21x2 which was confirmed to be heterozygous in both unaffected parents. Since the resolution of the karyotype was insufficient to identify any putatively causative gene, we undertook medium-coverage whole genome sequencing using paired-end reads, in order to elucidate the molecular breakpoints. In a two-step analysis, we first narrowed down the region by identifying discordant read-pairs, and then determined the precise molecular breakpoint by analysing the mapping locations of "soft-clipped" breakpoint-spanning reads. PCR and Sanger sequencing confirmed the identified breakpoints, both of which were located in intergenic regions. Significantly, the 7p15 breakpoint was located 523 kb upstream of HOXA13, the locus for hand-foot-genital syndrome. By inference from studies of HOXA locus control in the mouse, we suggest that the inversion has delocalised a HOXA13 enhancer to produce the phenotype observed in our patient. This study demonstrates how modern genetic diagnostic approach can characterise structural variants at nucleotide resolution and provide potential insights into functional regulation.

  7. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Yerle Martine

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+ translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5 were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2 from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases.

  8. 胎儿9号染色体臂间倒位与产前诊断指征的关系%The relationship between pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 of fetus and the indications of prenatal diagnosis

    覃婷; 田矛; 莫伟英; 施月秋; 许莉莉

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨孕妇高龄与唐氏综合征血清学筛查高危与胎儿9号染色体臂间倒位(inv (9))的关系.方法 回顾性分析2004年10月至2009年8月间在我院因各种原因行羊膜腔穿刺或脐带血穿刺产前诊断的inv(9)胎儿的产前诊断指征.结果 唐氏筛查高危的孕妇胎儿inv(9)检出率为0.91%,高于普通人群inv(9)染色体异常检出率,高龄孕妇胎儿inv(9)染色体异常检出率0.71%,低于普通人群inv(9)染色体异常检出率,但2组孕妇的胎儿inv(9)染色体异常检出率与普通人群inv(9)染色体异常检出率差异无显著性.结论 唐氏综合征筛查高危,孕妇高龄均不是胎儿染色体inv(9)的高危因素.%Objective: To study the relationship between the women with advanced maternal age and the pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 ( inv (9)), and the relationship between the pregnant women at high risk for Down syndrome through serologic screening and the pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 ( inv (9) ). Methods: To analyze the indications of the prenatal diagnosis of the ( inv (9)) fetuses who have an amniocentesis or cordocentesis in our hospital due to various reasons from October 2004 - August 2009. Results: The detection rate of fetal inv (9) of pregnant women who were at high risk for Down syndrome was 0. 91%, which is higher than the detection rate of inv (9) chromosome abnormality of the common people. The detection rate of inv (9) chromosome abnormality of fetuses of elderly pregnant women was 0. 71%, which is lower than the detection rate of inv (9) chromosome abnormality of the common people. However, there is no significant difference between the detection rate of inv (9) chromosome abnormality of fetuses of pregnant women of Group 2 and the detection rate of inv (9) chromosome abnormality of the common people. Conclusions: The high risk for Down syndrome through screening and the advanced maternal age are not the high risk factors of the fetal chromosome 9

  9. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. PMID:22831897

  10. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    Yerle Martine; Ducos Alain; Pinton Alain

    2003-01-01

    Abstract A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and...

  11. Clinical significant evaluation of the inversion abnormality of chromosome on the fertile dysfunction%生育障碍患者中染色体倒位核型的特点及临床分析

    陈亮; 鞠慧岩; 薛晴; 左文莉; 徐阳; 付杰; 贺占举; 于丽; 齐雯; 潘虹; 陈菲; 张娜; 王玲

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:To analyze the clinical significance of the inversion abnormality of chromosome on the adverse pregnancy events.Methods:Cytogenetics of patients was examined by culturing peripheral-blood lym-phocyte and G-banding technology,and karyotyping analysis technique was used to study the relationship between the chromosomal inversion abnormality and the fertile dysfunction in 1408 couples with adverse pregnancy outcome. Results:Among 2816 cases with adverse pregnancy events,31cases (16 male and 15 female)were found with chromosomal inversion abnormality,and the abnormal rate was 1.10%.There was no significant difference in the abnormal rate of chromosomal inversion between the different genders (male:1.13%,female:1.06%,P>0.05). 25 cases with inv (9)were detected and the detectable rate was 0.89%(25/2816).The other types of inversion abnormality included:one case with inv (6)(q11q21),one case inv (7)(p15q36),one case with inv (18) (p11q21),one case with inv (1)(q34q22),one case with inv(X)(p22q26)and one case with inv (10) (q12q22).The clinical symptoms of inversion abnormality were miscarriage,embryonic diapause,fetal anomalies and et al.Conclusion:During the inversion abnormality related to the fertile dysfunction couples,inv (9 )is the most common type.Inv (9)maybe have some potential effect on the adverse pregnancy events.There is no signifi-cant difference of the detectable rate of inversion abnormality between the different genders.Therefore,the couples with adverse pregnancy outcome should both receive cytogenetically examination at the same time.Possibly,the PGD and ICSI may be helpful to the patients with the inversion abnormality,but the detailed issues need to be fur-ther investigated.%目的:分析及总结生育障碍患者中染色体倒位核型的特点及临床意义。方法:临床分析不良妊娠结局夫妇双方的外周血染色体核型,对男方及女方不同性别间染色体异常的检出率进行比较并进

  12. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 3

    The type and frequency of chromosome variants detected by the C-staining method were ascertained in 1,857 individuals residing in Hiroshima. The most frequent heteromorphic variant was the total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 9 found in 27 individuals (1.45%). The total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was not seen in this sample, but the partial inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was found in 18 persons (0.97%). Partial inversion was also detected in the C-band in chromosome 9 in 22 individuals (1.18%). In chromosome 16, neither total nor partial inversion of the C-band was observed in the present study. The frequencies of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 with a very large C-band were 0.70%, 0.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. Aside from these (1, 9, and 16) a very large C-band was found occasionally in chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 15, and an unusual insertion of the Y chromosome was observed. A total of 128 C-band variants (6.89%) was found in the 1,857 Hiroshima residents. (author)

  13. Familial transmission of a deletion of chromosome 21 derived from a translocation between chromosome 21 and an inverted chromosome 22.

    Aviv, H; Lieber, C; Yenamandra, A; Desposito, F

    1997-06-27

    Chromosome analysis of a newborn boy with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual derivative chromosome 22. The child has 46 chromosomes, including two chromosomes 21, one normal chromosome 22, and a derivative chromosome 22. Giemsa banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies show that the derivative chromosome is chromosome 22 with evidence of both paracentric and pericentric inversions, joined to the long arm of chromosome 21 from 21q21.2 to qter. The rearrangement results in partial trisomy 21 extending from 21q21.2 to 21q terminus in the patient. The child's mother, brother, maternal aunt, and maternal grandmother are all carriers of the derivative chromosome. All have 45 chromosomes, with one normal chromosome 21, one normal chromosome 22, and the derivative chromosome 22. The rearrangement results in the absence of the short arm, the centromere, and the proximal long arm of chromosome 21 (del 21pter-21q21.2) in carriers. Carriers of the derivative chromosome in this family have normal physical appearance, mild learning disabilities and poor social adjustment. PMID:9182781

  14. Hobo transposons causing chromosomal breakpoints.

    Ladevèze, V; Aulard, S.; Chaminade, N; Périquet, G; Lemeunier, F

    1998-01-01

    Several laboratory surveys have shown that transposable elements (TEs) can cause chromosomal breaks and lead to inversions, as in dysgenic crosses involving P-elements. However, it is not presently clear what causes inversions in natural populations of Drosophila. The only direct molecular studies must be taken as evidence against the involvement of mobile elements. Here, in Drosophila lines transformed with the hobo transposable element, and followed for 100 generations, we show the appearan...

  15. [Cytogenetic study of a case of Fanconi's syndrome with a familial pericentric inversion].

    Crippa, L; Ferrier, S

    1975-03-01

    The cytogenetic study of a case of Fanconi syndrome in a 16-year-old boy revealed besides chromosomal breakages, quadriradials and dicentric chromosomes, a pericentric inversion of chromosome No. 1. An uncle and an aunt on the paternal side presented likewise this pericentric inversion, however without breakages or clinical signs of Fanconi syndrome. Another paternal aunt showed short thumbs, but without chromosomal anomalies. The authors point to possible genetic repercussions of this familial pericentric inversion. PMID:1165481

  16. Chromosomal variations in the primate Alouatta seniculus seniculus.

    Yunis, E J; Torres de Caballero, O M; Ramírez, C; Ramírez, Z E

    1976-01-01

    Chromosome analysis in 23 specimens of Alouatta s. seniculus trapped in different localities of Colombia were examined with the C- and Q-banding techniques. The chromosome numbers (2n=44) showed variations from 2n = 43 to 2n = 45 involving three and five microchromosomes, respectively. Two specimens also showed a structural chromosome variation involving a pericentric inversion of the chromosome No. 13. Chromosome measurements revealed an X chromosome with a value significantly smaller to that established for the standard mammalian X chromosome. PMID:817992

  17. Chromosomal geometry in the interface from the frequency of the radiation induced chromosome aberrations

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosomal aberrations. Stable chromosomal aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). When DSBs induction and interaction is done at random, and the proximity effects are neglected, the expected relation between translocations and inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm length. The number of translocations and inversions is analyzed by using G-banding in 16 lymphocytes cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0,5 Gy - 3 Gy). The result obtained was: F=13,5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values, but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have more interaction probability. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. A DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length= 1μ is assumed. According to our results, the confinement volume is ≅ 6.4% of the nuclear volume. Nevertheless, we presume that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosomal confinement. (authors). 14 refs

  18. Chromosomal aberration

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G1 phase. (author)

  19. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  20. A versatile reporter system for CRISPR-mediated chromosomal rearrangements

    Li, Yingxiang; Park, Angela I.; Mou, Haiwei; Colpan, Cansu; Bizhanova, Aizhan; Akama-Garren, Elliot; Joshi, Nik; Hendrickson, Eric A; Feldser, David; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G.; Jacks, Tyler; Weng, Zhiping; Xue, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although chromosomal deletions and inversions are important in cancer, conventional methods for detecting DNA rearrangements require laborious indirect assays. Here we develop fluorescent reporters to rapidly quantify CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletions and inversions. We find that inversion depends on the non-homologous end-joining enzyme LIG4. We also engineer deletions and inversions for a 50 kb Pten genomic region in mouse liver. We discover diverse yet sequence-specific indels at the rearrang...

  1. Inverse Dynamics

    2007-01-01

    This media offers the student a chance to review how to exploit differential flatness of the system and emply inverse dynamics in the virtual domain to compute the states and controls that were not approximated with the reference functions. Last modified: 5/18/2009

  2. Chromosome Microarray.

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  3. Genome landscape and evolutionary plasticity of chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes.

    Ai Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonrandom distribution of rearrangements is a common feature of eukaryotic chromosomes that is not well understood in terms of genome organization and evolution. In the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, polymorphic inversions are highly nonuniformly distributed among five chromosomal arms and are associated with epidemiologically important adaptations. However, it is not clear whether the genomic content of the chromosomal arms is associated with inversion polymorphism and fixation rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better understand the evolutionary dynamics of chromosomal inversions, we created a physical map for an Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, and compared it with the genome of An. gambiae. We also developed and deployed novel Bayesian statistical models to analyze genome landscapes in individual chromosomal arms An. gambiae. Here, we demonstrate that, despite the paucity of inversion polymorphisms on the X chromosome, this chromosome has the fastest rate of inversion fixation and the highest density of transposable elements, simple DNA repeats, and GC content. The highly polymorphic and rapidly evolving autosomal 2R arm had overrepresentation of genes involved in cellular response to stress supporting the role of natural selection in maintaining adaptive polymorphic inversions. In addition, the 2R arm had the highest density of regions involved in segmental duplications that clustered in the breakpoint-rich zone of the arm. In contrast, the slower evolving 2L, 3R, and 3L, arms were enriched with matrix-attachment regions that potentially contribute to chromosome stability in the cell nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results highlight fundamental differences in evolutionary dynamics of the sex chromosome and autosomes and revealed the strong association between characteristics of the genome landscape and rates of chromosomal evolution. We conclude that a unique combination of various

  4. Sequencing papaya X and Yh chromosomes reveals molecular basis of incipient sex chromosome evolution.

    Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Qingyi; Gschwend, Andrea R; Han, Jennifer; Zeng, Fanchang; Aryal, Rishi; VanBuren, Robert; Murray, Jan E; Zhang, Wenli; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael; Feltus, F Alex; Lemke, Cornelia; Tong, Eric J; Chen, Cuixia; Wai, Ching Man; Singh, Ratnesh; Wang, Ming-Li; Min, Xiang Jia; Alam, Maqsudul; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H; Jiang, Jiming; Paterson, Andrew H; Ming, Ray

    2012-08-21

    Sex determination in papaya is controlled by a recently evolved XY chromosome pair, with two slightly different Y chromosomes controlling the development of males (Y) and hermaphrodites (Y(h)). To study the events of early sex chromosome evolution, we sequenced the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Y(h) chromosome (HSY) and its X counterpart, yielding an 8.1-megabase (Mb) HSY pseudomolecule, and a 3.5-Mb sequence for the corresponding X region. The HSY is larger than the X region, mostly due to retrotransposon insertions. The papaya HSY differs from the X region by two large-scale inversions, the first of which likely caused the recombination suppression between the X and Y(h) chromosomes, followed by numerous additional chromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, including the X and/or HSY regions, 124 transcription units were annotated, including 50 functional pairs present in both the X and HSY. Ten HSY genes had functional homologs elsewhere in the papaya autosomal regions, suggesting movement of genes onto the HSY, whereas the X region had none. Sequence divergence between 70 transcripts shared by the X and HSY revealed two evolutionary strata in the X chromosome, corresponding to the two inversions on the HSY, the older of which evolved about 7.0 million years ago. Gene content differences between the HSY and X are greatest in the older stratum, whereas the gene content and order of the collinear regions are identical. Our findings support theoretical models of early sex chromosome evolution. PMID:22869747

  5. Mechanisms of Chromosome Number Evolution in Yeast

    Gordon, Jonathan L.; Byrne, Kevin P.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2011-01-01

    The whole-genome duplication (WGD) that occurred during yeast evolution changed the basal number of chromosomes from 8 to 16. However, the number of chromosomes in post-WGD species now ranges between 10 and 16, and the number in non-WGD species (Zygosaccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, and Ashbya) ranges between 6 and 8. To study the mechanism by which chromosome number changes, we traced the ancestry of centromeres and telomeres in each species. We observe only two mechanisms by which the number of chromosomes has decreased, as indicated by the loss of a centromere. The most frequent mechanism, seen 8 times, is telomere-to-telomere fusion between two chromosomes with the concomitant death of one centromere. The other mechanism, seen once, involves the breakage of a chromosome at its centromere, followed by the fusion of the two arms to the telomeres of two other chromosomes. The only mechanism by which chromosome number has increased in these species is WGD. Translocations and inversions have cycled telomere locations, internalizing some previously telomeric genes and creating novel telomeric locations. Comparison of centromere structures shows that the length of the CDEII region is variable between species but uniform within species. We trace the complete rearrangement history of the Lachancea kluyveri genome since its common ancestor with Saccharomyces and propose that its exceptionally low level of rearrangement is a consequence of the loss of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway in this species. PMID:21811419

  6. Chimpanzee and human Y chromosomes are remarkably divergent in structure and gene content

    J.F. Hughes; H. Skaletsky; T. Pyntikova; T.A. Graves; S.K.M. van Daalen; P.J. Minx; R.S. Fulton; S.D. McGrath; D.P. Locke; C. Friedman; B.J. Trask; E.R. Mardis; W.C. Warren; S. Repping; S. Rozen; R.K. Wilson; D.C. Page

    2010-01-01

    The human Y chromosome began to evolve from an autosome hundreds of millions of years ago, acquiring a sex-determining function and undergoing a series of inversions that suppressed crossing over with the X chromosome(1,2). Little is known about the recent evolution of the Y chromosome because only

  7. Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Ji, X.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. I studied numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The large genomic changes are important for gene balance control, gene expression and regulation, and may affect the plant’s phenotype. Moreover, chromosome changes, in particular polyploidy, inversions and translocations play a signif...

  8. Field inversion gel electrophoresis with different pulse time ramps.

    Heller, C.(Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Germany); Pohl, F M

    1990-01-01

    The influence of different pulse time ramps on the separation of yeast chromosomes with field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) was investigated by the means of two dimensional gel electrophoresis. The problem of band inversion, which makes it difficult to distinguish DNA molecules of different size, has been solved by using double randomized pulse times. A major disadvantage of the field inversion technique is thereby overcome, making this system comparable to other pulsed field techniques.

  9. Neo-sex chromosomes in the black muntjac recapitulate incipient evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes

    Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jun; Huang, Ling; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Xiangyi; Yang, Fengtang; Wang, Wen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The regular mammalian X and Y chromosomes diverged from each other at least 166 to 148 million years ago, leaving few traces of their early evolution, including degeneration of the Y chromosome and evolution of dosage compensation. RESULTS: We studied the intriguing case of black...... muntjac, in which a recent X-autosome fusion and a subsequent large autosomal inversion within just the past 0.5 million years have led to inheritance patterns identical to the traditional X-Y (neo-sex chromosomes). We compared patterns of genome evolution in 35-kilobase noncoding regions and 23 gene...... SNX22 abolished a microRNA target site. Finally, expression analyses revealed complex patterns of expression divergence between neo-Y and neo-X alleles. CONCLUSION: The nascent neo-sex chromosome system of black muntjacs is a valuable model in which to study the evolution of sex chromosomes in mammals...

  10. Lattice animal model of chromosome organization

    Iyer, Balaji V. S.; Arya, Gaurav

    2012-07-01

    Polymer models tied together by constraints of looping and confinement have been used to explain many of the observed organizational characteristics of interphase chromosomes. Here we introduce a simple lattice animal representation of interphase chromosomes that combines the features of looping and confinement constraints into a single framework. We show through Monte Carlo simulations that this model qualitatively captures both the leveling off in the spatial distance between genomic markers observed in fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments and the inverse decay in the looping probability as a function of genomic separation observed in chromosome conformation capture experiments. The model also suggests that the collapsed state of chromosomes and their segregation into territories with distinct looping activities might be a natural consequence of confinement.

  11. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  12. Chromosome differentiation patterns during cichlid fish evolution

    Nirchio Mauro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation which has led to an extensive ecological diversity and their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To increase our understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, karyotypes of one Asian, 22 African, and 30 South American cichlid species were investigated, and chromosomal data of the family was reviewed. Results Although there is extensive variation in the karyotypes of cichlid fishes (from 2n = 32 to 2n = 60 chromosomes, the modal chromosome number for South American species was 2n = 48 and the modal number for the African ones was 2n = 44. The only Asian species analyzed, Etroplus maculatus, was observed to have 46 chromosomes. The presence of one or two macro B chromosomes was detected in two African species. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene revealed a variable number of clusters among species varying from two to six. Conclusions The karyotype diversification of cichlids seems to have occurred through several chromosomal rearrangements involving fissions, fusions and inversions. It was possible to identify karyotype markers for the subfamilies Pseudocrenilabrinae (African and Cichlinae (American. The karyotype analyses did not clarify the phylogenetic relationship among the Cichlinae tribes. On the other hand, the two major groups of Pseudocrenilabrinae (tilapiine and haplochromine were clearly discriminated based on the characteristics of their karyotypes. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene did not follow the chromosome diversification in the family. The dynamic evolution of the repeated units of rRNA genes generates patterns of chromosomal distribution that do not help follows the phylogenetic relationships among taxa. The presence of B chromosomes in cichlids is of particular interest because they may not be represented in

  13. Mitotic chromosome structure

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  14. Engineering Mouse Chromosomes with Cre-loxP: Range, Efficiency, and Somatic Applications

    Zheng, Binhai; Sage, Marijke; Sheppeard, Elizabeth A.; Jurecic, Vesna; Bradley, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are important resources for genetic studies. Recently, a Cre-loxP-based method to introduce defined chromosomal rearrangements (deletions, duplications, and inversions) into the mouse genome (chromosome engineering) has been established. To explore the limits of this technology systematically, we have evaluated this strategy on mouse chromosome 11. Although the efficiency of Cre-loxP-mediated recombination decreases with increasing genetic distance when the two endp...

  15. Chromosome studies in some Stevia. Cav. (Compositae) species from Southern Brazil

    Adriana P. Frederico; Paulo M. Ruas; Marin-Morales, Maria A.; Claudete F. Ruas; Jimi N. Nakajima

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of six species of the genus Stevia from Southern Brazil were studied, utilizing root tip metaphases. All species were diploid with 2n = 22 chromosomes. It was possible to identify each species by chromosome morphology. The basic chromosome number for Brazilian species of Stevia is X = 11. This number is also found in almost all South American species. We suggest that in Stevia there is an evolutionary trend toward chromosomal rearrangement, caused mainly by pericentric inversions. ...

  16. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J;

    1983-01-01

    A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were...... unbalanced chromosome abnormality in group A (women with elevated risk) is significantly higher than in group B + C (women without elevated risk) (relative risk 2.4). Women with a known familial translocation and women 40 years or more have a relative risk of 5.7 of having an unbalanced chromosome......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...

  17. Chromosome evolution in malaria mosquitoes inferred from physically mapped genome assemblies.

    Sharakhov, Igor V; Artemov, Gleb N; Sharakhova, Maria V

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphic inversions in mosquitoes are distributed nonrandomly among chromosomes and are associated with ecological, behavioral, and physiological adaptations related to pathogen transmission. Despite their significance, the patterns and mechanism of genome rearrangements are not well understood. Recent sequencing and physical mapping of the genomes for 16 Anopheles mosquito species provided an opportunity to study chromosome evolution at the highest resolution. New studies revealed that fixed rearrangement accumulated [Formula: see text]3 times faster on the X chromosome than on autosomes. The highest densities of transposable elements (TEs) and satellites of different sizes have also been found on the X chromosome, suggesting a mechanism for the inversion generation. The high rate of X chromosome rearrangements is in sharp contrast with the paucity of polymorphic inversions on the X in the majority of anopheline species. This paper highlights the advances in understanding chromosome evolution in malaria vectors and discusses possible future directions in studying mechanisms and biological roles of genome rearrangements. PMID:27021248

  18. 伴有inv(16)重排的儿童急性髓系白血病的临床与实验研究%Clinical and laboratory features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with inversion of chromosome 16

    何亚香; 胡绍燕; 薛永权; 王红英; 杨乃超; 邵雪君; 徐俊; 季正华; 黄益萍; 丁云芳

    2012-01-01

    transcript detected by RT-PCR,and 2 cases with trisomy 8 ( + 8 ).The results were compared with the morphology,immunophenotype,karyotype and RT-PCR.Result Morphologically,12 cases were diagnosed as M4EO,2 as M4,and 1 as M2a lmmunophenotypically,all 13 AML cases with inv(16) showed positive expression of CD13 and CD33,but without the expression of any lymphoid lineage antigens.Karyotyping analysis with G-banding detected inv (16) in 10 AML cases,including 9 M4EO cases and 1 M2a,but only 5 positive cases were detected using R-banding technique.Among them,2 cases had simultaneous + 8 and trisomy22 ( + 22),one had + 22 only in addition to inv(16).D-FISH revealed a CBFβ-MYH11 rearrangement in 13 cases of AML with positive RT-PCR results,and the mean positive rate of cell detection was 55.15% (range 37.0% -86.0% ).The complete remission rate (CR) and median survival period in this series of inv(16) AML were 81.5% and 11 months,respectively,of whom,8 cases were still in CR.Relapse and karyotypic evolution were seen in case 5 with + 8,+ 22 in addition to inv(16).Conclusion AML with inv(16) is a special subtype.Most cases belong to M4 EO.Its prognosis is good in general,but it seems to be an unfavorable feature for AM L with inv(16) and + 8,+ 22 simultaneously,especially with karyotypic evolution.For detection of inv (16),G-banding technique is evidently superior to R-banding technique.D-FISH combined with RT-PCR are more sensitive and reliable than chromosome banding analysis.

  19. Inverse problems of geophysics

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  20. Chromosome painting in plants.

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  1. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities.Results: The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner’s syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter’s syndrome.Conclusion: According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  2. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  3. A versatile reporter system for CRISPR-mediated chromosomal rearrangements.

    Li, Yingxiang; Park, Angela I; Mou, Haiwei; Colpan, Cansu; Bizhanova, Aizhan; Akama-Garren, Elliot; Joshi, Nik; Hendrickson, Eric A; Feldser, David; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Jacks, Tyler; Weng, Zhiping; Xue, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Although chromosomal deletions and inversions are important in cancer, conventional methods for detecting DNA rearrangements require laborious indirect assays. Here we develop fluorescent reporters to rapidly quantify CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletions and inversions. We find that inversion depends on the non-homologous end-joining enzyme LIG4. We also engineer deletions and inversions for a 50 kb Pten genomic region in mouse liver. We discover diverse yet sequence-specific indels at the rearrangement fusion sites. Moreover, we detect Cas9 cleavage at the fourth nucleotide on the non-complementary strand, leading to staggered instead of blunt DNA breaks. These reporters allow mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangements to be investigated. PMID:26018130

  4. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  5. A systematic study of field inversion gel electrophoresis.

    Heller, C.; Pohl, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mobilities of oligomers of phage lambda DNA and of yeast chromosomes in agarose gels during field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) were measured at different pulse times and electric fields. Also the ratios between forward and backward pulse times and/or field gradients were varied. The problem of 'band inversion' during FIGE, leading to an ambiguity in the mobility of large DNA fragments, was solved by using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with different parameters in the first a...

  6. Chromosome studies in some Stevia. Cav. (Compositae species from Southern Brazil

    Adriana P. Frederico

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Karyotypes of six species of the genus Stevia from Southern Brazil were studied, utilizing root tip metaphases. All species were diploid with 2n = 22 chromosomes. It was possible to identify each species by chromosome morphology. The basic chromosome number for Brazilian species of Stevia is X = 11. This number is also found in almost all South American species. We suggest that in Stevia there is an evolutionary trend toward chromosomal rearrangement, caused mainly by pericentric inversions. It was found that, in addition to aneuploidy and polyploidy, chromosomal rearrangements are common in the tribe Eupatorieae.

  7. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  8. Inversion in the lactose region of Escherichia coli K-12: inversion termini map within IS3 elements alpha 3 beta 3 and beta 5 alpha 5.

    Savić, D J; Romac, S P; Ehrlich, S D

    1983-01-01

    In this work, the previously described inversion in the lactose region of the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome (D. J. Savić, J. Bacteriol. 140:311-319, 1979) is analyzed in greater detail. The results presented indicate that the inversion most likely occurred by a homologous recombination between alpha 3 beta 3 and beta 5 alpha 5 IS3 elements.

  9. Chromosomal evolution among leaf-nosed nectarivorous bats – evidence from cross-species chromosome painting (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera)

    2013-01-01

    Background New World leaf-nosed bats, Phyllostomidae, represent a lineage of Chiroptera marked by unprecedented morphological/ecological diversity and extensive intergeneric chromosomal reorganization. There are still disagreements regarding their systematic relationships due to morphological convergence among some groups. Their history of karyotypic evolution also remains to be documented. Results To better understand the evolutionary relationships within Phyllostomidae, we developed chromosome paints from the bat species Macrotus californicus. We tested the potential of these paints as phylogenetic tools by looking for chromosomal signatures in two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids whose independent origins have been statistically supported by molecular phylogenies. By examining the chromosomal homologies defined by chromosome painting among two representatives of the subfamily Glossophaginae (Glossophaga soricina and Anoura cultrata) and one species from the subfamily Lonchophyllinae (Lonchophylla concava), we found chromosomal correspondence in regions not previously detected by other comparative cytogenetic techniques. We proposed the corresponding human chromosomal segments for chromosomes of the investigated species and found two syntenic associations shared by G. soricina and A. cultrata. Conclusion Comparative painting with whole chromosome-specific paints of M. californicus demonstrates an extensive chromosomal reorganization within the two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids, with a large number of chromosomes shared between M. californicus and G. soricina. We show that the evolution of nectar-feeding bats occurs mainly by reshuffling of chiropteran Evolutionarily Conserved Units (ECUs). Robertsonian fusions/fissions and inversions seem to be important modifiers of phyllostomid karyotypes, and autapomorphic character states are common within species. Macrotus californicus chromosome paints will be a valuable tool for documenting the pattern of

  10. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in subgroups of infertile men

    Dul, E. C.; Groen, H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Dijkhuizen, T.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Land, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is assumed to be higher in infertile men and inversely correlated with sperm concentration. Although guidelines advise karyotyping infertile men, karyotyping is costly, therefore it would be of benefit to identify men with the highest risk of c

  11. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  12. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  13. Inverse Quadratic Transportation Problem

    Jalilzadeh, Afrooz; Hamedani, Erfan Yazdandoost

    2014-01-01

    Many research has been conducted about quadratic programming and inverse optimization. In this paper we present the combination aspect of these subjects, applying on transportation problem. First, we obtain the inverse form of quadratic tranportation problem under $L_1$ norm by using duality as well as introducing the optimal value. Then, we do the same process for inverse quadratic transportation problem (IQTP) under $L_\\infty$ norm.

  14. Acute puerperal uterine inversion

    Objective: To determine the frequency, causes, clinical presentations, management and maternal mortality associated with acute puerperal inversion of the uterus. Materials and Methods: All the patients who developed acute puerperal inversion of the uterus either in or outside the JPMC were included in the study. Patients of chronic uterine inversion were not included in the present study. Abdominal and vaginal examination was done to confirm and classify inversion into first, second or third degrees. Results: 57036 deliveries and 36 acute uterine inversions occurred during the study period, so the frequency of uterine inversion was 1 in 1584 deliveries. Mismanagement of third stage of labour was responsible for uterine inversion in 75% of patients. Majority of the patients presented with shock, either hypovolemic (69%) or neurogenic (13%) in origin. Manual replacement of the uterus under general anaesthesia with 2% halothane was successfully done in 35 patients (97.5%). Abdominal hysterectomy was done in only one patient. There were three maternal deaths due to inversion. Conclusion: Proper education and training regarding placental delivery, diagnosis and management of uterine inversion must be imparted to the maternity care providers especially to traditional birth attendants and family physicians to prevent this potentially life-threatening condition. (author)

  15. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  16. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  17. Dynamical inverse problems

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  18. About Inverse 3-SAT

    Labouze, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The Inverse 3-SAT problem is known to be coNP Complete. This article shows a new interesting way to solve directly the problem by using closure under resolution and partial assignment properties. An algorithm is proposed which lets solve the (co)Inverse 3-SAT problem.

  19. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....

  20. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  1. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  3. 0-Semidistributive Inverse Semigroups

    田振际

    2004-01-01

    @@ For an inverse semigroup S, the set L(S) of all inverse subsemigroups (including the empty set) of S forms a lattice with respect to intersection denoted as usual by ∩ and union, where the union is the inverse subsemigroup generated by inverse subsemigroups A, B of S. The set LF(S) of all full inverse subsemigroups of S forms a complete sublattice of L(S), with Es as zero element (Es is the set of all idempotent of S)(see [3,5,6]). Note, that if S a group, then LF(S)=L(S), its lattice of all subgroups of S. If S = G0 is a group with adjoined zero, then clearly LF(S) ≌ L(G).

  4. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    2000-01-01

    The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. u...

  5. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  6. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  7. Three decades of studies on chromosomal polymorphism of Drosophila willistoni and description of fifty different rearrangements

    Claudia Rohde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila willistoni (Insecta, Diptera is considered a paradigm for evolutionary studies. Their chromosomes are characterized by multiple paracentric inversions that make it hard to identify and describe chromosomal poly-morphisms. In the present report we attempted to systematize the description of all the 50 inversions found in the last three decades, since we have been studying the chromosomes of several individuals of 30 different populations, including the one used in the genome sequencing project (Gd-H4-1. We present the photographic register of 11 arrangements in the left arm of the X chromosome (XL, eight in the right arm (XR, 10 in the left arm of chromosome II (IIL, eight in its right arm (IIR and 13 in chromosome III. This information also includes their breakpoints on the reference photomap. A clear geographic difference was detected in XL and XR, with different fixed arrangements depending on the origin of the population studied. Through the comparison of all X arrangements it was possible to infer the putative ancestral arrangements, i.e., those related to all the remaining arrangements through the small number of inversions that occurred in the past, which we will call XL-A and XR-A. In the autosomes (IIL/IIR and III, fixed inversions were detected, but most are segregating in different frequencies along the geographical distribution of the D. willistoni populations.

  8. Inversion flachseismischer Wellenfeldspektren

    Forbriger, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    In dieser Arbeit stelle ich ein neues Verfahren zur Inversion flachseismischer Wellenfelder vor. Die Inversion erfolgt in zwei Schritten. Zunächst wird ein Phasenslowness-Frequenz-Spektrum (omega,p-Spektrum) der Seismogramme bestimmt. In einem zweiten Schritt werden dieses Spektrum und die Laufzeiten der Ersteinsätze gemeinsam zu einem rein Tiefen-abhängigen Modell der seismischen Geschwindigkeiten und der Diskontinuitäten des untersuchten Mediums invertiert. Typische flachseismische Messunge...

  9. Unique genomic sequences in human chromosome 16p are conserved in the great apes.

    Tarzami, S T; Kringstein, A M; Conte, R A; Verma, R S

    1997-01-27

    In humans, acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMML) with abnormal bone marrow eosinophilia is diagnosed by the presence of a pericentric inversion in chromosome 16, involving breakpoints p13;q23 [i.e., inv(16)(p13;q23)]. A pericentric inversion involves breaks that have occurred on the p and q arms and the segment in between is rotated 180 degrees and reattaches. The recent development of a "human micro-coatasome" painting probe for 16p contains unique DNA sequences that fluorescently label only the short arm of chromosome 16, which facilitates the identification of such inversions and represents an ideal tool for analyzing the "divergence/convergence" of the equivalent human chromosome 16 (PTR 18, GGO 17 and PPY 19) in the great apes, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. When the probe is used on the type of pericentric inversion characteristic of AMML, signals are observed on the proximal portions (the regions closest to the centromere) of the long and short arms of chromosome 16. The probe hybridized to only the short arm of all three ape chromosomes and signals were not observed on the long arms, suggesting that a pericentric inversion similar to that seen in AMML has not occurred in any of these great apes. PMID:9037113

  10. Chromosome numbers in Bromeliaceae

    Cotias-de-Oliveira Ana Lúcia Pires

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports chromosome numbers of 17 species of Bromeliaceae, belonging to the genera Encholirium, Bromelia, Orthophytum, Hohenbergia, Billbergia, Neoglaziovia, Aechmea, Cryptanthus and Ananas. Most species present 2n = 50, however, Bromelia laciniosa, Orthophytum burle-marxii and O. maracasense are polyploids with 2n = 150, 2n = 100 and 2n = 150, respectively, while for Cryptanthus bahianus, 2n = 34 + 1-4B. B chromosomes were observed in Bromelia plumieri and Hohenbergia aff. utriculosa. The chromosome number of all species was determined for the first time, except for Billbergia chlorosticta and Cryptanthus bahianus. Our data supports the hypothesis of a basic number of x = 25 for the Bromeliaceae family and decreasing aneuploidy in the genus Cryptanthus.

  11. Those amazing dinoflagellate chromosomes

    PETER J RIZZO

    2003-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a very large and diverse group of eukaryotic algae that play a major role in aquatic food webs of both fresh water and marine habitats. Moreover, the toxic members of this group pose a health threat in the form of red tides. Finally, dinoflagellates are of great evolutionary importance,because of their taxonomic position, and their unusual chromosome structure and composition. While the cytoplasm of dinoflagellates is typically eukaryotic, the nucleus is unique when compared to the nucleus of other eukaryotes. More specifically, while the chromosomes of all other eukaryotes contain histones,dinoflagellate chromosomes lack histones completely. There are no known exceptions to this observation: all dinoflagellates lack histones, and all other eukaryotes contain histones. Nevertheless, dinoflagellates remain a relatively unstudied group of eukaryotes.

  12. Arm-specific dynamics of chromosome evolution in malaria mosquitoes

    Xia Ai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malaria mosquito species of subgenus Cellia have rich inversion polymorphisms that correlate with environmental variables. Polymorphic inversions tend to cluster on the chromosomal arms 2R and 2L but not on X, 3R and 3L in Anopheles gambiae and homologous arms in other species. However, it is unknown whether polymorphic inversions on homologous chromosomal arms of distantly related species from subgenus Cellia nonrandomly share similar sets of genes. It is also unclear if the evolutionary breakage of inversion-poor chromosomal arms is under constraints. Results To gain a better understanding of the arm-specific differences in the rates of genome rearrangements, we compared gene orders and established syntenic relationships among Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles funestus, and Anopheles stephensi. We provided evidence that polymorphic inversions on the 2R arms in these three species nonrandomly captured similar sets of genes. This nonrandom distribution of genes was not only a result of preservation of ancestral gene order but also an outcome of extensive reshuffling of gene orders that created new combinations of homologous genes within independently originated polymorphic inversions. The statistical analysis of distribution of conserved gene orders demonstrated that the autosomal arms differ in their tolerance to generating evolutionary breakpoints. The fastest evolving 2R autosomal arm was enriched with gene blocks conserved between only a pair of species. In contrast, all identified syntenic blocks were preserved on the slowly evolving 3R arm of An. gambiae and on the homologous arms of An. funestus and An. stephensi. Conclusions Our results suggest that natural selection favors specific gene combinations within polymorphic inversions when distant species are exposed to similar environmental pressures. This knowledge could be useful for the discovery of genes responsible for an association of inversion polymorphisms with

  13. Arm-specific dynamics of chromosome evolution in malaria mosquitoes

    2011-01-01

    Background The malaria mosquito species of subgenus Cellia have rich inversion polymorphisms that correlate with environmental variables. Polymorphic inversions tend to cluster on the chromosomal arms 2R and 2L but not on X, 3R and 3L in Anopheles gambiae and homologous arms in other species. However, it is unknown whether polymorphic inversions on homologous chromosomal arms of distantly related species from subgenus Cellia nonrandomly share similar sets of genes. It is also unclear if the evolutionary breakage of inversion-poor chromosomal arms is under constraints. Results To gain a better understanding of the arm-specific differences in the rates of genome rearrangements, we compared gene orders and established syntenic relationships among Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles funestus, and Anopheles stephensi. We provided evidence that polymorphic inversions on the 2R arms in these three species nonrandomly captured similar sets of genes. This nonrandom distribution of genes was not only a result of preservation of ancestral gene order but also an outcome of extensive reshuffling of gene orders that created new combinations of homologous genes within independently originated polymorphic inversions. The statistical analysis of distribution of conserved gene orders demonstrated that the autosomal arms differ in their tolerance to generating evolutionary breakpoints. The fastest evolving 2R autosomal arm was enriched with gene blocks conserved between only a pair of species. In contrast, all identified syntenic blocks were preserved on the slowly evolving 3R arm of An. gambiae and on the homologous arms of An. funestus and An. stephensi. Conclusions Our results suggest that natural selection favors specific gene combinations within polymorphic inversions when distant species are exposed to similar environmental pressures. This knowledge could be useful for the discovery of genes responsible for an association of inversion polymorphisms with phenotypic variations in

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities and environmental exposures in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Chromosomal abnormalities are present in bone marrow of approximately 50% of newly diagnostic acute nonlymphatic leukemia (ANLL) patients, but their etiologic significance, if any, is unclear. The frequency of environmental exposures, gathered by questionnaire from patients or relatives, was compared in 127 newly diagnosed ANLL patients with marrow abnormalities (AA) and 109 ANLL patients with cytogenetically normal marrow. These represented 73% of de novo patients treated at M. D. Anderson Hospital between 1976 and 1983. AA patients were more likely than NN patients to: report cytotoxic treatment for prior medical conditions, smoke cigarettes, drink alcoholic beverages, and work at occupations with possible exposure to mutagens. No statistically significant associations between aneuploidy and use of other tobacco, avocational exposure to chemicals or exposure to animals were present. Associations between specific abnormalities and prior cytotoxic therapy (deletion of chromosome 7), smoking (extra chromosome 8, inversion chromosome 16), and occupation at the time of diagnosis (translocation between chromosomes 8 and 21) were noted. No association between occupational exposure to benzene or ionizing radiation and the 6 most common chromosomal abnormalities in ANLL patients were noted, although these agents are known to be leukemogenic. Problems with interpreting the above associations, including the high nonresponse rate, a high proportion of surrogate respondents, and the large number of significance tests that were performed, are discussed. These results are consistent with those from previously reported series, and suggest that tumor-specific markers may be present for some exposures in this disease

  15. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) *

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xyp and XYp clearly prevailing (79.0%), but with the XO well represented too (19.75%). The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2%) although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6%) and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%). Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74) has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry. PMID:22303104

  16. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xy(p) and XY(p) clearly prevailing (79.0%), but with the XO well represented too (19.75%). The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2%) although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6%) and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%). Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74) has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry. PMID:22303104

  17. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xyp and XYp clearly prevailing (79.0%, but with the XO well represented too (19.75%. The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2% although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6% and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%. Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74 has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry.

  18. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  19. Ring chromosome 13

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B; Vogel, F; Noer, H; Mikkelsen, M

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation with...

  20. The Y Chromosome

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  1. Chromosome Morphology in Kniphofia.

    J. M. J de Wet

    1960-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of species and varieties of the genus  Kniphofia (Liliaceae were studied cytologically. The somatic chromosome number is  2n = 12 in all the species. This is also true in  Notosceptrum natalense Baker.

  2. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  3. Large-scale selective sweep among Segregation Distorter chromosomes in African populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Presgraves, Daven C; Gérard, Pierre R; Cherukuri, Anjuli; Lyttle, Terrence W

    2009-05-01

    Segregation Distorter (SD) is a selfish, coadapted gene complex on chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster that strongly distorts Mendelian transmission; heterozygous SD/SD(+) males sire almost exclusively SD-bearing progeny. Fifty years of genetic, molecular, and theory work have made SD one of the best-characterized meiotic drive systems, but surprisingly the details of its evolutionary origins and population dynamics remain unclear. Earlier analyses suggested that the SD system arose recently in the Mediterranean basin and then spread to a low, stable equilibrium frequency (1-5%) in most natural populations worldwide. In this report, we show, first, that SD chromosomes occur in populations in sub-Saharan Africa, the ancestral range of D. melanogaster, at a similarly low frequency (approximately 2%), providing evidence for the robustness of its equilibrium frequency but raising doubts about the Mediterranean-origins hypothesis. Second, our genetic analyses reveal two kinds of SD chromosomes in Africa: inversion-free SD chromosomes with little or no transmission advantage; and an African-endemic inversion-bearing SD chromosome, SD-Mal, with a perfect transmission advantage. Third, our population genetic analyses show that SD-Mal chromosomes swept across the African continent very recently, causing linkage disequilibrium and an absence of variability over 39% of the length of the second chromosome. Thus, despite a seemingly stable equilibrium frequency, SD chromosomes continue to evolve, to compete with one another, or evade suppressors in the genome. PMID:19412335

  4. Karyotype and chromosomal polymorphism of Camptochironomous tentans (diptera, chironomidae)

    Particular features of chromosomal polymorphism and cytogenetic differentiations have been studied in three natural populations of Camptochironomous tentans affecting the Semipalatinsk test site. For the first time C. tentans population from water-bodies of the Degelen mountain massif was found to contain a unique rarely observed inverse sequence of chromosomal disks (p'ten B85, p'ten D3, p'ten Ck, p'ten FK) and a series of special homozygous (p'ten C1.1; p'ten D2.2) and heterozygous (p'ten B1.5; p'ten D1.2; p'ten D1.3; p'ten F1.3; p'ten F1K) inversions which could be the result of Chironomini adaptation to the radioactive environment. (author)

  5. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  6. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    Krawiec, S.; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction ...

  7. Speeding up chromosome evolution in Phaseolus: multiple rearrangements associated with a one-step descending dysploidy.

    Fonsêca, Artur; Ferraz, Maria Eduarda; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The genus Phaseolus L. has been subject of extensive cytogenetic studies due to its global economic importance. It is considered karyotypically stable, with most of its ca. 75 species having 2n = 22 chromosomes, and only three species (Phaseolus leptostachyus, Phaseolus macvaughii, and Phaseolus micranthus), which form the Leptostachyus clade, having 2n = 20. To test whether a simple chromosomal fusion was the cause of this descending dysploidy, mitotic chromosomes of P. leptostachyus (2n = 20) were comparatively mapped by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) probes. Our results corroborated the conservation of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites on ancestral chromosomes 10 and 6, respectively. The reduction from x = 11 to x = 10 was the result of the insertion of chromosome 10 into the centromeric region of chromosome 11, supporting a nested chromosome fusion (NCF) as the main cause of this dysploidy. Additionally, the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 6 was translocated to this larger chromosome. Surprisingly, the NCF was accompanied by several additional translocations and inversions previously unknown for the genus, suggesting that the dysploidy may have been associated to a burst of genome reorganization in this otherwise stable, diploid plant genus. PMID:26490170

  8. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in common variable immune deficiency

    Vorechovsky, Igor (Karolinska Institute, Center for BioTechnology, Huddinge (Sweden)); Scott, David (Cancer Research Campaign Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)); Haeney, Mansel R. (Department of Immunology, Hope Hospital, Salford (United Kingdom)); Webster, David A.B. (Clinical Research Centre, Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, Middlesex (United Kingdom))

    1993-12-01

    From more than 500 tumours reported in human primary immune deficiencies a majority has been observed in two disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and common variable immune deficiency (CVID). Since both diseases have an increased risk of lymphomas/leukaemias and gastrointestinal tumours, suggesting a common risk factor, and the cells derived from A-T patients exhibit an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity we analysed chromosome damage in the G[sub 2] lymphocytes of 24 CVID patients and 21 controls after X-irradiation in vitro. There was a significant difference in mean aberration yields between patients and controls. Three CVID patients had yields higher than the mean+3SD of the controls. Six patients but only one control had yields higher than the mean+2SD of controls. The patient with the highest chromosomal radiosensitivity subsequently developed a lymphoma. Repeat assays on the same blood sample, with a 24-h delay in setting up the second culture, showed as much variability for control donors as the variation between control donors although for CVID patients inter-individual variation was greater than the difference between results of repeat samples. There was a weak positive correlation between radiosensitivity and age of donor. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of five patients with X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia was not different from healthy donors. The mean mitotic index (MI) for unirradiated samples from CVID patients was significantly lower than for controls and there was an inverse relationship between MI and aberration yields in the patients, but not in controls. We suggest that the defect in CVID patients that reduces response to mitogenic stimuli may have mechanism(s) in common with those involved in cellular repair processes.

  9. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.; Kirkegaard, Casper C.; Auken, Esben

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted by...... using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes this by......, the results are compatible with the data and, at the same time, favor sharp transitions. The focusing strategy can also be used to constrain the 1D solutions laterally, guaranteeing that lateral sharp transitions are retrieved without losing resolution. By means of real and synthetic datasets, sharp...

  10. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation

    A pericentric inversion of human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome [rec(X)] derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3 → Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3 → Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter → Xq26.3::Xp22.3 → Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) wee duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3 → qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state

  11. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation

    Mohandas, T.; Geller, R.L.; Yen, P.H.; Rosendorff, J.; Bernstein, R.; Yoshida, A.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1987-07-01

    A pericentric inversion of human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome (rec(X)) derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3 ..-->.. Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3 ..-->.. Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter ..-->.. Xq26.3::Xp22.3 ..-->.. Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) wee duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3 ..-->.. qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state.

  12. Rapid method for epidemiological evaluation of gram-positive cocci by field inversion gel electrophoresis.

    Goering, R V; Winters, M A

    1992-01-01

    We report a rapid method for the isolation of intact chromosomal DNA from gram-positive cocci that is suitable for in situ restriction endonuclease digestion in agarose blocks. When combined with a rapid field inversion gel electrophoresis protocol, this approach allows the preparation and electrophoretic analysis of chromosomal restriction fragments produced by rare-cutting enzymes in a total time period of 2 days from start to finish. The utility of the method is demonstrated in the epidemi...

  13. Chromosome aberrations in A-bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    Radiation-induced chromosome rearrangements are known to have persisted in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. A dose-response relationship for chromosome aberration frequencies has been observed in both cities. A preliminary analysis of cytogenetic data indicates that the inter-city difference observed with the T65D dose estimate becomes less pronounced with the new DS86 dosimetry system. The regression coefficient of the dose-response curves is nevertheless higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. The majority of chromosome aberrations detectable to date are of the stable type, such as translocations and inversions, and they have formed the dose-response relationship. (author)

  14. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species. PMID:20058798

  15. STRUCTURAL CHROMOSOME DIVERSIFICATION IN TWO SOUTHERN ATLANTIC MARINE CATFISHES (ARIIDAE

    Washington Candeia de Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Siluriforms is one of the most diverse groups of the Neotropical ichthyofauna. About 1,750 species occurs exclusively in the Americas. In view the high number of species, geographical widespread and morphological similarities, there are still many questions about the relationship among some families and species. One of the two families in this Order that inhabit the marine environment, Ariidae shows numerous taxonomic uncertainties. Cytogenetic analysis in Atlantic species are still incipient. To evaluate the karyotype diversity and infer the evolutionary history of this clade are presented here chromosomal data of species Cathorops spixii and Sciades sp. distributed in the northeastern Brazil coastline. Both species have the same diploid number 2n=56, but with marked differences between chromosomal formulas. In fact, C. spixii shows 12m+16sm+24st+4a (NF=108 and Sciades sp. presents 14m+10sm+22st+10a (NF=102. Both species have multiple NORs (nucleolar organizer regions, localized in the terminal portion of two chromosome pairs. The karyotypic patterns of these and other species of Ariidae indicates that pericentric inversion represent that the main mechanism involved in chromosomal diversity of the family. Taxonomic uncertainty in some taxa and the occurrence of interpopulational karyotypic variations in species Ariidae, raise detailed analyzes using the mapping of repetitive sequences in order to identify possible cryptic species in this family along the Brazilian coast. Keywords: Cathorops spixii, Sciades sp., pericentric inversions, fish cytogenetics, marine catfishes.

  16. Sequence features contributing to chromosomal rearrangements in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Russell Spencer-Smith

    Full Text Available Through whole genome sequence alignments, breakpoints in chromosomal synteny can be identified and the sequence features associated with these determined. Alignments of the genome sequences of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain FA1090, N.gonorrhoeae strain NCCP11945, and N. gonorrhoeae strain TCDC-NG08107 reveal chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred. Based on these alignments and dot plot pair-wise comparisons, the overall chromosomal arrangement of strain NCCP11945 and TCDC-NG08107 are very similar, with no large inversions or translocations. The insertion of the Gonococcal Genetic Island in strain NCCP11945 is the most prominent distinguishing feature differentiating these strains. When strain NCCP11945 is compared to strain FA1090, however, 14 breakpoints in chromosomal synteny are identified between these gonococcal strains. The majority of these, 11 of 14, are associated with a prophage, IS elements, or IS-like repeat enclosed elements which appear to have played a role in the rearrangements observed. Additional rearrangements of small regions of the genome are associated with pilin genes. Evidence presented here suggests that the rearrangements of blocks of sequence are mediated by activation of prophage and associated IS elements and reintegration elsewhere in the genome or by homologous recombination between IS-like elements that have generated inversions.

  17. Patterns of Chromosomal Evolution in Sigmodon, Evidence from Whole Chromosome Paints

    Swier, V.J.; Bradley, R.D.; Rens, W.; Elder, F.F.B.; Baker, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Of the superfamily Muroidea (31 genera, 1578 species), the Sigmodontinae (74 genera, 377 species) is the second largest subfamily in number of species and represents a significant radiation of rodent biodiversity. Only 2 of the 74 genera are found in both North and South America (Sigmodon and Oryzomys) and the remainder are exclusively from South America. In recent molecular studies, the genus Sigmodon (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae) has been considered sister to many other South American Sigmodontines [Steppan et al., 2004]. We examine the chromosomal evolution of 9 species of Sigmodon utilizing chromosomal paints isolated from S. hispidus, proposed to be similar to the ancestral karyotype [Elder, 1980]. Utilizing a phylogenetic hypothesis of a molecular phylogeny of Sigmodon [Henson and Bradley, 2009], we mapped shared chromosomal rearrangements of taxa on a molecular tree to estimate the evolutionary position of each rearrangement. For several species (S. hirsutus, S. leucotis, S. ochrognathus, S. peruanus, and S. toltecus), the karyotype accumulated few or no changes, but in three species (S. arizonae, S. fulviventer, and S. mascotensis) numerous karyotype rearrangements were observed. These rearrangements involved heterochromatic additions, centric fusions, tandem fusions, pericentric inversions, as well as the addition of interstitial DNA not identified by chromosome paints or C-banding. The hypothesis that the ancestral karyotype for this complex had a diploid number of 52, a fundamental number of 52, and a G-band pattern of which most, if not all are similar to that present in modern day S. hispidus fails to be rejected. This hypothesis remains viable as an explanation of chromosomal evolution in Sigmodontine rodents. PMID:19617697

  18. Genome-wide detection of chromosomal rearrangements, indels, and mutations in circular chromosomes by short read sequencing

    Skovgaard, Ole; Bak, Mads; Løbner-Olesen, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) with new short-read sequencing technologies has recently been applied for genome-wide identification of mutations. Genomic rearrangements have, however, often remained undetected by WGS, and additional analyses are required for their detection. Here, we have applied a...... combination of WGS and genome copy number analysis, for the identification of mutations that suppress the growth deficiency imposed by excessive initiations from the Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC. The E. coli chromosome, like the majority of bacterial chromosomes, is circular, and DNA...... inversion, and one was a large chromosomal duplication. The latter two mutations could not be detected solely by WGS, validating the present approach for identification of genomic rearrangements. We further suggest the use of copy number analysis in combination with WGS for validation of newly assembled...

  19. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on ou...

  20. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  1. Detection and possible role of two large nondivisible zones on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    Rebollo, J E; François, V; Louarn, J M

    1988-01-01

    Inversion of many predetermined segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome was attempted by using a system for in vivo selection of genomic rearrangements. Two types of constraints on these inversions were observed: (i) a sensitivity to rich medium when the distance between oriC and the 86- to 91-min region (which carries loci essential for transcription and translation) is increased; (ii) a poor viability or inviability of inversions having at least one endpoint in the one-third of the chromosome around replication terminators (with an exception for some inversions ending between these terminators). Although the first constraint is simply explained by a decreased dosage of the region involved, the second one may result from disruption of two long-range chromosomal organizations. The nondivisible zones thus disclosed coincide remarkably well with the two zones that we have previously described, which are polarized with respect to their replication. It is proposed that the two phenomena result from a sequence-dependent and polarized organization of the terminal region of the chromosome, which defines chromosome replication arms and may participate in nucleoid organization. Images PMID:3059345

  2. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  3. A new derived and highly polymorphic chromosomal race of Liolaemus monticola (Iguanidae) from the 'Norte Chico' of Chile.

    Lamborot, M

    1998-06-01

    A multiple Robertsonian fission chromosomal race of the Liolaemus monticola complex in Chile is described and is shown to be the most derived and the most complex among the Liolaemus examined thus far. The 29 karyotyped lizards analysed from the locality of Mina Hierro Viejo, Petorca, Provincia de Valparaiso, Chile, exhibited a diploid chromosomal number ranging from 42 to 44, and several polymorphisms. The polymorphisms included: a pair 1 fission; a pair 2 fission plus a pericentric inversion in one of the fission products, which moved the NOR and satellite from the tip of the long arm of the metacentric 2 to the short arm of the fission product; a fission in pair 3; a polymorphism for an enlarged chromosome pair 6; and a polymorphism for a pericentric inversion in pair 7. This population is fixed for a fission of chromosome pair 4. A total of 76% of the lizards analysed were polymorphic for one or more pairs of chromosomes. We have compared these data with other Liolaemus monticola chromosomal races and calculated the Hardy-Weinberg ratios for the polymorphic chromosome pairs in this Multiple-Fission race. Karyotypic differences between the Northern (2n = 38-40) and the Multiple-Fission (2n = 42-44) races were attributed mainly to Robertsonian fissions, an enlarged chromosome and pericentric inversions involving the macrochromosomes and one microchromosome pair. PMID:9688513

  4. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen, (The Netherlands). Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in mentally retarded children in the Konya region--Turkey.

    Cora, T; Demirel, S; Acar, A

    2000-01-01

    Etiology of mental retardation is diverse. 120 Students from 11 special training, education, and rehabilitation subclasses were investigated cytogenetically for determining the contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to mild mental retardation. 23 of the 120 children (19%) had chromosomal abnormalities: thirteen cases a classical trisomy 21 (the male:female ratio was 9:4), three a balanced autosomal reciprocal translocation, one a pericentric inversion of chromosome 9, and six fragile-X syndrome (The male:female ratio was 5:1). PMID:10756429

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in couples with repeated fetal loss: An Indian retrospective study

    Frenny J Sheth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent pregnancy loss is a common occurrence and a matter of concern for couples planning the pregnancy. Chromosomal abnormalities, mainly balanced rearrangements, are common in couples with repeated miscarriages. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contribution of chromosomal anomalies causing repeated spontaneous miscarriages and provide detailed characterization of a few structurally altered chromosomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cytogenetic study was carried out on 4859 individuals having a history of recurrent miscarriages. The cases were analyzed using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization wherever necessary. Results: Chromosomal rearrangements were found in 170 individuals (3.5%. Translocations were seen in 72 (42.35% cases. Of these, reciprocal translocations constituted 42 (24.70% cases while Robertsonian translocations were detected in 30 (17.64% cases. 7 (4.11% cases were mosaic, 8 (4.70% had small supernumerary marker chromosomes and 1 (0.6% had an interstitial microdeletion. Nearly, 78 (1.61% cases with heteromorphic variants were seen of which inversion of Y chromosome (57.70% and chromosome 9 pericentromeric variants (32.05% were predominantly involved. Conclusions: Chromosomal analysis is an important etiological investigation in couples with repeated miscarriages. Characterization of variants/marker chromosome enable calculation of a more precise recurrent risk in a subsequent pregnancy thereby facilitating genetic counseling and deciding further reproductive options.

  7. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly one dimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons

  8. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  9. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  10. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...... impedance spectroscopy was selected as the sensing method on a microfabricated chip with array of 12 electrode sets. Two independent chips (Chip1 and Chip2) were used for targeting the chromosomal fragments involved in the translocation. Each chip was differentially functionalized with DNA probes matching...

  11. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  12. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan,; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A.; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed “reference-assisted chromosome assembly” (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that ou...

  13. Genomic Evidence for Adaptive Inversion Clines in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Kapun, Martin; Fabian, Daniel K; Goudet, Jérôme; Flatt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Clines in chromosomal inversion polymorphisms-presumably driven by climatic gradients-are common but there is surprisingly little evidence for selection acting on them. Here we address this long-standing issue in Drosophila melanogaster by using diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to estimate inversion frequencies from 28 whole-genome Pool-seq samples collected from 10 populations along the North American east coast. Inversions In(3L)P, In(3R)Mo, and In(3R)Payne showed clear latitudinal clines, and for In(2L)t, In(2R)NS, and In(3R)Payne the steepness of the clinal slopes changed between summer and fall. Consistent with an effect of seasonality on inversion frequencies, we detected small but stable seasonal fluctuations of In(2R)NS and In(3R)Payne in a temperate Pennsylvanian population over 4 years. In support of spatially varying selection, we observed that the cline in In(3R)Payne has remained stable for >40 years and that the frequencies of In(2L)t and In(3R)Payne are strongly correlated with climatic factors that vary latitudinally, independent of population structure. To test whether these patterns are adaptive, we compared the amount of genetic differentiation of inversions versus neutral SNPs and found that the clines in In(2L)t and In(3R)Payne are maintained nonneutrally and independent of admixture. We also identified numerous clinal inversion-associated SNPs, many of which exhibit parallel differentiation along the Australian cline and reside in genes known to affect fitness-related traits. Together, our results provide strong evidence that inversion clines are maintained by spatially-and perhaps also temporally-varying selection. We interpret our data in light of current hypotheses about how inversions are established and maintained. PMID:26796550

  14. Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  15. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  16. X-chromosome workshop.

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  17. Chromosome analysis and sorting

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Šimková, Hana

    Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, 2007 - (Doležel, J.; Greilhuber, J.; Suda, J.), s. 373-403 ISBN 978-3-527-31487-4 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant ostatní: Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně / Agronomická fakulta(CZ) ME 844 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant flow cytometry * chromosome sorting * flow cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://books. google .com/books?id=3cwakORieqUC&pg=PA373&lpg=PA373&dq=Chromosome+analysis+and+sorting&source=web&ots=8IyvJlBQyq&sig=_NlXyQQgBCwpj1pTC9YITvvVZqU

  18. Inverse Degree and Connectivity

    MA Xiao-ling; TIAN Ying-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V(G),order n =丨V(G)丨,minimum degree δ(G) and connectivity κ(G).The graph G is called maximally connected if κ(G) =δ(G).Define the inverse degree of G with no isolated vertices as R(G) =Σv∈V(G)1/d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of the vertex v.We show that G is maximally connected if R(G) < 1 + 2/δ + n-2δ+1/(n-1)(n-3).

  19. of Generalized Inverse

    Jingyun Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cohen's kappa and weighted kappa statistics are the conventional methods used frequently in measuring agreement for categorical responses. In this paper, through the perspective of a generalized inverse, we propose an alternative general framework of the fixed-effects modeling of Cohen's weighted kappa, proposed by Yang and Chinchilli (2011. Properties of the proposed method are provided. Small sample performance is investigated through bootstrap simulation studies, which demonstrate good performance of the proposed method. When there are only two categories, the proposed method reduces to Cohen's kappa.

  20. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on our...... ability to produce efficient search algorithms. Such algorithms may be completely problem-independent (which is the case for the so-called 'meta-heuristics' or 'blind-search' algorithms), or they may be designed with the structure of the concrete problem in mind. We show that pure meta-heuristics are...

  1. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  2. Human Xq28 Inversion Polymorphism: From Sex Linkage to Genomics--A Genetic Mother Lode

    Kirby, Cait S.; Kolber, Natalie; Salih Almohaidi, Asmaa M.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Saunders, Lori; Williams, Steven; Merritt, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An inversion polymorphism of the filamin and emerin genes at the tip of the long arm of the human X-chromosome serves as the basis of an investigative laboratory in which students learn something new about their own genomes. Long, nearly identical inverted repeats flanking the filamin and emerin genes illustrate how repetitive elements can lead to…

  3. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  4. Causes of oncogenic chromosomal translocation

    Aplan, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Non-random chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a variety of cancers, especially hematologic malignancies and childhood sarcomas In addition to their diagnostic utility, chromosomal translocations are increasingly being used in the clinic to guide therapeutic decisions. However, the mechanisms which cause these translocations remain poorly understood. Illegit...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    ... 3 links) Encyclopedia: Chromosome Encyclopedia: Epilepsy Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 20 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    ... Encyclopedia: Chromosome Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Ring chromosome 14 Additional NIH Resources (2 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: Chromosome Abnormalities National Institute of ...

  7. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  8. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  9. ADN et chromosomes

    Hayes, Hélène

    2000-01-01

    Chaque chromosome contient une seule molécule d’ADN. L’ADN déroulé d’un noyau de cellule humaine mesurerait environ 1,8 m : chaque molécule d’ADN est enroulée et compactée en plusieurs étapes, grâce à l’association de différentes protéines, et loge dans le noyau de 6 µm de diamètre. Le degré de condensation de l’ADN est variable selon les régions chromosomiques et les régions les moins condensées sont les plus riches en gènes. L’ADN est composé d’une variété de séquences codantes ou non et ré...

  10. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  11. Chromosome survey for children of A-bomb survivors

    To investigate chromosomes from children of A-bomb survivors, cytogenetic survey has been started in 1967 by the ABCC and completed in 1985 by the succeeding RERF. This paper is designed to overview the cytogenetic survey and to discuss the cytogenetic effects of A-bomb radiation. A cohort of 16,298 children of A-bomb survivors, which were collected from mortality survey population in 1974, was enrolled in this survey and was divided into two groups: the proximally exposed group (n=8,322, whose parents exposed to estimated doses of 0.01 Gy or more within 2,000 m from the hypocenter) and the distally exposed group (n=7,976, those exposed to 0.005 Gy or less far from 2,500 m or not in the city). Three chromosomal aberrations were identified: sex chromosome aberrations consisting mainly of XYY, XXY, and mosaic; structural abnormality of autosomes consisting mainly of translocation and inversion; and trisomy of autosomes. Overall, the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was higher in the distally exposed group (6.39%) than the proximally exposed group (5.17%). According to the type of chromosomal aberrations, the incidences of both sex chromosomes and structural abnormality of autosomes were slightly higher in the distally exposed group (0.30% and 0.34%) than the proximally exposed group (0.23% and 0.28%). Trisomy of autosomes was identified in only one child in the proximally exposed group. These findings failed to demonstrate the rationale for the cytogenetic effects of A-bomb radiation; however, cytogenetic risk of radiation has not been denied completely. (N.K.)

  12. Genome comparisons reveal a dominant mechanism of chromosome number reduction in grasses and accelerated genome evolution in Triticeae

    Luo, M. C.; Deal, K. R.; Akhunov, E. D.; Akhunova, A. R.; Anderson, O. D.; Anderson, J. A.; Blake, N.; Clegg, M. T.; Coleman-Derr, D.; Conley, E. J.; Crossman, C. C.; Dubcovsky, J.; Gill, B. S.; Gu, Y. Q.; Hadam, J.; Heo, H. Y.; Huo, N.; Lazo, G.; Ma, Y.; Matthews, D. E.; McGuire, P. E.; Morrell, P. L.; Qualset, C. O.; Renfro, J.; Tabanao, D.; Talbert, L. E.; Tian, C.; Toleno, D. M.; Warburton, M. L.; You, F. M.; Zhang, W.; Dvorak, J.

    2009-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism was used in the construction of an expressed sequence tag map of Aegilops tauschii, the diploid source of the wheat D genome. Comparisons of the map with the rice and sorghum genome sequences revealed 50 inversions and translocations; 2, 8, and 40 were assigned respectively to the rice, sorghum, and Ae. tauschii lineages, showing greatly accelerated genome evolution in the large Triticeae genomes. The reduction of the basic chromosome number from 12 to 7 in the Triticeae has taken place by a process during which an entire chromosome is inserted by its telomeres into a break in the centromeric region of another chromosome. The original centromere–telomere polarity of the chromosome arms is maintained in the new chromosome. An intrachromosomal telomere–telomere fusion resulting in a pericentric translocation of a chromosome segment or an entire arm accompanied or preceded the chromosome insertion in some instances. Insertional dysploidy has been recorded in three grass subfamilies and appears to be the dominant mechanism of basic chromosome number reduction in grasses. A total of 64% and 66% of Ae. tauschii genes were syntenic with sorghum and rice genes, respectively. Synteny was reduced in the vicinity of the termini of modern Ae. tauschii chromosomes but not in the vicinity of the ancient termini embedded in the Ae. tauschii chromosomes, suggesting that the dependence of synteny erosion on gene location along the centromere–telomere axis either evolved recently in the Triticeae phylogenetic lineage or its evolution was recently accelerated. PMID:19717446

  13. Chromosomal phylogeny of the Drosophila fasciola species subgroup revisited (Diptera, Drosophilidae

    Nilda Maria Diniz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of polytene chromosomes in 26 strains of seven species in the Drosophila fasciola subgroup, from several locations in Brazil, in addition to strains of two species belonging to the Drosophila mulleri subgroup (D. aldrichi and D. mulleri, enabled us to determine that the 3c inversion found in the latter species differ in one of its break points from that present in the species of the fasciola subgroup. Therefore, a change in the mulleri complex denomination from inversion 3c to inversion 3u is proposed. Accordingly, the fasciola subgroup is no longer a lesser phylogenetic part within the mulleri subgroup. Rather, it is directly related to the likely ancestor of the repleta group, called Primitive I. This information removes the main obstacle to considering the Drosophila fasciola subgroup as an ancestral group within the Drosophila repleta species group, according to the hypothesis of Throckmorton. Our data also support the conclusion that D. onca and D. carolinae are closely related species based on one new inversion in chromosome 4 (4f², in both species. D. fascioloides and D. ellisoni also form a pair of sister species based on the presence of fusions of chromosomes 2-4 and 3-5. D. rosinae is related only to the likely ancestor of the fasciola subgroup, where the 3c inversion was fixed.

  14. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  15. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  16. Inversion amalgam chronopotentiometry

    The review deals with the theoretical principles of the method of inversion amalgam chronopotentiometry. The transition times and the potential-time relations for the electrochemical dissolution of amalgams under galvanostatic conditions are analysed and the applications of the method in electroanalytical practise, in the study of the kinetics of electrode processes and adsorption, in the determination of the numbers of electrons involved in the reaction and diffusion coefficients, and in the study of complex formation, corrosion of amalgams, etc. are examined in detail. The fundamentals of the theory of electrode processes complicated by preceding, subsequent, and simultaneous chemical reactions are described. The possibilities and advantages of the method of amalgam chronopotentiometry in relation to other electrochemical procedures are indicated

  17. Inverse fusion PCR cloning.

    Markus Spiliotis

    Full Text Available Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 5'-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

  18. Dark Radiative Inverse Seesaw

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah

    2016-01-01

    We present a minimal model that simultaneously accounts for neutrino masses and the origin of dark matter (DM) and where the electroweak phase transition is strong enough to allow for electroweak baryogenesis. The Standard Model is enlarged with a Majorana fermion, three generations of chiral fermion pairs, and a single complex scalar that plays a central role in DM production and phenomenology, neutrino masses, and the strength of the phase transition. All the new fields are singlets under the SM gauge group. Neutrino masses are generated via a new variant of radiative inverse seesaw where the required small mass term is generated via loops involving DM and no large hierarchy is assumed among the mass scales. The model offers all the advantage of low-scale neutrino mass models as well as a viable dark matter candidate that is testable with direct detection experiments.

  19. The chromosomes of the Didelphidae (Marsupialia) and their evolutionary significance

    Reig, O.; Gardner, A.L.; Bianchi, N.O.; Patton, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-seven specimens of American didelphids, representing 9 genera and 22 species have been studied for their chromosomal constitution. Didelphids are very conservative in chromosomal complements. All of the studied species can be sorted into one of three kinds of karyotypes: 2n= 14 (three species of Didelphis, one of Lutreolina, two of Philander, and one of Chironectes), 2n = 14 (eight species of Marmosa, one of Metachirus, three of Caluromys, and one of Dromiciops), and 2n= 18 (three species of Monodelphis). These karyotypes are stable, showing only minor variations within each basic pattern. It is concluded that chromosomals evolution in the Didelphidae proceededs from low numbers to higher numbers by a process of centromeric fissioning complemented by some pericentric inversions and/or translocations. The pattern of karyotypic stability is consistent with bradytely at the organismic level of evolution. This is explained by a low rate of regulatory genetic evolution promoted by epistatic selection favouring the retention of chromosomal arrangements highly advantageous for overall adaptation.

  20. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-01-01

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat. PMID:23884766

  1. Micro-geographic variation of inversions in natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura

    Salceda Víctor M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal polymorphism for the third chromosome in Drosophila pseudoobscura has been widely studied for genetic variation in different environments or locations far apart. However, there is less information regarding sites geographically near one another. Targeting on possible micro-geographic variation in the species, a serial study was done on 12 Mexican populations grouped in four regions, including locations in Durango (DU, the border area of Guanajuato-San Luis Potosi states (GP, Chiapas (CH and Saldilo (SA. Flies were trapped in their natural habitats using fermenting bananas as bait. They were individually cultivated in the laboratory for larvae production. In a given population sample several flies were cultivated together but only one larva per culture provided salivary tissue to observe polytene chromosomes. Gene arrangements or inversions were identified and frequencies were calculated. A total of 767 third chromosomes were studied and 11 different inversions detected. The type and relative frequencies of the arrangements varied among regions. From the 11 inversions observed, 10 were found in Durango, five in Guanajuato-San Luis Potosi and Chiapas, and eight in Saltillo. The inversion frequencies in the Durango locations varied in four cases, but only one in Chiapas, three cases in Guanajuato-San Luis Potosi, and five in Saltillo. It was also observed that there were geographical gradients for inversions within regions as follows: four arrangements in Saltillo and Durango, three in Guanajuato-San Luis Potosí and one in Chiapas. Moreover, all four regions studied showed evidences for micro-geographical variation. Nevertheless, more studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of the inversion frequencies changes in neighboring populations and also any seasonal-annual frequencies observed in the locations studied here.

  2. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  3. Holocaust inversion and contemporary antisemitism.

    Klaff, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    One of the cruellest aspects of the new antisemitism is its perverse use of the Holocaust as a stick to beat 'the Jews'. This article explains the phenomenon of 'Holocaust Inversion', which involves an 'inversion of reality' (the Israelis are cast as the 'new' Nazis and the Palestinians as the 'new' Jews) and an 'inversion of morality' (the Holocaust is presented as a moral lesson for, or even a moral indictment of, 'the Jews'). Holocaust inversion is a form of soft-core Holocaust denial, yet...

  4. Chromosome conservation in squamate reptiles revealed by comparative chromosome painting

    Giovannotti, M.; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, L.; Caputo, V.; Olmo, E.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Rens, W.

    Manchester : ICCS, 2011. 78-78. [Intarnational Chromosome Conference /18./. 29.08.2011-02.09.2011, Manchester] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : squamate reptiles Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  5. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    Beatriz Vicoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot, but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes. Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  6. Generating Generalized Inverse Gaussian Random Variates by Fast Inversion

    Leydold, Josef; Hörmann, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that for the fast numerical inversion of the (generalized) inverse Gaussian distribution two algorithms based on polynomial interpolation are well-suited. Their precision is close to machine precision and they are much faster than the bisection method recently proposed by Y. Lai. (author´s abstract)

  7. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia;

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome. In...... human genomic variation is discussed....... particular, we have identified intrachromosomal identical repeats that are located in reverse orientation, which may lead to chromosomal inversions. A bioinformatic workflow pathway to select appropriate regions for analysis was developed. Three such regions overlapping with known human genes, located on...

  8. Meiosis and chromosome painting of sex chromosome systems in Ceboidea.

    Mudry, M D; Rahn, I M; Solari, A J

    2001-06-01

    The identity of the chromosomes involved in the multiple sex system of Alouatta caraya (Aca) and the possible distribution of this system among other Ceboidea were investigated by chromosome painting of mitotic cells from five species and by analysis of meiosis at pachytene in two species. The identity of the autosome #7 (X2) involved in the multiple system of Aca and its breakage points were demonstrated by both meiosis and chromosome painting. These features are identical to those described by Consigliere et al. [1996] in Alouatta seniculus sara (Assa) and Alouatta seniculus arctoidea (Asar). This multiple system was absent in the other four Ceboidea species studied here. However, data from the literature strongly suggest the presence of this multiple in other members of this genus. The presence of this multiple system among several species and subspecies that show high levels of chromosome rearrangements may suggest a special selective value of this multiple. The meiotic features of the sex systems of Aca and Cebus apella paraguayanus (Cap) are strikingly different at pachytene, as the latter system is similar to the sex pair of man and other primates. The relatively large genetic distances between species presently showing this multiple system suggest that its origin is not recent. Other members of the same genus should be investigated at meiosis and by chromosome painting in order to know the extent and distribution of this complex sex-chromosome system. PMID:11376445

  9. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  10. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  11. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O.; Brown, Keith S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results i...

  12. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Giorgio Bernardi

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few...

  13. Inverse fracture network modelling

    The basic problem in analyzing flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely governed by a poorly connected network of fractures. Flow in such a system cannot be modeled with traditional modelling techniques. Fracture network models also have a limitation, in that they are based on geological data on fracture geometry even though it is known that only a small portion of fractures observed is hydraulically active. This paper discusses a new technique developed for treating the problem as well as presents a modelling example carried out to apply it. The approach is developed in Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and it treats the fracture zone as an 'equivalent discontinuum'. The discontinuous nature of the problem is represented through flow on a partially filled lattice. An equivalent discontinuum model is constructed by adding and removing conductive elements through a statistical inverse technique called 'simulated annealing'. The fracture network model is 'annealed' until the modified systems behaves like the observed. The further development of the approach continues at LBL and in a joint LBL/VTT collaboration project the possibilities to apply the technique in Finnish conditions are investigated

  14. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  15. Multiples waveform inversion

    Zhang, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  16. Inverse Problems of Thermoelectricity

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Luste, O. J.; Kuz, R. V.; Strutinsky, M. N.

    2011-05-01

    Classical thermoelectricity is based on the use of the Seebeck and Thomson effects that occur in the near-contact areas between n- and p-type materials. A conceptually different approach to thermoelectric power converter design that is based on the law of thermoelectric induction of currents is also known. The efficiency of this approach has already been demonstrated by its first applications. More than 10 basically new types of thermoelements were discovered with properties that cannot be achieved by thermocouple power converters. Therefore, further development of this concept is of practical interest. This paper provides a classification and theory for solving the inverse problems of thermoelectricity that form the basis for devising new thermoelement types. Computer methods for their solution for anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are elaborated. Regularities related to thermoelectric current excitation in anisotropic and inhomogeneous media are established. The possibility of obtaining eddy currents of a particular configuration through control of the temperature field and material parameters for the creation of new thermo- element types is demonstrated for three-dimensional (3D) models of anisotropic and inhomogeneous media.

  17. Multiscale Modelling and Inverse Problems

    Nolen, J; Stuart, A M

    2010-01-01

    The need to blend observational data and mathematical models arises in many applications and leads naturally to inverse problems. Parameters appearing in the model, such as constitutive tensors, initial conditions, boundary conditions, and forcing can be estimated on the basis of observed data. The resulting inverse problems are often ill-posed and some form of regularization is required. These notes discuss parameter estimation in situations where the unknown parameters vary across multiple scales. We illustrate the main ideas using a simple model for groundwater flow. We will highlight various approaches to regularization for inverse problems, including Tikhonov and Bayesian methods. We illustrate three ideas that arise when considering inverse problems in the multiscale context. The first idea is that the choice of space or set in which to seek the solution to the inverse problem is intimately related to whether a homogenized or full multiscale solution is required. This is a choice of regularization. The ...

  18. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies.

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O; Brown, Keith S

    2013-06-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results in the context of chromosome numbers of over 1400 Neotropical butterfly species and subspecies derived from about 3000 populations published here and in earlier papers of a series. The overall results show that many Neotropical groups are characterized by karyotype instability with several derived modal numbers or none at all, while almost all taxa of Lepidoptera studied from the other parts of the world have one of n = 29-31 as modal numbers. Possibly chromosome number changes become fixed in the course of speciation driven by biotic interactions. Population subdivision and structuring facilitate karyotype change. Factors that stabilize chromosome numbers include hybridization among species sharing the same number, migration, sexual selection and possibly the distribution of chromosomes within the nucleus. PMID:23865963

  20. Chromosome Architecture and Genome Organization

    Bernardi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    How the same DNA sequences can function in the three-dimensional architecture of interphase nucleus, fold in the very compact structure of metaphase chromosomes and go precisely back to the original interphase architecture in the following cell cycle remains an unresolved question to this day. The strategy used to address this issue was to analyze the correlations between chromosome architecture and the compositional patterns of DNA sequences spanning a size range from a few hundreds to a few thousands Kilobases. This is a critical range that encompasses isochores, interphase chromatin domains and boundaries, and chromosomal bands. The solution rests on the following key points: 1) the transition from the looped domains and sub-domains of interphase chromatin to the 30-nm fiber loops of early prophase chromosomes goes through the unfolding into an extended chromatin structure (probably a 10-nm “beads-on-a-string” structure); 2) the architectural proteins of interphase chromatin, such as CTCF and cohesin sub-units, are retained in mitosis and are part of the discontinuous protein scaffold of mitotic chromosomes; 3) the conservation of the link between architectural proteins and their binding sites on DNA through the cell cycle explains the “mitotic memory” of interphase architecture and the reversibility of the interphase to mitosis process. The results presented here also lead to a general conclusion which concerns the existence of correlations between the isochore organization of the genome and the architecture of chromosomes from interphase to metaphase. PMID:26619076

  1. Comparative Genomics of Interreplichore Translocations in Bacteria: A Measure of Chromosome Topology?

    Supriya Khedkar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomes evolve not only in base sequence but also in terms of their architecture, defined by gene organization and chromosome topology. Whereas genome sequence data inform us about the changes in base sequences for a large variety of organisms, the study of chromosome topology is restricted to a few model organisms studied using microscopy and chromosome conformation capture techniques. Here, we exploit whole genome sequence data to study the link between gene organization and chromosome topology in bacteria. Using comparative genomics across ∼250 pairs of closely related bacteria we show that: (a many organisms show a high degree of interreplichore translocations throughout the chromosome and not limited to the inversion-prone terminus (ter or the origin of replication (oriC; (b translocation maps may reflect chromosome topologies; and (c symmetric interreplichore translocations do not disrupt the distance of a gene from oriC or affect gene expression states or strand biases in gene densities. In summary, we suggest that translocation maps might be a first line in defining a gross chromosome topology given a pair of closely related genome sequences.

  2. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  3. The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

    MacKinnon, Ruth N.; Campbell, Lynda J.

    2011-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centromere deletion in cancer cells. We review what is known about dicentric chromosomes and the mechanisms by which they can undergo stabilization in both constitutional and cancer genomes. The failure to identify centromere deletion in cancer cells until recently can be partly explained by the standard approaches to routine diagnostic cancer genome analysis, which do not identify centromeres in the context of chromosome organization. This hitherto hidden group of primary dicentric, secondary monocentric chromosomes, together with other unrecognized dicentric chromosomes, points to a greater role for dicentric chromosomes in cancer initiation and progression than is generally acknowledged. We present a model that predicts and explains a significant role for dicentric chromosomes in the formation of unbalanced translocations in malignancy. PMID:22567363

  4. Chromosomal Analysis of Couples with Repeated Spontaneous Abortions in Northeastern Iran

    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytogenetic study of reproductive wastage is an important aspect in determining the genetic background of early embryogenesis. Approximately 15 to 20% of all pregnancies in humans are terminated as recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSAs. The aim of this study was to detect chromosome abnormalities in couples with RSAs and to compare our results with those reported previously. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations was evaluated during a six-year period from 2005 to 2011. The population under study was 728 couples who attended genetic counseling services for their RSAs at Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory, Mashhad, Iran. Results: In this study, about 11.7% of couples were carriers of chromosomal aberrations. The majority of abnormalities were found in couples with history of abortion, without stillbirth or livebirth. Balanced reciprocal translocations, Robertsonian translocations, inversions and sex chromosome aneuploidy were seen in these cases. Balanced reciprocal translocations were the most frequent chromosomal anomalies (62.7% detected in current study. Conclusion: These findings suggest that chromosomal abnormalities can be one of the important causes of RSAs. In addition, cytogenetic study of families who experienced RSAs may prevent unnecessary treatment if RSA are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. The results of cytogenetic studies of RSA cases will provide a standard protocol for the genetic counselors in order to follow up and to help these families.

  5. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration In Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma-ray and Secondary Neutrons of Low Dose Rate

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's "30L" beam line is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams at an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr or gamma-ray at 1.7cGy/hr, and assessed the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with mBAND. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results for gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate, the neutron data showed a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. The low dose rate gamma-rays induced a lower frequency of chromosome aberrations than high dose rate gamma-rays, but the inversion spectrum was similar for the same cytotoxic effect. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 for different radiation types will also be discussed.

  6. Evolution of Sex Chromosomes in Insects

    Kaiser, Vera B; Bachtrog, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. Y (or W) chromosomes lack genetic recombination, are male- (female-) limited, and show an abundance of genetically inert heterochromatic DNA but contain few functional genes. X (or Z) chromosomes also show sex-biased transmission (i.e., X chromosomes show female-biased and Z-chromosomes show male-biased inheritance) and are hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. Their unusual ploidy level and pattern of inheritance imply that sex...

  7. Aberration distribution and chromosomally marked clones in x-irradiated skin

    Samples of clinically normal human skin were removed from therapeutically X-irradiated areas at intervals of time ranging from one hour to 60 years after completion of radiation treatment. Primary cultures of untransformed fibroblasts from these samples were analysed for surviving chromosomal structural changes using ASG banding techniques. Aberrations of four basic types, reciprocal translocations, terminal deletions, pericentric inversions and paracentric inversions (the last very rare) were found in all samples. Evidence indicates that many of these are secondary aberrations derived from primary chromatid types. Presumptive break points for all aberrations were mapped, and various tests applied to investigate their within-chromosome distributions (the data are unsuitable for valid between-chromosome analysis). For translocations, the within-arm distributions are non-random, principally as the result of a very significant deficiency of break points in terminal segments. Tests for the intrachromosomal changes (pericentric inversions and deletions) are simpler, and in neither case were there significant departure from randomness Two lines of evidence are present in the data for division and migration of chromosomally abnormal cells in vivo: (a) the presence of identical aberrations in cells from different parts of the biopsy; (b) the presence of cells with sequential changes, indicating cell division between the dose fractions of the therapeutic regime. (author)

  8. Genetics of dioecy and causal sex chromosomes in plants

    Sushil Kumar; Renu Kumari; Vishakha Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Dioecy (separate male and female individuals) ensures outcrossing and is more prevalent in animals than in plants. Although it is common in bryophytes and gymnosperms, only 5% of angiosperms are dioecious. In dioecious higher plants, flowers borne on male and female individuals are, respectively deficient in functional gynoecium and androecium. Dioecy is inherited via three sex chromosome systems: XX/XY, XX/X0 and WZ/ZZ, such that XX or WZ is female and XY, X0 or ZZ are males. The XX/XY system generates the rarer XX/X0 andWZ/ZZ systems. An autosome pair begets XY chromosomes. A recessive loss-of-androecium mutation (ana) creates X chromosome and a dominant gynoecium-suppressing (GYS) mutation creates Y chromosome. The ana/ANA and gys/GYS loci are in the sex-determining region (SDR) of the XY pair. Accumulation of inversions, deleterious mutations and repeat elements, especially transposons, in the SDR of Y suppresses recombination between X and Y in SDR, making Y labile and increasingly degenerate and heteromorphic from X. Continued recombination between X and Y in their pseudoautosomal region located at the ends of chromosomal arms allows survival of the degenerated Y and of the species. Dioecy is presumably a component of the evolutionary cycle for the origin of new species. Inbred hermaphrodite species assume dioecy. Later they suffer degenerate-Y-led population regression. Cross-hybridization between such extinguishing species and heterologous species, followed by genome duplication of segregants from hybrids, give rise to new species.

  9. On inversion of cations in compounds with cryolite structure

    IR and Raman spectra for polycrystalline niobates and tantalates, crystallizing in cryolite structural type, (40Ca - 44Ca) isotope-substituted by calcium samples among them, are investigated. Oscillation frequencies for cations of alkaline-earth and rare-earth elements in octahedral and cubooctahedral positions are found. Calculation for normal oscillation forms and frequencies of Ca2LaNbO6 and Ca2LuNbO6, which are characterized by the inverted position of alkaline-earth and rare-earth elements in crystal lattice, is carried out. Negligible difference of dynamic coefficients for these compounds agrees with structural data and explains the possibility of cations inversion within one structural type frameworks

  10. Multidimensional NMR Inversion without Kronecker Products: Multilinear Inversion

    Medellín, David; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required...

  11. Inversion polymorphism in some natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura from central Mexico

    Salceda Víctor M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of D. pseudoobscura were taken in seventeen localities in Central Mexico inside the parallels 18o - 20o N, with the purpose of determine the chromosomal polymorphism in the third of the different populations of this species. From each captured female a single larva of its offspring was taken, its salivary glands extracted and stained with a solution of aceto orcein to observe the polytene chromosomes. From these smears the corresponding karyotype of each larva was determined, keeping a record of them. With the information gathered the relative frequency of each one of the fourteen different inversions found was calculated. A grand total of 1894 third chromosomes were analyzed. The fourteen different inversions found are equivalent to a 34.1 % of the total chromosomal variation of the species. The most abundant inversions found were: TL 50.6 %, CU 27.2 5, SC 9.1 % and EP 5.5 %; the remaining ten inversions detected are in general grounds rare ones with variable relative frequencies depending on the locality. Analysis of the predominant inversions for each population was done. The presence of West-East gradients is reported, even if in cases not so well defined, since as one moves in a particular direction the ups and downs in relative frequency for the alternating pairs TL-CU; TL-SC in the western populations and TL-CU in the eastern ones were observed. The assignment of each population to a particular race was also done, and such a way we were able to recognize three different races coexisting in the area of study.

  12. Chromosome evolution in Solanum traced by cross-species BAC-FISH.

    Szinay, Dóra; Wijnker, Erik; van den Berg, Ronald; Visser, Richard G F; de Jong, Hans; Bai, Yuling

    2012-08-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements are relatively rare evolutionary events and can be used as markers to study karyotype evolution. This research aims to use such rearrangements to study chromosome evolution in Solanum. Chromosomal rearrangements between Solanum crops and several related wild species were investigated using tomato and potato bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) in a multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The BACs selected are evenly distributed over seven chromosomal arms containing inversions described in previous studies. The presence/absence of these inversions among the studied Solanum species were determined and the order of the BAC-FISH signals was used to construct phylogenetic trees.Compared with earlier studies, data from this study provide support for the current grouping of species into different sections within Solanum; however, there are a few notable exceptions, such as the tree positions of S. etuberosum (closer to the tomato group than to the potato group) and S. lycopersicoides (sister to S. pennellii). These apparent contradictions might be explained by interspecific hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting. This cross-species BAC painting technique provides unique information on genome organization, evolution and phylogenetic relationships in a wide variety of species. Such information is very helpful for introgressive breeding. PMID:22686400

  13. Inverse Doppler Effects in Flute

    Zhao, Xiao P; Liu, Song; Shen, Fang L; Li, Lin L; Luo, Chun R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the observation of the inverse Doppler effects in a flute. It is experimentally verified that, when there is a relative movement between the source and the observer, the inverse Doppler effect could be detected for all seven pitches of a musical scale produced by a flute. Higher tone is associated with a greater shift in frequency. The effect of the inverse frequency shift may provide new insights into why the flute, with its euphonious tone, has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  14. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2011-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems, 2e provides geoscience students and professionals with answers to common questions like how one can derive a physical model from a finite set of observations containing errors, and how one may determine the quality of such a model. This book takes on these fundamental and challenging problems, introducing students and professionals to the broad range of approaches that lie in the realm of inverse theory. The authors present both the underlying theory and practical algorithms for solving inverse problems. The authors' treatment is approp

  15. The Reduction of Chromosome Number in Meiosis Is Determined by Properties Built into the Chromosomes

    Paliulis, Leocadia V.; Nicklas, R. Bruce

    2000-01-01

    In meiosis I, two chromatids move to each spindle pole. Then, in meiosis II, the two are distributed, one to each future gamete. This requires that meiosis I chromosomes attach to the spindle differently than meiosis II chromosomes and that they regulate chromosome cohesion differently. We investigated whether the information that dictates the division type of the chromosome comes from the whole cell, the spindle, or the chromosome itself. Also, we determined when chromosomes can switch from ...

  16. Break Point Distribution on Chromosome 3 of Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma Rays, Neutrons and Fe Ions

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the reported studies of break point distribution on the damaged chromosomes from radiation exposure were carried out with the G-banding technique or determined based on the relative length of the broken chromosomal fragments. However, these techniques lack the accuracy in comparison with the later developed multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique that is generally used for analysis of intrachromosomal aberrations such as inversions. Using mBAND, we studied chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells exposed in vitro to both low or high dose rate gamma rays in Houston, low dose rate secondary neutrons at Los Alamos National Laboratory and high dose rate 600 MeV/u Fe ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed after neutron or Fe ion exposure, and the majority of inversions in gamma-irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations. In addition, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges. We further compared the distribution of break point on chromosome 3 for the three radiation types. The break points were found to be randomly distributed on chromosome 3 after neutrons or Fe ions exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering break points was observed for gamma-rays. The break point distribution may serve as a potential fingerprint of high-LET radiation exposure.

  17. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  18. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  19. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  20. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437. ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant ostatní: Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  1. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2005-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems primarily serves as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and introductory graduate courses. Class notes have been developed and reside on the World Wide Web for faciliting use and feedback by teaching colleagues. The authors'' treatment promotes an understanding of fundamental and practical issus associated with parameter fitting and inverse problems including basic theory of inverse problems, statistical issues, computational issues, and an understanding of how to analyze the success and limitations of solutions to these probles. The text is also a practical resource for general students and professional researchers, where techniques and concepts can be readily picked up on a chapter-by-chapter basis.Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems is structured around a course at New Mexico Tech and is designed to be accessible to typical graduate students in the physical sciences who may not have an extensive mathematical background. It is accompanied by a Web site that...

  2. Statistical perspectives on inverse problems

    Andersen, Kim Emil

    interior of an object from electrical boundary measurements. One part of this thesis concerns statistical approaches for solving, possibly non-linear, inverse problems. Thus inverse problems are recasted in a form suitable for statistical inference. In particular, a Bayesian approach for regularisation is...... obtained by assuming that the a priori beliefs about the solution before having observed any data can be described by a prior distribution. The solution to the statistical inverse problem is then given by the posterior distribution obtained by Bayes' formula. Hence the solution of an ill-posed inverse...... problem is given in terms of probability distributions. Posterior inference is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods and new, powerful simulation techniques based on e.g. coupled Markov chains and simulated tempering is developed to improve the computational efficiency of the overall simulation...

  3. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    Page, Morgan T.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  4. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  5. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  6. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    C, Bouchikhi; H, Saadi; B, Fakhir; H, Chaara; H, Bouguern; A, Banani; Melhouf MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supporte...

  7. -Colour Self-Inverse Compositions

    Geetika Narang; A K Agarwal

    2006-08-01

    MacMahon’s definition of self-inverse composition is extended to -colour self-inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence relations, generating functions and a summation formula are obtained. Two new binomial identities with combinatorial meaning are also given.

  8. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  9. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer. PMID:27103486

  10. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child. PMID:25403900

  11. Chromosome Studies in Patients with Polycythaemia Vera after Treatment with 32P

    The chromosomes of bone-marrow cells and blood lymphocytes of forty-six patients with polycythaemia vera were analysed to trace the sequence of events leading to the development of bone-marrow failure or 'leukaemia'. All except one of the patients had received radiophosphorus (32P). It might be expected that the yield of chromosomal aberrations of the two-break type (translocations etc.) from the low dose-rate beta radiation of 32P would be small. However, 'unstable' types of abnormality (dicentrics, fragments) and stable types (translocations, inversions, deletions) were observed in 6-25% of the blood lymphocytes; there was no evidence of clones of abnormal cells. In the majority of patients the bone marrow was predominantly normal diploid; occasional sporadic cells with 'stable' chromosomal abnormalities were seen in two-thirds of the cases, but 'unstable' aberrations were rare. In seven cases there were clones of cells characterised by deletions or translocations. All these chromosomal changes are probably radiation-induced. Clones of cells with a similar abnormality, an apparent deletion of one of the F-group chromosomes, were observed in the bone marrow in ten patients. Eight of these had received 32P and two busulphan. In two cases the clone appeared to develop after treatment. A similar anomaly has been reported in several cases of idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia who had not been irradiated. Progression into the leukaemic phase of the disease is associated in some cases with gross chromosomal abnormalities, such as shift of the stem line chromosome number and bizarre chromosome 'markers'. In other cases, some of whom have not been irradiated for several years, the chromosomal changes are less pronounced and may result from non-disjunctional gain of one or more chromosomes or chromosome loss. One case showed a step-by-step clonal evolution over a two-year period. None of the chromosomal abnormalities in the 'leukaemic' phase appear to be a direct result of

  12. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions. PMID:26351122

  13. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  14. Inversion polymorphism in populations of Drosophila subobscura from urban and non-urban environments

    Kenig B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Drosophila subobscura from the urban area of Belgrade and from the locality, Deliblato, which is not under strong anthropogenic influence, were studied with the aim to characterize and compare their genetic structure by examining chromosomal inversion polymorphism. Additional analysis and comparison of this type of polymorphism with several other populations from different habitats in the central Balkans, was done. The obtained results indicate higher heterozygosity in the population from Belgrade. Despite being ecologically marginal and under strong and complex influences, this population did not show a decline in the number of inversions and it is not highly differentiated compared to the referent populations. .

  15. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  16. Extensive Pericentric Rearrangements in the Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotype "Chinese Spring" Revealed from Chromosome Shotgun Sequence Data

    Ma, J.; Stiller, J.; Wei, Y.M.; Zheng, Y.L.; Devos, K. M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Liu, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2014), s. 3039-3048. ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : chromosomal rearrangement * comparative genomics * pericentric inversion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.229, year: 2014

  17. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; MATSHUDA, Yoichi; 秀之, 田辺

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7–10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  18. Characterization of chromosome structures of Falconinae (Falconidae, Falconiformes, Aves) by chromosome painting and delineation of chromosome rearrangements during their differentiation

    Nishida, Chizuko; Ishijima, Junko; KOSAKA, Ayumi; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Habermann, Felix A.; Griffin, Darren K.; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Karyotypes of most bird species are characterized by around 2n = 80 chromosomes, comprising 7Y10 pairs of large- and medium-sized macrochromosomes including sex chromosomes and numerous morphologically indistinguishable microchromosomes. The Falconinae of the Falconiformes has a different karyotype from the typical avian karyotype in low chromosome numbers, little size difference between macrochromosomes and a smaller number of microchromosomes. To characterize chromosome structures of Falcon...

  19. Increased low-level chromosome 21 mosaicism in older individuals with Down syndrome

    Jenkins, E.C.; Genovese, M.; Ye, Ling Ling [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    During a study of the familial aggregation of Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer disease (AD), we observed an increase in mosaicism for disomy 21 in older individuals with DS. In a total of 213 DS subjects who were studied cytogenetically, only 1 of 121 (0.8%) under age 45 exhibited mosaicism, while 14 of 92 (15.2%) who were age 45 or older had mosaicism. Mosaicism in this report connotes {open_quotes}low-level{close_quotes} mosaicism, where all 15 individuals exhibited a modal chromosome number of 47 (i.e., trisomy 21), and at least two cells lacked one of the three chromosomes 21. The occurrence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 15, 17, and X increased with age, and an inverse correlation between chromosome loss and size was also observed. Because older individuals had not been karyotyped at birth, it was not possible to determine whether our observations were due to either increased survival of mosaic individuals or accumulation of disomy 21 cells via increased chromosome loss with aging of the trisomy 21 individual. Using a modeling approach involving life table methods, we obtained results that suggested acquired mosaicism as the predominant mechanism to explain our findings. These results support the hypothesis that as individuals with DS age, there is an increased loss of chromosome 21. 30 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a group of patients carriers of gonosomopathies

    This paper was aimed at determining the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a group of patients carriers of gonosomopathies and at relating in each case the meaning of the different chromosomal aberrations found to the patients' clinical diagnosis. 656 patients with presumptive diagnosis of gonosomopathies from different hospital institutions of the country that were received at the molecular genetics laboratory of Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical and Surgical Hospital from 1982 to 2001, were studied. Of the total of patients with presumptive diagnosis of gonosomopathies, in 32.7 % (215/656) the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the cytogenetic study. The chromosomal study was conducted by using G band techniques. The chromosomal rearrangements found were classified into 4 groups. The group of numerical gonosomopathies showed the highest frequency with 110 patients, accounting for 51 % of the total. It was followed by the group of numerical and structural alterations (mosaics) with 59 patients (27.0), the inversions of sex with 24 patients (12.0), and the group of structural gonosomopathies with 22 patients (10.0) The most common chromosomal aberrations were the numerical gonosomopathies (Turner and Klinefelter's syndrome). The chromosomal study in these patients is a very important diagnostic value indicator for the therapeutical conduct to be followed in every case

  1. The phylogeny of howler monkeys (Alouatta, Platyrrhini): reconstruction by multicolor cross-species chromosome painting.

    de Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Neusser, Michaela; Figueiredo, Wilsea B; Nagamachi, Cleusa; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Sbalqueiro, Ives J; Wienberg, Johannes; Müller, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    We performed multidirectional chromosome painting in a comparative cytogenetic study of the three howler monkey species Alouatta fusca, A. caraya and A. seniculus macconnelli (Atelinae, Platyrrhini) in order to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships within this genus. Comparative genome maps between these species were established by multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) employing human, Saguinus oedipus and Lagothrix lagothricha chromosome-specific probes. The three species included in this study and previously analyzed howler monkey species were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis on the basis of a data matrix comprised of 98 discrete molecular cytogenetic characters. The results revealed that howler monkeys represent the genus with the most extensive karyotype diversity within Platyrrhini so far analyzed with high levels of intraspecific chromosomal variability. Two different multiple sex chromosome systems were identified. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that Alouatta is a monophyletic clade which can be derived from a proposed ancestral Atelinae karyotype of 2n = 62 chromosomes by a chromosome fusion, a fission, a Y-autosomal translocation and a pericentric inversion. Following these suggestions, the genus Alouatta can be divided into two distinct species groups: the first includes A. caraya and A. belzebul, the second A. s. macconnelli, A. sara, A. s. arctoidea and A. fusca. PMID:12575795

  2. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  3. Dynamics of rye chromosome 1R regions with high or low crossover frequency in homology search and synapsis development.

    Nohelia T Valenzuela

    Full Text Available In many organisms, homologous pairing and synapsis depend on the meiotic recombination machinery that repairs double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs produced at the onset of meiosis. The culmination of recombination via crossover gives rise to chiasmata, which locate distally in many plant species such as rye, Secale cereale. Although, synapsis initiates close to the chromosome ends, a direct effect of regions with high crossover frequency on partner identification and synapsis initiation has not been demonstrated. Here, we analyze the dynamics of distal and proximal regions of a rye chromosome introgressed into wheat to define their role on meiotic homology search and synapsis. We have used lines with a pair of two-armed chromosome 1R of rye, or a pair of telocentrics of its long arm (1RL, which were homozygous for the standard 1RL structure, homozygous for an inversion of 1RL that changes chiasma location from distal to proximal, or heterozygous for the inversion. Physical mapping of recombination produced in the ditelocentric heterozygote (1RL/1RL(inv showed that 70% of crossovers in the arm were confined to a terminal segment representing 10% of the 1RL length. The dynamics of the arms 1RL and 1RL(inv during zygotene demonstrates that crossover-rich regions are more active in recognizing the homologous partner and developing synapsis than crossover-poor regions. When the crossover-rich regions are positioned in the vicinity of chromosome ends, their association is facilitated by telomere clustering; when they are positioned centrally in one of the two-armed chromosomes and distally in the homolog, their association is probably derived from chromosome elongation. On the other hand, chromosome movements that disassemble the bouquet may facilitate chromosome pairing correction by dissolution of improper chromosome associations. Taken together, these data support that repair of DSBs via crossover is essential in both the search of the homologous partner

  4. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  5. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  6. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  7. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  8. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  9. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer

    Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi–a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  10. Luminescent properties of Eu-doped germanate apatite Sr2La8(GeO4)O2

    The photoluminescence properties of Eu-doped Sr2La8(GeO4)6O2 were investigated by measuring emission and excitation spectra, and decay curves. The Eu3+ ions were found to occupy two cationic sites labeled La(2) and Sr(1). The dominant sites La(2) occupied by Eu3+ ions shows strong red emission (5D0→7F2 transition) at 613 nm. The Eu3+ ions incorporated into the subordinate sites Sr(1) produces strong orange emission (5D0→7F1 transition) at 589 nm. This would be responsible for the charge-compensating mechanism, in which inversion symmetry is evident around the europium ions. The concentration quenching behaviors of excitation under CTS and intra-4f energy levels are different. The emission intensity decreases at the onset of about 15 mol% Eu3+ concentration under the excitation at CTS, and the saturation of emission intensity excited by intra-4f transitions occurs at a concentration of 50 mol% Eu3+. The maximum photoluminescence intensity of excited at intra-4f transitions is about a factor of 10 times brighter than that excited at CTS