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Sample records for 2h nmr spectroscopy

  1. Hot-Pressing Effects on Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Investigated by 2H NMR Spectroscopy

    The structural change of Nafion polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) induced by hot-pressing, which is one of the representative procedures for preparing membrane-electrode-assembly for low temperature fuel cells, was investigated by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The hydrophilic channels were asymmetrically flattened and more aligned in the membrane plane than along the hot-pressing direction. The average O-2H director of 2H2O in polymer electrolyte membrane was employed to extract the structural information from the 2H NMR peak splitting data. The dependence of 2H NMR data on water contents was systematically analyzed for the first time. The approach presented here can be used to understand the chemicals' behavior in nano-spaces, especially those reshaping and functioning interactively with the chemicals in the wet and/or mixed state

  2. Determination of relative natural isotopic abundance of 2H using NMR spectroscopy and application in food analysis

    The basic relations are defined for determining the content of deuterium in compound CXHP. Hydrogen atoms 1H and 2H are distributed among the individual diastereotopic points in the molecule which is either monodeuterized or non deuterized. The SNIF-NMR parameter is derived from these assumptions. Procedures are presented for preparing samples for NMR experiments. For measuring NMR spectra of 2H the effects are considered of relaxation times and the total time of measurement. Relaxation times of deuterium in small molecules are of the order of 1 second. The possibilities are shown of using 2H NMR spectroscopy for the study of deuterium transfer during chemical and biochemical reactions, for the determination of isotope purity, the determination of the origin of the sample and for the surveillance of technological processes. Examples of the applications are given. (E.S.). 3 figs., 8 tabs., 42 refs

  3. 2H and 13C tracer studies of ethanol metabolism by Fourier transform 13C[2H, 1H] NMR difference spectroscopy

    A novel form of NMR difference spectroscopy has been developed to monitor low levels of deuterium incorporation in steroids resulting from ethanol metabolism. Ethanol specifically labeled with 13C and/or 2H was administered to bile fistula rats, and bile acids were collected, derivatized and separated. Subtracting 13C [1H] spectra from 13C[2H,1H] spectra of such samples, where the brackets imply complete noise decoupling of the indicated nuclei, results in difference spectra. These spectra display 13C resonances only from 13C spins which are J-coupled to 2H spins. Particular sites and extents of 2H incorporation along the steroid skeletons could thus be evaluated and compared with GC-MS analysis. A practical lower limit of approximately 20 nanomoles of 13C--2H couples could be observed using this technique, through use of sample microcells, quadrature detection and long-term signal averaging

  4. NMR spectroscopy

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Capturing Guest Dynamics in Metal-Organic Framework CPO-27-M (M = Mg, Zn) by (2)H Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Xu, Jun; Sinelnikov, Regina; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising porous materials for gas separation and storage as well as sensing. In particular, a series of isostructural MOFs with coordinately unsaturated metal centers, namely, CPO-27-M or M-MOF-74 (M = Mg, Zn, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu), have shown exceptional adsorption capacity and selectivity compared to those of classical MOFs that contain only fully coordinated metal sites. Although it is widely accepted that the interaction between guest molecules and exposed metal centers is responsible for good selectivity and large maximum uptake, the investigation of such guest-metal interaction is very challenging because adsorbed molecules are usually disordered in the pores and undergo rapid thermal motions. (2)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is one of the most extensively used techniques for capturing guest dynamics in porous materials. In this work, variable-temperature (2)H wide-line SSNMR experiments were performed on CPO-27-M (M = Mg, Zn) loaded with four prototypical guest molecules: D2O, CD3CN, acetone-d6, and C6D6. The results indicate that different guest molecules possess distinct dynamic behaviors inside the channel of CPO-27-M. For a given guest molecule, its dynamic behavior also depends on the nature of the metal centers. The binding strength of guest molecules is discussed on the basis of the (2)H SSNMR data. PMID:27183247

  6. Short hydrogen bonds in salts of dicarboxylic acids; structural correlations from solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectroscopy

    Kalsbeek, Nicoline; Schaumburg, Kjeld; Larsen, Sine

    1993-10-01

    Solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectra are found to very suitable for characterizing the short Osbnd H...O hydrogen bonds observed in acid salts of dicarboxylic acids. The majority of the investigated compounds are acid salts of malonic, succinic and tartaric acid with monovalent cations derived from alkali metals and small aliphatic amines. They include systems with symmetric and asymmetric hydrogen bonds. Accurate structural information about their geometry is available from low-temperature X-ray diffraction data. The 13C chemical shifts of the C atoms in the different carboxy groups display a linear variation with the absolute difference between the two Csbnd O bond lengths. Theoretical ab initio calculations for model systems showed that the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant NQCC for 2H increases with increasing asymmetry of the hydrogen-bonded system. NQCC values for 2H in the short symmetric hydrogen-bonded systems are in the range 53-59 kHz compared with the larger values of up to 166kHz found in systems with longer asymmetric hydrogen bonds. The 2H NQCC values display a perfect linear dependence on the asymmetry of the hydrogen bond. 2H NQCC decreases with decreasing temperature in the symmetric hydrogen bonds showing that the corresponding potential has a single well.

  7. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  8. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  9. Recent advances in the analysis of the site-specific isotopic fractionation of metabolites such as fatty acids using anisotropic natural-abundance 2H NMR spectroscopy: application to conjugated linolenic methyl esters.

    Lesot, Philippe; Serhan, Zeinab; Billault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The full elucidation of the enzymatic mechanisms leading to polyunsaturated ω-3 to ω-5 fatty acids (PUFAs) occurring in plants or microorganisms by analyzing their site-specific isotopic fractionation profiles is a challenging task. Isotropic SNIF-NMR® method is an historical, powerful tool for the determination of ((2)H/(1)H) ratios. However, the absence of accessible isotopic data on the enantiotopic hydrogen sites (CH(2) groups) prevents the study of the enzymatic reaction stereoselectivity. Natural-abundance deuterium (NAD) 2D NMR experiment using chiral liquid crystals (CLC) as solvent is a new tool in this field, overcoming this limitation. In this work, we have explored various possibilities for optimizing the enantio-discrimination properties of CLC by changing the nature of the polypeptide and/or increasing the polarity of the organic co-solvents. We report also the first applications of TMU as co-solvent for preparing enantio-discriminating, homogenous polypeptide mesophases. The various experimental NAD NMR results recorded at an optimal sample temperature are discussed and compared in terms of number of discriminated (2)H sites and magnitude of spectral separation for different PUFAs such as the linoleic and linolenic acids. The comparison of all NMR results shows that optimal results are obtained when CLC mixtures made of poly-γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG) and high polarity co-solvents are used. As new challenging examples of applications, we report the preliminary analytical results obtained from two ω-5 conjugated linolenic acids: the α-eleostearic acid (9Z, 11E, 13E) and the punicic acid (9Z, 11E, 13Z). NMR data are discussed in terms of molecular orientational ordering parameters and isotopic distribution. PMID:21107978

  10. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  11. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  12. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  13. Insight into the local magnetic environments and deuteron mobility in jarosite (AFe3(SO4)2(OD)6, A = K, Na, D3O) and hydronium alunite ((D3O)Al3(SO4)2(OD,OD2)6), from variable temperature 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy

    Nielsen, Ulla Gro; Heinmaa, Ivo; Samoson, Ago;

    2011-01-01

    Detailed insight into the magnetic properties and mobility of the different deuteron species in jarosites (AFe3(SO4)2(OD)6, A = K, Na, D3O) is obtained from variable temperature 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy from 40 K to 300 K. Fast MAS results in high resolution spectra of these paramagnetic compounds....... The 2H NMR hyperfine shift (), measured as a function of temperature, provides to be a very sensitive probe of the local magnetic environment. Two different magnetic environments are observed: i) Fe2-OD and D3O+/ in stoichiometric regions of the sample. Here (2H) is proportional to the bulk...... susceptibility and follows a Curie-Weiss law above 150 K. ii) Fe-OD2 and D2O near Fe vacancies. The Fe near these vacancies shows strong local anti-ferromagnetic couplings even high above the Néel temperature (ca. 65 K). 2H NMR can discriminate between D2O and D3O+ ions substituted on the A site due to the...

  14. Sepsis does not alter red blood cell glucose metabolism or Na+ concentration: A 2H-, 23Na-NMR study

    The effects of sepsis on intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) and glucose metabolism were examined in rat red blood cells (RBCs) by using 23Na- and 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Sepsis was induced in 15 halothane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats by using the cecal ligation and perforation technique; 14 control rats underwent cecal manipulation without ligation. The animals were fasted for 36 h, but allowed free access to water. At 36 h postsurgery, RBCs were examined by 23Na-NMR by using dysprosium tripolyphosphate as a chemical shift reagent. Human RBCs from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients and from 7 patients who were diagnosed as septic were also examined for [Na+]i. Five rat RBC specimens had [Na+]i determined by both 23Na-NMR and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). For glucose metabolism studies, RBCs from septic and control rats were suspended in modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing [6,6-2H2]glucose and examined by 2H-NMR. No significant differences in [Na+]i or glucose utilization were found in RBCs from control or septic rats. There were no differences in [Na+]i in the two groups of patients. The [Na+]i determined by NMR spectroscopy agreed closely with measurements using ICP-AES and establish that 100% of the [Na+]i of the RBC is visible by NMR. Glucose measurements determined by 2H-NMR correlated closely (correlation coefficient = 0.93) with enzymatic analysis. These studies showed no evidence that sepsis disturbed RBC membrane function or metabolism

  15. 2H-NMR CHARACTERIZATION OF CLAY DISPERSION AND CONFINEMENT EFFECT ON PROBE MOLECULES IN RUBBER/CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE-GELS

    Ping-chuan Sun; Jian-jun Zhu; Tie-hong Chen

    2009-01-01

    2H-NMR spectroscopy of the probe molecule,deuterated benzene,was applied to characterize organo-clay dispersion and confinement effect on the local motion of benzene in rubber/clay nanocomposite-gels.The observed 2H line shapes of benzene in intercalated and exfoliated nanocomposites were obviously different,which can be used to estimate clay-dispersion quality.2H-NMR line shapes also reflect the different influence of intercalated or exfoliated layered-silicates on local motions of benzene,implying that probe molecules exhibit different local motions depending on different confined geometry in these nanocomposites.Viscosity measurements further confirmed these NMR results.

  16. Synthesis, structural characterization, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of [Ga(phen)(H1.5PO4)2].H2O and [Ga(phen)(HPO4)(H2PO4)].1.5H2O (phen=1, 10-phenanthroline), two organic-inorganic hybrid compounds with 1-D chain structures

    Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, [Ga(phen)(H1.5PO4)2].H2O (1) and [Ga(phen)(HPO4)(H2PO4)].1.5H2O (2) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline), have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Their structures consist of 1-D chains of strictly alternating GaO4N2 octahedra and phosphate tetrahedra. The phen ligands in both compounds bind in a bidentate fashion to the gallium atoms and the 1-D structures extend into 3-D supramolecular arrays via π-π stacking interactions of phen ligands and hydrogen bonds. 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy was applied to study the deuterated sample of 1 which contains very short hydrogen bonds with an O-O distance of 2.406(2) A. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group C2/c (No. 15), a=11.077(1) A, b=21.496(2) A, c=7.9989(7) A, β=127.211(2)o, and Z=4. The crystal symmetry is the same for 2 as for 1 except a=27.555(2) A, b=6.3501(5) A, c=21.327(2) A, β=122.498(1)o, and Z=8

  17. Structural proteomics by NMR spectroscopy.

    Shin, Joon; Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae

    2008-08-01

    Structural proteomics is one of the powerful research areas in the postgenomic era, elucidating structure-function relationships of uncharacterized gene products based on the 3D protein structure. It proposes biochemical and cellular functions of unannotated proteins and thereby identifies potential drug design and protein engineering targets. Recently, a number of pioneering groups in structural proteomics research have achieved proof of structural proteomic theory by predicting the 3D structures of hypothetical proteins that successfully identified the biological functions of those proteins. The pioneering groups made use of a number of techniques, including NMR spectroscopy, which has been applied successfully to structural proteomics studies over the past 10 years. In addition, advances in hardware design, data acquisition methods, sample preparation and automation of data analysis have been developed and successfully applied to high-throughput structure determination techniques. These efforts ensure that NMR spectroscopy will become an important methodology for performing structural proteomics research on a genomic scale. NMR-based structural proteomics together with x-ray crystallography will provide a comprehensive structural database to predict the basic biological functions of hypothetical proteins identified by the genome projects. PMID:18761469

  18. Site-resolved (2)H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra.

    Lindh, E L; Stilbs, P; Furó, I

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in (2)H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the (2)H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two (2)H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In (2)H-exchanged cellulose containing two (2)H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics. PMID:27152833

  19. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  20. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  1. NMR spectroscopy assists synthetic fuels research

    Cookson, D.J.; Smith, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proved to be a useful and versatile technique for the study of synthetic fuels feedstocks, catalysts, process intermediates and final products. Some applications of the technique to coal and gas conversion research are illustrated and discussed.

  2. Ethylene glycol causes acyl chain disordering in liquid-crystalline, unsaturated phospholipid model membranes, as measured by 2H NMR

    NICOLAY K; Smaal, E B; de Kruijff, B.

    1986-01-01

    2H NMR has been used to probe the effects of ethylene glycol at the level of the acyl chains in liposomes prepared from dioleoylphosphatidic acid or dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, labeled with 2H at the 11-position of both oleic acid chains. Increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol lead to a proportional and substantial decrease in the quadrupolar splittings, measured from the 2H NMR spectra of both liposomal systems, indicative of acyl chain disordering.

  3. Ethylene glycol causes acyl chain disordering in liquid-crystalline, unsaturated phospholipid model membranes, as measured by 2H NMR

    2H NMR has been used to probe the effects of ethylene glycol at the level of the acyl chains in liposomes prepared from dioleoylphosphatidic acid or dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, labeled with 2H at the 11-position of both oleic acid chains. Increasing concentrations of ethylene glycol lead to a proportional and substantial decrease in the quadrupolar splittings, measured from the 2H NMR spectra of both liposomal system, indicative of acyl chain disordering. (Auth.)

  4. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  6. Metabolism of excess methionine in the liver of intact rat: an in vivo 2H NMR study

    L-Methionine is the most toxic amino acid if supplied in excess, and the metabolic basis for this toxicity has been extensively studied, with varying conclusions. It is demonstrated here that in vivo 2H NMR spectroscopy provides a useful approach to the study of the hepatic metabolism of methionine in the anesthetized rat. Resonances corresponding to administered L-[methyl-2H3]methionine, and to the transmethylation product sarcosine, are observed during the first 10-min period after an intravenous injection of the labeled methionine, and the time dependence has been followed for a period of 5 h. A third resonance, assigned to the N-trimethyl groups of carnitine, phosphorylcholine, and other metabolites, becomes observable several hours after administration of the deuteriated methionine. In addition, there is a small increase in the intensity of the HDO resonance over the period of the study, which is interpreted to reflect the ultimate oxidation of the labeled sarcosine methyl group via mitochondrial sarcosine dehydrogenase. Additional small 2H resonances assigned to N1-methylhistidine and creatine could be observed in perchloric acid extracts of the livers of rats treated with the deuteriated methionine. Inhibition of the flux through the transmethylation pathway is observed in the rat pretreated with the S-ethyl analogue of methionine, ethionine. These data provide strong support for the importance of glycine transmethylation in the catabolism of excess methionine

  7. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs

  8. Characterization of Hydrogenated Fullerenes by NMR Spectroscopy

    Hedenström, Mattias; Wågberg, Thomas; Johnels, Dan

    NMR spectroscopy is so far the only analytical technique that has been used to get a detailed structural characterization of hydrogenated fullerenes. A substantial amount of information derived from different NMR experiments can thus be found in the literature for a number of fullerenes hydrogenated to various degrees. These studies have benefitted from the fact that chemical shifts of 1H and 13C and in some cases also 3He can be used to obtain structural information of these compounds. Such results, together with discussions about different NMR experiments and general considerations regarding sample preparations, are summarized in this chapter. The unique information, both structural and physicochemical, that can be derived from different NMR experiments ensures that this technique will continue to be of central importance in characterization of hydrogenated fullerenes.

  9. Handbook of tritium NMR spectroscopy and applications

    Following a brief introduction, highlighting the importance of 3H nmr spectroscopy for tritium tracer studies, Chapter 1 deals with the theory of the method, the interpretation of spectra and other experimental aspects, emphasizing the importance of careful sample preparation and the special relationship of 3H nmr spectral detail to the wealth of published data for proton spectra. Chapter 2 reviews the current methods for labelling compounds with tritium and the relationship of observed patterns of labelling to these methods. Chapter 3 describes applications of 3H nmr spectroscopy to research in the life sciences which illustrate the power of the technique. Studies employing this analytical tool have revealed numerous interesting and indeed unexpected results in the behaviour of tritium atoms in labelled molecules. These studies have included applications of tritiated compounds in analytical and biochemical problems, in problems of catalysis and reaction mechanisms, and in other areas of scientific research. (author)

  10. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  11. Protein dynamics in the solid state from 2H NMR line shape analysis: a consistent perspective.

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2015-02-19

    Deuterium line shape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying microsecond-millisecond protein motions in the solid state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison among the different systems is not possible. Here we develop a new methodology for (2)H NMR line shape analysis free of these limitations. It is based on the microscopic-order-macroscopic-disorder (MOMD) approach. In MOMD motions are described by diffusion tensors, spatial restrictions by potentials/ordering tensors, and geometric features by relative tensor orientations. Jump-type motions are recovered in the limit of large orientational potentials. Model improvement is accomplished by monitoring the magnitude, symmetry, and orientation of the various tensors. The generality of MOMD makes possible comparison among different scenarios. CD3 line shapes from the Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain and the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor are used as experimental examples. All of these spectra are reproduced by using rhombic local potentials constrained for simplicity to be given by the L = 2 spherical harmonics, and by axial diffusion tensors. Potential strength and rhombicity are found to be ca. 2-3 k(B)T. The diffusion tensor is tilted at 120° from the C-CD3 axis. The perpendicular (parallel) correlation times for local motion are 0.1-1.0 ms (3.3-30 μs). Activation energies in the 1.1-8.0 kcal/mol range are estimated. Future prospects include extension to the (2)H relaxation limit, application to the (15)N and (13)C NMR nuclei, and accounting for collective motions and anisotropic media. PMID:25594631

  12. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal

  13. Water interactions with varying molecular states of bovine casein: 2H NMR relaxation studies

    The caseins occur in milk as spherical colloidal complexes of protein and salts with an average diameter of 1200 A, the casein micelles. Removal of Ca2+ is thought to result in their dissociation into smaller protein complexes stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and called submicelles. Whether these submicelles actually occur within the micelles as discrete particles interconnected by calcium phosphate salt bridges has been the subject of much controversy. A variety of physical measurements have shown that casein micelles contain an inordinately high amount of trapped water (2 to 7 g H2O/g protein). With this in mind it was of interest to determine if NMR relaxation measurements could detect the presence of this trapped water within the micelles, and to evaluate whether it is a continuum with picosecond correlation times or is associated in part with discrete submicellar structures with nanosecond motions. For this purpose the variations in 2H NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of water with protein concentration were determined for bovine casein at various temperatures, under both submicellar and micellar conditions. D2O was used instead of H2O to eliminate cross-relaxation effects. From the protein concentration dependence of the relaxation rates, the second virial coefficient of the protein was obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Using either an isotropic tumbling or an intermediate asymmetry model, degrees of hydration, v, and correlation times, tau c, were calculated for the caseins; from the latter parameter the Stokes radius, r, was obtained. Next, estimates of molecular weights were obtained from r and the partial specific volume. Values were in the range of those published from other methodologies for the submicelles

  14. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H54]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    Ae Ran Lim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H54]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H54+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  15. Rapid solid-state NMR of deuterated proteins by interleaved cross-polarization from 1H and 2H nuclei

    Bjerring, Morten; Paaske, Berit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Akbey, Ümit; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel sampling strategy, interleaving acquisition of multiple NMR spectra by exploiting initial polarization subsequently from 1H and 2H spins, taking advantage of their different T1 relaxation times. Different 1H- and 2H-polarization based spectra are in this way simultaneously recorded improving either information content or sensitivity by adding spectra. The so-called Relaxation-optimized Acquisition of Proton Interleaved with Deuterium (RAPID) 1H → 13C/ 2H → 13C CP/MAS multiple-acquisition method is demonstrated by 1D and 2D experiments using a uniformly 2H, 15N, 13C-labeled α-spectrin SH3 domain sample with all or 30% back-exchanged labile 2H to 1H. It is demonstrated how 1D 13C CP/MAS or 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra initialized with polarization from either 1H or 2H may be recorded simultaneously with flexibility to be added or used individually for spectral editing. It is also shown how 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra may be recorded interleaved with 2H- 13C correlation spectra to obtain 13C- 13C correlations along with information about dynamics from 2H sideband patterns.

  16. Deuterium NMR of Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A in oriented DMPC bilayers

    Deuterium NMR is used to study the selectively labeled Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A molecule to investigate the structure and dynamics of the C alpha-2H bond in the Ala3 residue of gramicidin. Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A is synthesized, purified, and characterized and then incorporated into oriented bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine sandwiched between glass coverslips. Phosphorus NMR line shapes obtained from this sample are consistent with the presence of the bilayer phase and indicate that no nonbilayer phases are present in significant amounts. Deuterium NMR line shapes obtained from this sample indicate that the motional axis of the gramicidin Ala3 residue is parallel to the coverslip normal, that the distribution of motional axis orientations has a width of 2 degrees, and that only one major conformational and dynamical state of the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond is observed on the NMR time scale. Furthermore, the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond angle relative to the motional axis is 19-20 degrees if fast axial rotation is assumed to be the only motion present but is less than or equal to 19-20 degrees in the absence of such an assumption. This result indicates that various double-stranded, helical dimer models are very unlikely to represent the structure of gramicidin in the sample studied but that the single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer models are consistent with the experimental data. However, a definitive distinction between the left-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model and the right-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model cannot be made on the basis of the experimental data obtained in this study

  17. 1H MAS, 13C CP/MAS, and 2H NMR spectra studies of piperidinium p-chlorobenzoate

    Anomalous H/D isotope effects were detected in the 1H MAS NMR spectra of piperidinium p-chlorobenzoate (C5H10NH 2+⋅ ClC6H4COO − ) upon deuterium substitution of hydrogen atoms which form two kinds of N-H⋯O H-bonds in the crystal; in contrast to these spectra, only slight chemical shifts were recorded in 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra. 2H NMR spectrum of the deuterated sample show quadrupole coupling constants of 148 and 108 kHz, and reveal that there are a few motions contributing to the electric-field modulation of the 2H nucleus. The 1H MAS NMR spectra of piperidinium p-chlrobenzoate-d16 (C5D10ND 2+⋅ ClC6D4COO − ) and -d14 (C5D10NH 2+⋅ ClC6D4COO − ) revealed that the change in the envelope is caused by chemical shifts of each signal upon deuteration. Calculations based on the density-functional-theory showed that the N-H distance along the crystallographic a-axis mainly contributes to the anomalous isotope effects on 1H MAS NMR envelopes.

  18. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of ripening avocado

    Ripening of avocado fruit is associated with a dramatic increase in respiration. Previous studies have indicated that the increase in respiration is brought about by activation of the glycolytic reaction catalyzing the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The authors reinvestigated the proposed role of glycolytic regulation in the respiratory increase using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using an external surface coil and analysis of phosphofructokinase (PFK), phosphofructophosphotransferase (PFP), and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (fru 2,6-P2) levels in ripening avocado fruit. In vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy revealed large increases in ATP levels accompanying the increase in respiration. Both glycolytic enzymes, PFK and PFP, were present in avocado fruit, with the latter activity being highly stimulated by fru 2,6-P2. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate levels increased approximately 90% at the onset of ripening, indicating that the respiratory increase in ripening avocado may be regulated by the activation of PFP brought about by an increase in fru 2,6-P2

  19. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO22+ and NpO2+ ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO2(CO3)34- + 3H+ rightleftharpoons (NpO2)3(CO3)66- + 3HCO3- was determined to be logK = 19.7 (± 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). 17O NMR spectroscopy of NpO2n+ ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable 17O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO2+ was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO2+ + H2O rightleftharpoons NpO2OH + H+ was found to be logK = 2.28 - 3780/T, where T is in degree K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be logβ01 = 1.47 + 786/T

  20. NMR spectroscopy assists synthetic fuels research

    There is little doubt that sources of liquid transport fuels, other than petroleum, will need to be developed for the future. While coal, oil shale and natural gas are potentially appropriate hydrocarbon resources, they all require chemical processing before a substitute crude oil (or synfuel) can be produced. There are many different possible pathways by which alternative crudes can be produced and subsequently upgraded to transport fuel quality. To develop and evaluate processing strategies it is necessary to gain some understanding of the nature of feedstocks, catalysts, process intermediates and potential final products. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has proven a useful and versatile technique for this purpose. Some contributions from this technique to coal and gas conversion research are illustrated and discussed

  1. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  2. Grasping hydrogen adsorption and dynamics in metal-organic frameworks using (2)H solid-state NMR.

    Lucier, Bryan E G; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Kelly J; Lu, Yuanjun; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-18

    Record greenhouse gas emissions have spurred the search for clean energy sources such as hydrogen (H2) fuel cells. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising H2 adsorption and storage media, but knowledge of H2 dynamics and adsorption strengths in these materials is lacking. Variable-temperature (VT) (2)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments targeting (2)H2 gas (i.e., D2) shed light on D2 adsorption and dynamics within six representative MOFs: UiO-66, M-MOF-74 (M = Zn, Mg, Ni), and α-M3(COOH)6 (M = Mg, Zn). D2 binding is relatively strong in Mg-MOF-74, Ni-MOF-74, α-Mg3(COOH)6, and α-Zn3(COOH)6, giving rise to broad (2)H SSNMR powder patterns. In contrast, D2 adsorption is weaker in UiO-66 and Zn-MOF-74, as evidenced by the narrow (2)H resonances that correspond to rapid reorientation of the D2 molecules. Employing (2)H SSNMR experiments in this fashion holds great promise for the correlation of MOF structural features and functional groups/metal centers to H2 dynamics and host-guest interactions. PMID:27181834

  3. 1H and 13C NMR assignments for the glycans in glycoproteins by using 2H/13C-labeled glucose as a metabolic precursor

    In order to understand the role of the glycans in glycoproteins in solution, structural information obtained by NMR spectroscopy is obviously required. However, the assignment of the NMR signals from the glycans in larger glycoproteins is still difficult, mainly due to the lack of appropriate methods for the assignment of the resonances originating from the glycans. By using [U-13C6,2H7]glucose as a metabolic precursor, we have successfully prepared a glycoprotein whose glycan is uniformly labeled with 13C and partially with D at the sugar residues. The D to H exchange ratios at the C1-C6 positions of the sugar residues have been proven to provide useful information for the spectral assignments of the glycan in the glycoprotein. This is the first report on the residue-specific assignment of the anomeric resonances originating from a glycan attached to a glycoprotein by using the metabolic incorporation of hydrogen from the medium into a glycan labeled with [U-13C6,2H7]glucose

  4. Syntheses of [5-2H]-uracil, [5-2H]-cytosine, [6-2H]-uracil and [6-2H]-cytosine

    Syntheses of [5-2H]-, [6-2H]-uracil and [5-2H]-, [6-2H]-cytosine were investigated. The catalytic reaction of uracil or cytosine with 2H2 gas in alkaline media gave rise to [6-2H]-compounds almost exclusively. On the other hand, the reaction of 5-bromouracil or 5-bromocytosine with 2H2 gas gave rise to a mixture of [5-2H]-, [6-2H]- and [5-2H, 6-2H]-compounds depending on the experimental conditions. By controlling the temperature, the pressure of 2H2 gas and the amount of catalyst, [5-2H]-uracil and [5-2H]-cytosine were obtained. The isotopic distribution in each product was measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy combined with an HPLC method. (author)

  5. Double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR analysis of D2O in intervertebral disc tissue

    Ooms, Kristopher J.; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana; Cannella, Marco; Marcolongo, Michele

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR spectra obtained from D2O perfused in the nucleus pulposus of human intervertebral disc tissue samples is reported. Fitting the spectra with a three-site model allows for residual quadrupolar couplings and T2 relaxation times to be measured. The analysis reveals changes in both the couplings and relaxation times as the tissue begins to show signs of degradation. The full analysis demonstrates that information about tissue hydration, water collagen interactions, and sample heterogeneity can be obtained and used to better understand the biochemical differences between healthy and degraded tissue.

  6. 1H and 2H NMR study in paramagnetic solutions of Eu3+ nitrate

    The dependence of the spin-lattice rate(1/T1) of 1H and 2H nuclei for the 2.1 T magnetic field of the concentration (from 0.1 to 2.75 mol) of Eu3+ paramagnetic ions in the range from 263 K to 373 K is presented . Also the NMRD profield for the frecuency range from 0.1 to 500 Mhz is showed

  7. Effect of Sterol Structure on Chain Ordering of an Unsaturated Phospholipid: A 2H-NMR Study of POPC/Sterol Membranes

    Shaghaghi, Mehran; Thewalt, Jenifer; Zuckermann, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The physical properties of biological membranes are considerably altered by the presence of sterols. In particular, sterols help to maintain the integrity of the cell by adjusting the fluidity of the plasma membrane. Cholesterol is in addition an important component of lipid rafts which are hypothesized to compartmentalize the cell membrane surface thereby making it possible for certain proteins to function. Using 2H-NMR spectroscopy, we studied the effect of a series of different sterols on the chain ordering of POPC, an unsaturated phospholipid present in eukaryotic cell membranes. We were able to assigned specific roles to the structural differences between the sterols by comparing the manner in which they affect the average lipid chain conformation of POPC.

  8. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN)2Cl2

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. F.; Gargouri, M.

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS) hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH3)2(CH2)2]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N) = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z" versus Z') plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3) eV.

  9. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN2Cl2

    Gargouri M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH32(CH22]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z” versus Z’ plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3 eV.

  10. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  11. Applications of NMR spectroscopy to systems biochemistry.

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N

    2016-02-01

    The past decades of advancements in NMR have made it a very powerful tool for metabolic research. Despite its limitations in sensitivity relative to mass spectrometric techniques, NMR has a number of unparalleled advantages for metabolic studies, most notably the rigor and versatility in structure elucidation, isotope-filtered selection of molecules, and analysis of positional isotopomer distributions in complex mixtures afforded by multinuclear and multidimensional experiments. In addition, NMR has the capacity for spatially selective in vivo imaging and dynamical analysis of metabolism in tissues of living organisms. In conjunction with the use of stable isotope tracers, NMR is a method of choice for exploring the dynamics and compartmentation of metabolic pathways and networks, for which our current understanding is grossly insufficient. In this review, we describe how various direct and isotope-edited 1D and 2D NMR methods can be employed to profile metabolites and their isotopomer distributions by stable isotope-resolved metabolomic (SIRM) analysis. We also highlight the importance of sample preparation methods including rapid cryoquenching, efficient extraction, and chemoselective derivatization to facilitate robust and reproducible NMR-based metabolomic analysis. We further illustrate how NMR has been applied in vitro, ex vivo, or in vivo in various stable isotope tracer-based metabolic studies, to gain systematic and novel metabolic insights in different biological systems, including human subjects. The pathway and network knowledge generated from NMR- and MS-based tracing of isotopically enriched substrates will be invaluable for directing functional analysis of other 'omics data to achieve understanding of regulation of biochemical systems, as demonstrated in a case study. Future developments in NMR technologies and reagents to enhance both detection sensitivity and resolution should further empower NMR in systems biochemical research. PMID:26952191

  12. Developments of RF Coil for P in vivo NMR Spectroscopy .

    S. Khushu

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available RF receiver coils are very important parts of an NMR System. The design of these coils is very critical and has a dramatic effect on the SNR of the NMR signal and are generally developed in TRA/REC mode. This paper reports the developments of a 3.5 cm TRA/REC 26 MHz RF coil for P spectroscopy of small organs like thyroid. The coil is small in size, fits well in the neck for thyroid spectroscopy and is successfully working with the 1.5 tesla whole body Superconducting NMR System available at INMAS.

  13. Developments of RF Coil for P in vivo NMR Spectroscopy .

    S. Khushu; S.B. Mehta; Sushil Chandra; A Jena

    1993-01-01

    RF receiver coils are very important parts of an NMR System. The design of these coils is very critical and has a dramatic effect on the SNR of the NMR signal and are generally developed in TRA/REC mode. This paper reports the developments of a 3.5 cm TRA/REC 26 MHz RF coil for P spectroscopy of small organs like thyroid. The coil is small in size, fits well in the neck for thyroid spectroscopy and is successfully working with the 1.5 tesla whole body Superconducting NMR System availab...

  14. Protein 2D NMR analysis utilizing selective 2H and 13C enrichment

    E. coli thioredoxin has been prepared with specific residue types substituted with fully enriched 2H or 13C labeled amino acids. In 1H COSY and NOESY experiments cross peaks result from pairs of protons interacting via through-bond or through-space coupling respectively. A cross peak is eliminated if either nucleus is substituted with deuterium. Direct residue type assignments of cross peaks have been obtained by comparing data from protein samples with one residue type deuterated and data from a non-enriched sample. Selective deuteration is particularly useful for the interresidue connectivity assignments obtained by NOESY experiments which normally depend on residue type assignment information obtained from independent COSY data. Difficulties in 1H COSY type intraresidue connectivity assignments are the main reason that successful analyses generally have been limited to proteins less than 10 kilodaltons. The authors have collected 13C homonuclear COSY data which compared to the 1H experiment benefit from larger spin couplings as well as from the spectral simplification obtained by enrichment. Resolved cross peaks for the 13C-13C J1 couplings are readily observed with 30 mg of labeled protein. 1H-13C heteronuclear COSY experiments then provide an independent method of intraresidue proton spin connectivity assignments

  15. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  16. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  17. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    LeMaster, D.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  18. Molecular orientation of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA)2-(BPy)x as Studied by 2H NMR

    The thermal properties of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA)2-(BPy)x (6BA: 4-n-hexylbenzoicacid, BPy: 4,4’-bipyridine) were investigated by DSC. Two liquid crystal phases (LCI, LCII) were found for (6BA)2-(BPy)0.5. In LCII, the distribution of the orientation of molecules was larger than in LCI. The order parameter S of molecular orientation in the liquid crystal phase was estimated from a 2H NMR spectrum. S decreased rapidly around the LCI-LCII phase transition. The increase in orientational fluctuation of the 6BA dimer with an open dimer structure is predicted to cause the rapid decrease of S

  19. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  20. Acyl chain length effects related to glycosphingolipid crypticity in phospholipid membranes: probed by 2H-NMR.

    Hamilton, K S; Briere, K; Jarrell, H C; Grant, C W

    1994-03-23

    Wideline 2H-NMR was used to consider the relationships amongst glycosphingolipid and phospholipid fatty acid chain length and glycosphingolipid receptor function, in a system classically associated with crypticity. Galactosyl ceramide (GalCer), having 18- or 24-carbon fatty acid, was deuterium labelled at the conformationally-restricted fatty acid alpha-carbon (C-2). 2H-NMR spectra of N-[2,2-2H2]stearoyl and N-[2,2-2H2]lignoceroyl GalCer (GalCer with 18-vs. 24-carbon selectively deuterated fatty acid) were then compared over a range of temperatures in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol membranes in which the host phospholipid had dimyristoyl, dipalmitoyl, or distearoyl fatty acid composition. Findings were evaluated in the light of known sensitivity of antibody interaction with GalCer to temperature and to both glycolipid fatty acid chain length and host matrix fatty acid chain length. Under the conditions of experimentation, spectra were not obtainable for glycolipids having rigid body motions that were slow on the NMR timescale (10(-4)-10(-5) s)-i.e.. motions typical of non-fluid (gel phase) membranes. The systems, DPPC/cholesterol and DSPC/cholesterol, in which the original observation was made of increased antibody binding to GalCer with long fatty acid, proved to be characterised by receptor motions that were in this slow timescale for both 18:0 and 24:0 GalCer at 22-24 degrees C. Under conditions for which spectra could be obtained, those for GalCer with [2,2-2H2]lignoceroyl (24-carbon alpha-deuterated) fatty acid were qualitatively similar to those of its 18-carbon analogue in all (fluid) membranes examined. However, spectral splittings differed quantitatively between deuterated 18:0 and 24:0 GalCer at a given temperature, dependent upon host matrix. These differences were most marked at lower temperatures and in the longer chain (more ordered) matrices, DPPC/cholesterol and DSPC/cholesterol. This suggests that maximum effects of glycolipid chain length on

  1. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences

  2. Recent progress in protein structure analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    In recent years, many NMR methodologies have been developed to improve the molecular weight limit of protein structure analysis. Sophisticated selective stable-isotope labeling techniques such as the SAIL method solved the issue of signal reduction due to increased correlation time and that of spectral overlapping. Residual dipolar coupling and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement enabled to obtain long-range distance restraints for structure determination. NMR analysis of intrinsically disordered protein revealed novel molecular recognition mode of protein called coupling folding and binding. NMR method also revealed intermediates in macromolecular binding processes. New data acquisition techniques such the projection spectroscopy and the non-linear sampling, which introduced signal processing techniques, were developed to reduce the data acquisition time and/or increase sensitivity. In this chapter, recent progress in protein structure analysis by NMR spectroscopy is summarized. (author)

  3. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  4. Room Temperature Chiral Discrimination in Paramagnetic NMR Spectroscopy

    Soncini, Alessandro; Calvello, Simone

    2016-04-01

    A recently proposed theory of chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy based on the detection of a molecular electric polarization P rotating in a plane perpendicular to the NMR magnetic field [A. D. Buckingham, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 011103 (2014)] is generalized here to paramagnetic systems. Our theory predicts new contributions to P , varying as the square of the inverse temperature. Ab initio calculations for ten Dy3 + complexes, at 293 K, show that, in strongly anisotropic paramagnetic molecules, P can be more than 1000 times larger than in diamagnetic molecules, making paramagnetic NMR chiral discrimination amenable to room temperature detection.

  5. Room temperature chiral discrimination in paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    Soncini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A recently proposed theory of chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy based on the detection of a molecular electric polarization $\\mathbf{P}$ rotating in a plane perpendicular to the NMR magnetic field [A. D. Buckingham, J. Chem. Phys. $\\mathbf{140}$, 011103 (2014)], is here generalized to paramagnetic systems. Our theory predicts new contributions to $\\mathbf{P}$, varying as the square of the inverse temperature. Ab initio calculations for ten Dy$^{3+}$ complexes, at 293K, show that in strongly anisotropic paramagnetic molecules $\\mathbf{P}$ can be more than 1000 times larger than in diamagnetic molecules, making paramagnetic NMR chiral discrimination amenable to room temperature detection.

  6. Membrane structure and dynamics as viewed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Auger, M

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the present study is the investigation of the structure and dynamics of biological membranes using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two approaches are used in our laboratory. The first involves the measurement of high-resolution 13C and 1H spectra obtained by the magic angle spinning (MAS) technique while the second approach involves the measurement of 31P and 2H powder spectra in static samples. This paper will present some recent results obtained by high-resolution solid-state 1H NMR on the conformation of gramicidin A incorporated in a phosphatidylcholine bilayers. More specifically, we were able to observe changes in the gramicidin spectra as a function of the cosolubilization solvent initially used to prepare the samples. The interaction between lipid bilayers and an anticancer drug derived from chloroethylurea was also investigated using proton NMR spectroscopy. Finally, we have studied the interaction between cardiotoxin, a toxic protein extracted from snake venom, and negatively charged lipid bilayers using 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:9468622

  7. Identification of phenacetin metabolites in human urine after administration of phenacetin-C2H3: measurement of futile metabolic deacetylation via HPLC/MS-SPE-NMR and HPLC-ToF MS.

    Nicholls, A W; Wilson, I D; Godejohann, M; Nicholson, J K; Shockcor, J P

    2006-07-01

    The metabolism of acetyl-labelled phenacetin-C2H3 was investigated in man following a single (150 mg) oral dose. Urine samples were collected at predose, 0-2 h and >2-4 h post-dose, and samples from each time-point were then analysed directly using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The phenacetin metabolites acetaminophen (paracetamol) glucuronide, sulphate and the N-acetyl-L-cysteinyl conjugate were identified by this method, and all showed clear evidence of the loss of the original 2H3-acetyl label and its replacement with 1H3 (futile deacetylation). The observed percentage futile deacetylation by 1H-NMR spectroscopy was measured as approximately 20% in each metabolite (about 2% of the recovered dose). After sample preparation by solid-phase extraction on a C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, further profiling was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance (HPLC/MS-SPE-NMR) confirming futile deacetylation had taken place as indicated by NMR spectroscopy on both the isolated acetaminophen glucuronide and L-cysteinyl-metabolites. Additional analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ToF MS) identified further phenacetin metabolites, and from these data the mean percentage of futile deacetylation was measured as 31% +/- 2% for the acetylated phenacetin metabolites. A number of non-acetylated metabolites were also detected in the sample via HPLC-ToF MS. The results showed that phenacetin underwent a transient formation via a number of toxic intermediates to a much greater extent than had been observed in similar studies on acetaminophen. These results may contribute to the understanding of the analgesic nephropathy reported following chronic phenacetin consumption. PMID:16864507

  8. Dual-laser absorption spectroscopy of C2H2 at 1.4 μ m

    Fasci, E.; Odintsova, T. A.; Castrillo, A.; De Vizia, M. D.; Merlone, A.; Bertiglia, F.; Moretti, L.; Gianfrani, L.

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (line intensity factor, pressure self-broadening, and shifting coefficients) of C2H2 at 1.4 μ m were accurately measured using a dual-laser approach, based upon the technique of optical phase locking. This generated an absolute frequency scale underneath the absorption spectra. A pair of extended-cavity diode lasers was used. One of them, the probe laser, is forced to maintain a precise frequency offset from a reference laser, which is an optical frequency standard based on noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy. Laser-gas interaction takes place inside an isothermal multipass cell that is stabilized at the temperature of the triple point of water. The fidelity in the observation of the shape associated to the Pe(14) line of the 2 ν3+ν5 band allowed us to measure the spectroscopic parameters, with a global uncertainty for the line strength of 0.22%.

  9. Combined analysis of C-18 unsaturated fatty acids using natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR spectroscopy in chiral oriented solvents.

    Lesot, Philippe; Baillif, Vincent; Billault, Isabelle

    2008-04-15

    The quantitative determination of isotopic (2H/1H)i ratios at natural abundance using the SNIF-NMR protocol is a well-known method for understanding the enzymatic biosynthesis of metabolites. However, this approach is not always successful for analyzing large solutes and, specifically, is inadequate for prochiral molecules such as complete essential unsaturated fatty acids. To overcome these analytical limitations, we use the natural abundance deuterium 2D NMR (NAD 2D NMR) spectroscopy on solutes embedded in polypeptide chiral liquid crystals. This approach, recently explored for measuring (2H/1H)i ratios of small analytes (Lesot, P.; Aroulanda, C.; Billault, I. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 2827-2835), is a powerful way to separate the 2H signals of all nonequivalent enantioisotopomers on the basis both of the 2H quadrupolar interactions and of the 2H chemical shift. Two significant advances over our previous work are presented here and allow the complete isotopic analysis of four mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters: methyl oleate (1), methyl linoleate (2), methyl linolenate (3), and methyl vernoleate (4). The first consists of using NMR spectrometers operating at higher magnetic field strength (14.1 T) and equipped with a selective cryoprobe optimized for deuterium nuclei. The second is the development of Q-COSY Fz 2D NMR experiments able to produce phased 2H 2D maps after a double Fourier transformation. This combination of modern hardware and efficient NMR sequences provides a unique tool to analyze the (2H/1H)i ratios of large prochiral molecules (C-18) dissolved in organic solutions of poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) and requires smaller amounts of solute than previous study on fatty acids. For each compound (1-4), all 2H quadrupolar doublets visible in the 2D spectra have been assigned on the basis of 2H chemical shifts, isotopic data obtained from isotropic quantitative NAD NMR, and by an interspectral comparison of the anisotropic NAD spectra of four

  10. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    Saether, Oddbjoern

    2005-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  11. NMR spectroscopy applied to the eye: Drugs and metabolic studies

    NMR spectroscopy has been extensively applied in biomedical research during the last decades. It has proved to be an analytical tool of great value. From being mainly used in chemistry, technological developments have expanded the application of NMR spectroscopy to a great wealth of disciplines. With this method, biochemical information can be obtained by analysing tissue extracts. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly employed for pharmacokinetic studies and analysis of biofluids. Technological progress has provided increased sensitivity and resolution in the spectra, which enable even more of the complexity of biological samples to be elucidated. With the implementation of high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy in biomedicine, intact tissue samples or biopsies can be investigated. Thus, NMR spectroscopy has an ever-increasing impact in metabolic screening of human samples and in animal models, and methods are also increasingly realised in vivo. The present work, NMR spectroscopy applied to eye research, consists of two main parts. Firstly, the feasibility to monitor fluorinated ophthalmic drugs directly in the eye was assessed. Secondly, HR-MAS H1 NMR spectroscopy was applied for metabolic profiling of the anterior eye segment, specifically to analyse metabolic changes in intact corneal and lenticular samples after cataractogenic insults. This work included metabonomics with the application of pattern recognition methods to analyse HR-MAS spectra of eye tissues. Optimisation strategies were explored for F19 NMR detection of fluorinated drugs in a phantom eye. S/N gains in F19 NMR spectroscopy were achieved by implementing time-share H1 decoupling at 2.35 T. The method is advantageous for compounds displaying broad spectral coupling patterns, though detection of drugs at concentrations encountered in the anterior eye segment after topical application was not feasible. Higher magnetic fields and technological improvements could enable

  12. Structure and dynamics of model membranes by advanced NMR spectroscopy

    The molecular conformation and dynamics of phospholipids have important implications for the detailed understanding of membrane function, fluidity, composition and protein-lipid interaction. The advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods used in the study of structure and dynamics of model membranes are reviewed. Conformational exchange of the lipid headgroup as well as segmental order can be measured using dipolar couplings between the nuclei 31 P - 1 H, 13 C - 1 H, 1 H - 1 H and 31 P - 13 C by a novel solid-state two-dimensional (2D) NMR technique. Self-diffusion of lipids and water in lipid bilayers measured by sensitive NMR method of fringe field of superconducting magnet as well as 2D deuterium exchange NMR spectroscopy are presented. The powerful method of 2D NOESY in establishing the intermolecular interaction between an antineoplastic drug (daunomycin) and a model membrane is discussed. (authors)

  13. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  14. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational me

  15. Proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain at 3 TESLA

    Mlynárik, V.; Starčuk, Zenon; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Gruber, S.; Moser, E.

    Valtice : Masarykova Univerzita, 2002, s. 30. ISBN 80-210-2808-4. [NMR Valtice. Valtice (CZ), 08.04.2002-10.04.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : spectroscopy * human brain Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. 1H NMR spectroscopy-based interventional metabolic phenotyping

    Lauridsen, Michael B; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin;

    2010-01-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic phenotyping was used to identify biomarkers in the plasma of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Forty-seven patients with RA (23 with active disease at baseline and 24 in remission) and 51 healthy subjects were evaluated during a one-year follow-up with...

  17. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  18. Mobile sensor for high resolution NMR spectroscopy and imaging

    Danieli, Ernesto; Mauler, Jörg; Perlo, Juan; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2009-05-01

    In this work we describe the construction of a mobile NMR tomograph with a highly homogeneous magnetic field. Fast MRI techniques as well as NMR spectroscopy measurements were carried out. The magnet is based on a Halbach array built from identical permanent magnet blocks generating a magnetic field of 0.22 T. To shim the field inhomogeneities inherent to magnet arrays constructed from these materials, a shim strategy based on the use of movable magnet blocks is employed. With this approach a reduction of the line-width from ˜20 kHz to less than 0.1 kHz was achieved, that is by more than two orders of magnitude, in a volume of 21 cm 3. Implementing a RARE sequence, 3D images of different objects placed in this volume were obtained in short experimental times. Moreover, by reducing the sample size to 1 cm 3, sub ppm resolution is obtained in 1H NMR spectra.

  19. Optical emission spectroscopy study of premixed C2H4/O2 and C2H4/C2H2/O2 flames for diamond growth with and without CO2 laser excitation

    He, X. N.; Gebre, T.; Shen, X. K.; Xie, Z. Q.; Zhou, Y. S.; Lu, Y. F.

    2010-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements were carried out to study premixed C2H4/O2 and C2H4/C2H2/O2 combustion flame for diamond deposition with and without a CO2 laser excitation. Strong emissions from radicals C2 and CH were observed in the visible range in all the OES spectra acquired. By adding a continuous-wave CO2 laser to irradiate the flame at a wavelength of 10.591 μm, the common CO2 laser wavelength, it was discovered that the emission intensities of the C2 and CH radicals were increased due to the laser beam induced excitation. OES measurements of the C2 and CH radicals were performed using different gas combinations and laser powers. The rotational temperatures in the flame were determined by analyzing the spectra of the R-branch of the A2Δ-->X2Π (0, 0) electronic transition near 430 nm (CH band head). Information obtained from the OES spectra, including the emission intensities of the C2 and CH radicals, the intensity ratios, and the rotational temperatures, was integrated into the study of diamond deposition on tungsten carbide substrates for mechanism analysis of the laser induced vibrational excitation and laser-assisted diamond deposition.

  20. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protein complexes.

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E; Williams, John C; Byeon, In-Ja L; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble, and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility, or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR-based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general SSNMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies, and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection, and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  1. Application of Solution NMR Spectroscopy to Study Protein Dynamics

    Christoph Göbl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in spectroscopic methods allow the identification of minute fluctuations in a protein structure. These dynamic properties have been identified as keys to some biological processes. The consequences of this structural flexibility can be far‑reaching and they add a new dimension to the structure-function relationship of biomolecules. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy allows the study of structure as well as dynamics of biomolecules in a very broad range of timescales at atomic level. A number of new NMR methods have been developed recently to allow the measurements of time scales and spatial fluctuations, which in turn provide the thermodynamics associated with the biological processes. Since NMR parameters reflect ensemble measurements, structural ensemble approaches in analyzing NMR data have also been developed. These new methods in some instances can even highlight previously hidden conformational features of the biomolecules. In this review we describe several solution NMR methods to study protein dynamics and discuss their impact on important biological processes.

  2. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  3. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    prevent dendrite formation. The in situ method was also applied to monitor (by (11)B NMR) electrochemical double-layer formation in supercapacitors in real time. Though this method is useful, it comes with challenges. The separation of the contributions from the different cell components in the NMR spectra is not trivial because of overlapping resonances. In addition, orientation-dependent NMR interactions, including the spatial- and orientation-dependent bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, can lead to resonance broadening. Efforts to understand and mitigate these BMS effects are discussed in this Account. The in situ NMR investigation of fuel cells initially focused on the surface electrochemistry at the electrodes and the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and CO to CO2 on the Pt cathode. On the basis of the (13)C and (195)Pt NMR spectra of the adsorbates and electrodes, CO adsorbed on Pt and other reaction intermediates and complete oxidation products were detected and their mode of binding to the electrodes investigated. Appropriate design and engineering of the NMR hardware has allowed researchers to integrate intact direct methanol fuel cells into NMR probes. Chemical transformations of the circulating methanol could be followed and reaction intermediates could be detected in real time by either (2)H or (13)C NMR spectroscopy. By use of the in situ NMR approach, factors that control fuel cell performance, such as methanol cross over and catalyst performance, were identified. PMID:24041242

  4. Internal dynamics of (C 3N 2H 5) 5Bi 2Cl 11 studied by IINS, 1H NMR and QC methods

    Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.; Jakubas, R.; Nowak, D.; Medycki, W.

    2008-11-01

    The low temperature inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra of pentakis (imidazolium) undecachlorodibismuthate (III) [(C 3N 2H 5) 5Bi 2Cl 11] were discussed versus different models of reference structures obtained by quantum chemical calculations in the energy transfer range up to 1200 cm -1. The second moment of 1H NMR line and spin-lattice relaxation times were employed to study the internal dynamics of imidazolium cation at the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition.

  5. PMP1 18-38, a yeast plasma membrane protein fragment, binds phosphatidylserine from bilayer mixtures with phosphatidylcholine: a (2)H-NMR study.

    M. Roux; Beswick, V; Coïc, Y M; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Sanson, A.; Neumann, J M

    2000-01-01

    PMP1 is a 38-residue plasma membrane protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulates the activity of the H(+)-ATPase. The cytoplasmic domain conformation results in a specific interfacial distribution of five basic side chains, thought to strongly interact with anionic phospholipids. We have used the PMP1 18-38 fragment to carry out a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H-NMR) study for investigating the interactions between the PMP1 cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylserine...

  6. Advancements in waste water characterization through NMR spectroscopy: review.

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Alexandre e Silva, Lorena M; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    There are numerous organic pollutants that lead to several types of ecosystem damage and threaten human health. Wastewater treatment plants are responsible for the removal of natural and anthropogenic pollutants from the sewage, and because of this function, they play an important role in the protection of human health and the environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven to be a valuable analytical tool as a result of its versatility in characterizing both overall chemical composition as well as individual species in a wide range of mixtures. In addition, NMR can provide physical information (rigidity, dynamics, etc.) as well as permit in depth quantification. Hyphenation with other techniques such as liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry creates unprecedented capabilities for the identification of novel and unknown chemical species. Thus, NMR is widely used in the study of different components of wastewater, such as complex organic matter (fulvic and humic acids), sludge and wastewater. This review article summarizes the NMR spectroscopy methods applied in studies of organic pollutants from wastewater to provide an exhaustive review of the literature as well as a guide for readers interested in this topic. PMID:25280056

  7. NMR spectroscopy of proteins encapsulated in a positively charged surfactant.

    Lefebvre, Brian G; Liu, Weixia; Peterson, Ronald W; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, large proteins, aggregation-prone proteins, and membrane proteins have been difficult to examine by modern multinuclear and multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy. A major limitation presented by these protein systems is that their slow molecular reorientation compromises many aspects of the more powerful solution NMR methods. Several approaches have emerged to deal with the various spectroscopic difficulties arising from slow molecular reorientation. One of these takes the approach of actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation by encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid. Since the encapsulation is largely driven by electrostatic interactions, the preparation of samples of acidic proteins suitable for NMR spectroscopy has been problematic owing to the paucity of suitable cationic surfactants. Here, it is shown that the cationic surfactant CTAB may be used to prepare samples of encapsulated anionic proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents. In a more subtle application, it is further shown that this surfactant can be employed to encapsulate a highly basic protein, which is completely denatured upon encapsulation using an anionic surfactant. PMID:15949753

  8. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Structural and Chemical Biology (United States); Harada, Erisa [Suntory Foundation for Life Sciences, Bioorganic Research Institute (Japan); Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@sunbor.or.jp, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  9. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis

  10. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  11. Synthesis, structure and NMR characterization of a new monomeric aluminophosphate [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4 containing four different types of monophosphates

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jiyang; Xu, Jun; Duan, Fangzheng; Deng, Feng; Xu, Ruren

    2009-03-01

    A new zero-dimensional (0D) aluminophosphate monomer [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4 (designated AlPO-CJ38) with Al/P ratio of 1/6 has been solvothermally prepared by using racemic cobalt complex dl-Co(en) 3Cl 3 as the template. The Al atom is octahedrally linked to six P atoms via bridging oxygen atoms, forming a unique [Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2] 6- monomer. Notably, there exists intramolecular symmetrical O⋯H⋯O bonds, which results in pseudo-4-rings stabilized by the strong H-bonding interactions. The structure is also featured by the existence of four different types of monophosphates that have been confirmed by 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectra. The crystal data are as follows: AlPO-CJ38, [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4, M = 1476.33, monoclinic, C2/ c (No. 15), a = 36.028(7) Å, b = 8.9877(18) Å, c = 16.006(3) Å, β = 100.68(3)°, U = 5093.2(18) Å 3,Z = 4, R1 = 0.0509 ( I > 2 σ( I)) and wR2 = 0.1074 (all data). CCDC number 689491.

  12. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  13. Interaction of the replication terminator protein of Bacillus subtilis with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the dimeric 29 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. We have used NMR spectroscopy to probe the changes in 1H-15N correlation spectra of a 15N-labelled RTP.C110S mutant upon the addition of a 21 base pair symmetrical DNA binding site. Assignment of the 1H-15N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with 15N,13C,70% 2H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. Perturbations to 1H-15N spectra revealed that the N-termini, α3-helices and several loops are affected by the binding interaction. An analysis of this data in light of the crystallographically determined apo- and DNA-bound forms of RTP.C110S revealed that the NMR spectral perturbations correlate more closely to protein structural changes upon complex formation rather than to interactions at the protein-DNA interface

  14. Zwitterionic phosphorylated quinines as chiral solvating agents for NMR spectroscopy.

    Rudzińska-Szostak, Ewa; Górecki, Łukasz; Berlicki, Łukasz; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Mucha, Artur

    2015-10-01

    Because of their unique 3D arrangement, naturally occurring Cinchona alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives have found wide-ranging applications in chiral recognition. Recently, we determined the enantioselective properties of C-9-phosphate mixed triesters of quinine as versatile chiral solvating agents in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In the current study, we introduce new zwitterionic members of this class of molecules containing a negatively charged phosphate moiety (i.e., ethyl, n-butyl and phenyl hydrogen quininyl phosphate). An efficient approach for synthesizing these compounds is elaborated, and full characterization, including conformational and autoaggregation phenomena studies, was performed. Therefore, their ability to induce NMR anisochrony of selected enantiomeric substrates (i.e., primarily N-DNB-protected amino acids and their methyl esters) was analyzed compared to uncharged diphenyl quininyl phosphate and its positively charged quaternary ammonium hydrochloride salt. In addition, (1) H and (13) C NMR experiments revealed their enantiodiscrimination potential toward novel analytes, such as secondary amines and nonprotected amino acids. PMID:26415853

  15. NMR spectroscopy study of agar-based polymers electrolytes

    Mattos, R.I.; Tambelli, C.E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Raphael, E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rey (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Silva, I.D.A.; Magon, C.J.; Donoso, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This communication presents the results of preparation and characterization of transparent films obtained from agar and acetic acid. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The film formed by agar (Sigma Aldrich) was dispersed in water and kept under stirring and heating at 100 deg C. Next, glycerol, formaldehyde and different quantities of acetic acid (25 and 50 wt%) were added to this solution. The obtained solution was placed on a glass plate and left to dry for 48 hours in oven at 50 deg C to obtain the films, which were kept under vacuum before characterization. The ionic conductivity of the films display an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy E{sub a} = 78 (25 wt% of acetic acid) and E{sub a} = 87 kJ/mol (50 wt% of acetic acid). The conductivity values were 3:0 X 10{sup -6} and 1:2 X 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature and 4:4 X 10{sup -4} and 1:5 X 10{sup -3}S/cm at 70 deg C, for the 25 and 50 wt% of acetic acid respectively. To investigate the mechanism of protonic conduction in the polymer proton conductor proton NMR measurements were performed in the temperature range 200-370 K. The {sup 1}H-NMR results exhibit the qualitative feature associated with the proton mobility, namely the presence of well defined {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation maxima at 300 K. Activation energy of the order of 40 kJ/mol was obtained from the {sup 1}H-NMR line narrowing data. The ionic conductivity of the film combined with their transparency, flexibility, homogeneity and good adhesion to the glasses or metals indicate that agar-based SPEs are promising materials for used on optoelectronic applications. (author)

  16. NMR spectroscopy study of agar-based polymers electrolytes

    Full text: This communication presents the results of preparation and characterization of transparent films obtained from agar and acetic acid. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The film formed by agar (Sigma Aldrich) was dispersed in water and kept under stirring and heating at 100 deg C. Next, glycerol, formaldehyde and different quantities of acetic acid (25 and 50 wt%) were added to this solution. The obtained solution was placed on a glass plate and left to dry for 48 hours in oven at 50 deg C to obtain the films, which were kept under vacuum before characterization. The ionic conductivity of the films display an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy Ea = 78 (25 wt% of acetic acid) and Ea = 87 kJ/mol (50 wt% of acetic acid). The conductivity values were 3:0 X 10-6 and 1:2 X 10-4 S/cm at room temperature and 4:4 X 10-4 and 1:5 X 10-3S/cm at 70 deg C, for the 25 and 50 wt% of acetic acid respectively. To investigate the mechanism of protonic conduction in the polymer proton conductor proton NMR measurements were performed in the temperature range 200-370 K. The 1H-NMR results exhibit the qualitative feature associated with the proton mobility, namely the presence of well defined 1H spin-lattice relaxation maxima at 300 K. Activation energy of the order of 40 kJ/mol was obtained from the 1H-NMR line narrowing data. The ionic conductivity of the film combined with their transparency, flexibility, homogeneity and good adhesion to the glasses or metals indicate that agar-based SPEs are promising materials for used on optoelectronic applications. (author)

  17. Intramolecular hydrogen-bonding studies by NMR spectroscopy

    Cantalapiedra, N A

    2000-01-01

    o-methoxybenzamide and N-methyl-o-methylbenzamide, using the pseudo-contact shifts calculated from the sup 1 H and sup 1 sup 3 C NMR spectra. The main conformation present in solution for o-fluorobenzamide was the one held by an intramolecular N-H...F hydrogen bond. Ab-initio calculations (at the RHF/6-31G* level) have provided additional data for the geometry of the individual molecules. A conformational equilibrium study of some nipecotic acid derivatives (3-substituted piperidines: CO sub 2 H, CO sub 2 Et, CONH sub 2 , CONHMe, CONEt sub 2) and cis-1,3-disubstituted cyclohexane derivatives (NHCOMe/CO sub 2 Me, NHCOMe/CONHMe, NH sub 2 /CO sub 2 H) has been undertaken in a variety of solvents, in order to predict the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding energies involved in the systems. The conformer populations were obtained by direct integration of proton peaks corresponding to the equatorial and axial conformations at low temperature (-80 deg), and by geometrically dependent coupling constants ( sup 3 J sub H s...

  18. A survey on quantitative analysis of organic compounds by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is known as a powerful analytical technique, which is used to determine the structure of small and macro organic compounds. In recent years, 1H NMR is being recognized more and more as a quantitative analytical method, which is based on the principle where the area under a 1H NMR signal peak in solution state is proportional to the number of nuclei contributing to the peak. In this report, the basic concepts, developmental history and current state of the quantitative 1H NMR (qNMR) method are described. Furthermore, future prospect of the qNMR method is presented. (author)

  19. Determination of gluconeogenesis in man by the use of deuterium-NMR-spectroscopy

    Rosian, E

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is the quantification of the deuterium--distribution in human glucose by the use of the deuterium NMR spectroscopy of deuteriated water. The glucose production in human organism is composed of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. The quantification of the part of gluconeogenesis on the total glucose production was determined by the use of deuterium NMR spectroscopy. (boteke)

  20. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  1. Aluminum polyphosphate gels structural evolution probed by NMR spectroscopy

    The aim of this work was to investigate how the structure of aluminum polyphosphate gels change upon aging and drying. This is essential if one is interested in using a gel as a matrix to synthesize organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The liquid and solid samples were characterized by 27Al and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Larger polyphosphate chains make the main contribution to gel formation and the smaller units are expelled into the supernatant solution. Polyphosphate chains undergo hydrolysis and chain scission upon gelation. Samples aged in a moisture-rich environment turn into viscous liquids as a consequence of water uptake, followed by extensive hydrolysis. Samples exposed to low relative humidity environments dry yielding brittle samples in which larger chains are stable. Vacuum-dried samples still contain ca. 30%-weight water. (author)

  2. Saturation in Deuteron Hadamard NMR Spectroscopy of Solids

    Greferath, M.; Blumich, B.; Griffith, W. M.; Hoatson, G. L.

    Hadamard NMR was investigated for wide-line solid-state deuteron spectroscopy by numerical simulations and experiments on hexamethylbenzene. Similar signal-to-noise ratios were obtained at large filter bandwidths (500 kHz) by both the quadrupolar echo and the Hadamard methods, although the excitation power differs by up to four orders in magnitude. Increasing the excitation power leads to systematic, noise-like features in Hadamard spectra. In contrast to phase modulation, simulations indicate that for amplitude modulation of the pseudorandom excitation, the pulse sequence burns a saturation hole into the lineshape at the carrier frequency. Violation of the cyclicity requirement by introduction of a recycle delay between successive Hadamard scans results in a high-frequency noise contribution. Finite pulse widths are shown not to cause significant spectral distortions.

  3. Zero-field NMR study on a spin glass: iron-doped 2H-niobium diselenide

    Spin echoes are used to study the 93Nb NQR in 2H-NbSe2Fe/sub x/. Measured are (intensity) x (temperature), and T/sub 1P/ (spin-lattice relaxation parameter) and T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) as a function of temperature. Data reveal dramatic differences between non-spin glass samples (x = 0, 0.25%, 1% and 5%) and spin glass samples (x = 8%, 10% and 12%). All of the NQR results and the model calculation of the correlation times of Fe spins are best described by the phase transition picture of spin glasses

  4. 2H-NMR resolution of the methylenic isotopomers of ethanol applied to the study of stereospecific enzyme-catalysed exchange.

    Rabiller, C; Mesbahi, M; Martin, M L

    1990-01-01

    We have shown that site-specific natural isotope fractionation of hydrogen studied by NMR (SNIF-NMR) is an important source of information on the mechanistic and environmental effects which govern the photosynthesis of sugars and their fermentation into ethanol. Three isotope ratios associated with the methyl, methylene, and hydroxyl sites of ethanol are determined in achiral media. In this study we show that complementary information about possible stereospecific mechanisms involving the methylenic hydrogens is also rendered accessible by 2H-NMR enantiomeric resolution. The synthesis of mandelate esters enables exchange between the pro-R site of ethanol and water to be investigated. Simultaneous access to the three site-specific isotope ratios of the ethyl group is obtained at isotopic dilutions close to the natural ones. Mediation of the exchange by the enzymic system alcohol dehydrogenase-alpha-lipoyldehydrogenase and by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. The progress of the reaction can be followed quantitatively as a function of time and the occurrence of glycolytic metabolism of endogeneous materials by yeast can be substantiated in a one-pot experiment. PMID:2205266

  5. Phase equilibria and molecular packing in the N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide/gramicidin D/water system studied by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Orädd, G; Lindblom, G; Arvidson, G; Gunnarsson, K.

    1995-01-01

    A partial phase diagram of the system N,N-dimethyldodecylamine oxide (DDAO)/water/gramicidin D was determined by 2H-NMR. Both 2H2O and perdeuterated DDAO (DDAO-d31) were studied by solid state NMR techniques. Addition of gramicidin D to the micellar (L1), normal hexagonal (HI) and cubic (I) phases of DDAO induces phase separations, giving two-phase regions, which all contain a lamellar (L alpha) phase. The L alpha phase containing gramicidin is characterized by larger order parameters for DDA...

  6. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions. PMID:26575437

  8. Molecular orientation of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA){sub 2}-(BPy){sub x} as Studied by {sup 2}H NMR

    Mizuno, M., E-mail: mizuno@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Higashima, Y.; Yamashita, A.; Ishida, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science & Technology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    The thermal properties of hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (6BA){sub 2}-(BPy){sub x} (6BA: 4-n-hexylbenzoicacid, BPy: 4,4’-bipyridine) were investigated by DSC. Two liquid crystal phases (LC{sub I}, LC{sub II}) were found for (6BA){sub 2}-(BPy){sub 0.5}. In LC{sub II}, the distribution of the orientation of molecules was larger than in LC{sub I}. The order parameter S of molecular orientation in the liquid crystal phase was estimated from a {sup 2}H NMR spectrum. S decreased rapidly around the LC{sub I}-LC{sub II} phase transition. The increase in orientational fluctuation of the 6BA dimer with an open dimer structure is predicted to cause the rapid decrease of S.

  9. Deuterium dynamics in the icosahedral and amorphous phases of the Ti40Zr40Ni20 hydrogen-absorbing alloy studied by 2H NMR

    Gradišek, A.; Kocjan, A.; McGuiness, P. J.; Apih, T.; Kim, Hae Jin; Dolinšek, J.

    2008-11-01

    The Ti40Zr40Ni20 hydrogen-absorbing alloy was prepared in the icosahedral and amorphous phases by controlling the rotation speed of the melt-spinning method of sample preparation, and the deuterium dynamics was investigated by 2H NMR dynamic lineshape and spin-lattice relaxation. The results were analysed by the lineshape and relaxation models that assume deuterium thermally activated hopping within a manifold of different chemical environments. The observed 8% larger activation energy for the deuterium hopping over the interstitial sites and the 10% larger static spectrum width of the amorphous phase, as compared to the icosahedral phase, can be accounted for by the larger deuterium content of the investigated amorphous sample. From the deuterium dynamics point of view, the icosahedral phase is not special with respect to the amorphous modification of the same material.

  10. 31P NMR spectroscopy measurements of hum ovarian carcinoma xenografts

    /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy was used to study lipid and energy metabolism as well as tumour pH in three human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines with widely differing growth rate, necrotic fraction and differentiation status. Two of the liines showed decreasing PCr (phosphocreatine) and NTPbhta (nucleoside triphosphates bhta) resonances and an increasing P/sub i/ (inorganic phosphate) resonance with increasing tumour volume in the volume range 100-4000 mm/sup 3/. This decrease in bioenergetic status was accompanied by a decrease in tumour pH from about 7.15 to about 6.95. The volume-dependence of these spectral parametes probably reflected increased nutritional deprivation and development of hypoxia and necrosis during tumour growth. The third xenograft line did not show changes in the intensity of any of the resonances during tumour growth. The spectral parameters differed significantly among the xenograft lines at given tumour volumes, but no correlations with volume-doubling time, necrotic fraction of differentiation status were found

  11. An economical method for production of (2H, (13CH3-threonine for solution NMR studies of large protein complexes: application to the 670 kDa proteasome.

    Algirdas Velyvis

    Full Text Available NMR studies of very high molecular weight protein complexes have been greatly facilitated through the development of labeling strategies whereby (13CH(3 methyl groups are introduced into highly deuterated proteins. Robust and cost-effective labeling methods are well established for all methyl containing amino acids with the exception of Thr. Here we describe an inexpensive biosynthetic strategy for the production of L-[α-(2H; β-(2H;γ-(13C]-Thr that can then be directly added during protein expression to produce highly deuterated proteins with Thr methyl group probes of structure and dynamics. These reporters are particularly valuable, because unlike other methyl containing amino acids, Thr residues are localized predominantly to the surfaces of proteins, have unique hydrogen bonding capabilities, have a higher propensity to be found at protein nucleic acid interfaces and can play important roles in signaling pathways through phosphorylation. The utility of the labeling methodology is demonstrated with an application to the 670 kDa proteasome core particle, where high quality Thr (13C,(1H correlation spectra are obtained that could not be generated from samples prepared with commercially available U-[(13C,(1H]-Thr.

  12. Automatic Structure Determination of Regular Polysaccharides Based Solely on NMR Spectroscopy

    Lundborg, Magnus; Fontana, Carolina; Widmalm, Göran

    2011-01-01

    The structural analysis of polysaccharides requires that the sugar components and their absolute configurations are determined. We here show that this can be performed based on NMR spectroscopy by utilizing butanolysis with (+)- and (−)-2-butanol that gives the corresponding 2-butyl glycosides with characteristic 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The subsequent computer-assisted structural determination by CASPER can then be based solely on NMR data in a fully automatic way as shown and impleme...

  13. Exploiting periodic first-principles calculations in NMR spectroscopy of disordered solids

    Ashbrook, Sharon Elizabeth Marie; Dawson, Daniel McLean

    2013-01-01

    Much of the information contained within solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra remains unexploited because of the challenges in obtaining high-resolution spectra and the difficulty in assigning those spectra. Recent advances that enable researchers to accurately and efficiently determine NMR parameters in periodic systems have revolutionized the application of density functional theory (DFT) calculations in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. These advances are particularly useful fo...

  14. Conformational analysis and enzymatic decomposition of a locked nucleoside phosphoramidates using NMR spectroscopy

    Procházková, Eliška; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Nencka, Radim; Dračínský, Martin

    Brno : Masaryk University, 2014 - (Novotný, J.; Foroutan -Nejad, C.; Marek, R.). C26 ISBN 978-80-86441-45-0. [NMR Valtice. Central European NMR Meeting /29./. 27.4.-30.4.2014, Valtice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : enzymatic decomposition * locked nucleosides * conformation * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  15. Integration of screening and identifying ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Yalin Tang, Qian Shang, Junfeng Xiang, Qianfan Yang, Qiuju Zhou, Lin Li, Hong Zhang, Qian Li, Hongxia Sun, Aijiao Guan, Wei Jiang & Wei Gai ### Abstract This protocol presents the screening of ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy. A detailed description of sample preparation and analysis process is provided. NMR spectroscopies described here are 1H NMR, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), relaxation-edited NMR, ...

  16. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A 2H and 31P NMR study

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-[2-2H1]serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-[11,11-2H2]dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. 2H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed

  17. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  18. 2H NMR study of dynamics of benzene-d6 interacting with humic and fulvic acids.

    Eastman, Margaret A; Brothers, Lucinda A; Nanny, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    Samples of three humic acids and one fulvic acid with 1% loading of benzene-d(6) in sealed glass tubes have been studied with solid-state deuterium quadrupole-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Calculated spectra combining three motional models, two isotropic models and a third more restricted small-angle wobble (SAW) motional model, are fit to the experimental spectra. One isotropic motion (ISO(v)) is assigned to vaporous benzene-d(6) due to the small line width, short T(1), and the loss of this component by about -25 °C when the temperature is lowered. The remaining two motional components, ISO(s) and SAW, are sorbed by the humic or fulvic acid. Benzene-d(6) slowly interacts with the humic substances, progressively filling SAW sites as ISO(s) motion diminishes. Both the sorption and increase in percentage of SAW motion are for the most part complete within 200 days but continue to a lesser extent over a period of a few years. For the SAW motion there are at least two and most likely a series of T(1) values, indicating more than one adsorption environment. Enthalpies of sorption, obtained from application of the van't Hoff equation to the percentages of the different motional models derived from a series of variable temperature spectra, are comparable in magnitude to the enthalpy of vaporization of benzene. In Leonardite humic acid, ΔH and ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition change from positive to negative values with age, implying a transition in the driving force from an entropic effect associated with expansion and deformation in the molecular structure of the humic substance to accommodate benzene-d(6) to an enthalpic effect of strong benzene-d(6)-humic substance interactions. In contrast, at advanced ages, Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids have small positive or near zero ΔH and positive ΔS for the ISO(s) to SAW transition. PMID:21456559

  19. [Measurement of Trace C2H6 Based on Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy].

    Wan, Fu; Chen, Wei-gen; Gu, Zhao-liang; Zou, Jing-xin; DU, Ling-Ling; Qi, Wei; Zhou, Qu

    2015-10-01

    Ethane is one of major fault characteristic gases dissolved in power transformer, the detection of Ethane with high accuracy and sensitivity is the key of dissolved gas analysis. In this paper, based on optical feedback theory and cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy, combined with quantum cascade laser, a detection system for dissolved gas C2 H6 in transformer oil was built up. Based on the symmetry of the individual cavity modes, the phase matching of returning light in resonance with the cavity was achieved through LabVIEW codes. The optical feedback effect that the emitted light return to the laser cavity after a small delay time and lock to the resonance frequency of cavity, even and odd modes effect that the higher modes and lower modes structure will build up alternatively, and threshold current lowering effect of about 1.2 mA were studied and achieved. By cavity ring-down spectroscopy, the effective reflectivity of 99.978% and cavity finesse of 7 138.4 is obtained respectively. The frequency selectivity is 0.005 2 cm(-1). With an acquisition time of 1s, this optical system allows detection for the PQ3 band of C2 H6 with high accuracy of 95.72% ± 0.17% and detection limit of (1.97 ± 0.06) x 10(-3) μL x L(-1) at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 degrees C, which lays a foundation for fault diagnose from dissolved gas analysis. PMID:26904820

  20. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  1. Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings

    Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

    2009-01-01

    A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

  2. Mobility and Diffusion-Ordered Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    Morris, Kevin Freeman

    Mobility and diffusion-ordered two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have been developed for the analysis of mixtures. In the mobility -ordered experiments, the full range of positive and negative electrophoretic mobilities is displayed in one dimension and chemical shifts are displayed in the other. A concentric cylindrical tube electrophoresis chamber was designed to reduce the effective pathlength for current and to provide unidirectional flow for ions of interest. Techniques based upon the reverse precession method were also implemented to recover the signs of the mobilities and improved resolution in the mobility dimension was obtained by replacing Fourier transformation of truncated data sets with a linear prediction analysis. In the diffusion-ordered two-dimensional NMR experiments, the conventional chemical shift spectrum is resolved in one dimension and spectra of diffusion rates or molecular radii are resolved in the other. Diffusion dependent pulsed field gradient NMR data sets were inverted by means of the computer programs SPLMOD or DISCRETE, when discrete diffusion coefficients were present, and CONTIN when continuous distributions were present. Since the inversion is ill -conditioned, it was necessary to introduce additional information to limit the range of the solutions. In addition to prior knowledge of the decay kernels and non-negativity of amplitudes and damping constants, a set of rejection criteria was constructed for the discrete analysis case that took into account physical limits on diffusion coefficients, experimentally accessible values, and variations in effective decay kernels resulting from instrumental non-linearities. Examples of analyses of simulated data and experimental data for mixtures are presented as well as two-dimensional spectra generated by CONTIN for polydisperse polymer samples. Also, resolution in the diffusion dimension was increased by performing experiments on hydrophobic molecules in

  3. Monitoring organic reactions by UF-NMR spectroscopy.

    Herrera, Antonio; Fernández-Valle, Encarnación; Martínez-Álvarez, Roberto; Molero-Vílchez, Dolores; Pardo-Botero, Zulay D; Sáez-Barajas, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Standard 2D NMR experiments suffer from the many t1 increments needed for spectra with sufficient digital resolution in the indirect dimension. Despite the different methodological approaches to overcome this problem, these increments have prevented studies of fast reactions. The development of ultrafast NMR (UF-NMR) has decisively speeded up the time scale of standard NMR to allow the study of organic reactions as they happen in real time to reveal mechanistic details. This mini-review summarizes the results achieved in monitoring organic reactions through this exciting technique. PMID:25998506

  4. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  5. Recent advances in the application of 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy to soil organic matter studies

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to many studies in soil science, geochemistry, and environmental science. In recent years, the study of soil organic matter (SOM) using NMR techniques has progressed rapidly. NMR spectroscopy has been used to study chemical changes of SOM during decomposition, and also of soil extract fractions such as humic acid and fulvic acid. NMR spectroscopy of soils has improved rapidly in recent years with the introduction of pre-treatment and particle-size fractionation. In addition to routine liquid- and solid-state 13C NMR applications, 15N NMR spectra of natural abundant samples have been reported, but 15N-enriched material is more convenient to use due to the low natural abundance of 15N. Some newly developed NMR techniques have also been utilised, such as 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and improved 1H NMR techniques. These are reviewed and commented on in this paper. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Publishing

  6. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S.; Comment, Arnaud;

    2015-01-01

    of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh‐field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply...... optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed....

  7. Organic structure determination using 2-D NMR spectroscopy a problem-based approach

    Simpson, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Organic Structure Determination Using 2-D NMR Spectroscopy: A Problem-Based Approach, Second Edition, provides an introduction to the use of two-dimensional (2-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine organic structure. The book begins with a discussion of the NMR technique, while subsequent chapters cover instrumental considerations; data collection, processing, and plotting; chemical shifts; symmetry and topicity; through-bond effects; and through-space effects. The book also covers molecular dynamics; strategies for assigning resonances to atoms within a molecule; s

  8. The strengths and weaknesses of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry with particular focus on metabolomics research.

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have evolved as the most common techniques in metabolomics studies, and each brings its own advantages and limitations. Unlike MS spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy is quantitative and does not require extra steps for sample preparation, such as separation or derivatization. Although the sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy has increased enormously and improvements continue to emerge steadily, this remains a weak point for NMR compared with MS. MS-based metabolomics provides an excellent approach that can offer a combined sensitivity and selectivity platform for metabolomics research. Moreover, different MS approaches such as different ionization techniques and mass analyzer technology can be used in order to increase the number of metabolites that can be detected. In this chapter, the advantages, limitations, strengths, and weaknesses of NMR and MS as tools applicable to metabolomics research are highlighted. PMID:25677154

  9. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Analysis of Petroleum Derivatives and Products

    Parlov Vuković, J.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex chemical composition and physical properties of oil and fuel make their complete cha racterization very difficult. Components present in oil and oil products differ in structure, size, po larity and functionality. The presence and structure of specific hydrocarbons in final products depend on the processing procedure and type of the fuel. In order to predict or improve fuel pro perties it is necessary to determine its composition. Thus, new and more sophisticated analytical methods and procedures are constantly being developed. NMR spectroscopy plays a significant role in analysis and identification of complex hydrocarbon mixtures of petroleum and petroleum products. In this review, we describe the application of NMR spectroscopy for analyzing gasoline and diesel fuels. Hence, by using NMR spectroscopy it is possible to determine gasoline composition and presence of benzene and oxygenates, as well as some important physical characteristics of gasoli ne such as the research octane number. An application of different NMR techniques made it pos sible to characterize diesel fuels and middle oil distillates from various refineries. Data so obtained can be used in combination with statistical methods to predict fuel properties and to monitor pro- duction processes in the petroleum industry. NMR spectroscopy has proven useful in analysis of FAME which has recently been used as an ecologically acceptable alternative fuel. Furthermore, techniques such as CP/MAS for characterization of solid state oil-geochemical samples are inclu- ded. Also, possibilities of using NMR spectroscopy in the analysis of polymeric additives are di- scussed.

  10. Analysis of human urine metabolites using SPE and NMR spectroscopy

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis of metabonome/metabolome has widespread applications in biomedical science researches. However, most of NMR resonances for urinary metabolites remain to be fully assigned. In the present study, human urine samples from two healthy volunteers were pre-treated with C18 solid-phase extraction and the resultant 5 sub-fractions were subjected to one- and two-dimensional NMR studies, including 1H J-Resolved, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-1H TOCSY, 1H-13C HSQC, and HMBC 2D NMR. More than 70 low molecular weight metabolites were identified, and complete assignments of 1H and 13C resonances including many complex coupled spin systems were obtained.

  11. Rapid characterization of molecular diffusion by NMR spectroscopy.

    Pudakalakatti, Shivanand M; Chandra, Kousik; Thirupathi, Ravula; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2014-11-24

    An NMR-based approach for rapid characterization of translational diffusion of molecules has been developed. Unlike the conventional method of acquiring a series of 2D (13)C and (1)H spectra, the proposed approach involves a single 2D NMR spectrum, which can be acquired in minutes. Using this method, it was possible to detect the presence of intermediate oligomeric species of diphenylalanine in solution during the process of its self-assembly to form nanotubular structures. PMID:25331210

  12. Dynamics and ferroelectric phase transition of (C3N2H5)5Bi2Br11 by means of ac calorimetry and 1H NMR relaxometry

    Highlights: ► The excess entropy clearly confirms an ‘order–disorder’ mechanism assigned to the dynamics of the imidazolium cations. ► 1H NMR conformed dynamical heterogeneity of the imidazolium cations in low temperature phases. ► The paraelectric-ferroelectric transition at 155 K is close to the tricritical one. -- Abstract: A quite uncommon type of heat anomaly has been disclosed by calorimetric experiments in ferroelectric crystal (C3N2H5)5Bi2Br11 close to the paraelectric-ferroelectric transition. Thermal parameters (such as the excess enthalpy (ΔH) and the excess entropy (ΔS)) of the continuous ferroelectric phase transition at ca. 155 K have been estimated and discussed. The entropy transition accompanying the ferroelectric phase transition (PT) of the order of 35 J/mol K confirms an ‘order–disorder’ mechanism. The ferroelectric–paraelectric PT has been described by the Landau model using the specific heat data.1H spin–lattice relaxation at 25 MHz has been measured for this crystal in a very broad temperature range 90–420 K, covering two phase transitions (at 155 and 355 K). The relaxation data have been interpreted in terms of different dynamical properties of imidazolium cations put in structurally different environments.

  13. Conditions affecting the re-alignment of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa in membranes as monitored by solid state 2H-NMR.

    Tremouilhac, Pierre; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2006-09-01

    The cationic antimicrobial peptide PGLa is electrostatically attracted to bacterial membranes, binds as an amphiphilic alpha-helix, and is thus able to permeabilize the lipid bilayer. Using solid state (2)H-NMR of non-perturbing Ala-d(3) labels on the peptide, we have characterized the helix alignment under a range of different conditions. Even at a very high peptide-to-lipid ratio (1:20) and in the presence of negatively charged lipids, there was no indication of a toroidal wormhole structure. Instead, PGLa re-aligns from a surface-bound S-state to an obliquely tilted T-state, which is presumably dimeric. An intermediate structure half-way between the S- and T-state was observed in fully hydrated multilamellar DMPC vesicles at 1:50, suggesting a fast exchange between the two states on the time scale of >50 kHz. We demonstrate that this equilibrium is shifted from the S- towards the T-state either upon (i) increasing the peptide concentration, (ii) adding negatively charged DMPG, or (iii) decreasing the level of hydration. The threshold concentration for re-alignment in DMPC is found to be between 1:200 and 1:100 in oriented samples at 96% humidity. In fully hydrated multilamellar DMPC vesicles, it shifts to an effective peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:50 as some peptides are able to escape into the bulk water phase. PMID:16716250

  14. Functional genomics by NMR spectroscopy. Phenylacetate catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Ismail, Wael; El-Said Mohamed, Magdy; Wanner, Barry L; Datsenko, Kirill A; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Bacher, Adelbert; Fuchs, Georg

    2003-07-01

    Aerobic metabolism of phenylalanine in most bacteria proceeds via oxidation to phenylacetate. Surprisingly, the further metabolism of phenylacetate has not been elucidated, even in well studied bacteria such as Escherichia coli. The only committed step is the conversion of phenylacetate into phenylacetyl-CoA. The paa operon of E. coli encodes 14 polypeptides involved in the catabolism of phenylacetate. We have found that E. coli K12 mutants with a deletion of the paaF, paaG, paaH, paaJ or paaZ gene are unable to grow with phenylacetate as carbon source. Incubation of a paaG mutant with [U-13C8]phenylacetate yielded ring-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrophenylacetyl lactone as shown by NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of the paaF and paaH mutants with phenylacetate yielded delta3-dehydroadipate and 3-hydroxyadipate, respectively. The origin of the carbon atoms of these C6 compounds from the aromatic ring was shown using [ring-13C6]phenylacetate. The paaG and paaZ mutants also converted phenylacetate into ortho-hydroxyphenylacetate, which was previously identified as a dead end product of phenylacetate catabolism. These data, in conjunction with protein sequence data, suggest a novel catabolic pathway via CoA thioesters. According to this, phenylacetyl-CoA is attacked by a ring-oxygenase/reductase (PaaABCDE proteins), generating a hydroxylated and reduced derivative of phenylacetyl-CoA, which is not re-oxidized to a dihydroxylated aromatic intermediate, as in other known aromatic pathways. Rather, it is proposed that this nonaromatic intermediate CoA ester is further metabolized in a complex reaction sequence comprising enoyl-CoA isomerization/hydration, nonoxygenolytic ring opening, and dehydrogenation catalyzed by the PaaG and PaaZ proteins. The subsequent beta-oxidation-type degradation of the resulting CoA dicarboxylate via beta-ketoadipyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA appears to be catalyzed by the PaaJ, PaaF and PaaH proteins. PMID:12846838

  15. Determination of Dihydrobenzoacridinone Structures by NMR, IR, and UV Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    Kozlov, N. G.; Zhiharko, Yu. D.; Skakovsky, E. D.; Baranovsky, A. V.; Ogorodnikova, M. M.; Basalaeva, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    Condensation of 2-naphthylamine, aromatic aldehydes, and dimedone was found to produce 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a] acridin-11-one derivatives according to PMR, 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Correlation spectroscopy showed that the carbonyl in the synthesized dihydrobenzoacridinone derivatives was located on C11.

  16. Photochromism of indolino-benzopyrans studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of photochromic 3,3-di( 4 ′ -fluorophenyl-3H-benzopyrans fused to an indole moiety is described. The structures of photomerocyanines elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and spectrokinetic data ( λ max⁡ of colored form, colorability, and rate constant of bleaching obtained by UV-visible spectroscopy are reported.

  17. High-resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy for metabolic profiling of intact tissues.

    Beckonert, Olaf; Coen, Muireann; Keun, Hector C; Wang, Yulan; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2010-06-01

    Metabolic profiling, metabolomic and metabonomic studies require robust study protocols for any large-scale comparisons and evaluations. Detailed methods for solution-state NMR spectroscopy have been summarized in an earlier protocol. This protocol details the analysis of intact tissue samples by means of high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy and we provide a detailed description of sample collection, preparation and analysis. Described here are (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques such as the standard one-dimensional, relaxation-edited, diffusion-edited and two-dimensional J-resolved pulse experiments, as well as one-dimensional (31)P NMR spectroscopy. These are used to monitor different groups of metabolites, e.g., sugars, amino acids and osmolytes as well as larger molecules such as lipids, non-invasively. Through the use of NMR-based diffusion coefficient and relaxation times measurements, information on molecular compartmentation and mobility can be gleaned. The NMR methods are often combined with statistical analysis for further metabonomics analysis and biomarker identification. The standard acquisition time per sample is 8-10 min for a simple one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectrum, giving access to metabolite information while retaining tissue integrity and hence allowing direct comparison with histopathology and MRI/MRS findings or the evaluation together with biofluid metabolic-profiling data. PMID:20539278

  18. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated 'sampling problem' and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins.

  19. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  20. Interaction of the replication terminator protein (RTP) with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography

    Full text: The arrest of replication forks during the termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis is dependent upon the binding of the 30 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) to its cognate Ter binding site. Two adjacently bound dimers of RTP form a termination complex that can prevent the progression of a replication fork approaching from one direction, but not the other. The crystal structure of free RTP has previously been solved, but the precise orientation with which it binds to Ter sites remains unknown. This information is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of replication fork arrest. We have used NMR spectroscopy to observe 1H-15N correlations arising from 15N-labelled RTP mutant, and to track their perturbations upon the addition of DNA. This showed that 60% of the amino acid residues are affected by the DNA interaction, and also that the complex is symmetrical. Assignment of the 1H-15N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with 15N,13C,2H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. This revealed that α3-helices are involved in the binding interaction, and that the 'wings' of RTP may not be contributing to binding. Crystals of the complex have been grown from the NMR sample, and data collected to 3.1 Angstroms is anticipated to provide further molecular detail

  1. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  2. Magic-angle-spinning NMR (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy and the structure of zeolites

    After outlining the chemical features and properties which make zeolites such an important group of catalysts and sorbents, the article explains how high-resolution solid-state NMR with magic-angle spinning reveals numerous new insights into their structure. 29Si-MAS-NMR readily and quantitatively identifies five distinct Si(OAl)sub(n)(OSi)sub(4-n) structural groups in zeolitic frameworks (n=0,1,...4), corresponding to the first tetrahedral coordination shell of a silicon atom. Many catalytic and other chemical properties of zeolites are governed by the short-range Si, Al order, the nature of which is greatly clarified by 29Si-MAS-NMR. (orig./EF)

  3. 2H NMR and 13C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, 18O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: International collaborative study report

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the 13C/12C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the 18O/16O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring δ13C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per mille , and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per mille . As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources (δ13C and δ18O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring δ18O were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for other methods applied to wine and fruit juices: the

  4. 2H NMR and 13C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, 18O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: international collaborative study report.

    Thomas, Freddy; Jamin, Eric

    2009-09-01

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the 13C/12C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the 18O/16O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring delta13C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per thousand, and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per thousand. As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources (delta13C and delta18O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring delta18O were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for other methods applied to wine and

  5. Solid-state 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    Magusin, P.C.M.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of various 31P NMR experiments observed for intact virus particles of bacteriophage M13 and Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV), are presented. To explain the results in a consistent way, models are developed and tested. 31P nuclei in M13 and TMV are only present in the phosphodiesters of the encapsulated nucleic acid molecule. Therefore, 31P NMR spectroscopy reveals structural and dynamic properties of the nucleic acid backbone selectively without isotope labeling, even th...

  6. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    Antonio Sacco; Gino Vonghia; Francesco Giannico; Daniela Sacco; Vincenzo di Martino; Anna Caputi Jambrenghi; Maria Antonietta Brescia

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS), for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes ...

  7. A primer to nutritional metabolomics by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Savorani, Francesco; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Mikkelsen, Mette Skau;

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of using high throughput NMR metabolomics for nutritional studies with emphasis on the workflow and data analytical methods for generation of new knowledge. The paper describes one-by-one the major research activities in the interdisciplinary m...

  8. Stimuli-responsive copolymers studied by NMR spectroscopy

    Konefal, Rafal; Spěváček, Jiří; Petrova, Svetlana; Jäger, Eliezer

    Sofia : Institute of Polymers BAS, 2015. P1-18. [Challenges in Science and Technology of Polymer Materials. 19.05.2015-23.05.2015, Bansko] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-13853S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : NMR * stimuli -responsive polymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  9. Exchange NMR spectroscopy in solids: application in large-scale conformational biopolymer dynamics studies

    The exchange NMR experiment compares resonant frequencies of a magnetic nucleus before and after the so-called mixing time, thereby gaining molecular dynamics information on millisecond and second correlation time scales. Although exchange NMR experiments on solutions have a long history, conducting them on solids presents methodological challenges, and it was only in the late 1990s that solid-state exchange spectroscopy matured to the level where such complex entities as biopolymers could be addressed. In this review, major methodological advances in the field are examined and the application of exchange NMR experiments to conformational molecular dynamics of solid-state biopolymers is described. (reviews of topical problems)

  10. Alanine scan and (2)H NMR analysis of the membrane-active peptide BP100 point to a distinct carpet mechanism of action.

    Zamora-Carreras, Héctor; Strandberg, Erik; Mühlhäuser, Philipp; Bürck, Jochen; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Bruix, Marta; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-06-01

    The short membrane-active peptide BP100 [KKLFKKILKYL-NH2] is known as an effective antimicrobial and cell penetrating agent. For a functional alanine scan each of the 11 amino acids was replaced with deuterated Ala-d3, one at a time. MIC assays showed that a substitution of Lys did not affect the antimicrobial activity, but it decreased when a hydrophobic residue was replaced. In most cases, a reduction in hydrophobicity led to a decrease in hemolysis, and some peptide analogues had an improved therapeutic index. Circular dichroism showed that BP100 folds as an amphiphilic α-helix in a bilayer. Its alignment was determined from (2)H NMR in oriented membranes of different composition. The azimuthal rotation angle was the same under all conditions, but the average helix tilt angle and the dynamical behavior of the peptide varied in a systematic manner. In POPC/POPG bilayers, with a negative spontaneous curvature, the peptide was found to lie flat on the bilayer surface, and with little wobble. In DMPC/DMPG, with a positive spontaneous curvature, BP100 at higher concentrations became tilted obliquely into the membrane, with the uncharged C-terminus inserted more deeply into the lipid bilayer, experiencing significant fluctuations in tilt angle. In DMPC/DMPG/lyso-MPC, with a pronounced positive spontaneous curvature, the helix tilted even further and became even more mobile. The 11-mer BP100 is obviously too short to form transmembrane pores. We conclude that BP100 operates via a carpet mechanism, whereby the C-terminus gets inserted into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which leads to membrane perturbation and induces transient permeability. PMID:26975251

  11. Chemical applications of 99Tc NMR spectroscopy: preparation of novel Tc(VII) species and their characterization by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    The 99Tc NMR parameters of a number of Tc(VII) and one Tc(V) species have been determined. The anion TcO4- (ω = 22.508 311 MHz in H2O) was chosen as the standard for 99Tc NMR spectroscopy. A 99Tc-17O coupling constant of 131.4 Hz was obtained from a 17O- and 18O-enriched sample of TcO4- whose 99Tc spectrum also showed an isotopic shift of 0.22 ppm/mass number arising from a statistical distribution of 16O/17O/18O isotopic isomers. Technetium-99 and proton NMR provided definitive proof for the existence of the stereochemically nonrigid TcH92- anion. Both TcO3F and the novel TcO3+ cation were synthesized and characterized by 99Tc, 17O, and 19F NMR spectroscopy. Preliminary results on two new technetium(VII) oxyfluorides tentatively identified as F2O2TcOTcO2F2 and TcO2F3 are also reported. The diagmagnetic d2 anion, TcO2(CN)43-, represents the most deshielded 99Tc environment encountered in the present study

  12. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Metal–Organic Framework Compounds (MOFs

    Stefan Kaskel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy is a well-established method for the investigation of various types of porous materials. During the past decade, metal–organic frameworks have attracted increasing research interest. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has rapidly evolved into an important tool for the study of the structure, dynamics and flexibility of these materials, as well as for the characterization of host–guest interactions with adsorbed species such as xenon, carbon dioxide, water, and many others. The present review introduces and highlights recent developments in this rapidly growing field.

  13. Computational Analysis of Solvent Effects in NMR Spectroscopy.

    Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2010-01-12

    Solvent modeling became a standard part of first principles computations of molecular properties. However, a universal solvent approach is particularly difficult for the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding and spin-spin coupling constants that in part result from collective delocalized properties of the solute and the environment. In this work, bulk and specific solvent effects are discussed on experimental and theoretical model systems comprising solvated alanine zwitterion and chloroform molecules. Density functional theory computations performed on larger clusters indicate that standard dielectric continuum solvent models may not be sufficiently accurate. In some cases, more reasonable NMR parameters were obtained by approximation of the solvent with partial atomic charges. Combined cluster/continuum models yielded the most reasonable values of the spectroscopic parameters, provided that they are dynamically averaged. The roles of solvent polarizability, solvent shell structure, and bulk permeability were investigated. NMR shielding values caused by the macroscopic solvent magnetizability exhibited the slowest convergence with respect to the cluster size. For practical computations, however, inclusion of the first solvation sphere provided satisfactory corrections of the vacuum values. The simulations of chloroform chemical shifts and CH J-coupling constants were found to be very sensitive to the molecular dynamics model used to generate the cluster geometries. The results show that computationally efficient solvent modeling is possible and can reveal fine details of molecular structure, solvation, and dynamics. PMID:26614339

  14. Genetic algorithm optimized triply compensated pulses in NMR spectroscopy.

    Manu, V S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-11-01

    Sensitivity and resolution in NMR experiments are affected by magnetic field inhomogeneities (of both external and RF), errors in pulse calibration, and offset effects due to finite length of RF pulses. To remedy these problems, built-in compensation mechanisms for these experimental imperfections are often necessary. Here, we propose a new family of phase-modulated constant-amplitude broadband pulses with high compensation for RF inhomogeneity and heteronuclear coupling evolution. These pulses were optimized using a genetic algorithm (GA), which consists in a global optimization method inspired by Nature's evolutionary processes. The newly designed π and π/2 pulses belong to the 'type A' (or general rotors) symmetric composite pulses. These GA-optimized pulses are relatively short compared to other general rotors and can be used for excitation and inversion, as well as refocusing pulses in spin-echo experiments. The performance of the GA-optimized pulses was assessed in Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments using a crystalline U-(13)C, (15)N NAVL peptide as well as U-(13)C, (15)N microcrystalline ubiquitin. GA optimization of NMR pulse sequences opens a window for improving current experiments and designing new robust pulse sequences. PMID:26473327

  15. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  16. Hadamard-encoded high-resolution NMR spectroscopy via intermolecular single-quantum coherences

    Ke, Hanping; Cai, Honghao; Cai, Shuhui, E-mail: shcai@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yanqin, E-mail: linyq@xmu.edu.cn; Chen, Zhong

    2014-11-24

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A NMR pulse sequence is proposed based on intermolecular single-quantum coherence. • Hadamard encoding is utilized to shorten the acquisition time. • High-resolution NMR spectra can be retrieved under inhomogeneous magnetic fields. • Good solvent suppression efficiency can be achieved. • The proposed method facilitates analyses of heterogeneous biological tissues. - Abstract: NMR spectroscopy plays an important role in metabolite studies because it can provide atomic level information critical for understanding biological systems. Nevertheless, NMR investigations on biological tissues are hampered by the magnetic field inhomogeneities originating from variations in macroscopic magnetic susceptibility, which lead to broad spectral lines and subsequently obscure metabolite signals. A new pulse sequence based on intermolecular single-quantum coherences was proposed to obtain one-dimensional high-resolution NMR spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields via Hadamard encoding. The new method can provide resolution-improved spectra directly through one-dimensional acquisition within a relatively short acquisition time. Theoretical derivation was performed and the conclusion was tested by solution samples in purposely de-shimmed magnetic fields and pig brain tissue sample. The experimental results show that this sequence can yield useful structural information, even when the field inhomogeneity is sufficiently severe to erase almost all spectral information with conventional one-dimensional single-quantum coherence techniques. Moreover, good solvent suppression efficiency can be achieved by this sequence. This sequence may provide a promising way for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of biological tissue.

  17. Noninvasive study of high-energy phosphate metabolism in human heart by depth-resolved T P NMR spectroscopy

    Bottomley, P.A.

    1985-08-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra showing the relative concentrations of high-energy phosphate metabolites have been recorded noninvasively from the human heart in vivo. Spectral data were spatially localized by combining a pulsed magnetic field gradient with surface NMR excitation-detection coils. The location of the selected spectral region was determined by conventional proton NMR imaging immediately before examination by phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy. 22 references, 3 figures.

  18. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory

  19. Structural studies of PCU-hydrazones: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractions, and DFT calculations

    Veljković, Jelena; Šekutor, Marina; Molčanov, Krešimir; Lo, Rabindranath; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata

    2011-06-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for the configurational isomers of PCU-hydrazones. The structural characterization of these hydrazones was performed using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and theoretical calculations. The single crystal X-ray structures of PCU-hydrazones 6B and 6C have been solved and used to conclusively confirm the characterization obtained via NMR spectra of a particular isomer. Nuclear magnetic shielding values calculated for 6A-C using DFT calculations were correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The computed results were found to be in good agreement with the observed 13C NMR values. The computed NMR results helped to ascertain the isomers of PCU-hydrazones 4A-C.

  20. Photochromism of indolino-benzopyrans studied by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy

    M. M. Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of photochromic 3,3-di(4′-fluorophenyl-3H-benzopyrans fused to an indole moiety is described. The structures of photomerocyanines elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and spectrokinetic data (λmax⁡ of colored form, colorability, and rate constant of bleaching obtained by UV-visible spectroscopy are reported.

  1. Online T5 learning model to enhance chemistry students’ understanding of NMR spectroscopy

    Saksri Supasorn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regular lecture-based teaching approaches sometimes fail to enhance students’ understanding of some practice-based chemistry topics such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. A new task-based approach called the T5 learning model was introduced for 48 students studying NMR in the Spectroscopic Methods for Chemical Identification course in 2011. Four different NMR learning environments based on T5 learning models were developed. The students were requested to participate in the following online processes in each environment: 1 complete an individual task, 2 provide feedback and evaluate three anonymous peer tasks, 3 adjust their individual task and evaluate peer feedback, 4 complete a team task and evaluate the effort of each group member, and 5 get feedback from instructor to fulfill understanding. The result showed that the students obtained post-achievement NMR score (mean 24.25, SD 4.80 statistically significantly higher than pre- achievement score (mean 12.29, SD 1.69 at p-value of 0.05. In addition, the implementation of T5-D4LP NMR course in each year during 2010-2012 showed that the students achieved high score (about 70% in the NMR topics. The student evaluation of the T5 NMR learning environments revealed that they agreed that peer feedback with instructor facilitation engaged them in deep learning and effectively promoted their conceptual understanding.

  2. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon registered seat, and Kalrez registered O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample

  3. Magic angle spinning carbon-13 NMR of tobacco mosaic virus. An application of the high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy to very large biological systems.

    Hemminga, M A; Veeman, W.S.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.; Schaafsma, T J

    1981-01-01

    Magic angle spinning 13C NMR was used to study tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in solution. Well-resolved 13C NMR spectra were obtained, in which several carbon resonances of amino acids of the TMV coat protein subunits that are not observable by conventional high-resolution NMR spectroscopy can be designed. RNA resonance were absent, however, in the magic angle spinning 13C NMR spectra. Since three different binding sites are available for each nucleotide of the RNA, this is probably due to a lin...

  4. Determination of the DNA sugar pucker using 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of a series of crystalline nucleosides and nucleotides allows direct measurement of the effect of the deoxyribose ring conformation on the carbon chemical shift. It is found that 3'-endo conformers have 3' and 5' chemical shifts significantly (5-10 ppm) upfield of comparable 3'-exo and 2'-endo conformers. The latter two conformers may be distinguished by smaller but still significant differences in the carbon chemical shifts at the C-2' and C-4' positions. High-resolution solid-state NMR of three modifications of fibrous calf thymus DNA shows that these trends are maintained in high-molecular-weight DNA and confirms that the major ring pucker in A-DNA is 3'-endo, while both B-DNA and C-DNA are largely 2'-endo. The data show that 13C NMR spectroscopy is a straightforward and useful probe of DNA ring pucker in both solution and the solid state

  5. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  6. 19F NMR spectroscopy in monitoring fluorinated-solvent regeneration

    Extensive use is made of solvents such as trichloroethylene, freon-133, and perchloroethylene because they are good solvents for inorganic, plant, and animal greases, while the solvents can be recovered and there is no fire hazard. In this paper, the authors examined methods to monitor spent solution regeneration rapidly and with high accuracy. The authors tested perfluorinated telomeric alcohols as solvents for cleaning engineering components which have melting points of 60-120 degrees celsius. The higher working temperatures and the increased energy consumption are disadvantages of these solvents, but these are compensated for by the scope for using them virtually in the solid, liquid, and vapor states. The authors' proposed technology is based on solvents with melting points over 40 degrees celsius which produce virtually no wastes. The telomeric alcohols are recovered after cooling to normal conditions by separation from the oil by filtration and centrifugation, and they can be used in the next purification cycle. When the solvents have been regenerated, the petroleum products such as industrial oils can be reused for their original purpose. However, quantitative data are required on the solvent contents in the oil and the oil contents in the solvent in order to determine the degree of regeneration and the modes to be used. The authors have also proposed a quantitative method of determining traces of these alcohols in oils and residual oils in the solvent by fluorine NMR. All measurements were made with a BS497 NMR spectrometer

  7. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures

  8. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  9. Determination of the Nucleic Acid Adducts Structure at the Nucleoside/Nucleotide Level by NMR Spectroscopy

    Dračínský, Martin; Pohl, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2015), s. 155-165. ISSN 0893-228X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy * nucleic acids * nucleotides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.529, year: 2014

  10. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  11. Structural analysis of the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    This thesis deals with the structural analysis by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy of carbohydrate chains obtained from glycoproteins. In the chapters 1 to 6 the structural analysis of N-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains is described. The chapters 7 to 10 describe the structural analysis of O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains. 381 refs.; 44 figs.; 24 tabs.; 7 schemes

  12. Equilibrium in water-peroxide solutions of cesium tellurate studied by 125Te NMR spectroscopy

    Water-peroxide solutions of cesium tellurate are studied by the method of 125Te NMR spectroscopy. It is shown that there are different anionic forms of Te(VI) in equilibrium in the system studied, including compounds with coordinated peroxy- and hydroperoxy-groups

  13. Structure and Dynamics Studies of Cytolytic Peptides in Lipid Bilayers using NMR Spectroscopy

    Hansen, Sara Krogh

    2015-01-01

    different and cytolytic peptides were investigated in this work. The peptides were SPF-5506-A4 from Trichoderma sp, Conolysin-Mt1 from Conus mustelinus, and Alamethicin from Trichoderma viride. The studies employed solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy in combination with different biophysical methods...

  14. Nuclear delocalization of hydrogen atoms studied by PIMD simulations and NMR spectroscopy

    Dračínský, Martin; Hodgkinson, P.

    Debrecen: -, 2015. s. 71. [International Conference on Density Functional Theory and its Applications /16./. 31.08.2015-04.09.2015, Debrecen] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : path integral molecular dynamics * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  16. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  17. Structural rearrangements of membrane proteins probed by water-edited solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Ader, C.; Schneider, R.; Seidel, K.; Etzkorn, M.; Becker, S.; Baldus, M.

    2009-01-01

    We show that water-edited solid-state NMR spectroscopy allows for probing global protein conformation and residue-specific solvent accessibility in a lipid bilayer environment. The transfer dynamics can be well described by a general time constant, irrespective of protein topology and lipid environm

  18. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  19. Suppression of baseline artifacts in 1H NMR spectroscopy of diluted water solutions

    Suppression of baseline artifacts in 1H NMR spectroscopy of diluted aqueous solutions has been discussed. The time-domain technique capable of eliminating or lowering the baseline distortions in the spectra caused by the ringing of low pas filters has been proposed. Simultaneously, the problem of proper adjusting of the start of data acquisition have been discussed

  20. Two dimensional NMR spectroscopy in the structural elucidation of natural products

    The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in the structure elucidation of natural products is demonstrated using a himachalane type sesquiterpenoid as an example. It is shown that these methods can be applied without detailed knowledge about the physical and mathematical background. (author). 52 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Near constant loss regime in fast ionic conductors analyzed by impedance and NMR spectroscopies

    Bucheli, W.; Arbi, K.; Sanz, J.; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Kamba, Stanislav; Várez, A.; Jimenez, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 29 (2014), s. 15346-15354. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : microwave impedance spectroscopy * NMR * ionic conductivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014

  2. (13)C NMR assignments of regenerated cellulose from solid-state 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    Idström, Alexander; Schantz, Staffan; Sundberg, Johan; Chmelka, Bradley F; Gatenholm, Paul; Nordstierna, Lars

    2016-10-20

    From the assignment of the solid-state (13)C NMR signals in the C4 region, distinct types of crystalline cellulose, cellulose at crystalline surfaces, and disordered cellulose can be identified and quantified. For regenerated cellulose, complete (13)C assignments of the other carbon regions have not previously been attainable, due to signal overlap. In this study, two-dimensional (2D) NMR correlation methods were used to resolve and assign (13)C signals for all carbon atoms in regenerated cellulose. (13)C-enriched bacterial nanocellulose was biosynthesized, dissolved, and coagulated as highly crystalline cellulose II. Specifically, four distinct (13)C signals were observed corresponding to conformationally different anhydroglucose units: two signals assigned to crystalline moieties and two signals assigned to non-crystalline species. The C1, C4 and C6 regions for cellulose II were fully examined by global spectral deconvolution, which yielded qualitative trends of the relative populations of the different cellulose moieties, as a function of wetting and drying treatments. PMID:27474592

  3. In vivo P-31 NMR spectroscopy of human heart transplants

    Thirty-four studies in 13 cardiac transplant recipients undergoing endocardial biopsies were examined with gated spin-echo imaging, cine imaging, and P-31 spectroscopy. Localized phosphorus spectra from the anterior wall of the myocardium were compared with histologic findings in endocardial biopsy specimens obtained the same day. Pi/PCr proved to be a sensitive indicator of rejection (P < .001). The combined imaging and spectroscopic examination may represent a noninvasive monitor of rejection, eliminating the need for endocardial biopsies. The tendency demonstrated in these data suggests encouraging results for the utilization of P-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the noninvasive evaluation of transplant rejection

  4. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  5. Hadamard NMR spectroscopy for two-dimensional quantum information processing and parallel search algorithms.

    Gopinath, T; Kumar, Anil

    2006-12-01

    Hadamard spectroscopy has earlier been used to speed-up multi-dimensional NMR experiments. In this work, we speed-up the two-dimensional quantum computing scheme, by using Hadamard spectroscopy in the indirect dimension, resulting in a scheme which is faster and requires the Fourier transformation only in the direct dimension. Two and three qubit quantum gates are implemented with an extra observer qubit. We also use one-dimensional Hadamard spectroscopy for binary information storage by spatial encoding and implementation of a parallel search algorithm. PMID:17011221

  6. Monitoring electrochemical reactions in situ using steady-state free precession 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Highlights: • Analysis of electrochemical reaction in situ by 13C NMR spectroscopy was demonstrated. • 13C NMR signals are obtained in few minutes, using steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence. • The analysis is performed in standard NMR spectrometer. • KBDM can be an alternative to Fourier Transform to process SSFP signal. - Abstract: All attempts to use in situ13C NMR in spectroelectrochemical studies, using static cells and unlabeled substrates, have failed due to the very long average time (several hours). In this paper, we demonstrated that steady-state free precession (SSFP) pulse sequence can enhance signal to noise ratio and reduces the average time of 13C NMR signals by more than one order of magnitude. The results showed that each 13C NMR spectrum during the electrochemical reduction of 9-chloroanthracene, in a static cell, can be acquired in eleven minutes. This short averaging time allowed the analysis of the reaction every 30 min during 3 h. The phase and truncation anomalies present in SSFP spectra were minimized using Traff apodization function and Krylov basis diagonalization method (KBDM)

  7. Uptake of BSH in M2R melanoma cells monitored by NMR spectroscopy

    The accumulation ratio of BSH, relative to that of boric acid, in M2R mouse melanoma cells, was measured using 11B NMR of the cell extracts. The cells were incubated in growth medium for up to 24 h, in the presence of 0.8 mM boric acid and 0.25-1.5 mM BSH. The aqueous phase of the cellular extracts was re-suspended for NMR spectroscopy. The relative accumulation ratio of BSH/boric acid determined from 9 separate experiments was 0.45±0.09. (author)

  8. Grape juice quality control by means of ¹H nmr spectroscopy and chemometric analyses

    Caroline Werner Pereira da Silva Grandizoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the application of ¹H NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics for quality control of grape juice. A wide range of quality assurance parameters were assessed by single ¹H NMR experiments acquired directly from juice. The investigation revealed that conditions and time of storage should be revised and indicated on all labels. The sterilization process of homemade grape juices was efficient, making it possible to store them for long periods without additives. Furthermore, chemometric analysis classified the best commercial grape juices to be similar to homemade grape juices, indicating that this approach can be used to determine the authenticity after adulteration.

  9. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    13C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific 13C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient 13C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets

  10. 31P NMR spectroscopy of tumors in the evaluation of response to therapy

    In this thesis the effects of different kinds of therapy on tumour metabolism were investigated by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy. From the first five chapters (laboratory-animal studies) it turns out that after radiotherapy as well as after hyperthermy or chemoterapy changes can be observed in the 31P NMR spectra of tumours. In a number of cases a durable decline occurred in the ratio of the high-energetic adenosinephosphate (ATP) and the low-energeic anorganic phosphate, cuased by the mortification of tumourcells. On the other hand, tumour regression after effective chemotherapy resulted in a growth of the ATP/Pi ratio. In one case a temporary drop occurred which could be related to a temporary decrease in tumour perfusion. In anoter case a temporary drop of the ATP/Pi ratio correlated with resistence against treatment with cis-diaminodichoroplatina. In contrast with the changes in ATP/Pi ratio, the changes, after (chemo)therapy, in tumour pH do not seem to be related with the respons of the tumour. The results of the laboratory-animal experiments indicate that in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy could be applied in the clinic in order to establish betime the response of tumours on therapy. In ch. 6 initial experiences with clinical NMR spectroscopy of human breast cancer are described. The results indicate that by 31P NMR spectroscopy malignant breast tissues can be discerned from normal breast tissues, following radiotherapy and subsequent tumour regression, in the spectrum of the tumorous region an intense PCr signal developed which appeared to reflect a metabolic change in the tumous itself. 177 refs.; 27 figs.; 6 tabs

  11. Quantitative analysis of water heavy by NMR spectroscopy

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has been applied to a wide variety of quantitative problems. A typical example has been the determination of isotopic composition. In this paper two different analytical methods for the determination of water in deuterium oxide are described. The first one, employs acetonitril as an internal standard compound and in the second one calibration curve of signal integral curve versus amount of D2O is constructed. Both methods give results comparable to those of mass spectrometry of IR spectroscopy. (Author) 5 refs

  12. Evidence for a dipolar-coupled AM system in carnosine in human calf muscle from in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Schröder, Leif; Bachert, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Spin systems with residual dipolar couplings such as creatine, taurine, and lactate in skeletal muscle tissue exhibit first-order spectra in in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T because the coupled protons are represented by (nearly) symmetrized eigenfunctions. The imidazole ring protons (H2, H4) of carnosine are suspected to form also a coupled system. The ring's stiffness could enable a connectivity between these anisochronous protons with the consequence of second-order spectra at low field strength. Our purpose was to study whether this deviation from the Paschen-Back condition can be used to detect the H2-H4 coupling in localized 1D 1H NMR spectra obtained at 1.5 T (64 MHz) from the human calf in a conventional whole-body scanner. As for the hydrogen hyperfine interaction, a Breit-Rabi equation was derived to describe the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime for two dipolar-coupled protons. The ratio of the measurable coupling strength ( Sk) and the difference in resonance frequencies of the coupled spins (Δ ω) induces quantum-state mixing of various degree upon definition of an appropriate eigenbase of the coupled spin system. The corresponding Clebsch-Gordan coefficients manifest in characteristic energy corrections in the Breit-Rabi formula. These additional terms were used to define an asymmetry parameter of the line positions as a function of Sk and Δ ω. The observed frequency shifts of the resonances were found to be consistent with this parameter within the accuracy achievable in in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Thus it was possible to identify the origin of satellite peaks of H2, H4 and to describe this so far not investigated type of residual dipolar coupling in vivo.

  13. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  14. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Schwartz, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

  15. 15N NMR spectroscopy of Pseudomonas cytochrome c-551

    15N-1H correlation spectroscopy with detection at the 1H frequency has been used at natural abundance to detect nitrogen nuclei bonded to protons in the ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429). Side-chain aromatic nitrogen, main-chain amides, and side-chain amides have been assigned to specific residues by comparison to previous proton assignments. Assignment ambiguities arising from overlap in the proton dimension have been resolved by examining spectra as a function of temperature and pH. Nitrogen chemical shifts are reported at pH 4.6 and 9.4 and three temperatures, 32, 50, and 60 degree C. Significant differences arise from the observed protein shifts and expected shifts in the random coil polypeptide

  16. Characterisation of oxygen permeation into a microfluidic device for cell culture by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Yilmaz, Ali; Utz, Marcel

    2016-05-24

    A compact microfluidic device for perfusion culture of mammalian cells under in situ metabolomic observation by NMR spectroscopy is presented. The chip is made from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and uses a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane to allow gas exchange. It is integrated with a generic micro-NMR detector developed recently by our group [J. Magn. Reson., 2016, 262, 73-80]. While PMMA is an excellent material in the context of NMR, PDMS is known to produce strong background signals. To mitigate this, the device keeps the PDMS away from the detection area. The oxygen permeation into the device is quantified using a flow chemistry approach. A solution of glucose is mixed on the chip with a solution of glucose oxidase, before flowing through the gas exchanger. The resulting concentration of gluconate is measured by (1)H NMR spectroscopy as a function of flow rate. An oxygen equilibration rate constant of 2.4 s(-1) is found for the device, which is easily sufficient to maintain normoxic conditions in a cell culture at low perfusion flow rates. PMID:27149932

  17. Metabolic profiling, metabolomic and metabonomic procedures for NMR spectroscopy of urine, plasma, serum and tissue extracts.

    Beckonert, Olaf; Keun, Hector C; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Bundy, Jacob; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic profiling, metabolomic and metabonomic studies mainly involve the multicomponent analysis of biological fluids, tissue and cell extracts using NMR spectroscopy and/or mass spectrometry (MS). We summarize the main NMR spectroscopic applications in modern metabolic research, and provide detailed protocols for biofluid (urine, serum/plasma) and tissue sample collection and preparation, including the extraction of polar and lipophilic metabolites from tissues. 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques such as standard 1D spectroscopy, relaxation-edited, diffusion-edited and 2D J-resolved pulse sequences are widely used at the analysis stage to monitor different groups of metabolites and are described here. They are often followed by more detailed statistical analysis or additional 2D NMR analysis for biomarker discovery. The standard acquisition time per sample is 4-5 min for a simple 1D spectrum, and both preparation and analysis can be automated to allow application to high-throughput screening for clinical diagnostic and toxicological studies, as well as molecular phenotyping and functional genomics. PMID:18007604

  18. Biosynthetic studies on mycotoxins using multiple stable isotope labelling and NMR spectroscopy

    The biosynthesis of terretonin and mevinolin, polyketide metabolites from mycotoxin-producing Aspergillus terreus strains, have been examined by incorporation of precursors multiply-labelled with 13C, 18O, and 2H. A variety of one and two dimensional NMR techniques permit facile spectral assignment and location of labelled sites. The results show that the polyketide parts of both metabolites, terretonin and mevinolin, are assembled by enzymes similar to those of fatty acid biosynthesis and that extensive oxidative transformation occurs in the later stages of biosynthesis. 25 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 table

  19. Analysis and aging of unsaturated polyester resins in contemporary art installations by NMR spectroscopy.

    Stamatakis, Georgios; Knuutinen, Ulla; Laitinen, Kai; Spyros, Apostolos

    2010-12-01

    Two original art installations constructed from unsaturated polyester resins (UPR) and four different reference UPR products (before and after UVB aging) were analyzed by high-resolution 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Breaking strain studies were also conducted for the four UPR model products before and after different aging procedures (moisture, UVB exposure, melt/freeze). NMR analysis of the chemical composition of the UPR resin extracts showed they contain several low MW organic compounds and oligomers rich in polar -OH groups that play a significant role in the degradation behavior of the composite UPR materials. Statistical analysis of the NMR compositional data showed that styrene and benzaldehyde contents can be used to differentiate between fresh and aged UPR samples. The phthalate and propylene glycol unit speciation (esterified, primary or secondary -OH) of the extracts provided evidence that UPR resin C was used in the construction of the two art installations, and direct comparison of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra verified this compositional similarity. UPR resin C was shown by both NMR and breaking strain studies to be the reference UPR most susceptible to degradation by different aging procedures, a characteristic attributed to the lower styrene content of resin C. PMID:20922516

  20. 31P-NMR spectroscopy and histological studies of the response of rat mammary tumours to endocrine therapy.

    Stubbs, M.; Coombes, R C; Griffiths, J R; Maxwell, R J; Rodrigues, L. M.; Gusterson, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    We have shown by 31P-NMR spectroscopy that ovariectomy, in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced mammary adenocarcinomas, increases signals from phosphocreatine (PCr) relative to nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) before measurable regression (2 days) and for at least a further 13 days. The present study correlates the NMR changes with histological changes in the regressing tumour. Mammary tumours were examined by NMR before, and 2 and 14 days after, ovariectomy or sham-ovariectomy. Sections were taken f...

  1. Protolytic properties of polyamine wasp toxin analogues studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Piazzi, Lorna; Olsen, Christian A;

    2006-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the natural polyamine wasp toxin PhTX-433 (1) and seven synthetic analogues [PhTX-343 (2), PhTX-334 (3), PhTX-443 (4), PhTX-434 (5), PhTX-344 (6), PhTX-444 (7), and PhTX-333 (8)], each having four protolytic sites, were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Nonlinear, mul...

  2. Stimuli-responsive polymers in solution investigated by NMR and infrared spectroscopy

    Spěváček, Jiří; Dybal, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 1 (2011), s. 17-25. ISSN 1022-1360. [International IUPAC Conference on Polymer-solvent Complexes and Intercalates /8./. Strasbourg, 05.07.2010-08.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1281 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : aqueous solutions * infrared spectroscopy * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  3. Resonance-assisted stabilisation of hydrogen bonds probed by NMR spectroscopy and path integral molecular dynamics

    Dračínský, Martin; Čechová, Lucie; Hodgkinson, P.; Procházková, Eliška; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 73 (2015), s. 13986-13989. ISSN 1359-7345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : polysubstituted 5-nitrosopyrimidines * chemical shifts * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.834, year: 2014 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cc/c5cc05199a

  4. Analysis of metabolic disorders of dairy cows employing multidimensional and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Klein, Matthias S.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, metabolism profiles of different diseases were measured in body fluids and tissues using high-resolution one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) proton (1H) and carbon-13 (13C) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at natural 13C abundance. Protocols for measuring and quantifying low-molecular weight organic molecules in urine, milk, plasma, serum and tissue extracts were established and validated by comparison with established analytical techniques such as gas c...

  5. Statistical contributrion to the analysis of metabonomic data in 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    Rousseau, Réjane

    2011-01-01

    This thesis provides a complete methodology to lead a metabonomic study from the data acquisition to the discovery of biomarkers. Metabonomics aims to discover biomarkers or the metabolites altered in biological reactions. 1H-NMR spectroscopy is used to generate spectral profiles describing the composition of metabolites in collected biofluid samples. Statistical comparisons of spectra obtained in various biological states permits a quantitative investigation of metabolites changes inherent t...

  6. Metabolic phenotyping by 1H-NMR spectroscopy detects lung cancer via a simple blood sample

    Louis,Evelyne; MESOTTEN, Liesbet; Thomeer, Michiel; Vandeurzen, Kurt; Darquennes, Karen; Vanhove, Karolien; Reekmans, Gunter; Adriaensens, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. There is an urgent need of effective methods to detect lung cancer. Accumulating evidence shows that the metabolism of cancer cells differs from that of normal cells. Disturbances in biochemical pathways which occur during the development of cancer provoke changes in the metabolic phenotype. Objective: To determine the metabolic phenotype of lung cancer by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Methods: Fasting venous blood samples of 78...

  7. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched

  8. Self-Assembled Ionophores from Isoguanosine: Diffusion NMR Spectroscopy Clarifies Cation's and Anion's Influence on Supramolecular Structure

    Evan-Salem, Tamar; Frish, Limor; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.; Reinhoudt, David N.; Verboom, Willem; Kaucher, Mark S.; Davis, Jeffery T.; Cohen, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Cation-templated self-assembly of the lipophilic isoguanosine (isoG 1) with different monovalent cations (M+=Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, and Cs+) was studied in solvents of different polarity by using diffusion NMR spectroscopy. Previous studies that did not use diffusion NMR techniques concluded that isoG

  9. Application of magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy in study of metabolic processes in the anterior segment of the eye

    Midelfart, A.; Risa, O.; Saether, O.; Löfgren, S.; Söderberg, P. G.; Krane, J.; Čejková, Jitka

    Tampere, 2002. s. 71. [Nordic Congress of Ophthalmology /35./. 23.08.2002-27.08.2002, Tampere - Finland] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  10. Application of NMR spectroscopy in the study of metabolic changes in the anterior segment of the eye

    Midelfart, A.; Saether, O.; Risa, O.; Soderberg, P. G.; Krane, J.; Čejková, Jitka

    Prague, 2002. s. 28. [International Symposium on Cornea and Contact Lenses .. 07.12.2002-10.12.2002, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  11. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    Jean-Claude Debouzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA and cyclosporine A (CYSP were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P. Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD.

  12. Structural polymorphism in new organic-inorganic hybrid: Pyrazolium bromoantimonates(III) [C 3N 2H 5] 6Sb 4Br 18·2H 2O (tetragonal and triclinic forms). Thermal, dielectric and proton magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) studies on the tetragonal form

    Piecha, A.; Białońska, A.; Jakubas, R.; Medycki, W.

    2008-11-01

    Two polymorphic forms of pyrazolium bromoantimonates(III) - [C 3N 2H 5] 6Sb 4Br 18·2H 2O: α modification - tetragonal form and β modification - triclinic form, have been synthesized and structurally characterized at 100 K. The α-polymorph consists of a unique three-dimensional (3D) anionic substructure built up of cyclic tetramers and discrete chains linked to each other, three nonequivalent pyrazolium cations and water molecules. The β-polymorph is characterized by discrete cyclic anionic tetramers [Sb 4Br 18] -6, three nonequivalent cations and water molecules. The physical properties have been studied for the [C 3N 2H 5] 6Sb 4Br 18·2H 2O (α form). The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed a complex sequence of phase transitions above room temperature. The low-frequency dielectric relaxation process was found to appear at low temperatures, which was assigned to the dynamics of dipolar pyrazolium cations. The molecular motions of the pyrazolium cations in the α-polymorph were studied in a wide temperature range by means of a proton magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) technique. Two minima of the spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1) are disclosed: at low temperatures a wide one attributed to a small-angle-libration of cations and motion of water molecules, whereas the high temperature one assigned to the reorientation of cation about its pseudo-fivefold axis.

  13. Probing structure and dynamics of protein assemblies by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Yan, Si; Suiter, Christopher L; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-09-17

    In living organisms, biological molecules often organize into multicomponent complexes. Such assemblies consist of various proteins and carry out essential functions, ranging from cell division, transport, and energy transduction to catalysis, signaling, and viral infectivity. To understand the biological functions of these assemblies, in both healthy and disease states, researchers need to study their three-dimensional architecture and molecular dynamics. To date, the large size, the lack of inherent long-range order, and insolubility have made atomic resolution studies of many protein assemblies challenging or impractical using traditional structural biology methods such as X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. In the past 10 years, we have focused our work on the development and application of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS NMR) methods to characterize large protein assemblies at atomic-level resolution. In this Account, we discuss the rapid progress in the field of MAS NMR spectroscopy, citing work from our laboratory and others on methodological developments that have facilitated the in-depth analysis of biologically important protein assemblies. We emphasize techniques that yield enhanced sensitivity and resolution, such as fast MAS (spinning frequencies of 40 kHz and above) and nonuniform sampling protocols for data acquisition and processing. We also discuss the experiments for gaining distance restraints and for recoupling anisotropic tensorial interactions under fast MAS conditions. We give an overview of sample preparation approaches when working with protein assemblies. Following the overview of contemporary MAS NMR methods, we present case studies into the structure and dynamics of two classes of biological systems under investigation in our laboratory. We will first turn our attention to cytoskeletal microtubule motor proteins including mammalian dynactin and dynein light chain 8. We will then discuss protein assemblies from the

  14. Membrane topology of a 14-mer model amphipathic peptide: a solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    Ouellet, Marise; Doucet, Jean-Daniel; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction between a synthetic amphipathic 14-mer peptide and model membranes by solid-state NMR. The 14-mer peptide is composed of leucines and phenylalanines modified by the addition of crown ethers and forms a helical amphipathic structure in solution and bound to lipid membranes. To shed light on its membrane topology, 31P, 2H, 15N solid-state NMR experiments have been performed on the 14-mer peptide in interaction with mechanically oriented bilayers of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The 31P, 2H, and 15N NMR results indicate that the 14-mer peptide remains at the surface of the DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers stacked between glass plates and perturbs the lipid orientation relative to the magnetic field direction. Its membrane topology is similar in DLPC and DMPC bilayers, whereas the peptide seems to be more deeply inserted in DPPC bilayers, as revealed by the greater orientational and motional disorder of the DPPC lipid headgroup and acyl chains. 15N{31P} rotational echo double resonance experiments have also been used to measure the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between the 14-mer peptide and the phospholipid headgroup of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and the results indicate that the 14-mer peptide is in contact with the polar region of the DMPC lipids. On the basis of these studies, the mechanism of membrane perturbation of the 14-mer peptide is associated to the induction of a positive curvature strain induced by the peptide lying on the bilayer surface and seems to be independent of the bilayer hydrophobic thickness. PMID:17487978

  15. Stereochemistry of 16a-Hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene Established by 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    Vagner Fernandes Knupp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Friedelin (1, 3b-friedelinol (2, 28-hydroxyfriedelin (3, 16a-hydroxyfriedelin (4, 30-hydroxyfriedelin (5 and 16a,28-dihydroxyfriedelin (6 were isolated through fractionation of the hexane extract obtained from branches of Salacia elliptica. After a week in CDCl3 solution, 16a-hydroxyfriedelin (4 reacted turning into 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (7. This is the first report of a dehydration followed by a Nametkin rearrangement of a pentacyclic triterpene in CDCl3 solution occurring in the NMR tube. These seven pentacyclic triterpenes was identified through NMR spectroscopy and the stereochemistry of compound 4 and 7 was established by 2D NMR (NOESY spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (GC-MS. It is also the first time that all the 13C-NMR and 2D NMR spectral data are reported for compounds 4 and 7.

  16. Study of radiation induced changes of phosphorus metabolism in mice by 31P NMR spectroscopy

    The aim of this study was to examine whether 31P NMR can efficiently detect X-ray radiation induced changes of energy metabolism in mice. Exposure to ionizing radiation causes changes in energy supply that are associated with the tissue damage because of oxidative stress and uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation. This has as a consequence decreased phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate ratio (Pcr/ATP) as well as increased creatine kinase (CK) and liver enzymes (transaminases AST and ALT) levels in serum. In this study, experimental mice that received 7 Gy of X-ray radiation and a control group were studied by 31P NMR spectroscopy and biochemically by measuring CK and liver enzyme levels in plasma. Mice (irradiated and control) were measured at regular time intervals for the next three weeks after the exposure to radiation. A significant change in the Pcr/ATP ratio, determined from corresponding peaks of 31P NMR spectra, was observed in the 7 Gy group 2 days or more after the irradiation, while no significant change in the Pcr/ATP ratio, was observed in the control group. This result was supported by parallel measurements of CK levels that were highly increased immediately after the irradiation which correlates with the observed decrease of the Pcr/ATP ratio and with it associated drop of muscle energy supply. The 31P NMR measurements of the Pcr/ATP ratio can in principle serve as an instantaneous and noninvasive index for assessment of the received dose of irradiation

  17. μHigh resolution-magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy for metabolic phenotyping of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Wong, Alan; Li, Xiaonan; Molin, Laurent; Solari, Florence; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2014-06-17

    Analysis of model organisms, such as the submillimeter-size Caenorhabditis elegans, plays a central role in understanding biological functions across species and in characterizing phenotypes associated with genetic mutations. In recent years, metabolic phenotyping studies of C. elegans based on (1)H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have relied on the observation of large populations of nematodes, requiring labor-intensive sample preparation that considerably limits high-throughput characterization of C. elegans. In this work, we open new platforms for metabolic phenotyping of C. elegans mutants. We determine rich metabolic profiles (31 metabolites identified) from samples of 12 individuals using a (1)H NMR microprobe featuring high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS), a simple conversion of a standard HR-MAS probe to μHR-MAS. In addition, we characterize the metabolic variations between two different strains of C. elegans (wild-type vs slcf-1 mutant). We also acquire a NMR spectrum of a single C. elegans worm at 23.5 T. This study represents the first example of a metabolomic investigation carried out on a small number of submillimeter-size organisms, demonstrating the potential of NMR microtechnologies for metabolomics screening of small model organisms. PMID:24897622

  18. Characterization of the insertase BamA in three different membrane mimetics by solution NMR spectroscopy

    The insertase BamA is the central protein of the Bam complex responsible for outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria. BamA features a 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel and five periplasmic POTRA domains, with a total molecular weight of 88 kDa. Whereas the structure of BamA has recently been determined by X-ray crystallography, its functional mechanism is not well understood. This mechanism comprises the insertion of substrates from a dynamic, chaperone-bound state into the bacterial outer membrane, and NMR spectroscopy is thus a method of choice for its elucidation. Here, we report solution NMR studies of different BamA constructs in three different membrane mimetic systems: LDAO micelles, DMPC:DiC7PC bicelles and MSP1D1:DMPC nanodiscs. The impact of biochemical parameters on the spectral quality was investigated, including the total protein concentration and the detergent:protein ratio. The barrel of BamA is folded in micelles, bicelles and nanodiscs, but the N-terminal POTRA5 domain is flexibly unfolded in the absence of POTRA4. Measurements of backbone dynamics show that the variable insertion region of BamA, located in the extracellular lid loop L6, features high local flexibility. Our work establishes biochemical preparation schemes for BamA, which will serve as a platform for structural and functional studies of BamA and its role within the Bam complex by solution NMR spectroscopy

  19. Ultrafast double-quantum NMR spectroscopy with optimized sensitivity for the analysis of mixtures.

    Rouger, Laetitia; Gouilleux, Boris; Pourchet-Gellez, Mariane; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-02-15

    Ultrafast (UF) 2D NMR enables the acquisition of 2D spectra within a single-scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool, used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width and resolution. With the commonly used UF-COSY pulse sequence, resolution issues are compounded by the presence of strong auto-correlation signals, particularly in the case of samples with high dynamic ranges. The recently proposed concept of UF Double Quantum Spectroscopy (DQS) allows a better peak separation as it provides a lower spectral peak density. This paper presents the detailed investigation of this new NMR tool in an analytical chemistry context. Theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are used to characterize the modulation of peak intensities as a function of pulse-sequence parameters, and thus enable a significant enhancement of the sensitivity. The analytical comparison of UF-COSY and UF-DQS shows similar performances, however the ultrafast implementation of the DQS approach is found to have some sensitivity advantages over its conventional counterpart. The analytical performance of the pulse sequence is illustrated by the quantification of taurine in complex mixtures (homemade and commercial energy drinks). The results demonstrate the high potential of this experiment, which forms a valuable alternative to UF-COSY spectra when the latter are characterized by strong overlaps and high dynamic ranges. PMID:26865359

  20. Characterization of the insertase BamA in three different membrane mimetics by solution NMR spectroscopy

    Morgado, Leonor; Zeth, Kornelius; Burmann, Björn M.; Maier, Timm; Hiller, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.hiller@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Biozentrum (Switzerland)

    2015-04-15

    The insertase BamA is the central protein of the Bam complex responsible for outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria. BamA features a 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel and five periplasmic POTRA domains, with a total molecular weight of 88 kDa. Whereas the structure of BamA has recently been determined by X-ray crystallography, its functional mechanism is not well understood. This mechanism comprises the insertion of substrates from a dynamic, chaperone-bound state into the bacterial outer membrane, and NMR spectroscopy is thus a method of choice for its elucidation. Here, we report solution NMR studies of different BamA constructs in three different membrane mimetic systems: LDAO micelles, DMPC:DiC{sub 7}PC bicelles and MSP1D1:DMPC nanodiscs. The impact of biochemical parameters on the spectral quality was investigated, including the total protein concentration and the detergent:protein ratio. The barrel of BamA is folded in micelles, bicelles and nanodiscs, but the N-terminal POTRA5 domain is flexibly unfolded in the absence of POTRA4. Measurements of backbone dynamics show that the variable insertion region of BamA, located in the extracellular lid loop L6, features high local flexibility. Our work establishes biochemical preparation schemes for BamA, which will serve as a platform for structural and functional studies of BamA and its role within the Bam complex by solution NMR spectroscopy.

  1. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    Tomasz Kryczka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years. The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative control of carbonated cola beverages using ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    Maes, Pauline; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Reusch, Helmut; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2012-03-21

    ¹H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D₂O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as "fingerprints" and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  3. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    E. Finessi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1 and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions.

    The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls. Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA, based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of

  4. Structure of the inactivating gate from the Shaker voltage gated K+ channel analyzed by NMR spectroscopy

    Rapid inactivation of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels is mediated by an N-terminal domain (inactivating ball domain) which blocks the open channel from the cytoplasmic side. Inactivating ball domains of various KV channels are also biologically active when synthesized separately and added as a peptide to the solution. Synthetic inactivating ball domains from different KV channels with hardly any sequence homology mediate quite similar effects even on unrelated KV channel subtypes whose inactivation domain has been deleted. The solution structure of the inactivating ball peptide from Shaker (Sh-P22) was analyzed with NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data indicate a non-random structure in an aqueous environment. However, while other inactivating ball peptides showed well-defined three-dimensional structures under these conditions, Sh-P22 does not have a unique, compactly folded structure in solution. (orig.)

  5. Remeasuring HEWL pKa values by NMR spectroscopy 

    Webb, Helen; Tynan-Connolly, Barbara Mary; Lee, Gregory M; Farrell, Damien; O'Meara, Fergal; Søndergaard, Chresten R; Teilum, Kaare; Hewage, Chandralal; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Nielsen, Jens Erik

    2011-01-01

    protonated carbons and protons in this protein. We extracted pK(a) values from the resulting titration curves using standard fitting methods, and compared these values to each other, and with those measured previously by ¹H NMR (Bartik et al., Biophys J 1994;66:1180–1184). This analysis gives insights into......Site-specific pK(a) values measured by NMR spectroscopy provide essential information on protein electrostatics, the pH-dependence of protein structure, dynamics and function, and constitute an important benchmark for protein pK(a) calculation algorithms. Titration curves can be measured by...... field effects, and conformational changes. We have re-measured titration curves for all carboxylates and His 15 in Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) by recording the pH-dependent chemical shifts of all backbone amide nitrogens and protons, Asp/Glu side chain protons and carboxyl carbons, and imidazole...

  6. An instrument control and data analysis program for NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    We describe a software environment created to support real-time instrument control and signal acquisition as well as array-processor based signal and image processing in up to five dimensions. The environment is configured for NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. It is designed to provide flexible tools for implementing novel NMR experiments in the research laboratory. Data acquisition and processing operations are programmed in macros which are loaded in assembled from to minimize instruction overhead. Data arrays are dynamically allocated for efficient use of memory and can be mapped directly into disk files. The command set includes primitives for real-time control of data acquisition, scalar arithmetic, string manipulation, branching, a file system and vector operations carried out by an array processor. 6 figs

  7. Classification of Wines Based on Combination of 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Principal Component Analysis

    DU, Yuan-Yuan; BAI, Guo-Yun; ZHANG, Xu; LIU, Mai-Li

    2007-01-01

    A combination of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA)has shown the potential for being a useful method for classification of type, production origin or geographic origin of wines. In this preliminary study, twenty-one bottled wines were classified/separated for their location of production in Shacheng, Changli and Yantai, and the types of the blended, medium dry, dry white and dry red wines, using the NMR-PCA method. The wines were produced by three subsidiary companies of an enterprise according to the same national standard. The separation was believed to be mainly due to the fermentation process for different wines and environmental variations, such as local climate, soil, underground water, sunlight and rainfall. The major chemicals associated with the separation were identified.

  8. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    Clark, Lindsay; Zahm, Jacob A.; Ali, Rustam [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Biophysics (United States); Kukula, Maciej; Bian, Liangqiao [University of Texas at Arlington, Shimadzu Center for Advanced Analytical Chemistry (United States); Patrie, Steven M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Pathology (United States); Gardner, Kevin H. [CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, Structural Biology Initiative (United States); Rosen, Michael K.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M., E-mail: dan.rosenbaum@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    2015-07-15

    {sup 13}C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific {sup 13}C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient {sup 13}C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets.

  9. Structural studies of pravastatin and simvastatin and their complexes with SDS micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    Rakhmatullin, I. Z.; Galiullina, L. F.; Klochkova, E. A.; Latfullin, I. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational features of pravastatin and simvastatin molecules in solution and in their complexes with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles (SDS) were studied by 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiments it was established that pravastatin and simvastatin can form molecular complex with SDS micelles which were considered as the model of cell membrane. In addition, interatomic distances for studied compounds were calculated based on 2D NOESY NMR experiments. It was shown that pravastatin interacts only with a surface of model membrane. However, in contrast to pravastatin, simvastatin penetrates into the inner part of SDS micelles. Observed distinctions in the mechanisms of interaction of pravastatin and simvastatin with models of cell membranes could explain the differences in their pharmacological properties.

  10. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    Antonio Sacco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS, for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes it pos-  sible to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about chemical composition, both quickly and without any par-  ticular preparation of the sample to be analysed. Finally, the study highlights the potentiality of this method in defining  the origin of meat and the possibility of identifying meat adulteration. 

  11. Monitoring of the insecticide trichlorfon by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is extensively being used for protection of fruit crops. Trichlorfon is a thermal labile compound, which cannot be easily determined by gas chromatography (GC) and has no suitable group for sensitive detection by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this study, a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) has been described for monitoring of trichlorfon without any separation step. The quantitative works of 31P NMR spectroscopy has been performed in the presence of an internal standard (hexamethylphosphoramide). Limit of detection (LOD) for this method has been found to be 55 mg L-1, without any sample preparation, and the linear working range was 150-5500 mg L-1. Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method for three replicates within and between days was obtained ≤9%. The average recovery efficiency was approximately 99-112%. This method was applied for monitoring trichlorfon in a commercial insecticide sample and tomato sample

  12. Preparation of partially 2H/13C-labelled RNA for NMR studies. Stereo-specific deuteration of the H5′′ in nucleotides

    Cromsigt, Jenny; Schleucher, Jürgen; Gustafsson, Tomas; Kihlberg, Jan; Wijmenga, Sybren

    2002-01-01

    An effective in vitro enzymatic synthesis is described for the production of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) which are stereo-specifically deuterated on the H5′′ position with high selectivity (>98%), and which can have a variety of different labels (13C, 15N, 2H) in other positions. The NTPs can subsequently be employed in the enzymatic synthesis of RNAs using T7 polymerase from a DNA template. The stereo-specific deuteration of the H5′′ immediately provides the stereo-specific assignment of...

  13. Microfabricated inserts for magic angle coil spinning (MACS wireless NMR spectroscopy.

    Vlad Badilita

    Full Text Available This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the "magic angle" of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning - MAS, accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds.

  14. Characterization of the major nutritional components of Caryocar brasiliense fruit pulp by NMR spectroscopy

    Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Camb.), a typical fruit of Brazilian Cerrado, is well known in regional cookery and used in folk medicine to treat various illnesses. Mass spectrometry and chromatographic methods have identified the organic composition of pequi fruit pulp; however, NMR spectroscopy is used for the first time to characterize the nutritional components of organic and aqueous-ethanolic extracts. This spectroscopic technique determined the triacylglycerols in the pequi organic fraction, which is constituted mainly by oleate and palmitate esters, and detected the carbohydrate mixtures as the major components of aqueous and ethanolic fractions, respectively. In this study, presence of phenolic compounds was only evidenced in the ethanolic fraction. (author)

  15. Enzymatic decomposition of a locked nucleoside phosphoramidate monitored by 31P NMR spectroscopy

    Procházková, Eliška; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Nencka, Radim; Dračínský, Martin

    Praha : Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry AS CR, v. v. i, 2014 - (Hocek, M.), s. 356-357 ISBN 978-80-86241-50-0. - (Collection Symposium Series. 14). [Symposium on Chemistry of Nucleic Acid Components /16./. Český Krumlov (CZ), 08.06.2014-13.06.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-24880S; GA ČR GPP207/12/P625 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phosphoramidate derivatives * enzymatic hydrolysis * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Structural comparison of oligoribonucleotides and their 2 -Deoxy-2 -fluoro analogs by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Reif, Bernd; Wittmann, Valentin; Schwalbe, Harald; Griesinger, Christian; Wörner, Karlheinz; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Engels, Joachim W.; Bermel, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    1-(2-Deoxy-2-fluororibofuranosyl)pyrimidines were synthesized and incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide to give 5-r[CfGCf(UfUfCfG)GCfG]-3 (Cf: short form of Cd2f2 = 2-deoxy-2-fluorocytidine; Uf: short form of Ud2f2 = 2-deoxy-2-fluorouridine). The oligomer was investigated by means of UV, CD, and NMR spectroscopy to address the question of how F-labels can substitute 13C-labels in the ribose ring. Through-space (NOE) and through-bond (scalar couplings) experiments were performed that make u...

  17. NMR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization of hybrid organic – inorganic coatings

    Brus, Jiří; Špírková, Milena

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 1 (2005), s. 155-164. ISSN 1022-1360. [Discussion Conference Spectroscopy of Partially Ordered Macromolecular Systems /22./. Prague, 21.07.2003-24.07.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0735; GA AV ČR IAA4050008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * coatings and films * solid-state NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2005

  18. NMR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization of hybrid organic ů inorganic coatings

    Špírková, Milena; Brus, Jiří

    Nürnberg : International Centre for Coatings Technology, 2003, s. 312-324. ISBN 3-87870-145-4. - (1). [Nürnberg Congress: Creative Advances in Coatings Technology /7./. Nürnberg (DE), 07.04.2003-08.04.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/0735; GA ČR GA203/98/P290; GA AV ČR IAA4050008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : coatings and films * sol-gel process * NMR spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. Characterization of the major nutritional components of Caryocar brasiliense fruit pulp by NMR spectroscopy

    Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica e Morfologia; Resck, Ines Sabioni; Mendonca, Marcio Antonio [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Camb.), a typical fruit of Brazilian Cerrado, is well known in regional cookery and used in folk medicine to treat various illnesses. Mass spectrometry and chromatographic methods have identified the organic composition of pequi fruit pulp; however, NMR spectroscopy is used for the first time to characterize the nutritional components of organic and aqueous-ethanolic extracts. This spectroscopic technique determined the triacylglycerols in the pequi organic fraction, which is constituted mainly by oleate and palmitate esters, and detected the carbohydrate mixtures as the major components of aqueous and ethanolic fractions, respectively. In this study, presence of phenolic compounds was only evidenced in the ethanolic fraction. (author)

  20. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast: An in vivo statistical total correlation NMR spectroscopy approach

    Maso Ricci; Marianna Aggravi; Claudia Bonechi; Silvia Martini; Anna Maria; Claudio Rossi

    2012-09-01

    In vivo NMR spectroscopy, together with selectively 13C-labelled substrates and ‘statistical total correlation spectroscopy’ analysis (STOCSY), are valuable tools to collect and interpret the metabolic responses of a living organism to external stimuli. In this study, we applied this approach to evaluate the effects of increasing concentration of exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. We show that the STOCSY analysis correctly identifies the different types of correlations among the enriched metabolites involved in the fermentation, and that these correlations are quite stable even in presence of a stressing factor such as the exogenous ethanol.

  1. Dynamics and ferroelectric phase transition of (C3N2H5)5Bi2Br11 by means of ac calorimetry and 1H NMR relaxometry

    Przesławski, J.; Medycki, W.; Piecha, A.; Jakubas, R.; Kruk, D.

    2013-01-01

    A quite uncommon type of heat anomaly has been disclosed by calorimetric experiments in ferroelectric crystal (C3N2H5)5Bi2Br11 close to the paraelectric-ferroelectric transition. Thermal parameters (such as the excess enthalpy (ΔH) and the excess entropy (ΔS)) of the continuous ferroelectric phase transition at ca. 155 K have been estimated and discussed. The entropy transition accompanying the ferroelectric phase transition (PT) of the order of 35 J/mol K confirms an 'order-disorder' mechanism. The ferroelectric-paraelectric PT has been described by the Landau model using the specific heat data.1H spin-lattice relaxation at 25 MHz has been measured for this crystal in a very broad temperature range 90-420 K, covering two phase transitions (at 155 and 355 K). The relaxation data have been interpreted in terms of different dynamical properties of imidazolium cations put in structurally different environments.

  2. C-13 NMR spectroscopy of plasma reduces interference of hypertriglyceridemia in the H-1 NMR detection of malignancy; Application in patients with breast lesions

    Fossell, E.T.; Hall, F.M. (Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charles E. Dana Research Institute, Boston (USA). Department of Radiology); McDonagh, J. (Beth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charles E. Dana Research Institute, Boston (USA). Department of Pathology)

    1991-05-01

    The authors have previously described the application of water-suppressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1 NMR) spectroscopy of plasma for detection of malignancy. Subsequently, hypertriglyceridemia has been identified as a source of false positive results. Here is described a confirmatory, adjunctive technique -analysis of the carbon-13 (C-13) NMR spectrum of plasma- which also identifies the presence of malignancy but is not sensitive to the plasma triglyceride level. Blinded plasma samples from 480 normal donors and 208 patients scheduled for breast biopsy were analyzed by water-suppressed H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Triglyceride levels were also measured. Among the normal donors, there were 38 individuals with hypertriglyceridemia of whom 18 had results consistent with malignancy by H-1 NMR spectroscopy. However, the C-13 technique reduced the apparent H-1 false positive rate from 7.0 to 0.6 percent. Similarly, in the breast biopsy cohort, C-13 reduced the false positive rate from 2.8 to 0.9 percent. Furthermore, the accuracy of the combined H-1/C-13 test in this blinded study was greater than 96 percent in 208 patients studied. (author). 27 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs.

  3. Novel monosaccharide fermentation products in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus identified using NMR spectroscopy

    Isern, Nancy G.; Xue, Junfeng; Rao, Jaya V.; Cort, John R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2013-04-03

    Profiles of metabolites produced by the thermophilic obligately anaerobic cellulose-degrading Gram-positive bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 strain following growth on different monosaccharides (D-glucose, D-mannose, L-arabinose, D-arabinose, D-xylose, L-fucose, and D-fucose) as carbon sources revealed several unexpected fermentation products, suggesting novel metabolic capacities and unexplored metabolic pathways in this organism. Both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to determine intracellular and extracellular metabolite profiles. Metabolite profiles were determined from 1-D 1H NMR spectra by curve fitting against spectral libraries provided in Chenomx software. To reduce uncertainties due to unassigned, overlapping, or poorly-resolved peaks, metabolite identifications were confirmed with 2-D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments. In addition to expected metabolites such as acetate, lactate, glycerol, and ethanol, several novel fermentation products were identified: ethylene glycol (from growth on D-arabinose, though not L-arabinose), acetoin and 2,3-butanediol (from D-glucose and L-arabinose), and hydroxyacetone (from D-mannose and L-arabinose). Production of ethylene glycol from D-arabinose was particularly notable, with around 10% of the substrate carbon converted into this uncommon fermentation product. The novel products have not previously been reported to be produced by C. saccharolyticus, nor would they be easily predicted from the current genome annotation, and show new potentials for using this strain for production of bioproducts.

  4. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  6. Symmetry Breaking in NMR Spectroscopy: The Elucidation of Hidden Molecular Rearrangement Processes

    Michael J. McGlinchey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy is probably the most convenient and sensitive technique to monitor changes in molecular structure in solution. Rearrangements that are rapid on the NMR time-scale exhibit simplified spectra, whereby non-equivalent nuclear environments yield time-averaged resonances. At lower temperatures, when the rate of exchange is sufficiently reduced, these degeneracies are split and the underlying “static” molecular symmetry, as seen by X-ray crystallography, becomes apparent. Frequently, however, such rearrangement processes are hidden, even when they become slow on the NMR time-scale, because the molecular point group remains unchanged. Judicious symmetry breaking, such as by substitution of a molecular fragment by a similar, but not identical moiety, or by the incorporation of potentially diastereotopic (chemically non-equivalent nuclei, allows the elucidation of the kinetics and energetics of such processes. Examples are chosen that include a wide range of rotations, migrations and other rearrangements in organic, inorganic and organometallic chemistry.

  7. Structural Characterization of Lignins Isolated from Caragana sinica Using FT-IR and NMR Spectroscopy

    XIAOLing-ping; SHIZheng-jun; XUFeng; SUN Run-cang; Amar Kmohanty

    2011-01-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass,six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic.solvents and alkaline solutions.The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR).FT-IR spectra revealed that the “core” of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given.The results of 1 H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2,isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH,was mainly composed of β-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit.Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum,the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1,extracted with 70% ethanol,presents a predominance of β-O-4' arylether linkages (61% of total side chains),and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as β-β',β-1',and β-5') and a lower S/G ratio.Furthermore,a small percentage (ca.9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the γ-carbon.

  8. Rapid etiological classification of meningitis by NMR spectroscopy based on metabolite profiles and host response.

    Uwe Himmelreich

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is an acute disease with high mortality that is reduced by early treatment. Identification of the causative microorganism by culture is sensitive but slow. Large volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are required to maximise sensitivity and establish a provisional diagnosis. We have utilised nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to rapidly characterise the biochemical profile of CSF from normal rats and animals with pneumococcal or cryptococcal meningitis. Use of a miniaturised capillary NMR system overcame limitations caused by small CSF volumes and low metabolite concentrations. The analysis of the complex NMR spectroscopic data by a supervised statistical classification strategy included major, minor and unidentified metabolites. Reproducible spectral profiles were generated within less than three minutes, and revealed differences in the relative amounts of glucose, lactate, citrate, amino acid residues, acetate and polyols in the three groups. Contributions from microbial metabolism and inflammatory cells were evident. The computerised statistical classification strategy is based on both major metabolites and minor, partially unidentified metabolites. This data analysis proved highly specific for diagnosis (100% specificity in the final validation set, provided those with visible blood contamination were excluded from analysis; 6-8% of samples were classified as indeterminate. This proof of principle study suggests that a rapid etiologic diagnosis of meningitis is possible without prior culture. The method can be fully automated and avoids delays due to processing and selective identification of specific pathogens that are inherent in DNA-based techniques.

  9. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Metabolomic Characterization of Ovarian Epithelial Carcinomas by HRMAS-NMR Spectroscopy

    D. Ben Sellem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of the present study are to determine if a metabolomic study by HRMAS-NMR can (i discriminate between different histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue, (ii generate statistical models capable of classifying borderline tumors and (iii establish a potential relationship with patient's survival or response to chemotherapy. Methods. 36 human epithelial ovarian tumor biopsies and 3 healthy ovarian tissues were studied using 1H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis. Results. The results presented in this study demonstrate that the three histological types of epithelial ovarian carcinomas present an effective metabolic pattern difference. Furthermore, a metabolic signature specific of serous (N-acetyl-aspartate and mucinous (N-acetyl-lysine carcinomas was found. The statistical models generated in this study are able to predict borderline tumors characterized by an intermediate metabolic pattern similar to the normal ovarian tissue. Finally and importantly, the statistical model of serous carcinomas provided good predictions of both patient's survival rates and the patient's response to chemotherapy. Conclusions. Despite the small number of samples used in this study, the results indicate that metabolomic analysis of intact tissues by HRMAS-NMR is a promising technique which might be applicable to the therapeutic management of patients.