WorldWideScience

Sample records for 2d laser scans

  1. Terrain Classification for Outdoor Autonomous Robots using 2D Laser Scans

    Rufus Blas, Morten; Riisgaard, Søren; Ravn, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope, and...... department developed Medium Mobile Robot and tests conducted in a national park environment....

  2. Terrain Classification for Outdoor Autonomous Robots using 2D Laser Scans

    Rufus Blas, Morten; Riisgaard, Søren; Ravn, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope...... with a department developed Medium Mobile Robot and tests conducted in a national park environment....

  3. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  4. Traversable terrain classification for outdoor autonomous robots using single 2D laser scans

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Blas, Morten Rufus; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole; Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses seven distinctly different classifiers: raw height, roughness, step size......, curvature, slope, width and invalid data. These are then used to extract road borders, traversable terrain and identify obstacles. Experimental results are shown and discussed. The results were obtained using a DTU developed mobile robot, and the autonomous tests were conducted in a national park...

  5. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity

    Taekjun Oh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach.

  6. Graph Structure-Based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using a Hybrid Method of 2D Laser Scan and Monocular Camera Image in Environments with Laser Scan Ambiguity.

    Oh, Taekjun; Lee, Donghwa; Kim, Hyungjin; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Localization is an essential issue for robot navigation, allowing the robot to perform tasks autonomously. However, in environments with laser scan ambiguity, such as long corridors, the conventional SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) algorithms exploiting a laser scanner may not estimate the robot pose robustly. To resolve this problem, we propose a novel localization approach based on a hybrid method incorporating a 2D laser scanner and a monocular camera in the framework of a graph structure-based SLAM. 3D coordinates of image feature points are acquired through the hybrid method, with the assumption that the wall is normal to the ground and vertically flat. However, this assumption can be relieved, because the subsequent feature matching process rejects the outliers on an inclined or non-flat wall. Through graph optimization with constraints generated by the hybrid method, the final robot pose is estimated. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, real experiments were conducted in an indoor environment with a long corridor. The experimental results were compared with those of the conventional GMappingapproach. The results demonstrate that it is possible to localize the robot in environments with laser scan ambiguity in real time, and the performance of the proposed method is superior to that of the conventional approach. PMID:26151203

  7. INTEGRATION OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING POINTS AND 2D FLOOR PLANS BASED ON MAXIMUM SEQUENTIAL SIMILARITY

    L. Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Maximum Sequential Similarity Reasoning (MSSR algorithm based method for co-registration of 3D TLS data and 2D floor plans. The co-registration consists of two tasks: estimating a transformation between the two datasets and finding the vertical locations of windows and doors. The method first extracts TLS line sequences and floor plan line sequences from a series of horizontal cross-section bands of the TLS points and floor plans respectively. Then each line sequence is further decomposed into column vectors defined by using local transformation invariant information between two neighbouring line segments. Based on a normalized cross-correlation based similarity score function, the proposed MSSR algorithm is then used to iteratively estimate the vertical and horizontal locations of each floor plan by finding the longest matched consecutive column vectors between floor plan line sequences and TLS line sequences. A group matching algorithm is applied to simultaneously determine final matching results across floor plans and estimate the transformation parameters between floor plans and TLS points. With real datasets, the proposed method demonstrates its ability to deal with occlusions and multiple matching problems. It also shows the potential to detect conflict between floor plan and as-built, which makes it a promising method that can find many applications in many industrial fields.

  8. An Integrated Flexible Self-calibration Approach for 2D Laser Scanning Range Finders Applied to the Hokuyo UTM-30LX-EW

    Mader, D.; Westfeld, P.; Maas, H.-G.

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents a flexible approach for the geometric calibration of a 2D infrared laser scanning range finder. It does not require spatial object data, thus avoiding the time-consuming determination of reference distances or coordinates with superior accuracy. The core contribution is the development of an integrated bundle adjustment, based on the flexible principle of a self-calibration. This method facilitates the precise definition of the geometry of the scanning device, including the estimation of range-measurement-specific correction parameters. The integrated calibration routine jointly adjusts distance and angular data from the laser scanning range finder as well as image data from a supporting DSLR camera, and automatically estimates optimum observation weights. The validation process carried out using a Hokuyo UTM-30LX-EW confirms the correctness of the proposed functional and stochastic contexts and allows detailed accuracy analyses. The level of accuracy of the observations is computed by variance component estimation. For the Hokuyo scanner, we obtained 0.2% of the measured distance in range measurement and 0.2 deg for the angle precision. The RMS error of a 3D coordinate after the calibration becomes 5 mm in lateral and 9 mm in depth direction. Particular challenges have arisen due to a very large elliptical laser beam cross-section of the scanning device used.

  9. 2D Saturable Absorbers for Fibre Lasers

    Robert I. Woodward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D nanomaterials are an emergent and promising platform for future photonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we review recent progress demonstrating the application of 2D nanomaterials as versatile, wideband saturable absorbers for Q-switching and mode-locking fibre lasers. We focus specifically on the family of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, including MoS2, MoSe2 and WS2.

  10. Laser Scanning in Forests

    Håkan Olsson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS to forests has been revolutionary during the last decade. This development was facilitated by combining earlier ranging lidar discoveries [1–5], with experience obtained from full-waveform ranging radar [6,7] to new airborne laser scanning systems which had components such as a GNSS receiver (Global Navigation Satellite System, IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit and a scanning mechanism. Since the first commercial ALS in 1994, new ALS-based forest inventory approaches have been reported feasible for operational activities [8–12]. ALS is currently operationally applied for stand level forest inventories, for example, in Nordic countries. In Finland alone, the adoption of ALS for forest data collection has led to an annual savings of around 20 M€/year, and the work is mainly done by companies instead of governmental organizations. In spite of the long implementation times and there being a limited tradition of making changes in the forest sector, laser scanning was commercially and operationally applied after about only one decade of research. When analyzing high-ranked journal papers from ISI Web of Science, the topic of laser scanning of forests has been the driving force for the whole laser scanning research society over the last decade. Thus, the topic “laser scanning in forests” has provided a significant industrial, societal and scientific impact. [...

  11. Resolving 2D Amorphous Materials with Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Burson, Kristen M.; Buechner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    Novel two-dimensional (2D) materials have garnered significant scientific interest due to their potential technological applications. Alongside the emphasis on crystalline materials, such as graphene and hexagonal BN, a new class of 2D amorphous materials must be pursued. For amorphous materials, a detailed understanding of the complex structure is necessary. Here we present a structural study of 2D bilayer silica on Ru(0001), an insulating material which is weakly coupled to the substrate. Atomic structure has been determined with a dual mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) sensor in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperatures, revealing a network of different ring sizes. Liquid AFM measurements with sub-nanometer resolution bridge the gap between clean UHV conditions and the environments that many material applications demand. Samples are grown and characterized in vacuum and subsequently transferred to the liquid AFM. Notably, the key structural features observed, namely nanoscale ring networks and larger holes to the substrate, show strong quantitative agreement between the liquid and UHV microscopy measurements. This provides direct evidence for the structural stability of these silica films for nanoelectronics and other applications. KMB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  12. Fast 2D phantom dosimetry for scanning proton beams

    Boon, SN; van Luijk, P; Schippers, JM; Meertens, H; Denis, JM; Vynckier, S; Medin, J; Grusell, E

    1998-01-01

    A quality control system especially designed for dosimetry in scanning proton beams has been designed and tested. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd2O2S:Tb), mounted at the beam-exit side of a phantom, and observed by a low noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The purpose of

  13. Non Resonant Slots for Wide Band 2D Scanning Arrays

    Gerini, G.; Bruni, S.; Neto, A.; Maci, S.

    2005-01-01

    A novel type of broadband integrated array scanning in one plane is proposed. Such arrays are aimed to meet the requirements typically set for airborne Synthetic Aperture Radars, while allowing the highest degree of integration between the T/R modules and radiating elements. The array is composed by

  14. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  15. A 2D optomechanical focused laser spot scanner: analysis and experimental results for microstereolithography

    Gandhi, P. S.; Deshmukh, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes and analyzes a 2D optomechanical-focused laser spot scanning system (patent pending) which allows uniform intensity focused spot scanning with high speed and high resolution over a large range of scan. Such scanning is useful where variation of focused spot characteristics affects the performance of applications such as micro-/nano-stereolithography, laser micro-machining, scanning optical tweezers, optical scanning microscopy, and so on. Proposed scanning is achieved by using linear movement of mirrors and lens maintaining the alignment of motion and optical axis of laser. Higher speed and high resolution at the same time are achieved by use of two serial double parallelogram flexural mechanisms with mechatronics developed around them. Optical analysis is carried out to demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed system numerically and is further supported by the experimental results. Additional analysis is carried out to demonstrate robustness of the scanner in the case of small misalignment errors incurred in actual practice. Although the proposed scanner is useful in general in several applications mentioned above, discussion in this paper is focused on microstereolithography.

  16. Micro-scanning mirrors for high-power laser applications in laser surgery

    Sandner, T.; Kimme, S.; Grasshoff, T.; Todt, U; A. Graf; Tulea, C.; Lenenbach, A.; H. Schenk

    2013-01-01

    We present two novel micro scanning mirrors with large aperture and HR dielectric coatings suitable for high power laser applications in a miniaturized laser instrument. An electrostatic driven 2D-raster scanning mirror with 5×7.1mm aperture is used for dynamic steering of the ps-laser beam of the laser cutting process. A second magnetic 2D-beam steering mirror enables a static beam correction of a hand guided laser instrument. Optimizations of a magnetic gimbal micromirror with 6 mm × 8 mm m...

  17. Enhanced Algorithms for Estimating Tree Trunk Diameter Using 2D Laser Scanner

    Ola Ringdahl

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate vehicle localization in forest environments is still an unresolved problem. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS have well known limitations in dense forest, and have to be combined with for instance laser based SLAM algorithms to provide satisfying accuracy. Such algorithms typically require accurate detection of trees, and estimation of tree center locations in laser data. Both these operations depend on accurate estimations of tree trunk diameter. Diameter estimations are important also for several other forestry automation and remote sensing applications. This paper evaluates several existing algorithms for diameter estimation using 2D laser scanner data. Enhanced algorithms, compensating for beam width and using multiple scans, were also developed and evaluated. The best existing algorithms overestimated tree trunk diameter by ca. 40%. Our enhanced algorithms, compensating for laser beam width, reduced this error to less than 12%.

  18. A Laser Scanning Tracking Method

    Xu, Gaoyue; Hu, Baoli; Wang, Jiangping

    1988-04-01

    In this paper, a new tracking approach, a laser scanning tracking method (LSTM) is proposed. The LSTM has been designed to track a cylindrical retroreflective target mounted on the object, which makes plane motion. The retroreflector pasted by scotchlite reflective sheeting (mad. in 3M ,0.) i s located by scanning a laser beam in holizontal. When the retroreflector is struck, its position that is azimuth is read by microcomputer and the aiming device is servocontrolled by microcomputer according to this azimuth immediately. This is a step-by-step tracking method. The time of servo-reponse is less than one millisecona in actual tests. The angular accuracy is less than 0.5 milliradian. The track angular velocity is greater than one radian/second.

  19. The evaluation system of the 2-D scanning mirror based on CMOS sensor

    Zeng, Gui-ying; Xie, Yuan; Chen, Jin-xing

    2010-10-01

    The high precision two-dimension scanning control technique is being developed for the next geosynchronous satellites FY-4 satellites which is using the three-axis stabilization stages. How to evaluate the point and scanning precision of the scanning mirror is one of the most important technologies. This paper describes the optoelectronic measure method based on CMOS sensors to evaluate the point and scanning precision of the scanning mirror in the laboratory, which is a 2-D dynamic angle measurement system. Some technologies, such as the sup-pixel orientation technology and the CMOS ROI technology, are used in the measurement system. The research shows that the angle measurement system based on IBIS-6600CMOS sensors can attain the 20°× 20° field of view, 2" accuracy, and 1Kframes/s speed. But the system is sensitive to the environment and it can only be worked in the laboratory.

  20. Radiometer uncertainty equation research of 2D planar scanning PMMW imaging system

    Hu, Taiyang; Xu, Jianzhong; Xiao, Zelong

    2009-07-01

    With advances in millimeter-wave technology, passive millimeter-wave (PMMW) imaging technology has received considerable concerns, and it has established itself in a wide range of military and civil practical applications, such as in the areas of remote sensing, blind landing, precision guidance and security inspection. Both the high transparency of clothing at millimeter wavelengths and the spatial resolution required to generate adequate images combine to make imaging at millimeter wavelengths a natural approach of screening people for concealed contraband detection. And at the same time, the passive operation mode does not present a safety hazard to the person who is under inspection. Based on the description to the design and engineering implementation of a W-band two-dimensional (2D) planar scanning imaging system, a series of scanning methods utilized in PMMW imaging are generally compared and analyzed, followed by a discussion on the operational principle of the mode of 2D planar scanning particularly. Furthermore, it is found that the traditional radiometer uncertainty equation, which is derived from a moving platform, does not hold under this 2D planar scanning mode due to the fact that there is no absolute connection between the scanning rates in horizontal direction and vertical direction. Consequently, an improved radiometer uncertainty equation is carried out in this paper, by means of taking the total time spent on scanning and imaging into consideration, with the purpose of solving the problem mentioned above. In addition, the related factors which affect the quality of radiometric images are further investigated under the improved radiometer uncertainty equation, and ultimately some original results are presented and analyzed to demonstrate the significance and validity of this new methodology.

  1. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m × 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emissio...

  2. Handbook of optical and laser scanning

    Marshall, Gerald F

    2011-01-01

    From its initial publication titled Laser Beam Scanning in 1985 to Handbook of Optical and Laser Scanning, now in its second edition, this reference has kept professionals and students at the forefront of optical scanning technology. Carefully and meticulously updated in each iteration, the book continues to be the most comprehensive scanning resource on the market. It examines the breadth and depth of subtopics in the field from a variety of perspectives. The Second Edition covers: Technologies such as piezoelectric devices Applications of laser scanning such as Ladar (laser radar) Underwater

  3. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  4. Laser Absorption spectrometer instrument for tomographic 2D-measurement of climate gas emission from soils

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2014-05-01

    One of the most intricate effects in climate modelling is the role of permafrost thawing during the global warming process. Soil that has formerly never totally lost its ice cover now emits climate gases due to melting processes[1]. For a better prediction of climate development and possible feedback mechanisms, insights into physical procedures (like e.g. gas emission from underground reservoirs) are required[2]. Therefore, a long-term quantification of greenhouse gas concentrations (and further on fluxes) is necessary and the related structures that are responsible for emission need to be identified. In particular the spatial heterogeneity of soils caused by soil internal structures (e.g. soil composition changes or surface cracks) or by surface modifications (e.g. by plant growth) generate considerable complexities and difficulties for local measurements, for example with soil chambers. For such situations, which often cannot be avoided, a spatially resolved 2D-measurement to identify and quantify the gas emission from the structured soil would be needed, to better understand the influence of the soil sub-structures on the emission behavior. Thus we designed a spatially scanning laser absorption spectrometer setup to determine a 2D-gas concentration map in the soil-air boundary layer. The setup is designed to cover the surfaces in the range of square meters in a horizontal plane above the soil to be investigated. Existing field instruments for gas concentration or flux measurements are based on point-wise measurements, so structure identification is very tedious or even impossible. For this reason, we have developed a tomographic in-situ instrument based on TDLAS ('tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy') that delivers absolute gas concentration distributions of areas with 0.8m × 0.8m size, without any need for reference measurements with a calibration gas. It is a simple and robust device based on a combination of scanning mirrors and reflecting foils, so

  5. Quantized 1D- and 2D optical molasses: Laser cooling and spectrum of resonance fluorescene

    We present results for laser cooling of optical molasses and the spectrum of resonance fluorescene based on a fully quantum mechanical treatment of the atomic center-of-mass motion for 1D and 2D laser configurations. Our calculations based on recently developed wave function simulations of the quantum master equation for laser cooling

  6. 2D size, position and shape definition of defects by B-scan image analysis

    Michele Scafidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The non-destructive evaluation of defects by automatic procedures is of great importance for structural components. Thanks to the developments of the non-contact ultrasonic techniques, the automation of the inspections is gaining a progressively important role. In this work, an automatic inspection technique for the evaluation of defects by the analysis of B-scan images obtained by a laser ultrasonic system is presented. The data are extracted directly from a B-scan map obtained for a panel with internal defects, and are used to build an image of the cross section of the panel. The proposed automatic procedure allows the definition of size, position and shape of defects in panels of known thickness

  7. Formation of nitric oxide in an industrial burner measured by 2-D laser induced fluorescence

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence (2-D LIF) measurements of nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical distributions in an industrial burner at atmospheric pressure. The relative 2-D LIF data of NO were set to an absolute scale by calibration with probe sampling combined with gas analysis. (author) 3 figs., 7 refs.

  8. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed

  9. MULTIPLATFORM APPROACH TO MOBILE LASER SCANNING

    A. Kukko; H. Kaartinen; J. Hyyppä; Chen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology for capturing three-dimensional information from the surrounding objects. With state of the art sensors the achieved point cloud could capture fine details of the surroundings with good accuracy and effectiveness. Many of the applications deal with the civil engineering purposes in urban areas for traffic and city planning and modelling. In this article we present multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions for mapping applications that requir...

  10. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    Agurto Carla; Pattichis Marios S; Yu Honggang; Beth Goens M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is ...

  11. Spectrally encoded confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    Tao, Yuankai K.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2010-02-01

    Fundus imaging has become an essential clinical diagnostic tool in ophthalmology. Current generation scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (SLO) offer advantages over conventional fundus photography and indirect ophthalmoscopy in terms of light efficiency and contrast. As a result of the ability of SLO to provide rapid, continuous imaging of retinal structures and its versatility in accommodating a variety of illumination wavelengths, allowing for imaging of both endogenous and exogenous fluorescent contrast agents, SLO has become a powerful tool for the characterization of retinal pathologies. However, common implementations of SLO, such as the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO) and line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO), require imaging or multidimensional scanning elements which are typically implemented in bulk optics placed close to the subject eye. Here, we apply a spectral encoding technique in one dimension combined with single-axis lateral scanning to create a spectrally encoded confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SECSLO) which is fully confocal. This novel implementation of the SLO allows for high contrast, high resolution in vivo human retinal imaging with image transmission through a single-mode optical fiber. Furthermore, the scanning optics are similar and the detection engine is identical to that of current-generation spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) systems, potentially allowing for a simplistic implementation of a joint SECSLO-SDOCT imaging system.

  12. Scanning laser doppler velocimeter using iodine iodine-vapor discriminator

    This paper presents a scanning laser doppler velocimeter (SLDV) that is able to measure the velocity over two dimensions. SDV can be used to measure the 2-D velocity of a rotating disk or fluid by using the molecular iodine absorption line (1109) as the frequency discrimination to determine the doppler shift of the target backscattering. The laser source, a narrow line-width Nd:YAG laser at the second harmonic, is frequency locked to the 1109 line as the frequency reference by a digital PID servo with the frequency jitter less than 1 MHz for arbitrarily long periods. Experimental results show that SDV is capable of mapping the speed vector of the target, and the measurement uncertainty of the rotating disk speed is less than 0.25 m/s.

  13. Manufacture of a 2D optical fiber array coupler with micrometer precision for laser radar applications

    This article presents the manufacture of a 2D-fiber array coupler using UV-LIGA technology for the precise positioning of a two-dimensional (2D) optical fiber array. The precision of the alignment of the eight-by-eight fiber array was demonstrated to be less than 2 μm. The average concentricity error of the fibers to the positioning holes of the array coupler had a minimum and maximum error of 1.7 µm and 6.5 μm, respectively. The 2D fiber array coupler can fulfill the coupling and transmission requirements of 2D light spots for laser radar applications. The method developed here can easily be extended to the manufacture of larger arrays. (paper)

  14. Multiplatform Mobile Laser Scanning: Usability and Performance

    Yuwei Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology capable of capturing three-dimensional data from surrounding objects. With state-of-the-art sensors, the achieved point clouds capture object details with good accuracy and precision. Many of the applications involve civil engineering in urban areas, as well as traffic and other urban planning, all of which serve to make 3D city modeling probably the fastest growing market segment in this field. This article outlines multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions such as vehicle- and trolley-operated urban area data acquisition, and boat-mounted equipment for fluvial environments. Moreover, we introduce a novel backpack version of mobile laser scanning equipment for surveying applications in the field of natural sciences where the requirements include precision and mobility in variable terrain conditions. In addition to presenting a technical description of the systems, we discuss the performance of the solutions in the light of various applications in the fields of urban mapping and modeling, fluvial geomorphology, snow-cover characterization, precision agriculture, and in monitoring the effects of climate change on permafrost landforms. The data performance of the mobile laser scanning approach is described by the results of an evaluation of the ROAMER on a permanent MLS test field. Furthermore, an in situ accuracy assessment using a field of spherical 3D targets for the newly-introduced Akhka backpack system is conducted and reported on.

  15. Measurements of laboratory turbulence with the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Peinke, Joachim; Hoelling, Michael

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed anemometer, the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer, was used to measure the two-dimensional wind speed vector in laboratory-generated turbulence. The anemometer provides a temporal and spatial resolution comparable or even higher to those of commercial hot-wires and thus is an excellent alternative for high-resolution measurements. The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer uses a previously unseen measurement technique in the range of anemometers. The principle is adopted from atomic force microscopes (AFM). A tiny micro-structured cantilever is brought into the airflow, where it experiences a drag force due to the moving fluid. The resulting deflection is measured using the laser pointer principle. Unlike the measuring principle of hot-wires this technique can be applied in challenging environments such as in liquids or very close to walls. Our comparing measurements with the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer and an x-wire were carried out in the wake of rigid bodies and grids. The results show a great agreement with regards to the increment statistics on various scales, power spectra and turbulence intensity, thus proving the new anemometer.

  16. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas; Pichon, Laurent; Wallez, Gilles; Mottin, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Département des Arts Graphiques, Musée du Louvre and in the Musée des Beaux- Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special µ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique.

  17. An omnidirectional 3D sensor with line laser scanning

    Xu, Jing; Gao, Bingtuan; Liu, Chuande; Wang, Peng; Gao, Shuanglei

    2016-09-01

    An active omnidirectional vision owns the advantages of the wide field of view (FOV) imaging, resulting in an entire 3D environment scene, which is promising in the field of robot navigation. However, the existing omnidirectional vision sensors based on line laser can measure points only located on the optical plane of the line laser beam, resulting in the low-resolution reconstruction. Whereas, to improve resolution, some other omnidirectional vision sensors with the capability of projecting 2D encode pattern from projector and curved mirror. However, the astigmatism property of curve mirror causes the low-accuracy reconstruction. To solve the above problems, a rotating polygon scanning mirror is used to scan the object in the vertical direction so that an entire profile of the observed scene can be obtained at high accuracy, without of astigmatism phenomenon. Then, the proposed method is calibrated by a conventional 2D checkerboard plate. The experimental results show that the measurement error of the 3D omnidirectional sensor is approximately 1 mm. Moreover, the reconstruction of objects with different shapes based on the developed sensor is also verified.

  18. Validation of digit-length ratio (2D:4D) assessments on the basis of DXA-derived hand scans

    The second-to-fourth digit-length ratio (2D:4D) may be a correlate of prenatal sex steroids, and it has been linked to sporting prowess. The aim of the study was to validate dual-energy X-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) as a technique to assess 2D:4D in soccer players under 15 years of age (U-15). Paired X-ray and DXA scans of the left hands of 63 male U-15 elite soccer players (age: 14.0 ± 0.3 years) were performed, and 2D:4D was then compared between the two techniques. The 2D:4D measurements were performed twice by two blinded raters. Intrarater and interrater reliability, as well as agreement between the X-ray and the DXA assessments, were tested. Intrarater reliabilities of both raters using X-ray with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.97 and 0.90 were excellent. Using DXA, the ICCs were 0.90 and 0.91 thus also showing excellent reliability. Interrater reliabilities were excellent using both the X-ray (ICC of 0.94) and the DXA (ICC of 0.90), assessments respectively. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that the 2D:4D ratios of the two raters did not differ significantly between the X-ray and the DXA assessments. The standard errors of estimate were 0.01 for both techniques. The 95% limits of agreement of ±0.018 (±2.0%) and ±0.023 (±2.6%), respectively, were within the acceptable tolerance of 5%, and showed very good agreement. DXA offered a replicable technique for assessing 2D:4D in youth soccer players. Therefore, the DXA technique seems to be an alternative method for evaluating 2D:4D in youth sports

  19. 2-D fluid dynamics models for laser driven fusion on IBM 3090 vector multiprocessors

    Fluid-dynamics codes for laser fusion are complex research codes, consisting of many distinct modules and embodying a variety of numerical methods. They are therefore good candidates for testing general purpose advanced computer architectures and the related software. In this paper, after a brief outline of the basic concepts of laser fusion, the implementation of the 2-D laser fusion fluid code DUED on the IBM 3090 VF vector multiprocessors is discussed. Emphasis is put on parallelization, performed by means of IBM Parallel FORTRAN (PF). It is shown how different modules have been optimized by using different features of PF: i) modules based on depth-2 nested loops exploit automatic parallelization; ii) laser light ray tracing is partitioned by scheduling parallel ICCG algorithm (executed in parallel by appropiately synchronized parallel subroutines). Performance results are given for separate modules of the code, as well as for typical complete runs

  20. 2-D analysis of Ge implanted SiO2 surfaces by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    2-D elemental distribution of Ge in silicon oxide substrates with differing implantation doses of between 3 x 1016 cm-2 and 1.5 x 1017 cm-2 has been investigated by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Spectral emission intensity has been optimized with respect to time, crater size, ablation depth and laser energy. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX) have been utilized to obtain crater depth, morphology and elemental composition of the sample material, respectively. LIBS spectral data revealed the possibility of performing 2-D distribution analysis of Ge atoms in silicon oxide substrate. EDX analysis results confirmed that LIBS is capable to detect Ge atoms at concentrations lower than 0.2% (atomic). LIBS as a fast semi-quantitative analysis method with 50 μm lateral and 800 nm depth resolution has been evaluated. Results illustrate the potential use of LIBS for rapid, on-line assessment of the quality of advanced technology materials during the manufacturing process

  1. Automatic classification of trees from laser scanning point clouds

    Sirmacek, B.; R. Lindenbergh

    2015-01-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for automatically classifying laser scanning point clouds into ’tree’ and ’non-tree’ classes. Our method uses the 3D coordinates of the laser scanning points as input and generates a new point cloud whic...

  2. A design of a compact gantry for proton therapy with 2D-scanning

    Vrenken, H.; Schuitema, R.; Dermois, O.C.; Schippers, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact gantry (3 m radius) for proton therapy in which a so-called ''pencil" beam scans a 30 x 30 cm(2) surface, has been designed. The advantages of this gantry are its small size and the bet that no mechanical movements of magnets or patient couch are necessary to accomplish the two-dimensional

  3. Laser scanned image sensors using photoconductors with deep traps

    Maserjian, J.

    1975-01-01

    Photoconductor records image when holes and electrons are trapped inside it due to incident photons. Image can be read out by exposing photoconductor to scanning laser beam. Photons from scanning laser empty traps, generating photocurrent. Image information is obtained by detecting this photocurrent synchronously with laser scan.

  4. Robust, spatially scanning, open-path TDLAS hygrometer using retro-reflective foils for fast tomographic 2-D water vapor concentration field measurements

    Seidel, A.; Wagner, S.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a fast, spatially scanning direct tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (dTDLAS) that combines four polygon-mirror based scanning units with low-cost retro-reflective foils. With this instrument, tomographic measurements of absolute 2-D water vapor concentration profiles are possible without any calibration using a reference gas. A spatial area of 0.8 m x 0.8 m was covered, which allows for application in soil physics, where greenhouse gas emission from certain soil structures shall be monitored. The whole concentration field was measured with up to 2.5 Hz. In this paper, we present the setup and spectroscopic performance of the instrument regarding the influence of the polygon rotation speed and mode on the absorption signal. Homogeneous H2O distributions were measured and compared to a single channel, bi-static reference TDLAS spectrometer for validation of the instrument. Good accuracy and precision with errors of less than 6% of the absolute concentration and length and bandwidth normalized detection limits of up to 1.1 ppmv . m (Hz)-0.5 were achieved. The spectrometer is a robust and easy to set up instrument for tomographic reconstructions of 2-D-concentration fields that can be considered as a good basis for future field measurements in environmental research.

  5. OBSTACLE DETECTION BY ALV USING TWO 2D LASER RANGE FINDERS

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an effective method of obstacle detection by ALV (Autonomous Land Vehi- cle) equipped with two 2D laser range finders (LRF) installed at different locations of the ALV to obtain eom- prehensive information on the environment. The data processing includes two main steps: ( 1 ) data-processing of the current sample; (2) fusion of the former range data and the current one. The rough description of the ALV's environnent via the four sub-steps ( Data Filter, Obstacle Extraction, Obstacle Merging, Distinguish- ing Obstacle from Road-Edge) was not reliable enough for our control system. To overcome the shortcoming of the 2D LRF and the motion noise of the ALV, a Kalman filter was used to estimate the position of the obsta- cles; then the data of the two LRFs were collated to obtain the height and width of the obstacles. Experiment results attested the feasibility of the detection system.

  6. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    Agurto Carla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions

  7. Element distribution imaging in rat kidney using a 2 D rapid scan EDXRF device

    Figueroa, R. G. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Temuco 4811230, Araucania (Chile); Lozano, E. [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Unidad de Fisica Medica, Av. Profesor Zanartu 1010, Santiago (Chile); Bongiovanni, G., E-mail: figueror@ufro.cl [IDEPA-CONICET, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Investigacion y Desarrollo de la Patagonia Norte, Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    Visualization of elemental distributions of biological tissue is gaining importance in many disciplines of biological, forensic and medical research. Furthermore, the maps of elements have wide application in archaeology for the understanding of the pigments, modes of preservation and environmental context. Since major advances in relation to collimators and detectors have yielded micro scale images, the chemical mapping via synchrotron scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-{mu}X RF) is widely used as microanalytical techniques. However, the acquisition time is a limitation of current SR-{mu}X RF imaging protocols, doing tedious micro analysis of samples of more than 1 cm and very difficult to study of larger samples such as animal organ, whole organisms, work or art, etc. Recently we have developed a robotic system to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly ar concentration levels of parts per million. Multiple images of distribution of elements can be obtained on surfaces of 100 x 100 mm and a spatial resolution of up to 0.2 mm{sup 2} per pixel, with a spectral capture time up to 1 ms per point. This system has proven to be highly efficient for the X RF mapping of elements in large biological samples, achieving comparable s results to those obtained by SR-{mu}X RF. Thus, images of As and Cu accumulation in renal cortex of arsenic-exposed rats were obtained by both methodologies. However, the new imaging system enables the X RF scanning in few minutes, whereas SR-{mu}X RF required several hours. These and other advantages as well as the potential applications of this system, will be discussed. (Author)

  8. Element distribution imaging in rat kidney using a 2 D rapid scan EDXRF device

    Visualization of elemental distributions of biological tissue is gaining importance in many disciplines of biological, forensic and medical research. Furthermore, the maps of elements have wide application in archaeology for the understanding of the pigments, modes of preservation and environmental context. Since major advances in relation to collimators and detectors have yielded micro scale images, the chemical mapping via synchrotron scanning micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-μX RF) is widely used as microanalytical techniques. However, the acquisition time is a limitation of current SR-μX RF imaging protocols, doing tedious micro analysis of samples of more than 1 cm and very difficult to study of larger samples such as animal organ, whole organisms, work or art, etc. Recently we have developed a robotic system to image the chemistry of large specimens rapidly ar concentration levels of parts per million. Multiple images of distribution of elements can be obtained on surfaces of 100 x 100 mm and a spatial resolution of up to 0.2 mm2 per pixel, with a spectral capture time up to 1 ms per point. This system has proven to be highly efficient for the X RF mapping of elements in large biological samples, achieving comparable s results to those obtained by SR-μX RF. Thus, images of As and Cu accumulation in renal cortex of arsenic-exposed rats were obtained by both methodologies. However, the new imaging system enables the X RF scanning in few minutes, whereas SR-μX RF required several hours. These and other advantages as well as the potential applications of this system, will be discussed. (Author)

  9. Remote z-scanning with a macroscopic voice coil motor for fast 3D multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prendergast, Andrew; Wyart, Claire; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2016-05-01

    There is a high demand for 3D multiphoton imaging in neuroscience and other fields but scanning in axial direction presents technical challenges. We developed a focusing technique based on a remote movable mirror that is conjugate to the specimen plane and translated by a voice coil motor. We constructed cost-effective z-scanning modules from off-the-shelf components that can be mounted onto standard multiphoton laser scanning microscopes to extend scan patterns from 2D to 3D. Systems were designed for large objectives and provide high resolution, high speed and a large z-scan range (>300 μm). We used these systems for 3D multiphoton calcium imaging in the adult zebrafish brain and measured odor-evoked activity patterns across >1500 neurons with single-neuron resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27231612

  10. Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser

    Palanker, Daniel; Jain, ATul; Paulus, Yannis; Andersen, Dan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2007-02-01

    Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132μm decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

  11. Contact transfer length investigation of a 2D nanoparticle network by scanning probe microscopy.

    Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S; Reissner, Patrick A; Wagner, Tino; Wyss, Roman M; Park, Hyung Gyu; Stemmer, Andreas

    2015-09-11

    Nanoparticle network devices find growing application in sensing and electronics. One recurring challenge in the design and fabrication of this class of devices is ensuring a stable interface via robust yet unobstructive electrodes. A figure of merit which dictates the minimum electrode overlap required for optimal charge injection into the network is the contact transfer length. However, we find that traditional contact characterization using the transmission line model, an indirect method which requires extrapolation, is insufficient for network devices. Instead, we apply Kelvin probe force microscopy to characterize the contact resistance by imaging the surface potential with nanometer resolution. We then use scanning probe lithography to directly investigate the contact transfer length. We have determined the transfer length in graphene contacted devices to be 200-400 nm, thus apt for further device reduction which is often necessary for on-site sensing applications. Simulations from a two-dimensional resistor model support our observations and are expected to be an important tool for further optimizing the design of nanoparticle-based devices. PMID:26291069

  12. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  13. Mobile Laser Scanning for Indoor Modelling

    Thomson, C.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Backes, D.; Boehm, J.

    2013-10-01

    The process of capturing and modelling buildings has gained increased focus in recent years with the rise of Building Information Modelling (BIM). At the heart of BIM is a process change for the construction and facilities management industries whereby a BIM aids more collaborative working through better information exchange, and as a part of the process Geomatic/Land Surveyors are not immune from the changes. Terrestrial laser scanning has been proscribed as the preferred method for rapidly capturing buildings for BIM geometry. This is a process change from a traditional measured building survey just with a total station and is aided by the increasing acceptance of point cloud data being integrated with parametric building models in BIM tools such as Autodesk Revit or Bentley Architecture. Pilot projects carried out previously by the authors to investigate the geometry capture and modelling of BIM confirmed the view of others that the process of data capture with static laser scan setups is slow and very involved requiring at least two people for efficiency. Indoor Mobile Mapping Systems (IMMS) present a possible solution to these issues especially in time saved. Therefore this paper investigates their application as a capture device for BIM geometry creation over traditional static methods through a fit-for-purpose test.

  14. Exposure Limits in Ophthalmic Imaging with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes

    We present an analysis of the exposure to laser radiation resulting from the use of scanning laser ophthalmoscopes in ophthalmic imaging of the ocular fundus. Exposures limits are determined, based on the IEC/EN 60825-1 standard. These limits are applied on the safety analysis of a commercial scanning laser ophthalmoscope. (author)

  15. 2D electrostatic PIC algorithm for laser induced studying plasma in vacuum

    Álvarez, C. A.; Riascos, H.; Gonzalez, C.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-In-Cell(PIC) method is widely used for simulating plasma kinetic models. A 2D-PIC electrostatic algorithm is implemented for simulating the expansion of a laser- induced plasma plume. For potential and Electric Field calculation, Dirichlet and periodic boundary conditions are used in the X (perpendicular to the ablated material) and Y directions, respectively. Poisson-solver employs FFTW3 library and the five-point Laplacian to compute the electric potential. Electric field calculation is made by central finite differences method. Leap-frog scheme updates particle positions and velocities at each iteration. Plume expansion anlysis is done for the Emission and Post-Emission stages. In the Emission phase (while the laser is turned on), fast electron expansion is observed and ion particles remain near the surface of the ablated material. In the post-emission stage (with the laser turned off) the charge separation produces an electric field that accelerates the ions leading to the formation of a KeV per particle Ion-Front. At the end of the expansion, fastest electrons escape from the simulation space; an almost homogeneous ion-electron distribution is observed, decreasing the electric field value and the Coulomb interactions.

  16. Confocal laser scanning microscopy image correlation for nanoparticle flow velocimetry

    Jun, Brian; Giarra, Matthew; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC) based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date,...

  17. Nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction of femtosecond laser pulses in a 2D nonlinear photonic crystal.

    Vyunishev, A M; Arkhipkin, V G; Slabko, V V; Baturin, I S; Akhmatkhanov, A R; Shur, V Ya; Chirkin, A S

    2015-09-01

    We study second-harmonic generation (SHG) of femtosecond laser pulses in a rectangular two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (NLPC). Multiple SH beams were observed in the vicinity of the propagation direction of the fundamental beam. It has been verified that the angular positions of these beams obey the conditions of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction (NRND). The measured SH spectra of specific NRND orders consist of narrow peaks that experience a high-frequency spectral shift as the order grows. We derive an analytical expression for the process studied and find the theoretical results to be in good agreement with the experimental data. We estimate the enhancement factor of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in 2D NLPC to be 70. PMID:26368697

  18. Novel Aerial 3D Mapping System Based on UAV Platforms and 2D Laser Scanners

    David Roca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of 3D geometric data from an aerial view implies a high number of advantages with respect to terrestrial acquisition, the greatest being that aerial view allows the acquisition of information from areas with no or difficult accessibility, such as roofs and tops of trees. If the aerial platform is copter-type, other advantages are present, such as the capability of displacement at very low-speed, allowing for a more detailed acquisition. This paper presents a novel Aerial 3D Mapping System based on a copter-type platform, where a 2D laser scanner is integrated with a GNSS sensor and an IMU for the generation of georeferenced 3D point clouds. The accuracy and precision of the system are evaluated through the measurement of geometries in the point clouds generated by the system, as well as through the geolocation of target points for which the real global coordinates are known.

  19. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    Peiquan Xu; Shun Yao; Fenggui Lu; Xinhua Tang; Wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built.This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams,escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  20. Ultra-Rapid 2-D and 3-D Laser Microprinting of Proteins

    Scott, Mark Andrew

    When viewed under the microscope, biological tissues reveal an exquisite microarchitecture. These complex patterns arise during development, as cells interact with a multitude of chemical and mechanical cues in the surrounding extracellular matrix. Tissue engineers have sought for decades to repair or replace damaged tissue, often relying on porous scaffolds as an artificial extracellular matrix to support cell development. However, these grafts are unable to recapitulate the complexity of the in vivo environment, limiting our ability to regenerate functional tissue. Biomedical engineers have developed several methods for printing two- and three-dimensional patterns of proteins for studying and directing cell development. Of these methods, laser microprinting of proteins has shown the most promise for printing sub-cellular resolution gradients of cues, but the photochemistry remains too slow to enable large-scale applications for screening and therapeutics In this work, we demonstrate a novel high-speed photochemistry based on multi-photon photobleaching of fluorescein, and we build the fastest 2-D and 3-D laser microprinter for proteins to date. First, we show that multiphoton photobleaching of a deoxygenated solution of biotin-4-fluorescein onto a PEG monolayer with acrylate end-group can enable print speeds of almost 20 million pixels per second at 600 nanometer resolution. We discovered that the mechanism of fluorescein photobleaching evolves from a 2-photon to 3- and 4-photon regime at higher laser intensities, unlocking faster printing kinetics. Using this 2-D printing system, we develop a novel triangle-ratchet method for directing the polarization of single hippocampal neurons. This ability to determine which neurite becomes an axon, and which neuritis become dendrites is an essential step for developing defined in vitro neural networks. Next, we modify our multiphoton photobleaching system to print in three dimensions. For the first time, we demonstrate 3

  1. Automatic classification of trees from laser scanning point clouds

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for automatical

  2. Synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging using a translational scanning with galvanometric mirrors

    Glastre, Wilfried; Jacquin, Olivier; Hugon, Olivier; de Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; Lacot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental setup based on Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) and on Synthetic Aperture (SA) with translational scanning by galvanometric mirrors for the purpose of making deep and resolved images through scattering media. We provide real 2D optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed scattering target with a moving aperture and an isotropic resolution. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that we can keep microscope resolution beyond the working dis...

  3. Structural monitoring of tunnels using terrestrial laser scanning

    R. C. Lindenbergh; Uchanski, L.; Bucksch, A.; Van Gosliga, R.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years terrestrial laser scanning is rapidly evolving as a surveying technique for the monitoring of engineering objects like roof constructions, mines, dams, viaducts and tunnels. The advantage of laser scanning above traditional surveying methods is that it allows for the rapid acquisition of millions of scan points representing the whole surface of the object considered. Still it is a big challenge to obtain accuracies and precisions in the millimeter level when quantifying deform...

  4. Quality Analysis and Correction of Mobile Backpack Laser Scanning Data

    Rönnholm, P.; Liang, X.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Hyyppä, J.

    2016-06-01

    Backpack laser scanning systems have emerged recently enabling fast data collection and flexibility to make measurements also in areas that cannot be reached with, for example, vehicle-based laser scanners. Backpack laser scanning systems have been developed both for indoor and outdoor use. We have developed a quality analysis process in which the quality of backpack laser scanning data is evaluated in the forest environment. The reference data was collected with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) laser scanning system. The workflow included noise filtering, division of data into smaller patches, ground point extraction, ground data decimation, and ICP registration. As a result, we managed to observe the misalignments of backpack laser scanning data for 97 patches each including data from circa 10 seconds period of time. This evaluation revealed initial average misalignments of 0.227 m, 0.073 and -0.083 in the easting, northing and elevation directions, respectively. Furthermore, backpack data was corrected according to the ICP registration results. Our correction algorithm utilized the time-based linear transformation of backpack laser scanning point clouds. After the correction of data, the ICP registration was run again. This revealed remaining misalignments between the corrected backpack laser scanning data and the original UAV data. We found average misalignments of 0.084, 0.020 and -0.005 meters in the easting, northing and elevation directions, respectively.

  5. Laser-scanning techniques for rapid ballistics identification

    Woodburgy, R. C.; Nakich, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Two different laser-scanning methods may be utilized. In each case scanned cylindrical bullet surface is displayed ""unwrapped'' on oscilloscope screen. Bullets are compared by photographing each display and superimposing negatives of two images. With some modifications bullets can be scanned and compared by superimposing images on screen of dual-beam oscilloscope.

  6. Laser scanning measurements on trees for logging harvesting operations.

    Zheng, Yili; Liu, Jinhao; Wang, Dian; Yang, Ruixi

    2012-01-01

    Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular. PMID:23012543

  7. Laser Scanning Measurements on Trees for Logging Harvesting Operations

    Ruixi Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Logging harvesters represent a set of high-performance modern forestry machinery, which can finish a series of continuous operations such as felling, delimbing, peeling, bucking and so forth with human intervention. It is found by experiment that during the process of the alignment of the harvesting head to capture the trunk, the operator needs a lot of observation, judgment and repeated operations, which lead to the time and fuel losses. In order to improve the operation efficiency and reduce the operating costs, the point clouds for standing trees are collected with a low-cost 2D laser scanner. A cluster extracting algorithm and filtering algorithm are used to classify each trunk from the point cloud. On the assumption that every cross section of the target trunk is approximate a standard circle and combining the information of an Attitude and Heading Reference System, the radii and center locations of the trunks in the scanning range are calculated by the Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient algorithm. The method is validated through experiments in an aspen forest, and the optimized calculation time consumption is compared with the previous work of other researchers. Moreover, the implementation of the calculation result for automotive capturing trunks by the harvesting head during the logging operation is discussed in particular.

  8. Perfusion measures from dynamic ICG scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    Larkin, Sean; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Beecher, David; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Tim

    2010-02-01

    Movies acquired from fundus imaging using Indocyanine Green (ICG) and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope provide information for identifying vascular and other retinal abnormalities. Today, the main limitation of this modality is that it requires esoteric training for interpretation. A straightforward interpretation of these movies by objective measurements would aid in eliminating this training barrier. A software program has been developed and tested that produces and visualizes 2D maps of perfusion measures. The program corrects for frame-to-frame misalignment caused by eye motion, including rigid misalignment and warp. The alignment method uses a cross-correlation operation that automatically detects the distance due to motion between adjacent frames. The d-ICG movie is further corrected by removing flicker and vignetting artifacts. Each pixel in the corrected movie sequence is fit with a least-squares spline to yield a smooth intensity temporal profile. From the dynamics of these intensity curves, several perfusion measures are calculated. The most effective of these measures include a metric that represents the amount of time required for a vessel to fill with dye, a metric that represents the diffusion of dye, and a metric that is affected by local blood volume. These metrics are calculated from movies acquired before and after treatment for a neovascular condition. A comparison of these before and after measures may someday provide information to the clinician that helps them to evaluate disease progression and response to treatment.

  9. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  10. Multispectral Analysis of Indigenous Rock Art Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Skoog, B.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral analysis is a widely used technique in the photogrammetric and remote sensing industry. The use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in combination with imagery is becoming increasingly common, with its applications spreading to a wider range of fields. Both systems benefit from being a non-contact technique that can be used to accurately capture data regarding the target surface. Although multispectral analysis is actively performed within the spatial sciences field, its extent of application within an archaeological context has been limited. This study effectively aims to apply the multispectral techniques commonly used, to a remote Indigenous site that contains an extensive gallery of aging rock art. The ultimate goal for this research is the development of a systematic procedure that could be applied to numerous similar sites for the purpose of heritage preservation and research. The study consisted of extensive data capture of the rock art gallery using two different TLS systems and a digital SLR camera. The data was combined into a common 2D reference frame that allowed for standard image processing to be applied. An unsupervised k-means classifier was applied to the multiband images to detect the different types of rock art present. The result was unsatisfactory as the subsequent classification accuracy was relatively low. The procedure and technique does however show potential and further testing with different classification algorithms could possibly improve the result significantly.

  11. Maritime Laser Scanning as the Source for Spatial Data

    Szulwic Jakub

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of scanning technology, especially mobile scanning, gives the possibility to collect spatial data coming from maritime measurement platforms and autonomous manned or unmanned vehicles. Presented solution is derived from the mobile scanning. However we should keep in mind that the specificity of laser scanning at sea and processing collected data should be in the form acceptable in Geographical Information Systems, especially typical for the maritime needs. At the same time we should be aware that data coming from maritime mobile scanning constitutes a new approach to the describing of maritime environment and brings a new perspective that is completely different than air and terrestrial scanning.

  12. 2D Self-Similar Profile for Laser Beam Propagation in Medium with Saturating Multi-Photon Absorption

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.; Zakharova, Irina G.

    2016-02-01

    We study a self-similar mode of 2D laser beam propagation in media with multiphoton absorption (MA) taking into account a resonant nonlinearity and nonlinear absorption saturating. An analytical solution of the corresponding equations describing the problems under consideration is derived using an eigenvalue problem method generalization for soliton- like solution finding. The developed solution is used as incident beam profile and phase front for computer simulation of the 2D laser beam propagation. In particular, we demonstrate numerically that the laser beam propagation in a self-similar mode occurs within a certain distance, which depends on medium properties. Under certain relations between the nonlinear absorption and resonant nonlinearity, and cubic nonlinear response, we observe the super long distance of the beam propagation without any beam profile distributions.

  13. Laser Scanning and Simulation at Kennedy Space Center

    Kickbusch, Tracey E.

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations of ground operations leading up launch at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base in CA. We use Laser Scanning, Modeling and Simulations to make sure operations are feasible, efficient, and safe.

  14. Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Quantifying Uncertainty in Fluvial Applications

    Resop, Jonathan Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Stream morphology is an important aspect of many hydrological and ecological applications such as stream restoration design (SRD) and estimating sediment loads for total maximum daily load (TMDL) development. Surveying of stream morphology traditionally involves point measurement tools, such as total stations, or remote sensing technologies, such as aerial laser scanning (ALS), which have limitations in spatial resolution. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can potentially offer improvements ov...

  15. Ultra-low power threshold for laser induced changes in optical properties of 2D Molybdenum dichalcogenides

    Cadiz, Fabian; Wang, Gang; Kong, Wilson; Fan, Xi; Blei, Mark; Lagarde, Delphine; Gay, Maxime; Manca, Marco; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Amand, Thierry; Marie, Xavier; Renucci, Pierre; Tongay, Sefaattin; Urbaszek, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The optical response of traditional semiconductors depends on the laser excitation power used in experiments. For two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, laser excitation effects are anticipated to be vastly different due to complexity added by their ultimate thinness, high surface to volume ratio, and laser-membrane interaction effects. We show in this article that under laser excitation the optical properties of 2D materials undergo irreversible changes. Most surprisingly these effects take place even at low steady state excitation, which is commonly thought to be non-intrusive. In low temperature photoluminescence (PL) we show for monolayer (ML) MoSe2 samples grown by different techniques that laser treatment increases significantly the trion (i.e. charged exciton) contribution to the emission compared to the neutral exciton emission. Comparison between samples exfoliated onto different substrates shows that laser induced doping is more efficient for ML MoSe2 on SiO2/Si compared to h-BN and gold. For ML MoS2 ...

  16. Facial recognition and laser surface scan: a pilot study

    Lynnerup, Niels; Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Kristoffersen, Agnethe May;

    2009-01-01

    photographs of the faces of the volunteers. Fifteen male volunteers were surface scanned using a Polhemus FastSCAN Cobra Handheld Laser Scanner. Three photographs were taken of each volunteer's face in full frontal, profile and from above at an angle of 45 degrees and also 45 degrees laterally. Via special...

  17. Multicolor pattern scan laser for diabetic retinopathy with cataract

    Takao; Hirano; Yasuhiro; Iesato; Toshinori; Murata

    2014-01-01

    · AIM: To evaluate the ability of various laser wavelengths in delivering sufficient burns to the retina in eyes with cataract using a new multicolor pattern scan laser with green(532 nm), yellow(577 nm), and red(647 nm)lasers.·METHODS: The relationship between the Emery-Little(EL) degree of cataract severity and the laser wavelength required to deliver adequate burns was investigated in102 diabetic eyes. Treatment time, total number of laser shots, and intra-operative pain were assessed as well.·RESULTS: All EL-1 grade eyes and 50% of EL-2 eyes were successfully treated with the green laser, while 50%of EL-2 eyes, 96% of EL-3 eyes, and 50% of EL-4 eyes required the yellow laser. The red laser was effective in the remaining 4% of EL-3 and 50% of EL-4 eyes.·CONCLUSION: Longer wavelength lasers are more effective in delivering laser burns through cataract when we use a multicolor pattern scan laser system.

  18. Control and analysis software for a laser scanning microdensitometer

    H R Bundel; C P Navathe; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2006-02-01

    A PC-based control software and data acquisition system is developed for an existing commercial microdensitometer (Biomed make model No. SL-2D/1D UV/VIS) to facilitate scanning and analysis of X-ray films. The software is developed in Labview, which includes operation of the microdensitometer in 1D and 2D scans and analysis of spatial or spectral data on X-ray films, such as optical density, intensity and wavelength. It provides a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) to analyse the scanned data and also store the analysed data/image in popular formats like data in Excel and images in jpeg. It has also on-line calibration facility with standard optical density tablets. The control software and data acquisition system is simple, inexpensive and versatile.

  19. New technique for investigation of solar cell sheet resistance distribution by laser beam scanning

    Goncharov, Vadym O.; Ilchenko, Leonid M.; Kilchitskaya, S.; Litvinenko, Sergiy V.; Smirnov, Eugene M.

    1998-04-01

    Laser beam scanning was applied for evaluating the distribution of sheet resistance of solar cell emitter. It was shown that the voltage drop around the illuminated spot has an information about the local sheet resistance since the most part of the voltage drop occurs near the illuminated area. The current under local illumination in reverse direction depends on the local quantum efficiency while in forward direction it depends on the same local properties and on the local sheet resistance. The processing of laser beam induced current images at different bias voltage gives a map of local sheet resistance complementing other techniques for investigation the electron devices. We investigated one and dual-beam technique for amplitude and phase LBIC measurement by means of universal laser scanning microscope worked in amplitude and differential-phase regimes. Acousto-optical scanning results in 2D distribution of amplitude or phase LBIC. For convenience of image processing and visualization, TV type scanning is applied to laser beams.

  20. Development, Calibration and Evaluation of a Portable and Direct Georeferenced Laser Scanning System for Kinematic 3D Mapping

    Heinz, Erik; Eling, Christian; Wieland, Markus; Klingbeil, Lasse; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, kinematic laser scanning has become increasingly popular because it offers many benefits compared to static laser scanning. The advantages include both saving of time in the georeferencing and a more favorable scanning geometry. Often mobile laser scanning systems are installed on wheeled platforms, which may not reach all parts of the object. Hence, there is an interest in the development of portable systems, which remain operational even in inaccessible areas. The development of such a portable laser scanning system is presented in this paper. It consists of a lightweight direct georeferencing unit for the position and attitude determination and a small low-cost 2D laser scanner. This setup provides advantages over existing portable systems that employ heavy and expensive 3D laser scanners in a profiling mode. A special emphasis is placed on the system calibration, i. e. the determination of the transformation between the coordinate frames of the direct georeferencing unit and the 2D laser scanner. To this end, a calibration field is used, which consists of differently orientated georeferenced planar surfaces, leading to estimates for the lever arms and boresight angles with an accuracy of mm and one-tenth of a degree. Finally, point clouds of the mobile laser scanning system are compared with georeferenced point clouds of a high-precision 3D laser scanner. Accordingly, the accuracy of the system is in the order of cm to dm. This is in good agreement with the expected accuracy, which has been derived from the error propagation of previously estimated variance components.

  1. Boresight calibration of construction misalignments for 3D scanners built with a 2D laser range finder rotating on its optical center.

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  2. Boresight Calibration of Construction Misalignments for 3D Scanners Built with a 2D Laser Rangefinder Rotating on Its Optical Center

    Jesús Morales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder.

  3. Influence of laser frequency noise on scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimetry

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    n this work, we study the performance of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimeter (sFPILDV) and compare two candidate 1.5 um single-frequency laser sources for the system – a fiber laser (FL) and a semiconductor laser (SL). We describe a straightforward calibration pr...... procedure for the sFPI-LDV and investigate the effect of different degrees of laser frequency noise between the FL and the SL on the velocimeter’s performance...

  4. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite. (paper)

  5. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by μ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of μ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Departement des Arts Graphiques, Musee du Louvre and in the Musee des Beaux-Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special μ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique. (orig.)

  6. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by μ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, UMR8247, Paris (France); Pichon, Laurent; Mottin, Bruno [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, C2RMF, Paris (France); Wallez, Gilles [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, UMR8247, Paris (France); Sorbonne University, UPMC Univ., Paris 06 (France)

    2015-11-15

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of μ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Departement des Arts Graphiques, Musee du Louvre and in the Musee des Beaux-Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special μ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique. (orig.)

  7. Confocal laser scanning microscopy image correlation for nanoparticle flow velocimetry

    Jun, Brian; Yang, Haisheng; Main, Russell; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-01-01

    We present a new particle image correlation technique for resolving nanoparticle flow velocity using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The two primary issues that complicate nanoparticle scanning laser image correlation (SLIC) based velocimetry are (1) the use of diffusion dominated nanoparticles as flow tracers, which introduce a random decorrelating error into the velocity estimate, and (2) the effects of the scanning laser image acquisition, which introduces a bias error. To date, no study has quantified these errors or demonstrated a means to deal with them in SLIC velocimetry. In this work, we build upon the robust phase correlation (RPC) and existing methods of SLIC to quantify and mitigate these errors. First, we implement an ensemble RPC instead of using an ensemble standard cross correlation, and develop an SLIC optimal filter that maximizes the correlation strength in order to reliably and accurately detect the correlation peak representing the most probable average displacement of the nano...

  8. Scanning Laser Infrared Molecular Spectrometer (SLIMS)

    Scott, David C.; Rickey, Kelly; Ksendzov, Alexander; George, Warren P.; Aljabri, Abdullah S.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    This prototype innovation is a novel design that achieves very long, effective laser path lengths that are able to yield ppb (parts per billion) and sub-ppb measurements of trace gases. SLIMS can also accommodate multiple laser channels covering a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in detection of more chemicals of interest. The mechanical design of the mirror cell allows for the large effective path length within a small footprint. The same design provides a robust structure that lends itself to being immune to some of the alignment challenges that similar cells face. By taking a hollow cylinder and by cutting an elliptically or spherically curved surface into its inner wall, the basic geometry of a reflecting ring is created. If the curved, inner surface is diamond-turned and highly polished, a surface that is very highly reflective can be formed. The surface finish can be further improved by adding a thin chrome or gold film over the surface. This creates a high-quality, curved, mirrored surface. A laser beam, which can be injected from a small bore hole in the wall of the cylinder, will be able to make many low-loss bounces around the ring, creating a large optical path length. The reflecting ring operates on the same principle as the Herriott cell. The difference exists in the mirror that doesn't have to be optically aligned, and which has a relatively large, internal surface area that lends itself to either open air or evacuated spectroscopic measurements. This solid, spherical ring mirror removes the possibility of mirror misalignment caused by thermal expansion or vibrations, because there is only a single, solid reflecting surface. Benefits of the reflecting ring come into play when size constraints reduce the size of the system, especially for space missions in which mass is at a premium.

  9. Street-Scene Tree Segmentation from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Guan, H.; Cao, S.; Yu, Y.; Li, J.; Liu, N.; Chen, P.; Li, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Our work addresses the problem of extracting trees from mobile laser scanning data. The work is a two step-wise strategy, including terrain point removal and tree segmentation. First, a voxel-based upward growing filtering is proposed to remove terrain points from the mobile laser scanning data. Then, a tree segmentation is presented to extract individual trees via a Euclidean distance clustering approach and Voxel-based Normalized Cut (VNCut) segmentation approach. A road section data acquired by a RIEGL VMX-450 system are selected for evaluating the proposed tree segmentation method. Qualitative analysis shows that our algorithm achieves a good performance.

  10. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  11. ACCURACY ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING MODELS CREATED FROM LASER SCANNING DATA

    Borkowski, A; Jóźków, G.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it can be observed a growing interest in 3D building or city models created from laser scanning data. These models are used in many areas of interest. In this work the accuracy assessment of 3D buildings models created from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data was carried out. TLS data for modelling were acquired with average point spacing about 0.02 m. In order to model invisible from the ground building elements such as roofs, the LIDAR data was used with density of about ...

  12. Crack imaging by scanning laser-line thermography and laser-spot thermography

    The thermographic images of laser-heated spots or lines are perturbed by nearby cracks, providing NDE techniques for crack detection. Scanning with a laser line, rather than a laser spot, results in a substantial reduction in inspection time. 3D finite difference modelling results are presented that show the sensitivity of the laser-line thermography technique to cracks of varying lengths, depths and openings. A novel crack imaging technique is presented that is based on assembling the second spatial derivative thermal images of a scanned laser line. Experimental results show the new technique to image cracks with openings as small as a few micrometres. The scanning time of the laser-line thermography technique is shown to be over an order of magnitude smaller than that of the laser-spot thermography technique whilst producing crack images of similar quality

  13. Fluence scan: an unexplored property of a laser beam

    We present an extended theoretical background of so-called fluence scan (f-scan or F-scan) method, which is frequently being used for offline characterization of focused short-wavelength (EUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray) laser beams [J. Chalupsky et al., Opt. Express 18, 27836 (2010)]. The method exploits ablative imprints in various solids to visualize iso-fluence beam contours at different fluence and/or clip levels. An f-scan curve (clip level as a function of the corresponding iso-fluence contour area) can be generated for a general non-Gaussian beam. As shown in this paper, fluence scan encompasses important information about energy distribution within the beam profile, which may play an essential role in laser-matter interaction research employing intense non-ideal beams. Here we for the first time discuss fundamental properties of the f-scan function and its inverse counterpart (if-scan). Furthermore, we extensively elucidate how it is related to the effective beam area, energy distribution, and to the so called Liu's dependence [J.M. Liu, Opt. Lett. 7, 196 (1982)]. A new method of the effective area evaluation based on weighted inverse f-scan fit is introduced and applied to real data obtained at the SCSS (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source) facility. (authors)

  14. Synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging using a translational scanning with galvanometric mirrors

    Glastre, Wilfried; Hugon, Olivier; De Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; Lacot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental setup based on Laser Optical Feedback Imaging (LOFI) and on Synthetic Aperture (SA) with translational scanning by galvanometric mirrors for the purpose of making deep and resolved images through scattering media. We provide real 2D optical synthetic-aperture image of a fixed scattering target with a moving aperture and an isotropic resolution. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that we can keep microscope resolution beyond the working distance. A photometric balance is made and we show that the number of photons participating in the final image decreases with the square of the reconstruction distance. This degradation is partially compensated by the high sensitivity of LOFI.

  15. Theoretical benchmarking of laser-accelerated ion fluxes by 2D-PIC simulations

    Mackenroth, Felix; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists a number of different schemes for laser based ion acceleration in the literature. Some of these schemes are also partly overlapping, making a clear distinction between the schemes difficult in certain parameter regimes. Here, we provide a systematic numerical comparison between the following schemes and their analytical models: light-sail acceleration, Coulomb explosions, hole boring acceleration, and target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). We study realistic laser parameters and various different target designs, each optimized for one of the acceleration schemes, respectively. As a means of comparing the schemes, we compute the ion current density generated at different laser powers, using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and benchmark the particular analytical models for the corresponding schemes against the numerical results. Finally, we discuss the consequences for attaining high fluxes through the studied laser ion-acceleration schemes.

  16. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  17. A diffraction-limited scanning system providing broad spectral range for laser scanning microscopy

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Zhuo, Zong-Yan; Huang, Chen-Han; Chui, Hsiang-Chen; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2009-11-01

    Diversified research interests in scanning laser microscopy nowadays require broadband capability of the optical system. Although an all-mirror-based optical design with a suitable metallic coating is appropriate for broad-spectrum applications from ultraviolet to terahertz, most researchers prefer lens-based scanning systems despite the drawbacks of a limited spectral range, ghost reflection, and chromatic aberration. One of the main concerns is that the geometrical aberration induced by off-axis incidence on spherical mirrors significantly deteriorates image resolution. Here, we demonstrate a novel geometrical design of a spherical-mirror-based scanning system in which off-axis aberrations, both astigmatism and coma, are compensated to reach diffraction-limited performance. We have numerically simulated and experimentally verified that this scanning system meets the Marechà l condition and provides high Strehl ratio within a 3°×3° scanning area. Moreover, we demonstrate second-harmonic-generation imaging from starch with our new design. A greatly improved resolution compared to the conventional mirror-based system is confirmed. This scanning system will be ideal for high-resolution linear/nonlinear laser scanning microscopy, ophthalmoscopic applications, and precision fabrications.

  18. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2015-03-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge. In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model. The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty and reliability analysis. The reliability of the scanning paths are established using cumulative probability distribution functions for process output criteria such as sample density, thermal homogeneity, etc. A customized genetic algorithm is used along with the simulation model to generate optimized cellular scanning strategies and processing parameters, with an objective of reducing thermal asymmetries and mechanical deformations. The optimized scanning strategies are used for selective laser melting of the standard samples, and experimental and numerical results are compared.

  19. Laser scanning of a recirculation zone on the Bolund escarpment

    Mann, Jakob; Angelou, Nikolas; Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben

    Rapid variations in the height of the recirculation zone are measured with a scanning wind lidar over a small escarpment on the Bolund Peninsula. The lidar is essentially a continuous-wave laser Doppler anemometer with the capability of rapidly changing the focus distance and the beam direction...

  20. USE OF LASER SCANNING FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE DOCUMENTATION

    Gulhan BENLI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In terms of raising an awareness of the historical, national and cultural properties in our country and ensuring a transfer of information to posterity, it is of vital importance to take inventory of the cultural and natural real properties located in protected sites. Many fields, such as medical science, construction, ground engineering, geodetic engineering, and architecture, make use of the present-day laser scanning technology. Even if contemporary and current scientific methods are used for the inventory and documentation studies related to cultural and natural real properties in the PROTECTED SITES in the field of architecture; acquiring data of the entirety of a protected site using these methods is a time consuming process. Among the scientific methods applied, laser scanning technology has the utmost importance in the latest years. The laser scanning devices for the detection of cultural, natural and historical properties in archeological, historical, urban or mixed protected sites in Turkey, eliminate challenges such as the enormity of sites, the difficulty of working in the sites, intense work hours, and the necessity of having a thorough knowledge of the site. In the scope of this study, the usage, application, facilities, advantages and attainments of geodetic laser scanning systems in conducting surveys on facade, street or avenue silhouettes in the protected sites, where historical buildings within field of architecture are widespread, will be examined.

  1. Single scan vector prediction in selective laser melting

    Wits, W.W.; Bruins, R.; Terpstra, L.; Huls, R.A.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In selective laser melting (SLM) products are built by melting layers of metal powder successively. Optimal process parameters are usually obtained by scanning single vectors and subsequently determining which settings lead to a good compromise between product density and build speed. This paper pro

  2. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  3. Non-Contact Measurement Using A Laser Scanning Probe

    Modjarrad, Amir

    1989-03-01

    Traditional high accuracy touch-trigger probing can now be complemented by high speed, non-contact, profile scanning to give another "dimension" to the three-dimensional Co-ordinate Measuring Machines (CMMs). Some of the features of a specially developed laser scanning probe together with the trade-offs involved in the design of inspection systems that use triangulation are examined. Applications of such a laser probe on CMMs are numerous since high speed scanning allows inspection of many different components and surfaces. For example, car body panels, tyre moulds, aircraft wing skins, turbine blades, wax and clay models, plastics, etc. Other applications include in-process surveillance in manufacturing and food processing, robotics vision and many others. Some of these applications are discussed and practical examples, case studies and experimental results are given with particular reference to use on CMMs. In conclusion, future developments and market trends in high speed non-contact measurement are discussed.

  4. 2D plasmonic and diffractive structures with sharp features by UV laser patterning

    Peláez, R.J.; Afonso, C.N.; Bulíř, Jiří; Novotný, Michal; Lančok, Ján; Piksová, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2013), "095301-1"-"095301-7". ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100718 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silver thin film * silver nanoparticles * plasmonics * diffractive structures * laser processing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.672, year: 2013

  5. PICLE: a 2-D code for laser-beam - gas-jet interaction studies

    A heat transport hydrodynamic PIC code was adapted for application to the KMSF gas-jet experiments. The input material density profile was changed from the original solid slab geometry to a cylindrically symmetric profile modeling the gas-jet plume. The target material was changed from the original Z = 1 to arbitrary Z. Energy deposition was modified to include inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance absorption. Preliminary results indicate electron thermal conduction dominates over mass flow for times up to about the laser pulse length. Electron thermal conduction is seen to vary between classical and flux-limited values spatially and temporally according to plasma conditions. Applications of this code, entitled PICLE (Particle-In-Cell Laser Equipment code), to absorption and flux-limit parameter studies are described. A source listing and sample input deck are included

  6. Synthesis by pulsed laser ablation of 2D nanostructures for advanced biomedical sensing

    Trusso, S.; Zanchi, C.; Bombelli, A.; Lucotti, A.; Tommasini, M.; de Grazia, U.; Ciusani, E.; Romito, L. M.; Ossi, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Au nanoparticle arrays with controlled nanostructure were produced by pulsed laser ablation on glass. Such substrates were optimized for biomedical sensing by means of SERS keeping fixed all process parameters but the laser pulse (LP) number that is a key deposition parameter. It allows to fine-tune the Au surface nanostructure with a considerable improvement in the SERS response towards the detection of apomorphine in blood serum (3.3 × 10‑6 M), when LP number is increased from 1 × 104 to 2 × 104. This result is the starting point to correlate the intensity of selected SERS signals of apomorphine to its concentration in the blood of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  7. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  8. Fluence scan: an unexplored property of a laser beam

    Chalupský, Jaromír; Burian, Tomáš; Hájková, Věra; Juha, Libor; Polcar, T.; Gaudin, J.; Nagasono, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Yabashi, M.; Krzywinski, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 22 (2013), s. 26363-26375. ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR GA13-28721S; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) M100101221; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : free-electron laser s (FELs) * UV * EUV * x-ray laser s * laser beam characterization * F-scan Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 3.525, year: 2013

  9. Novel adaptive laser scanning sensor for reverse engineering measurement

    Zhao Ji; Ma Zi; Lin Na; Zhu Quanmin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a series of new techniques are used to optimize typical laser scanning sensor. The integrated prototype is compared with traditional approach to demonstrate the much improved performance. In the research and development, camera calibration is achieved by extracting characteristic points of the laser plane, so that the calibration efficiency is improved significantly. With feedback control of its intensity, the laser is automatically adjusted for different material. A modified algorithm is presented to improve the accuracy of laser stripe extraction. The fusion of data extracted from left and right camera is completed with re-sampling technique. The scanner is integrated with a robot arm and some other machinery for on-line measurement and inspection, which provides a flexible measurement tool for reverse engineering.

  10. Automated house internal geometric quality inspection using laser scanning

    Wang, Yuchen; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiu, Zhouyan

    2015-12-01

    Taking a terrestrial laser scanner to scan the room of a house, the scanned data can be used to inspect the geometric quality of the room. Taking advantage of the scan line feature, we can quickly calculate normal of the scanned points. Afterwards, we develop a fast plane segmentation approach to recognize the walls of the room according to the semantic constraints of a common room. With geometric and semantic constraints, we can exclude points that don't belong to the inspecting room. With the segmented results, we can accurately do global search of max and min height, width and length of a room, and the flatness of the wall as well. Experiment shows the robustness of this geometric inspecting approach. This approach has the ability to measure some important indicators that cannot be done by manual work.

  11. Airborne laser scanning to detect pipeline area invasions

    Falat, Denise R.; Sallem Filho, Silas [ESTEIO Engenharia e Aerolevantamentos S.A, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The occupation of the surface on the pipeline right-of-ways needs constant detailing and updating. The speed of changes in the vegetation areas and the irregular growth of urbanization prove the need for quick answers on the identification of invasions and on the elaboration of technical reports showing spatially referenced elements. In this context, this technical paper seeks to identify changes on the surface, making use of data derived from airborne LASER (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiance) sensor scanning performed in different periods in the same study right-of-way. This technique has been successfully used in a number of applications, however, in most of the cases the LASER data are combined with digital photogrammetric products. This paper aims at the identification of alterations on the surface of right-of-ways and pipelines, using data exclusively from LASER scanning, performed in distinct periods. From the data processing are generated the DSM's (Digital Surface Models). The automatic comparison between the DSM's allows the identification of changes occurred between the surveys. Based on the configuration of the altered areas, we then expect to distinguish the several types of changes occurred as: new buildings, the advance of vegetation over right-of-ways and objects. For the validation of this methodology, photographic images of the regions have been used, obtained through photogrammetry in the same period of the LASER scanning. (author)

  12. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; Wang, H.; Wilson, K.; Zhang, S.

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ˜1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  13. Continuous-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: Extensions to arbitrary areas, multi-frequency and 3D capture

    Weekes, B.; Ewins, D. [University of Bristol, Queen' s Building, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TR (United Kingdom); Acciavatti, F. [Universita' Politecnica Delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche 12, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2014-05-27

    To date, differing implementations of continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry have been demonstrated by various academic institutions, but since the scan paths were defined using step or sine functions from function generators, the paths were typically limited to 1D line scans or 2D areas such as raster paths or Lissajous trajectories. The excitation was previously often limited to a single frequency due to the specific signal processing performed to convert the scan data into an ODS. In this paper, a configuration of continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry is demonstrated which permits scanning of arbitrary areas, with the benefit of allowing multi-frequency/broadband excitation. Various means of generating scan paths to inspect arbitrary areas are discussed and demonstrated. Further, full 3D vibration capture is demonstrated by the addition of a range-finding facility to the described configuration, and iteratively relocating a single scanning laser head. Here, the range-finding facility was provided by a Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive piece of consumer electronics.

  14. Practical Enhancement of Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Fluvial Geomorphology Surveys

    Hwang, K.; Chandler, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate measurement of microtopography plays an important role in fluvial geomorphology. Whereof the surface is obscured by vegetation or landform, airborne remote sensing can be impractical and ground-based surveys using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) show promise. TLS provides high resolution observations of the land surface for relatively low cost and with simple setup. However, the scanning range is effectively limited to less than 100 m, requiring individual scenes to be merged in software to represent larger landforms. For studies requiring several scenes, an efficient scanning strategy should be established in advance to optimize for time, resolution and spatial coverage. This requires careful consideration of scanner placement to merge scenes. We address problems encountered with blind spots. TLS is generally conducted on a 2-m (or shorter) tripod and the low scanning angle to the land surface at long distance inevitably causes blind spots in rugose or complex terrain. Similarly, the distance between TLS placement points is limited by the ability to resolve matching targets from sequential surveys. Here we present a simple geometry-based scanning plan regardless of the type and range of the instrument, with modification of the survey instrument platform. The half of a minimum range is used to make at least 18% of a superposed area with the next scan. Since scanning height barely affects the scanning range, the tripod was substituted to a 3-m stepladder and the platform of the scanner was modified to level and adjust the device easily with one hand. The results show that the new scanning plan performs well regardless of the topography and figure of the area of interest, with sufficient superposed area for combination with other adjacent scans. The modification of the platform also turned out to be more efficient to secure the observing angle and improve usability. The physical enhancement for TLS will provide valuable opportunity to conduct a standardized

  15. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO2 laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm2 area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm2. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites

  16. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    Jones, S.C.

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO{sub 2} laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm{sup 2} area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites.

  17. Differential diagnosis of choroidal melanomas and nervi using scanning laser ophthalmoscopical indocyanine green angiography

    Andersen, Mads V. Nis; Scherfig, Erik; Prause, J.U.

    1995-01-01

    Ophthalmology, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green (ICG), scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), angiography......Ophthalmology, choroidal melanoma, choroidal nevus, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green (ICG), scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), angiography...

  18. The geometry of terrestrial laser scanning; identification of errors, modeling and mitigation of scanning geometry

    Soudarissanane, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, Terrestrial Laser Scanners are increasingly being used in a broad spectrum of applications, from surveying to civil engineering, medical modeling and forensics. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also need observations with a well described quality, from which it is possible to reliably derive the quality of the end-product. As any measurement, TLS scans are subject to measurement noise. Curren...

  19. Quantification of fold curvature and fracturing using terrestrial laser scanning

    Pearce, M. A.; eospatial Research Ltd., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom;; Jones, R. R.; Geospatial Research Ltd., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom;; Smith, S. A. F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; McCaffrey, K .J. W.; Geospatial Research Ltd., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, United Kingdom;

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning is used to capture the geometry of three single folded bedding surfaces. The resulting light detection and ranging (LIDAR) point clouds are filtered and smoothed to enable meshing and calculation of principal curvatures. Fracture traces, picked from the LIDAR data, are used to calculate fracture densities. The rich data sets produced by this method provide statistically robust estimates of spatial variations in fracture density across the fold surface. The digital n...

  20. A New Multichannel Spectral Imaging Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope

    Yunhai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multichannel spectral imaging laser scanning confocal microscope for effective detection of multiple fluorescent labeling in the research of biological tissues. In this paper, the design and key technologies of the system are introduced. Representative results on confocal imaging, 3-dimensional sectioning imaging, and spectral imaging are demonstrated. The results indicated that the system is applicable to multiple fluorescent labeling in biological experiments.

  1. Applications of terrestrial laser scanning for tunnels: a review

    Weixing Wang; Weisen Zhao; Lingxiao Huang; Vivian Vimarlund; Zhiwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technique in engineering surveys is gaining an increasing interest due to the advantages of non-contact, rapidity, high accuracy, and large scale. Millions of accurate 3D points (mm level accuracy) can be delivered by this technique with a high point density in a short time (up to 1 million points per second), which makes it a potential technique for large scale applications in engineering environments such as tunnels, bridges, and ...

  2. Self-calibration and direct georeferencing in terrestrial laser scanning

    Reshetyuk, Yuriy

    2009-01-01

    An important step in data processing from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is georeferencing, i.e. transformation of the scanner data (point clouds) into a real world coordinate system, which is important for their integration with other geospatial data. An efficient approach for this is direct georeferencing, whereby the position and orientation of the scanner can be determined in the field, similarly to the working routine of total stations. Thus the efficiency of the survey can be increase...

  3. Automation in laser scanning for cultural heritage applications

    Böhm, Jan; Haala, Norbert; Alshawabkeh, Yahya

    2005-01-01

    Within the paper we present the current activities of the Institute for Photogrammetry in cultural heritage documentation in Jordan. In particular two sites, Petra and Jerash, were recorded using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). We present the results and the current status of the recording. Experiences drawn from these projects have led us to investigate more automated approaches to TLS data processing. We detail two approaches within this work. The automation of georeferencing for TLS data...

  4. Improving Completeness of Geometric Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Clemens Nothegger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of terrestrial laser scanning for the documentation of cultural heritage assets is becoming increasingly common. While the point cloud by itself is sufficient for satisfying many documentation needs, it is often desirable to use this data for applications other than documentation. For these purposes a triangulated model is usually required. The generation of topologically correct triangulated models from terrestrial laser scans, however, still requires much interactive editing. This is especially true when reconstructing models from medium range panoramic scanners and many scan positions. Because of residual errors in the instrument calibration and the limited spatial resolution due to the laser footprint, the point clouds from different scan positions never match perfectly. Under these circumstances many of the software packages commonly used for generating triangulated models produce models which have topological errors such as surface intersecting triangles, holes or triangles which violate the manifold property. We present an algorithm which significantly reduces the number of topological errors in the models from such data. The algorithm is a modification of the Poisson surface reconstruction algorithm. Poisson surfaces are resilient to noise in the data and the algorithm always produces a closed manifold surface. Our modified algorithm partitions the data into tiles and can thus be easily parallelized. Furthermore, it avoids introducing topological errors in occluded areas, albeit at the cost of producing models which are no longer guaranteed to be closed. The algorithm is applied to scan data of sculptures of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Schönbrunn Palace and data of a petrified oyster reef in Stetten, Austria. The results of the method’s application are discussed and compared with those of alternative methods.

  5. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature...... gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge.In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and...... process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model.The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo...

  6. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  7. Detection and characterisation of surface cracking using scanning laser techniques

    Edwards, R. S.; Clough, A. R.; Rosli, M. H.; Hernandez-Valle, J. F.; Dutton, B.

    2012-05-01

    The use of lasers for generating and detecting ultrasound is becoming more established in non-destructive testing. However, there is still scope in developing the techniques to fully realise the benefits of non-contact measurements. One application is the detection of surface defects in metals; for example, rolling contact fatigue in rails, and surface cracking on billets or plates. We present measurements using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to generate surface ultrasonic waves and an interferometer to detect the surface displacement on the sample, and investigate the interaction of Rayleigh or Lamb waves with surface defects. Signal enhancement in the near-field is observed for Rayleigh waves when either the generator or detector is close to a defect. For a scanned detector measurement, enhancement is observed due to constructive interference of the incident and reflected waves. For a scanned generator measurement, the change in generation conditions when the laser is over the defect also lead to an enhancement. In measurements of plate samples we observe similar enhancement effects whereby higher order modes are observed when the laser is above a defect. We discuss the implications of signal enhancements for detecting and characterising surface cracking.

  8. Dental scanning in CAD/CAM technologies: laser beams

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Faur, Nicolae; Negru, Radu; Romînu, Mihai; Cozarov, Dalibor

    2008-02-01

    Scanning, also called digitizing, is the process of gathering the requisite data from an object. Many different technologies are used to collect three dimensional data. They range from mechanical and very slow, to radiation-based and highly-automated. Each technology has its advantages and disadvantages, and their applications and specifications overlap. The aims of this study are represented by establishing a viable method of digitally representing artifacts of dental casts, proposing a suitable scanner and post-processing software and obtaining 3D Models for the dental applications. The method is represented by the scanning procedure made by different scanners as the implicated materials. Scanners are the medium of data capture. 3D scanners aim to measure and record the relative distance between the object's surface and a known point in space. This geometric data is represented in the form of point cloud data. The contact and no contact scanners were presented. The results show that contact scanning procedures uses a touch probe to record the relative position of points on the objects' surface. This procedure is commonly used in Reverse engineering applications. Its merits are represented by efficiency for objects with low geometric surface detail. Disadvantages are represented by time consuming, this procedure being impractical for artifacts digitization. The non contact scanning procedure implies laser scanning (laser triangulation technology) and photogrammetry. As a conclusion it can be drawn that different types of dental structure needs different types of scanning procedures in order to obtain a competitive complex 3D virtual model that can be used in CAD/CAM technologies.

  9. Profilometry of fuel rods with the laser scan micrometer

    In the hot laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) fuel rod inspection for nuclear power plants is performed periodically. The older system, using linear variable displacement transducers, is outperformed regarding accuracy, speed and maintenance effort. It was decided to design a non contact laser scanner. The laser scanning of fuel rods is now fully integrated in the non destructive researches in the laboratory of material behaviour from PSI. To summarize: - The new laser scanner is working well on fuel rods. Shielding is very important to keep a constant signal from the reception unit and keep the laser scanner working for a long time; - The performance of the non contact laser profilometry is better than the old mechanical equipment, regarding accuracy, speed and maintenance; - Set up and calibration of the unit within one day, measuring ovality in midspan areas and diameter in positions 0/180; 45/225; 90/270; 135/315 degrees, step size 0.5 mm, over a length of about 4000 mm within 20 hr; - Accuracy < 1 micron is reached; - Costs about 30000 Euros. (authors)

  10. Globally consistent registration of terrestrial laser scans via graph optimization

    Theiler, Pascal Willy; Wegner, Jan Dirk; Schindler, Konrad

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the automatic registration of multiple terrestrial laser scans. The proposed method can handle arbitrary point clouds with reasonable pairwise overlap, without knowledge about their initial orientation and without the need for artificial markers or other specific objects. The framework is divided into a coarse and a fine registration part, which each start with pairwise registration and then enforce consistent global alignment across all scans. While we put forward a complete, functional registration system, the novel contribution of the paper lies in the coarse global alignment step. Merging multiple scans into a consistent network creates loops along which the relative transformations must add up. We pose the task of finding a global alignment as picking the best candidates from a set of putative pairwise registrations, such that they satisfy the loop constraints. This yields a discrete optimization problem that can be solved efficiently with modern combinatorial methods. Having found a coarse global alignment in this way, the framework proceeds by pairwise refinement with standard ICP, followed by global refinement to evenly spread the residual errors. The framework was tested on six challenging, real-world datasets. The discrete global alignment step effectively detects, removes and corrects failures of the pairwise registration procedure, finally producing a globally consistent coarse scan network which can be used as initial guess for the highly non-convex refinement. Our overall system reaches success rates close to 100% at acceptable runtimes < 1 h, even in challenging conditions such as scanning in the forest.

  11. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C. PMID:22559543

  12. Femtosecond laser written 16.5 mm long glass-waveguide amplifier and laser with 5.2 dB cm−1 internal gain at 1534 nm

    A 16.5 mm long, heavily doped erbium–ytterbium phosphate glass-waveguide amplifier was fabricated by the femtosecond laser (fs-laser) inscription technique. The femtosecond laser inscription of waveguides was carried out at 500 kHz repetition rate using a 0.68 NA aspheric lens. The energy deposition profile in the dielectric material was initially simulated using a generalized adaptive fast-Fourier evolver (GAFFE) algorithm. The size and shape of the guiding structures were carefully controlled by the slit shaping technique to reduce the coupling losses, with achievable values down to less than 0.1 dB. Rigorous simulations of the response of the active waveguides were carried out to optimize their performance as optical amplifiers. A maximum of 8.6 dB internal gain at 1534 nm was obtained upon bidirectional laser pumping at 976 nm, leading to a gain per unit length of 5.2 dB cm−1. Laser action was also achieved for both ring and linear cavity configurations. (letter)

  13. LAND-BASED MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEMS: A REVIEW

    I. Puente

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile mapping has been using various photogrammetric techniques for many years. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of mobile mapping systems using laser scanners available in the market, partially because of the improvement in GNSS/INS performance for direct georeferencing. In this article, some of the most important land-based mobile laser scanning (MLS systems are reviewed. Firstly, the main characteristics of MLS systems vs. airborne (ALS and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS systems are compared. Secondly, a short overview of the mobile mapping technology is also provided so that the reader can fully grasp the complexity and operation of these devices. As we put forward in this paper, a comparison of different systems is briefly carried out regarding specifications provided by the manufacturers. Focuses on the current research are also addressed with emphasis on the practical applications of these systems. Most of them have been utilized for data collection on road infrastructures or building façades. This article shows that MLS technology is nowadays well established and proven, since the demand has grown to the point that there are several systems suppliers offering their products to satisfy this particular market.

  14. Efficient terrestrial laser scan segmentation exploiting data structure

    Mahmoudabadi, Hamid; Olsen, Michael J.; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-09-01

    New technologies such as lidar enable the rapid collection of massive datasets to model a 3D scene as a point cloud. However, while hardware technology continues to advance, processing 3D point clouds into informative models remains complex and time consuming. A common approach to increase processing efficiently is to segment the point cloud into smaller sections. This paper proposes a novel approach for point cloud segmentation using computer vision algorithms to analyze panoramic representations of individual laser scans. These panoramas can be quickly created using an inherent neighborhood structure that is established during the scanning process, which scans at fixed angular increments in a cylindrical or spherical coordinate system. In the proposed approach, a selected image segmentation algorithm is applied on several input layers exploiting this angular structure including laser intensity, range, normal vectors, and color information. These segments are then mapped back to the 3D point cloud so that modeling can be completed more efficiently. This approach does not depend on pre-defined mathematical models and consequently setting parameters for them. Unlike common geometrical point cloud segmentation methods, the proposed method employs the colorimetric and intensity data as another source of information. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on several datasets encompassing variety of scenes and objects. Results show a very high perceptual (visual) level of segmentation and thereby the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. The proposed method is also more efficient compared to Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC), which is a common approach for point cloud segmentation.

  15. Laser cutting of irregular shape object based on stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Tang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Xuping

    2015-05-01

    Irregular shape objects with different 3-dimensional (3D) appearances are difficult to be shaped into customized uniform pattern by current laser machining approaches. A laser galvanometric scanning system (LGS) could be a potential candidate since it can easily achieve path-adjustable laser shaping. However, without knowing the actual 3D topography of the object, the processing result may still suffer from 3D shape distortion. It is desirable to have a versatile auxiliary tool that is capable of generating 3D-adjusted laser processing path by measuring the 3D geometry of those irregular shape objects. This paper proposed the stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system (SLGS), which takes the advantages of both the stereo vision solution and conventional LGS system. The 3D geometry of the object obtained by the stereo cameras is used to guide the scanning galvanometers for 3D-shape-adjusted laser processing. In order to achieve precise visual-servoed laser fabrication, these two independent components are integrated through a system calibration method using plastic thin film target. The flexibility of SLGS has been experimentally demonstrated by cutting duck feathers for badminton shuttle manufacture.

  16. Hot Slab Surface Inspection By Laser Scanning Method

    Matsubara, Toshiro; Toyota, Toshio; Fujiyama, Akihiro

    1986-10-01

    An optical flaw detector with laser as the external light source, which is called LST ( laser scanning tester ), has been developed. This equipment automatically inspects the entire surface of hot slabs. The results are used to examine the suitability of those slabs for hot charge rolling. The characteristics of LST are its high optical resolving power and the signal processing method with which two-dimensional information on the type of the flaw is processed. For the opening width of O.4mm and over, the detection ratio is nearly 100%. This equipment started commercial operation in January 1983 in Nippon Steel's Yawata Works and its application has increased the hot charge rolling ratio.

  17. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy: optimized testing strategies for psychophysics

    Van de Velde, Frans J.

    1996-12-01

    Retinal function can be evaluated with the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). the main advantage is a precise localization of the psychophysical stimulus on the retina. Four alternative forced choice (4AFC) and parameter estimation by sequential testing (PEST) are classic adaptive algorithms that have been optimized for use with the SLO, and combined with strategies to correct for small eye movements. Efficient calibration procedures are essential for quantitative microperimetry. These techniques measure precisely visual acuity and retinal sensitivity at distinct locations on the retina. A combined 632 nm and IR Maxwellian view illumination provides a maximal transmittance through the ocular media and has a animal interference with xanthophyll or hemoglobin. Future modifications of the instrument include the possibility of binocular evaluation, Maxwellian view control, fundus tracking using normalized gray-scale correlation, and microphotocoagulation. The techniques are useful in low vision rehabilitation and the application of laser to the retina.

  18. Automatic Railway Power Line Extraction Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng; Yang, Zhuang; Chen, Yiping; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Research on power line extraction technology using mobile laser point clouds has important practical significance on railway power lines patrol work. In this paper, we presents a new method for automatic extracting railway power line from MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning) data. Firstly, according to the spatial structure characteristics of power-line and trajectory, the significant data is segmented piecewise. Then, use the self-adaptive space region growing method to extract power lines parallel with rails. Finally use PCA (Principal Components Analysis) combine with information entropy theory method to judge a section of the power line whether is junction or not and which type of junction it belongs to. The least squares fitting algorithm is introduced to model the power line. An evaluation of the proposed method over a complicated railway point clouds acquired by a RIEGL VMX450 MLS system shows that the proposed method is promising.

  19. Scanning laser mass spectrometry for trace level solute concentration profiles

    Scanning laser mass spectrometry (SLMS) is shown to support solid-state studies of migration of trace level solutes in solids. SLMS possesses the spatial chemical analysis capabilities necessary for these studies. Nuclides present in the solid specimen at less than 10 parts-per-million atomic (ppMa) are measured accurately with ordinary Faraday ion detectors. Spatial resolution for these studies is on the order of 25 to 50 μm. Quantification is demonstrated with standards where a relative deviation of a mean calibration factor is 1.6%. Scanning samples are achieved by sequential stepping or by a dynamic measuring technique. Several different solutes and solid matrices are measured concerned with actual solid-state experiments involving electric mobility and chemical diffusion

  20. Laser scanning confocal microscopy for 3D surface mapping

    Lapšanská, Hana; Schovánek, Petr

    Rožnov pod Radhoštěm : TECON Scientific, s.r.o., 2010 - (Vojtěchovský, K.), s. 435-440 ISBN 978-80-254-7361-0. [Scientific and Business Conference SILICON 2010 /12./. Rožnov pod Radhoštěm (CZ), 02.11.2010-05.11.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : laser scanning * 3D surface mapping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Laser cladding with wide-band scanning rotative polygon mirror

    This paper discusses the scanning rotative polygon mirror providing a uniform linear heat source with both amplitude and frequency continuous adjustment that has been developed to produce singlepass widths about 14mm and 13mm, fourpass widths about 43mm and 35mm respectively for NiCrSiB and FeCrSiB alloy cladded on A3 substrate. Bead side angles were 175 degrees and 167 degrees respectively above alloys. A very large smooth area with average roughness Ra = 0.64μm was made by NiCrSiB alloy laser cladded

  2. Surface characterization of weathered wood using a laser scanning system

    Most of the existing methods to assess the effect of weathering on wood surfaces have some drawbacks that limit their use to specific tasks. The amount of surface erosion is often used as a measure for the weathering action. The application of a laser scanning system to reproduce surface profiles and to measure weathering erosion was tested on various samples and was found to be a very useful and superior alternative to existing methods. Further improvements of the system used can be made by refinements of the calibration procedures and by more comprehensive profile analyses. (author)

  3. A hand-held 3D laser scanning with global positioning system of subvoxel precision

    In this paper we propose a hand-held 3D laser scanner composed of an optical head device to extract 3D local surface information and a stereo vision system with subvoxel precision to measure the position and orientation of the 3D optical head. The optical head is manually scanned over the surface object by the operator. The orientation and position of the 3D optical head is determined by a phase-sensitive method using a 2D regular intensity pattern. This phase reference pattern is rigidly fixed to the optical head and allows their 3D location with subvoxel precision in the observation field of the stereo vision system. The 3D resolution achieved by the stereo vision system is about 33 microns at 1.8 m with an observation field of 60cm x 60cm.

  4. Geomorphometric analysis of cave ceiling channels mapped with 3-D terrestrial laser scanning

    Gallay, Michal; Hochmuth, Zdenko; Kaňuk, Ján; Hofierka, Jaroslav

    2016-05-01

    The change of hydrological conditions during the evolution of caves in carbonate rocks often results in a complex subterranean geomorphology, which comprises specific landforms such as ceiling channels, anastomosing half tubes, or speleothems organized vertically in different levels. Studying such complex environments traditionally requires tedious mapping; however, this is being replaced with terrestrial laser scanning technology. Laser scanning overcomes the problem of reaching high ceilings, providing new options to map underground landscapes with unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. The acquired point cloud can be handled conveniently with dedicated software, but applying traditional geomorphometry to analyse the cave surface is limited. This is because geomorphometry has been focused on parameterization and analysis of surficial terrain. The theoretical and methodological concept has been based on two-dimensional (2-D) scalar fields, which are sufficient for most cases of the surficial terrain. The terrain surface is modelled with a bivariate function of altitude (elevation) and represented by a raster digital elevation model. However, the cave is a 3-D entity; therefore, a different approach is required for geomorphometric analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate the benefits of high-resolution cave mapping and 3-D modelling to better understand the palaeohydrography of the Domica cave in Slovakia. This methodological approach adopted traditional geomorphometric methods in a unique manner and also new methods used in 3-D computer graphics, which can be applied to study other 3-D geomorphological forms.

  5. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Merino, Pablo Loza-Alvarez The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Castelldefels, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. Keywords: high-resolution, in vivo retinal imaging, AOSLO

  6. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  7. High resolution scanning photoluminescence characterization of semi-insulating GaAs using a laser scanning microscope

    Marek, J.; Elliot, A. G.; Wilke, V.; Geiss, R.

    1986-12-01

    Spatially resolved photoluminescence properties of semi-insulating, liquid encapsulated Czochralski-grown GaAs substrates are analyzed with a laser scanning microscope. The improved resolution of the laser scanning microscope results in the observation of single dislocations within the subgrain boundaries of the polyganized dislocation cell network for the first time by photoluminescence. Both the cell structure and the Cottrell cloud are clearly resolved.

  8. Experiment design of the terrestrial laser scanning of elongated objects

    Marko PEJIĆ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In high-demanding engineering applications, the latest performance improvements of the terrestrial lasers scanning (TLS system and price decreasing trend shows the significant potential of this technology. Beside the fact that some scanners have the scanning frequency of over 1.000.000 Hz, in the engineering applications the accuracy of this survey method plays the key role. Achievement of the satisfactory accuracy of the object modelling using TLS has to be done by experiment designing. This implies the optimization process of the relevant measurements parameters and of the methodology of measurement processing through analysis of the different sources of measurement errors, instrumental precision and performance of the specific TLS, spatial configuration of the object and analysis of the models of registration and georeferencing errors. The proposed methodology of the TLS experiment design is related to the scanning of elongated objects (tunnels, corridors, pipelines, underground passages etc, which generally represent unfavourable cases in providing geodetic measurements of sufficient accuracy and reliability.

  9. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  10. Two-photon flow cytometer with laser scanning Bessel beams

    Wang, Yongdong; Ding, Yu; Ray, Supriyo; Paez, Aurelio; Xiao, Chuan; Li, Chunqiang

    2016-03-01

    Flow cytometry is an important technique in biomedical discovery for cell counting, cell sorting and biomarker detection. In vivo flow cytometers, based on one-photon or two-photon excited fluorescence, have been developed for more than a decade. One drawback of laser beam scanning two-photon flow cytometer is that the two-photon excitation volume is fairly small due to the short Rayleigh range of a focused Gaussian beam. Hence, the sampling volume is much smaller than one-photon flow cytometry, which makes it challenging to count or detect rare circulating cells in vivo. Bessel beams have narrow intensity profiles with an effective spot size (FWHM) as small as several wavelengths, making them comparable to Gaussian beams. More significantly, the theoretical depth of field (propagation distance without diffraction) can be infinite, making it an ideal solution as a light source for scanning beam flow cytometry. The trade-off of using Bessel beams rather than a Gaussian beam is the fact that Bessel beams have small concentric side rings that contribute to background noise. Two-photon excitation can reduce this noise, as the excitation efficiency is proportional to intensity squared. Therefore, we developed a two-photon flow cytometer using scanned Bessel beams to form a light sheet that intersects the micro fluidic channel.

  11. An algorithm for kilovoltage x-ray dose calculations with applications in kV-CBCT scans and 2D planar projected radiographs

    A new model-based dose calculation algorithm is presented for kilovoltage x-rays and is tested for the cases of calculating the radiation dose from kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) and 2D planar projected radiographs. This algorithm calculates the radiation dose to water-like media as the sum of primary and scattered dose components. The scatter dose is calculated by convolution of a newly introduced, empirically parameterized scatter dose kernel with the primary photon fluence. Several approximations are introduced to increase the scatter dose calculation efficiency: (1) the photon energy spectrum is approximated as monoenergetic; (2) density inhomogeneities are accounted for by implementing a global distance scaling factor in the scatter kernel; (3) kernel tilting is ignored. These approximations allow for efficient calculation of the scatter dose convolution with the fast Fourier transform. Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain the model parameters. The accuracy of using this model-based algorithm was validated by comparing with the Monte Carlo method for calculating dose distributions for real patients resulting from radiotherapy image guidance procedures including volumetric kV-CBCT scans and 2D planar projected radiographs. For all patients studied, mean dose-to-water errors for kV-CBCT are within 0.3% with a maximum standard deviation error of 4.1%. Using a medium-dependent correction method to account for the effects of photoabsorption in bone on the dose distribution, mean dose-to-medium errors for kV-CBCT are within 3.6% for bone and 2.4% for soft tissues. This algorithm offers acceptable accuracy and has the potential to extend the applicability of model-based dose calculation algorithms from megavoltage to kilovoltage photon beams. (paper)

  12. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels. PMID:22714427

  13. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement following laser in situ keratomileusis using scanning laser polarimetry

    Dada Tanuj; Chaudhary Sunil; Muralidhar Rajamani; Nair Soman; Sihota Ramanjit; Vajpayee Rasik

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) on the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry using customized corneal compensation in myopes. Materials and Methods: Scanning laser polarimetry was performed on 54 eyes of 54 healthy patients with myopia using the glaucoma diagnostics variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC) instrument (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, California) before and a week after LASIK. ...

  14. Theoretical and practical improvement of forest inventory by using laser scanning

    Bikuvienė, Ina

    2012-01-01

    The aim and objectives. Overall: To improve forest inventory methods using laser scanning. Specific: To create methodological background for laser scanning in the Lithuanian forest inventory and to provide practical suggestions for the use of remote sensing technique in practice. To attain the objective, the following tasks were formulated: 1. To investigate the influence of forest cover on the digital surface model accuracy when it is drawn up based on laser scanning dat...

  15. Application of laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of wound healing

    Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Patzelt, Alexa; Kramer, Axel; Meyer, Lars; Lademann, Jürgen; Alborova, Alena

    2007-01-01

    Optical non-invasive methods have become more and more important for the characterization of skin lesions and for therapy control. In vivo laser scanning microscopy is a promising method which can be used for the analysis of cellular structures in the skin up to a depth of 250 µm. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy (LSM) is well-suited for the characterization of wound healing processes. In contrast to measurements of the transepidermal waterloss (TEWL) the laser scanning microscopy allows ...

  16. Surface analysis by laser beam scanning and stereophotogrammetry

    Aliverti, Andrea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The possibility to describe mathematically the body surfaces could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities, the follow up of progressive diseases and could represent a useful tool for other medical sectors as prosthetic and plastic surgery as well as for industrial applications where a real shape needs to be digitized and analyzed or modified mathematically. The approach here presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the beam are obtained by an automatic image analyzer (ELITE system), originally developed for human motion analysis. The 3D coordinates are obtained by stereo-photogrammetry starting from at least two different view of the subject. A software package for graphic representation of the obtained surfaces has been developed and some preliminary results about some body shapes will be presented.

  17. System Design Considerations In Bar-Code Laser Scanning

    Barkan, Eric; Swartz, Jerome

    1984-08-01

    The unified transfer function approach to the design of laser barcode scanner signal acquisition hardware is considered. The treatment of seemingly disparate system areas such as the optical train, the scanning spot, the electrical filter circuits, the effects of noise, and printing errors is presented using linear systems theory. Such important issues as determination of depth of modulation, filter specification, tolerancing of optical components, and optimi-zation of system performance in the presence of noise are discussed. The concept of effective spot size to allow for impact of optical system and analog processing circuitry upon depth of modulation is introduced. Considerations are limited primarily to Gaussian spot profiles, but also apply to more general cases. Attention is paid to realistic bar-code symbol models and to implications with respect to printing tolerances.

  18. Urban Tree Classification Using Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanning

    Koma, Zs.; Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2016-06-01

    Vegetation mapping in urban environments plays an important role in biological research and urban management. Airborne laser scanning provides detailed 3D geodata, which allows to classify single trees into different taxa. Until now, research dealing with tree classification focused on forest environments. This study investigates the object-based classification of urban trees at taxonomic family level, using full-waveform airborne laser scanning data captured in the city centre of Vienna (Austria). The data set is characterised by a variety of taxa, including deciduous trees (beeches, mallows, plane trees and soapberries) and the coniferous pine species. A workflow for tree object classification is presented using geometric and radiometric features. The derived features are related to point density, crown shape and radiometric characteristics. For the derivation of crown features, a prior detection of the crown base is performed. The effects of interfering objects (e.g. fences and cars which are typical in urban areas) on the feature characteristics and the subsequent classification accuracy are investigated. The applicability of the features is evaluated by Random Forest classification and exploratory analysis. The most reliable classification is achieved by using the combination of geometric and radiometric features, resulting in 87.5% overall accuracy. By using radiometric features only, a reliable classification with accuracy of 86.3% can be achieved. The influence of interfering objects on feature characteristics is identified, in particular for the radiometric features. The results indicate the potential of using radiometric features in urban tree classification and show its limitations due to anthropogenic influences at the same time.

  19. High-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical imaging system

    A high-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical (MO) imaging system has been developed. The system is mainly composed of a laser source, galvano meters, and a high-sensitive differential optical-detector. Preliminary evaluation of system performance by using a Faraday indicator with a Faraday rotation coefficient of 3.47x10-5 rad/μm Oe shows a magnetic sensitivity of about 5 μT, without any need for accumulation or averaging processing. Using the developed MO system we have succeeded in the fast and quantitative imaging of a rotationally symmetric magnetic field distribution around an YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) strip line applied with dc-biased current, and also succeeded in the detection of quantized fine signals corresponding to magnetic flux quantum generation in a superconducting loop of an YBCO Josephson vortex flow transistor. Thus, the developed system enables us not only to do fast imaging and local signal detection but also to directly evaluate both the strength and direction of a magnetic signal.

  20. Pedestrian Detection by Laser Scanning and Depth Imagery

    Barsi, A.; Lovas, T.; Molnar, B.; Somogyi, A.; Igazvolgyi, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Pedestrian flow is much less regulated and controlled compared to vehicle traffic. Estimating flow parameters would support many safety, security or commercial applications. Current paper discusses a method that enables acquiring information on pedestrian movements without disturbing and changing their motion. Profile laser scanner and depth camera have been applied to capture the geometry of the moving people as time series. Procedures have been developed to derive complex flow parameters, such as count, volume, walking direction and velocity from laser scanned point clouds. Since no images are captured from the faces of pedestrians, no privacy issues raised. The paper includes accuracy analysis of the estimated parameters based on video footage as reference. Due to the dense point clouds, detailed geometry analysis has been conducted to obtain the height and shoulder width of pedestrians and to detect whether luggage has been carried or not. The derived parameters support safety (e.g. detecting critical pedestrian density in mass events), security (e.g. detecting prohibited baggage in endangered areas) and commercial applications (e.g. counting pedestrians at all entrances/exits of a shopping mall).

  1. RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA

    C. Briese

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne laser scanning (ALS is a widely used technique for the sampling of the earth's surface. Nowadays a wide range of ALS sensor systems with different technical specifications can be found. One parameter is the laser wavelength which leads to a sensitivity for the wavelength dependent backscatter characteristic of sensed surfaces. Current ALS sensors usually record next to the geometric information additional information on the recorded signal strength of each echo. In order to utilize this information for the study of the backscatter characteristic of the sensed surface, radiometric calibration is essential. This paper focuses on the radiometric calibration of multi-wavelength ALS data and is based on previous work on the topic of radiometric calibration of monochromatic (single-wavelength ALS data. After a short introduction the theory and whole workflow for calibrating ALS data radiometrically based on in-situ reference surfaces is presented. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that this approach for the monochromatic calibration can be used for each channel of multi-wavelength ALS data. The resulting active multi-channel radiometric image does not have any shadows and from a geometric viewpoint the position of the objects on top of the terrain surface is not altered (the result is a multi-channel true orthophoto. Within this paper the approach is demonstrated by three different single-wavelength ALS data acquisition campaigns (532nm, 1064nm and 1550nm covering the area of the city Horn (Austria. The results and practical issues are discussed.

  2. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  3. Applications of terrestrial laser scanning for tunnels: a review

    Weixing Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technique in engineering surveys is gaining an increasing interest due to the advantages of non-contact, rapidity, high accuracy, and large scale. Millions of accurate 3D points (mm level accuracy can be delivered by this technique with a high point density in a short time (up to 1 million points per second, which makes it a potential technique for large scale applications in engineering environments such as tunnels, bridges, and heritage buildings. Tunnels, in particular those with long lengths, create great challenges for surveyors to obtain the satisfactory scanned data. This paper presents a short history of TLS techniques used for tunnels. A general overview of TLS techniques is given, followed by a review of several applications of TLS for tunnels. These applications are classified as: detecting geological features of drilling tunnels, monitoring the geometry of tunnels during excavation, making deformation measurements, and extracting features. The review emphasizes how TLS techniques can be used to measure various aspects of tunnels. It is clear that TLS techniques are not yet a common tool for tunnel investigations, but there is still a huge potential to excavate.

  4. Laser scanning cytometry as a tool for biomarker validation

    Mittag, Anja; Füldner, Christiane; Lehmann, Jörg; Tarnok, Attila

    2013-03-01

    Biomarkers are essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. As diverse is the range of diseases the broad is the range of biomarkers and the material used for analysis. Whereas body fluids can be relatively easily obtained and analyzed, the investigation of tissue is in most cases more complicated. The same applies for the screening and the evaluation of new biomarkers and the estimation of the binding of biomarkers found in animal models which need to be transferred into applications in humans. The latter in particular is difficult if it recognizes proteins or cells in tissue. A better way to find suitable cellular biomarkers for immunoscintigraphy or PET analyses may be therefore the in situ analysis of the cells in the respective tissue. In this study we present a method for biomarker validation using Laser Scanning Cytometry which allows the emulation of future in vivo analysis. The biomarker validation is exemplarily shown for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on synovial membrane. Cryosections were scanned and analyzed by phantom contouring. Adequate statistical methods allowed the identification of suitable markers and combinations. The fluorescence analysis of the phantoms allowed the discrimination between synovial membrane of RA patients and non-RA control sections by using median fluorescence intensity and the "affected area". As intensity and area are relevant parameters of in vivo imaging (e.g. PET scan) too, the presented method allows emulation of a probable outcome of in vivo imaging, i.e. the binding of the target protein and hence, the validation of the potential of the respective biomarker.

  5. Using airborne laser scanning profiles to validate marine geoid models

    Julge, Kalev; Gruno, Anti; Ellmann, Artu; Liibusk, Aive; Oja, Tõnis

    2014-05-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a remote sensing method which utilizes LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology. The datasets collected are important sources for large range of scientific and engineering applications. Mostly the ALS is used to measure terrain surfaces for compilation of Digital Elevation Models but it can also be used in other applications. This contribution focuses on usage of ALS system for measuring sea surface heights and validating gravimetric geoid models over marine areas. This is based on the ALS ability to register echoes of LiDAR pulse from the water surface. A case study was carried out to analyse the possibilities for validating marine geoid models by using ALS profiles. A test area at the southern shores of the Gulf of Finland was selected for regional geoid validation. ALS measurements were carried out by the Estonian Land Board in spring 2013 at different altitudes and using different scan rates. The one wavelength Leica ALS50-II laser scanner on board of a small aircraft was used to determine the sea level (with respect to the GRS80 reference ellipsoid), which follows roughly the equipotential surface of the Earth's gravity field. For the validation a high-resolution (1'x2') regional gravimetric GRAV-GEOID2011 model was used. This geoid model covers the entire area of Estonia and surrounding waters of the Baltic Sea. The fit between the geoid model and GNSS/levelling data within the Estonian dry land revealed RMS of residuals ±1… ±2 cm. Note that such fitting validation cannot proceed over marine areas. Therefore, an ALS observation-based methodology was developed to evaluate the GRAV-GEOID2011 quality over marine areas. The accuracy of acquired ALS dataset were analyzed, also an optimal width of nadir-corridor containing good quality ALS data was determined. Impact of ALS scan angle range and flight altitude to obtainable vertical accuracy were investigated as well. The quality of point cloud is analysed by cross

  6. [Laser scan microscopy: a new imaging procedure in quality assessment of artificial lenses].

    Rochels, R; Ziegler, E

    1989-01-01

    Laser-scan microscopy permits the evaluation of surfaces and deeper layers of an object by computer-assisted scanning with a laser beam. The reflected helium-neon or argon laser light is transmitted to a photodetector and after signal processing, to a frame store and a TV monitor. Imaging is realized by synchronous scanning and modulation of light intensity. Laser-scan microscopy revealed a smooth surface of both PMMA and HEMA lenses, whereas tears were detected in folded silicone implants. The physical and chemical homogeneity inside the three different materials was optimal. Compared to scanning electron microscopy, the quality of imaging is not as good with laser-scan microscopy. Nevertheless, one decisive advantage of the latter method is an analysis free of processing and artifacts, which permits a routine control of brand new and folded intraocular lenses. PMID:2722098

  7. Time-resolved investigations of the fragmentation dynamic of H2 (D2) in and with ultra-short laser pulses

    In course of this work pump-probe experiments aimed to study ultrafast nuclear motion in H2 (D2) fragmentation by intense 6-25 fs laser pulses have been carried out. In order to perform time-resolved measurements, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer providing two identical synchronized laser pulses with the time-delay variable from 0 to 3000 fs with 300 as accuracy and long-term stability has been built. The laser pulses at the intensities of up to 1015 W/cm2 were focused onto a H2 (D2) molecular beam leading to the ionization or dissociation of the molecules, and the momenta of all charged reactions fragments were measured with a reaction microscope. With 6-7 fs pulses it was possible to probe the time evolution of the bound H+2 (D+2) nuclear wave packet created by the first (pump) laser pulse, fragmenting the molecule with the second (probe) pulse. A fast delocalization, or ''collapse'', and subsequent ''revival'' of the vibrational wave packet have been observed. In addition, the signatures of the ground state vibrational excitation in neutral D2 molecule have been found, and the dominance of a new, purely quantum mechanical wave packet preparation mechanism (the so-called ''Lochfrass'') has been proved. In the experiments with 25 fs pulses the theoretically predicted enhancement of the ionization probability for the dissociating H+2 molecular ion at large internuclear distances has been detected for the first time. (orig.)

  8. Development of an Online Archive for Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Crosby, Christopher; Lowry, Ben; McWhirter, Jeff; Phillips, David; Meertens, Chuck

    2013-04-01

    The UNAVCO Geodetic Imaging program provides terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) support to the Earth science research community through a TLS instrumentation pool of five scanners, field engineering, data processing, and technical training. As part of this community TLS support role, UNAVCO is responsible for generation of level one (L1) TLS data products and TLS data archive and access. A UNAVCO-organized and US National Science Foundation-funded TLS community workshop held October 2011 in Boulder, Colorado defined many of the challenges and requirements a TLS data archive and access system must address. TLS data acquisition presents unique challenges for metadata, provenance capture, and data archive. TLS datasets are often large and level zero (L0 - raw) data are stored in a variety of proprietary formats, requiring conversion and standardization for access and exchange. Due to the wide range of scientific and engineering objectives that motivate TLS data collection, field methods and collection techniques vary greatly and must be thoroughly documented in project metadata. These challenges make data and metadata capture, preservation, and provenance important objectives for an online TLS archive. To address these challenges, UNAVCO is developing a TLS archive based on the open source RAMADDA platform (http://ramadda.org). The UNAVCO TLS archive will provide online archive of L0 and L1 data products, capture field metadata and data processing workflows for provenance, and store original georeferencing information. In addition, the TLS repository provides on-demand services for simple point cloud visualization, data sub-setting and thinning, and file format (e.g., LAS, ASCII, proprietary) data conversion. The system also offers automation of RINEX processing of GPS data, OPUS and CSRS submission and solution ingestion, and generation of control point lists to streamline georeferencing of TLS point cloud data. Georeferencing metadata and GPS file provenance are

  9. Estimation of forest resources from a country wide laser scanning survey and national forest inventory data

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Schumacher, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning may provide a means for assessing local forest biomass resources. In this study, national forest inventory (NFI) data was used as reference data for modeling forest basal area, volume, aboveground biomass, and total biomass from laser scanning data obtained in a countrywide...

  10. Evaluation of a laser scanning sensor for variable-rate tree sprayer development

    Accurate canopy measurement capabilities are prerequisites to automate variable-rate sprayers. A 270° radial range laser scanning sensor was tested for its scanning accuracy to detect tree canopy profiles. Signals from the laser sensor and a ground speed sensor were processed with an embedded comput...

  11. Parametric modeling and optimization of laser scanning parameters during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718

    Venkatesan, K.; Ramanujam, R.; Kuppan, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parametric effect, microstructure, micro-hardness and optimization of laser scanning parameters (LSP) on heating experiments during laser assisted machining of Inconel 718 alloy. The laser source used for experiments is a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser with maximum power of 2 kW. The experimental parameters in the present study are cutting speed in the range of 50-100 m/min, feed rate of 0.05-0.1 mm/rev, laser power of 1.25-1.75 kW and approach angle of 60-90°of laser beam axis to tool. The plan of experiments are based on central composite rotatable design L31 (43) orthogonal array. The surface temperature is measured via on-line measurement using infrared pyrometer. Parametric significance on surface temperature is analysed using response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and 3D surface graphs. The structural change of the material surface is observed using optical microscope and quantitative measurement of heat affected depth that are analysed by Vicker's hardness test. The results indicate that the laser power and approach angle are the most significant parameters to affect the surface temperature. The optimum ranges of laser power and approach angle was identified as 1.25-1.5 kW and 60-65° using overlaid contour plot. The developed second order regression model is found to be in good agreement with experimental values with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.94 respectively for surface temperature and heat affected depth.

  12. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

    Juha Hyyppä

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin.

  13. Diffusion of photoacid generators by laser scanning confocal microscopy

    Zhang, Ping L.; Webber, Stephen E.; Mendenhall, J.; Byers, Jeffrey D.; Chao, Keith K.

    1998-06-01

    Diffusion of the photogenerated acid during the period of time between exposure and development can cause contrast loss and ultimately loss of the latent image. This is especially relevant for chemically amplified photoresists that require a post-exposure baking step, which in turn facilitates acid diffusion due to the high temperature normally employed. It is thus important to develop techniques with good spatial resolution to monitor the photogeneration of acid. More precisely, we need techniques that provide two distinct types of information: spatial resolution on various length scales within the surface layer and also sufficient depth resolution so that one can observe the transition from very surface layer to bulk structure in the polymer blend coated on silicon substrate. Herein laser scanning confocal microscopy is used to evaluate the resist for the first time. We report the use of the confocal microscopy to map the pag/dye distribution in PHS matrices, with both reflectance images and fluorescence images. A laser beam is focused onto a small 3D volume element, termed a voxel. It is typically 200 nm X 200 nm laterally and 800 nm axially. The illuminated voxel is viewed such that only signals emanating from this voxel are detected, i.e., signal from outside the probed voxel is not detected. By adjusting the vertical position of the laser focal point, the voxel can be moved to the designated lateral plane to produce an image. Contrast caused by topology difference between the exposed and unexposed area can be eliminated. Bis-p-butylphenyl iodonium triflat (7% of polyhydroxystyrene) is used as photoacid generators. 5% - 18% (by weight, PHS Mn equals 13 k) resist in PGMEA solution is spin cast onto the treated quartz disk with thickness of 1.4 micrometers , 5 micrometers space/10 micrometers pitch chrome mask is used to generate the pattern with mercury DUV illumination. Fluoresceinamine, the pH-sensitive dye, is also used to enhance the contrast of

  14. Scanning Transmission X-Ray, Laser Scanning, and Transmission Electron Microscopy Mapping of the Exopolymeric Matrix of Microbial Biofilms

    Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G. D. W.; Leppard, G. G.; Araki, T; Zhang, X.; West, M. M.; Hitchcock, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provid...

  15. Laser scanning stereomicroscopy for fast volumetric imaging with two-photon excitation and scanned Bessel beams

    Yang, Yanlong; Zhou, Xing; Li, Runze; Van Horn, Mark; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Wu, Di; Chen, Xun; Yao, Baoli; Ye, Tong

    2015-03-01

    Bessel beams have been used in many applications due to their unique optical properties of maintaining their intensity profiles unchanged during propagation. In imaging applications, Bessel beams have been successfully used to provide extended focuses for volumetric imaging and uniformed illumination plane in light-sheet microscopy. Coupled with two-photon excitation, Bessel beams have been successfully used in realizing fluorescence projected volumetric imaging. We demonstrated previously a stereoscopic solution-two-photon fluorescence stereomicroscopy (TPFSM)-for recovering the depth information in volumetric imaging with Bessel beams. In TPFSM, tilted Bessel beams were used to generate stereoscopic images on a laser scanning two-photon fluorescence microscope; upon post image processing we could successfully provide 3D perception of acquired volume images by wearing anaglyph 3D glasses. However, tilted Bessel beams were generated by shifting either an axicon or an objective laterally; the slow imaging speed and severe aberrations made it hard to use in real-time volume imaging. In this article, we report recent improvements of TPFSM with newly designed scanner and imaging software, which allows 3D stereoscopic imaging without moving any of the optical components on the setup. This improvement has dramatically improved focusing qualities and imaging speed so that the TPFSM can be performed potentially in real-time to provide 3D visualization in scattering media without post image processing.

  16. The Simulation Research on Capturing Time of Three Scanning Styles in Laser Tracking System

    Leihong Zhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the optical communication, the choosing scanning style is important for the optical communication, because the illuminating laser beam is narrow and the communication range is long. In this study, three typical scanning styles of raster scan, spiral scan and square spiral scan are compared with each other. The characteristics of the scanning styles are introduced. The numerical simulation model is built. The capturing time at the same condition is computed. The capturing time is affected by the scanning interval and the scanning area. In the same scanning area and scanning interval, the capturing time of raster scan is the biggest one and the capturing time of the square spiral scan is the smallest one.

  17. Estimation of forest parameters using airborne laser scanning data

    J. Cohen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods for the estimation of forest characteristics by airborne laser scanning (ALS data have been introduced by several authors. Tree height (TH and canopy closure (CC describing the forest properties can be used in forest, construction and industry applications, as well as research and decision making. The National Land Survey has been collecting ALS data from Finland since 2008 to generate a nationwide high resolution digital elevation model. Although this data has been collected in leaf-off conditions, it still has the potential to be utilized in forest mapping. A method where this data is used for the estimation of CC and TH in the boreal forest region is presented in this paper. Evaluation was conducted in eight test areas across Finland by comparing the results with corresponding Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI datasets. The ALS based CC and TH maps were generally in a good agreement with the MS-NFI data. As expected, deciduous forests caused some underestimation in CC and TH, but the effect was not major in any of the test areas. The processing chain has been fully automated enabling fast generation of forest maps for different areas.

  18. Estimation of forest parameters using airborne laser scanning data

    Cohen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methods for the estimation of forest characteristics by airborne laser scanning (ALS) data have been introduced by several authors. Tree height (TH) and canopy closure (CC) describing the forest properties can be used in forest, construction and industry applications, as well as research and decision making. The National Land Survey has been collecting ALS data from Finland since 2008 to generate a nationwide high resolution digital elevation model. Although this data has been collected in leaf-off conditions, it still has the potential to be utilized in forest mapping. A method where this data is used for the estimation of CC and TH in the boreal forest region is presented in this paper. Evaluation was conducted in eight test areas across Finland by comparing the results with corresponding Multi-Source National Forest Inventory (MS-NFI) datasets. The ALS based CC and TH maps were generally in a good agreement with the MS-NFI data. As expected, deciduous forests caused some underestimation in CC and TH, but the effect was not major in any of the test areas. The processing chain has been fully automated enabling fast generation of forest maps for different areas.

  19. Multi-Pass Approach for Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Nolan, J.; Eckels, R.; Evers, M.; Singh, R.; Olsen, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Terrestrial Laser Scanning (MTLS) has been utilised for an increasing number of corridor surveys. Current MTLS surveys require that many targets be placed along the corridor to monitor the MTLS trajectory's accuracy. These targets enable surveyors to directly evaluate the magnitude of GNSS errors at regular intervals and can also be used to adjust the trajectory to the survey control. However, this "Multi-Target" approach (MTA) is an onerous task that can significantly reduce efficiency. It also is inconvenient to the travelling public, as lanes are often blocked and traffic slowed to permit surveyors to work safely along the road corridor. This paper introduces a "Multi-Pass" approach (MPA), which minimises the number of targets required for monitoring the GNSS-controlled trajectory while still maintaining strict engineering accuracies. MPA uses the power of multiple, independent MTLS passes with different GNSS constellations to generate a "Control Polyline" from the point cloud for the corridor. The Control Polyline can be considered as a statistically valid survey measurement and be incorporated in a network adjustment to strengthen a control network by identifying outliers. Results from a test survey at the MTLS course maintained by the Oregon Department of Transportation illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  20. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  1. Performance of a scanning laser line striper in outdoor lighting

    Mertz, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    For search and rescue robots and reconnaissance robots it is important to detect objects in their vicinity. We have developed a scanning laser line striper that can produce dense 3D images using active illumination. The scanner consists of a camera and a MEMS-micro mirror based projector. It can also detect the presence of optically difficult material like glass and metal. The sensor can be used for autonomous operation or it can help a human operator to better remotely control the robot. In this paper we will evaluate the performance of the scanner under outdoor illumination, i.e. from operating in the shade to operating in full sunlight. We report the range, resolution and accuracy of the sensor and its ability to reconstruct objects like grass, wooden blocks, wires, metal objects, electronic devices like cell phones, blank RPG, and other inert explosive devices. Furthermore we evaluate its ability to detect the presence of glass and polished metal objects. Lastly we report on a user study that shows a significant improvement in a grasping task. The user is tasked with grasping a wire with the remotely controlled hand of a robot. We compare the time it takes to complete the task using the 3D scanner with using a traditional video camera.

  2. Monitoring Riverbank Erosion in Mountain Catchments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Laura Longoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment yield is a key factor in river basins management due to the various and adverse consequences that erosion and sediment transport in rivers may have on the environment. Although various contributions can be found in the literature about sediment yield modeling and bank erosion monitoring, the link between weather conditions, river flow rate and bank erosion remains scarcely known. Thus, a basin scale assessment of sediment yield due to riverbank erosion is an objective hard to be reached. In order to enhance the current knowledge in this field, a monitoring method based on high resolution 3D model reconstruction of riverbanks, surveyed by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning, was applied to four banks in Val Tartano, Northern Italy. Six data acquisitions over one year were taken, with the aim to better understand the erosion processes and their triggering factors by means of more frequent observations compared to usual annual campaigns. The objective of the research is to address three key questions concerning bank erosion: “how” erosion happens, “when” during the year and “how much” sediment is eroded. The method proved to be effective and able to measure both eroded and deposited volume in the surveyed area. Finally an attempt to extrapolate basin scale volume for bank erosion is presented.

  3. Assessment of Wooded Area Reduction by Airborne Laser Scanning

    Thi Huong Giang Tran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS data hold a great deal of promise in monitoring the reduction of single trees and forests with high accuracy. In the literature, the canopy height model (CHM is the main input used frequently for forest change detection. ALS also has the key capability of delivering 3D point clouds, not only from the top canopy surface, but also from the entire canopy profile and also from the terrain. We investigated the use of two additional parameters, which exploit these capabilities for assessing the reduction of wooded area: Slope-adapted echo ratio (sER and Sigma0. In this study, two ALS point cloud data sets (2005 and 2011 were used to calculate Digital Surface Model (DSM, sER, and Sigma0 in 1.5 km2 forest area in Vorarlberg, Austria. Image differencing was applied to indicate the change in the three difference models individually and in their combinations. Decision trees were used to classify the area of removed trees with the minimum mapping unit of 13 m2. The final results were evaluated by a knowledge-based manual digitization using completeness and correctness measures. The best result is achieved using the combination of sER and DSM, namely a correctness of 92% and a completeness of 85%.

  4. Filtering method for 3D laser scanning point cloud

    Liu, Da; Wang, Li; Hao, Yuncai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the hardware and software of the three-dimensional model acquisition, three-dimensional laser scanning technology is utilized in various aspects, especially in space exploration. The point cloud filter is very important before using the data. In the paper, considering both the processing quality and computing speed, an improved mean-shift point cloud filter method is proposed. Firstly, by analyze the relevance of the normal vector between the upcoming processing point and the near points, the iterative neighborhood of the mean-shift is selected dynamically, then the high frequency noise is constrained. Secondly, considering the normal vector of the processing point, the normal vector is updated. Finally, updated position is calculated for each point, then each point is moved in the normal vector according to the updated position. The experimental results show that the large features are retained, at the same time, the small sharp features are also existed for different size and shape of objects, so the target feature information is protected precisely. The computational complexity of the proposed method is not high, it can bring high precision results with fast speed, so it is very suitable for space application. It can also be utilized in civil, such as large object measurement, industrial measurement, car navigation etc. In the future, filter with the help of point strength will be further exploited.

  5. High-Q MEMS Resonators for Laser Beam Scanning Displays

    Ulrich Hofmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on design, fabrication and characterization of high-Q MEMS resonators to be used in optical applications like laser displays and LIDAR range sensors. Stacked vertical comb drives for electrostatic actuation of single-axis scanners and biaxial MEMS mirrors were realized in a dual layer polysilicon SOI process. High Q-factors up to 145,000 have been achieved applying wafer level vacuum packaging technology including deposition of titanium thin film getters. The effective reduction of gas damping allows the MEMS actuator to achieve large amplitudes at high oscillation frequencies while driving voltage and power consumption can be minimized. Exemplarily shown is a micro scanner that achieves a total optical scan angle of 86 degrees at a resonant frequency of 30.8 kHz, which fulfills the requirements for HD720 resolution. Furthermore, results of a new wafer based glass-forming technology for fabrication of three dimensionally shaped glass lids with tilted optical windows are presented.

  6. Feasibility studies of terrestrial laser scanning in Coastal Geomorphology, Agronomy, and Geoarchaeology

    Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a newer, active method of remote sensing for the automatic detection of 3D coordinate points. This method has been developed particularly during the last 20 years, in addition to airborne and mobile laser scanning methods. All these methods use laser light and additional angle measurements for the detection of distances and directions. Thus, several thousands to hundreds of thousands of polar coordinates per second can be measured directly by an automatic d...

  7. RANSAC approach for automated registration of terrestrial laser scans using linear features

    Al-Durgham, K.; Habib, A.; Kwak, E.

    2013-01-01

    The registration process of terrestrial laser scans (TLS) targets the problem of how to combine several laser scans in order to attain better information about features than what could be obtained through single scan. The main goal of the registration process is to estimate the parameters which determine geometrical variation between the origins of datasets collected from different locations. Scale, shifts, and rotation parameters are usually used to describe such variation. This pap...

  8. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Ramla Gary; Giovani Carbone; Gia Petriashvili; Maria Penelope De Santo; Riccardo Barberi

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra ...

  9. Modelling and calibration of the laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system

    Wang, Guoyu; Zheng, Bing; Li, Xin; Houkes, Z.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present an approach of modelling and calibration of an active laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system. The system works with the pattern of two-dimensional beam-scanning illumination and one-dimensional slit-scanning detection with a photo-multiplier tube instead of a CCD camera. By

  10. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Evolution of optimal grid-based scanning path & parametric approach to thermal homogeneity

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    developed and validated using thermal distributions obtained using different existing scanning strategies. Several existing standard and non-standard scanning methods have been evaluated and compared using the empirical model as well as a 3D-thermal finite element model. Finally, a new grid-based scan......Selective laser melting, as a rapid manufacturing technology, is uniquely poised to enforce a paradigm shift in the manufacturing industry by eliminating the gap between job- and batch-production techniques. Products from this process, however, tend to show an increased amount of defects such as...

  11. Photorealistic Building Reconstruction from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Harri Kaartinen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, advanced real-time visualization for location-based applications, such as vehicle navigation or mobile phone navigation, requires large scale 3D reconstruction of street scenes. This paper presents methods for generating photorealistic 3D city models from raw mobile laser scanning data, which only contain georeferenced XYZ coordinates of points, to enable the use of photorealistic models in a mobile phone for personal navigation. The main focus is on the automated processing algorithms for noise point filtering, ground and building point classification, detection of planar surfaces, and on the key points (e.g., corners of building derivation. The test site is located in the Tapiola area, Espoo, Finland. It is an area of commercial buildings, including shopping centers, banks, government agencies, bookstores, and high-rise residential buildings, with the tallest building being 45 m in height. Buildings were extracted by comparing the overlaps of X and Y coordinates of the point clouds between the cutoff-boxes at different and transforming the top-view of the point clouds of each overlap into a binary image and applying standard image processing technology to remove the non-building points, and finally transforming this image back into point clouds. The purpose for using points from cutoff-boxes instead of all points for building detection is to reduce the influence of tree points close to the building facades on building extraction. This method can also be extended to transform point clouds in different views into binary images for various other object extractions. In order to ensure the building geometry completeness, manual check and correction are needed after the key points of building derivation by automated algorithms. As our goal is to obtain photorealistic 3D models for walk-through views, terrestrial images were captured and used for texturing building facades. Currently, fully automatic generation of high quality 3D models is

  12. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopic imaging resolution of secondary retinal effects induced by laser radiation

    Zwick, Harry; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Elliot, Rowe; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Belkin, M.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    1996-02-01

    We have evaluated secondary laser induced retinal effects in non-human primates with a Rodenstock confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. A small eye animal model, the Garter snake, was employed to evaluate confocal numerical aperture effects in imaging laser retinal damage in small eyes vs. large eyes. Results demonstrate that the confocal image resolution in the Rhesus monkey eye is sufficient to differentiate deep retinal scar formation from retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) damage and to estimate the depth of the NFL damage. The best comparison with histological depth was obtained for the snake retina, yielding a ratio close to 1:1 compared to 2:1 for the Rhesus. Resolution in the Garter snake allows imaging the photoreceptor matrix and therefore, evaluation of the interrelationship between the primary damage site (posterior retina), the photoreceptor matrix, and secondary sites in the anterior retina such as the NFL and the epiretinal vascular system. Alterations in both the retinal NFL and epiretinal blood flow rate were observed within several minutes post Argon laser exposure. Unique aspects of the snake eye such as high tissue transparency and inherently high contrast cellular structures, contribute to the confocal image quality. Such factors may be nearly comparable in primate eyes suggesting that depth of resolution can be improved by smaller confocal apertures and more sensitive signal processing techniques.

  13. High-repetition-rate three-dimensional OH imaging using scanned planar laser-induced fluorescence system for multiphase combustion.

    Cho, Kevin Y; Satija, Aman; Pourpoint, Timothée L; Son, Steven F; Lucht, Robert P

    2014-01-20

    Imaging dynamic multiphase combusting events is challenging. Conventional techniques can image only a single plane of an event, capturing limited details. Here, we report on a three-dimensional, time-resolved, OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (3D OH PLIF) technique that was developed to measure the relative OH concentration in multiphase combustion flow fields. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a 3D OH PLIF technique has been reported in the open literature. The technique involves rapidly scanning a laser sheet across a flow field of interest. The overall experimental system consists of a 5 kHz OH PLIF system, a high-speed detection system (image intensifier and CMOS camera), and a galvanometric scanning mirror. The scanning mirror was synchronized with a 500 Hz triangular sweep pattern generated using Labview. Images were acquired at 5 kHz corresponding to six images per mirror scan, and 1000 scans per second. The six images obtained in a scan were reconstructed into a volumetric representation. The resulting spatial resolution was 500×500×6 voxels mapped to a field of interest covering 30  mm×30  mm×8  mm. The novel 3D OH PLIF system was applied toward imaging droplet combustion of methanol gelled with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) (3 wt. %, 6 wt. %), as well as solid propellant combustion, and impinging jet spray combustion. The resulting 3D dataset shows a comprehensive view of jetting events in gelled droplet combustion that was not observed with high-speed imaging or 2D OH PLIF. Although the scan is noninstantaneous, the temporal and spatial resolution was sufficient to view the dynamic events in the multiphase combustion flow fields of interest. The system is limited by the repetition rate of the pulsed laser and the step response time of the galvanometric mirror; however, the repetition rates are sufficient to resolve events in the order of 100 Hz. Future upgrade includes 40 kHz pulsed UV laser system, which can reduce

  14. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Highlights: ► High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. ► The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. ► In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. ► Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  15. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  16. Retro-Mode Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Planning for Navigated Macular Laser Photocoagulation in Macular Edema.

    Boiko, Ernest V; Maltsev, Dmitrii S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare treatment areas and navigated macular laser photocoagulation (MLP) plans suggested by retro-mode scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (RM-SLO) image versus optical coherence tomography (OCT) central retinal thickness map and treatment planning among retina specialists. Methods. Thirty-nine eyes with diabetic or branch retinal vein occlusion-related ME undergoing navigated MLP with navigated photocoagulator had OCT and RM-SLO taken. OCT map and RM-SLO image were imported to the photocoagulator and aligned onto the retina. Two retina specialists placed laser spot marks separately based on OCT and RM-SLO images in a random fashion. The spots placed by each physician were compared between OCT and RM-SLO and among physicians. The areas of retinal edema on OCT and RM-SLO of the same eye were also compared. Results. The average number of laser spots using RM-SLO and OCT template was 189.6 ± 77.4 and 136.6 ± 46.8, respectively, P = 0.003. The average area of edema on RM-SLO image was larger than that on OCT map (14.5 ± 3.9 mm(2) versus 10.3 ± 2.8 mm(2), P = 0.005) because of a larger scanning area. There was narrow variability in treatment planning among retina specialists for both RM-SLO (P = 0.13) and OCT (P = 0.19). Conclusion. The RM-SLO image superimposed onto the fundus of the same eye can be used to guide MLP with narrow variability in treatment planning among retina specialists. The treatment areas suggested by RM-SLO-guided MLP plans for ME were shown to be larger than those suggested by OCT-guided plans. PMID:26989498

  17. Cosmetic and aesthetic skin photosurgery using a computer-assisted CO2 laser-scanning system

    Dutu, Doru C. A.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Nedelcu, Ioan; Ghetie, Sergiu D.

    1997-12-01

    Since the first application of CO2 laser in skin photosurgery, various techniques such as laser pulsing, beam scanning and computer-assisted laser pulse generator have been introduced for the purpose of reducing tissue carbonization and thermal necrosis. Using a quite simple XY optical scanner equipped with two galvanometric driven mirrors and an appropriate software to process the scanning data and control the interaction time and energy density in the scanned area, we have obtained a device which can improve CO2 laser application in cosmetic and aesthetic surgery. The opto-mechanical CO2 laser scanner based on two total reflecting flat mirrors placed at 90 degree(s) in respect to the XY scanning directions and independently driven through a magnetic field provides a linear movement of the incident laser beam in the operating field. A DA converter supplied with scanning data by the software enables a scanning with linearity better than 1% for a maximum angular deviation of 20 degree(s). Because the scanning quality of the laser beam in the operating field is given not only by the displacement function of the two mirrors, but also by the beam characteristics in the focal plane and the cross distribution in the laser beam, the surgeon can control through software either the scanning field dimensions or the distance between two consecutive points of the vertically and/or horizontally sweep line. The development of computer-assisted surgical scanning techniques will help control the surgical laser, to create either a reproducible incision with a controlled depth or a controlled incision pattern with minimal incision width, a long desired facility for plastic surgery, neurosurgery, ENT and dentistry.

  18. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement following laser in situ keratomileusis using scanning laser polarimetry

    Dada Tanuj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK on the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry using customized corneal compensation in myopes. Materials and Methods: Scanning laser polarimetry was performed on 54 eyes of 54 healthy patients with myopia using the glaucoma diagnostics variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC instrument (Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, California before and a week after LASIK. The various parameters were compared using the Student′s t test. Results: No statistically significant change was observed in any of the retinal nerve fiber layer parameters before and after LASIK. Conclusions: While the measurement of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness by scanning laser polarimetry is affected by anterior segment birefringent properties and LASIK would be expected to produce changes in the same, customized corneal compensation using the GDx VCC seems to adequately compensate for these changes.

  19. Solution approach of a laser plane based on Plücker matrices of the projective lines on a flexible 2D target.

    Xu, Guan; Zhang, Xinyuan; Su, Jian; Li, Xiaotao; Zheng, Anqi

    2016-04-01

    A calibration method adopting Plücker matrices is proposed to explore the laser plane in a structured light measurement. The calibration model establishes the geometrical relationship among the camera, 2D target, and laser plane. The laser plane is constructed by multiple Plücker matrices of the dual 3D crossing lines between the laser plane and target planes in the camera coordinate system. Moreover, the validity of this calibration method is experimentally analyzed through the impact factors of noise magnitude and number of images. The mean errors of three directional angles of the normal vector to the laser plane are -0.174°, 0.170°, and -0.022°, respectively. The variances of the errors of three directional angles are 0.069°, 0.046°, and 0.160°, respectively. The maximal absolute errors of three directional angles are 1.362°, 1.351°, and 1.347°, respectively. The experiments prove that the calibration method is available to provide an accurate calibration for the laser plane. PMID:27139669

  20. Periodic and uniform nanogratings formed on cemented carbide by femtosecond laser scanning

    Periodic and uniform nanogratings are fabricated by femtosecond laser scanning on cemented carbide. Specifically, three experiments are designed to study the influence of single pulse energy, scanning speed, and scanning spacing on the period and the uniformity of the formed nanogratings. The results show that the sample with single pulse energy of 2 μJ, scanning speed of 1000 μm/s, and scanning spacing of 5 μm shows the best quality of nanogratings among all the tested samples at different processing parameters. The uniformity of the nanogratings is largely determined by single pulse energy, scanning speed, and scanning spacing. Single pulse energy and scanning speed significantly affect the period of the nanogratings, whereas the period of the nanogratings maintains a fixed value under different scanning spacings. The period of the nanogratings increases gradually with the decrease of the single pulse energy and the increase of the scanning speed, respectively.

  1. Characterization of landslide ground surface kinematics from terrestrial laser scanning and strain field computation

    Teza, Giordano; Pesci, Arianna; Genevois, Rinaldo; Galgaro, Antonio

    2008-05-01

    Assessment and mitigation of the risk induced by landslide activation need an appropriate phenomenon investigation, to obtain useful information about the failure processes. The first step is the complete kinematics characterization of the landslide ground surface, by evaluating the involved displacement and deformation patterns. A dense displacement field can be obtained from comparison of a series of multi-temporal observations performed by means of terrestrial laser scanning. Subsequently, the strain field can be computed from displacement vectors. In this paper, a modified least square technique is employed to compute the strain on the nodes of a regular grid (2D approach) or on the points of a digital terrain model (3D approach). Such a computation takes into account the displacements, their spatial distribution, as well as the measurement and modelling errors. A scale factor is introduced in order to emphasize the contributions of the experimental points on the basis of their distance from each computation point, and to recognize possible scale-depending behaviours. This method has been implemented in Matlab and applied on two landslides located in the northeastern Italian Alps (Lamosano and Perarolo di Cadore). The experiments show that different kinematics can be recognized, and the presence and influence of eventual discontinuities can be revealed.

  2. AN H2 (D2)/F2 CHEMICAL LASER INITIATED WITH A NOVEL TEFLON SURFACE SPARK UV FLASH

    Watanabe, K.; Sato, Y; Lee, C; Obara, M.; Fujioka, T.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics and the optimization parameters of a newly developed HF (DF) laser initiated by a novel surface spark UV flash using Teflon are presented. We have obtained an output energy of 0.65 J/pulse (11 J/1, 1.6 µsec FWHM) for HF laser, 0.25 J/pulse (4.2 J/1, 2.0 µsec FWHM) for DF laser with the improved maintenance of the light source. An intense short-pulse surface spark UV source driven by a coaxial Marx generator is realized experimentally in order to improve the pow...

  3. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz. PMID:26907062

  4. Laser-driven proton and deuteron acceleration from a pure solid-density H2/D2 cryogenic jet

    Kim, Jongjin; Gauthier, Maxence; Aurand, Bastian; Curry, Chandra; Goede, Sebastian; Goyon, Clement; Williams, Jackson; Kerr, Shaun; Ruby, John; Propp, Adrienne; Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Pak, Art; Hazi, Andy; Glenzer, Siegfried; Roedel, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration has become of tremendous interest for the fundamental science and the potential applications in tumor therapy and proton radiography. We have developed a cryogenic liquid hydrogen jet, which can deliver a self-replenishing target of pure solid-density hydrogen or deuterium. This allows for a target compatible with high-repetition-rate experiments and results in a pure hydrogen plasma, facilitating comparison with simulations. A new modification has allowed for the formation of jets with rectangular profiles, facilitating comparison with foil targets. This jet was installed at the Titan laser and driven by laser pulses of 40-60 J of 527 nm laser light in 1 ps. The resulting proton and deuteron spectra were measured in multiple directions with Thomson parabola spectrometers and RCF stacks. The spectral and angular information suggest contribution from both the TNSA and RPA acceleration mechanisms.

  5. Retinal Oximetry with Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope in Infants

    Vehmeijer, Wouter B.; Magnusdottir, Vigdis; Eliasdottir, Thorunn S.; Hardarson, Sveinn Hakon; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Stefánsson, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual wavelength retinal oximetry has been developed for adults, but is not available for infants. Retinal oximetry may provide insight into the pathophysiology of oxygen-mediated diseases like retinopathy of prematurity. More insight in the oxygen metabolism of the retina in infants may provide valuable clues for better understanding and subsequent prevention or treatment of the disease. The measurements of oxygen saturation are obtained with two fundus images simultaneously captured in two different wavelengths of light. The comparison in light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin can be used to estimate the oxygen saturation within the retinal vessels by means of a software algorithm. This study aims to make retinal oximetry available for neonates. The first step towards estimating retinal oxygen saturation is determining the optical density ratio. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to image healthy newborn infants with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and determine the optical density ratio for retinal oximetry analysis. Methods Images of the retina of full-term healthy infants were obtained with an SLO, Optomap 200Tx (Optos), with two laser wavelengths (532nm and 633nm). The infant lay face down on the lower arm of the parent, while the parent supported the chest and chin with one hand, and stabilized the back with the other hand. No mydriatics or eyelid specula were used during this study. The images were analyzed with modified Oxymap Analyzer software for calculation of the Optical Density Ratio (ODR) and vessel width. The ODR is inversely and approximately linearly related to the oxygen saturation. Measurements were included from the superotemporal vessel pair. A paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty-nine infants, (58% female), were included with mean gestational age of 40 ± 1.3 weeks (mean ± SD) and mean post-natal age of 16 ± 4.8 days. A total of 28 images were selected for retinal oximetry analysis

  6. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  7. Event-based progression detection strategies using scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina

    Vermeer, K.A.; Lo, B.; Zhou, Q.; Vos, F.M.; Vossepoel, A.M.; Lemij, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring glaucoma patients and ensuring optimal treatment requires accurate and precise detection of progression. Many glaucomatous progression detection strategies may be formulated for Scanning Laser Polarimetry (SLP) data of the local nerve fiber thickness. In this paper, several strategies, al

  8. A Rapid Calibration Technique for Scanning Line-Structured Laser Sensor

    Li Tao; Changku Sun; Zhiqin Xu; Wei Wei

    2003-01-01

    A novel procedure to calibrate the scanning line-structured laser sensor is presented. A drone composed of two orthogonal planes is designed, with the result that camera parameters and light-plane equation parameters is achieved simultaneously.

  9. POSSIBILITIES OF APPLYING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING FOR ROADS CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS

    Seredovich, V.; Seredovich, A.; Ivanov, A; Gorokhova, Ye; Miftakhudinova, O.

    2011-01-01

    A new field of terrestrial laser scanning application is the control of roads construction and repairs. The application seems to be important due to the need in a more accurate and qualitative geometrical control of works at all the stages. It is of interest to primarily the supervisory bodies and the customers of roads construction and repairs. The experience of terrestrial laser scanning application in road construction and repairs is described. The technologies for field and office works a...

  10. Reconstructing 3D building models from laser scanning to calculate the heat demand

    Neidhart, Hauke; Sester, Monika

    2008-09-15

    The objective of the project is to determine the heat demand of settlement areas using geospatial data, especially airborne laser scanning data. With airborne laser scanning it possible to record detailed 3D data for great areas. With this 3D data it is possible to reconstruct 3D building models. The geometry then can be used to derive information for the calculation of the heat demand

  11. Application to monitoring of tailings dam based on 3D laser scanning technology

    Ren, Fang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2011-06-01

    This paper presented a new method of monitoring of tailing dam based on 3D laser scanning technology and gave the method flow of acquiring and processing the tailing dam data. Taking the measured data for example, the author analyzed the dam deformation by generating the TIN, DEM and the curvature graph, and proved that it's feasible to global monitor the tailing dam using 3D laser scanning technology from the theory and method.

  12. A NEW APPROACH FOR SUBWAY TUNNEL DEFORMATION MONITORING: HIGH-RESOLUTION TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING

    Li, J.; Wan, Y.; Gao, X.

    2012-01-01

    With the improvement of the accuracy and efficiency of laser scanning technology, high-resolution terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology can obtain high precise points-cloud and density distribution and can be applied to high-precision deformation monitoring of subway tunnels and high-speed railway bridges and other fields. In this paper, a new approach using a points-cloud segmentation method based on vectors of neighbor points and surface fitting method based on moving leas...

  13. Application of laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of wound healing

    Antoniou, Christina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical non-invasive methods have become more and more important for the characterization of skin lesions and for therapy control. In vivo laser scanning microscopy is a promising method which can be used for the analysis of cellular structures in the skin up to a depth of 250 µm. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy (LSM is well-suited for the characterization of wound healing processes. In contrast to measurements of the transepidermal waterloss (TEWL the laser scanning microscopy allows the analysis of the healing process on a cellular level. The course of wound healing determined by laser scanning microscopy was correlated with numerical values, which correspond to those used for measurements of TEWL, allowing the numerical characterization of the wound healing process. Laser scanning microscopy showed that wound healing starts not only from the wound edges but also from "islands" inside the wound area. In contrast to TEWL measurements the LSM analysis is not influenced by disturbing factors such as temperature, humidity and topically applied substances. Therefore, the laser scanning microscopy is well-suited for the characterization of different types of wound healing therapies including the topical application of creams and lotions.

  14. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

    Klemens Schadauer; Bernhard Maier; Wolfgang Wagner; Markus Hollaus

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth’s surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the c...

  15. Selective laser removal of the dimer layer from Si(100) surfaces revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of laser-irradiated Si(100) surfaces shows that the dimerized outermost layer can be selectively removed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a fluence below the melt threshold. The atoms in the laser-uncovered second layer are close to positions of a bulk terminated (1x1) structure, but with a slight pairing, while dimers retain a (2x1) configuration in the first layer. The pairing distance and fraction of the remaining dimers decrease with increasing laser exposures. The laser-uncovered layer also remains free of vacancies. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  17. Assessment of Relative Accuracy of AHN-2 Laser Scanning Data Using Planar Features

    Khoshelham, K.; Soudarissanane , S.; Van der Sande, C.

    2010-01-01

    AHN-2 is the second part of the Actueel Hoogtebestand Nederland project, which concerns the acquisition of high-resolution altimetry data over the entire Netherlands using airborne laser scanning. The accuracy assessment of laser altimetry data usually relies on comparing corresponding tie elements,

  18. Application of step-scan FTIR to the research of quantum cascade lasers

    Junqi Liu; Xiuzhen Lu; Yu Guo; Xiuqi Huang; Xiaoling Che; Wen Lei; Fengqi Liu

    2005-01-01

    The principle of step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is introduced. Double modulation step-scan FTIR technique is used to obtain the quantum cascade laser's stacked emission spectra in the time domain. Optical property and thermal accumulation of devices due to large drive current are analyzed.

  19. Scanning Auger Microscopy of laser-produced Cu ions implanted in silicon

    Mezzasalma, A. M.; Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Mondio, G.; Franco, G.; Wolowski, J.; Parys, P.; Badziak, J.; Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš

    Frascati : C. R. ENEA Frascati, 2005 - (Strangio, C.), x [ECLIM 2004: European Conference on Laser Interaction with Matter /28./. Roma (IT), 06.09.2004-10.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : ion implantation * pulsed laser irradiation * Scanning Auger Microscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  20. Ordered graphene strips onto polymer backing prepared by laser scanning

    Lyutakov, O.; Huttel, I.; Tůma, J.; Kalbáč, Martin; Janoušek, M.; Šimek, P.; Svorcik, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 17 (2012), s. 173102. ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : cutting * graphene * laser materials processing Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2012

  1. Eye safety analysis for non-uniform retinal scanning laser trajectories

    Schelinski, Uwe; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Grüger, Heinrich; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Reinig, Peter; Woittennek, Franziska

    2016-03-01

    Scanning the retinae of the human eyes with a laser beam is an approved diagnosis method in ophthalmology; moreover the retinal blood vessels form a biometric modality for identifying persons. Medical applied Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopes (SLOs) usually contain galvanometric mirror systems to move the laser spot with a defined speed across the retina. Hence, the load of laser radiation is uniformly distributed and eye safety requirements can be easily complied. Micro machined mirrors also known as Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are interesting alternatives for designing retina scanning systems. In particular double-resonant MEMS are well suited for mass fabrication at low cost. However, their Lissajous-shaped scanning figure requires a particular analysis and specific measures to meet the requirements for a Class 1 laser device, i.e. eye-safe operation. The scanning laser spot causes a non-uniform pulsing radiation load hitting the retinal elements within the field of view (FoV). The relevant laser safety standards define a smallest considerable element for eye-related impacts to be a point source that is visible with an angle of maximum 1.5 mrad. For non-uniform pulsing expositions onto retinal elements the standard requires to consider all particular impacts, i.e. single pulses, pulse sequences in certain time intervals and cumulated laser radiation loads. As it may be expected, a Lissajous scanning figure causes the most critical radiation loads at its edges and borders. Depending on the applied power the laser has to be switched off here to avoid any retinal injury.

  2. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with integrated wide-field retinal imaging and tracking

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Zhong, Zhangyi; Hammer, Daniel X.; Mujat, Mircea; Patel, Ankit H.; Deng, Cong; Zou, Weiyao; Burns, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new, unified implementation of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) incorporating a wide-field line-scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) and a closed-loop optical retinal tracker. AOSLO raster scans are deflected by the integrated tracking mirrors so that direct AOSLO stabilization is automatic during tracking. The wide-field imager and large-spherical-mirror optical interface design, as well as a large-stroke deformable mirror (DM), enable the AOSLO image fi...

  3. Scanning microphotolysis: a new photobleaching technique based on fast intensity modulation of a scanned laser beam and confocal imaging.

    Wedekind, P; Kubitscheck, U; Peters, R

    1994-10-01

    The fluorescence photobleaching method has been widely used to study molecular transport in single living cells and other microsystems while confocal microscopy has opened new avenues to high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging. A new technique, scanning microphotolysis (Scamp), combines the potential of photobleaching, beam scanning and confocal imaging. A confocal scanning laser microscope was equipped with a sufficiently powerful laser and a novel device, the 'Scamper'. This consisted essentially of a filter changer, an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) and a computer. The computer was programmed to activate the AOM during scanning according to a freely defined image mask. As a result, almost any desired pattern could be bleached ('written') into fluorescent samples at high definition and then imaged ('read') at non-bleaching conditions, employing full confocal resolution. Furthermore, molecular transport could be followed by imaging the dissipation of bleach patterns. Experiments with living cells concerning dynamic processes in cytoskeletal filaments and the lateral mobility of membrane lipids suggest a wide range of potential biological applications. Thus, Scamp offers new possibilities for the optical manipulation and analysis of both technical and biological microsystems. PMID:7799426

  4. 3D laser scanning and open source GIS for solar potential assessment

    such as roof overhangs or building parts covered by e.g. vegetation are not represented in 2.5D raster data, they have been used for building detection and solar radiation modeling in many cases. This thesis aims to utilize the highest degree of information - the third dimension - of the laser scanning point cloud for both the detection of planar areas of buildings and solar radiation modeling. The algorithms and workflows developed in the framework of this thesis are implemented in Open Source GRASS and SAGA GIS allowing the integration of own modules and the use of existing visualization and spatial analysis tools to interpret and further process the results. Methods are demonstrated generating 2D GIS-ready information in the form of vector polygons and vector lines of the detected objects and their properties (e.g. area, total amount of the incoming solar energy). This offers the possibility for 'normal' GIS users such as spatial planners to analyze and further process the spatial information in standard GIS environments. In the first part of this thesis approaches for the detection and segmentation, respectively, of roof planes using 3D point cloud data acquired by Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) are presented. The detected roof planes are used as input for point cloud-based solar radiation modeling. Shadows of nearby objects are considered by modeling the 3D horizon of each point being reflected from a roof plane within the original laser scanning point cloud. As solar thermal and photovoltaic conversion systems can also be mounted on building facades the developed point cloud based solar radiation model is transferred on building walls extracted from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) data in order to assess their solar potential. The developed algorithms are completely executed within the computer's main memory and thus are not suitable for large study areas because the huge amount of point cloud data produced by LiDAR technology cannot be processed at once. In the

  5. Nano-strip grating lines self-organized by a high speed scanning CW laser

    After a laser annealing experiment on Si wafer, we found an asymmetric sheet resistance on the surface of the wafer. Periodic nano-strip grating lines (nano-SGLs) were self-organized along the trace of one-time scanning of the continuous wave (CW) laser. Depending on laser power, the nano-trench formed with a period ranging from 500 to 800 nm with a flat trough between trench structures. This simple method of combining the scanning laser with high scanning speed of 300 m min-1 promises a large area of nanostructure fabrication with a high output. As a demonstration of the versatile method, concentric circles were drawn on silicon substrate rotated by a personal computer (PC) cooling fan. Even with such a simple system, the nano-SGL showed iridescence from the concentric circles.

  6. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  7. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector ('GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude

  8. An hybrid detector GEM-ASIC for 2-D soft X-ray imaging for laser produced plasma and pulsed sources

    Pacella, D.; Claps, G.; De Angelis, R.; Murtas, F.

    2016-03-01

    The following paper presents a new 2-D detector (`GEMpix') in the soft X-ray range, having a wide dynamic range thanks to its intrisic gain, working in charge integration mode to be used for diagnosing laser produced plasma (LPP) or X-ray pulsed sources. It is a gas detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology with a quad-medipix chip as read-out electronics. In our prototype, the substitution of semiconductor material with a gas triple-GEM allows several advantages with respect to the detectors commonly used in LPP, as X-ray CCDs and Micro Channel Plates or Image Plates. In these experiments the configuration Time-over-Threshold (ToT) has been used, to measure the total charge released to the gas and collected by each pixel, integrated over the X-ray burst duration. Intensity response and spatial resolution has been measured first in laboratory for calibration, as function of the voltage applied to the GEMs, in single photon regime with energies between 3.7 and 17 keV. Subsequently it has been tested at the ABC laser facility (ENEA, Frascati). In this case, we measured the X-rays produced when the ABC neodymium laser, with pulse of 50 J and 3 ns time width, hits plane targets of aluminum. 2-D images have been acquired by means of a pinhole configuration with magnification 1.5 and 50 μ m of spatial resolution. The results are encouraging regarding the capability of this imaging detector to work in experiments where soft X-ray emissivity varies over many orders of magnitude.

  9. Laser transmission welding of Clearweld-coated polyethylene glycol terephthalate by incremental scanning technique

    Wang, Y. Y.; Wang, A. H.; Weng, Z. K.; Xia, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    Transmission laser welding using Incremental Scanning Technique(TWIST) mode and conventional contour welding mode were adopted to investigate laser transmission welding of 0.5 mm thick PET plate. A 1064 nm fiber laser was used to weld PET at the (TWIST) mode, and an 808 nm diode laser was applied to conduct the conventional contour welding. The Clearweld coating was used as laser absorbing material. The influences of laser parameters (i.e. defocusing distance, distance between two circles) on the quality of weld seams were analyzed by optical microscopy. Moreover, geometry and shear strength of the weld zone were tested to optimize laser parameters. Additionally, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of weld seams was measured to test hermetical capacity. Results show that the shear strength and hermetic capacity of weld seam by TWIST mode are at the same level in comparison with that of the conventional contour welding.

  10. An Automatic Algorithm for Minimizing Anomalies and Discrepancies in Point Clouds Acquired by Laser Scanning Technique

    Bordin, Fabiane; Gonzaga, Luiz, Jr.; Galhardo Muller, Fabricio; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Scaioni, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning technique from airborne and land platforms has been largely used for collecting 3D data in large volumes in the field of geosciences. Furthermore, the laser pulse intensity has been widely exploited to analyze and classify rocks and biomass, and for carbon storage estimation. In general, a laser beam is emitted, collides with targets and only a percentage of emitted beam returns according to intrinsic properties of each target. Also, due interferences and partial collisions, the laser return intensity can be incorrect, introducing serious errors in classification and/or estimation processes. To address this problem and avoid misclassification and estimation errors, we have proposed a new algorithm to correct return intensity for laser scanning sensors. Different case studies have been used to evaluate and validated proposed approach.

  11. A Cross-Track Cloud-Scanning Dual-Frequency Doppler (C2D2) Radar for the Proposed ACE Mission and Beyond

    Sadowy, Gregory; Tanelli, Simone; Chamberlain, Neil; Durden, Stephen; Fung, Andy; Sanchez-Barbetty, Mauricio; Thrivikraman, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    The National Resource Council’s Earth Science Decadal Survey” (NRCDS) has identified the Aerosol/Climate/Ecosystems (ACE) Mission as a priority mission for NASA Earth science. The NRC recommended the inclusion of "a cross-track scanning cloud radar with channels at 94 GHz and possibly 34 GHz for measurement of cloud droplet size, glaciation height, and cloud height". Several radar concepts have been proposed that meet some of the requirements of the proposed ACE mission but none have provided scanning capability at both 34 and 94 GHz due to the challenge of constructing scanning antennas at 94 GHz. In this paper, we will describe a radar design that leverages new developments in microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) and micro-machining to enable an electronically-scanned radar with both Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (94-GHz) channels. This system uses a dual-frequency linear active electronically-steered array (AESA) combined with a parabolic cylindrical reflector. This configuration provides a large aperture (3m x 5m) with electronic-steering but is much simpler than a two-dimension AESA of similar size. Still, the W-band frequency requires element spacing of approximately 2.5 mm, presenting significant challenges for signal routing and incorporation of MMICs. By combining (Gallium Nitride) GaN MMIC technology with micro-machined radiators and interconnects and silicon-germanium (SiGe) beamforming MMICs, we are able to meet all the performance and packaging requirements of the linear array feed and enable simultaneous scanning of Ka-band and W-band radars over swath of up to 100 km.

  12. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    Jin, Si

    Deflection Shapes (ODSs) measured by the scanning laser vibrometer. The BED method decomposes an ODS into central and boundary solutions by using a sliding-window least-squares fitting technique. Because boundary solutions are non-zero only at damage sites as well as structural boundaries, they can reveal damage locations. Three signal processing methods are developed for use in the BED method: (1) processing 1-D ODSs (i.e., beams) using a sliding-window curve-fitting technique, (2) processing 2-D ODSs (i.e., plates) using a sliding-window surface-fitting technique, and (3) processing 2-D ODSs using a sliding-window curve-fitting technique. Experiments are performed on isotropic beams and plates with different types of damage. At a damage location on a beam, results show that the boundary solution of slope changes sign, the boundary solution of displacement peaks up or dimples down, the fitting error peaks up, and second and third spatial derivatives show sudden changes. For plates, results show that sensitive damage detection parameters are boundary solutions and parameters related to bending moments and shear forces because they show significant sign changes or peaks at damage locations. All the results show that the BED method is more sensitive than other dynamics-based methods using curvatures and/or strain energies. Moreover, because the BED method works without using any structural models or historical data and it provides multiple damage detection parameters for users to ensure the identified damage locations, it is a reliable method and is applicable to actual structures.

  13. Influence of scanning velocity on bovine shank bone ablation with pulsed CO2 laser

    Xianzeng Zhang; Shusen Xie; Qing Ye; Zhenlin Zhan

    2009-01-01

    The influence of scanning speed on hard bone tissue ablation is studied with a 10.6-μm laser. The groove morphology and the thermal damage created in bovine shank bone by pulsed CO2 laser are examined as a function of incident fluence by optical microscope following standard histological processing. The results show that ablation groove width, depth and ablation volume, as well as the zone of thermal injury, increase gradually with incident fluence. As compared to the result for high scanning speed, the lower scanning speed always produces larger ablation volume but thicker zone of thermal injury. It is evident that scanning speed plays an important role in the ablation process. In clinical applications, it is important to select appropriate scanning speed to obtain both high ablation rates and minimal thermal injury.

  14. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  15. Angle extended linear MEMS scanning system for 3D laser vision sensor

    Pang, Yajun; Zhang, Yinxin; Yang, Huaidong; Zhu, Pan; Gai, Ye; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Zhanhua

    2016-09-01

    Scanning system is often considered as the most important part for 3D laser vision sensor. In this paper, we propose a method for the optical system design of angle extended linear MEMS scanning system, which has features of huge scanning degree, small beam divergence angle and small spot size for 3D laser vision sensor. The principle of design and theoretical formulas are derived strictly. With the help of software ZEMAX, a linear scanning optical system based on MEMS has been designed. Results show that the designed system can extend scanning angle from ±8° to ±26.5° with a divergence angle small than 3.5 mr, and the spot size is reduced for 4.545 times.

  16. Detection of Gold Nanoparticles Aggregation Growth Induced by Nucleic Acid through Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy.

    Gary, Ramla; Carbone, Giovani; Petriashvili, Gia; De Santo, Maria Penelope; Barberi, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The gold nanoparticle (GNP) aggregation growth induced by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is studied by laser scanning confocal and environmental scanning electron microscopies. As in the investigated case the direct light scattering analysis is not suitable, we observe the behavior of the fluorescence produced by a dye and we detect the aggregation by the shift and the broadening of the fluorescence peak. Results of laser scanning confocal microscopy images and the fluorescence emission spectra from lambda scan mode suggest, in fact, that the intruding of the hydrophobic moiety of the probe within the cationic surfactants bilayer film coating GNPs results in a Förster resonance energy transfer. The environmental scanning electron microscopy images show that DNA molecules act as template to assemble GNPs into three-dimensional structures which are reminiscent of the DNA helix. This study is useful to design better nanobiotechnological devices using GNPs and DNA. PMID:26907286

  17. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    Vassilis Gikas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered.

  18. Three-dimensional laser scanning for geometry documentation and construction management of highway tunnels during excavation.

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the use and explores the potential of laser scanning technology to accurately track excavation and construction activities of highway tunnels. It provides a detailed overview of the static laser scanning method, its principles of operation and applications for tunnel construction operations. Also, it discusses the planning, execution, data processing and analysis phases of laser scanning activities, with emphasis given on geo-referencing, mesh model generation and cross-section extraction. Specific case studies are considered based on two construction sites in Greece. Particularly, the potential of the method is examined for checking the tunnel profile, producing volume computations and validating the smoothness/thickness of shotcrete layers at an excavation stage and during the completion of excavation support and primary lining. An additional example of the use of the method in the geometric documentation of the concrete lining formwork is examined and comparisons against dimensional tolerances are examined. Experimental comparisons and analyses of the laser scanning method against conventional surveying techniques are also considered. PMID:23112655

  19. Recommendations for the design and the installation of large laser scanning microscopy systems

    Helm, P. Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has since the inventions of the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CLSM) and the Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscope (MPLSM) developed into an essential tool in contemporary life science and material science. The market provides an increasing number of turn-key and hands-off commercial LSM systems, un-problematic to purchase, set up and integrate even into minor research groups. However, the successful definition, financing, acquisition, installation and effective use of one or more large laser scanning microscopy systems, possibly of core facility character, often requires major efforts by senior staff members of large academic or industrial units. Here, a set of recommendations is presented, which are helpful during the process of establishing large systems for confocal or non-linear laser scanning microscopy as an effective operational resource in the scientific or industrial production process. Besides the description of technical difficulties and possible pitfalls, the article also illuminates some seemingly "less scientific" processes, i.e. the definition of specific laboratory demands, advertisement of the intention to purchase one or more large systems, evaluation of quotations, establishment of contracts and preparation of the local environment and laboratory infrastructure.

  20. Vlasov simulation of 2D Modulational Instability of Ion Acoustic Waves and Prospects for Modeling such instabilities in Laser Propagation Codes

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of Ion Acoustic waves (IAWs) driven by an external traveling-wave potential, ϕ0 (x , t) , with frequency, ω, and wavenumber, k, obeying the kinetic dispersion relation. Both electrons and ions are treated kinetically. Simulations with ϕ0 (x , t) , localized transverse to the propagation direction, model IAWs driven in a laser speckle. The waves bow with a positive or negative curvature of the wave fronts that depends on the sign of the nonlinear frequency shift ΔωNL , which is in turn determined by the magnitude of ZTe /Ti where Z is the charge state and Te , i is the electron, ion temperature. These kinetic effects result can cause modulational and self-focusing instabilities that transfer wave energy to kinetic energy. Linear dispersion properties of IAWs are used in laser propagation codes that predict the amount of light reflected by stimulated Brillouin scattering. At high enough amplitudes, the linear dispersion is invalid and these kinetic effects should be incorporated. Including the spatial and time scales of these instabilities is computationally prohibitive. We report progress including kinetic models in laser propagation codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 15.

  1. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation project quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%−90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  2. Mobile laser scanning applied to the earth sciences

    Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Ericksen, Todd; Hauser, Darren

    2013-01-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging), a method by which the precise time of flight of emitted pulses of laser energy is measured and converted to distance for reflective targets, has helped scientists make topographic maps of Earth's surface at scales as fine as centimeters. These maps have allowed the discovery and analysis of myriad otherwise unstudied features, such as fault scarps, river channels, and even ancient ruins [Glennie et al., 2013b].

  3. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  4. Structural analysis of biofilms and pellets of Aspergillus niger by confocal laser scanning microscopy and cryo scanning electron microscopy.

    Villena, G K; Fujikawa, T; Tsuyumu, S; Gutiérrez-Correa, M

    2010-03-01

    Biomass organization of Aspergillus niger biofilms and pellets stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate were analyzed by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy and detectable differences between both types of growth were found. Three-dimensional surface plot analysis of biofilm structure revealed interstitial voids and vertical growth compared with pellets. Growth was lower in biofilm and according to fluorescence profile obtained, biomass density increased at the surface (0-20 microm). However, a decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed through optical sections of pellets even though growth was significantly higher than biofilms. Cryo scanning electron microscopy also showed structural differences. While biofilms showed a spatially ordered mycelium and well structured hyphal channels, pellets were characterized by an entangled and notoriously compacted mycelium. These findings revealed common structural characteristics between A. niger biofilms and those found in other microbial biofilms. Thus, biofilm microstructure may represent a key determinant of biofilm growth and physiology of filamentous fungi. PMID:19919894

  5. Laser-induced cantilever behaviour in apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopes

    The laser-induced deformation of a typical commercial cantilever commonly used for scanning near-field optical microscopes was investigated by means of a software package based on the finite element method. The thermo-mechanical behaviour of such a cantilever whose tip was irradiated by a laser beam was calculated in the temperature regime between room temperature and 850 K. The spatial tip displacement was simulated at timescales <0.1 ms, since feedback-based constant force measurements exhibit reaction times in this range. It could be shown that in addition to former tip-based thermal expansion calculations the cantilever deformation is already significant at moderate temperatures, particularly when a reflective coating is present. The experimental and calculated results suggest that tip scanning in cantilever-based scanning probe microscopes for laser-based surface modification applications should be performed in thermal equilibrium. (paper)

  6. Il laser scanning e CloudCUBE per le grotte di Naica

    Erminio Paolo Canevese

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser scanning and CloudCube for Naica cavesOn May 2007, Virtualgeo, a geomatic software development and communication company, took part in the first official expedition to Mexico. The Project, coined "Naica", involves researchers from ten universities, four companies and several laboratories. Virtualgeo carried out the survey by applying laser scanning technology to hypogeal caves covered with selenite crystals. The data was processed using CloudCUBE, a proprietary software designed to manage and model 3D point clouds. The first results of the laser scanning survey of a spectacular “forest of crystals” are presented here.

  7. Hyperfine structure and lifetime measurements in the 4s2nd 2D3/2 Rydberg sequence of Ga I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Liu, Chunqing; Tian, Yanshan; Yu, Qi; Bai, Wanshuang; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Chong; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-05-01

    The hyperfine structure (HFS) constants of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=6-18) Rydberg sequence and the 4s26p 2P3/2 level for two isotopes of 69Ga and 71Ga atoms were measured by means of the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the quantum beat method. The observed hyperfine quantum beat spectra were analyzed and the magnetic-dipole HFS constants A as well as the electric-quadrupole HFS constants B of these levels were obtained by Fourier transform and a program for multiple regression analysis. Also using TR-LIF method radiative lifetimes of the above sequence states were determined at room temperature. The measured lifetime values range from 69 to 2279 ns with uncertainties no more than 10%. To our knowledge, the HFS constants of this Rydberg sequence and the lifetimes of the 4s2nd 2D3/2 (n=10-18) levels are reported for the first time. Good agreement between our results and the previous is achieved.

  8. Semi-Automatic Registration of Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data Using Building Corner Matching with Boundaries as Reliability Check

    Liang Cheng; Lihua Tong; Manchun Li; Yongxue Liu

    2013-01-01

    Data registration is a prerequisite for the integration of multi-platform laser scanning in various applications. A new approach is proposed for the semi-automatic registration of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data with buildings without eaves. Firstly, an automatic calculation procedure for thresholds in density of projected points (DoPP) method is introduced to extract boundary segments from terrestrial laser scanning data. A new algorithm, using a self-extending procedure, is dev...

  9. Novel Image Metrics for Retrieval of the Lateral Resolution in Line Scan-Based 2D LA-ICPMS Imaging via an Experimental-Modeling Approach.

    van Elteren, Johannes Teun; Izmer, Andrei; Šelih, Vid Simon; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-07-19

    The quality of elemental image maps obtained via line scan-based LA-ICPMS is a function of the temporal response of the entire system, governed by the design of the system and mapping and acquisition conditions used, next to the characteristics of the sample. To quantify image degradation, ablation targets with periodic gratings are required for the construction of a modulation transfer function (MTF) and subsequent determination of the lateral resolution as a function of image noise and contrast. Since such ablation targets, with suitable matrix composition, are not readily available, computer-generated periodic gratings were virtually ablated via a computational process based on a two-step discrete-time convolution procedure using empirical/experimental input data. This experimental-modeling procedure simulates LA-ICPMS imaging based on two consecutive processes, viz., LA sampling (via ablation crater profiles [ACP]) and aerosol washout/transfer/ICPMS measurement (via single pulse responses [SPR]). By random selection of experimental SPRs from a large database for each individual pulse during the simulation, the convolution procedure simulates an accurate elemental image map of the periodic gratings with realistic (proportional or flicker) noise. This facilitates indirect retrieval of the experimental lateral resolution for the matrix targeted without performing actual line scanning on periodic gratings. PMID:27349804

  10. Bag-of-visual-phrases and hierarchical deep models for traffic sign detection and recognition in mobile laser scanning data

    Yu, Yongtao; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Guan, Haiyan; Luo, Huan; Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for detection and recognition of traffic signs in mobile laser scanning (MLS) data for intelligent transportation-related applications. The traffic sign detection task is accomplished based on 3-D point clouds by using bag-of-visual-phrases representations; whereas the recognition task is achieved based on 2-D images by using a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine-based hierarchical classifier. To exploit high-order feature encodings of feature regions, a deep Boltzmann machine-based feature encoder is constructed. For detecting traffic signs in 3-D point clouds, the proposed algorithm achieves an average recall, precision, quality, and F-score of 0.956, 0.946, 0.907, and 0.951, respectively, on the four selected MLS datasets. For on-image traffic sign recognition, a recognition accuracy of 97.54% is achieved by using the proposed hierarchical classifier. Comparative studies with the existing traffic sign detection and recognition methods demonstrate that our algorithm obtains promising, reliable, and high performance in both detecting traffic signs in 3-D point clouds and recognizing traffic signs on 2-D images.

  11. New kind of subarea-parallel scanning mode for laser metal deposition shaping

    BIAN Hongyou; LIU Weijun; ZHAO Jibin

    2007-01-01

    A scanning mode is the key technology in a laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) fabrication process. On the basis of the analysis of existing scanning modes and their influences on the fabrication efficiency and the quality of parts, some disadvantages of them are pointed out. A new kind of subarea-parallel scanning mode for LMDS based on a subdividing profiled outline into monotonous polygon subareas is presented. First, based on the principle of point visibility, inner loops are eliminated, and simple polygons are subdivided into monotonous polygons with the minimal zones. Second, the parallel scanning paths of all monotonous polygon subareas are finished, which diminishes the length of the scanning line. The practical application shows that the scanning mode can enhance the fabrication efficiency and quality.

  12. Surveying a fossil oyster reef using terrestrial laser scanning

    Haring, A.; Exner, U.; Harzhauser, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Korneuburg Basin, situated north-west of Vienna, is well known to contain a rich variety of fossils from the Early Miocene (16.5 ma) and therefore has been investigated extensively by scientists in the past decades. An exceptional discovery was made in 2005: a large fossil oyster reef has been excavated and documented carefully during the last years. Aside from the giant-sized oyster (Crassostrea gryphoides), the excavation site contains numerous species of molluscs along with teeth of sharks and rays and even isolated bones of sea cows. The oysters, having lengths of up to 80 cm, are protruding from the ground surface, which is more or less a tilted plane (25˚ ) with a size of about 300 m2. The entire site is crosscut by a network of geological faults, often also offsetting individual oyster shells. Displacements along the normal faults do not exceed ~ 15 cm. The faulted fossils offer a unique opportunity to measure displacement distribution along the faults in great detail and provide insight in deformation mechanisms in porous, barely lithified sediments. In order to get a precise 3D model of the oyster reef, the terrestrial laser scanner system Leica HDS 6000 is used. It is a phase-based laser scanner, i.e. the distance measurement is performed using the phase-shift principle. Compared to the time-of-flight principle, this method is generally more appropriate to projects like this one, where the distances to be measured are relatively small (Digital Terrain Model) software SCOP++. The entire site has also been systematically documented by a large number of digital photographs. The obtained texture information allows a visual interpretation of the underlying surface. We discuss in how far such a 3D model derived from terrestrial laser scanner data may be useful to support the research work of geoscientists.

  13. Advances in Forest Inventory Using Airborne Laser Scanning

    Hannu Hyyppä; Mikko Vastaranta; Markus Holopainen; Antero Kukko; Harri Kaartinen; Anttoni Jaakkola; Matti Vaaja; Jarkko Koskinen; Petteri Alho; Xiaowei Yu; Juha Hyyppä

    2012-01-01

    We present two improvements for laser-based forest inventory. The first improvement is based on using last pulse data for tree detection. When trees overlap, the surface model between the trees corresponding to the first pulse stays high, whereas the corresponding model from the last pulse results in a drop in elevation, due to its better penetration between the trees. This drop in elevation can be used for separating trees. In a test carried out in Evo, Southern Finland, we used 292 forests ...

  14. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (TLS) offers potential for high definition monitoring of marsh surface evolution. However, several challenges must be overcome in the application of the technology for geodetic imaging of marsh surfaces. These challenges include surface occlusion by dense vegetation, error propagation due to scan co-registration and referencing across time, impacts of scan angle, and filtering of non-ground points. Researchers at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a field-survey of a marsh within the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve using TLS and RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi

  15. Influence of scanning velocity on femtosecond laser direct writing lines on FOTURAN glass

    Yinzhong Wu; Ching-Yue Wang; Wei Jia; Xiaochang Ni; Minglie Hu; Lu Chai

    2008-01-01

    Lines are induced on the surface of a photosensitive (FOTURAN) glass by focused femtosecond laser transverse writing with scanning velocity in a wide range of 40- 1800μm/s. The formed lines are analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM). It is observed that three distinct morphologies of lines are produced depending on the scanning velocity. Lines written in low velocity level (40 - 100 μm/s) and high velocity level (1000 - 1800 μm/s) are uniform and regular, while those written in moderate velocity level (150 - 600 μm/s) are rough. The influence of scanning velocity is explained based on different pulses overlapping or cumulative dose of laser exposure in irradiated area. Fabrication of shallow groove on the surface is also demonstrated.

  16. Reversible patterning of poly(methylmethacrylate) doped with disperse Red 1 by laser scanning

    Thin poly(methylmethacrylate) films doped by or covalently attached to disperse Red 1 acrylate (DR1) were patterned by laser scanning and simultaneous sample movement in confocal microscope. In both cases, periodical structure due to Marangoni effect is created. Modified polymers surfaces were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. After first stage of patterning, second stage with sample movement in perpendicular direction was applied. Depending on the method of DR1 dotation fishnet structure is obtained or pattern structure disappears. In the latter case, reversibility of pattern formation and erasure by laser scanning was studied

  17. Multicolor immunophenotyping of tissue sections by laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    Tarnok, Attila; Gerstner, Andreas O.; Lenz, Dominik; Osmancik, Pavel; Schneider, Peter; Trumpfheller, Christine; Racz, Pal; Tenner-Racz, Klara

    2002-05-01

    In lymphatic organs the quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of leukocytes would give relevant information about alterations during diseases (leukemia, HIV, AIDS) and their therapeutic regimen. Analysis of them in solid tissues is difficult to perform but would yield important data in a variety of clinical and experimental settings. We have developed an automated analysis method for LSC suitable for archived or fresh biopsy material of human lymph nodes and tonsils. Sections are stained with PI for DNA and up to three antigens using direct or indirect immunofluorescence staining. Measurement is triggered on DNA-fluorescence (Argon Laser). Due to the heterogeneity in cell density measurements are repeatedly performed at different threshold levels (low threshold: regions of low cellular density, germinal centers; high threshold: dense regions, mantle zone). Data are acquired by single- (Ar) or dual-laser excitation (Ar-HeNe) in order to determine data from single- (FITC), up to triple-staining (FITC/PE-Cy5/APC). Percentage and cellular density of cell-subsets is quantified in different structural regions of the specimen. Comparison with manual analysis of identical specimens showed very good correlation. With LSC a semi-automated operator-independent and immunophenotyping of lymphatic tissues with simultaneously up to four antibodies is possible. This technique should yield new insight into processes during diseases and should help to quantify the success of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Application of pressure scanning to the tuning of a high resolution dye laser

    Pressure tuning of a dye laser pumped by a nitrogen laser is described. Tuning is by a grating with an intracavity etalon or by grating, etalon and extracavity confocal filter. Pressure chambers of dry nitrogen surround the grating filter combination and the filter, respectively. Without the filter, the tuning range is more than 40 cm-1. With the filter the scan range is 4 cm-1. Results of an absorption experiment show isotope shifts of the chromium ions in ruby. (U.S.)

  19. Analysis of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Capsulotomy Cutting Edges and Manual Capsulorhexis Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Sebastiano Serrao; Giuseppe Lombardo; Giovanni Desiderio; Lucio Buratto; Domenico Schiano-Lomoriello; Marco Pileri; Marco Lombardo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the structure and irregularity of the capsulotomy cutting edges created by two femtosecond (FS) laser platforms in comparison with manual continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) using environmental scanning electron microscopy (eSEM). Methods. Ten anterior capsulotomies were obtained using two different FS laser cataract platforms (LenSx, n=5, and Victus, n=5). In addition, five manual CCC (n=5) were obtained using a rhexis f...

  20. Low-cost Mobile Laser Scanning and its Feasibility for Environmental Mapping

    Jaakkola, Anttoni

    2015-01-01

    Mobile laser scanning is a measurement technology that combines accurate positioning and attitude information from navigation satellites and inertial sensors with distance measurements from a laser scanner into a point cloud that represents the geometry of the environment surrounding the measurement platform. This geometrical information can be utilized in a variety of applications ranging from 3D city modelling and infrastructure maintenance to forestry and environmental monitoring. In th...

  1. The use of targets to improve the precision of mobile laser scanning

    Abdulrahman, Farsat Heeto

    2013-01-01

    A Mobile Laser Scanning System (MLSS) is a kinematic platform combining different sensors, namely: GPS, IMU and laser scanner. These sensors are integrated and synchronised to a common time base providing 3D geo-referenced data. MLSS is used in several areas; such as 3D urban and landscape modelling for visualisation in planning and road design, simulations for environmental management, and to support land use decision-making. The accuracy of 3D geo-referenced points, achieved via Mobil...

  2. Use of terrestrial laser scanning to evaluate the spatial distribution of soil disturbance by skidding operations

    Koren M; Slančík M; Suchomel J; Dubina J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the disturbance to the surface of a skid trail caused by removing cut timber from inside the forest to the roadside by dragging using terrestrial laser scanning technology. We scanned the study site prior to taking any action, after skidding and after implementing post-harvesting reinstatement to the surface of the skid trail. From the point cloud obtained, we derived an irregular point field. We generated a triangulated irregular network which we then interpolated into a rast...

  3. Registration of Long-Strip Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds Using RANSAC and Closed Constraint Adjustment

    Li Zheng; Manzhu Yu; Mengxiao Song; Anthony Stefanidis; Zheng Ji; Chaowei Yang

    2016-01-01

    The registration of long-strip, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds is a prerequisite for various engineering tasks, including tunnels, bridges, and roads. An artificial target-based registration method is proposed in this paper to automatically calculate registration parameters (i.e., rotation, translation) of scanned pairs without initial estimations. The approach is based on the well-known Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) method and effectively searches the point cloud for corres...

  4. Laser power and Scanning Speed Influence on the Mechanical Property of Laser Metal Deposited Titanium-Alloy

    Mahamood, Rasheedat M.; Akinlabi, Esther T.; Akinlabi, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The influence of the laser power and the scanning speed on the microhardness of the Laser Metal Deposited Ti6Al4V, an aerospace Titanium-alloy, was studied. Ti6Al4V powder was deposited on the Ti6Al4V substrate using the Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process, an Additive Manufacturing (AM) manufacturing technology. The laser power was varied between 1.8 kW 3 kW and the scanning speed was varied between 0.05 m/s and 0.1 m/s. The powder flow rate and the gas flow rate were kept at constant values of 2 g/min and 2 l/min respectively. The full factorial design of experiment was used to design the experiment and to also analyze the results in the Design Expert 9 software environment. The microhardness profiling was studied using Microhardness indenter performed at a load of 500 g and at a dwelling time of 15 s. The distance between indentations was maintained at a distance of 15 μm. The study revealed that as the laser power was increased, the microhardness was found to decrease and as the scanning speed was increased, the microhardness was found to also increase. The results are presented and fully discussed.

  5. Retrieval of Gap Fraction and Effective Plant Area Index from Phase-Shift Terrestrial Laser Scans

    Pyare Pueschel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of canopy structure is crucial for modeling eco-physiological processes. Two commonly used metrics for characterizing canopy structure are the gap fraction and the effective Plant Area Index (PAIe. Both have been successfully retrieved with terrestrial laser scanning. However, a systematic assessment of the influence of the laser scan properties on the retrieval of these metrics is still lacking. This study investigated the effects of resolution, measurement speed, and noise compression on the retrieval of gap fraction and PAIe from phase-shift FARO Photon 120 laser scans. We demonstrate that FARO’s noise compression yields gap fractions and PAIe that deviate significantly from those based on scans without noise compression and strongly overestimate Leaf Area Index (LAI estimates based on litter trap measurements. Scan resolution and measurement speed were also shown to impact gap fraction and PAIe, but this depended on leaf development phase, stand structure, and LAI calculation method. Nevertheless, PAIe estimates based on various scan parameter combinations without noise compression proved to be quite stable.

  6. Topographic laser ranging and scanning principles and processing

    Shan, Jie

    2008-01-01

    A systematic, in-depth introduction to theories and principles of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology is long overdue, as it is the most important geospatial data acquisition technology to be introduced in recent years. An advanced discussion, this text fills the void.Professionals in fields ranging from geology, geography and geoinformatics to physics, transportation, and law enforcement will benefit from this comprehensive discussion of topographic LiDAR principles, systems, data acquisition, and data processing techniques. The book covers ranging and scanning fundamentals, and broad, contemporary analysis of airborne LiDAR systems, as well as those situated on land and in space. The authors present data collection at the signal level in terms of waveforms and their properties; at the system level with regard to calibration and georeferencing; and at the data level to discuss error budget, quality control, and data organization. They devote the bulk of the book to LiDAR data processing and inform...

  7. Generation of UV laser light by stimulated Raman scattering in D2, D2/Ar and D2/He using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355nm

    徐贲; 岳古明; 张寅超; 胡欢陵; 周军; 胡顺星

    2003-01-01

    A pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 355nm is used to pump Raman cell filled with D2,D2/Ar and D2/He.With adequately adjusted parameters,the maximum photon conversion efficiency of the first-order Stokes light(S1,396.796nm)reaches 33.33% in D2/Ar and the stability of S1 in pure D2 is fairly high,the energy drift being less than 10% when the pump energy drifts in the range of 5%.The conversion efficiency and stability,which are functions of the composition and pressure of the Raman medium and the energy of pump laser,are investigated.The result has been used to optimize the laser transmitter system for a differential absorption lidar system to measure NO2 concentration profiles.

  8. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.; Perez-Murano, F.; Barniol, N.; Davis, Zachary James; Boisen, Anja

    2001-01-01

    By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical...... microscope (SNOM) has been used. The laser modifications locally changes the optical properties of the waveguide. The change in the effective refractive index is attributed to a TE to TM mode conversion, Thus, the laser modification might be a new way to fabricate optical mode converters....

  9. Semiautomatic generation of three-view drawing of building using terrestrial laser scanning

    Terrestrial laser scanning is an effective and efficient technique for acquisition of three dimensional data of indoor and outdoor environment in a short period of time. Precision of laser scanning data are usually within millimetres, which is satisfactory for building surveying and mapping. In recent years terrestrial laser scanning has been widely used in historical building preservation and cultural heritage documentation. Three-view drawing (plan, front and section views) is standard and important presentation of building surveying and mapping. However, generation of three-view drawing of a building using terrestrial laser scanning data often entails much human intervention. In this paper we present a methodology for semiautomatic generation of three-view drawing of a building. Three-view drawing of a building is often made on virtual planes which are perpendicular to the axis directions of the building. We define the projection plane using interactively selected laser points of the building surface and project point cloud to the determined projection plane. We project point cloud data to such a virtual plane defined by interactively selected points on the surface of building. A depth image is generated based on the distance between points and the virtual plane. The generated depth image is orthographic projection of three-dimensional laser scanning scene, which preserves the structural information of a building. Then segmentation and pattern recognition methods are exploited to extract the features (geometric primitives) from the depth image. The extracted features can be further refined to generate three-view drawing of a building. The presented methodology greatly reduces volume of data in operation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the methodology

  10. Error analysis of 3D laser scanning system for gangue monitoring

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xia, Yuyang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2012-01-01

    The paper put forward the system error evaluation method of 3D scanning system for gangue monitoring; analyzed system errors including integrated error which can be avoided, and measurement error which needed whole analysis; firstly established the system equation after understanding the relationship of each structure. Then, used error independent effect and spread law to set up the entire error analysis system, and simulated the trend of error changing along X, Y, Z directions. At last, it is analytic that the laser rangefinder carries some weight in system error, and the horizontal and vertical scanning angles have some influences on system error in the certain vertical and horizontal scanning parameters.

  11. Aesthetic applications of scanning CO2 laser surgery: hype or state-of-the-art?

    Lach, Elliot

    1995-05-01

    The clinical application of the CO2 laser for skin surgery has traditionally been plagued with a number of inherent disadvantages. These problems mainly consist of variable depth of penetration, dermal charring with thermal build-up, and a slow surgical technique. This has severely limited the success and usefulness of the laser in aesthetic plastic surgery. An optomechanical flashscanner unit-`SwiftlaseTM', was coupled to a continuous-wave CO2 laser and used during numerous plastic surgical procedures--both reconstructive and purely aesthetic. The instrument uses two rotating mirrors to cause a vaporizing laser beam to scan across target biological tissue in a somewhat sinusoidal array, thus modulating the CO2 laser. Another flashscanner unit, `SilktouchTM' was also utilized. The scanning pattern of the SilktouchTM yields a whirling spiral across the target and is typically used in a pulsed mode. Areas that were treated in this study included the face, trunk and extremities. Treatment mainly consisted of management of facial wrinkles and scars, benign lesions, and rhinophyma. Histology confirmed depth of dermal penetration as a function of fluence. There were no wound healing complications. Healing occurred in a predictable manner dependent on depth of laser penetration. Conservative, primarily ablative flashscanning CO2 laser surgery has usefulness for treatment of patients in aesthetic surgery and offers major advantages.

  12. Orientation of Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds with Multi-View, Multi-Scale Image Blocks

    Henrik Haggrén

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters.

  13. Automatic registration of laser-scanned point clouds based on planar features

    Li, Minglei; Gao, Xinyuan; Wang, Li; Li, Guangyun

    2016-03-01

    Automatic multistation registration of laser-scanned point clouds is a research hotspot in laser-scanned point clouds registration. Some targets such as common buildings have plenty of planar features, and using these features as constraints properly can bring about high accuracy registration results. Starting from this, a new automatic multistation registration method using homologous planar features of two scan stations was proposed. In order to recognize planes from different scan stations and get plane equations in corresponding scan station coordinate systems, k-means dynamic clustering method was improved to be adaptive and robust. And to match the homologous planes of the two scan stations, two different procedures were proposed, respectively, one of which was based on the "common" relationship between planes and the other referenced RANSAC algorithm. And the transformation parameters of the two scan station coordinate systems were calculated after homologous plane matching. Finally, the transformation parameters based on the optimal match of planes was adopted as the final registration result. Comparing with ICP algorithm in experiment, the method is proved to be effective.

  14. Automatic Stem Mapping by Merging Several Terrestrial Laser Scans at the Feature and Decision Levels

    Juha Hyyppä

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed up-to-date ground reference data have become increasingly important in quantitative forest inventories. Field reference data are conventionally collected at the sample plot level by means of manual measurements, which are both labor-intensive and time-consuming. In addition, the number of attributes collected from the tree stem is limited. More recently, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS, using both single-scan and multi-scan techniques, has proven to be a promising solution for efficient stem mapping at the plot level. In the single-scan method, the laser scanner is placed at the center of the plot, creating only one scan, and all trees are mapped from the single-scan point cloud. Consequently, the occlusion of stems increases as the range of the scanner increases, depending on the forest’s attributes. In the conventional multi-scan method, several scans are made simultaneously inside and outside of the plot to collect point clouds representing all trees within the plot, and these scans are accurately co-registered by using artificial reference targets manually placed throughout the plot. The additional difficulty of applying the multi-scan method is due to the point-cloud registration of several scans not being fully automated yet. This paper proposes a multi-single-scan (MSS method to map the sample plot. The method does not require artificial reference targets placed on the plot or point-level registration. The MSS method is based on the fully automated processing of each scan independently and on the merging of the stem positions automatically detected from multiple scans to accurately map the sample plot. The proposed MSS method was tested on five dense forest plots. The results show that the MSS method significantly improves the stem-detection accuracy compared with the single-scan approach and achieves a mapping accuracy similar to that achieved with the multi-scan method, without the need for the point-level registration.

  15. Analysis of somitogenesis using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM)

    Dickinson, Mary E.; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2001-04-01

    In order to study complex cellular interactions in the developing somite and nervous system, we have been refining techniques for labeling and imaging individual cells within the living vertebrate embryo. Most recently, we have been using MPLSM to analyze cellular behaviors, such as cell migration, filopodial extension, cell process collapse, and neuron pathfinding using time-lapse microscopy in 3-dimensions (3-d). To enhance the efficiency of two-photon excitation in these samples, we have been using a Zeiss LSM 510 NLO fiber delivery system with a Grating Dispersion Compensator (GDC). This system not only offers the convenience of fiber delivery for coupling our Ti:Sapphire laser to the microscope, but also affords us precise control over the pulsewidth of the mode- locked beam. In addition, we have developed a novel peptide/non-cationic lipid gene delivery system to introduce GFP plasmid into somite cells. This approach has allowed us to generate detailed 3-d images of somite cell morphologies at various stages of somite development in a way that best preserves the vitality of the cells being imaged.

  16. Fabrication of Enhanced Electron Transport Layer by Laser Scanning Technology for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Graphical abstract: Micro-patterned TiO2 nanorod arrays/mesoporous TiO2 nanoparticles photo-anodes have been fabricated by laser scanning technology and investigated to improve the energy conversion efficiency of DSSCs. - Highlights: • Patterning the TiO2 nanorod arrays by laser scanning technology. • Fabrication of patterned TiO2 nanorod arrays/TiO2 nanoparticles composite photo-anodes. • Enhancing electron transport and collection by the TiO2 nanorod arrays. • Improving light absorption by the composite structured double layer photo-anodes. - Abstract: In this work, an additional enhanced electron transport layer consisted of patterned TiO2 nanorod arrays is fabricated by laser scanning technology. DSSCs based on patterned TiO2 nanorod arrays/TiO2 nanoparticles composite photo-anodes exhibit improved photovoltaic performance, which can be ascribed to the fast charge transport, reduced electron/hole pairs recombination and enhanced light absorption. The UV-Vis measurements reveal much better light absorption for the cell based on patterned TiO2 nanorod arrays. Furthermore, the photovoltaic and electrochemical impedance measurements demonstrate the fast electron transport and lower charge recombination for the cell based on patterned TiO2 nanorod arrays. The direct fabrication of patterned TiO2 nanorod micro/nano composite structures by laser scanning technology is anticipated to be also an alternative method to improve the performance of the other optoelectronic devices

  17. Real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining through scanning beam delivery system

    Ji, Yang; Grindal, Alexander W.; Webster, Paul J. L.; Fraser, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Scanning optics enable many laser applications in manufacturing because their low inertia allows rapid movement of the process beam across the sample. We describe our method of inline coherent imaging for real-time (up to 230 kHz) micron-scale (7-8 µm axial resolution) tracking and control of laser machining depth through a scanning galvo-telecentric beam delivery system. For 1 cm trench etching in stainless steel, we collect high speed intrapulse and interpulse morphology which is useful for further understanding underlying mechanisms or comparison with numerical models. We also collect overall sweep-to-sweep depth penetration which can be used for feedback depth control. For trench etching in silicon, we show the relationship of etch rate with average power and scan speed by computer processing of depth information without destructive sample post-processing. We also achieve three-dimensional infrared continuous wave (modulated) laser machining of a 3.96 × 3.96 × 0.5 mm3 (length × width × maximum depth) pattern on steel with depth feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of direct real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining with scanning optics.

  18. Nondestructive estimates of above-ground biomass using terrestrial laser scanning

    Calders, K.; Newnham, G.; Burt, A.; Murphy, S.; Raumonen, P.; Herold, M.; Culvenor, D.; Avitabile, V.; Disney, M.; Armston, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Allometric equations are currently used to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) based on the indirect relationship with tree parameters. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can measure the canopy structure in 3D with high detail. In this study, we develop an approach to estimate AGB from TLS data, which

  19. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied...

  20. Real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining through scanning beam delivery system

    Scanning optics enable many laser applications in manufacturing because their low inertia allows rapid movement of the process beam across the sample. We describe our method of inline coherent imaging for real-time (up to 230 kHz) micron-scale (7–8 µm axial resolution) tracking and control of laser machining depth through a scanning galvo-telecentric beam delivery system. For 1 cm trench etching in stainless steel, we collect high speed intrapulse and interpulse morphology which is useful for further understanding underlying mechanisms or comparison with numerical models. We also collect overall sweep-to-sweep depth penetration which can be used for feedback depth control. For trench etching in silicon, we show the relationship of etch rate with average power and scan speed by computer processing of depth information without destructive sample post-processing. We also achieve three-dimensional infrared continuous wave (modulated) laser machining of a 3.96 × 3.96 × 0.5 mm3 (length × width × maximum depth) pattern on steel with depth feedback. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of direct real-time depth monitoring and control of laser machining with scanning optics. (paper)

  1. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and uncover

  2. Initial Tests and Accuracy Assesment of a Compact Mobile Laser Scanning System

    Julge, K.; Ellmann, A.; Vajakas, T.; Kolka, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a faster and cost-effective alternative to static laser scanning, even though there is a slight trade-off in accuracy. This contribution describes a compact mobile laser scanning system mounted on a vehicle. The technical parameters of the used system components, i.e. a small LIDAR sensor Velodyne VLP-16 and a dual antenna GNSS/INS system Advanced Navigation Spatial Dual, are reviewed, along with the integration of these components for spatial data acquisition. Calculation principles of 3D coordinates from the real-time data of all the involved sensors are discussed. The field tests were carried out in a controlled environment of a parking lot and at different velocities. Experiments were carried out to test the ability of the GNSS/INS system to cope with difficult conditions, e.g. sudden movements due to cornering or swerving. The accuracy of the resulting MLS point cloud is evaluated with respect to high-accuracy static terrestrial laser scanning data. Problems regarding combining LIDAR, GNSS and INS sensors are outlined, as well as the initial accuracy assessments. Initial tests revealed errors related to insufficient quality of inertial data and a need for the trajectory post-processing calculations. Although this study was carried out while the system was mounted on a car, there is potential for operating the system on an unmanned aerial vehicle, all-terrain vehicle or in a backpack mode due to its relatively compact size.

  3. Towards automated characterization of horizontal and vertical forest structure using multi-seasonal airborne laser scanning

    Leiterer, Reik; Schaepman, Michael E; Morsdorf, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to characterize the vertical layering of forests in space and time based on vertical echo distributions from airborne laser scanning. We further demonstrate successful scaling from local to regional areas, including assessment of transferability, robustness and operational use of the method.

  4. Error analysis of motion correction method for laser scanning of moving objects

    Goel, S.; Lohani, B.

    2014-05-01

    The limitation of conventional laser scanning methods is that the objects being scanned should be static. The need of scanning moving objects has resulted in the development of new methods capable of generating correct 3D geometry of moving objects. Limited literature is available showing development of very few methods capable of catering to the problem of object motion during scanning. All the existing methods utilize their own models or sensors. Any studies on error modelling or analysis of any of the motion correction methods are found to be lacking in literature. In this paper, we develop the error budget and present the analysis of one such `motion correction' method. This method assumes availability of position and orientation information of the moving object which in general can be obtained by installing a POS system on board or by use of some tracking devices. It then uses this information along with laser scanner data to apply correction to laser data, thus resulting in correct geometry despite the object being mobile during scanning. The major application of this method lie in the shipping industry to scan ships either moving or parked in the sea and to scan other objects like hot air balloons or aerostats. It is to be noted that the other methods of "motion correction" explained in literature can not be applied to scan the objects mentioned here making the chosen method quite unique. This paper presents some interesting insights in to the functioning of "motion correction" method as well as a detailed account of the behavior and variation of the error due to different sensor components alone and in combination with each other. The analysis can be used to obtain insights in to optimal utilization of available components for achieving the best results.

  5. Standalone Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Efficiently Capturing Aec Buildings for As-Built Bim

    Bassier, M.; Vergauwen, M.; Van Genechten, B.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing popularity of as-built building models for the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry, the demand for highly accurate and dense point cloud data is rising. The current data acquisition methods are labour intensive and time consuming. In order to compete with indoor mobile mapping systems (IMMS), surveyors are now opting to use terrestrial laser scanning as a standalone solution. However, there is uncertainty about the accuracy of this approach. The emphasis of this paper is to determine the scope for which terrestrial laser scanners can be used without additional control. Multiple real life test cases are evaluated in order to identify the boundaries of this technique. Furthermore, this research presents a mathematical prediction model that provides an indication of the data accuracy given the project dimensions. This will enable surveyors to make informed discussions about the employability of terrestrial laser scanning without additional control in mid to large-scale projects.

  6. Development of a remote defect imaging system with the scanning laser source technique

    Laser ultrasonics have been studying for many years as a promising technique for evaluating industrial materials. The non-contact technique, however, still have some problems in practical use for large structures such as pipes, tanks, bridges, etc. Authors have adopted the scanning laser source technique for imaging defects in a plate-like structure to solve one of the problems that elastic wave cannot be measured stably with laser interferometry due to the unstable detection of scattering light at rough and inclined surfaces of existing structures. In this study, a remote experimental system of the defect imaging technique with the scanning laser source, which does not require cables between receiving transducers and experimental equipments, was developed. In the experimental system, laser emission signal detected by a photo-detector was used as trigger signal that requires quick response for accurate measurements. The other data that does not require such quick responses were transferred with local area network (LAN) communications. Using the remote defect imaging system, we confirmed that defect images can be obtained clearly as the conventional cablewired experimental system was used. Moreover, we obtained defect images at the distances of 2.6 m and 7.6 m between the plate specimen and laser equipment. (author)

  7. Femtosecond laser surface ablation of polymethyl-methacrylate with position control through z-scan

    Spatial resolution of laser micromachining of polymers can be improved with the use of femtosecond laser pulses. Due to the short interaction time, thermal effects are significantly reduced. Additionally, the non-linear character of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with transparent materials allows the modification inside their bulk also. However, this creates the challenge to accurately focus the laser beam in the surface when only surface ablation is required. Thus, this work presents a study of the laser ablation of a transparent polymer at different pulse energies and focusing positions controlled through z-scan transmittance measurements. Experiments were performed using an Yb:KYW laser with 450 fs pulses and 1027 nm wavelength. Morphological analysis of the polymer surface after irradiation was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Similar ablation craters were found for a range of sample positions around the beam waist. However, focused ion beam cross-sections of the craters unveil significant inner modifications under most of the focusing conditions leading to surface ablation. Hence, surface ablation without damaging the bulk material only occurs at critical positions where the beam waist is located slightly outside the sample. In situ monitoring of the sample position can be made through transmittance measurements. (paper)

  8. 3D change detection at street level using mobile laser scanning point clouds and terrestrial images

    Qin, Rongjun; Gruen, Armin

    2014-04-01

    Automatic change detection and geo-database updating in the urban environment are difficult tasks. There has been much research on detecting changes with satellite and aerial images, but studies have rarely been performed at the street level, which is complex in its 3D geometry. Contemporary geo-databases include 3D street-level objects, which demand frequent data updating. Terrestrial images provides rich texture information for change detection, but the change detection with terrestrial images from different epochs sometimes faces problems with illumination changes, perspective distortions and unreliable 3D geometry caused by the lack of performance of automatic image matchers, while mobile laser scanning (MLS) data acquired from different epochs provides accurate 3D geometry for change detection, but is very expensive for periodical acquisition. This paper proposes a new method for change detection at street level by using combination of MLS point clouds and terrestrial images: the accurate but expensive MLS data acquired from an early epoch serves as the reference, and terrestrial images or photogrammetric images captured from an image-based mobile mapping system (MMS) at a later epoch are used to detect the geometrical changes between different epochs. The method will automatically mark the possible changes in each view, which provides a cost-efficient method for frequent data updating. The methodology is divided into several steps. In the first step, the point clouds are recorded by the MLS system and processed, with data cleaned and classified by semi-automatic means. In the second step, terrestrial images or mobile mapping images at a later epoch are taken and registered to the point cloud, and then point clouds are projected on each image by a weighted window based z-buffering method for view dependent 2D triangulation. In the next step, stereo pairs of the terrestrial images are rectified and re-projected between each other to check the geometrical

  9. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope.

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  10. Flash scanning the CO2 laser: a revival of the CO2 laser in plastic surgery

    Lach, Elliot

    1994-09-01

    The CO2 laser has broad clinical application yet also presents a number of practical disadvantages. These drawbacks have limited the success and utilization of this laser in plastic surgery. Flashscanner technology has recently been used for char-free CO2 laser surgery of the oropharynx, the external female genital tract, and perirectal mucosa. A commercially available optomechanical flashscanner unit `Swiftlase,' was adapted to a CO2 laser and used for treatment in numerous plastic surgical applications. Conditions and situations that were treated in this study included generalized neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, rhinophyma, viral warts, breast reconstruction, and deepithelialization prior to microsurgery or local flap transfer and/or skin graft placement. There were no significant wound healing complications. Some patients previously sustained undue scarring from conventional CO2 laser surgery. Conservative, primarily ablative CO2 laser surgery with the Swiftlase has usefulness for treatment of patients in plastic surgery including those that were previously unsuccessfully treated.

  11. Capturing and modelling high-complex alluvial topography with UAS-borne laser scanning

    Mandlburger, Gottfried; Wieser, Martin; Pfennigbauer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Due to fluvial activity alluvial forests are zones of highest complexity and relief energy. Alluvial forests are dominated by new and pristine channels in consequence of current and historic flood events. Apart from topographic features, the vegetation structure is typically very complex featuring, both, dense under story as well as high trees. Furthermore, deadwood and debris carried from upstream during periods of high discharge within the river channel are deposited in these areas. Therefore, precise modelling of the micro relief of alluvial forests using standard tools like Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is hardly feasible. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), in turn, is very time consuming for capturing larger areas as many scan positions are necessary for obtaining complete coverage due to view occlusions in the forest. In the recent past, the technological development of Unmanned Arial Systems (UAS) has reached a level that light-weight survey-grade laser scanners can be operated from these platforms. For capturing alluvial topography this could bridge the gap between ALS and TLS in terms of providing a very detailed description of the topography and the vegetation structure due to the achievable very high point density of >100 points per m2. In our contribution we demonstrate the feasibility to apply UAS-borne laser scanning for capturing and modelling the complex topography of the study area Neubacher Au, an alluvial forest at the pre-alpine River Pielach (Lower Austria). The area was captured with Riegl's VUX-1 compact time-of-flight laser scanner mounted on a RiCopter (X-8 array octocopter). The scanner features an effective scan rate of 500 kHz and was flown in 50-100 m above ground. At this flying height the laser footprint is 25-50 mm allowing mapping of very small surface details. Furthermore, online waveform processing of the backscattered laser energy enables the retrieval of multiple targets for single laser shots resulting in a dense point cloud of

  12. Scan Profiles Based Method for Segmentation and Extraction of Planar Objects in Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Nguyen, Hoang Long; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s). The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc.) that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling) that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  13. SCAN PROFILES BASED METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION AND EXTRACTION OF PLANAR OBJECTS IN MOBILE LASER SCANNING POINT CLOUDS

    H. L. Nguyen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s. The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc. that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  14. Analysis of adaptive laser scanning optical system with focus-tunable components

    Pokorný, P.; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Novák, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a primary analysis of an adaptive laser scanner based on two-mirror beam-steering device and focustunable components (lenses with tunable focal length). It is proposed an optical scheme of an adaptive laser scanner, which can focus the laser beam in a continuous way to a required spatial position using the lens with tunable focal length. This work focuses on a detailed analysis of the active optical or opto-mechanical components (e.g. focus-tunable lenses) mounted in the optical systems of laser scanners. The algebraic formulas are derived for ray tracing through different configurations of the scanning optical system and one can calculate angles of scanner mirrors and required focal length of the tunable-focus component provided that the position of the focused beam in 3D space is given with a required tolerance. Computer simulations of the proposed system are performed using MATLAB.

  15. Morphology and deflection properties of bat wing sensory hairs: scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning vibrometry, and mechanics model.

    Sterbing-D'Angelo, S J; Liu, H; Yu, M; Moss, C F

    2016-01-01

    Bat wings are highly adaptive airfoils that enable demanding flight maneuvers, which are performed with astonishing robustness under turbulent conditions, and stability at slow flight velocities. The bat wing is sparsely covered with microscopically small, sensory hairs that are associated with tactile receptors. In a previous study we demonstrated that bat wing hairs are involved in sensing airflow for improved flight maneuverability. Here, we report physical measurements of these hairs and their distribution on the wing surface of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, based on scanning electron microscopy analyses. The wing hairs are strongly tapered, and are found on both the dorsal and ventral wing surfaces. Laser scanning vibrometry tests of 43 hairs from twelve locations across the wing of the big brown bat revealed that their natural frequencies inversely correlate with length and range from 3.7 to 84.5 kHz. Young's modulus of the average wing hair was calculated at 4.4 GPa, which is comparable with rat whiskers or arthropod airflow-sensing hairs. PMID:27545727

  16. Multiparameter Correction Intensity of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data as AN Input for Rock Surface Modelling

    Paleček, V.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-06-01

    A large increase in the creation of 3D models of objects all around us can be observed in the last few years; thanks to the help of the rapid development of new advanced technologies for spatial data collection and robust software tools. A new commercially available airborne laser scanning data in Czech Republic, provided in the form of the Digital terrain model of the fifth generation as irregularly spaced points, enable locating the majority of rock formations. However, the positional and height accuracy of this type of landforms can reach huge errors in some cases. Therefore, it is necessary to start mapping using terrestrial laser scanning with the possibility of adding a point cloud data derived from ground or aerial photogrammetry. Intensity correction and noise removal is usually based on the distance between measured objects and the laser scanner, the incidence angle of the beam or on the radiometric and topographic characteristics of measured objects. This contribution represents the major undesirable effects that affect the quality of acquisition and processing of laser scanning data. Likewise there is introduced solutions to some of these problems.

  17. Role of the scanning laser ophthalmoscope in photodynamic therapy of macular disease

    Van de Velde, Frans J.

    2000-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment modality for exudative forms of age-related maculopathy. It can be combined with others types of selective or conventional laser therapy. Imaging and functional testing with the scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) are important for detailed diagnostic information as well as for the interpretation of the long term outcome of different treatment strategies. For example, infrared imaging in a confocal mode superbly outlines areas of minimal edema due to slow leakage and switching of wavelengths enables simultaneous and repeated angiographic studies of the retina with the same instrument. Visual acuities are strongly influenced by background illuminance and binocular fixation patterns, and absolute but not incremental microperimetric thresholds measure correctly the functional status of the photoreceptor-pigment epithelium complex. The scanning laser ophthalmoscope has been adapted for use as a delivery system in microphotocoagulation and photodynamic therapy. A non- scanning external therapeutic laser source uses the same Maxwellian view entrance location into the eye as the SLO. Advantages include a non-contact delivery, fixation control, registration of treatment locations, and the possibility to spatially modulate the area being treated.

  18. Roof Modelling Potential of Unmanned Air Vehicle Point Clouds with Respect to Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Karakis, Serkan; Gunes Sefercik, Umut; Atalay, Can

    2016-07-01

    In parallel with the improvement of laser scanning technologies, dense point clouds which provide the detailed description of terrain and non-terrain objects became indispensable for remotely-sensed data users. Owing to the large demand, besides laser scanning, point clouds were started to achieve using photogrammetric images. Unmanned air vehicle (UAV) images are one of the most preferred data for creating dense point clouds by the advantage of low cost, rapid and periodically gain. In this study, we tried to assess the roof modelling potential of UAV point clouds by comparing three dimensional (3D) roof models produced from UAV and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds. In the study, very popular low cost action camera SJ4000 and Faro Laser Scanner Focus3D X 330 were used to provide point clouds and the roof of Bulent Ecevit University Civil Aviation Academy building was utilized. For the validation of horizontal and vertical geolocation accuracies, standard deviation was used as the main indicator. The visual results demonstrated that UAV roof model is almost coherent with TLS roof model after the filtering-based refinement on noisy pixels and systematic bias correction. Moreover, the horizontal geolocation accuracy is approx. |5cm| both in X and Y directions and bias corrected vertical geolocation accuracy is approx. 17cm for zero roof slope.

  19. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela; Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek; Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela; Kuta, Jan; Prokeš, Lubomír; Kynický, Jindřich; Kanický, Viktor

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS.

  20. Wafer-level vacuum packaged resonant micro-scanning mirrors for compact laser projection displays

    Hofmann, Ulrich; Oldsen, Marten; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim; Janes, Joachim; Heller, Martin; Weiss, Manfred; Fakas, Georgios; Ratzmann, Lars; Marchetti, Eleonora; D'Ascoli, Francesco; Melani, Massimiliano; Bacciarelli, Luca; Volpi, Emilio; Battini, Francesco; Mostardini, Luca; Sechi, Francesco; De Marinis, Marco; Wagner, Bernd

    2008-02-01

    Scanning laser projection using resonant actuated MEMS scanning mirrors is expected to overcome the current limitation of small display size of mobile devices like cell phones, digital cameras and PDAs. Recent progress in the development of compact modulated RGB laser sources enables to set up very small laser projection systems that become attractive not only for consumer products but also for automotive applications like head-up and dash-board displays. Within the last years continuous progress was made in increasing MEMS scanner performance. However, only little is reported on how mass-produceability of these devices and stable functionality even under harsh environmental conditions can be guaranteed. Automotive application requires stable MEMS scanner operation over a wide temperature range from -40° to +85°Celsius. Therefore, hermetic packaging of electrostatically actuated MEMS scanning mirrors becomes essential to protect the sensitive device against particle contamination and condensing moisture. This paper reports on design, fabrication and test of a resonant actuated two-dimensional micro scanning mirror that is hermetically sealed on wafer level. With resonant frequencies of 30kHz and 1kHz, an achievable Theta-D-product of 13mm.deg and low dynamic deformation package surface can be seperated from the projection field by permanent inclination of the micromirror.

  1. AUTOMATIC RECOGNITION OF PIPING SYSTEM FROM LARGE-SCALE TERRESTRIAL LASER SCAN DATA

    K. Kawashima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, changes in plant equipment have been becoming more frequent because of the short lifetime of the products, and constructing 3D shape models of existing plants (as-built models from large-scale laser scanned data is expected to make their rebuilding processes more efficient. However, the laser scanned data of the existing plant has massive points, captures tangled objects and includes a large amount of noises, so that the manual reconstruction of a 3D model is very time-consuming and costs a lot. Piping systems especially, account for the greatest proportion of plant equipment. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to propose an algorithm which can automatically recognize a piping system from terrestrial laser scan data of the plant equipment. The straight portion of pipes, connecting parts and connection relationship of the piping system can be recognized in this algorithm. Eigenvalue analysis of the point clouds and of the normal vectors allows for the recognition. Using only point clouds, the recognition algorithm can be applied to registered point clouds and can be performed in a fully automatic way. The preliminary results of the recognition for large-scale scanned data from an oil rig plant have shown the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  2. An automated method to register airborne and terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    Yang, Bisheng; Zang, Yufu; Dong, Zhen; Huang, Ronggang

    2015-11-01

    Laser scanning techniques have been widely used to capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of various scenes (e.g. urban scenes). In particular, airborne laser scanning (ALS) and mobile laser scanning (MLS), terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are effective to capture point clouds from top or side view. Registering the complimentary point clouds captured by ALS and MLS/TLS provides an aligned data source for many purposes (e.g. 3D reconstruction). Among these MLS can be directly geo-referenced to ALS according to the equipped position systems. For small scanning areas or dense building areas, TLS is used instead of MLS. However, registering ALS and TLS datasets suffers from poor automation and robustness because of few overlapping areas and sparse corresponding geometric features. A robust method for the registration of TLS and ALS datasets is proposed, which has four key steps. (1) extracts building outlines from TLS and ALS data sets independently; (2) obtains the potential matching pairs of outlines according to the geometric constraints between building outlines; (3) constructs the Laplacian matrices of the extracted building outlines to model the topology between the geometric features; (4) calculates the correlation coefficients of the extracted geometric features by decomposing the Laplacian matrices into the spectral space, providing correspondences between the extracted features for coarse registration. Finally, the multi-line adjustment strategy is employed for the fine registration. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified using field data, demonstrating a reliable and stable solution to accurately register ALS and TLS datasets.

  3. Reduction of the pulse duration of the ultrafast laser pulses of the Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy (2PLSM

    Reshak Ali

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provide an update of our two-photon laser scanning microscope by compressing or reducing the broadening of the pulse width of ultrafast laser pulses for dispersion precompensation, to enable the pulses to penetrate deeply inside the sample. Findings The broadening comes as the pulses pass through the optical elements. We enhanced and modified the quality and the sharpness of images by enhancing the resolution using special polarizer namely Glan Laser polarizer GL10. This polarizer consists of two prisms separated by air space. This air separation between the two prisms uses to delay the red wavelength when the light leaves the first prism to the air then to second prism. We note a considerable enhancing with using the GL polarizer, and we can see the details of the leaf structure in early stages when we trying to get focus through z-stacks of images in comparison to exactly the same measurements without using GL polarizer. Hence, with this modification we able to reduce the time of exposure the sample to the laser radiation thereby we will reduce the probability of photobleaching and phototoxicity. When the pulse width reduced, the average power of the laser pulses maintained at a constant level. Significant enhancement is found between the two kinds of images of the Two-Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF. Conclusion In summary reduction the laser pulse width allowed to collect more diffraction orders which will used to form the images. The more diffraction orders the higher resolution images.

  4. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  5. Accuracy improvement in laser stripe extraction for large-scale triangulation scanning measurement system

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Fan; Gao, Peng; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale triangulation scanning measurement systems are widely used to measure the three-dimensional profile of large-scale components and parts. The accuracy and speed of the laser stripe center extraction are essential for guaranteeing the accuracy and efficiency of the measuring system. However, in the process of large-scale measurement, multiple factors can cause deviation of the laser stripe center, including the spatial light intensity distribution, material reflectivity characteristics, and spatial transmission characteristics. A center extraction method is proposed for improving the accuracy of the laser stripe center extraction based on image evaluation of Gaussian fitting structural similarity and analysis of the multiple source factors. First, according to the features of the gray distribution of the laser stripe, evaluation of the Gaussian fitting structural similarity is estimated to provide a threshold value for center compensation. Then using the relationships between the gray distribution of the laser stripe and the multiple source factors, a compensation method of center extraction is presented. Finally, measurement experiments for a large-scale aviation composite component are carried out. The experimental results for this specific implementation verify the feasibility of the proposed center extraction method and the improved accuracy for large-scale triangulation scanning measurements.

  6. Possibilities of a Personal Laser Scanning System for Forest Mapping and Ecosystem Services

    Xinlian Liang; Antero Kukko; Harri Kaartinen; Juha Hyyppä; Xiaowei Yu; Anttoni Jaakkola; Yunsheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detec...

  7. Analysis of the geometry of the cultural heritage object from the terrestrial laser scanning data

    Gabršček, Tjaša

    2015-01-01

    On the selected case (the belfry in village Črni kal, Slovenia) the analysis of data about terrestial laser scanning with a view to graphically and numerically determined nonverticality and other possible deformations of the belfry is carried out. Data acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner has been provided by 3D ATA Ltd. Data analysis was conducted with a program Geomagic, and a program AutoCAD has been used to draw horizontal planes. The point cloud was imported into the pro...

  8. Generation of 3D Virtual Geographic Environment Based on Laser Scanning Technique

    DU Jie; CHEN Xiaoyong; FumioYamazaki

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an experiment on the generation of 3D virtual geographic environment on the basis of experimental flight laser scanning data by a set of algorithms and methods that were developed to automatically interpret range images for extracting geo-spatial features and then to reconstruct geo-objects. The algorithms and methods for the interpretation and modeling of laser scanner data include triangulated-irregular-network (TIN)-based range image interpolation ; mathematical-morphology(MM)-based range image filtering,feature extraction and range image segmentation, feature generalization and optimization, 3D objects reconstruction and modeling; computergraphics (CG)-based visualization and animation of geographic virtual reality environment.

  9. Brief communication "Application of mobile laser scanning in snow cover profiling"

    S. Kaasalainen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a snowmobile-based mobile mapping system and its first application to snow cover roughness and change detection measurement. The ROAMER mobile mapping system, constructed at the Finnish Geodetic Institute, consists of the positioning and navigating systems, a terrestrial laser scanner, and the carrying platform (a snowmobile sledge in this application. We demonstrate the applicability of the instrument to snow cover roughness profiling and change detection by presenting preliminary results from a mobile laser scanning (MLS campaign. The results show the potential of MLS for fast and efficient snow profiling from large areas in a millimetre scale.

  10. Capturing Detailed Outcrop Geology Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Lidar) and Other Digital Technologies: Current Status and Future Directions

    Jones, R. R.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Geospatial data acquisition at global to regional scales has wide acceptance, and tools such as Google Earth have been instrumental in extending Earth visualisation far beyond specialist users of GIS and satellite imagery. At the outcrop scale, the number of industry and academic geoscientists adopting digital technologies to gather field data is steadily increasing. When integrated with traditional field skills, these technologies offer two fundamental advantages: firstly, outcrop geology can now be recorded with very high detail and precision; secondly, observations and data are precisely georeferenced, which is a prerequisite for 2D and 3D spatial analysis. Digital outcrop data are being used in a wide variety of ways, many of which can be characterised in terms of two end members. Firstly, using methods such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry, it is possible to create highly realistic virtual copies of the outcrop. These virtual outcrop models can be used to great effect to enhance teaching, to provide virtual field-trips (most effective in conjunction with a real visit to the outcrop), to promote group discussion and interpretation, or as part of Health & Safety briefing. Secondly, digital outcrop data is also being used to derive quantitative attribute measurements from specific geological features. Here the emphasis is not on capturing a photo-realistic copy of the outcrop, but rather on gathering the relevant types of data at the most appropriate resolution and geospatial precision for the type of analysis undertaken. In addition to laser scanning, useful technologies include dGPS, laser range-finding, and Total Station surveying. Examples of this kind of quantitative analysis include fault curvature, roughness, branch-line geometry, spatial variation in fault displacement, fracture spacing and 3D spatial clustering, fold curvature, sedimentary channel morphology, lateral and vertical facies variations, and geomorphological analysis of

  11. Research and Development of High-speed Laser Scanning Galvanometer System

    Chao-Ching Ho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study developed and controlled laser scanning mechanism and circuit design, in order to reduce the vibratory magnitude resulted from high-speed operation. The principle of mechanism design is that the output end mirror can swing within ± 3° when the laser scanning mechanism is in operation, the accuracy value is ± 0.2°. The static simulation and dynamic measurement were carried out for mutual validation. The vibration generated in the operation of machine causes dynamic unbalance, influencing the stability of machine. In order to overcome and improve the dynamic unbalance generated when the mechanism is in motion, different solutions were proposed, such as changing the output end mass, to add elastic material in or to change constant speed control of input end motor to variable speed control.

  12. Development of Large Concrete Object Geometrical Model Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Zaczek-Peplinska Janina

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents control periodic measurements of movements and survey of concrete dam on Dunajec River in Rożnów, Poland. Topographical survey was conducted using laser scanning technique. The goal of survey was data collection and creation of a geometrical model. Acquired cross- and horizontal sections were utilised to create a numerical model of object behaviour at various load depending of changing level of water in reservoir. Modelling was accomplished using finite elements technique. During the project an assessment was conducted to terrestrial laser scanning techniques for such type of research of large hydrotechnical objects such as gravitational water dams. Developed model can be used to define deformations and displacement prognosis.

  13. A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope tested on Josephson tunnel junctions

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    A novel cryogenic scanning laser microscope with a spatial resolution of less than 5 µm has been designed for on-chip in situ investigations of the working properties of normal and superconducting circuits and devices. The instrument relies on the detection of the electrical response of the circuit...... to a very localized heating induced by irradiation with 675 nm wavelength light from a semiconductor laser. The hot spot is moved by a specially designed piezoelectric scanner sweeping the tip of a single-mode optical fiber a few µm above the circuit. Depending on the scanner design the scanning area...... can be as large as 50×500 µm2 at 4.2 K. The microscope can be operated in the temperature range 2–300 K using a standard temperature controller. The central microscope body is mounted inside the vacuum can of a dip-stick-type cryoprobe. A damped spring system is used to reduce interference from...

  14. Scanning laser ultrasound and wavenumber spectroscopy for in-process inspection of additively manufactured parts

    Koskelo, EliseAnne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new in-process laser ultrasound inspection technique for additive manufacturing. Ultrasonic energy was introduced to the part by attaching an ultrasonic transducer to the printer build-plate and driving it with a single-tone, harmonic excitation. The full-field response of the part was measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer after each printer layer. For each scan, we analyzed both the local amplitudes and wavenumbers of the response in order to identify defects. For this study, we focused on the detection of delamination between layers in a fused deposition modeling process. Foreign object damage, localized heating damage, and the resulting delamination between layers were detected in using the technique as indicated by increased amplitude and wavenumber responses within the damaged area.

  15. Measuring bank retreat in fluvial environments with Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS)

    Foerst, M.; Rüther, N.

    2013-11-01

    In the last years methods for measuring bank erosion and sedimentation have been used to understand the process of river migration to get a better understanding of river migration. For this purpose a river bank in a medium low land river has been chosen. The river bank has been measured with a terrestrial laser scanner with a high resolution over the last three years. The yielded point clouds have been filtered and digital elevation models (DEM) have been created. These DEMs have been used to compare the mass balance and slope gradient changes between the scans. To achieve this goal, the slope gradient has been averaged horizontally and vertically. In addition, statistical analyses have been used to verify the significance of changes between the scans. The results show that erosion and sedimentation processes occur simultaneous. Further is the slope gradient a valuable tool to investigate different sections within a point cloud from terrestrial laser scanner.

  16. Three-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Geometry Documentation and Construction Management of Highway Tunnels during Excavation

    Gikas, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Driven by progress in sensor technology, computer software and data processing capabilities, terrestrial laser scanning has recently proved a revolutionary technique for high accuracy, 3D mapping and documentation of physical scenarios and man-made structures. Particularly, this is of great importance in the underground space and tunnel construction environment as surveying engineering operations have a great impact on both technical and economic aspects of a project. This paper discusses the...

  17. Acidic Microclimate pH Distribution in PLGA Microspheres Monitored by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Ding, Amy G.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The microclimate pH (μpH) distribution inside poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres was monitored quantitatively over an acidic range as a function of several formulation variables. A ratiometric method by confocal laser scanning microscopy with Lysosensor yellow/blue® dextran was adapted from those previously reported, and μpH distribution kinetics inside PLGA microspheres was examined during incubation under physiologic conditions for 4 weeks. The effects of polymer molecular we...

  18. WIDE-AREA MAPPING OF FOREST WITH NATIONAL AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING AND FIELD INVENTORY DATASETS

    Monnet, J.-M.; C. Ginzler; Clivaz, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) remote sensing data are now available for entire countries such as Switzerland. Methods for the estimation of forest parameters from ALS have been intensively investigated in the past years. However, the implementation of a forest mapping workflow based on available data at a regional level still remains challenging. A case study was implemented in the Canton of Valais (Switzerland). The national ALS dataset and field data of the Swiss National Forest Inventory w...

  19. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions and Superconductor/Ferromagnet Hybrids Investigated by Low-Temperature Scanning Laser Microscopy

    Werner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Low-temperature scanning laser microscopy (LTSLM) allows the investigation of local properties in thin film structures in a broad temperature range. Depending on the sample under investigation, LTSLM can map various kinds of physical properties such as the current distribution or the magnetic microstructure. In this thesis, the correlation between local and integral magnetotransport properties in thin-film superconductor/ferromagnet (S/F) hybrids and magnetic tunnel junctions are investigated...

  20. Reproducibility and sensitivity of scanning laser Doppler flowmetry during graded changes in PO2

    Strenn, K.; Menapace, R.; Rainer, G.; Findl, O; Wolzt, M.; Schmetterer, L

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Recently a commercially available scanning laser Doppler flowmeter has been produced, which provides two dimensional maps of the retinal perfusion. The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility and the sensitivity of these measurements.
METHODS—16 healthy subjects were randomised to inhale different gas mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen in a double blind crossover study. The following gas mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen were administered: 100% oxygen + 0% n...

  1. Parallel Processing Method for Airborne Laser Scanning Data Using a PC Cluster and a Virtual Grid

    Kiyun Yu; Hong Gyoo Sohn; Joon Heo; Soo Hee Han

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a parallel processing method using a PC cluster and a virtual grid is proposed for the fast processing of enormous amounts of airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. The method creates a raster digital surface model (DSM) by interpolating point data with inverse distance weighting (IDW), and produces a digital terrain model (DTM) by local minimum filtering of the DSM. To make a consistent comparison of performance between sequential and parallel processing approaches, the means of ...

  2. Compensation of illumination inhomogeneities in confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) images

    Michálek, Jan; Čapek, Martin; Kubínová, Lucie

    Bologna : Esculapio, 2009 - (Capasso, V.; Aletti, G.; Micheletti, A.), s. 384-389 ISBN 978-88-7488-310-3. [European Congress of Stereology and Image Analysis /10./. Milano (IT), 22.06.2009-26.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0691 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal laser scanning microscope * illumination inhomogeneity * grayscale mapping Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software

  3. Automatic Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds using Panoramic Reflectance Images

    Qile Zhao; Liqiang Zhang; Jonathan Li; Zhizhong Kang; Sisi Zlatanova

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds using panoramic reflectance images. The approach follows a two-step procedure that includes both pair-wise registration and global registration. The pair-wise registration consists of image matching (pixel-to-pixel correspondence) and point cloud registration (point-to-point correspondence), as the correspondence between the image and the point cloud (pixel-to-point) is inherent t...

  4. Subcellular localization of flavonol aglycone in hepatocytes visualized by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope

    Mukai, Rie; Shirai, Yasuhito; Saito, Naoaki; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and show various biological activities. The bioavailability of flavonoids in biological samples has conventionally been quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, but with these analytical techniques it is difficult to estimate the subcellular localization of flavonoids in intact cells. In this study, we attempted to examine the localization of flavonoids in cultured cells using a confocal laser scanning f...

  5. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown u......, inoculation of the flow cells, running of the system, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis, and disassembly and cleaning of the system....

  6. The application of terrestrial laser scanning to measure small scale changes in aeolian bedforms

    Squirrell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods used to measure aeolian sediment transport rely on point based sampling, such as sand traps or saltation impact sensors, which ignore the spatial heterogeneity displayed in the transport system. Obtaining an accurate transport rate is important to parameterise predictive models, which currently show large deviations between measured and predicted rates. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is a tool that is rapidly emerging in the field of geomorphology. It provides the ab...

  7. Effect of airborne laser scanning accuracy on forest stock and yield estimates

    HOLOPAINEN Markus

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess the magnitude of uncertainty of airborne laser scanning (ALS) -based forest inventory data in forest net present value (NPV) computations. A starting point was the current state of change in operative forest-planning in which traditional standwise field inventories (SWFI) are being replaced by area-based ALS inventories (A_ALS). The more detailed objectives were as follows: 1) to investigate the significance of the accuracy of current (SWFI, A_ALS...

  8. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANT ADDITION ON RHEOLOGY USING LASER SCANNING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY

    White, T

    2007-05-08

    The effectiveness of three dispersants to modify rheology was examined using rheology measurements and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) in simulated waste solutions. All of the dispersants lowered the yield stress of the slurries below the baseline samples. The rheology curves were fitted reasonably to a Bingham Plastic model. The three-dimensional LSCM images of simulants showed distinct aggregates were greatly reduced after the addition of dispersants leading to a lowering of the yield stress of the simulated waste slurry solutions.

  9. Three-dimensional imaging of monogenoidean sclerites by laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Galli, Paolo; Strona, Giovanni; Villa, Anna Maria; Benzoni, Francesca; Fabrizio, Stefani; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Kritsky, Delane C

    2006-04-01

    A nondestructive protocol for preparing specimens of Monogenoidea for both alpha-taxonomic studies and reconstruction of 3-dimensional structure is presented. Gomori's trichrome, a stain commonly used to prepare whole-mount specimens of monogenoids for taxonomic purposes, is used to provide fluorescence of genital spines, the copulatory organ, accessory piece, squamodisc, anchors, hooks, bars, and clamps under laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:16729702

  10. Objective quantitative analysis of eosinophils and bronchial epithelial cells in induced sputum by laser scanning cytometry

    Woltmann, G; Ward, R.; Symon, F; Rew, D.; Pavord, I.; Wardlaw, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Sputum induction is an important non-invasive technique for measuring airway inflammation in asthma. Cell numbers are often too low for flow cytometric analysis. Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a novel technique that allows objective multicolour fluorescence analysis of cells on a microscope slide.
METHODS—LSC was used to determine sputum eosinophil and bronchial epithelial cell counts. We first confirmed that we could measure eosinophil counts accurately in ...

  11. A 1 kHz A-scan rate pump-probe laser-ultrasound system for robust inspection of composites.

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Shtokolov, Alex; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We recently built a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aircraft composites and demonstrated its greatly improved sensitivity and stability compared with current noncontact systems. It is also very attractive in terms of cost, stability to environmental noise and surface roughness, simplicity in adjustment, footprint, and flexibility. A new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is a key component of this all-optical LU pump-probe system. Very high A-scan rates can be achieved because no reference arm or stabilization feedback are needed. Here, we demonstrate LU system performance at 1000 A-scans/s combined with a fast 2-D translator operating at a scanning speed of 100 mm/s with a peak acceleration of 10 m/s(2) in both lateral directions to produce parallel B-scans at high rates. The fast scanning strategy is described in detail. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of noise equivalent pressure, was further improved to be only 8.3 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a noncontact ultrasonic detector of this dimension used to inspect aircraft composites. PMID:26415130

  12. In vivo quantification of microglia dynamics with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope in a mouse model of focal laser injury

    Alt, Clemens; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-03-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and play a crucial role in maintaining neuronal health and function. Their dynamic behavior, that is, the constant extension and retraction of microglia processes, is thought to be critical for communication between microglia and their cellular neighbors, such as neurons, astrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Here, we investigated the morphology and dynamics of retinal microglia in vivo under normal conditions and in response to focal laser injury of blood vessel endothelial wall, using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) designed specifically for imaging the retina of live mice. The multichannel confocal imaging system allows retinal microstructure, such as the processes of microglia and retinal vasculature, to be visualized simultaneously. In order to generate focal laser injury, a photocoagulator based on a continuous wave (cw) laser was coupled into the SLO. An acousto-optic modulator chopped pulses from the cw laser. A tip-tilt-scanner was used to direct the laser beam into a blood vessel of interest under SLO image guidance. Mild coagulation was produced using millisecond-long pulses. Microglia react dynamically to focal laser injury of blood vessel endothelial walls. Under normal conditions, microglia somas remain stationary and the processes probe a territory of their immediate environment. In response to local injury, process movement velocity approximately doubles within minutes after injury. Moreover, the previously unpolarized process movement assumes a distinct directionality towards the injury site, indicating signaling between the injured tissue and the microglia. In vivo retinal imaging is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamic behavior of retinal cells.

  13. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg2+ does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm−2; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg−1 DW HgCl2. It was found that at given Hg

  14. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Debeljak, Marta [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Elteren, Johannes T. van, E-mail: elteren@ki.si [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg{sup 2+} does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm{sup −2}; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg{sup −1} DW HgCl{sub 2}. It was

  15. Geometric validation of a mobile laser scanning system for urban applications

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Liu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) technologies have been actively studied and implemented over the past decade, as their application fields are rapidly expanding and extending beyond conventional topographic mapping. Trimble's MX-8, as one of the MLS systems in the current market, generates rich survey-grade laser and image data for urban surveying. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Trimble MX-8 MLS data satisfies the accuracy requirements of urban surveying. According to the formula of geo-referencing, accuracies of navigation solution and laser scanner determines the accuracy of the collected LiDAR point clouds. Two test sites were selected to test the performance of Trimble MX-8. Those extensive tests confirm that Trimble MX-8 offers a very promising tool to survey complex urban areas.

  16. Widely tuneable scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy using pulsed quantum cascade lasers

    Yoxall, Edward, E-mail: edward.yoxall@imperial.ac.uk; Rahmani, Mohsen; Maier, Stefan A.; Phillips, Chris C. [The Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Navarro-Cía, Miguel [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-18

    We demonstrate the use of a pulsed quantum cascade laser, wavelength tuneable between 6 and 10 μm, with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM). A simple method for calculating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the s-SNOM measurement is presented. For pulsed lasers, the SNR is shown to be highly dependent on the degree of synchronization between the laser pulse and the sampling circuitry; in measurements on a gold sample, the SNR is 26 with good synchronization and less than 1 without. Simulations and experimental s-SNOM images, with a resolution of 100 nm, corresponding to λ/80, and an acquisition time of less than 90 s, are presented as proof of concept. They show the change in the field profile of plasmon-resonant broadband antennas when they are excited with wavelengths of 7.9 and 9.5 μm.

  17. Widely tuneable scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy using pulsed quantum cascade lasers

    We demonstrate the use of a pulsed quantum cascade laser, wavelength tuneable between 6 and 10 μm, with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM). A simple method for calculating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the s-SNOM measurement is presented. For pulsed lasers, the SNR is shown to be highly dependent on the degree of synchronization between the laser pulse and the sampling circuitry; in measurements on a gold sample, the SNR is 26 with good synchronization and less than 1 without. Simulations and experimental s-SNOM images, with a resolution of 100 nm, corresponding to λ/80, and an acquisition time of less than 90 s, are presented as proof of concept. They show the change in the field profile of plasmon-resonant broadband antennas when they are excited with wavelengths of 7.9 and 9.5 μm

  18. Decontamination of nuclear facilities using 3-D power line laser scanning

    Nuclear facilities were contaminated with radioisotope, which plated out on the surface and penetrated into inner side. As for a reactor, cobalt 60 was usually main source of contaminated radioisotopes and plated out with iron rusts into stress corrosion cracks or inside pitting corrosion of stainless steels. Existing decontamination method was not enough for this type of contamination. New laser decontamination method had been developed by the author group using continuous were power line laser with focusing on very small area on the surface with 3-D scanning. High energy density laser could evaporate or sublimate contaminants distributed over the surface and inside cracks of stainless steels as well as their base materials. This article introduced mechanism of the small-size trial product with specifications, testing results for plates, cylinder or stepped block of several materials, and demonstration tests for simulated plates of contaminated reactor component combined with robot arm and strips collector. (T. Tanaka)

  19. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases

  20. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kuta, Jan [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Lubomír [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kynický, Jindřich [Department of Pedology and Geology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 3, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases.

  1. Benchmarking the Performance of Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field

    Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Kukko, Antero; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    The performance of various mobile laser scanning systems was tested on an established urban test field. The test was connected to the European Spatial Data Research (EuroSDR) project “Mobile Mapping—Road Environment Mapping Using Mobile Laser Scanning”. Several commercial and research systems collected laser point cloud data on the same test field. The system comparisons focused on planimetric and elevation errors using a filtered digital elevation model, poles, and building corners as the reference objects. The results revealed the high quality of the point clouds generated by all of the tested systems under good GNSS conditions. With all professional systems properly calibrated, the elevation accuracy was better than 3.5 cm up to a range of 35 m. The best system achieved a planimetric accuracy of 2.5 cm over a range of 45 m. The planimetric errors increased as a function of range, but moderately so if the system was properly calibrated. The main focus on mobile laser scanning development in the near future should be on the improvement of the trajectory solution, especially under non-ideal conditions, using both improvements in hardware and software. Test fields are relatively easy to implement in built environments and they are feasible for verifying and comparing the performance of different systems and also for improving system calibration to achieve optimum quality.

  2. Benchmarking the Performance of Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field

    Hannu Hyyppä

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of various mobile laser scanning systems was tested on an established urban test field. The test was connected to the European Spatial Data Research (EuroSDR project “Mobile Mapping—Road Environment Mapping Using Mobile Laser Scanning”. Several commercial and research systems collected laser point cloud data on the same test field. The system comparisons focused on planimetric and elevation errors using a filtered digital elevation model, poles, and building corners as the reference objects. The results revealed the high quality of the point clouds generated by all of the tested systems under good GNSS conditions. With all professional systems properly calibrated, the elevation accuracy was better than 3.5 cm up to a range of 35 m. The best system achieved a planimetric accuracy of 2.5 cm over a range of 45 m. The planimetric errors increased as a function of range, but moderately so if the system was properly calibrated. The main focus on mobile laser scanning development in the near future should be on the improvement of the trajectory solution, especially under non-ideal conditions, using both improvements in hardware and software. Test fields are relatively easy to implement in built environments and they are feasible for verifying and comparing the performance of different systems and also for improving system calibration to achieve optimum quality.

  3. Identifying underground coal mine displacement through field and laboratory laser scanning

    Slaker, Brent; Westman, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The ability to identify ground movements in the unique environment of an underground coalmine is explored through the use of laser scanning. Time-lapse scans were performed in an underground coal mine to detect rib surface change after different volumes of coal were removed from the mine ribs. Surface changes in the rib as small as 57 cm3 were detected through analysis of surface differences between triangulated surfaces created from point clouds. Results suggest that the uneven geometry, coal reflectance, and small movements of objects and references in the scene due to ventilation air do not significantly influence monitoring ability. Time-lapse scans were also performed on an artificial coal rib constructed to allow the researchers to control deformation and error precisely. A test of displacement measurement precision showed relative standard deviations of 3200 pts/m2. Changing the distance and angle of incidence of the artificial coal rib to the scanner had little impact on the accuracy of results beyond the expected reduction due to a smaller point density of the target area. The results collected in this study suggest that laser scanning can be a useful, comprehensive tool for measuring ground change in an underground coal mining environment.

  4. Azimuthal angle- and scanning pitch-dependent colorization of metals by ultrashort laser pulses

    Li, Yangbo; Qian, Jing; Bai, Feng; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Chengwei; Fan, Wenzhong; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Quanzhong

    2016-04-01

    We report the modification of optical properties of 304 stainless steel surfaces by femtosecond laser direct writing with different scanning pitches. Regularly arranged ripples with a spatial period of ~700 nm were obtained, rendering vivid structural colors when we illuminated the surface with white light. Diffraction spectra were generated to investigate the spectral properties of the structural colors. Results indicate that the diffraction maximum strongly depends on scanning pitch and azimuthal angle, but that the central wavelength is insensitive to both of them. The reflectance properties were also investigated. This study adds a new parameter, the scanning pitch, to the list of parameters in the production of controllable colorized metal, which may find a range of applications in color display, decoration, and so on.

  5. Laser shaping of corneal transplants in vitro: area ablation with small overlapping laser spots produced by a pulsed scanning laser beam using an optimizing ablation algorithm

    Area laser lathing and trephination of donor corneas is used to produce different types of grafts for human transplantation. 193 nm (ArF excimer) laser radiation is used, since this is known to give a non-thermal laser-tissue interaction with a minimal zone of tissue damage. To guarantee the highest degree of flexibility concerning the overall shape of the grafts as well as their thickness profiles, we use a small (compared with the area to be ablated) scanning laser spot. For area lathing of the tissue we have developed a new ablation algorithm (optimized scanning laser ablation, OSLA) that can be applied to lathe and perforate any tissue - with concave (as in this application), convex or plane surface geometry - where surface precision and smoothness are key issues. Using OSLA with the Excimer Laser Corneal Shaping System (a tool for in vitro fabrication of all kinds of corneal transplants like donor buttons for keratoplasty, lamellar grafts for epikeratoplasty and refractive lenticules) enabled us to produce all types of corneal grafts with very high precision. This is considered to be a major improvement towards the production of refractive lenticules. (author)

  6. A model for the ultrasonic detection of surface-breaking cracks by the scanning laser source technique

    Arias Vicente, Irene; Achenbach, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    A model for the scanning laser source (SLS) technique is presented. The SLS is a novel laser-based inspection method for the ultrasonic detection of small surface-breaking cracks. The generated ultrasonic signal is monitored as a line-focused laser is scanned over the defect. Characteristic changes in the amplitude and the frequency content are observed. The modeling approach is based on the decomposition of the field generated by the laser in a cracked two-dimensional half-space, by virtue o...

  7. Ethical Praxis in Body Scanning:An Experimental Study into 3D laser Scanning in Fashion and Textiles/Surface Design

    Taylor, Andrew; Unver, Ertu

    2005-01-01

    Ethical Praxis in Body Scanning: An Experimental Study into 3D laser Scanning in Fashion and Textiles/Surface Design Artists, scientists, anthropometrists and tailors have accurately measured the human body with traditional tools, such as tape measures, callipers and accumulated experience for centuries. Due to the recent acceleration in the quality of 3D graphics technology and computer processing power, many industries who traditionally use 3D software as a design/visualisation...

  8. A Target Detection Method for Artifical Harvesting Based on 2D Laser and Images%基于二维激光与图像的人工林采育目标检测方法

    丁小康; 闫磊; 孔建磊; 刘晋浩

    2015-01-01

    performance. [Result]Models with different optimizations were compared by ROC curves. Experiment results showed that the optimized model by GA used in this paper could recognize harvesting targets effectively and it’s correct rate could reach more than 96%.[Conclusion]Multi-sensor fusion technology was introduced into smart forestry equipment in this paper. Instead of the commonly used expensive 3D laser scanning system,2D laser and images were combined and used. On the one hand,it saved the costs; on the other hand,for the 2D data,the data processing was faster. At the same time, the complementary among sensorsmade the measuring and identification more accurate. The results showed that the method used in this study could provide the information needed by forestry equipment operations,which improved operational efficiency and reduced operational risks.%【目的】对人工林区内的采育目标进行检测和识别,为采育作业操作员提供辅助信息,弥补人眼判断的不足,提高作业效率,降低操作风险。【方法】提出一种基于二维激光和图像的人工林采育目标检测方法,主要内容包括以下几个方面:1)基于二维激光测距仪和红外热像仪搭建采育目标信息采集系统,利用上位机对传感器的信息采集进行控制,并对采集到的信号进行预处理,获取目标的激光数据、可见光图像和红外热图像;2)将激光与图像进行标定,得到图像中的目标区域,同时由激光坐标得到目标的位置信息,为目标识别和定位打好基础;3)将可见光图像与红外图像进行融合,融合后的图像信息更丰富并减少由单一传感器所引起的不确定性,起到互补的作用;4)根据采育目标的特点,基于激光与图像信息进行特征提取,包括温度特征、颜色特征和形状特征等,为目标识别提供具体依据;5)在获得采育目标特征的基础上,运用当前流行的机器学习算法—

  9. FROM THE CONTINUOS TO THE DISCRETE MODEL: A LASER SCANNING APPLICATION TO CONSERVATION PROJECTS

    A. Cardaci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to demonstrate the usage of laser scanning (in particular through a methodology based on the integrated use of the software "FARO© Scene" and "GEXCEL JRC-3D Reconstructor" as a valid alternative to traditional surveying techniques, especially when finalized to the restoration and conservation repair of historical buildings. The need to recreate the complex and often irregular shapes of the ancient architecture, by acting quickly and also being accurate, as well as the subsequent implementation of FEM (Finite Element Method for structural analysis, have made nowadays the laser scanning survey a very useful technique. The point cloud obtained by laser scanning can be a flexible tool for every need; not a finished product, but a huge database from which it is possible to extract different information at different times. The use of numerical methods in data processing allows wide opportunities of further investigations starting from the fitting equations. The numerical model lends by itself to the possibility of usage in many applications, such as modelization and structure analysis software. This paper presents the case study of the Church of the Assumption and Saint Michael the Archangel, located in Borgo di Terzo (Italy, a magnificent 18th century's building that presented several structural problems like as the overturning of the façade, the cracking of part of the vaulted ceiling. The survey, carried out by laser scanner (FARO© Photon 120 allowed the reconstruction of the exact geometry of the church, offering the basis for performing structural analysis supported by a realistic model (and not an idealized regular one, useful also in the design of repair interventions.

  10. Efficacy of Pattern Scan Laser photocoagulation for superficial conjunctival nevi ablation.

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jong Soo

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the efficacy and safety of Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulation in the removal of superficial conjunctival nevi. Superficial conjunctival nevi were removed from 10 eyes of 10 patients using PASCAL. The laser spots were 200 μm in size, and the power delivered ranged from 250 to 300 mW. The duration of the laser pulse was kept at the minimum needed for adequate lesion removal. The duration of the laser pulse administered to the patients varied from 100 to 200 ms. Complete removal of the conjunctival nevus was observed in all the patients after PASCAL photocoagulation. Six months after treatment, complete re-epithelialization of the overlying conjunctiva was noted. No signs of recurrence or scarring were found in any of the patients during the follow-up period. Pure thermal denaturation is the main mechanism of PASCAL photocoagulation for removal of superficial conjunctival nevi. PASCAL can be considered as an alternative to conventional argon laser treatment or surgery. PMID:26914686

  11. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo. (letter)

  12. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo.

  13. Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Measurement of Local Fundus Reflectance and Autofluorescence Changes Arising from Rhodopsin Bleaching and Regeneration

    Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin was measured locally in the retina with a widely available, dual wavelength scanning laser ophthalmoscope that does not require pupil dilation. Increased autofluorescence attendant bleaching arises largely from transient removal of rhodopsin's screening of autofluorescent fluorochromes.

  14. An interactive mapping tool for visualizing lacunarity of laser scanned point clouds

    Kania, Adam; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space in a certain model or real space over large spatial scales, is found to be a useful descriptive quantity in many fields using imagery, including, among others, geology, dentistry, neurology. Its application in ecology was suggested more than 20 years ago. The main problem of its application was the lack of appropriate high resolution data. Nowadays, full-waveform laser scanning, also known as FWF LiDAR, provides the tool for mapping the vegetation in unprecedented details and accuracy. Consequently, the lacunarity concept can be revitalized, in order to study the structure of the vegetation in this sense as well. Calculation of lacunarity, even if it is done in two dimensions (2D), is still has its problems: on one hand it is a number-crunching procedure, on the other hand, it produces 4D results: at each 3D point it returns a set of data that are function of scale. These data sets are difficult to visualize, to evaluate, and to compare. In order to solve this problem, an interactive mapping tool has been conceptualized that is designed to manipulate and visualize the data, lets the user set parameters for best visualization or comparison results. The system is able to load large amounts of data, visualize them as lacunarity curves, or map view as horizontal slices or in 3D point clouds coloured according to the user's choice. Lacunarity maps are presented as a series of (usually) horizontal profiles, e.g. rasters, which cells contain color-mapped values of selected lacunarity of the point cloud. As lacunarity is usually analysed in a series of successive windows sizes, the tool can show a series of rasters with sequentially animated lacunarity maps calculated for various window sizes. A very fast switching of colour schemes is possible to facilitate rapid visual feedback to better understand underlying data patterns exposed by lacunarity functions. In the comparison mode, two sites (or two areas

  15. A LOW BUDGET MOBILE LASER SCANNING SOLUTION USING ON BOARD SENSORS AND FIELD BUS SYSTEMS OF TODAY'S CONSUMER AUTOMOBILES

    D. M. M. Vock

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning systems (MLS offer a great potential for acquiring detailed point cloud data of urban and suburban surroundings with minimum effort. In this paper a new solution for MLSs is presented, requiring solely a combination of a profile laser scanning device and systems that are included in today's serialized end consumer vehicles. While today's mobile laser scan systems require different and expensive additional hardware that needs to be mounted onto the vehicle, the devices included within vehicle electronics offer good alternatives without additional costs.The actual scan consists of a continuous profile scan together with information gathered from on-board sensor modules. In a post- processing step, the sensor data is used to reconstruct the car's trajectory for the period of the scan and, based on this information, the track of the scan device for every measured laser pixel. Synchronization of pixel data and vehicle movement is realized via a timestamp signal which is transmitted to the car's field bus system and the scan device. To generate the final point cloud scenario, the trajectory is interpolated for every single scan point and used to convert its local position within the profile into the global coordinate system (Fig.1, Left.

  16. Optimization of 3D laser scanning speed by use of combined variable step

    Garcia-Cruz, X. M.; Sergiyenko, O. Yu.; Tyrsa, Vera; Rivas-Lopez, M.; Hernandez-Balbuena, D.; Rodriguez-Quiñonez, J. C.; Basaca-Preciado, L. C.; Mercorelli, P.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of 3D TVS slow functioning caused by constant small scanning step becomes its solution in the presented research. It can be achieved by combined scanning step application for the fast search of n obstacles in unknown surroundings. Such a problem is of keynote importance in automatic robot navigation. To maintain a reasonable speed robots must detect dangerous obstacles as soon as possible, but all known scanners able to measure distances with sufficient accuracy are unable to do it in real time. So, the related technical task of the scanning with variable speed and precise digital mapping only for selected spatial sectors is under consideration. A wide range of simulations in MATLAB 7.12.0 of several variants of hypothetic scenes with variable n obstacles in each scene (including variation of shapes and sizes) and scanning with incremented angle value (0.6° up to 15°) is provided. The aim of such simulation was to detect which angular values of interval still permit getting the maximal information about obstacles without undesired time losses. Three of such local maximums were obtained in simulations and then rectified by application of neuronal network formalism (Levenberg-Marquradt Algorithm). The obtained results in its turn were applied to MET (Micro-Electro-mechanical Transmission) design for practical realization of variable combined step scanning on an experimental prototype of our previously known laser scanner.

  17. Time-resolved investigations of the fragmentation dynamic of H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) in and with ultra-short laser pulses; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchungen zur Fragmentationsdynamik von H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) in ultra-kurzen Laserpulsen

    Ergler, T.

    2006-07-19

    In course of this work pump-probe experiments aimed to study ultrafast nuclear motion in H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) fragmentation by intense 6-25 fs laser pulses have been carried out. In order to perform time-resolved measurements, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer providing two identical synchronized laser pulses with the time-delay variable from 0 to 3000 fs with 300 as accuracy and long-term stability has been built. The laser pulses at the intensities of up to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} were focused onto a H{sub 2} (D{sub 2}) molecular beam leading to the ionization or dissociation of the molecules, and the momenta of all charged reactions fragments were measured with a reaction microscope. With 6-7 fs pulses it was possible to probe the time evolution of the bound H{sup +}{sub 2} (D{sup +}{sub 2}) nuclear wave packet created by the first (pump) laser pulse, fragmenting the molecule with the second (probe) pulse. A fast delocalization, or ''collapse'', and subsequent ''revival'' of the vibrational wave packet have been observed. In addition, the signatures of the ground state vibrational excitation in neutral D{sub 2} molecule have been found, and the dominance of a new, purely quantum mechanical wave packet preparation mechanism (the so-called ''Lochfrass'') has been proved. In the experiments with 25 fs pulses the theoretically predicted enhancement of the ionization probability for the dissociating H{sup +}{sub 2} molecular ion at large internuclear distances has been detected for the first time. (orig.)

  18. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables

  19. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  20. Time resolved three-dimensional flamebase imaging of a lifted jet flame by laser scanning

    Weinkauff, J.; Greifenstein, M.; Dreizler, A.; Böhm, B.

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of flame surface evolution in both space and time is necessary for the advancement of knowledge concerning the physical processes contributing to lifted jet flame stabilisation. Previous studies either reproduce the flame front accurately in three-dimensional space or in time. In this study a measurement system capable of both is presented. Based on the Mie-scattering of oil droplets added to the jet flow, the system reconstructs the volumetric surface at the base of a lifted jet flame from a series of two-dimensional slices. The slices are created using a pulsed high-speed laser and a polygonal laser scanner unit which serves to sweep the laser beam through the measurement volume. A single high-speed camera is used for recording the subsequent measurement slices. The achieved temporal and spatial resolution as well as the accuracy and precision of the sheet placement are discussed in respect to the flames’ scales. The first results of the reconstruction of the lifted jet flame at its stabilisation point show the potential of such measurements to avoid the ambiguities in interpreting conventional 2D-data.

  1. Time resolved three-dimensional flamebase imaging of a lifted jet flame by laser scanning

    The measurement of flame surface evolution in both space and time is necessary for the advancement of knowledge concerning the physical processes contributing to lifted jet flame stabilisation. Previous studies either reproduce the flame front accurately in three-dimensional space or in time. In this study a measurement system capable of both is presented. Based on the Mie-scattering of oil droplets added to the jet flow, the system reconstructs the volumetric surface at the base of a lifted jet flame from a series of two-dimensional slices. The slices are created using a pulsed high-speed laser and a polygonal laser scanner unit which serves to sweep the laser beam through the measurement volume. A single high-speed camera is used for recording the subsequent measurement slices. The achieved temporal and spatial resolution as well as the accuracy and precision of the sheet placement are discussed in respect to the flames’ scales. The first results of the reconstruction of the lifted jet flame at its stabilisation point show the potential of such measurements to avoid the ambiguities in interpreting conventional 2D-data. (paper)

  2. Intercomparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Instruments for Assessing Forested Ecosystems: A Brisbane Field Experiment

    Armston, J.; Newnham, G.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Danson, M.; Gaulton, R.; Zhang, Z.; Disney, M.; Sparrow, B.; Phinn, S. R.; Schaefer, M.; Burt, A.; Counter, S.; Erb, A.; Goodwin, N.; Hancock, S.; Howe, G.; Johansen, K.; Li, Z.; Lollback, G.; Martel, J.; Muir, J.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Scarth, P.; Tindall, D.; Walker, L.; Witte, C.; Woodgate, W.; Wu, S.

    2013-12-01

    During 28th July - 3rd August, 2013, an international group of researchers brought five terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) to long-term monitoring plots in three eucalyptus-dominated woodland sites near Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, to acquire scans at common locations for calibration and intercomparison.They included: DWEL - a dual-wavelength full-waveform laser scanner (Boston U., U. Massachusetts Lowell, U. Massachusetts Boston, USA) SALCA - a dual-wavelength full-waveform laser scanner (U. Salford, UK) CBL - a canopy biomass lidar, a small ultraportable low-cost multiple discrete return scanner (U. Massachusetts Boston, USA) Riegl VZ400 - a survey-grade commercial waveform scanner (Queensland Government and TERN, U. Queensland, Australia) FARO Focus 3D - a lightweight commercial phase-shift ranging laser scanner (U. Southern Queensland) Two plots were scanned at Karawatha Forest Park, a Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) Supersite, and one plot at D'Aguilar National Park. At each 50 x 100 m plot, a center scan point was surrounded by four scan points located 25 m away in a cross pattern allowing for 3-D reconstructions of scan sites in the form of point clouds. At several center points, multiple instrument configurations (i.e. different beam divergence, angular resolution, pulse rate) were acquired to test the impact of instrument specifications on separation of woody and non-woody materials and estimation of vegetation structure parameters. Three-dimensional Photopoint photographic panoramas were also acquired, providing reconstructions of stems in the form of point clouds using photogrammetric correlation methods. Calibrated reflectance targets were also scanned to compare instrument geometric and radiometric performance. Ancillary data included hemispherical photos, TRAC LAI/clumping measurements, spectra of leaves, bark, litter, and other target components. Wet and dry leaf weights determined water content. Planned intercomparison topics and

  3. Tritium Removal from Codeposits on Carbon Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Carpe; G. Guttadora; S. Langish; K.M. Young; W.M. Shu; and H. Nakamura

    2001-09-28

    A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on codeposited layers on graphite and carbon-fiber-composite tiles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A scanning continuous wave Nd laser beam heated the codeposits to a temperature of 1200-2300 degrees C for 10 to 200 milliseconds in an argon atmosphere. The temperature rise of the codeposit was significantly higher than that of the manufactured tile material (e.g., 1770 degrees C cf. 1080 degrees C). A major fraction of tritium was thermally desorbed with minimal change to the surface appearance at a laser intensity of 8 kW/cm(superscript ''2''), peak temperatures above 1230 degrees C and heating duration 10-20 milliseconds. In two experiments, 46% and 84% of the total tritium was released during the laser scan. The application of this method for tritium removal from a tokamak reactor appears promising and has significant advantages over oxidative techniques.

  4. D Documentation of a Historical Monument Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning Case Study: Byzantine Water Cistern, Istanbul

    Temizer, T.; Nemli, G.; Ekizce, E.; Ekizce, A.; Demir, S.; Bayram, B.; Askin, F. H.; Cobanoglu, A. V.; Yilmaz, H. F.

    2013-07-01

    3D modelling of architectural structures for monitoring, conservation and restoration alterations in heritage sites has special challenges for data acquisition and processing. The accuracy of created 3D model is very important. In general, because of the complexity of the structures, 3D modelling can be time consuming and may include some difficulties. 3D terrestrial laser scanning technique is a reliable and advantageous method for reconstruction and conservation of monuments. This technique is commonly acknowledged due to its accuracy, speed and flexibility. Terrestrial laser scanners can be used for documentation of the cultural heritage for the future. But it is also important to understand the capabilities and right conditions of use and limitations of this technology. Istanbul is a rich city with cultural monuments, buildings and cultural heritage. The presented study consists of documentation of a Byzantine water cistern situated underground the court of Sarnicli Han building. The cistern which represents a very good living example of its period has been modelled in 3D by using terrestrial laser scanning technology and the accuracy assessment of this modelling is examined.

  5. Laser scanning probe with multiple detectors used for sculptured surface digitization in reverse engineering

    This paper presents a single-point laser probe with multiple detectors for scanning of a sculptured surface for digitization by reverse engineering. The probe consists of a point laser source and four linear high-resolution PSDs (Position Sensitive Devices). Its target scanning distance is 180 mm from the probe to the measured surface, with a measurable range of 90 mm. Assuming a diffusive surface, the displacement from the light spot on the measured surface to the probe along the light-axis can be derived by the Lambert model. In addition, the inclination angle of the measured point from the vertical axis of the light beam is also calculated. In this study, the probe is mounted on the NC machine integrating the three-axis controller, personal computer and A/D card to conduct the digitization process. Functions of the probe are verified by a standard half-sphere model. The test results show that the displacement resolution is reaching 50 μm and the measurable range of the inclination angle is 80 degrees. A mask model is digitized to demonstrate the scanning results

  6. Highly Accurate Tree Models Derived from Terrestrial Laser Scan Data: A Method Description

    Jan Hackenberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for fitting cylinders into a point cloud, derived from a terrestrial laser-scanned tree. Utilizing high scan quality data as the input, the resulting models describe the branching structure of the tree, capable of detecting branches with a diameter smaller than a centimeter. The cylinders are stored as a hierarchical tree-like data structure encapsulating parent-child neighbor relations and incorporating the tree’s direction of growth. This structure enables the efficient extraction of tree components, such as the stem or a single branch. The method was validated both by applying a comparison of the resulting cylinder models with ground truth data and by an analysis between the input point clouds and the models. Tree models were accomplished representing more than 99% of the input point cloud, with an average distance from the cylinder model to the point cloud within sub-millimeter accuracy. After validation, the method was applied to build two allometric models based on 24 tree point clouds as an example of the application. Computation terminated successfully within less than 30 min. For the model predicting the total above ground volume, the coefficient of determination was 0.965, showing the high potential of terrestrial laser-scanning for forest inventories.

  7. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. PMID:24723320

  8. Multidimensional Laser Scanning System for Underwater Mapping of Small Structures and Bottom Topography

    Fuchs, E.

    2005-05-01

    A multidimensional laser scanning imaging system is under development to investigate new concepts in underwater imaging. The system is a modification of the 3D Laser Imaging & Tracking Electro-optical System (3D LITES; HBOI, patent # 5,418,608) that was developed for 3D mapping applications in biological oceanography. The new 3D-FLITES ("F" stands for added Fluorescence capability) captures both spatial and spectral data and offers extended operation capabilities. The system can capture the range to each pixel in the sensor's field of view, the relative reflectance of each pixel (similar to "conventional" images) and five channels of fluorescence emission in the scene, captured sequentially. Multidimensional data sets can be instrumental in bottom topography mapping and object identification. The 3D FLITES has the unique capability to operate in user-selectable line or raster scanning modes if mounted on a moving platform. In raster mode two perpendicular mirrors are driven, allowing the operator to capture single frames (capturing either reflectance or fluorescence data) or a stream of images in fast rate (16 frames per second). With this operational flexibility the operator can combine a "fly over" scanning mode with "look ahead", "look sideways" and "zoom" modes. The current system is limited in range and resolution; nevertheless it can serve as a test-bed to evaluate operational parameters, data acquisition and signal processing protocols that could lead to a smaller, more efficient system in the future.

  9. Semi-Automatic Registration of Airborne and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data Using Building Corner Matching with Boundaries as Reliability Check

    Liang Cheng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Data registration is a prerequisite for the integration of multi-platform laser scanning in various applications. A new approach is proposed for the semi-automatic registration of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data with buildings without eaves. Firstly, an automatic calculation procedure for thresholds in density of projected points (DoPP method is introduced to extract boundary segments from terrestrial laser scanning data. A new algorithm, using a self-extending procedure, is developed to recover the extracted boundary segments, which then intersect to form the corners of buildings. The building corners extracted from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning are reliably matched through an automatic iterative process in which boundaries from two datasets are compared for the reliability check. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed approach provides both high reliability and high geometric accuracy (average error of 0.44 m/0.15 m in horizontal/vertical direction for corresponding building corners for the final registration of airborne laser scanning (ALS and tripod mounted terrestrial laser scanning (TLS data.

  10. Improving peatland erosion rate measurements through the use of terrestrial laser scanning

    Grayson, R.; Holden, J.; Jones, R.; Lloyd, A.

    2013-12-01

    Globally peatlands account for 30-50% of all carbon stored within soils (Holden, 2005). Within the UK they represent the single largest terrestrial carbon store, with blanket bogs covering roughly 7.5% (Tallis et al., 1997); unfortunately these upland blanket bogs are often found in a degraded state. The amount of carbon being lost to erosional processes in peatlands is poorly constrained, with estimates typically being based on traditional low-tech methods. Erosion pins have been the primary method for measuring erosion rates in peatlands; however their use is prone to error due to the depth of peat and its high water content which allows both horizontal and vertical movement through time. Erosion pins can only realistically be used over a relatively small area and assume erosion remains constant between pins making any upscaling problematic. Therefore, innovative methods are required to improve estimates of peatland erosion that are capable of increasing both spatial coverage and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanning is increasingly being used by geomorphologists to produce highly detailed 3D topographic maps. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the ability of terrestrial laser scanning to measure erosion rates within peatlands and to identify any obstacles that may need to be overcome. An actively eroding blanket bog in northern England was chosen as the test site with surveys being carried out before and after winter as active erosion is most likely during winter months. Erosion measurements were also made using erosion pins to allow comparisons between the two methods. Terrestrial laser scanning was not only found to offer vastly improved spatial coverage compared with erosion pins but was also able to provide data at a much higher resolution. Erosion rates calculated using erosion pins were significantly higher than the average rate calculated using terrestrial laser scanning (-35mm compared to +2.5mm), this overestimation by the erosion pins primarily

  11. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  12. Transmissive liquid-crystal device correcting primary coma aberration and astigmatism in laser scanning microscopy

    Tanabe, Ayano; Hibi, Terumasa; Ipponjima, Sari; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Kurihara, Makoto; Hashimoto, Nobuyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2016-03-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows 3D cross-sectional imaging inside biospecimens. However, certain aberrations produced can degrade the quality of the resulting images. We previously reported a transmissive liquid-crystal device that could compensate for the predominant spherical aberrations during the observations, particularly in deep regions of the samples. The device, inserted between the objective lens and the microscope revolver, improved the image quality of fixed-mouse-brain slices that were observed using two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy, which was originally degraded by spherical aberration. In this study, we developed a transmissive device that corrects primary coma aberration and astigmatism, motivated by the fact that these asymmetric aberrations can also often considerably deteriorate image quality, even near the sample surface. The device's performance was evaluated by observing fluorescent beads using single-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity in the image of the bead under a cover slip tilted in the y-direction was increased by 1.5 times after correction by the device. Furthermore, the y- and z-widths of the imaged bead were reduced to 66% and 65%, respectively. On the other hand, for the imaged bead sucked into a glass capillary in the longitudinal x-direction, correction with the device increased the fluorescence intensity by 2.2 times compared to that of the aberrated image. In addition, the x-, y-, and z-widths of the bead image were reduced to 75%, 53%, and 40%, respectively. Our device successfully corrected several asymmetric aberrations to improve the fluorescent signal and spatial resolution, and might be useful for observing various biospecimens.

  13. Volumetric evolution of Surtsey, Iceland, from topographic maps and scanning airborne laser altimetry

    Garvin, J.B.; Williams, R.S.; Frawley, J.J.; Krabill, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    The volumetric evolution of Surtsey has been estimated on the basis of digital elevation models derived from NASA scanning airborne laser altimeter surveys (20 July 1998), as well as digitized 1:5,000-scale topographic maps produced by the National Land Survey of Iceland and by Norrman. Subaerial volumes have been computed from co-registered digital elevation models (DEM's) from 6 July 1968, 11 July 1975, 16 July 1993, and 20 July 1998 (scanning airborne laser altimetry), as well as true surface area (above mean sea level). Our analysis suggests that the subaerial volume of Surtsey has been reduced from nearly 0.100 km3 on 6 July 1968 to 0.075 km3 on 20 July 1998. Linear regression analysis of the temporal evolution of Surtsey's subaerial volume indicates that most of its subaerial surface will be at or below mean sea-level by approximately 2100. This assumes a conservative estimate of continuation of the current pace of marine erosion and mass-wasting on the island, including the indurated core of the conduits of the Surtur I and Surtur II eruptive vents. If the conduits are relatively resistant to marine erosion they will become sea stacks after the rest of the island has become a submarine shoal, and some portions of the island could survive for centuries. The 20 July 1998 scanning laser altimeter surveys further indicate rapid enlargement of erosional canyons in the northeastern portion of the partial tephra ring associated with Surtur I. Continued airborne and eventually spaceborne topographic surveys of Surtsey are planned to refine the inter-annual change of its subaerial volume.

  14. Street-side vehicle detection, classification and change detection using mobile laser scanning data

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Statistics on street-side car parks, e.g. occupancy rates, parked vehicle types, parking durations, are of great importance for urban planning and policy making. Related studies, e.g. vehicle detection and classification, mostly focus on static images or video. Whereas mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are increasingly utilized for urban street environment perception due to their direct 3D information acquisition, high accuracy and movability. In this paper, we design a complete system for car park monitoring, including vehicle recognition, localization, classification and change detection, from laser scanning point clouds. The experimental data are acquired by an MLS system using high frequency laser scanner which scans the streets vertically along the system's moving trajectory. The point clouds are firstly classified as ground, building façade, and street objects which are then segmented using state-of-the-art methods. Each segment is treated as an object hypothesis, and its geometric features are extracted. Moreover, a deformable vehicle model is fitted to each object. By fitting an explicit model to the vehicle points, detailed information, such as precise position and orientation, can be obtained. The model parameters are also treated as vehicle features. Together with the geometric features, they are applied to a supervised learning procedure for vehicle or non-vehicle recognition. The classes of detected vehicles are also investigated. Whether vehicles have changed across two datasets acquired at different times is detected to estimate the durations. Here, vehicles are trained pair-wisely. Two same or different vehicles are paired up as training samples. As a result, the vehicle recognition, classification and change detection accuracies are 95.9%, 86.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Vehicle modelling improves not only the recognition rate, but also the localization precision compared to bounding boxes.

  15. Multimodal ophthalmic imaging using swept source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Malone, Joseph D.; El-Haddad, Mohamed T.; Tye, Logan A.; Majeau, Lucas; Godbout, Nicolas; Rollins, Andrew M.; Boudoux, Caroline; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) benefit clinical diagnostic imaging in ophthalmology by enabling in vivo noninvasive en face and volumetric visualization of retinal structures, respectively. Spectrally encoding methods enable confocal imaging through fiber optics and reduces system complexity. Previous applications in ophthalmic imaging include spectrally encoded confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SECSLO) and a combined SECSLO-OCT system for image guidance, tracking, and registration. However, spectrally encoded imaging suffers from speckle noise because each spectrally encoded channel is effectively monochromatic. Here, we demonstrate in vivo human retinal imaging using a swept source spectrally encoded scanning laser ophthalmoscope and OCT (SSSESLO- OCT) at 1060 nm. SS-SESLO-OCT uses a shared 100 kHz Axsun swept source, shared scanner and imaging optics, and are detected simultaneously on a shared, dual channel high-speed digitizer. SESLO illumination and detection was performed using the single mode core and multimode inner cladding of a double clad fiber coupler, respectively, to preserve lateral resolution while improving collection efficiency and reducing speckle contrast at the expense of confocality. Concurrent en face SESLO and cross-sectional OCT images were acquired with 1376 x 500 pixels at 200 frames-per-second. Our system design is compact and uses a shared light source, imaging optics, and digitizer, which reduces overall system complexity and ensures inherent co-registration between SESLO and OCT FOVs. En face SESLO images acquired concurrent with OCT cross-sections enables lateral motion tracking and three-dimensional volume registration with broad applications in multivolume OCT averaging, image mosaicking, and intraoperative instrument tracking.

  16. A new laser vibrometry-based 2D selective intensity method for source identification in reverberant fields: part II. Application to an aircraft cabin

    The selective intensity technique is a powerful tool for the localization of acoustic sources and for the identification of the structural contribution to the acoustic emission. In practice, the selective intensity method is based on simultaneous measurements of acoustic intensity, by means of a couple of matched microphones, and structural vibration of the emitting object. In this paper high spatial density multi-point vibration data, acquired by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, have been used for the first time. Therefore, by applying the selective intensity algorithm, the contribution of a large number of structural sources to the acoustic field radiated by the vibrating object can be estimated. The selective intensity represents the distribution of the acoustic monopole sources on the emitting surface, as if each monopole acted separately from the others. This innovative selective intensity approach can be very helpful when the measurement is performed on large panels in highly reverberating environments, such as aircraft cabins. In this case the separation of the direct acoustic field (radiated by the vibrating panels of the fuselage) and the reverberant one is difficult by traditional techniques. The work shown in this paper is the application of part of the results of the European project CREDO (Cabin Noise Reduction by Experimental and Numerical Design Optimization) carried out within the framework of the EU. Therefore the aim of this paper is to illustrate a real application of the method to the interior acoustic characterization of an Alenia Aeronautica ATR42 ground test facility, Alenia Aeronautica being a partner of the CREDO project

  17. Model Based Viewpoint Planning for Terrestrial Laser Scanning from AN Economic Perspective

    Wujanz, D.; Neitzel, F.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the enormous popularity of terrestrial laser scanners in the field of Geodesy, economic aspects in the context of data acquisition are mostly considered intuitively. In contrast to established acquisition techniques, such as tacheometry and photogrammetry, optimisation of the acquisition configuration cannot be conducted based on assumed object coordinates, as these would change in dependence to the chosen viewpoint. Instead, a combinatorial viewpoint planning algorithm is proposed that uses a given 3D-model as an input and simulates laser scans based on predefined viewpoints. The method determines a suitably small subset of viewpoints from which the sampled object surface is preferably large. An extension of the basic algorithm is proposed that only considers subsets of viewpoints that can be registered to a common dataset. After exemplification of the method, the expected acquisition time in the field is estimated based on computed viewpoint plans.

  18. Fiber laser-based scanning lidar for space rendezvous and docking.

    Luo, Yuan; He, Yan; Gao, Min; Zhou, Cuiyun; Zang, Huaguo; Lei, Linjun; Xie, Kedi; Yang, Yan; Shi, Wei; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-03-20

    Lidar systems have played an important role in space rendezvous and docking (RVD). A new type of scanning lidar is developed using a high-repetition-rate pulsed fiber laser and a position detector. It will be a candidate for autonomous space RVD between two spacecrafts. The lidar can search and track cooperative targets in a large region without artificial guidance. The lidar's operational range spans from 18 m to 20 km, and the relative angle between two aircrafts can be measured with high accuracy. A novel fiber laser with tunable pulse energy and repetition rate is developed to meet the wide dynamic detection range of the lidar. This paper presents the lidar system's composition, performance, and experimental results in detail. PMID:25968536

  19. Highly Sensitive Laser Scanning of Photon-Upconverting Nanoparticles on a Macroscopic Scale.

    Sedlmeier, Andreas; Hlaváček, Antonín; Birner, Lucia; Mickert, Matthias J; Muhr, Verena; Hirsch, Thomas; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Tanke, Hans J; Soukka, Tero; Gorris, Hans H

    2016-02-01

    An upconversion laser scanner has been optimized to exploit the advantages of photon-upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) for background-free imaging on a macroscopic scale. A collimated 980 nm laser beam afforded high local excitation densities to account for the nonlinear luminescence response of UCNPs. As few as 2000 nanoparticles were detectable, and the linear dynamic range covered more than 5 orders of magnitude, which is essentially impossible by using conventional fluorescent dyes. UCNPs covered by a dye-doped silica shell were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and scanned by a conventional fluorescence scanner as well as the upconversion scanner. Both optical labels could be detected independently. Finally, upconversion images of lateral flow test strips were recorded to facilitate the sensitive and quantitative detection of disease markers. A marker for the parasitic worm Schistosoma was used in this study. PMID:26704024

  20. Modeling the Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Thin Films Using a High Repetition Rate Scanning Laser

    R. Černý

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimum design of experimental setup for the preparation of polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si films from amorphous layers applicable in the solar cell production is analyzed in the paper. In the computational simulations, the influence of basic characteristic parameters of the experimental procedure on the mechanisms of pc-Si lateral growth is studied. Among these parameters, the energy density of the applied laser and the thickness of the amorphous silicon (a-Si layer are identified as the most significant. As an optimum solution, the mechanism of pc-Si growth consisting in repeated melting of a part of already crystallized pc-Si layer by the scanning laser is proposed.

  1. The Use of Computer Vision Algorithms for Automatic Orientation of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Markiewicz, Jakub Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents analysis of the orientation of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. In the proposed data processing methodology, point clouds are considered as panoramic images enriched by the depth map. Computer vision (CV) algorithms are used for orientation, which are applied for testing the correctness of the detection of tie points and time of computations, and for assessing difficulties in their implementation. The BRISK, FASRT, MSER, SIFT, SURF, ASIFT and CenSurE algorithms are used to search for key-points. The source data are point clouds acquired using a Z+F 5006h terrestrial laser scanner on the ruins of Iłża Castle, Poland. Algorithms allowing combination of the photogrammetric and CV approaches are also presented.

  2. Accurate flexural spring constant calibration of colloid probe cantilevers using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    Gates, Richard S.; Osborn, William A.; Shaw, Gordon A.

    2015-06-01

    Calibration of the flexural spring constant for atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe cantilevers provides significant challenges. The presence of a large attached spherical added mass complicates many of the more common calibration techniques such as reference cantilever, Sader, and added mass. Even the most promising option, AFM thermal calibration, can encounter difficulties during the optical lever sensitivity measurement due to strong adhesion and friction between the sphere and a surface. This may cause buckling of the end of the cantilever and hysteresis in the approach-retract curves resulting in increased uncertainty in the calibration. Most recently, a laser Doppler vibrometry thermal method has been used to accurately calibrate the normal spring constant of a wide variety of tipped and tipless commercial cantilevers. This paper describes a variant of the technique, scanning laser Doppler vibrometry, optimized for colloid probe cantilevers and capable of spring constant calibration uncertainties near ±1%.

  3. Efficacy of patterned scan laser in treatment of macular edema and retinal neovascularization

    Dimple Modi

    2009-08-01

    -term follow-up. PASCAL® photocoagulation can be performed quicker with less discomfort for patients.Keywords: diabetic retinopathy, laser, macular edema, PASCAL, patterned scan laser, photocoagulation, retinal neovascularization

  4. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Henry Pinkard

    Full Text Available Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM, the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  5. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.;

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented...... to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis...... scanning microscopy images can be used to provide information on the protein microstructure in yogurt products. For large numbers of microscopy images, subjective evaluation becomes a difficult or even impossible approach, if the images should be incorporated in any form of statistical analysis alongside...

  6. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems. PMID:26938064

  7. Static terrestrial laser scanning of juvenile understory trees for field phenotyping

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lin, Yi

    2014-11-01

    This study was to attempt the cutting-edge 3D remote sensing technique of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) for parametric 3D reconstruction of juvenile understory trees. The data for test was collected with a Leica HDS6100 TLS system in a single-scan way. The geometrical structures of juvenile understory trees are extracted by model fitting. Cones are used to model trunks and branches. Principal component analysis (PCA) is adopted to calculate their major axes. Coordinate transformation and orthogonal projection are used to estimate the parameters of the cones. Then, AutoCAD is utilized to simulate the morphological characteristics of the understory trees, and to add secondary branches and leaves in a random way. Comparison of the reference values and the estimated values gives the regression equation and shows that the proposed algorithm of extracting parameters is credible. The results have basically verified the applicability of TLS for field phenotyping of juvenile understory trees.

  8. A cryogenic scanning laser microscope for investigation of dynamical states in long Josephson junctions

    Holm, Jesper; Mygind, Jesper

    1995-01-01

    measurements on different oscillator samples, performed with a novel Cryogenic Scanning Laser Microscope (CSLM) having a spatial resolution of less than ±2.5 μm over a 500 μm×50 μm wide scanning area in the temperature range 2 K-300 K. Even though the dynamical states are extremely sensitive to external noise...... tunnel current is one of the most important internal junction parameters which together with the boundary conditions determine the dynamics, it is of vital importance to experimentally determine the current density throughout the entire junction with high spatial resolution. Here we report on...... this microscope enables us to make stable in-situ measurements on operating Josephson junctions. Recent results are presented and discussed....

  9. Registration of Long-Strip Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds Using RANSAC and Closed Constraint Adjustment

    Li Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The registration of long-strip, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS point clouds is a prerequisite for various engineering tasks, including tunnels, bridges, and roads. An artificial target-based registration method is proposed in this paper to automatically calculate registration parameters (i.e., rotation, translation of scanned pairs without initial estimations. The approach is based on the well-known Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC method and effectively searches the point cloud for corresponding returns from a system of artificial targets. In addition, Closed Constraint Adjustment (CCA is integrated into the registration method to significantly reduce the accumulative error. Experimental results demonstrate the robustness and feasibility of the proposed approach. It is a promising approach to register automatically long strips with limited external control points with satisfactory precision.

  10. Use of laser-scan technology to analyse topography and flow in a weir pool

    P. E. Dresel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of laser-scan techniques provides opportunity for detailed terrain analysis in hydrologic studies. Ground based scans were used to model the ground surface elevation in the area of a stream gauge weir over an area of 240 m2 at a resolution of 0.05 m. The terrain model was used to assess the possibility of flow bypassing the weir and to calculate stream flow during filling of the weir pool, prior to flow through the weir notch. The mapped surface shows a subtle low-lying area at the south end of the structure where flow could bypass the weir. The flow calculations quantify low-flows that do not reach the weir notch during small rain events and flow at the beginning of larger events in the ephemeral stream.

  11. OBSERVATION OF THE ALTERNATION OF NUCLEIC ACID IN BRAIN SLICE AND NEURONS BY CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    2000-01-01

    @@Confocal laser scanning microscope is one of the most important biomedicine Altus instru ment〔1〕. It has the characteristics of high sensitivity for detecting the stereo structure, and can scan a few hundreds of micrometer-thick tissue. It may get graphs of intracyte or tissue with uninvading stage scan and is named "cell CT". In this study, the nucleic acid alterations of whole brain slice was investigated with this technique after the formation of LTP.

  12. An Adaptive-Tabu GA for Registration of CT and Surface Laser Scan.

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Jau-Hua; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Liu, Li-Chang

    2005-01-01

    An adaptive-tabu GA (Genetic Algorithm) method is proposed to improve some traditional GA methods in the registration of computer tomography (CT) and surface laser scan. In this method, the adaptive memory structure and search strategy of Tabu Search (TS) with the modified chromosome crossover and adaptive mutation are proposed to increase the convergence speed and accuracy of the fitness function. This registration method can be used on non-fiducial stereo-tactic brain surgeries to assist surgeons to diagnose and treat brain diseases. PMID:17280970

  13. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Kecheng Li; Douglas W. Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. Withthe thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration, and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  14. IMAGING WOOD PULP FIBRE SURFACE LIGNIN BY FLUORESCENCE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    KechengLi; DouglasW.Reeve

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology for imaging wood pulp fibre surface lignin by fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy was developed. Various imaging modes and imaging conditions were explored for quantitative analysis. Acridine Orange was used for labelling lignin and the orthochromatic labelling condition was developed. With the thusly established methodology, the distribution of lignin across the fibre wall was clearly imaged. It was found that surface lignin concentration is about 2-4 times higher than bulk lignin concentration and that high concentration of lignin was also found on the fibre lumen surfaces and pit borders.

  15. Laser Scanning for the definition of high resolution topography in the Apuan Alps (IT) marble district

    Riccucci, Silvia; Salvini, Riccardo; Francioni, Mirko

    2010-05-01

    The present paper describes the results of five laser scanning surveys performed by a Leica™ ScanStation2 with the aim of producing an high definition topography of a quarry, at the scale of 1:1,000. The project comes from a joint research carried out by the Authors in collaboration with the Local Sanitary Unit Agency (ASL n.1) of Massa and Carrara (IT). The main objective of this work has been the survey of both the exploited quarry walls and the upper residual and natural slopes. The area of interest is characterized by several quarry fronts which develop to variable and alternate directions to create very evident rock spurs, from NW-SE to NE-SW trending for a total wideness of about 2 hectares. Moreover, the quarry walls are sub-vertical and sometimes overhang by a total height of 100 m in respect to the quarry floor. Differential GPS and orthometric correction have been applied in order to co-register and to georeference the five point clouds; for these purposes a series of optical targets have been measured using a Laser Total Station. The subsequent phase has been the mesh construction and editing, from which a topographic map, 25 cm equidistance contours lines, has been created. The planimetric map shows the position and the geometry of crests, banks, escarpments, walls and all others exploitation features and the characteristics of the upper natural slopes. Morphological profiles along the maximum slope have been realized in order to better plan the future extractive activities according to the regional law. In order to make easier the prospective observation of detailed and overall areas, 3D views of multi-directional orientation have been realized. The produced data has been published by using the free LeicaTM TruView plug-in for Internet Explorer in a way to easily view the photographs and to measure the laser scan point clouds. Processing results have highlighted the higher spatial resolution of data coming from laser scanning in respect to the

  16. Investigation of strain heterogeneities by laser scanning extensometry in strain ageing materials: application to zirconium alloys

    Graff, S.; Forest, S.; Strudel, J.L. [Centre des Materiaux / UMR 7633, Ecole des Mines de Paris / CNRS, BP 87, 91003 Evry (France); Dierke, H.; Neuhauser, H. [Institut fur Physik der Kondensierten Materie, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Prioul, C. [MSSMAT, Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bechade, J.L. [SRMA, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Laser scanning extensometry was used to detect and characterize propagating plastic instabilities such as the Luders bands at the millimeter scale. Spatio-temporal plastic heterogeneities are due to either static or dynamic strain ageing (SSA and DSA) phenomena. Regarding zirconium alloys, different type of heterogeneities were observed: their features strongly depended on mechanical test conditions. In one case, they appeared to be non propagating but preserved along the stress-strain curve and were associated with SSA effects such as stress peaks after relaxation periods or after unloading steps with waiting times. In other case, they appeared as non propagating but were not associated with SSA effects. (authors)

  17. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    Chen, Diana C.; Olivier, Scot S.; Jones; Steven M.

    2010-02-23

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  18. Embryological study of Herminium monorchis (Orchidaceae) using confocal scanning laser microscopy

    The embryology of Herminium monorchis (Orchidaceae) was studied using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), a new technique for embryological studies. This technique may contribute new information to plant embryology. Herminium monorchis has a monosporic embryo sac development. The mature embryo sac is 8-nucleate. Two integuments, both 2-layered, are formed, but only the inner takes part in formation of the micropyle. Double fertilization takes place. The primary endosperm nucleus does not divide, but remains alive at least at the 3-celled stage of embryo development. The three antipodals do not show any sign of degeneration at this stage. (author)

  19. Using laser confocal scanning microscope to study ischemia-hypoxia injury in rat brain slice

    2000-01-01

    The level of lipid peroxidation and cellular necrosis in rat living brain slices during brain ischemia-hypoxia injury have been observed using a laser confocal scanning microscope (LCSM) with double labeling of fluorescent probes D-399 (2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) and propidium iodide (PI).The hypoxia and/or reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices is markedly decreased by pretreatment with L-NG-nitro-arginine (L-NNA) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC),showing that the nitric oxide (NO) and other free radicals play an important role in brain ischemia-hypoxia injury.

  20. Fast Terahertz Computed-Tomography Imaging With a Quantum-Cascade Laser and a Scanning Mirror

    Rothbart, Nick; Richter, Heiko; Wienold, Martin; Schrottke, Lutz; Grahn, H. T.; Hübers, H. -W.

    2013-01-01

    A terahertz transmission imaging system based on a quantum-cascade laser (QCL), a fast scanning mirror, and a sensitive Ge:Ga detector is demonstrated. In order to reduce artifacts, special care was taken on the optics and the conversion of the measured data into the image. Images with a diameter of approximately 40 mm and a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 28 dB were obtained within 1.1 s. The system was used to record three dimensional images of objects in an ellipsoidal volume with axes o...

  1. Scanning cross-correlator for monitoring uniform 3D ellipsoidal laser beams

    Zelenogorskii, V V; Gacheva, E I; Gelikonov, G V; Krasilnikov, M; Mart'yanov, M A; Mironov, S Yu; Potemkin, A K; Syresin, E M; Stephan, F; Khazanov, E A

    2014-01-01

    The specific features of experimental implementation of a cross-correlator with a scan rate above 1600 cm s(-1) and a spatial delay amplitude of more than 15 mm are considered. The possibility of measuring the width of femtosecond pulses propagating in a train 300 mu s in duration with a repetition rate of 1 MHz is demonstrated. A time resolution of 300 fs for the maximum time window of 50 ps is attained.The cross-correlator is aimed at testing 3D pulses of a laser driver of an electron photo-injector.

  2. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    Roth, D.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics.

  3. Quantitative void characterization in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Roth, D.J.; Generazio, E.R.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) to characterize artificially seeded voids in sintered silicon nitride structural ceramic specimens was investigated. Using trigonometric relationships and Airy's diffraction theory, predictions of internal void depth and size were obtained from acoustic diffraction patterns produced by the voids. Agreement was observed between actual and predicted void depths. However, predicted void diameters were generally much greater than actual diameters. Precise diameter predictions are difficult to obtain due to measurement uncertainty and the limitations of 100 MHz SLAM applied to typical ceramic specimens.

  4. Reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy for detecting internal voids in structural ceramics

    Roth, D.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-07-01

    The reliability of 100 MHz scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting internal voids in sintered specimens of silicon nitride and silicon carbide was evaluated. The specimens contained artificially implanted voids and were positioned at depths ranging up to 2 mm below the specimen surface. Detection probability of 0.90 at a 0.95 confidence level was determined as a function of material, void diameter, and void depth. The statistical results presented for void detectability indicate some of the strengths and limitations of SLAM as a nondestructive evaluation technique for structural ceramics. 28 references.

  5. Nano-hardness and microstructure of selective laser melted AlSi10Mg scan tracks

    Aboulkhair, Nesma T.; Maskery, Ian; Tuck, Chris; Ashcroft, Ian; Everitt, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) of aluminium alloys faces more challenges than other ongoing alloys such as stainless steels and titanium alloys because of the material's properties. It is important to study single scan tracks if high density large parts are to be made since they are the primary building blocks. In this study, the geometrical features of AlSi10Mg tracks indicated keyhole mode melting domination. Chemical composition mapping and nanoindentation showed enhanced nano-hardness in SLM material over conventional material with no spatial variation. This is due to a homogeneous elemental distribution and fine microstructure developed by fast solidification.

  6. Automatic Geo-Referencing Mobile Laser Scanning Data to Uav Images

    Gao, Y.; Huang, X.; Zhang, F.; Fu, Z.; Yang, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a framework for adjusting mobile laser scanning point cloud data to improve the accuracy is proposed by integrating high resolution UAV images and MLS. First, aerial triangulated images with a few high accuracy ground control points are taken as control information. Then, a hierarchical strategy is proposed for robust pairwise registration of feature points between point cloud and images, so as to find the deviation of the point cloud. In the next step, a shape-preserving piecewise cubic interpolating method is employed to fit the time dependent error model of the trajectory. Finally, experiments are given to prove the effectiveness of proposed framework.

  7. The scanning laser ophthalmoscope-a review of its role in bioscience and medicine

    The scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) offers the potential for retinal imaging that is complementary both to that of the fundus camera and also the newly developing technique of optical coherence tomography (OCT). It has the ability to produce rapid images at low light levels using light of specific wavelengths. This permits temporal studies of fluorescent-labelled cells which offer a unique insight into inflammatory processes in the eye. The facility to image with several different wavelengths simultaneously offers the potential for spectral imaging of retinal tissue with the aim of revealing those early changes in tissue perfusion that indicate the onset of retinal disease, so increasing the probability of successful therapy

  8. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  9. The Effect of Wind on Tree STEM Parameter Estimation Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Vaaja, M. T.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Kurkela, M.; Lehtola, V.; Hyyppä, J.; Hyyppä, H.

    2016-06-01

    The 3D measurement technique of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories has shown great potential for improving the accuracy and efficiency of both individual tree and plot level data collection. However, the effect of wind has been poorly estimated in the error analysis of TLS tree measurements although it causes varying deformations to the trees. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of wind on tree stem parameter estimation at different heights using TLS. The data consists of one measured Scots pine captured from three different scanning directions with two different scanning resolutions, 6.3 mm and 3.1 mm at 10 m. The measurements were conducted under two different wind speeds, approximately 3 m/s and 9 m/s, as recorded by a nearby weather station of the Finnish Meteorological Institute. Our results show that the wind may cause both the underestimation and overestimation of tree diameter when using TLS. The duration of the scanning is found to have an impact for the measured shape of the tree stem under 9 m/s wind conditions. The results also indicate that a 9 m/s wind does not have a significant effect on the stem parameters of the lower part of a tree (stem movement.

  10. Handheld histology-equivalent sectioning laser-scanning confocal optical microscope for interventional imaging.

    Kumar, Karthik; Avritscher, Rony; Wang, Youmin; Lane, Nancy; Madoff, David C; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Uhr, Jonathan W; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-04-01

    A handheld, forward-imaging, laser-scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) demonstrating optical sectioning comparable with microtome slice thicknesses in conventional histology, targeted towards interventional imaging, is reported. Fast raster scanning (approximately 2.5 kHz line scan rate, 3.0-5.0 frames per second) was provided by a 2-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanning mirror fabricated by a method compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing. Cost-effective rapid-prototyped packaging combined the MEMS mirror with micro-optical components into a probe with 18 mm outer diameter and 54 mm rigid length. ZEMAX optical design simulations indicate the ability of the handheld optical system to obtain lateral resolution of 0.31 and axial resolution of 2.85 microm. Lateral and axial resolutions are experimentally measured at 0.5 microm and 4.2 microm respectively, with field of view of 200 x 125 microm. Results of reflectance imaging of ex vivo swine liver, and fluorescence imaging of the expression of cytokeratin and mammaglobin tumor biomarkers in epithelial human breast tissue from metastatic breast cancer patients are presented. The results indicate that inexpensive, portable handheld optical microscopy tools based on silicon micromirror technologies could be important in interventional imaging, complementing existing coarse-resolution techniques to improve the efficacy of disease diagnosis, image-guided excisional microsurgery, and monitored photodynamic therapy. PMID:20012209

  11. Testing of Land Cover Classification from Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    Bakuła, K.; Kupidura, P.; Jełowicki, Ł.

    2016-06-01

    Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning provides a new opportunity for airborne data collection. It provides high-density topographic surveying and is also a useful tool for land cover mapping. Use of a minimum of three intensity images from a multiwavelength laser scanner and 3D information included in the digital surface model has the potential for land cover/use classification and a discussion about the application of this type of data in land cover/use mapping has recently begun. In the test study, three laser reflectance intensity images (orthogonalized point cloud) acquired in green, near-infrared and short-wave infrared bands, together with a digital surface model, were used in land cover/use classification where six classes were distinguished: water, sand and gravel, concrete and asphalt, low vegetation, trees and buildings. In the tested methods, different approaches for classification were applied: spectral (based only on laser reflectance intensity images), spectral with elevation data as additional input data, and spectro-textural, using morphological granulometry as a method of texture analysis of both types of data: spectral images and the digital surface model. The method of generating the intensity raster was also tested in the experiment. Reference data were created based on visual interpretation of ALS data and traditional optical aerial and satellite images. The results have shown that multispectral ALS data are unlike typical multispectral optical images, and they have a major potential for land cover/use classification. An overall accuracy of classification over 90% was achieved. The fusion of multi-wavelength laser intensity images and elevation data, with the additional use of textural information derived from granulometric analysis of images, helped to improve the accuracy of classification significantly. The method of interpolation for the intensity raster was not very helpful, and using intensity rasters with both first and last return

  12. Airborne Laser Scanning of Forest Stem Volume in a Mountainous Environment

    Klemens Schadauer

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Airborne laser scanning (ALS is an active remote sensing technique that uses the time-of-flight measurement principle to capture the three-dimensional structure of the earth’s surface with pulsed lasers that transmit nanosecond-long laser pulses with a high pulse repetition frequency. Over forested areas most of the laser pulses are reflected by the leaves and branches of the trees, but a certain fraction of the laser pulses reaches the forest floor through small gaps in the canopy. Thus it is possible to reconstruct both the three-dimensional structure of the forest canopy and the terrain surface. For the retrieval of quantitative forest parameters such as stem volume or biomass it is necessary to use models that combine ALS with inventory data. One approach is to use multiplicative regression models that are trained with local inventory data. This method has been widely applied over boreal forest regions, but so far little experience exists with applying this method for mapping alpine forest. In this study the transferability of this approach to a 128 km2 large mountainous region in Vorarlberg, Austria, was evaluated. For the calibration of the model, inventory data as operationally collected by Austrian foresters were used. Despite these inventory data are based on variable sample plot sizes, they could be used for mapping stem volume for the entire alpine study area. The coefficient of determination R2 was 0.85 and the root mean square error (RMSE 90.9 m3ha-1 (relative error of 21.4% which is comparable to results of ALS studies conducted over topographically less complex environments. Due to the increasing availability, ALS data could become an operational part of Austrian’s forest inventories.

  13. Comparison of high resolution terrestrial laser scanning and terrestrial photogrammetry for modeling applications

    Özdemir, Samed; Bayrak, Temel

    2016-04-01

    3D documentation of cultural heritage and engineering projects is an important matter. These documentation applications, requires highest possible accuracy and detail to represent the actual surface correctly. Terrestrial photogrammetric method which is employed to produce 3D models to day, now can obtain dense point clouds thanks to advancements in computer technology. Terrestrial laser scanners gained popularity in the last decade because of their high capacity and today they are being widely used in many applications. However every application has its own requirements that depend on the type of application, modeling environment, accuracy and budget limitations. This means, for every application highest accuracy instruments are not always best, considering the facts that mentioned before. In this study, laser scanner and terrestrial photogrammetric methods' spatial and model accuracies investigated under various conditions which include measuring targets at different instrument to object distances then investigating the accuracy of these measurements, modeling an irregular shaped surface to compare two surfaces volume and surface areas, at last comparing dimensions of known geometrical shaped small objects. Also terrestrial laser scanners and terrestrial photogrammetric methods most suitable application conditions investigated in terms of cost, time, mobility and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanner has the ability to, measure distances under cm accuracy and directly measuring 3D world but there is also some drawbacks like sensitive, bulky and expensive equipment. When it comes to terrestrial photogrammetry, it has above cm accuracy, comparatively fast (considering the image acquisition stage), inexpensive but it can be affected by the coarse geometry, surface texture and the environmental lighting. Key Words: Accuracy, Comparison, Model, Terrestrial Photogrammetry, Terrestrial Laser Scanning,.

  14. High Resolution Airborne Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Imaging with a Small Uav Platform

    Gallay, Michal; Eck, Christoph; Zgraggen, Carlo; Kaňuk, Ján; Dvorný, Eduard

    2016-06-01

    The capabilities of unmanned airborne systems (UAS) have become diverse with the recent development of lightweight remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we demonstrate our custom integration of the state-of-the-art technologies within an unmanned aerial platform capable of high-resolution and high-accuracy laser scanning, hyperspectral imaging, and photographic imaging. The technological solution comprises the latest development of a completely autonomous, unmanned helicopter by Aeroscout, the Scout B1-100 UAV helicopter. The helicopter is powered by a gasoline two-stroke engine and it allows for integrating 18 kg of a customized payload unit. The whole system is modular providing flexibility of payload options, which comprises the main advantage of the UAS. The UAS integrates two kinds of payloads which can be altered. Both payloads integrate a GPS/IMU with a dual GPS antenna configuration provided by OXTS for accurate navigation and position measurements during the data acquisition. The first payload comprises a VUX-1 laser scanner by RIEGL and a Sony A6000 E-Mount photo camera. The second payload for hyperspectral scanning integrates a push-broom imager AISA KESTREL 10 by SPECIM. The UAS was designed for research of various aspects of landscape dynamics (landslides, erosion, flooding, or phenology) in high spectral and spatial resolution.

  15. Conceptual Issues Regarding the Development of Underground Railway Laser Scanning Systems

    Raymond Hung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS systems are widely applied for spatial data collection and support applications in many aspects. In recent years, MLS technology had been introduced to railway applications and greatly enhanced the spatial detail and efficiency when compared to traditional approaches. However, the advance of MLS technology is not completely applied to railway environment. Typical MLS systems rely on integrated navigation through the use of Inertial Navigation Systems (INS and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS for geo-referencing, while operation under long-term GNSS outages or even GNSS-free environments, such as underground railway or long tunnels, remains a challenging issue due to the degraded operation of standalone inertial navigation. Commercial MLS systems usually employ high performance inertial measurement units (IMU and various strategies to manage GNSS outages, but GNSS components are still necessary prior to and after experiencing the loss of GNSS signals. To tackle the problem of permanent GNSS outages, alternative methods are introduced to replace the GNSS and so allow the use of MLS systems in GNSS-free underground railway environments. Such approaches encourage the MLS systems to be developed into the Underground Railway Laser Scanning (URLS systems, which may provide several alternative operational functions for the management of underground railway operation.

  16. Integrating terrestrial laser scanning and repeat field measurements to quantify habitat changes during baseflow recession

    Woelfle-Erskine, C. A.; Thompson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding stream habitat heterogeneity is essential for evaluating stream habitat quality for salmonids, but the variability in pool sizes, groundwater sources, and the associated water quality makes characterization of habitat challenging. Habitat volume and stream connectivity are key drivers of ecosystem processes in spatially-intermittent streams, and strongly influence survival of juvenile salmonids in coastal California. Stream disconnection creates heterogeneous habitats, as disconnected pools are fed by distinct groundwater and hyporheic sources of water containing different concentrations of carbon, oxygen and nutrients. These distinct biogeochemical regimes drive production of benthic macroinvertebrates (salmonids' primary food source) and dissolved oxygen levels, which in turn govern salmonid metabolism. In this study, we use terrestrial laser scans of the streambed, topographic surveys of wetted pools, and repeat field measurements of pool depth to develop a timeseries of finely resolved pool volumes and dry riffle lengths. We overlay repeat water quality measurements onto this surface to visualize how cessation of flow creates heterogeneous habitats influenced by groundwater flux and geomorphic setting. By coupling terrestrial laser scans with traditional surveys, we create high-resolution facies surfaces that can be integrated with timeseries measurements of other biogeochemical data to characterize changes in habitat conditions during baseflow recession. Compared with traditional survey methods, this method yields improved qualitative descriptions of habitat fragmentation via visualizations and spatially and temporally explicit quantification of aquatic and riparian habitat characteristics that drive salmonid over-summer survival.

  17. LIDAR AND INS FUSION IN PERIODS OF GPS OUTAGES FOR MOBILE LASER SCANNING MAPPING SYSTEMS

    I. Klein

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile laser scanning systems are becoming an increasingly popular means to obtain 3D coverage on a large scale. To perform the mapping, the exact position of the vehicle must be known throughout the trajectory. Exact position is achieved via integration of Global Positioning Systems (GPS and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS. Yet, in urban environments, cases of complete or even partial GPS outages may occur leaving the navigation solution to rely only on the INS. The INS navigation solution degrades with time as the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU measurements contains noise, which permeates into the navigation equations. Degradation of the position determination leads to loss of data in such segments. To circumvent such drift and its effects, we propose fusing INS with lidar data by using building edges. This detection of edges is then translated into position data, which is used as an aiding to the INS. It thereby enables the determination of the vehicle position with a satisfactory level accuracy, sufficient to perform the laser-scanning based mapping in those outage periods.

  18. QUANTIFICATION OF BIOFILMS IN MULTI-SPECTRAL DIGITAL1 VOLUMES FROM CONFOCAL LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPES

    Karsten Rodenacker

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Populations of bacteria in sludge flocs and biofilm marked by fluorescence marked with fluorescent probes are digitised with a confocal laser scanning microscope. These data are used to analyse the microbial community structure, to obtain information on the localisation of specific bacterial groups and to examine gene expression. This information is urgently required for an in-depth understanding of the function and, more generally, the microbial ecology of biofilms. Methods derived from quantitative image analysis are applied to digitised data from confocal laser scanning microscopes to obtain quantitative descriptions of volumetric, topological (and topographical properties of different compartments of the components under research. In addition to free-moving flocs, also biofilms attached to a substratum in an experimental environment are analysed. Growth form as well as interaction of components are quantitatively described. Classical measurements of volume and intensity (shape, distribution and distance dependent interaction measurements using methods from mathematical morphology are performed. Mainly image (volume processing methods are outlined. Segmented volumes are globally and individually (in terms of 3Dconnected components measured and used for distance mapping transform as well as for estimation of geodesic distances from the substrate. All transformations are applied on the 3D data set. Resulting distance distributions are quantified and related to information on the identity and activity of the probe-identified bacteria.

  19. Tritium Removal from JET and TFTR Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    Fast and efficient tritium removal is needed for future D-T machines with carbon plasma-facing components. A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on co-deposited layers on tiles retrieved from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and from the Joint European Torus (JET). A scanning continuous wave neodymium laser beam was focused to =100 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the co-deposits, heating them to temperatures =2000 C for about 10 ms in either air or argon atmospheres. Fiber optic coupling between the laser and scanner was implemented. Up to 87% of the co-deposited tritium was thermally desorbed from the JET and TFTR samples. This technique appears to be a promising in-situ method for tritium removal in a next-step D-T device as it avoids oxidation, the associated de-conditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide

  20. Assessment of Light Environment Variability in Broadleaved Forest Canopies Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Dimitry Van der Zande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Light availability inside a forest canopy is of key importance to many ecosystem processes, such as photosynthesis and transpiration. Assessment of light availability and within-canopy light variability enables a more detailed understanding of these biophysical processes. The changing light-vegetation interaction in a homogeneous oak (Quercus robur L. stand was studied at different moments during the growth season using terrestrial laser scanning datasets and ray tracing technology. Three field campaigns were organized at regular time intervals (24 April 2008; 07 May 2008; 23 May 2008 to monitor the increase of foliage material. The laser scanning data was used to generate 3D representations of the forest stands, enabling structure feature extraction and light interception modeling, using the Voxel-Based Light Interception Model (VLIM. The VLIM is capable of estimating the relative light intensity or Percentage of Above Canopy Light (PACL at any arbitrary point in the modeled crown space. This resulted in a detailed description of the dynamic light environments inside the canopy. Mean vertical light extinction profiles were calculated for the three time frames, showing significant differences in light attenuation by the canopy between April 24 on the one hand, and May 7 and May 23 on the other hand. The proposed methodology created the opportunity to link these within-canopy light distributions to the increasing amount of photosynthetically active leaf material and its distribution in the considered 3D space.

  1. Fine Deformation Monitoring of Ancient Building Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technologies

    Laser scanning technology has been widely used to build high-precision three dimensional models in the preservation of ancient buildings. In this paper, we take the Tower of Buddhist Incense in the Summer Palace as our research subject. Combining laser scanning technologies with close-range photogrammetry, GIS and virtual reality technologies, we acquired comprehensive and high accuracy geospatial data of the tower, and built the 3D models with an average measurement error of a single point less than 2 millimeters and a registration error of 3D data less than 5 millimeters. After data registration of the whole tower with high-precision, deformation monitoring was conducted. Having been repaired many times, the cross-sections of the tower's pillars are not in a circular shape. In order to know the dip and dip direction of each pillar exactly, ellipse fitting algorithm was used to calculate the location of the centre of every pillar. And then, the coordinates of the pillars' centre points, the major and minor axes of the ellipses, and rotation angles were calculated. The technologies and methodology used in this paper could significantly contribute towards the long-term protection of endangered cultural relics using measurements and modelling with high-levels of scientific precision

  2. Scanning Laser Polarimetry for Measurement of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Absolute, Advanced and Early Glaucoma

    Jen-Chia Tsai

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: To detect differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL measurements inabsolute, advanced and early glaucoma with scanning laser polarimetry (TheNerve Fiber Analyzer GDx, and to assess the usefulness and limitations ofthis technique for longitudinal follow-up of glaucoma patients.Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional study. Twenty-one eyes of 21 patientswith absolute glaucoma, twenty-six eyes of 26 patients with advanced glaucomaand twenty-four eyes of 24 patients with early glaucoma were imagedusing scanning laser polarimetry. The twelve standard GDx measurementparameters were compared using ANOVA (analysis of variance and theTukey test.Results: No significant differences were demonstrated for any of the twelve GDxmeasurement parameters between absolute and advanced glaucoma cases.There were significant differences for some GDx parameters, including theGDx number (p < 0.0001 superior ratio (p < 0.0001, inferior ratio (p <0.0001, superior/nasal ratio (p < 0.0001, maximum modulation (p <0.0001, ellipse modulation (p < 0.0001 and inferior average (p = 0.001between early and advanced glaucoma, and, between early and absoluteglaucoma. Significant differences were demonstrated for the superior average(p = 0.01 parameter between early and absolute glaucoma, but notbetween early and advanced glaucoma.Conclusions: For follow-up of glaucoma progression, RNFL measurements using scanninglaser polarimetry are more useful in the early stage than in the advancedstage.

  3. Compact Multipurpose Mobile Laser Scanning System — Initial Tests and Results

    Craig Glennie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a prototype compact mobile laser scanning system that may be operated from a backpack or unmanned aerial vehicle. The system is small, self-contained, relatively inexpensive, and easy to deploy. A description of system components is presented, along with the initial calibration of the multi-sensor platform. The first field tests of the system, both in backpack mode and mounted on a helium balloon for real-world applications are presented. For both field tests, the acquired kinematic LiDAR data are compared with highly accurate static terrestrial laser scanning point clouds. These initial results show that the vertical accuracy of the point cloud for the prototype system is approximately 4 cm (1σ in balloon mode, and 3 cm (1σ in backpack mode while horizontal accuracy was approximately 17 cm (1σ for the balloon tests. Results from selected study areas on the Sacramento River Delta and San Andreas Fault in California demonstrate system performance, deployment agility and flexibility, and potential for operational production of high density and highly accurate point cloud data. Cost and production rate trade-offs place this system in the niche between existing airborne and tripod mounted LiDAR systems.

  4. Evaluation of confocal laser scanning microscopy for enumeration of virus-like particles in aquatic systems

    Agis, Martin; Luef, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Abundances of virus-like particles (VLPs, mostly bacteriophages) are high in aquatic environments; therefore, techniques for precise enumeration are essential in ecological monitoring. VLPs were determined after staining with SYBR Gold by conventional epifluorescence microscopy and compared to enumerations performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to assess the potential of CLSM for viral direct counts (VDCs), we processed samples from different freshwater and marine systems. Optical sectioning by CLSM and production of an overlay picture of multiple scans enables the often uneven whole investigated filter area to be brought to the plane of focus. This allows for subsequent image analysis of digitally created high-quality images. Another advantage using the CLSM was that the short spot excitation of the stain via laser beam minimized fading of the stain. The VDC results show that there is no significant difference between the two methods. Regarding the known difficulties of viral abundance estimates on particulate material, CLSM was further applied to enumerate VLPs on a small set of marine transparent exopolymeric particles sampled from the Atlantic Ocean. Our data suggest that CLSM is a useful tool to count viruses in water samples as well as attached to certain types of aquatic aggregates. PMID:23108709

  5. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry Application to Artworks: New Acoustic and Mechanical Exciters for Structural Diagnostics

    Agnani, A.; Esposito, E.

    After first attempts some years ago, the scanning laser Doppler vibrometer has become an effective way of diagnosing different types of artworks; successful applications regard frescoes, icons, mosaics, ceramic artefacts and wood inlays. Also application to historical bridges has been successfully developed and a recently approved European Commission project will see the employment of scanning laser Doppler Vibrometry (SLDV) for the dynamical characterization of ancient buildings. However, a critical issue consists in the adequate excitation of the structure under test. Moreover different types of defects and different kinds of artworks require different types of excitation, so this topic needs a deep consideration. In this work we will present two new types of exciters developed at our Department, namely an acoustic exciter and a mechanical one. Acoustic exciters allow remote non-invasive loading but are limited in the lower frequency range and in the amount of vibrational energy input into the structure. The proposed automatic tapping device based on a commercial impact hammer overcomes these problems. Also another acoustic exciter, a HyperSonic Sound (HSS) source has been evaluated, showing interesting features as regards sound radiation.

  6. Application of laser scan microscopy in vivo for wound healing characterization

    Considering the advancing age of the population, wound healing disturbances are becoming increasingly important in clinical routine. The development of wound healing creams and lotions as well as therapy control require an objective evaluation of the wound healing process, which represents the destruction of the barrier. Therefore, transepidermal water loss measurements are often carried out. These measurements have the disadvantage that they are disturbed by the interstitial fluid, which is located on the surface of chronic wounds and also by water components of the creams and lotions. Additionally, the TEWL measurements are very sensitive to temperature changes and to the anxiety of the volunteers. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the reepithelialization and barrier recovery of standardized wounds produced by the suction blister technique. It was demonstrated that this non-invasive, on-line spectroscopic method allows the evaluation of the wound healing process, without any disturbances. It was found that the wound healing starts not only from the edges of the wound, but also out of the hair follicles. The in vivo laser scanning microscopy is well suited to evaluate the efficacy of wound healing creams and for therapy control

  7. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    Lenda, Grzegorz; Uznański, Andrzej; Strach, Michał; Lewińska, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile), but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones). Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  8. Laser Scanning in Engineering Surveying: Methods of Measurement and Modeling of Structures

    Lenda Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the uses of laser scanning in the field of engineering surveying. It is currently one of the main trends of research which is developed at the Department of Engineering Surveying and Civil Engineering at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering of AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow. They mainly relate to the issues associated with tower and shell structures, infrastructure of rail routes, or development of digital elevation models for a wide range of applications. These issues often require the use of a variety of scanning techniques (stationary, mobile, but the differences also regard the planning of measurement stations and methods of merging point clouds. Significant differences appear during the analysis of point clouds, especially when modeling objects. Analysis of the selected parameters is already possible basing on ad hoc measurements carried out on a point cloud. However, only the construction of three-dimensional models provides complete information about the shape of structures, allows to perform the analysis in any place and reduces the amount of the stored data. Some structures can be modeled in the form of simple axes, sections, or solids, for others it becomes necessary to create sophisticated models of surfaces, depicting local deformations. The examples selected for the study allow to assess the scope of measurement and office work for a variety of uses related to the issue set forth in the title of this study. Additionally, the latest, forward-looking technology was presented - laser scanning performed from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (drones. Currently, it is basically in the prototype phase, but it might be expected to make a significant progress in numerous applications in the field of engineering surveying.

  9. Co-Registration of DSMs Generated by Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Systems

    Ancil Persad, Ravi; Armenakis, Costas

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the co-registration of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) is proposed. Specifically, a wavelet-based feature descriptor for matching surface keypoints on the 2.5D DSMs is developed. DSMs are useful in wide-scope of various applications such as 3D building modelling and reconstruction, cultural heritage, urban and environmental planning, aircraft navigation/path routing, accident and crime scene reconstruction, mining as well as, topographic map revision and change detection. For these listed applications, it is not uncommon that there will be a need for automatically aligning multi-temporal DSMs which may have been acquired from multiple sensors, with different specifications over a period of time, and may have various overlaps. Terrestrial laser scanners usually capture urban facades in an accurate manner; however this is not the case for building roof structures. On the other hand, vertical photography from UAVs can capture the roofs. Therefore, the automatic fusion of UAV and laser-scanning based DSMs is addressed here as it serves various geospatial applications.

  10. Towards Automatic Single-Sensor Mapping by Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning

    Ahokas, E.; Hyyppä, J.; Yu, X.; Liang, X.; Matikainen, L.; Karila, K.; Litkey, P.; Kukko, A.; Jaakkola, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of the Optech Titan multispectral airborne laser scanner in the fields of mapping and forestry. Investigation was targeted to six land cover classes. Multispectral laser scanner data can be used to distinguish land cover classes of the ground surface, including the roads and separate road surface classes. For forest inventory using point cloud metrics and intensity features combined, total accuracy of 93.5% was achieved for classification of three main boreal tree species (pine, spruce and birch).When using intensity features - without point height metrics - a classification accuracy of 91% was achieved for these three tree species. It was also shown that deciduous trees can be further classified into more species. We propose that intensity-related features and waveform-type features are combined with point height metrics for forest attribute derivation in area-based prediction, which is an operatively applied forest inventory process in Scandinavia. It is expected that multispectral airborne laser scanning can provide highly valuable data for city and forest mapping and is a highly relevant data asset for national and local mapping agencies in the near future.

  11. AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF ROAD SURFACE AND CURBSTONE EDGES FROM MOBILE LASER SCANNING DATA

    A. Miraliakbari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a procedure for automatic extraction of the road surface from geo-referenced mobile laser scanning data. The basic assumption of the procedure is that the road surface is smooth and limited by curbstones. Two variants of jump detection are investigated for detecting curbstone edges, one based on height differences the other one based on histograms of the height data. Region growing algorithms are proposed which use the irregular laser point cloud. Two- and four-neighbourhood growing strategies utilize the two height criteria for examining the neighborhood. Both height criteria rely on an assumption about the minimum height of a low curbstone. Road boundaries with lower or no jumps will not stop the region growing process. In contrast to this objects on the road can terminate the process. Therefore further processing such as bridging gaps between detected road boundary points and the removal of wrongly detected curbstone edges is necessary. Road boundaries are finally approximated by splines. Experiments are carried out with a ca. 2 km network of smalls streets located in the neighbourhood of University of Applied Sciences in Stuttgart. For accuracy assessment of the extracted road surfaces, ground truth measurements are digitized manually from the laser scanner data. For completeness and correctness of the region growing result values between 92% and 95% are achieved.

  12. High-speed automated NDT device for niobium plate using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    This paper presents a nondestructive testing (NDT) device which rapidly and automatically identifies defects throughout the volume of a 23.4 cm x 23.4 cm x 0.3 cm, pure niobium plate using Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope (SLAM), high-resolution, 60 MHz, ultrasonic images. A principle advantage of the SLAM technique is that it combines a video scan rate with a high scan density (130 lines/mm at 60 MHz). To automate the inspection system they integrated under computer control the following: the SLAM RS-170/330 video output, a computerized XY plate scanner, a real-time video digitizer/integrator, a computer algorithm for defect detection, a digital mass storage device, and a hardcopy output device. The key element was development of an efficient, reliable defect detection algorithm using a variance filter with a locally determined threshold. This algorithm is responsible for recognizing valid flaws in the midst of random texture. This texture was seen throughout the acoustic images and was caused by the niobium microstructure. The images, as analyzed, contained 128 x 120 pixels with 64 grey levels per pixel. This system allows economical inspection of the large quantities (eg. 100 tons) of material needed for future particle accelerators based on microwave superconductivity. Rapid nondestructive inspection of pure niobium sheet is required because current accelerator performance is largely limited by the quality of commercially available material. Previous work documented critical flaws that are detectable by SLAM techniques. 15 references, 9 figures

  13. Adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method for estimating tree diameter based on single terrestrial laser scanning

    Bu, Guochao; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to extract accurate forest biophysical parameters for inventory purposes. The diameter at breast height (DBH) is a key parameter for individual trees because it has the potential for modeling the height, volume, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential of the tree based on empirical allometric scaling equations. In order to extract the DBH from the single-scan data of TLS automatically and accurately within a certain range, we proposed an adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method based on the point cloud transect. This proposed method can correct the error caused by the simple circle fitting method when a tree is slanted. A slanted tree was detected by the circle-ellipse fitting analysis, then the corresponding slant angle was found based on the ellipse fitting result. With this information, the DBH of the trees could be recalculated based on reslicing the point cloud data at breast height. Artificial stem data simulated by a cylindrical model of leaning trees and the scanning data acquired with the RIEGL VZ-400 were used to test the proposed adaptive fitting method. The results shown that the proposed method can detect the trees and accurately estimate the DBH for leaning trees.

  14. Forest Inventory with Terrestrial LiDAR: A Comparison of Static and Hand-Held Mobile Laser Scanning

    Sébastien Bauwens

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract forest attributes. The use of a mobile laser scanner (MLS would reduce this occlusion. In this study, we assessed and compared a hand-held mobile laser scanner (HMLS with two TLS approaches (single scan: SS, and multi scan: MS for the estimation of several forest parameters in a wide range of forest types and structures. We found that SS is competitive to extract the ground surface of forest plots, while MS gives the best result to describe the upper part of the canopy. The whole cross-section at 1.3 m height is scanned for 91% of the trees (DBH > 10 cm with the HMLS leading to the best results for DBH estimates (bias of −0.08 cm and RMSE of 1.11 cm, compared to no fully-scanned trees for SS and 42% fully-scanned trees for MS. Irregularities, such as bark roughness and non-circular cross-section may explain the negative bias encountered for all of the scanning approaches. The success of using MLS in forests will allow for 3D structure acquisition on a larger scale and in a time-efficient manner.

  15. A scanning laser source and a microcantilever ultrasound receiver for detection of surface flaws in microdevices

    Sohn, Younghoon; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2005-05-01

    In recent work at Northwestern University, we have shown that near-field scattering of ultrasound generated by a Scanning Laser Source (SLS) can be used to effectively identify surface flaws in macroscale structures. In past work, the laser ultrasound source was in the near-field of a scatterer and a piezoelectric detector was used to measure the ultrasound in the far field. It was observed that distinct variations are observed in the far-field signals as the SLS scans past surface-breaking flaws. These changes were attributed to the near-field scatterer redirecting parts of the ultrasonic beam (which might otherwise have gone into the bulk of the object) towards the far-field detector. We now propose an extension of the SLS approach to map defects in microdevices by bringing both the generator and the receiver to the near-field scattering region of the defects. For the purpose of near-field ultrasound measurement, the receiving transducer has to be made very small as well. To facilitate this, silicon microcantilever probes are fabricated and their acoustical characteristics are first investigated. Silicon cantilevers with tip and chip body are fabricated using isotropic reactive ion etching and anisotropic KOH etching. To characterize the free cantilever vibration, the chip body with the microcantilever is excited by an ultrasonic transducer and a Michelson interferometer is used to monitor the cantilever motion. The fundamental frequency of the microcantilever is measured and compared with analytically calculated fundamental frequency assuming the cross sections of the cantilevers are rectangular. Next, the performance of the fabricated microcantilevers as ultrasound detectors is investigated. The microcantilever is used essentially as a profilometer by contacting it to the specimen surface. Surface and bulk acoustic waves are generated with specific narrowband frequencies and the surface ultrasonic displacements are detected using the microcantilever probe. Next

  16. 4D Analysis of Slope Monitoring Data from Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Williams, J.; Rosser, N. J.; Hardy, R. J.; Afana, A.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of deformation from actively failing slopes is essential for gaining insight into the rates, mechanisms and controls on failure. Recent models have focussed upon the temporal evolution of failures, the validation of which requires increasingly high-resolution, high-frequency monitoring data. Since its introduction to geomorphological study, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) has become a frequently used means of characterising change to failing slopes. The most computationally efficient approach represents change on a pixel-by-pixel basis using rasterised 2.5D DEMs of Difference; however, the level of detail reduces on steep surfaces and the use of a fixed grid spacing limits the ability to resolve fine-scaled features, both of which may underpin failure mechanisms. A number of algorithms and software packages have been developed to better characterise surface and joint structures using 'true 3D' point clouds; however, 3D change detection with a large number of scans remains limited. In addition to developments in geometric change detection, TLS systems now provide radiometric information by digitising the energy-time structure of the reflected laser pulse, sensitive to surface moisture amongst other variables. This study draws upon a unique dataset of > 800 sequential scans captured across a failing rock slope. Our algorithm extracts change between a large number of scans, using a Moving Least Squares adjustment to filter data through time and space. The analysis explores optimal kernel structures for retaining spatial resolution and temporal responsiveness to articulate the nature of change in rock slopes, distinguishing discrete failures (e.g. rockfalls) from ongoing deformation (e.g. creep). The code segments successive clouds into an octree structure of planar surfaces and provides 3D change metrics through time. We use the code to test the ability to separate movement at various scales, with the aim of capturing movements suited for failure

  17. Topographical and chemical microanalysis of surfaces with a scanning probe microscope and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Kossakovski; Beauchamp

    2000-10-01

    Spatially resolved chemical imaging is achieved by combining a fiber-optic scanning probe microscope with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in a single instrument, TOPOLIBS. Elemental composition of surfaces can be mapped and correlated with topographical data. The experiment is conducted in air with minimal sample preparation. In a typical experiment, surface topography is analyzed by scanning a sharp fiber-optic probe across the sample using shear force feedback. The probe is then positioned over a feature of interest and pulsed radiation is delivered to the surface using a nitrogen laser. The pulse vaporizes material from the surface and generates a localized plasma plume. Optical emission from the plume is analyzed with a compact UV/visible spectrometer. Ablation crater size is controlled by the amount of laser power coupled into the probe. Sampling areas with submicrometer dimensions are achieved by using reduced laser power. PMID:11028639

  18. Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data for Features Extraction of High Accuracy Driving Maps

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Dong, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    High Accuracy Driving Maps (HADMs) are the core component of Intelligent Drive Assistant Systems (IDAS), which can effectively reduce the traffic accidents due to human error and provide more comfortable driving experiences. Vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. This paper proposes a novel method to extract road features (e.g., road surfaces, road boundaries, road markings, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, vehicles and so on) for HADMs in highway environment. Quantitative evaluations show that the proposed algorithm attains an average precision and recall in terms of 90.6% and 91.2% in extracting road features. Results demonstrate the efficiencies and feasibilities of the proposed method for extraction of road features for HADMs.

  19. A semi-automatic multiple view texture mapping for the surface model extracted by laser scanning

    Zhang, Zhichao; Huang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Fan; Chang, Yongmin; Li, Deren

    2008-12-01

    Laser scanning is an effective way to acquire geometry data of the cultural heritage with complex architecture. After generating the 3D model of the object, it's difficult to do the exactly texture mapping for the real object. we take effort to create seamless texture maps for a virtual heritage of arbitrary topology. Texture detail is acquired directly from the real object in a light condition as uniform as we can make. After preprocessing, images are then registered on the 3D mesh by a semi-automatic way. Then we divide the mesh into mesh patches overlapped with each other according to the valid texture area of each image. An optimal correspondence between mesh patches and sections of the acquired images is built. Then, a smoothing approach is proposed to erase the seam between different images that map on adjacent mesh patches, based on texture blending. The obtained result with a Buddha of Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes is presented and discussed.

  20. Dual scale structural health monitoring system combining FBG sensors and laser scanning

    Lima, Hugo F.; Domingues, M. Fátima; Nogueira, Rogério N.; André, Paulo; Pinto, João L.

    2009-07-01

    This work reports a case study of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system combining large and micro scale measurements installed in a 16th Century Church in Aveiro. This dual scale SHM system relies on a network of 24 fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to perform micro scale, high resolution displacement and temperature measurements in several key points of the structure, while the large scale measurements are ensured by a scanning laser range finder. The results demonstrate that the developed systems allow adequate monitoring of the evolution of deformation in buildings, in different scales, keeping the visual impact in the structure reduced to a minimum and contributing for the implementation of best practices for rehabilitation of historic and cultural heritage.

  1. Characterization of acoustic lenses with the Foucault test by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Ahmed Mohamed, E. T.; Abdelrahman, A.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the Foucault knife-edge test, which has traditionally been known as the classic test for optical imaging devices, is used to characterize an acoustic lens for operation at 1.2 GHz. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used as the illumination and detection device utilizing its pinhole instead of the classical knife edge that is normally employed in the Foucault test. Information about the geometrical characteristics, such as the half opening angle of the acoustic lens, were determined as well as the quality of the calotte of the lens used for focusing. The smallest focal spot size that could be achieved with the examined lens employed as a spherical reflector was found to be about 1 μm. By comparison to the idealized resolution a degradation of about a factor of 2 can be deduced. This limits the actual quality of the acoustic focus.

  2. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  3. SINGLE TREE DETECTION FROM AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING DATA USING A MARKED POINT PROCESS BASED METHOD

    J. Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree detection and reconstruction is of great interest in large-scale city modelling. In this paper, we present a marked point process model to detect single trees from airborne laser scanning (ALS data. We consider single trees in ALS recovered canopy height model (CHM as a realization of point process of circles. Unlike traditional marked point process, we sample the model in a constraint configuration space by making use of image process techniques. A Gibbs energy is defined on the model, containing a data term which judge the fitness of the model with respect to the data, and prior term which incorporate the prior knowledge of object layouts. We search the optimal configuration through a steepest gradient descent algorithm. The presented hybrid framework was test on three forest plots and experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Building Facade Documentation Using Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry and Data Implementation Into Bim

    Faltýnová, M.; Matoušková, E.; Šedina, J.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    A project started last year called MORE-CONNECT, which focuses on the renovation of buildings (especially building facades) using prefabricated elements. The aim of this project is to create a competitive solution consisting of a technology and processes which enable fast, cost-effective renovation with minimal difficulties to inhabitants. Significant cost savings in renovation costs lies in the usage of prefabricated elements and the reduction of construction works on site. The precision of the prefabricated element depends on the precision of the construction, project and building documentation. This article offers an overview of the possible methods for building documentation and spatial data transfer into BIM (Building Information Modelling) software. The description of methods focuses on laser scanning and photogrammetry (including RPAS based), its advantages, disadvantages and limitations according to the documented building, level of renovation, situation on site etc. The next part involves spatial data transfer into BIM software. A proposed solution is tested in a case study.

  5. Object shape classification and scene shape representation for three-dimensional laser scanned outdoor data

    Ning, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Xiaopeng

    2013-02-01

    Shape analysis of a three-dimensional (3-D) scene is an important issue and could be widely used for various applications: city planning, robot navigation, virtual tourism, etc. We introduce an approach for understanding the primitive shape of the scene to reveal the semantic scene shape structure and represent the scene using shape elements. The scene objects are labeled and recognized using the geometric and semantic features for each cluster, which is based on the knowledge of scene. Furthermore, the object in scene with a different primitive shape could also be classified and fitted using the Gaussian map of the segmented scene. We demonstrate the presented approach on several complex scenes from laser scanning. According to the experimental result, the proposed method can accurately represent the geometric structure of the 3-D scene.

  6. In vivo integrated photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy, optical coherence tomography, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for retinal imaging

    Song, Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hao F.; Wei, Qing; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-12-01

    The physiological and pathological properties of retina are closely associated with various optical contrasts. Hence, integrating different ophthalmic imaging technologies is more beneficial in both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of several blinding diseases. Recently, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) was developed for in vivo retinal imaging in small animals, which demonstrated the capability of imaging retinal vascular networks and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) at high sensitivity. We combined PAOM with traditional imaging modalities, such as fluorescein angiography (FA), spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and auto-fluorescence scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AF-SLO), for imaging rats and mice. The multimodal imaging system provided more comprehensive evaluation of the retina based on the complementary imaging contrast mechanisms. The high-quality retinal images show that the integrated ophthalmic imaging system has great potential in the investigation of blinding disorders.

  7. Visualization of microcrack anisotropy in granite affected by afault zone, using confocal laser scanning microscope

    Onishi, Celia T.; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2004-01-02

    Brittle deformation in granite can generate a fracture system with different patterns. Detailed fracture analyses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales, together with physical property data from a drill-core, are used to classify the effects of reverse fault deformation in four domains: (1) undeformed granite, (2) fractured granite with cataclastic seams, (3) fractured granite from the damage zone, and (4) foliated cataclasite from the core of the fault. Intact samples from two orthogonal directions, horizontal (H) and vertical (V), from the four domains indicate a developing fracture anisotropy toward the fault, which is highly developed in the damage zone. As a specific illustration of this phenomenon, resin impregnation, using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) technique is applied to visualize the fracture anisotropy developed in the Toki Granite, Japan. As a result, microcrack networks have been observed to develop in H sections and elongate open cracks in V sections, suggesting that flow pathways can be determined by deformation.

  8. 3D laser scanning in plant and pipeline engineering; 3D-Laserscanning im Anlagen- und Rohrleitungsbau

    Weber, T. [Kaeser und Reiner, Ingenieurbuero fuer Vermessung und Geoinformation, Fellbach (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    3D laser scanning has been in use for a number of years now in the fields of surveying, building and factory planning. Laser scanning can, however, provide a highly supportive and helpful tool for the plant and piping designer, too. The benefits of this technology are relevant wherever the geometry of existing systems and subsystems needs to be registered and recorded. This may be the case in planning changes (basic and detail engineering), collision checks, documentation, plant relocations and visual?display projects. (orig.)

  9. Automatic Feature Detection, Description and Matching from Mobile Laser Scanning Data and Aerial Imagery

    Hussnain, Zille; Oude Elberink, Sander; Vosselman, George

    2016-06-01

    In mobile laser scanning systems, the platform's position is measured by GNSS and IMU, which is often not reliable in urban areas. Consequently, derived Mobile Laser Scanning Point Cloud (MLSPC) lacks expected positioning reliability and accuracy. Many of the current solutions are either semi-automatic or unable to achieve pixel level accuracy. We propose an automatic feature extraction method which involves utilizing corresponding aerial images as a reference data set. The proposed method comprise three steps; image feature detection, description and matching between corresponding patches of nadir aerial and MLSPC ortho images. In the data pre-processing step the MLSPC is patch-wise cropped and converted to ortho images. Furthermore, each aerial image patch covering the area of the corresponding MLSPC patch is also cropped from the aerial image. For feature detection, we implemented an adaptive variant of Harris-operator to automatically detect corner feature points on the vertices of road markings. In feature description phase, we used the LATCH binary descriptor, which is robust to data from different sensors. For descriptor matching, we developed an outlier filtering technique, which exploits the arrangements of relative Euclidean-distances and angles between corresponding sets of feature points. We found that the positioning accuracy of the computed correspondence has achieved the pixel level accuracy, where the image resolution is 12cm. Furthermore, the developed approach is reliable when enough road markings are available in the data sets. We conclude that, in urban areas, the developed approach can reliably extract features necessary to improve the MLSPC accuracy to pixel level.

  10. Scanning laser optical tomography resolves structural plasticity during regeneration in an insect brain.

    René Eickhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optical Projection Tomography (OPT is a microscopic technique that generates three dimensional images from whole mount samples the size of which exceeds the maximum focal depth of confocal laser scanning microscopes. As an advancement of conventional emission-OPT, Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOTy allows simultaneous detection of fluorescence and absorbance with high sensitivity. In the present study, we employ SLOTy in a paradigm of brain plasticity in an insect model system. METHODOLOGY: We visualize and quantify volumetric changes in sensory information procession centers in the adult locust, Locusta migratoria. Olfactory receptor neurons, which project from the antenna into the brain, are axotomized by crushing the antennal nerve or ablating the entire antenna. We follow the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the olfactory centers (antennal lobes and mushroom bodies by measuring their size in reconstructed SLOTy images with respect to the untreated control side. Within three weeks post treatment antennal lobes with ablated antennae lose as much as 60% of their initial volume. In contrast, antennal lobes with crushed antennal nerves initially shrink as well, but regain size back to normal within three weeks. The combined application of transmission-and fluorescence projections of Neurobiotin labeled axotomized fibers confirms that recovery of normal size is restored by regenerated afferents. Remarkably, SLOTy images reveal that degeneration of olfactory receptor axons has a trans-synaptic effect on second order brain centers and leads to size reduction of the mushroom body calyx. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SLOTy is a suitable method for rapid screening of volumetric plasticity in insect brains and suggests its application also to vertebrate preparations.

  11. Spectroscopic, scanning laser OBIC, and I-V/QE characterizations of browned EVA solar cells

    Pern, F.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Eisgruber, I.L. [Materials Research Group, Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Micheels, R.H. [Polestar Technologies, Inc., Needham Hts, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The effects of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) discoloration due to accelerated field or laboratory exposure on the encapsulated silicon (Si) solar cells or EVA/glass laminates were characterized quantitatively by using non-invasive, non-destructive ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, spectrocolorimetry, spectrofluorometry, scanning laser OBIC (optical beam induced current) spectroscopy, and current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) measurements. The results show that the yellowness index (YI) measured directly over the AR-coated solar cells under the glass superstrate increased from the range of -80 to -90 to the range of -20 to 15 as the EVA changed from clear to brown. The ratio of two fluorescence emission peak areas generally increased from 1.45 to 5.69 as browning increased, but dropped to 4.21 on a darker EVA. For a solar cell with brown EVA in the central region, small-area grating QE measurements and scanning laser OBIC analysis between the brown and clear EVA regions showed that the quantum efficiency loss at 633 nm was 42%-48% of the loss at 488 nm, due to a reduced decrease of transmittance in browned EVA at the longer wavelengths. The portion of the solar cell under the browned EVA showed a decrease of {approximately}36% in efficiency, as compared to the cell efficiency under clear EVA. Transmittance loss at 633 nm was 38% of the loss at 488 nm for a light yellow-brown EVA/glass laminate that showed a small increase of 10 in the yellowness index.

  12. Three dimensional microvascular measurements in human endometrium using optical slices from laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM).

    Manconi, Frank; Kable, Eleanor P; Dwarte, Dennis; Jones, Allan; Russell, Peter; Chullapram, Teerapat; Gange, Prasantha V; Obeysekara, Sunil; Thomas, Graham A; Fraser, Ian S

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the structure of the microvascular environment in human endometrium because of the recognition of the complexity and functional importance of this tissue. Endometrial microcirculatory networks and their relationships have rarely been studied in three-dimensions. Longitudinal uterine slices containing endometrial tissue were carefully selected from women undergoing a hysterectomy. Formalin-fixed endometrial sections (≤ 50 μm) representing the fundal and isthmic regions were immunofluorescently labeled with monoclonal antibody (CD34) to target the endothelium of microvessel and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled goat anti-mouse. Digital images were acquired using a Nikon Eclipse E800 microscope equipped with a Radiance 2000 confocal scanning laser attachment. ImarisBasic 4.1 visualization suite was utilized for qualitative interpretation. NeuronTracer 1.0 software was utilized to derive the length and numerical densities. There were significant changes across the phases of the menstrual cycle in functional and basal endometrial layers in vessel length density (LD(v)) and branch point density (ND(v)) within both fundal and isthmic regions of the uterus (P<0.001). There was also a significant effect of menstrual cycle phase on mean vessel segment length (SL(v)) within each region and within each of the layers (P<0.001). The capillary radial diffusion distance r(diff) was negatively correlated with LD(v). In general, within each of the menstrual cycle phases, LD(v), ND(v) were greater in the fundal than the isthmic regions while, in contrast, SL(v) was found to be greatest in the isthmic region. Utilization of immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy has enabled us to demonstrate significant vascular changes in human endometrial layers illustrating that in general, within each of the menstrual cycle phases, vessel length and branch point densities were greater in the fundal than the isthmic regions, while vessel

  13. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods

    Changjae Kim; Ayman Habib; Muwook Pyeon; Goo-rak Kwon; Jaehoon Jung; Joon Heo

    2016-01-01

    Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1) reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2) considers the a...

  14. Equivalente esférico e valores da espessura da camada de fibras nervosas obtidas com o GDX TM Scanning Laser System® Spherical equivalent and nerve fiber layer thickness assessed with GDX TM Scanning Laser System®

    Lênio Souza Alvarenga

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudar a influência do equivalente esférico nos valores obtidos pelo GDX TM Scanning Laser System®. Métodos: Foram avaliados 41 olhos de 41 voluntários sem doenças oculares e com campo visual sem alterações. Foi realizada a polarimetria de varredura a laser com o GDX TM Scanning Laser System® de acordo com as instruções contidas no manual do aparelho. Foram comparados os valores obtidos nesse exame em um grupo de pacientes com equivalente esférico positivo e em um outro com este valor nulo ou negativo, pelo teste de Mann-Whitney. Resultados: Não se verificou diferença estatística entre os valores obtidos nos olhos de pacientes do grupo I e os do grupo II. Não foi encontrada correlação entre o equivalente esférico e os valores obtidos com o GDX TM Scanning Laser System®. Conclusões: Na amostra estudada não houve diferença estatística entre os valores obtidos em um grupo de olhos com equivalente esférico positivo e outro com este valor negativo ou nulo, usando-se o GDX TM Scanning Laser System®.Purpose: To evaluate the effect of spherical equivalent on the acquisition of nerve fiber layer (NFL thickness with GDX TM Scanning Laser System®. Methods: Forty-one eyes of 41 volunteers were enrolled in this study. All of them presented with no ocular disease and no visual field defect. The NFL thickness was measured with GDX TM Scanning Laser System® as described in its manual. The values obtained in a group of volunteers with negative spherical equivalent (group I were compared to those from a group with a positive spherical equivalent (group II by the Mann-Whitney test. Results: There was no statistical difference between mea-surements in eyes of group I and those in group II. The NFL thickness measurements were not correlated with the sphe-rical equivalent. Conclusions: In the studied group there was no statistical difference in the GDX TM Scanning Laser System® parameters related to spherical equivalent.

  15. Detecting pruning of individual stems using Airborne Laser Scanning data captured from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Wallace, Luke; Watson, Christopher; Lucieer, Arko

    2014-08-01

    Modern forest management involves implementing optimal pruning regimes. These regimes aim to achieve the highest quality timber in the shortest possible rotation period. Although a valuable addition to forest management activities, tracking the application of these treatments in the field to ensure best practice management is not economically viable. This paper describes the use of Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) data to track the rate of pruning in a Eucalyptus globulus stand. Data is obtained from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and we describe automated processing routines that provide a cost-effective alternative to field sampling. We manually prune a 500 m2 plot to 2.5 m above the ground at rates of between 160 and 660 stems/ha. Utilising the high density ALS data, we first derived crown base height (CBH) with an RMSE of 0.60 m at each stage of pruning. Variability in the measurement of CBH resulted in both false positive (mean rate of 11%) and false negative detection (3.5%), however, detected rates of pruning of between 96% and 125% of the actual rate of pruning were achieved. The successful automated detection of pruning within this study highlights the suitability of UAV laser scanning as a cost-effective tool for monitoring forest management activities.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of intracochlear tissue by scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT)

    Tinne, N.; Nolte, L.; Antonopoulos, G. C.; Schulze, J.; Andrade, J.; Heisterkamp, A.; Meyer, H.; Warnecke, A.; Majdani, O.; Ripken, T.

    2016-02-01

    The presented study focuses on the application of scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) for non-destructive visualization of anatomical structures inside the human cochlea ex vivo. SLOT is a laser-based highly efficient microscopy technique, which allows for tomographic imaging of the internal structure of transparent large-scale specimens (up to 1 cm3). Thus, in the field of otology this technique is best convenient for an ex vivo study of the inner ear anatomy. For this purpose, the preparation before imaging comprises mechanically assisted decalcification, dehydration as well as optical clearing of the cochlea samples. Here, we demonstrate results of SLOT visualizing hard and soft tissue structures of the human cochlea with an optical resolution in the micrometer range using absorption and autofluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Furthermore, we compare our results with the method of X-ray micro tomography (micro-CT, μCT) as clinical gold standard which is based only on absorption. In general, SLOT can provide the advantage of covering all contrast mechanisms known from other light microscopy techniques, such as fluorescence or scattering. For this reason, a protocol for antibody staining has been developed, which additionally enables selective mapping of cellular structures within the cochlea. Thus, we present results of SLOT imaging rodent cochleae showing specific anatomical structures such as hair cells and neurofilament via fluorescence. In conclusion, the presented study has shown that SLOT is an ideally suited tool in the field of otology for in toto visualization of the inner ear microstructure.

  17. Possibilities of a personal laser scanning system for forest mapping and ecosystem services.

    Liang, Xinlian; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Wang, Yunsheng

    2013-01-01

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH) was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking. PMID:24434879

  18. Possibilities of a Personal Laser Scanning System for Forest Mapping and Ecosystem Services

    Xinlian Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking.

  19. Examination of an Irradiated Fuel Pin Segment by Laser Scanning Profilometry, Gamma Spectrometry and Neutron Radiography

    Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) conducts post-irradiation examinations (PIE) on fuel pins irradiated in nuclear power plants. During poolside inspections of the nuclear fuel at one of these plants, an intact fuel pin showed a small deviation in diameter along several mm of the axial elevation. The pin was added to the fuel delivery transport to PSI in the frame of a surveillance program. To detect the exact dimensions of the pin section, a laser scanning profilometer was adapted for hot cell use by mirroring the laser beam. The examined length of the found clad necking matched the nominal length of one fuel pellet, indicating a missing or diameter reduced pellet. Axial gamma spectrometry confirmed the match of the neckings's length with the pellet gaps indicated by higher cesium count rates. The azimuthal variation in cladding diameter was confirmed by gamma spectrometry angle dependent mappings. To investigate the pellet integrity without destructive methods, a neutron radiography was decided for. After cutting a segment of the pin, the radiography at the PSI neutron irradiation facility SINQ revealed one pellet with variations in diameter, but without abnormal structural defects. This paper outlines the combination of the three non-destructive methods as well as technical descriptions of the methods and some results of the examinations. (author)

  20. Automatic Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Point Clouds using Panoramic Reflectance Images

    Qile Zhao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to the automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS point clouds using panoramic reflectance images. The approach follows a two-step procedure that includes both pair-wise registration and global registration. The pair-wise registration consists of image matching (pixel-to-pixel correspondence and point cloud registration (point-to-point correspondence, as the correspondence between the image and the point cloud (pixel-to-point is inherent to the reflectance images. False correspondences are removed by a geometric invariance check. The pixel-to-point correspondence and the computation of the rigid transformation parameters (RTPs are integrated into an iterative process that allows for the pair-wise registration to be optimised. The global registration of all point clouds is obtained by a bundle adjustment using a circular self-closure constraint. Our approach is tested with both indoor and outdoor scenes acquired by a FARO LS 880 laser scanner with an angular resolution of 0.036° and 0.045°, respectively. The results show that the pair-wise and global registration accuracies are of millimetre and centimetre orders, respectively, and that the process is fully automatic and converges quickly.

  1. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A; Zhang, Hao F

    2015-10-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  2. Use of terrestrial laser scanning to evaluate the spatial distribution of soil disturbance by skidding operations

    Koren M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the disturbance to the surface of a skid trail caused by removing cut timber from inside the forest to the roadside by dragging using terrestrial laser scanning technology. We scanned the study site prior to taking any action, after skidding and after implementing post-harvesting reinstatement to the surface of the skid trail. From the point cloud obtained, we derived an irregular point field. We generated a triangulated irregular network which we then interpolated into a raster digital terrain model with a resolution of 1cm. By comparing the digital terrain models, we analysed the influence of skidding the timber and the influence of post-harvesting reinstatement upon the surface of the skid trail. The surface of the skid trail was most significantly affected in the area where the harvested logs were extracted and stacked for hauling. In the centre section of the trail, where the logs were dragged by a tractor, quite deep tracks were created and the intensity of soil disturbance was comparable to the handling section. The lowest intensity of soil disturbance was found in the area where the skid trail met the roadside. The post-harvesting reinstatement of the working area resulted in levelling the surface of the skid trail and the deepest tracks were filled in. The post-harvesting reinstatement caused a 12% increase of the volume of ruts, a 49% decrease of the volume of mounds of soil and a 6% increase of total soil volume change.

  3. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  4. Modeling and simulation of protein uptake in cation exchanger visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Yang, Kun; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2006-12-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been extensively applied in the area of protein chromatography to investigate the uptake mechanism of protein in adsorbents. However, due to the light attenuation in the deeper layers of a specimen, quantitative analysis using CLSM data is still far from reality. In this work, an attenuation equation for describing the darkening of the CLSM image in the deeper scanning layers was developed. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption to SP Sepharose FF was performed by batch adsorption and micro-column chromatography on which protein concentration in single absorbents were visualized by CLSM. The parameters in the equation were estimated by fitting it to the fluorescence intensity profiles obtained at adsorption equilibrium, and then the equation was used to simulate the effect caused by the light scattering and absorption. CLSM analysis demonstrated that BSA adsorption to SP Sepharose FF followed the shrinking core pattern and was predicted reasonably well by the pore diffusion model in combination with the attenuation equation. By comparison of the CLSM data with the simulations, it shows that the attenuation equation was useful to demonstrate the validity of an intraparticle mass transport model for the estimation of intraparticle protein concentration profiles. PMID:17034803

  5. Virtual Reconstruction of the Almaqah Temple of Yeha in Ethiopia by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Lindstaedt, M.; Mechelke, K.; Schnelle, M.; Kersten, Th.

    2011-09-01

    In autumn 2009 the Almaqah Temple of Yeha in Ethiopia has been recorded by terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry in cooperation between the Sana'a Branch of the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute and the HafenCity University Hamburg. The temple dates from the 7th Century BC and is one of the best preserved buildings of Sabaean architecture in Africa. As a basis for all future project works a geodetic network was established in UTM-coordinates by GPS measurements. The geodata collected will form the basis for all future work on the temple. The deformations of the facades were determined for restoration issues and the existing parts of the temple were modelled by meshing (3D triangulation). Using the scanned point cloud and a technical analysis of the building the Propylon, which is no longer existent today, was virtually reconstructed. In future, the data will also be included in the master plan for touristic development of the region of Axum and Yeha in northern Ethiopia.

  6. Assessing Metrics for Estimating Fire Induced Change in the Forest Understorey Structure Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Vaibhav Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying post-fire effects in a forested landscape is important to ascertain burn severity, ecosystem recovery and post-fire hazard assessments and mitigation planning. Reporting of such post-fire effects assumes significance in fire-prone countries such as USA, Australia, Spain, Greece and Portugal where prescribed burns are routinely carried out. This paper describes the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS to estimate and map change in the forest understorey following a prescribed burn. Eighteen descriptive metrics are derived from bi-temporal TLS which are used to analyse and visualise change in a control and fire-altered plot. Metrics derived are Above Ground Height-based (AGH percentiles and heights, point count and mean intensity. Metrics such as AGH50change, mean AGHchange and point countchange are sensitive enough to detect subtle fire-induced change (28%–52% whilst observing little or no change in the control plot (0–4%. A qualitative examination with field measurements of the spatial distribution of burnt areas and percentage area burnt also show similar patterns. This study is novel in that it examines the behaviour of TLS metrics for estimating and mapping fire induced change in understorey structure in a single-scan mode with a minimal fixed reference system. Further, the TLS-derived metrics can be used to produce high resolution maps of change in the understorey landscape.

  7. Sparse Density, Leaf-Off Airborne Laser Scanning Data in Aboveground Biomass Component Prediction

    Ville Kankare

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for cost-efficient forest aboveground biomass (AGB prediction methods is growing worldwide. The National Land Survey of Finland (NLS began collecting airborne laser scanning (ALS data throughout Finland in 2008 to provide a new high-detailed terrain elevation model. Similar data sets are being collected in an increasing number of countries worldwide. These data sets offer great potential in forest mapping related applications. The objectives of our study were (i to evaluate the AGB component prediction accuracy at a resolution of 300 m2 using sparse density, leaf-off ALS data (collected by NLS derived metrics as predictor variables; (ii to compare prediction accuracies with existing large-scale forest mapping techniques (Multi-source National Forest Inventory, MS-NFI based on Landsat TM satellite imagery; and (iii to evaluate the accuracy and effect of canopy height model (CHM derived metrics on AGB component prediction when ALS data were acquired with multiple sensors and varying scanning parameters. Results showed that ALS point metrics can be used to predict component AGBs with an accuracy of 29.7%–48.3%. AGB prediction accuracy was slightly improved using CHM-derived metrics but CHM metrics had a more clear effect on the estimated bias. Compared to the MS-NFI, the prediction accuracy was considerably higher, which was caused by differences in the remote sensing data utilized.

  8. Serous retinal detachment following panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) using Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulator

    Azar, Georges; Wolff, Benjamin; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report a case of serous retinal detachment after Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) treatment in a diabetic woman. Methods: A 34-year-old diabetic woman presented with florid diabetic retinopathy after a miscarriage during the 20th week of pregnancy. Her Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) was 20/40 right eye (OD) and 20/30 left eye (OS). Fundus exam showed multiple microaneurysms, large blot hemorrhages and venous dilation both eyes (OU). Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) revealed large areas of capillary nonperfusion and panretinal neovascularisation in all quadrants OU. Macular Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography scan (SD-OCT) did not show any foveal thickening. Panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) was immediately performed OU during the same day. Results: Two days after PASCAL treatment, her BCVA decreased to 20/80 OU and worsened to Count Fingers (CF) during the following days. Fundus exam revealed an extensive serous retinal detachment confirmed on SD-OCT. 2 sub-conjunctival injections of 0.1 ml Betamethasone were done OU. One month later, BCVA improved to 20/30 and SD-OCT confirmed regression of retinal detachment. Conclusions: PASCAL is considered to be a safe treatment, but one has to be aware of its potential side effects. It has to be used with caution in pregnant women.

  9. Bi-resonant scanning mirror with piezoresistive position sensor for WVGA laser projection systems

    Drabe, Christian; Kallweit, David; Dreyhaupt, André; Grahmann, Jan; Schenk, Harald; Davis, Wyatt

    2012-03-01

    Fraunhofer IPMS developed a new type of small-sized scanning mirror for Laser projection systems in mobile applications. The device consists of a single crystal mirror plate of 1 mm diameter in a gimbal mounting enabling a bi-resonant oscillation of both axes at a resonance frequency of about 100 Hz and 27 kHz respectively. The mechanical scan angle (MSA) achieved is +/- 7° for the slow and +/- 12° for the fast axis. The mirror angle position and phase can be read out via two piezo-resistive sensors located at the torsion axes. In order to allow for a minimum device size of the resonantly driven slow axis the sensor of the inner fast axis was connected by a new kind of thin silicon conductors. Those are created by means of an etch stop in TMAH etch and kept as thin as possible in order to reduce their contribution to the mechanical stiffness of the mirror-supporting structures. This new system enables to lead six (or even more) independent electrical potentials onto the moving parts of the device, whereas the mechanical properties are mainly determined by only 2 torsion axes. The devices were subsequently characterized and tested. Technology details, simulation results, pictures of the device and the new conductor structures as well as measurement results are presented.

  10. Automated Analysis of Barley Organs Using 3D Laser Scanning: An Approach for High Throughput Phenotyping

    Stefan Paulus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R2 = 0:99 for the leaf area and R2 = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored.

  11. Automated analysis of barley organs using 3D laser scanning: an approach for high throughput phenotyping.

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R(2) = 0:99 for the leaf area and R(2) = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored. PMID:25029283

  12. Calculation of laser pulse distribution maps for corneal reshaping with a scanning beam

    Manns, Fabrice; Shen, Jin-Hui; Soederberg, Per G.; Matsui, Takaaki; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1995-05-01

    A method for calculating pulse distribution maps for scanning laser corneal surgery is presented. The accuracy, the smoothness of the corneal shape, and the duration of surgery were evaluated for corrections of myopia by using computer simulations. The accuracy and the number of pulses were computed as a function of the beam diameter, the diameter of the treatment zone, and the amount of attempted flattening. The ablation is smooth when the spot overlap is 80% or more. The accuracy does not depend on the beam diameter or on the diameter of the ablation zone when the ablation zone is larger than 5 mm. With an overlap of 80% and an ablation zone larger than 5 mm, the error is 5% of the attempted flattening, and 610 pulses are needed per Diopter of correction with a beam diameter of 1 mm. Pulse maps for the correction of astigmatism were computed and evaluated. The simulations show that with 60% overlap, a beam diameter of 1 mm, and a 5 mm treatment zone, 6 D of astigmatism can be corrected with an accuracy better than 1.8 D. This study shows that smooth and accurate ablations can be produced with a scanning spot.

  13. Comparison of pain scores between patients undergoing panretinal photocoagulation using navigated or pattern scan laser systems

    Umit Ubeyt Inan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare the pain responses of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR undergoing panretinal photocoagulation (PRP using either pattern scan laser (PASCAL or navigated laser photocoagulation (NAVILAS. Methods: Patients diagnosed with PDR were randomly assigned to undergo either PASCAL or NAVILAS photocoagulation treatment. PRP was performed using the multi-shot mode with a spot size of 200-400 µm and a pulse duration of 30 ms to obtain a white-grayish spot on the retina. Parameters were identical in both procedures. After 30 min of PRP application, patients were asked to verbally describe their pain perception as either "none," "mild," "moderate," "severe," or "very severe" using a verbal rating scale (VRS and visual analog scale (VAS by indicating a score from "0" to "10," representing the severity of pain from "no pain" to "severe pain." Results: A total of 60 eyes of 60 patients (20 females and 40 males diagnosed with PDR were treated. The mean age of patients was 62.22 ± 9.19 years, and the mean diabetes duration was 195.47 ± 94.54 months. The mean number of laser spots delivered during PRP was 389.47 ± 71.52 in the NAVILAS group and 392.70 ± 54.33 in the PASCAL group (p=0.57. The difference in pain responses between patients in the NAVILAS and PASCAL groups was significant with regard to the mean VRS (1.10 ± 0.67 and 1.47 ± 0.69, respectively; p=0.042 and mean VAS (2.13 ± 1.17 and 2.97 ± 1.35, respectively; p=0.034 scores. Conclusions: Pain responses in patients undergoing PRP with a 30-ms pulse duration were significantly milder in the NAVILAS group than in the PASCAL group.

  14. 2D numerical modelling of the gas temperature in a high-temperature high-power strontium atom laser excited by nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a He-SrBr2 mixture

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2014-05-01

    Assuming axial symmetry and a uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed numerically for determination of the gas temperature in the case of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in He-SrBr2 formed in a newly-designed large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge-free zone, in order to find the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. The model determines the gas temperature of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  15. Morphological Changes Along a Dike Landside Slope Sampled by 4d High Resolution Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Herrero-Huertaa, Mónica; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Ponsioen, Luc; van Damme, Myron

    2016-06-01

    Emergence of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology provides new tools for geomorphologic studies improving spatial and temporal resolution of data sampling hydrogeological instability phenomena. Specifically, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) collects high resolution 3D point clouds allowing more accurate monitoring of erosion rates and processes, and thus, quantify the geomorphologic change on vertical landforms like dike landside slopes. Even so, TLS captures observations rapidly and automatically but unselectively. In this research, we demonstrate the potential of TLS for morphological change detection, profile creation and time series analysis in an emergency simulation for characterizing and monitoring slope movements in a dike. The experiment was performed near Schellebelle (Belgium) in November 2015, using a Leica Scan Station C10. Wave overtopping and overflow over a dike were simulated whereby the loading conditions were incrementally increased and 14 successful scans were performed. The aim of the present study is to analyse short-term morphological dynamic processes and the spatial distribution of erosion and deposition areas along a dike landside slope. As a result, we are able to quantify the eroded material coming from the impact on the terrain induced by wave overtopping which caused the dike failure in a few minutes in normal storm scenarios (Q = 25 l/s/m) as 1.24 m3. As this shows that the amount of erosion is measurable using close range techniques; the amount and rate of erosion could be monitored to predict dike collapse in emergency situation. The results confirm the feasibility of the proposed methodology, providing scalability to a comprehensive analysis over a large extension of a dike (tens of meters).

  16. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  17. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    Yazaki, Akio [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Yokohama Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kanagawa 244-0817 (Japan); Kim, Chanju [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chan, Jacky [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Mahjoubfar, Ata [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Goda, Keisuke, E-mail: goda@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Watanabe, Masahiro [Yokohama Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kanagawa 244-0817 (Japan); Jalali, Bahram [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-23

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  18. Digital Terrain Models from Mobile Laser Scanning Data in Moravian Karst

    Tyagur, N.; Hollaus, M.

    2016-06-01

    During the last ten years, mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a very popular and efficient technology for capturing reality in 3D. A 3D laser scanner mounted on the top of a moving vehicle (e.g. car) allows the high precision capturing of the environment in a fast way. Mostly this technology is used in cities for capturing roads and buildings facades to create 3D city models. In our work, we used an MLS system in Moravian Karst, which is a protected nature reserve in the Eastern Part of the Czech Republic, with a steep rocky terrain covered by forests. For the 3D data collection, the Riegl VMX 450, mounted on a car, was used with integrated IMU/GNSS equipment, which provides low noise, rich and very dense 3D point clouds. The aim of this work is to create a digital terrain model (DTM) from several MLS data sets acquired in the neighbourhood of a road. The total length of two covered areas is 3.9 and 6.1 km respectively, with an average width of 100 m. For the DTM generation, a fully automatic, robust, hierarchic approach was applied. The derivation of the DTM is based on combinations of hierarchical interpolation and robust filtering for different resolution levels. For the generation of the final DTMs, different interpolation algorithms are applied to the classified terrain points. The used parameters were determined by explorative analysis. All MLS data sets were processed with one parameter set. As a result, a high precise DTM was derived with high spatial resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 m. The quality of the DTMs was checked by geodetic measurements and visual comparison with raw point clouds. The high quality of the derived DTM can be used for analysing terrain changes and morphological structures. Finally, the derived DTM was compared with the DTM of the Czech Republic (DMR 4G) with a resolution of 5 x 5 m, which was created from airborne laser scanning data. The vertical accuracy of the derived DTMs is around 0.10 m.

  19. Processing of airborne laser scanning data to generate accurate DTM for floodplain wetland

    Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Mirosław-Świątek, Dorota; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Michałowski, Robert; Kardel, Ignacy

    2015-10-01

    Structure of the floodplain, especially its topography and vegetation, influences the overland flow and dynamics of floods which are key factors shaping ecosystems in surface water-fed wetlands. Therefore elaboration of the digital terrain model (DTM) of a high spatial accuracy is crucial in hydrodynamic flow modelling in river valleys. In this study the research was conducted in the unique Central European complex of fens and marshes - the Lower Biebrza river valley. The area is represented mainly by peat ecosystems which according to EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) are called "water-dependent ecosystems". Development of accurate DTM in these areas which are overgrown by dense wetland vegetation consisting of alder forest, willow shrubs, reed, sedges and grass is very difficult, therefore to represent terrain in high accuracy the airborne laser scanning data (ALS) with scanning density of 4 points/m2 was used and the correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM was executed. This correction was performed utilizing remotely sensed images, topographical survey using the Real Time Kinematic positioning and vegetation height measurements. In order to classify different types of vegetation within research area the object based image analysis (OBIA) was used. OBIA allowed partitioning remotely sensed imagery into meaningful image-objects, and assessing their characteristics through spatial and spectral scale. The final maps of vegetation patches that include attributes of vegetation height and vegetation spectral properties, utilized both the laser scanning data and the vegetation indices developed on the basis of airborne and satellite imagery. This data was used in process of segmentation, attribution and classification. Several different vegetation indices were tested to distinguish different types of vegetation in wetland area. The OBIA classification allowed correction of the "vegetation effect" on DTM. The final digital terrain model was compared and examined

  20. Linking water surface roughness to velocity patterns using terrestrial laser scanning and acoustic doppler velocimetry

    Heritage, George; Milan, David; Entwistle, Neil

    2010-05-01

    There are well established links between water surface characteristics and hydraulics. Biotope identification is currently an important part of the River Habitat Survey in England and Wales. Their differentiation is based upon recognition of a family of flow features exhibited on the water surface. Variability in this water surface ‘roughness' is dependent upon the interaction of flow with boundary roughness and flow depth. Past research that has attempted to differentiate biotopes based upon differences in Froude number (Fr) and Reynolds number (Re), however this linkage has only been limited to local analysis between flow velocity, depth and roughness. Milan et al. (2010) have recently demonstrated that terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) can be applied to produce fully quantitative maps of hydraulic habitat, based upon defined water surface roughness delimeters. However the nature of the linkages between water surface roughness, flow velocity and depth are still poorly understood, particularly at the reach-scale. This study attempts to provide a full spatial picture of the links between water surface roughness, flow depth and velocity. A Sontek Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) was used to provide detailed information on vertical velocity and water depth for a 300 m reach of the gravel-bed River Wharfe, Yorkshire, UK. Simultaneous to the ADVP measurements, a Riegl LMS-Z210 TLS was used to take a series of first return scans of the water surface. Categorisation of the point cloud elevation data for the water surface was achieved through the allocation of moving window standard deviation values to a regular grid, thus defining water surface roughness. The ADVP data demonstrate gross reach-scale variation in velocity and depth linked to bedforms, and more localised spatial and temporal variation within biotope units. The ADVP data was used to produce reach-scale maps of Fr and Re. The extent to which water surface roughness defined biotopes mapped onto these

  1. The illuminating role of laser scanning digital elevation models in precision agriculture experimental designs - an agro-ecology perspective

    Laser scanning data streams, when linked with multi-spectral, hyperspectral, apparent soil electro-conductivity (ECa), or other kinds of geo-referenced data streams, aid in the creation of maps that allow useful applications in agricultural systems. These combinations of georeferenced information p...

  2. Airborne laser scanning of forest resources: An overview of research in Italy as a commentary case study

    Montaghi, Alessandro; Corona, Piermaria; Dalponte, Michele; Gianelle, Damiano; Chirici, Gherardo; Olsson, Håkan

    2013-08-01

    This article reviews the recent literature concerning airborne laser scanning for forestry purposes in Italy, and presents the current methodologies used to extract forest characteristics from discrete return ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning) data. Increasing interest in ALS data is currently being shown, especially for remote sensing-based forest inventories in Italy; the driving force for this interest is the possibility of reducing costs and providing more accurate and efficient estimation of forest characteristics. This review covers a period of approximately ten years, from the first application of laser scanning for forestry purposes in 2003 to the present day, and shows that there are numerous ongoing research activities which use these technologies for the assessment of forest attributes (e.g., number of trees, mean tree height, stem volume) and ecological issues (e.g., gap identification, fuel model detection). The basic approaches - such as single tree detection and area-based modeling - have been widely examined and commented in order to explore the trend of methods in these technologies, including their applicability and performance. Finally this paper outlines and comments some of the common problems encountered in operational use of laser scanning in Italy, offering potentially useful guidelines and solutions for other countries with similar conditions, under a rather variable environmental framework comprising Alpine, temperate and Mediterranean forest ecosystems.

  3. Plastic-to-Elastic Transition in Aggregated Emulsion Networks, Studied with Atomic Force Microscopy-Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy Microrheology

    Filip, D.; Duits, M.H.G.; Uricanu, V.I.; Mellema, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how the simultaneous application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) can be used to characterize the (local) rheological properties of soft condensed matter at micrometer length scales. Measurement of AFM force curves as a func

  4. Accuracy in estimation of timber assortments and stem distribution - A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning techniques

    Kankare, Ville; Vauhkonen, Jari; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko; Joensuu, Marianna; Krooks, Anssi; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu; Alho, Petteri; Viitala, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Detailed information about timber assortments and diameter distributions is required in forest management. Forest owners can make better decisions concerning the timing of timber sales and forest companies can utilize more detailed information to optimize their wood supply chain from forest to factory. The objective here was to compare the accuracies of high-density laser scanning techniques for the estimation of tree-level diameter distribution and timber assortments. We also introduce a method that utilizes a combination of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning in timber assortment estimation. The study was conducted in Evo, Finland. Harvester measurements were used as a reference for 144 trees within a single clear-cut stand. The results showed that accurate tree-level timber assortments and diameter distributions can be obtained, using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or a combination of TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS). Saw log volumes were estimated with higher accuracy than pulpwood volumes. The saw log volumes were estimated with relative root-mean-squared errors of 17.5% and 16.8% with TLS and a combination of TLS and ALS, respectively. The respective accuracies for pulpwood were 60.1% and 59.3%. The differences in the bucking method used also caused some large errors. In addition, tree quality factors highly affected the bucking accuracy, especially with pulpwood volume.

  5. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP

    Müller, L.N.; de Brouwer, J.F.C.; Almeida, J.S.; Stal, L.J.; Xavier, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This commun

  6. Analysis of calibration-free wavelength-scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy for practical gas sensing using tunable diode lasers

    A novel strategy has been developed for analysis of wavelength-scanned, wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with tunable diode lasers (TDLs). The method simulates WMS signals to compare with measurements to determine gas properties (e.g., temperature, pressure and concentration of the absorbing species). Injection-current-tuned TDLs have simultaneous wavelength and intensity variation, which severely complicates the Fourier expansion of the simulated WMS signal into harmonics of the modulation frequency (fm). The new method differs from previous WMS analysis strategies in two significant ways: (1) the measured laser intensity is used to simulate the transmitted laser intensity and (2) digital lock-in and low-pass filter software is used to expand both simulated and measured transmitted laser intensities into harmonics of the modulation frequency, WMS-nfm (n = 1, 2, 3,…), avoiding the need for an analytic model of intensity modulation or Fourier expansion of the simulated WMS harmonics. This analysis scheme is valid at any optical depth, modulation index, and at all values of scanned-laser wavelength. The method is demonstrated and validated with WMS of H2O dilute in air (1 atm, 296 K, near 1392 nm). WMS-nfm harmonics for n = 1 to 6 are extracted and the simulation and measurements are found in good agreement for the entire WMS lineshape. The use of 1f-normalization strategies to realize calibration-free wavelength-scanned WMS is also discussed. (paper)

  7. 2D solar modeling

    Ventura, P; Li, L; Sofia, S; Basu, S; Demarque, P

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the cyclic variation of the total solar irradiance is one of the most challenging targets of modern astrophysics. These studies prove to be essential also for a more climatologic issue, associated to the global warming. Any attempt to determine the solar components of this phenomenon must include the effects of the magnetic field, whose strength and shape in the solar interior are far from being completely known. Modelling the presence and the effects of a magnetic field requires a 2D approach, since the assumption of radial symmetry is too limiting for this topic. We present the structure of a 2D evolution code that was purposely designed for this scope; rotation, magnetic field and turbulence can be taken into account. Some preliminary results are presented and commented.

  8. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for coastal geomorphologic research questions in western Greece

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Curdt, Constanze; Tilly, Nora; Ntageretzis, Konstantin; Aasen, Helge; Vött, Andreas; Bareth, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Coasts are areas of permanent change, influenced by gradual changes and sudden impacts. In particular, western Greece is a tectonically active region, due to the nearby plate boundary of the Hellenic Arc. The region has suffered from numerous earthquakes and tsunamis during prehistoric and historic times and is thus characterized by a high seismic and tsunami hazard risk. Additionally, strong winter storms may reach considerable dimensions. In this study, terrestrial laser scanning was applied for (i) annual change detection at seven coastal areas of western Greece for three years (2009-2011) and (ii) accurate parameter detection of large boulders, dislocated by high-energy wave impacts. The Riegl LMS-Z420i laser scanner was used in combination with a precise DGPS system (Topcon HiPer Pro) for all surveys. Each scan position and a further target were recorded for georeferencing and merging of the point clouds. (i) For the annual detection of changes, reference points for the base station of the DGPS system were marked. High-resolution digital elevation models (HRDEM) were generated from each dataset of the different years and are compared to each other, resulting in mass balances. (ii) 3D-models of dislocated boulders were reconstructed and parameters (e.g. volume in combination with density measurements, distance and height above present sea-level) were derived for the solution of wave transport equations, which estimate the minimum wave height or velocity that is necessary for boulder movement. (i) Our results show that annual changes are detectable by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning. In general, volumetric changes and affected areas are quantifiable and maps of changes can be established. On exposed beach areas, bigger changes were detectable, where seagrass and sand is eroded and gravel accumulated. In opposite, only minor changes for elevated areas are derived. Dislocated boulders on several sites showed no movement. At coastal areas with a high

  9. Application of Bessel beams to 2D microfabrication

    Fs laser-based two-photon polymerisation (2PP) has been widely reported as a means of directly writing three-dimensional nanoscale structures. Usually the voxel of a high numerical aperture microscope objective is scanned through the resin to build up the required model. In the case of high aspect ratio two-dimensional structures, such as cell scaffolds, repeated scanning is required to build up the height. The voxel shape can be substantially elongated by the inclusion of an axicon lens in the laser beam line. In this report we describe the use of a Bessel beam produced in the region beyond the focus of an objective lens when the beam has been modified in this way. A Ti:sapphire laser was used to write a range of 2D square cell structures in a Zr-loaded sol-gel system. The process was characterised, in terms of the dimensions of the polymerised Bessel region, for different processing conditions. Examples of the structures are also described

  10. Application of Bessel beams to 2D microfabrication

    Li, X.-F.; Winfield, R. J.; O'Brien, S.; Crean, G. M.

    2009-03-01

    Fs laser-based two-photon polymerisation (2PP) has been widely reported as a means of directly writing three-dimensional nanoscale structures. Usually the voxel of a high numerical aperture microscope objective is scanned through the resin to build up the required model. In the case of high aspect ratio two-dimensional structures, such as cell scaffolds, repeated scanning is required to build up the height. The voxel shape can be substantially elongated by the inclusion of an axicon lens in the laser beam line. In this report we describe the use of a Bessel beam produced in the region beyond the focus of an objective lens when the beam has been modified in this way. A Ti:sapphire laser was used to write a range of 2D square cell structures in a Zr-loaded sol-gel system. The process was characterised, in terms of the dimensions of the polymerised Bessel region, for different processing conditions. Examples of the structures are also described.

  11. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  12. VOXEL-BASED APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING URBAN TREE VOLUME FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING DATA

    C. Vonderach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of single trees and the determination of related parameters has been recognized in recent years, e.g. for forest inventories or management. For urban areas an increasing interest in the data acquisition of trees can be observed concerning aspects like urban climate, CO2 balance, and environmental protection. Urban trees differ significantly from natural systems with regard to the site conditions (e.g. technogenic soils, contaminants, lower groundwater level, regular disturbance, climate (increased temperature, reduced humidity and species composition and arrangement (habitus and health status and therefore allometric relations cannot be transferred from natural sites to urban areas. To overcome this problem an extended approach was developed for a fast and non-destructive extraction of branch volume, DBH (diameter at breast height and height of single trees from point clouds of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS. For data acquisition, the trees were scanned with highest scan resolution from several (up to five positions located around the tree. The resulting point clouds (20 to 60 million points are analysed with an algorithm based on voxel (volume elements structure, leading to an appropriate data reduction. In a first step, two kinds of noise reduction are carried out: the elimination of isolated voxels as well as voxels with marginal point density. To obtain correct volume estimates, the voxels inside the stem and branches (interior voxels where voxels contain no laser points must be regarded. For this filling process, an easy and robust approach was developed based on a layer-wise (horizontal layers of the voxel structure intersection of four orthogonal viewing directions. However, this procedure also generates several erroneous "phantom" voxels, which have to be eliminated. For this purpose the previous approach was extended by a special region growing algorithm. In a final step the volume is determined layer-wise based on the

  13. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  14. Diameter distribution estimation with laser scanning based multisource single tree inventory

    Kankare, Ville; Liang, Xinlian; Vastaranta, Mikko; Yu, Xiaowei; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-10-01

    Tree detection and tree species recognition are bottlenecks of the airborne remote sensing-based single tree inventories. The effect of these factors in forest attribute estimation can be reduced if airborne measurements are aided with tree mapping information that is collected from the ground. The main objective here was to demonstrate the use of terrestrial laser scanning-derived (TLS) tree maps in aiding airborne laser scanning-based (ALS) single tree inventory (multisource single tree inventory, MS-STI) and its capability in predicting diameter distribution in various forest conditions. Automatic measurement of TLS point clouds provided the tree maps and the required reference information from the tree attributes. The study area was located in Evo, Finland, and the reference data was acquired from 27 different sample plots with varying forest conditions. The workflow of MS-STI included: (1) creation of automatic tree map from TLS point clouds, (2) automatic diameter at breast height (DBH) measurement from TLS point clouds, (3) individual tree detection (ITD) based on ALS, (4) matching the ITD segments to the field-measured reference, (5) ALS point cloud metric extraction from the single tree segments and (6) DBH estimation based on the derived metrics. MS-STI proved to be accurate and efficient method for DBH estimation and predicting diameter distribution. The overall accuracy (root mean squared error, RMSE) of the DBH was 36.9 mm. Results showed that the DBH accuracy decreased if the tree density (trees/ha) increased. The highest accuracies were found in old-growth forests (tree densities less than 500 stems/ha). MS-STI resulted in the best accuracies regarding Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.)-dominated forests (RMSE of 29.9 mm). Diameter distributions were predicted with low error indices, thereby resulting in a good fit compared to the reference. Based on the results, diameter distribution estimation with MS-STI is highly dependent on the forest

  15. A reference-free micro defect visualization using pulse laser scanning thermography and image processing

    Yang, Jinyeol; Choi, Jaemook; Hwang, Soonkyu; An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2016-08-01

    As quality control of micro devices and early detection of micro defects in these devices are becoming increasingly important, the demand for a fast and automated online inspection technique to detect micro defects with high spatial resolution is increasing. In this study, a reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm is developed based on laser scanning thermography to detect micro defects in devices instantaneously and automatically with high spatial resolution. A pulse modulated continuous wave laser generates thermal waves in a target device, and the corresponding thermal responses are recorded by an infrared (IR) camera. When the thermal wave encounters a micro defect, the propagation of the thermal wave is blocked at the interface of the micro defect. The blockage of the thermal wave is detected by the proposed reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm. First, an edge detection algorithm is applied to a raw thermal image obtained at a specific time point to extract the thermal discontinuities formed at the boundaries of the defect. The edge images obtained from all time sequences are then assembled into a single accumulated edge image to accentuate defect-induced thermal disturbances in the form of edge features. Finally, the accumulated edge image is automatically processed using a binary imaging algorithm to visualize the micro defect in the target device. The performance of the proposed reference-free micro defect visualization algorithm is examined using two types of specimens, semiconductor chips and ceramic-epoxy composites. The proposed algorithm successfully diagnoses micro defects ranging from 4 μm to 40 μm in width.

  16. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  17. Possibilities of CT Scanning as Analysis Method in Laser Additive Manufacturing

    Karme, Aleksis; Kallonen, Aki; Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing is an established and constantly developing technique. Structural assessment should be a key component to ensure directed evolution towards higher level of manufacturing. The macroscopic properties of metallic structures are determined by their internal microscopic features, which are difficult to assess using conventional surface measuring methodologies. X-ray microtomography (CT) is a promising technique for three-dimensional non-destructive probing of internal composition and build of various materials. Aim of this study is to define the possibilities of using CT scanning as quality control method in LAM fabricated parts. Since the parts fabricated with LAM are very often used in high quality and accuracy demanding applications in various industries such as medical and aerospace, it is important to be able to define the accuracy of the build parts. The tubular stainless steel test specimens were 3D modelled, manufactured with a modified research AM equipment and imaged after manufacturing with a high-power, high-resolution CT scanner. 3D properties, such as surface texture and the amount and distribution of internal pores, were also evaluated in this study. Surface roughness was higher on the interior wall of the tube, and deviation from the model was systematically directed towards the central axis. Pore distribution showed clear organization and divided into two populations; one following the polygon model seams along both rims, and the other being associated with the concentric and equidistant movement path of the laser. Assessment of samples can enhance the fabrication by guiding the improvement of both modelling and manufacturing process.

  18. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods.

    Kim, Changjae; Habib, Ayman; Pyeon, Muwook; Kwon, Goo-rak; Jung, Jaehoon; Heo, Joon

    2016-01-01

    Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1) reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2) considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3) works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes' high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information. PMID:26805849

  19. Segmentation of Planar Surfaces from Laser Scanning Data Using the Magnitude of Normal Position Vector for Adaptive Neighborhoods

    Changjae Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse approaches to laser point segmentation have been proposed since the emergence of the laser scanning system. Most of these segmentation techniques, however, suffer from limitations such as sensitivity to the choice of seed points, lack of consideration of the spatial relationships among points, and inefficient performance. In an effort to overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a segmentation methodology that: (1 reduces the dimensions of the attribute space; (2 considers the attribute similarity and the proximity of the laser point simultaneously; and (3 works well with both airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. A neighborhood definition based on the shape of the surface increases the homogeneity of the laser point attributes. The magnitude of the normal position vector is used as an attribute for reducing the dimension of the accumulator array. The experimental results demonstrate, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations, the outcomes’ high level of reliability. The proposed segmentation algorithm provided 96.89% overall correctness, 95.84% completeness, a 0.25 m overall mean value of centroid difference, and less than 1° of angle difference. The performance of the proposed approach was also verified with a large dataset and compared with other approaches. Additionally, the evaluation of the sensitivity of the thresholds was carried out. In summary, this paper proposes a robust and efficient segmentation methodology for abstraction of an enormous number of laser points into plane information.

  20. Design and vibration analysis of a piezoelectric-actuated MEMS scanning mirror and its application to laser projection

    This study presents the design and analysis of a two-axis scanner driven by lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) ceramic. The proposed device consists of a silicon-based MEMS scanning mirror and a bulk-type piezoelectric actuator. The MEMS process involves three masks. The experimental results showed that the fast and slow frequencies at resonance are 29.6 kHz and 4.8 kHz, respectively. For the fast scan, the scanning angle is 46.9 degrees at a driving voltage of 10 V. For the slow scan, the scanning angle is 22.6 degrees at a driving voltage of 20 V. A multi-DOF vibration model was developed to analyze the scanning characteristics of the device. The numerical simulations, including the resonance frequency, scanning angle and the mode coupling phenomenon, were validated with the experimental observations. This study also develops a laser projection module integrated with the scanning device. The module can receive a video content with a resolution of 720 p and project a 16:9 image that is 19 inches in diagonal at a projection distance of 600 mm. (paper)