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Sample records for 2d airfoil section

  1. Aeroelastic Stability of a 2D Airfoil Section equipped with a Trailing Edge Flap

    Bergami, Leonardo

    Recent studies conclude that important reduction of the fatigue loads encountered by a wind turbine blade can be achieved using a deformable trailing edge control system. The focus of the current work is to determine the effect of this flap-like system on the aeroelastic stability of a 2D airfoil...... section. A simulation tool is implemented to predict the flow speed at which a flap equipped section may become unstable, either due to flutter or divergence. First, the stability limits of the airfoil without flap are determined, and, in the second part of the work, a deformable trailing edge flap is...

  2. Aeroelastic Stability of a 2D Airfoil Section equipped with a Trailing Edge Flap

    Bergami, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies conclude that important reduction of the fatigue loads encountered by a wind turbine blade can be achieved using a deformable trailing edge control system. The focus of the current work is to determine the effect of this flap-like system on the aeroelastic stability of a 2D airfoil section. A simulation tool is implemented to predict the flow speed at which a flap equipped section may become unstable, either due to flutter or divergence. First, the stability limits of the airfo...

  3. Aeroservoelastic stability of a 2D airfoil section equipped with a trailing edge flap

    Bergami, Leonardo

    2008-11-15

    Recent studies conclude that important reduction of the fatigue loads encountered by a wind turbine blade can be achieved using a deformable trailing edge control system. The focus of the current work is to determine the effect of this flap-like system on the aeroelastic stability of a 2D airfoil section. A simulation tool is implemented to predict the flow speed at which a flap equipped section may become unstable, either due to flutter or divergence. First, the stability limits of the airfoil without flap are determined, and, in the second part of the work, a deformable trailing edge flap is applied. Stability is investigated for the uncontrolled flap, and for three different control algorithms. The three controls are tuned for fatigue load alleviation and they are based on, respectively, measurement of the heave displacement and velocity, measurement of the local angle of attack, measurement of the pressure difference between the two sides of the airfoil. The stability of the aeroservoelastic system in a defined equilibrium state, and for a given flow speed, is then determined by solving an eigenvalue problem. Results show that the trailing edge control system modifies significantly the stability limits of the section. In the investigated case, increased flutter limits are reported when the elastic flap is left without control, whereas, by applying any of the control algorithms, the flutter velocity is reduced. Nevertheless, only in the heave control case the flutter limit becomes critically close to normal operation flow speeds. Furthermore, a marked dependence of the stability limits on the control gain is also observed and, by tuning the gain parameters, flutter and divergence can be suppressed for flow speed even above the flutter velocity encountered with uncontrolled flap. (author)

  4. Numerical prediction of shock induced oscillations over a 2D airfoil: Influence of turbulence modelling and test section walls

    The present study deals with recent numerical results from on-going research conducted at ONERA/DMAE regarding the prediction of transonic flows, for which shock wave/boundary layer interaction is important. When this interaction is strong enough (M ≥ 1.3), shock induced oscillations (SIO) appear at the suction side of the airfoil and lead to the formation of unsteady separated areas. The main issue is then to perform unsteady computations applying appropriate turbulence modelling and relevant boundary conditions with respect to the test case. Computations were performed with the ONERA elsA software and the URANS-type approach, closure relationships being achieved from transport-equation models. Applications are provided for the OAT15A airfoil data base, well documented for unsteady CFD validation (mean and r.m.s. pressure, phase-averaged LDA data, ...). In this paper, the capabilities of turbulence models are evaluated with two 2D URANS strategies, under free-stream or confined conditions. The latter takes into account the adaptive upper and lower wind-tunnel walls. A complete 3D URANS simulation was then performed to demonstrate the real impact of all lateral wind-tunnel walls on such a flow

  5. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils

  6. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D...... Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils....

  7. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling

  8. Validation of DYSTOOL for unsteady aerodynamic modeling of 2D airfoils

    González, A.; Gomez-Iradi, S.; Munduate, X.

    2014-06-01

    From the point of view of wind turbine modeling, an important group of tools is based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory using 2D aerodynamic calculations on the blade elements. Due to the importance of this sectional computation of the blades, the National Renewable Wind Energy Center of Spain (CENER) developed DYSTOOL, an aerodynamic code for 2D airfoil modeling based on the Beddoes-Leishman model. The main focus here is related to the model parameters, whose values depend on the airfoil or the operating conditions. In this work, the values of the parameters are adjusted using available experimental or CFD data. The present document is mainly related to the validation of the results of DYSTOOL for 2D airfoils. The results of the computations have been compared with unsteady experimental data of the S809 and NACA0015 profiles. Some of the cases have also been modeled using the CFD code WMB (Wind Multi Block), within the framework of a collaboration with ACCIONA Windpower. The validation has been performed using pitch oscillations with different reduced frequencies, Reynolds numbers, amplitudes and mean angles of attack. The results have shown a good agreement using the methodology of adjustment for the value of the parameters. DYSTOOL have demonstrated to be a promising tool for 2D airfoil unsteady aerodynamic modeling.

  9. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a method to determine flutter and divergence instability limits for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil section fitted with an actively controlled trailing edge flap. This flap consists of a deformable trailing edge, which deformation is governed by control algorithms based on measurements of either heave displacement, local angle of attack or aerodynamic pressure difference measured over the airfoil. The purpose of the controlled deformable flap is to reduce fluctuations in th...

  10. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...

  11. New airfoil sections for straight bladed turbine

    A theoretical investigation of aerodynamic performance for vertical axis Darrieus wind turbine with new airfoils sections is carried out. The blade section aerodynamics characteristics are determined from turbomachines cascade model. The model is also adapted to the vertical Darrieus turbine for the performance prediction of the machine. In order to choose appropriate value of zero-lift-drag coefficient in calculation, an analytical expression is introduced as function of chord-radius ratio and Reynolds numbers. New airfoils sections are proposed and analyzed for straight-bladed turbine

  12. Turbine airfoil having outboard and inboard sections

    Mazzola, Stefan; Marra, John J

    2015-03-17

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and formed from at least an outboard section and an inboard section such that an inner end of the outboard section is attached to an outer end of the inboard section. The outboard section may be configured to provide a tip having adequate thickness and may extend radially inward from the tip with a generally constant cross-sectional area. The inboard section may be configured with a tapered cross-sectional area to support the outboard section.

  13. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces and a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-07-15

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory, and the deflection of the airfoil is given by superposition of chordwise deflection mode shapes. It is shown from the expressions for the forces, that the influence from the shed vorticity in the wake is described by the same time-lag for all chordwise positions on the airfoil. This time-lag term can be approximated using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use of Duhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can be used for various applications which up to now have been possible only using much more computational costly methods. The propulsive performance of a soft heaving propulsor, and the influence of airfoil camberline elasticity on the flutter limit are two computational examples given in the report that highlight this feature. (au)

  14. Unsteady 2D potential-flow forces on a thin variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion

    Gaunaa, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report analytical expressions for the unsteady 2D force distribution on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by itscamberline as in classic thin-airfoil theory...... using an indicial function approach, making the practical calculation of the aerodynamic response numerically very efficient by use ofDuhamel superposition. Furthermore, the indicial function expressions for the time-lag terms are formulated in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use...... of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stabilityanalysis. The analytical expressions for the forces simplify to all previously known steady and unsteady thin-airfoil solutions. Apart from the obvious applications within active load control/reduction, the current theory can...

  15. Profile catalogue for airfoil sections based on 3D computations

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    This report is a continuation of the Wind Turbine Airfoil Catalogue [1] which objective was, firstly to provide a database of aerodynamic characteristics for a wide range of airfoil profiles aimed at wind turbine applications, and secondly to test thetwo-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D...... and the actual fluid flow, and thereby the incorrect prediction of airfoil characteristics. In addition, other features of the flow solver, such astransition and turbulence modelling, and their influence onto the numerical results are investigated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the evaluation of...... airfoil aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the use of the Navier-Stokes solver for fluid flowcalculations in general....

  16. 2-D and 3-D CFD Investigation of NREL S826 Airfoil at Low Reynolds Numbers

    In this study CFD investigation of flow over the NREL S826 airfoil is performed. NREL S826 airfoil was designed for HAWTs of 10-15 meter diameters. However, it is used in the NTNU wind turbine rotor model and low Reynolds number flow characteristics become important in the validations with the test cases of this rotor model. The airfoil CFD simulations are carried out in 2-D and 3-D computational domains. The k-rn SST turbulence model with Langtry-Menter (γ-Reθ) transition prediction model for turbulence closure is used in the calculations. The Delayed DES is also performed in the stall region for comparisons. The results are compared with the available METUWIND experimental data, and are shown to be in fair agreement. It is observed that 3-D CFD analysis provides increased accuracy at increased computational cost

  17. Mach number validation of a new zonal CFD method (ZAP2D) for airfoil simulations

    Strash, Daniel J.; Summa, Michael; Yoo, Sungyul

    1991-01-01

    A closed-loop overlapped velocity coupling procedure has been utilized to combine a two-dimensional potential-flow panel code and a Navier-Stokes code. The fully coupled two-zone code (ZAP2D) has been used to compute the flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.84 near the two-dimensional airfoil C(lmax) point for a Reynolds number of 3 million. For these cases, the grid domain size can be reduced to 3 chord lengths with less than 3-percent loss in accuracy for freestream Mach numbers through 0.8. Earlier validation work with ZAP2D has demonstrated a reduction in the required Navier-Stokes computation time by a factor of 4 for subsonic Mach numbers. For this more challenging condition of high lift and Mach number, the saving in CPU time is reduced to a factor of 2.

  18. Profile catalogue for airfoil sections based on 3D

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2006-12-15

    This report is a continuation of the Wind Turbine Airfoil Catalogue which objective was, firstly to provide a database of aerodynamic characteristics for a wide range of airfoil profiles aimed at wind turbine applications, and secondly to test the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D by comparing its results with experimental data. In the present work, the original two-dimensional results are compared with three-dimensional calculations as it was surmised that the two-dimensional assumption might be in some cases responsible for discrepancies between the numerical flow solution and the actual fluid flow, and thereby the incorrect prediction of airfoil characteristics. In addition, other features of the flow solver, such as transition and turbulence modelling, and their influence onto the numerical results are investigated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the evaluation of airfoil aerodynamic characteristics, as well as the use of the Navier-Stokes solver for fluid flow calculations in general. (au)

  19. Analysis of viscous transonic flow over airfoil sections

    Huff, Dennis L.; Wu, Jiunn-Chi; Sankar, L. N.

    1987-01-01

    A full Navier-Stokes solver has been used to model transonic flow over three airfoil sections. The method uses a two-dimensional, implicit, conservative finite difference scheme for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented as prescribed for the Viscous Transonic Airfoil Workshop to be held at the AIAA 25th Aerospace Sciences Meeting. The NACA 0012, RAE 2822 and Jones airfoils have been investigated for both attached and separated transonic flows. Predictions for pressure distributions, loads, skin friction coefficients, boundary layer displacement thickness and velocity profiles are included and compared with experimental data when possible. Overall, the results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Airfoil

    Ristau, Neil; Siden, Gunnar Leif

    2015-07-21

    An airfoil includes a leading edge, a trailing edge downstream from the leading edge, a pressure surface between the leading and trailing edges, and a suction surface between the leading and trailing edges and opposite the pressure surface. A first convex section on the suction surface decreases in curvature downstream from the leading edge, and a throat on the suction surface is downstream from the first convex section. A second convex section is on the suction surface downstream from the throat, and a first convex segment of the second convex section increases in curvature.

  1. Aero-elastic stability of airfoil flow using 2-D CFD

    Johansen, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A three degrees-of-freedom structural dynamics model has been coupled to a two-dimensional incompressible CFD code. The numerical investigation considers aero-elastic stability for two different airfoils; the NACA0012 and the LM 2 18 % airfoils. Stable and unstable configurations and limit cycle oscillations are predicted in accordance with literature for the first airfoil. An attempt to predict stall induced edge-wise vibrations on a wind turbine airfoil fails using this two-dimensional approach. (au)

  2. A parametric study of quasi-2D LES on Low-Reynolds-number transitional flows past an airfoil

    Low-Reynolds-number aerodynamic performance of small sized air vehicles is an area of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate low-Reynolds-number flows past an SD7003 airfoil to understand substantial viscous features of laminar separation and transitional flow followed by the intractable behavior of reattachment. In order to satisfy the three-dimensional (3D) requirement of the code, a simple '3D wing' is constructed from a two-dimensional (2D) airfoil and only four grid points are used in the spanwise direction. A parametric study of quasi-2D LES on the low-Reynolds-number airfoil flows at Re=60000 is performed. Effects of grid resolution and sub-grid scale (SGS) models are investigated. Although three-dimensional effects cannot be accurately captured, the quasi-2D LES calculations do reveal some important flow characteristics such as leading edge laminar separation and vortex shedding from the primary laminar separation bubble on the low-Reynolds-number airfoil. (author)

  3. 2-D Circulation Control Airfoil Benchmark Experiments Intended for CFD Code Validation

    Englar, Robert J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Allan, Brian G.; Lin, Johb C.

    2009-01-01

    A current NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project being conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) personnel and NASA collaborators includes the development of Circulation Control (CC) blown airfoils to improve subsonic aircraft high-lift and cruise performance. The emphasis of this program is the development of CC active flow control concepts for both high-lift augmentation, drag control, and cruise efficiency. A collaboration in this project includes work by NASA research engineers, whereas CFD validation and flow physics experimental research are part of NASA s systematic approach to developing design and optimization tools for CC applications to fixed-wing aircraft. The design space for CESTOL type aircraft is focusing on geometries that depend on advanced flow control technologies that include Circulation Control aerodynamics. The ability to consistently predict advanced aircraft performance requires improvements in design tools to include these advanced concepts. Validation of these tools will be based on experimental methods applied to complex flows that go beyond conventional aircraft modeling techniques. This paper focuses on recent/ongoing benchmark high-lift experiments and CFD efforts intended to provide 2-D CFD validation data sets related to NASA s Cruise Efficient Short Take Off and Landing (CESTOL) study. Both the experimental data and related CFD predictions are discussed.

  4. Investigation of a bio-inspired lift-enhancing effector on a 2D airfoil.

    Johnston, Joe; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2012-09-01

    A flap mounted on the upper surface of an airfoil, called a 'lift-enhancing effector', has been shown in wind tunnel tests to have a similar function to a bird's covert feathers, which rise off the wing's surface in response to separated flows. The effector, fabricated from a thin Mylar sheet, is allowed to rotate freely about its leading edge. The tests were performed in the NCSU subsonic wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4 × 10(5). The maximum lift coefficient with the effector was the same as that for the clean airfoil, but was maintained over an angle-of-attack range from 12° to almost 20°, resulting in a very gentle stall behavior. To better understand the aerodynamics and to estimate the deployment angle of the free-moving effector, fixed-angle effectors fabricated out of stiff wood were also tested. A progressive increase in the stall angle of attack with increasing effector angle was observed, with diminishing returns beyond the effector angle of 60°. Drag tests on both the free-moving and fixed effectors showed a marked improvement in drag at high angles of attack. Oil flow visualization on the airfoil with and without the fixed-angle effectors proved that the effector causes the separation point to move aft on the airfoil, as compared to the clean airfoil. This is thought to be the main mechanism by which an effector improves both lift and drag. A comparison of the fixed-effector results with those from the free-effector tests shows that the free effector's deployment angle is between 30° and 45°. When operating at and beyond the clean airfoil's stall angle, the free effector automatically deploys to progressively higher angles with increasing angles of attack. This slows down the rapid upstream movement of the separation point and avoids the severe reduction in the lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient that are seen on the clean airfoil at the onset of stall. Thus, the effector postpones the stall by 4-8° and makes the

  5. Investigation of a bio-inspired lift-enhancing effector on a 2D airfoil

    A flap mounted on the upper surface of an airfoil, called a ‘lift-enhancing effector’, has been shown in wind tunnel tests to have a similar function to a bird's covert feathers, which rise off the wing's surface in response to separated flows. The effector, fabricated from a thin Mylar sheet, is allowed to rotate freely about its leading edge. The tests were performed in the NCSU subsonic wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4 × 105. The maximum lift coefficient with the effector was the same as that for the clean airfoil, but was maintained over an angle-of-attack range from 12° to almost 20°, resulting in a very gentle stall behavior. To better understand the aerodynamics and to estimate the deployment angle of the free-moving effector, fixed-angle effectors fabricated out of stiff wood were also tested. A progressive increase in the stall angle of attack with increasing effector angle was observed, with diminishing returns beyond the effector angle of 60°. Drag tests on both the free-moving and fixed effectors showed a marked improvement in drag at high angles of attack. Oil flow visualization on the airfoil with and without the fixed-angle effectors proved that the effector causes the separation point to move aft on the airfoil, as compared to the clean airfoil. This is thought to be the main mechanism by which an effector improves both lift and drag. A comparison of the fixed-effector results with those from the free-effector tests shows that the free effector's deployment angle is between 30° and 45°. When operating at and beyond the clean airfoil's stall angle, the free effector automatically deploys to progressively higher angles with increasing angles of attack. This slows down the rapid upstream movement of the separation point and avoids the severe reduction in the lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient that are seen on the clean airfoil at the onset of stall. Thus, the effector postpones the stall by 4–8° and makes

  6. Predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of 2D airfoil and the performance of 3D wind turbine using a CFD code

    Despite of the laminar-turbulent transition region co-exist with fully turbulence region around the leading edge of an airfoil, still lots of researchers apply to fully turbulence models to predict aerodynamic characteristics. It is well known that fully turbulent model such as standard k-model couldn't predict the complex stall and the separation behavior on an airfoil accurately, it usually leads to over prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics such as lift and drag forces. So, we apply correlation based transition model to predict aerodynamic performance of the NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Phase IV wind turbine. And also, compare the computed results from transition model with experimental measurement and fully turbulence results. Results are presented for a range of wind speed, for a NREL Phase IV wind turbine rotor. Low speed shaft torque, power, root bending moment, aerodynamic coefficients of 2D airfoil and several flow field figures results included in this study. As a result, the low speed shaft torque predicted by transitional turbulence model is very good agree with the experimental measurement in whole operating conditions but fully turbulent model(K- ε) over predict the shaft torque after 7m/s. Root bending moment is also good agreement between the prediction and experiments for most of the operating conditions, especially with the transition model

  7. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Mankbadi, Mina

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tip vortex flow from a NACA0012 airfoil, pitched periodically at various frequencies, is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel. Initially, data for stationary airfoil held fixed at various angles-of-attack are gathered. Flow visualization pictures as well as detailed cross-sectional properties areobtained at various streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity as well as various turbulent stresses. Preliminary data are also acquired for periodically pitched airfoil. These results are briefly presented in this extended abstract.

  8. ICEG2D (v2.0) - An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils With Ice Accretion

    Thompson David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated geometry/grid/simulation software package, ICEG2D, is being developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single- and multi-element airfoils with ice accretions. The current version, ICEG213 (v2.0), was designed to automatically perform four primary functions: (1) generate a grid-ready surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generate high-quality structured and generalized grids starting from a defined surface definition, (3) generate the input and restart files needed to run the structured grid CFD solver NPARC or the generalized grid CFD solver HYBFL2D, and (4) using the flow solutions, generate solution-adaptive grids. ICEG2D (v2.0) can be operated in either a batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line within a Unix shell. This report summarizes activities completed in the first two years of a three-year research and development program to address automation issues related to CFD simulations for airfoils with ice accretions. As well as describing the technology employed in the software, this document serves as a users manual providing installation and operating instructions. An evaluation of the software is also presented.

  9. Nonlinear angle control of a sectioned airfoil by using shape memory alloys

    Abreu G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work illustrates an application of shape memory alloys and nonlinear controller applied to the active angular control of a sectioned airfoil. The main objective of the proposed control system is to modify the shape of the profile based on a reference angle. The change of the sectioned airfoil angle is resultant by the effect of shape memory of the alloy due to heating of the wire caused by an electric current that changes its temperature by Joule effect. Considering the presence of plant’s nonlinear effects, especially in the mathematical model of the alloy, this work proposes the application of an on-off control system.

  10. 2D Numerical Investigation of the Laminar and Turbulent Flow Over Different Airfoils Using OpenFOAM

    Rahimi, H.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the prediction capabilities of the turbulence models and the transition model kkl-ω available in OpenFOAM and to achieve a database of airfoil aerodynamical characteristics. The airfoils chosen for the simulations are FX 79-W- 15A and NACA 63-430, which are widely used in wind turbines. The numerically obtained lift and drag coefficients are compared with available experimental results. A quantitative and qualitative study is conducted to determine the influence of meshing strategies, computational time step together with interpolation and temporal schemes. Two Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes models (RANS models) are used, which are the k-ω SST model by Menter and the kkl-ω model (which involves transition modeling) by Walters and Davor.

  11. 2D Numerical Investigation of the Laminar and Turbulent Flow Over Different Airfoils Using OpenFOAM

    The aim of this work is to assess the prediction capabilities of the turbulence models and the transition model kkl-ω available in OpenFOAM and to achieve a database of airfoil aerodynamical characteristics. The airfoils chosen for the simulations are FX 79-W- 15A and NACA 63-430, which are widely used in wind turbines. The numerically obtained lift and drag coefficients are compared with available experimental results. A quantitative and qualitative study is conducted to determine the influence of meshing strategies, computational time step together with interpolation and temporal schemes. Two Reynolds Averaged Navier- Stokes models (RANS models) are used, which are the k-ω SST model by Menter and the kkl-ω model (which involves transition modeling) by Walters and Davor

  12. Assessment of the performance of various airfoil sections on power generation from a wind turbine using the blade element momentum theory

    Chen, Xiaomin; Agarwal, Ramesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) is a function of the number of blades, the tip speed ratio (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity) and the lift to drag ratio (CL /CD) of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD) for a given blade and ratio and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. In this study, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given blade and ratio and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter.

  13. Assessment of the performance of various airfoil sections on power generation from a wind turbine using the blade element momentum theory

    Xiaomin Chen, Ramesh Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the power generated by a Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT is a function of the number of blades B, the tip speed ratio λ (blade tip speed/wind free stream velocity and the lift to drag ratio (CL /CD of the airfoil sections of the blade. The airfoil sections used in HAWT are generally thick airfoils such as the S, DU, FX, Flat-back and NACA 6-series of airfoils. These airfoils vary in (CL /CD for a given B and λ, and therefore the power generated by HAWT for different blade airfoil sections will vary. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the effect of different airfoil sections on HAWT performance using the Blade Element Momentum (BEM theory. In this study, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750 and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and λ and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated by the turbine can be significantly increased. Parametric studies are also conducted by varying the turbine diameter.

  14. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  15. Derivation of airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade based on 3D CFD rotor calculations

    Bak, C.; Soerensen, N.N.; Madsen, H.A. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for the LM 19.1 blade are derived from 3D CFD computations on a full-scale 41-m rotor. Based on 3D CFD the force distributions on the blades are determined, from which airfoil characteristics are derived using the momentum theory. The final airfoil characteristics are constructed using both wind tunnel measurements and 3D CFD. Compared to 2D wind tunnel measurements they show a low lift in stall for the airfoil sections at the tip. At the airfoil sections at the inner part of the blade, they show a high lift in stall. At about 60% radius the lift agrees well to 2D wind tunnel measurements. Aero-elastic calculations using the final airfoil characteristics show good agreement to measured power and flap moments. Furthermore, a fatigue load analysis shows a reduction of up to 15% of the load compared to commonly used data. (au)

  16. Effect of Flap Deflection on Section Characteristics of S813 Airfoil; Period of Performance: 1993--1994

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of small deflections of a 30% chord, simple flap on the section characteristics of a tip airfoil, the S813, designed for 20- to 30-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been evaluated theoretically. The decrease in maximum lift coefficient due to leading-edge roughness increases in magnitude with increasing, positive flap deflection and with decreasing Reynolds number.

  17. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    Zaman, KBMQ; Fagan, A. F.; Mankbadi, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a tip vortex from a NACA0012 airfoil is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4x10(exp 4). Initially, data for a stationary airfoil held at various angles-of-attack (alpha) are gathered. Detailed surveys are done for two cases: alpha=10 deg with attached flow and alpha=25 deg with massive flow separation on the upper surface. Distributions of various properties are obtained using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity and turbulent stresses at various streamwise locations. For all cases, the vortex core is seen to involve a mean velocity deficit. The deficit apparently traces to the airfoil wake, part of which gets wrapped by the tip vortex. At small alpha, the vortex is laminar within the measurement domain. The strength of the vortex increases with increasing alpha but undergoes a sudden drop around alpha (is) greater than 16 deg. The drop in peak vorticity level is accompanied by transition and a sharp rise in turbulence within the core. Data are also acquired with the airfoil pitched sinusoidally. All oscillation cases pertain to a mean alpha=15 deg while the amplitude and frequency are varied. An example of phase-averaged data for an amplitude of +/-10 deg and a reduced frequency of k=0.2 is discussed. All results are compared with available data from the literature shedding further light on the complex dynamics of the tip vortex.

  18. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe;

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel...

  19. A PIV study of separated flow around a 2-D airfoil at high angles of attack in a low speed wind tunnel

    Holm, R.; Gustavsson, Jonas

    1999-08-01

    Wind tunnel tests were carried out in order to acquire experimental data for validation of numerical results from Navier-Stokes calculations (CFD-simulations) on airfoils at high angles of attack. The tests were performed on the 21% thick FFA-W3-211 airfoil geometry, 2-dimensional wind tunnel model with 0.45 m chord and 2 m span. The purpose of the study was to examine the flow field around the airfoil at 8 deg and 15 deg angle of attack, in particular to determine the position of the separation and the recirculating region. The wind tunnel tests were carried out at Re=1.25 million. The used measurement techniques were pressure measurement, oil flow visualisation and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry). The boundary layer transition was trigged at a fixed position (x/c=0.026 on the suction side and x/c=0.312 on the pressure side) by means of an adhesive zigzag tape. The uncertainties regarding the position of transition was thereby reduced. Based on the velocity vector field obtained by the PIV data the velocity profile, boundary layer quantities and the back-flow coefficient were derived. The back-flow coefficient was then used as a criterion for separation. The conclusions of the study were: The flow field was determined by PIV and available for comparison with CFD-results. Based on the velocity field the separation position, the velocity profile at different chordwise positions and boundary layer quantities were derived. The separation position, for 15 deg angle of attack, was determined in the PIV measurements to x/c 0.39{+-}0.03 and in the pressure measurements to x/c = 0.40{+-}0.05 and somewhat subjectively in the oil flow to x/c >> 0.42. The data are available on file format for comparison with CFD results.

  20. CFD aerodynamic analysis of non-conventional airfoil sections for very large rotor blades

    The aerodynamic performance of flat-back and elliptically shaped airfoils is analyzed on the basis of CFD simulations. Incompressible and low-Mach preconditioned compressible unsteady simulations have been carried out using the k-w SST and the Spalart Allmaras turbulence models. Time averaged lift and drag coefficients are compared to wind tunnel data for the FB 3500-1750 flat back airfoil while amplitudes and frequencies are also recorded. Prior to separation averaged lift is well predicted while drag is overestimated keeping however the trend in the tests. The CFD models considered, predict separation with a 5° delay which is reflected on the load results. Similar results are provided for a modified NACA0035 with a rounded (elliptically shaped) trailing edge. Finally as regards the dynamic characteristics in the load signals, there is fair agreement in terms of Str number but significant differences in terms of lift and drag amplitudes

  1. A parameter identification problem arising from a two-dimensional airfoil section model

    The development of state space models for aeroelastic systems, including unsteady aerodynamics, is particularly important for the design of highly maneuverable aircraft. In this work we present a state space formulation for a special class of singular neutral functional differential equations (SNFDE) with initial data in C(-1, 0). This work is motivated by the two-dimensional airfoil model presented by Burns, Cliff and Herdman in. In the same authors discuss the validity of the assumptions under which the model was formulated. They pay special attention to the derivation of the evolution equation for the circulation on the airfoil. This equation was coupled to the rigid-body dynamics of the airfoil in order to obtain a complete set of functional differential equations that describes the composite system. The resulting mathematical model for the aeroelastic system has a weakly singular component. In this work we consider a finite delay approximation to the model presented in. We work with a scalar model in which we consider the weak singularity appearing in the original problem. The main goal of this work is to develop numerical techniques for the identification of the parameters appearing in the kernel of the associated scalar integral equation. Clearly this is the first step in the study of parameter identification for the original model and the corresponding validation of this model for the aeroelastic system

  2. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    Bertagnolio, F.; Soerensen, N.; Johansen, J.; Fuglsang, P.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which air-foils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so. The airfoils are classified according to the agreement between the numerical results and experimental data. A study correlating the available data and this classification is performed. It is found that transition modelling is to a large extent responsible for the poor quality of the computational results for most of the considered airfoils. The transition model mechanism that leads to these discrepancies is identified. Some advices are given for elaborating future airfoil design processes that would involve the numerical code EllipSys2D in particular, and transition modelling in general. (au)

  3. Estimating elastic moduli of rocks from thin sections: Digital rock study of 3D properties from 2D images

    Saxena, Nishank; Mavko, Gary

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of elastic rock moduli using 2D plane strain computations from thin sections has several numerical and analytical advantages over using 3D rock images, including faster computation, smaller memory requirements, and the availability of cheap thin sections. These advantages, however, must be weighed against the estimation accuracy of 3D rock properties from thin sections. We present a new method for predicting elastic properties of natural rocks using thin sections. Our method is based on a simple power-law transform that correlates computed 2D thin section moduli and the corresponding 3D rock moduli. The validity of this transform is established using a dataset comprised of FEM-computed elastic moduli of rock samples from various geologic formations, including Fontainebleau sandstone, Berea sandstone, Bituminous sand, and Grossmont carbonate. We note that using the power-law transform with a power-law coefficient between 0.4-0.6 contains 2D moduli to 3D moduli transformations for all rocks that are considered in this study. We also find that reliable estimates of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocity (Vs) trends can be obtained using 2D thin sections.

  4. Evaluation of Wind-Tunnel Test Section for Airfoils and Bodies

    Popelka, Lukáš; Matějka, M.; Šimurda, David; Součková, Natálie

    Prague : Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR, v. v. i., 2011 - (Příhoda, J.; Kozel, K.), s. 1-4 ISBN 978-80-87012-32-1. [Topical Problems of Fluid Mechanics 2011. Praha (CZ), 16.02.2011-17.02.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1112; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : wind tunnel * experimental aerodynamics * airfoil characterisitics Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  5. A Wind Tunnel Experiment for Trailing Edge Circulation Control on a 6 Percent 2-D Airfoil up to Transonic Mach Numbers

    Alexander, Michael G.; Anders, Scott G.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted on a six percent thick slightly cambered elliptical circulation control airfoil with both upper and lower surface blowing. Parametric evaluations of jet slot heights and Coanda surface shapes were conducted at mass flow coefficients (C(sub mu)) from 0.0 to 0.12. The test data was acquired in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.8 and 0.3 at Reynolds numbers per foot of 1.05 x 10(exp 6) and 2.43 x 10(exp 5) respectively. For the transonic condition, (Mach = 0.8 at alpha = +3 deg), it was generally found that the smaller slot and larger Coanda surface were more effective overall than other slot/Coanda surface combinations. Generally it was found at Mach = 0.3 at alpha = 6 deg that the smaller slot and smaller Coanda surface were more effective overall than other slot/Coanda surface combinations.

  6. An Empirical Method Permitting Rapid Determination of the Area, Rate and Distribution of Water-Drop Impingement on an Airfoil of Arbitrary Section at Subsonic Speeds

    Bergrun, N. R.

    1951-01-01

    An empirical method for the determination of the area, rate, and distribution of water-drop impingement on airfoils of arbitrary section is presented. The procedure represents an initial step toward the development of a method which is generally applicable in the design of thermal ice-prevention equipment for airplane wing and tail surfaces. Results given by the proposed empirical method are expected to be sufficiently accurate for the purpose of heated-wing design, and can be obtained from a few numerical computations once the velocity distribution over the airfoil has been determined. The empirical method presented for incompressible flow is based on results of extensive water-drop. trajectory computations for five airfoil cases which consisted of 15-percent-thick airfoils encompassing a moderate lift-coefficient range. The differential equations pertaining to the paths of the drops were solved by a differential analyzer. The method developed for incompressible flow is extended to the calculation of area and rate of impingement on straight wings in subsonic compressible flow to indicate the probable effects of compressibility for airfoils at low subsonic Mach numbers.

  7. Airfoil structure

    Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

    1998-01-01

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  8. Aerodynamic response of an airfoil section undergoing pitch motion and trailing edge flap deflection: a comparison of simulation methods

    Bergami, Leonardo; Riziotis, Vasilis A.; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    generated by the airfoil undergoing harmonic pitching motions and harmonic flap deflections. The unsteady aerodynamic coefficients exhibit significant variations over the corresponding steady-state values. The dynamic characteristics of the unsteady response are predicted with an excellent agreement among...

  9. Fast multi-core based multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets

    Pielot Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solving bioinformatics tasks often requires extensive computational power. Recent trends in processor architecture combine multiple cores into a single chip to improve overall performance. The Cell Broadband Engine (CBE, a heterogeneous multi-core processor, provides power-efficient and cost-effective high-performance computing. One application area is image analysis and visualisation, in particular registration of 2D cross-sections into 3D image datasets. Such techniques can be used to put different image modalities into spatial correspondence, for example, 2D images of histological cuts into morphological 3D frameworks. Results We evaluate the CBE-driven PlayStation 3 as a high performance, cost-effective computing platform by adapting a multimodal alignment procedure to several characteristic hardware properties. The optimisations are based on partitioning, vectorisation, branch reducing and loop unrolling techniques with special attention to 32-bit multiplies and limited local storage on the computing units. We show how a typical image analysis and visualisation problem, the multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets, benefits from the multi-core based implementation of the alignment algorithm. We discuss several CBE-based optimisation methods and compare our results to standard solutions. More information and the source code are available from http://cbe.ipk-gatersleben.de. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the CBE processor in a PlayStation 3 accelerates computational intensive multimodal registration, which is of great importance in biological/medical image processing. The PlayStation 3 as a low cost CBE-based platform offers an efficient option to conventional hardware to solve computational problems in image processing and bioinformatics.

  10. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Soerensen, N.N.; Aagaard Madsen, H. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wen Zhong Shen; Noerkaer Soerensen, J. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Airfoil characteristics for use in the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method calculating the forces on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT) are derived by use of systematic methods. The investigation and derivation of the airfoil characteristics are based on four different methods: 1) Inverse momentum theory, 2) Actuator disc theory, 3) Numerical optimisation and 4) Quasi-3D CFD computations. The two former methods are based on 3D CFD computations and wind tunnel measurements on a 41-m full-scale rotor with LM 19.1 blades. The derived airfoil characteristics show that the lift coefficient in stall at the tip is low and that it is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. The use of these characteristics in aeroelastic calculations shows a good agreement in power and flap moments with measurements. Furthermore, a fatigue analysis shows a reduction in the loads of up to 15 % compared to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFD computations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves is derived that can be used to calculate mean values of power and loads. The lift in stall at the tip is low and at the root it is high compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. In particular the power curves were well calculated by use of the optimised airfoil characteristics. In the quasi-3D CFD computations, the airfoil characteristics are derived directly. This Navier-Stokes model takes into account rotational and 3D effects. The model enables the study of the rotational effect of a rotor blade at computing costs similar to what is typical for 2D airfoil calculations. The depicted results show that the model is capable of determining the correct qualitative behaviour for airfoils subject to rotation. The method shows that lift is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil

  11. 2D Cross Sectional Analysis and Associated Electrochemistry of Composite Electrodes Containing Dispersed Agglomerates of Nanocrystalline Magnetite, Fe₃O₄.

    Bock, David C; Kirshenbaum, Kevin C; Wang, Jiajun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jun; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-06-24

    When electroactive nanomaterials are fully incorporated into an electrode structure, characterization of the crystallite sizes, agglomerate sizes, and dispersion of the electroactive materials can lend insight into the complex electrochemistry associated with composite electrodes. In this study, composite magnetite electrodes were sectioned using ultramicrotome techniques, which facilitated the direct observation of crystallites and agglomerates of magnetite (Fe3O4) as well as their dispersal patterns in large representative sections of electrode, via 2D cross sectional analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Further, the electrochemistry of these electrodes were recorded, and Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) was used to determine the distribution of oxidation states of the reduced magnetite. Unexpectedly, while two crystallite sizes of magnetite were employed in the production of the composite electrodes, the magnetite agglomerate sizes and degrees of dispersion in the two composite electrodes were similar to each other. This observation illustrates the necessity for careful characterization of composite electrodes, in order to understand the effects of crystallite size, agglomerate size, and level of dispersion on electrochemistry. PMID:26024206

  12. Characterizing 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections in mylonites using a modified version of the Saltykov method

    Lopez-Sanchez, Marco; Llana-Fúnez, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of creep behaviour in rocks requires knowledge of 3D grain size distributions (GSD) that result from dynamic recrystallization processes during deformation. The methods to estimate directly the 3D grain size distribution -serial sectioning, synchrotron or X-ray-based tomography- are expensive, time-consuming and, in most cases and at best, challenging. This means that in practice grain size distributions are mostly derived from 2D sections. Although there are a number of methods in the literature to derive the actual 3D grain size distributions from 2D sections, the most popular in highly deformed rocks is the so-called Saltykov method. It has though two major drawbacks: the method assumes no interaction between grains, which is not true in the case of recrystallised mylonites; and uses histograms to describe distributions, which limits the quantification of the GSD. The first aim of this contribution is to test whether the interaction between grains in mylonites, i.e. random grain packing, affects significantly the GSDs estimated by the Saltykov method. We test this using the random resampling technique in a large data set (n = 12298). The full data set is built from several parallel thin sections that cut a completely dynamically recrystallized quartz aggregate in a rock sample from a Variscan shear zone in NW Spain. The results proved that the Saltykov method is reliable as long as the number of grains is large (n > 1000). Assuming that a lognormal distribution is an optimal approximation for the GSD in a completely dynamically recrystallized rock, we introduce an additional step to the Saltykov method, which allows estimating a continuous probability distribution function of the 3D grain size population. The additional step takes the midpoints of the classes obtained by the Saltykov method and fits a lognormal distribution with a trust region using a non-linear least squares algorithm. The new protocol is named the two-step method. The

  13. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  14. geomIO: A tool for geodynamicists to turn 2D cross-sections into 3D geometries

    Baumann, Tobias; Bauville, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    In numerical deformation models, material properties are usually defined on elements (e.g., in body-fitted finite elements), or on a set of Lagrangian markers (Eulerian, ALE or mesh-free methods). In any case, geometrical constraints are needed to assign different material properties to the model domain. Whereas simple geometries such as spheres, layers or cuboids can easily be programmed, it quickly gets complex and time-consuming to create more complicated geometries for numerical model setups, especially in three dimensions. geomIO (geometry I/O, http://geomio.bitbucket.org/) is a MATLAB-based library that has two main functionalities. First, it can be used to create 3D volumes based on series of 2D vector drawings similar to a CAD program; and second, it uses these 3D volumes to assign material properties to the numerical model domain. The drawings can conveniently be created using the open-source vector graphics software Inkscape. Adobe Illustrator is also partially supported. The drawings represent a series of cross-sections in the 3D model domain, for example, cross-sectional interpretations of seismic tomography. geomIO is then used to read the drawings and to create 3D volumes by interpolating between the cross-sections. In the second part, the volumes are used to assign material phases to markers inside the volumes. Multiple volumes can be created at the same time and, depending on the order of assignment, unions or intersections can be built to assign additional material phases. geomIO also offers the possibility to create 3D temperature structures for geodynamic models based on depth dependent parameterisations, for example the half space cooling model. In particular, this can be applied to geometries of subducting slabs of arbitrary shape. Yet, geomIO is held very general, and can be used for a variety of applications. We present examples of setup generation from pictures of micro-scale tectonics and lithospheric scale setups of 3D present-day model

  15. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    Hua YANG; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran; Hong, Zedong; Liu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamics performance, but the reliability of airfoil data is an important factor to improve the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power using a BEM code. The airfoil characteristics used in BEM codes are mostly based on 2D wind tunnel measurements of airfoils with constant span. However, a BEM code using airfoil data obtained directly from 2D wind tunnel measurements will not yield the...

  16. Airfoil characteristics for wind turbines

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    1999-01-01

    the tip is low and that it is high at the root compared to 2D airfoil characteristics. The use of these characteristics in aeroelastic calculations shows agood agreement in power and flap moments with measurements. Furthermore, a fatigue analysis shows a reduction in the loads of up to 15 % compared...... to a commonly used set of airfoil characteristics. The numerical optimisation is based on both the 3D CFDcomputations and measurements on a 41-m rotor with LM 19.1 and LM 19.0 blades, respectively. The method requires power and loads from a turbine and is promising since a set of lift and drag curves...

  17. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  18. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  19. Airfoils and method for designing airfoils

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to airfoils and design and design optimization of airfoils, in particular airfoils of rotor blades for wind turbines. One aspect of the invention relates to an airfoil with an external shape provided by an airfoil profile defined by a limited number of parameters, such...... as a set of parameters. Another aspect of the invention relates to a method for designing an airfoil by means of an analytical airfoil profile, said method comprising the step of applying a conformal mapping to a near circle in a near circle plane, wherein the near circle is at least partly expressed...... by means of an analytical function, said conformal mapping transforming the near circle in the near circle plane to the airfoil profile in an airfoil plane. L...

  20. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  1. Composite airfoil assembly

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  2. Adjoint Airfoil Optimization of Darrieus-Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Fuchs, Roman; Nordborg, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We present the feasibility of using an adjoint solver to optimize the torque of a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). We start with a 2D cross section of a symmetrical airfoil and restrict us to low solidity ratios to minimize blade vortex interactions. The adjoint solver of the ANSYS FLUENT software package computes the sensitivities of airfoil surface forces based on a steady flow field. Hence, we find the torque of a full revolution using a weighted average of the sensitivities at different wind speeds and angles of attack. The weights are computed analytically, and the range of angles of attack is given by the tip speed ratio. Then the airfoil geometry is evolved, and the proposed methodology is evaluated by transient simulations.

  3. Theoretical calculation of the partial cross section for first vibrational excitation in He-H2(D2,T2) collisions

    Shen Guang-Xian; Linghu Rong-Feng; Wang Rong-Kai; Yang Xiang-Dong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, close-coupling method was applied to the He-H2(D2,T2) system, and the first vibrational excitation differences of these partial wave cross sections, this paper have obtained the change rules of the partial wave cross sections with increases of quantum number, and with change of reduced mass of system. Based on the calculation,influence on the partial wave cross sections brought by the variations in the reduced mass of systems and in the relative kinetic energy of incident atoms is discussed.

  4. Diviseurs de la forme 2D-G sans sections et rang de la multiplication dans les corps finis (Divisors of the form 2D-G without sections and bilinear complexity of multiplication in finite fields)

    Randriam, Hugues

    2011-01-01

    Let X be an algebraic curve, defined over a perfect field, and G a divisor on X. If X has sufficiently many points, we show how to construct a divisor D on X such that l(2D-G)=0, of essentially any degree such that this is compatible the Riemann-Roch theorem. We also generalize this construction to the case of a finite number of constraints, l(k_i.D-G_i)=0, where |k_i|\\leq 2. Such a result was previously claimed by Shparlinski-Tsfasman-Vladut, in relation with the Chudnovsky-Chudnovsky method for estimating the bilinear complexity of the multiplication in finite fields based on interpolation on curves; unfortunately, as noted by Cascudo et al., their proof was flawed. So our work fixes the proof of Shparlinski-Tsfasman-Vladut and shows that their estimate m_q\\leq 2(1+1/(A(q)-1)) holds, at least when A(q)\\geq 5. We also fix a statement of Ballet that suffers from the same problem, and then we point out a few other possible applications.

  5. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  6. Reinforced Airfoil Shaped Body

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to an airfoil shaped body with a leading edge and a trailing edge extending along the longitudinal extension of the body and defining a profile chord, the airfoil shaped body comprising an airfoil shaped facing that forms the outer surface of the airfoil shaped body...

  7. Wind tunnel tests of the Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21 and Risoe-A1-24 airfoils

    Fuglsang, P.; Dahl, K.S.; Antoniou, I.

    1999-06-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21 and Risoe-A1-24 airfoils. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel was used having a background turbulence intensity of 1%, a flow velocity of 42 m/s and a Reynolds number of 1.6x10{sup 6}. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.60 m and a span of 1.9 m and and plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects. The measurements comprised both static and dynamic inflow where dynamic inflow was obtained by pitching the airfoil in a harmonic motion. We tested the influence of leading edge roughness, vortex generators and Gurney flaps both individually and in combination. For smooth surface conditions, all three airfoils had the desirable properties of constant lift curve slope and low drag coefficient until the maximum lift of about 1.4 was reached. The Risoe-A1-18 airfoil had a smooth post stall whereas the Risoe-A1-21 and Risoe-A1-24 airfoils had a significant drop in the lift coefficient after stall. Test on all airfoil sections mounted with zigzag tape showed that the airfoils were insensitive to leading edge roughness. However with a drop in the maximum lift coefficient to about 1.2. Mounting of delta wing shaped vortex generators and Gurney flaps showed that there was room for a significant increase in the maximum lift coefficient, which was increased to 1.90 for Risoe-A1-24 with vortex generators located at 15% chord. The combination of vortex generators and Gurney flaps increased the maximum lift coefficient to about 2.0. (au) EFP-98. 16 tabs., 98 ills., 10 refs.

  8. ZZ DLC-2D/100G, 100 Neutron-Group Cross-Section Library by SUPERTOG Calculation for ANISN, DOT

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Format: ANISN, DOT or DTF-4; Number of groups: 100; Nuclides: H, D, He, He-3, Li-6, Li-7, Be-9, B-10, B-11, C-12, N-14, O-16, Na-23, Mg, Al-27, Si, Cl, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn-55, Fe, Co-59, Ni, Cu, Cu-63, Cu-65, Nb, Mo, Ag-107, Xe-135, Cs-133, Sm-149, Eu-151, Eu-153, Gd, Dy-164, Lu-175, Lu-176, Ta-181, Ta-182, W-182, W-183, W-184, W-186, Re-185, Re-187, Au-197, Pb, Th-232, Pa-233, U-234, U-235, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, and Cm-244. Origin: The nuclides in DLC-2 are those which have been released as category I ENDF/B by the National Neutron Cross Section Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Weighting spectrum: The explicit assumption was made that the flux has the shape of a fission spectrum joined at 0.0674 MeV by a 1/E tail. Neutron transport calculations can be performed with DLC-2 data. Since the data are intended for use in multigroup discrete-ordinates or Monte Carlo transport codes which treat anisotropic scattering, possible cross section angular expansion is limited only by the options available in the particular code used. Specifically, the retrieval program manipulates DLC-2 such that it conforms to input requirements of the ANISN, DOT, or DTF-4 codes, or any computer code using data in the ANISN or DTF-4 format. The nuclides in DLC-2 are those which have been released as category I ENDF/B by the National Neutron Cross Section Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The library contains data for H, D, He, 3-He, 6-Li, 7-Li, 9-Be, 10-B, 11-B, 12-C, 14-N, 16-O, 23-Na, Mg, 27-Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, V, Cr, 55-Mn, Fe, 59-Co, Ni, Cu, 63-Cu, 65-Cu, Nb, Mo, 107-Ag, 135-Xe, 133-Cs, 149-Sm, 151-Eu, 153-Eu, Gd, 164-Dy, 175-Lu, 176-Lu, 181-Ta, 182-Ta, 182-W, 183-W, 184-W, 186-W, 185-Re, 187-Re, 197-Au, Pb, 232-Th, 233-Pa, 234-U, 235-U, 238-U, 238-Pu, 239-Pu, 240-Pu, 241-Pu, 242-Pu, 241-Am, 243-Am, and 244-Cm. 2 - Method of solution: DLC-2 was generated by SUPERTOG from nuclear data in either point

  9. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.; Antoniou, I.

    2000-12-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risoe-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel was used having a background turbulence intensity of 1%, an inlet flow velocity of 40 m/s which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1.6Oe10{sup 6}. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.600 m and 0.606 m for NACA 63-415 and NACA 63-415-Risoe-D, respectively. The span was 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects. The measurements comprised both static and dynamic inflow where dynamic inflow was obtained by pitching the airfoil in a harmonic motion. We tested the influence of leading edge roughness, stall strips and vortex generators. For smooth surface conditions the modified airfoil showed an increase in lift-drag ratio before stall at {alpha}=8 from 67 to 72. Furthermore, the maximum lift increased from 1.33 to 1.37 while the minimum drag was maintained. Double stall was observed on the NACA 63-415 airfoil, but not on the modified airfoil. This was reflected in the standard deviation of both lift and drag in stall which was significantly lower for the modified airfoil indicating smooth and stable stall conditions. No significant differences were observed for dynamic stall. Test on both airfoil sections with zigzag tape at the leading edge towards the pressure side showed that the insensitivity to roughness was improved significantly for the modified airfoil. However, if zigzag tape was mounted at the leading edge towards the suction side less improvement was observed. Mounting of stall strips at and near the leading edge showed that only if they were mounted at the very vicinity of the leading edge the airfoil characteristics were affected significantly. If the stall strips were mounted on the pressure side downstream of approximately 1 % chord length only little influence was

  10. Airfoil Shape Optimization in Transonic Flow

    A computationally efficient and adaptable design tool is constructed by coupling a flow analysis code based on Euler equations, with the well established numerical optimization algorithms. Optimization technique involving two analysis methods of Simplex and Rosenbrock have been used. The optimization study involves the minimization of wave drag for two different airfoils with geometric constraints on the airfoil maximum thickness or the cross sectional area along with aerodynamic constraint on lift coefficient. The method is applied to these airfoils transonic flow design points, and the results are compared with the original values. This study shows that the conventional low speed airfoils can be optimized to become supercritical for transonic flight speeds, while existing supercritical airfoils can still be improved further at particular design condition. (author)

  11. Multiple piece turbine engine airfoil with a structural spar

    Vance, Steven J.

    2011-10-11

    A multiple piece turbine airfoil having an outer shell with an airfoil tip that is attached to a root with an internal structural spar is disclosed. The root may be formed from first and second sections that include an internal cavity configured to receive and secure the one or more components forming the generally elongated airfoil. The internal structural spar may be attached to an airfoil tip and place the generally elongated airfoil in compression. The configuration enables each component to be formed from different materials to reduce the cost of the materials and to optimize the choice of material for each component.

  12. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  13. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  14. Research on design methods and aerodynamics performance of CQUDTU-B21 airfoil

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Wen, Zhong Shen

    This paper presents the design methods of CQU-DTU-B21 airfoil for wind turbine. Compared with the traditional method of inverse design, the new method is described directly by a compound objective function to balance several conflicting requirements for design wind turbine airfoils, which based on...... design theory of airfoil profiles, blade element momentum (BEM) theory and airfoil Self-Noise prediction model. And then an optimization model with the target of maximum power performance on a 2D airfoil and low noise emission of design ranges for angle of attack has been developed for designing CQU...

  15. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg2+ does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm−2; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg−1 DW HgCl2. It was found that at given Hg

  16. Development of a 2D laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry mapping procedure for mercury in maize (Zea mays L.) root cross-sections

    Debeljak, Marta [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Elteren, Johannes T. van, E-mail: elteren@ki.si [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna Pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LA-ICP-MS mapping to study the distribution of Hg in plant root cross-sections. •Sorption of LA-generated Hg vapour leads to serious memory effects. •Spot analysis with a delay time of 10 s in between spots alleviates memory effects. •Ablation straight through the sample simplifies calibration. •Hg{sup 2+} does not cross the endodermal root barrier of maize plants. -- Abstract: A LA-ICP-MS method based on a 213 nm Nd:YAG laser and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been developed for mapping of mercury in root cross-sections of maize (Zea mays L.) to investigate the mechanism of mercury uptake from soil and its potential translocation to the edible parts. Conventional rastering was found to be unusable due to sorption of mercury onto the internal parts of the LA device, giving rising to memory effects resulting in serious loss of resolution and inaccurate quantification. Spot analysis on a virtual grid on the surface of the root sections using washout times of 10 s in between spots greatly alleviated problems related to these memory effects. By ablating straight through the root sections on a poly(methyl methacrylate) support the calibration process was simplified as internal standardization and matrix-matching could be circumvented. Mercury-spiked freeze-drying embedding medium, sectioned similarly to the root sections, was used for the preparation of the standards. Standards and root sections were subjected to spot analysis using the following operational parameters: beam diameter, 15 μm; laser fluence, 2.5 J cm{sup −2}; repetition rate, 20 Hz; dwell time, 1 s; acquisition time, 0.1 s. The mercury peaks for standards and roots sections could be consistently integrated for quantification and construction of the 2D mercury maps for the root sections. This approach was successfully used to investigate the mercury distribution in root sections of maize grown in soil spiked to a level of 50 mg kg{sup −1} DW HgCl{sub 2}. It was

  17. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  18. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  19. Static aeroelastic response of chiral-core airfoils

    Spadoni, Alessandro; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research is being devoted to the analysis and application of cellular solids for the design of innovative structural components. The chiral geometry in particular features a unique mechanical behavior which is here exploited for the design of 2D airfoils with morphing capabilities. A coupled-physics model, comprising computational fluid dynamics and structural analyses, investigates the influence of the chiral core on the aerodynamic behavior of the airfoil. Specifically, the model ...

  20. Modeling of Airfoil Trailing Edge Flap with Immersed Boundary Method

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2011-01-01

    The present work considers incompressible flow over a 2D airfoil with a deformable trailing edge. The aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with a trailing edge flap is numerically investigated using computational fluid dynamics. A novel hybrid immersed boundary (IB) technique is applied to...... simulate the moving part of the trailing edge. Over the main fixed part of the airfoil the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using a standard body-fitted finite volume technique whereas the moving trailing edge flap is simulated with the immersed boundary method on a curvilinear mesh. The obtained...

  1. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela; Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek; Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela; Kuta, Jan; Prokeš, Lubomír; Kynický, Jindřich; Kanický, Viktor

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS.

  2. Design of the new Risoe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Fuglsang, P.; Dahl, K.S. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A new airfoil family for wind turbines was developed by use of a design method using numerical optimization and the flow solver, XFOIL. The results were evaluated with the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D. The airfoil family constitutes 6 airfoils ranging in thickness from 15% to 30%. The airfoils were designed to have a maximum lift coefficient around 1.5 in natural conditions and high lift-drag ratios below maximum lift. Insensitivity to leading edge roughness was obtained by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurred close to the leading edge just before stall. The airfoil family was designed for a 600 kW wind turbine and provides a basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  3. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases

  4. 2D elemental mapping of sections of human kidney stones using laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Possibilities and limitations

    Vašinová Galiová, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC), Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Čopjaková, Renata; Škoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Štěpánková, Kateřina; Vaňková, Michaela [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kuta, Jan [Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Masaryk University, Kamenice 126/3, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Lubomír [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kynický, Jindřich [Department of Pedology and Geology, Faculty of Forestry and Wood Technology, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 3, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-10-01

    A 213 nm Nd:YAG-based laser ablation (LA) system coupled to quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer and an ArF* excimer-based LA-system coupled to a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer were employed to study the spatial distribution of various elements in kidney stones (uroliths). Sections of the surfaces of uroliths were ablated according to line patterns to investigate the elemental profiles for the different urolith growth zones. This exploratory study was mainly focused on the distinguishing of the main constituents of urinary calculus fragments by means of LA-ICP-mass spectrometry. Changes in the ablation rate for oxalate and phosphate phases related to matrix density and hardness are discussed. Elemental association was investigated on the basis of 2D mapping. The possibility of using NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal as an external standard for calibration was tested. It is shown that LA-ICP-MS is helpful for determination of the mineralogical composition and size of all phases within the analyzed surface area, for tracing down elemental associations and for documenting the elemental content of urinary stones. LA-ICP-MS results (elemental contents and maps) are compared to those obtained with electron microprobe analysis and solution analysis ICP-MS. - Highlights: • Elements in phosphate and oxalate urolith phases were quantified by LA-ICP-MS. • SRM NIST 1486 Bone Meal was proved suitable for quantification in uroliths. • Different ablation rates in particular phases were included at quantification. • Oxalate and apatite phases show opposite hardness order to natural minerals. • Uroliths were classified according to elemental association to phases.

  5. Airfoil System for Cruising Flight

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Liu, Tianshu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An airfoil system includes an airfoil body and at least one flexible strip. The airfoil body has a top surface and a bottom surface, a chord length, a span, and a maximum thickness. Each flexible strip is attached along at least one edge thereof to either the top or bottom surface of the airfoil body. The flexible strip has a spanwise length that is a function of the airfoil body's span, a chordwise width that is a function of the airfoil body's chord length, and a thickness that is a function of the airfoil body's maximum thickness.

  6. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  7. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Kryštůfek P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  8. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  9. Characterization of the Effect of Wing Surface Instrumentation on UAV Airfoil Performance

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed flight research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) has prompted study into the aerodynamic effects of modifications made to the surfaces of laminar airfoils. The research is focused on the high-aspect ratio, laminar-flow type wings commonly found on UAVs and other aircraft with a high endurance requirement. A broad range of instrumentation possibilities, such as structural, pressure, and temperature sensing devices may require the alteration of the airfoil outer mold line as part of the installation process. This study attempts to characterize the effect of installing this additiona1 instrumentation on key airfoil performance factors, such as transition location, lift and drag curves, and stall point. In particular, the general case of an airfoil that is channeled in the spanwise direction is considered, and the impact on key performance characteristics is assessed. Particular attention is focused on exploring the limits of channel depth and low-Reynolds number on performance and stall characteristics. To quantify the effect of increased skin friction due to premature transition caused by protruding or recessed instrumentation, two simplified, conservative scenarios are used to consider two potential sources of diaturbance: A) that leading edge alterations would cause linearly expanding areas (triangles) of turbulent flow on both surfaces of the wing upstream of the natural transition point, and B) that a channel or bump on the upper surface would trip turbulent flow across the whole upper surface upstream of the natural transition point. A potentially more important consideration than the skin friction drag increment is the change in overall airfoil performance due to the installation of instrumentation along most of the wingspan. To quantify this effect, 2D CFD simulations of the flow over a representative mid-span airfoil section were conducted in order to assess the change in lift and drag curves for the airfoil in the presence of

  10. Design and Wind Tunnel Testing of a Thick, Multi-Element High-Lift Airfoil

    Zahle, Frederik; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2012-01-01

    In this work a 2D CFD solver has been used to optimize the shape of a leading edge slat with a chord length of 30% of the main airfoil which was 40% thick. The airfoil configuration was subsequently tested in a wind tunnel and compared to numerical predictions. The multi-element airfoil was...... predicted to achieve a Cl−max of 3.1 based on the main airfoil chord length, which was confirmed in the wind tunnel campaign. Using wake rake traversal and wool tuft flow visualization wall interference effects were investigated, which were found to be a source of considerable uncertainty when measuring on...

  11. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  12. Supercritical Airfoil Coordinates

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rectangular Supercritical Wing (Ricketts) - design and measured locations are provided in an Excel file RSW_airfoil_coordinates_ricketts.xls . One sheet is with Non...

  13. 3D visualisation of the middle ear and adjacent structures using reconstructed multi-slice CT datasets, correlating 3D images and virtual endoscopy to the 2D cross-sectional images

    The 3D imaging of the middle ear facilitates better understanding of the patient's anatomy. Cross-sectional slices, however, often allow a more accurate evaluation of anatomical structures, as some detail may be lost through post-processing. In order to demonstrate the advantages of combining both approaches, we performed computed tomography (CT) imaging in two normal and 15 different pathological cases, and the 3D models were correlated to the cross-sectional CT slices. Reconstructed CT datasets were acquired by multi-slice CT. Post-processing was performed using the in-house software ''3D Slicer'', applying thresholding and manual segmentation. 3D models of the individual anatomical structures were generated and displayed in different colours. The display of relevant anatomical and pathological structures was evaluated in the greyscale 2D slices, 3D images, and the 2D slices showing the segmented 2D anatomy in different colours for each structure. Correlating 2D slices to the 3D models and virtual endoscopy helps to combine the advantages of each method. As generating 3D models can be extremely time-consuming, this approach can be a clinically applicable way of gaining a 3D understanding of the patient's anatomy by using models as a reference. Furthermore, it can help radiologists and otolaryngologists evaluating the 2D slices by adding the correct 3D information that would otherwise have to be mentally integrated. The method can be applied to radiological diagnosis, surgical planning, and especially, to teaching. (orig.)

  14. Experimental verification of the new RISOe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Dahl, K.S.; Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper concerns the experimental verification of a new airfoil family for wind turbines. The family consist of airfoils in the relative thickness range from 15% to 30%. Three airfoils, Risoe-A1-18, Risoe-A1-21, and Risoe-A1-24 were tested in a wind tunnel. The verification consisted of both static and dynamic measurements. Here, the static results are presented for a Reynolds number of 1.6x10{sup 6} for the following airfoil configurations: smooth surface (all three airfoils) and Risoe-A1-24 mounted with leading edge roughness, vortex generators, and Gurney-flaps, respectively. All three airfoils have constant lift curve slope and almost constant drag coefficient until the maximum lift coefficient of about 1.4 is reached. The experimental results are compared with corresponding computational from the general purpose flow solver, EllipSys2D, showing good agreement. (au)

  15. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack

  16. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  17. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  18. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  19. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  20. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.;

    2000-01-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risø-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUXopen jet wind tunnel was used having a...

  1. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  2. The Effects of the Critical Ice Accretion on Airfoil and Wing Performance

    Selig, Michael S.; Bragg, Michael B.; Saeed, Farooq

    1998-01-01

    In support of the NASA Lewis Modern Airfoils Ice Accretion Test Program, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provided expertise in airfoil design and aerodynamic analysis to determine the aerodynamic effect of ice accretion on modern airfoil sections. The effort has concentrated on establishing a design/testing methodology for "hybrid airfoils" or "sub-scale airfoils," that is, airfoils having a full-scale leading edge together with a specially designed and foreshortened aft section. The basic approach of using a full-scale leading edge with a foreshortened aft section was considered to a limited extent over 40 years ago. However, it was believed that the range of application of the method had not been fully exploited. Thus a systematic study was being undertaken to investigate and explore the range of application of the method so as to determine its overall potential.

  3. Design of the wind turbine airfoil family RISOe-A-XX

    Dahl, K.S.; Fuglsang, P.

    1998-12-01

    A method for design of wind turbine airfoils is presented. The design method is based on direct numerical optimization of a B-spline representation of the airfoil shape. For flexibility, the optimization algorithm relies on separate, stand alone tools for the analysis of aerodynamic and structural properties. The panel method based XFOIL is used during the optimization whereas the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D is used in the evaluation of the results. The method is demonstrated by the design of an airfoil family composed of 7 airfoils ranging in thickness from 12% to 30%. The design is based on Reynolds and Mach numbers representative of a 600 kW wind turbine. The airfoils are designed to have maximum lift-drag ratio until just below stall, a design lift coefficient of about 1.55 at an angle of attack of 10 deg. and a maximum lift coefficient of 1.65. The airfoils are made insensitive to leading edge roughness by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurs close to the leading edge for post stall angles of attack. The design method and the airfoil family provides a sound basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95. 3 tabs., 24 ills., 31 refs.

  4. First-stage high pressure turbine bucket airfoil

    Brown, Theresa A.; Ahmadi, Majid; Clemens, Eugene; Perry, II, Jacob C.; Holiday, Allyn K.; Delehanty, Richard A.; Jacala, Ariel Caesar

    2004-05-25

    The first-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  5. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  6. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    Gilling, Lasse

    Wind turbines operate in inflow turbulence whether it originates from the shear in the atmospheric boundary layer or from the wake of other wind turbines. Consequently, the airfoils of the wings experience turbulence in the inflow. The main topic of this thesis is to investigate the effect of...

  7. Stereological measures of trabecular bone structure: comparison of 3D micro computed tomography with 2D histological sections in human proximal tibial bone biopsies

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Laib, A.; Koller, B.; Prohaska, S.; Mosekilde, Li.; Gowin, W.

    2005-01-01

    Stereology applied on histological sections is the 'gold standard' for obtaining quantitative information on cancellous bone structure. Recent advances in micro computed tomography (microCT) have made it possible to acquire three-dimensional (3D) data non-destructively. However, before the 3D...... methods can be used as a substitute for the current 'gold standard' they have to be verified against the existing standard. The aim of this study was to compare bone structural measures obtained from 3D microCT data sets with those obtained by stereology performed on conventional histological sections...... tibial metaphysis. The biopsies were embedded in methylmetacrylate before microCT scanning in a Scanco microCT 40 scanner at a resolution of 20 x 20 x 20 microm3, and the 3D data sets were analysed with a computer program. After microCT scanning, 16 sections were cut from the central 2 mm of each biopsy...

  8. Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with lifestyle factors and metabolic and cardiovascular disease markers: population-based cross-sectional study (FIN-D2D.

    Maija E Miettinen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD level has been associated with an increased risk of several chronic diseases. Our aim was to determine lifestyle and clinical factors that are associated with 25OHD level and to investigate connection of 25OHD level with metabolic and cardiovascular disease markers. DESIGN: In total, 2868 Finnish men and women aged 45-74 years participated in FIN-D2D population-based health survey in 2007. Participants that had a serum sample available (98.4%; n = 2822 were included in this study. 25OHD was measured with chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay method. RESULTS: The mean 25OHD level was 58.2 nmol/l in men (n = 1348 and 57.1 nmol/l in women (n = 1474. Mean 25OHD level was lower in the younger age groups than in the older ones (p<0.0001 both in men and women. This study confirmed that low physical activity (p<0.0001 both in men and women, smoking (p = 0.0002 in men and p = 0.03 in women and high BMI (p<0.0001 in women are factors that independently associate with low 25OHD level. Of the metabolic and cardiovascular disease markers high triglyceride concentration (p = 0.02 in men and p = 0.001 in women and high apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio (p = 0.04 in men and p = 0.03 in women were independently associated with low 25OHD level. CONCLUSIONS: Higher age did not predict lower 25OHD level in this study population of aged 45-74 years which may derive from a healthy life-style of "active pensioners". Low physical activity and smoking came up as independent lifestyle factors associated with low 25OHD level. Defining the molecular mechanisms behind the associations of 25OHD with low physical activity and smoking are important objective in future studies. The association of 25OHD with BMI, high triglyceride concentration and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio may be related to the role of vitamin D in inflammation, but more detailed studies are needed.

  9. Selection and Research on Transition Tape in Wind-Turbine Airfoil Section Wind Tunnel Experiment%风力机翼型风洞实验中粗糙带形式的选择研究*

    魏闯; 高永卫; 肖春生

    2013-01-01

    Due to the limitation of model demension and experimental speed, the experimental Reynolds number in the low speed wind tunnel is usually less than the practical value of airfoil section of wind turbine. This will make the transition location difference between experimental and actual situation. For the purpose of simulating real condition, fixed transition performed with transition tape is often adopted in wind tunnel experiments. Practice shows that the types and parameters of transition tape have an important impact on the experimental results. It needs to be chosen very carefully. In addition, because the wind turbine blade operated in the field for long time, contaminations accumulate on it and increase its surface roughness. This contamination has a great role on the rotor performance; the impact of it has not been well studied. This paper gives a summary of wind tunnel test results and discusses the actions of four types of transition tape of ZZ,ZZT,T and H, and additional effects on the wind turbine airfoil section. The results show that ZZT-type has well transition effect with the least additional drag and H-type has a better simulation for the impact of the insect compacts in the wind turbine blade airfoil experiment.%  由于模型尺寸与实验风速的限制,低速翼型风洞实验雷诺数通常小于实际值,造成翼面转捩点偏后,翼型表面流动与实际不相符。为了尽量真实模拟实际流动,风洞实验一般采用粗糙带在翼型表面前缘进行固定转捩。实践表明,粗糙带的种类及其参数对实验结果有重要的影响,需要非常仔细地选择。另外,由于风力机叶片长期在野外工作,污染造成表面粗糙度增加,这部分的影响一直没有得到很好的研究。本文采用风洞实验的方法,对ZZR、ZZT、T和H型等四种粗糙带在风力机翼型风洞实验中的作用及附加影响进行了研究。研究结果表明,在

  10. Multi-objective optimization design of airfoil and wing

    ZHU; Ziqiang; FU; Hongyan; YU; Rixin; LIU; Jie

    2004-01-01

    To extend available monoobjective optimization methods to multiobjective and multidisciplinary optimization, the construction of a suitable resultant objective function(in deterministic method-DM) or a fitness function(in genetic algorithm-GA) is important. An objective function combination method (OFCM) of constructing such a function for constrained optimization problems is suggested. How to use both deterministic and genetic algorithms to biobjective and bidisciplinary optimal design of high performance airfoils and wings is discussed. Numerical results in both 2D (airfoil) and 3D (wing) cases show that the present method can be used to optimaize different kinds of initial airfoils and wings. The performance of optimized shape is improved significantly. The method is successful and effective.

  11. Measurements of photoionization cross section of the 4p levels and oscillator strength of the 4p→nd 2D3/2,5/2 transitions of potassium

    Kalyar, M. A.; Yar, A.; Iqbal, J.; Ali, R.; Baig, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out measurements of absolute photoionization cross sections of the 4p excited levels and oscillator strengths of the 4p→nd Rydberg transitions in potassium using a two-step photo-excitation and ionization technique in conjunction with a thermionic diode ion detector. The measurements were conducted using the linearly polarized laser light and the absolute values of the cross sections from the 4p 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 excited levels have been determined at the ionization threshold as (6.3±0.9) Mb and (5.4±0.8) Mb respectively. In addition, photoionization cross sections have been determined at various ionizing wavelengths above the first ionization threshold to explore different energy regions of the continuum. The oscillator strengths for the 4p 2P1/2→nd 2D3/2 and 4p 2P3/2→nd 2D3/2,5/2 Rydberg transitions have been deduced by using the measured cross sections of the 4p 2P1/2 and 2P3/2 levels at the ionization threshold. The new results are in good agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data.

  12. Effect of camber and thickness on the aerodynamic properties of an airfoil in ground proximity

    A linear vortex panel method is extended to include the effect of ground proximity on the aerodynamic properties of two dimensional airfoils. The image method is used to model the ground effect. According to the results, lift coefficient of an airfoil may increase or decrease in ground effect based on a combinative effect of its camber, thickness, angle of attack and ground clearance. Airfoils with different section parameters are analysed and their relative effectiveness are compared

  13. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  14. Shape Changing Airfoil

    Ott, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Scoping of shape changing airfoil concepts including both aerodynamic analysis and materials-related technology assessment effort was performed. Three general categories of potential components were considered-fan blades, booster and compressor blades, and stator airfoils. Based on perceived contributions to improving engine efficiency, the fan blade was chosen as the primary application for a more detailed assessment. A high-level aerodynamic assessment using a GE90-90B Block 4 engine cycle and fan blade geometry indicates that blade camber changes of approximately +/-4deg would be sufficient to result in fan efficiency improvements nearing 1 percent. Constraints related to flight safety and failed mode operation suggest that use of the baseline blade shape with actuation to the optimum cruise condition during a portion of the cycle would be likely required. Application of these conditions to the QAT fan blade and engine cycle was estimated to result in an overall fan efficiency gain of 0.4 percent.

  15. Numerical Solution of Inviscid Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Euler equations in 2D compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. The results are compared with the solution using the software Ansys Fluent 15.0.7.

  16. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  17. From 2D slices to 3D volumes: Image based reconstruction and morphological characterization of hippocampal cells on charged and uncharged surfaces using FIB/SEM serial sectioning

    3D imaging at a subcellular resolution is a powerful tool in the life sciences to investigate cells and their interactions with native tissues or artificial objects. While a tomographic experimental setup achieving a sufficient structural resolution can be established with either X-rays or electrons, the use of electrons is usually limited to very thin samples in transmission electron microscopy due to the poor penetration depths of electrons. The combination of a serial sectioning approach and scanning electron microscopy in state of the art dual beam experimental setups therefore offers a means to image highly resolved spatial details using a focused ion beam for slicing and an electron beam for imaging. The advantage of this technique over X-ray μCT or X-ray microscopy attributes to the fact that absorption is not a limiting factor in imaging and therefore even strong absorbing structures can be spatially reconstructed with a much higher possible resolution. This approach was used in this study to elucidate the effect of an electric potential on the morphology of cells from a hippocampal cell line (HT22) deposited on gold microelectrodes. While cells cultivated on two different controls (gold and polymer substrates) did show the expected stretched morphology, cells on both the anode and the cathode differed significantly. Cells deposited on the anode part of the electrode exhibited the most extreme deviation, being almost spherical and showed signs of chromatin condensation possibly indicating cell death. Furthermore, EDX was used as supplemental methodology for combined chemical and structural analyses. -- Research highlights: → FIB/SEM is utilized as a tool to investigate morphological changes in cells. → Tomography of individual cells was achieved by a sequential slice and image approach. → Different detectors were reviewed for their applicability on biological material. → The influence of an electrical potential on neuronal cells was investigated.

  18. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  19. Experimental investigation of a transonic potential flow around a symmetric airfoil

    Hiller, W. J.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental flow investigations on smooth airfoils were done using numerical solutions for transonic airfoil streaming with shockless supersonic range. The experimental flow reproduced essential sections of the theoretically computed frictionless solution. Agreement is better in the expansion part of the of the flow than in the compression part. The flow was nearly stationary in the entire velocity range investigated.

  20. Design, Simulation, and Wind Tunnel Verication of a Morphing Airfoil

    Gustafson, Eric Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The application of smart materials to control the flight dynamics of a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) has numerous benefits over traditional servomechanisms. Under study is wing morphing achieved through the use of piezoelectric Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs). These devices exhibit low power draw but excellent bandwidth characteristics. This thesis provides a background in the 2D analytical and computer modeling tools and methods needed to design and characterize an MFC-actuated airfoil. A com...

  1. Conjugate Heat transfer Analysis of helical fins with airfoil crosssection and its comparison with existing circular fin design for air cooled engines employing constant rectangular cross-section

    Ashwin Shridhar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Air Cooled Engines have been used in a variety of applications, ranging from airplanes to motorbikes and even stationary or portable engines. Since modern automobiles and airplanes use engines delivering more power, they have to be cooled more efficiently due to which a more complex water cooling system is used for cooling engines with large displacements. Hence air cooling is becoming a thing of the past, especially in the aviation sector due to the advent of more efficient gas turbine engines. However air cooled internal combustion engines are still being used in a wide variety of two-wheelers ranging from small single cylinder engines to heavy duty liter class V-twins and Inline fours, due to the non-practicalities associated with the installment of a bulky water cooling system in two-wheelers. So one can ascertain that there is a scope for improving the efficiency of air cooled engines even further. The objective of this paper is to analyze currently existing fin design employed in most of the air cooled engines and improve it by changing the cross-section to a streamlined one and also making the fins in a helical orientation as opposed to the regular circular fins employed. Our analysis comprises of a computational fluid dynamics study of both the fin models with identical dimensions and simulated in the same environment using ANSYS FLUENT 15 software and we attempt to compare their performance using the temperature and heat transfer coefficient distribution plots obtained.

  2. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Vronsky, T.

    2014-01-01

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two...... different airfoils at a Reynolds number of 3 million, the FFA- W3-301 and FFA-W3-360, respectively. The computations are compared with wind tunnel measurements from the Stuttgart Laminar Wind Tunnel with respect to lift and drag variation as function of angle of attack. Even though the method does not...

  3. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  4. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    The CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils were designed with an objective of high lift and low noise emission. In the design process, the aerodynamic performance is obtained using XFOIL while noise emission is obtained with the BPM model. In this paper we present some validations of the designed CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil by using wind tunnel measurements in the acoustic wind tunnel located at Virginia Tech and numerical computations with the inhouse Q3uic and EllipSys 2D/3D codes. To show the superiority of the new airfoils, comparisons with a NACA64618 airfoil are made. For the aerodynamic features, the designed Cl and Cl/Cd agrees well with the experiment and are in general higher than those of the NACA airfoil. For the acoustic features, the noise emission of the LN118 airfoil is compared with the acoustic measurements and that of the NACA airfoil. Comparisons show that the BPM model can predict correctly the noise changes

  5. 2D solar modeling

    Ventura, P; Li, L; Sofia, S; Basu, S; Demarque, P

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the cyclic variation of the total solar irradiance is one of the most challenging targets of modern astrophysics. These studies prove to be essential also for a more climatologic issue, associated to the global warming. Any attempt to determine the solar components of this phenomenon must include the effects of the magnetic field, whose strength and shape in the solar interior are far from being completely known. Modelling the presence and the effects of a magnetic field requires a 2D approach, since the assumption of radial symmetry is too limiting for this topic. We present the structure of a 2D evolution code that was purposely designed for this scope; rotation, magnetic field and turbulence can be taken into account. Some preliminary results are presented and commented.

  6. Research on Aerodynamic Performance of an Wind Turbine Airfoil With Leading Edge Ice

    Fu Jie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of wind turbine was influenced by the environment. Among them, airfoil with leading edge ice has a great effect on the changes of aerodynamic performance. This study calculated the performance of an wind tubine airfoil at two iced shape model by CFD simulation using LES. LES in various models has been developed to simulate turbulent flows, especially to separated flows. In this investigation, 2D LES has been used to simulate flow past a wind turbine airfoil with leading edge ice which is a classical separated flow. The results show that flow structure is more complex with abundant whirlpools signifying violent turbulence when airfoil with ice and leads to poorer performance of wind turbine.

  7. Parallel numerical simulation of oscillating airfoil NACA0015 in the channel due to flutter instability

    Řidký Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to 3D and 2D parallel numerical computation of pressure and velocity fields around an elastically supported airfoil self-oscillating due to interaction with the airflow. Numerical solution is computed in the OpenFOAM package, an open-source software package based on finite volume method. Movement of airfoil is described by translation and rotation, identified from experimental data. A new boundary condition for the 2DOF motion of the airfoil was implemented. The results of numerical simulations (velocity are compared with data measured in a wind tunnel, where a physical model of NACA0015 airfoil was mounted and tuned to exhibit the flutter instability. The experimental results were obtained previously in the Institute of Thermomechanics by interferographic measurements in a subsonic wind tunnel in Nový Knín.

  8. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    Zhang, Qiang

    The effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape on the aerodynamic performance of turbine airfoils are investigated in compressible, high speed flows. The University of Utah Transonic Wind Tunnel is employed for the experimental part of the study. Two different test sections are designed to produce Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, passage mass flow rates, and physical dimensions, which match values along turbine blades in operating engines: (i) a nonturning test section with a symmetric airfoil, and (ii) a cascade test section with a cambered turbine vane. The nonuniform, irregular, three-dimensional surface roughness is characterized using the equivalent sand grain roughness size. Changing the airfoil surface roughness condition has a substantial effect on wake profiles of total pressure loss coefficients, normalized Mach number, normalized kinetic energy, and on the normalized and dimensional magnitudes of Integrated Aerodynamic Losses produced by the airfoils. Comparisons with results for a symmetric airfoil and a cambered vane show that roughness has more substantial effects on losses produced by the symmetric airfoil than the cambered vane. Data are also provided that illustrate the larger loss magnitudes are generally present with flow turning and cambered airfoils, than with symmetric airfoils. Wake turbulence structure of symmetric airfoils and cambered vanes are also studied experimentally. The effects of surface roughness and freestream turbulence levels on wake distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and power spectral density profiles and vortex shedding frequencies are quantified one axial chord length downstream of the test airfoils. As the level of surface roughness increases, all wake profile quantities broaden significantly and nondimensional vortex shedding frequencies decrease. Wake profiles produced by the symmetric airfoil are more sensitive to variations of surface

  9. Computational Analysis of Propulsion Performance of Modified Pitching Motion Airfoils in Laminar Flow

    Yonghui Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The thrust generation performance of airfoils with modified pitching motion was investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling two-dimensional laminar flow at Reynolds number of 104. The effect of shift distance of the pitch axis outside the chord line (R, reduced frequency (k, pitching amplitude (θ, pitching profile, and airfoil shape (airfoil thickness and camber on the thrust generated and efficiency were studied. The results reveal that the increase in R and k leads to an enhancement in thrust generation and a decrease in propulsive efficiency. Besides, there exists an optimal range of θ for the maximum thrust and the increasing θ induces a rapid decrease in propulsive efficiency. Six adjustable parameters (K were employed to realize various nonsinusoidal pitching profiles. An increase in K results in more thrust generated at the cost of decreased propulsive efficiency. The investigation of the airfoil shape effect reveals that there exists an optimal range of airfoil thickness for the best propulsion performance and that the vortex structure is strongly influenced by the airfoil thickness, while varying the camber or camber location of airfoil sections offers no benefit in thrust generation over symmetric airfoil sections.

  10. Vertical 2D Heterostructures

    Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene's legacy has become an integral part of today's condensed matter science and has equipped a whole generation of scientists with an armory of concepts and techniques that open up new perspectives for the postgraphene area. In particular, the judicious combination of 2D building blocks into vertical heterostructures has recently been identified as a promising route to rationally engineer complex multilayer systems and artificial solids with intriguing properties. The present review highlights recent developments in the rapidly emerging field of 2D nanoarchitectonics from a materials chemistry perspective, with a focus on the types of heterostructures available, their assembly strategies, and their emerging properties. This overview is intended to bridge the gap between two major—yet largely disjunct—developments in 2D heterostructures, which are firmly rooted in solid-state chemistry or physics. Although the underlying types of heterostructures differ with respect to their dimensions, layer alignment, and interfacial quality, there is common ground, and future synergies between the various assembly strategies are to be expected.

  11. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  12. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  13. Status for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, J.

    2001-01-01

    This report sets up an evaluation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D in its present state. This code is used for blade aerodynamics simulations in the Aeroelastic Design group at Risø. Two airfoils are investigated by computing theflow at several angles of attack ranging from...

  14. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length

  15. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    The present work contains an extension of the Beddoes-Leishman-type dynamic stall model. In this work, a deformable trailing-edge flap has been added to the dynamic stall model. The model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on an airfoil section undergoing arbitrary motion in heave......, lead-lag, pitch, trailing-edge flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model, which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered a crossover between the work of Gaunaa for the...

  16. A dynamic stall model for airfoils with deformable trailing edges

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Gaunaa, Mac; Bak, Dan Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2007-01-01

    airfoil section undergoing arbitrary motion in heave, lead-lag, pitch, Trailing Edge (TE) flapping. In the linear region, the model reduces to the inviscid model of Gaunaa [4], which includes the aerodynamic effect of a thin airfoil with a deformable camberline in inviscid flow. Therefore, the proposed......The present work contains an extension of the Beddoes-Leishman (B-L) type dynamic stall model, as described by Hansen et al. [7]. In this work a Deformable Trailing Edge Geometry (DTEG) has been added to the dynamic stall model. The model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on an...

  17. Angle-of-attack validation of a new zonal CFD method for airfoil simulations

    Yoo, Sungyul; Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    The angle-of-attack validation of a new concept suggested by Summa (1990) for coupling potential and viscous flow methods has been investigated for two-dimensional airfoil simulations. The fully coupled potential/Navier-Stokes code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program 2D), has been used to compute the flow field around an NACA 0012 airfoil for a range of angles of attack up to stall at a Mach number of 0.3 and a Reynolds number of 3 million. ZAP2D calculation for various domain sizes from 25 to 0.12 chord lengths are compared with the ARC2D large domain solution as well as with experimental data.

  18. Shape optimization of corrugated airfoils

    Jain, Sambhav; Bhatt, Varun Dhananjay; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The effect of corrugations on the aerodynamic performance of a Mueller C4 airfoil, placed at a 5° angle of attack and Re=10{,}000, is investigated. A stabilized finite element method is employed to solve the incompressible flow equations in two dimensions. A novel parameterization scheme is proposed that enables representation of corrugations on the surface of the airfoil, and their spontaneous appearance in the shape optimization loop, if indeed they improve aerodynamic performance. Computations are carried out for different location and number of corrugations, while holding their height fixed. The first corrugation causes an increase in lift and drag. Each of the later corrugations leads to a reduction in drag. Shape optimization of the Mueller C4 airfoil is carried out using various objective functions and optimization strategies, based on controlling airfoil thickness and camber. One of the optimal shapes leads to 50 % increase in lift coefficient and 23 % increase in aerodynamic efficiency compared to the Mueller C4 airfoil.

  19. Airfoil deposition model

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  20. Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

    Jacobs, E.N.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, A.E.

    1939-01-01

    In order to extend the useful range of Reynolds numbers of airfoils designed to take advantage of the extensive laminar boundary layers possible in an air stream of low turbulence, tests were made of the NACA 2412-34 and 1412-34 sections in the NACA low-turbulence tunnel. Although the possible extent of the laminar boundary layer on these airfoils is not so great as for specially designed laminar-flow airfoils, it is greater than that for conventional airfoils, and is sufficiently extensive so that at Reynolds numbers above 11,000,000 the laminar region is expected to be limited by the permissible 'Reynolds number run' and not by laminar separation as is the case with conventional airfoils. Drag measurements by the wake-survey method and pressure-distribution measurements were made at several lift coefficients through a range of Reynolds numbers up to 11,400,000. The drag scale-effect curve for the NACA 1412-34 is extrapolated to a Reynolds number of 30,000,000 on the basis of theoretical calculations of the skin friction. Comparable skin-friction calculations were made for the NACA 23012. The results indicate that, for certain applications at moderate values of the Reynolds number, the NACA 1412-34 and 2412-34 airfoils offer some advantages over such conventional airfoils as the NACA 23012. The possibility of maintaining a more extensive laminar boundary layer on these airfoils should result in a small drag reduction, and the absence of pressure peaks allows higher speeds to be reached before the compressibility burble is encountered. At lower Reynold numbers, below about 10,000,000, these airfoils have higher drags than airfoils designed to operate with very extensive laminar boundary layers.

  1. Activated sludge model No. 2d, ASM2d

    Henze, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) presents a model for biological phosphorus removal with simultaneous nitrification-denitrification in activated sludge systems. ASM2d is based on ASM2 and is expanded to include the denitrifying activity of the phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs...

  2. Advanced Airfoils Boost Helicopter Performance

    2007-01-01

    Carson Helicopters Inc. licensed the Langley RC4 series of airfoils in 1993 to develop a replacement main rotor blade for their Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The company's fleet of S-61 helicopters has been rebuilt to include Langley's patented airfoil design, and the helicopters are now able to carry heavier loads and fly faster and farther, and the main rotor blades have twice the previous service life. In aerial firefighting, the performance-boosting airfoils have helped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service control the spread of wildfires. In 2003, Carson Helicopters signed a contract with Ducommun AeroStructures Inc., to manufacture the composite blades for Carson Helicopters to sell

  3. 2D SIMPLIFIED SERVO VALVE

    2003-01-01

    A novel pilot stage valve called simplified 2D valve, which utilizes both rotary and linear motions of a single spool, is presented.The rotary motion of the spool incorporating hydraulic resistance bridge, formed by a damper groove and a crescent overlap opening, is utilized as pilot to actuate linear motion of the spool.A criterion for stability is derived from the linear analysis of the valve.Special experiments are designed to acquire the mechanical stiffness, the pilot leakage and the step response.It is shown that the sectional size of the spiral groove affects the dynamic response and the stiffness contradictorily and is also very sensitive to the pilot leakage.Therefore, it is necessary to establish a balance between the static and dynamic characteristics in deciding the structural parameters.Nevertheless, it is possible to sustain the dynamic response at a fairly high level, while keeping the leakage of the pilot stage at an acceptable level.

  4. Airfoil shape for a turbine nozzle

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Patik, Joseph Francis; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A first-stage nozzle vane includes an airfoil having a profile according to Table I. The annulus profile of the hot gas path is defined in conjunction with the airfoil profile and the profile of the inner and outer walls by the Cartesian coordinate values given in Tables I and II, respectively. The airfoil is a three-dimensional bowed design, both in the airfoil body and in the trailing edge. The airfoil is steam and air-cooled by flowing cooling mediums through cavities extending in the vane between inner and outer walls.

  5. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  6. A study of long separation bubble on thick airfoils and its consequent effects

    Highlights: • Effects of long separation bubbles on airfoil performance have been discussed. • The bubble is found to induce a camber-effect on the airfoil. • Effects of Re, TI and angle of attack on the bubble have been presented. • Appropriate modelling methodology of the separation-induced transition is presented. • Comparison of γ–Reθ and κ–κL–ω model for separation bubble in 2D is presented. - Abstract: A parametric study has been performed to analyse the flow around the thick-symmetric NACA 0021 airfoil in order to better understand the characteristics and effects of long separation bubbles (LoSBs) that exist on such airfoils at low Reynolds numbers and turbulence intensities. In the article, the prediction capabilities of two recently-developed transition models, the correlation-based γ–Reθ model and the laminar-kinetic-energy-based κ–κL–ω model are assessed. Two-dimensional steady-state simulations indicated that the κ–κL–ω model predicted the separation and reattachment process accurately when compared with published experimental work. The model was then used to study the attributes and the effects of LoSBs as a function of the angle of attack, freestream turbulence intensity and Reynolds number. It was observed that LoSBs considerably degrade the aerodynamic performance of airfoils and lead to abrupt stall behaviour. It is, furthermore, illustrated that the presence of the LoSB leads to an induced camber effect on the airfoil that increases as the airfoil angle of attack increases due to the upstream migration of the bubble. An increase in the Reynolds number or turbulence levels leads to a reduction in the bubble extent, considerably improving the airfoil performance and leading to a progressive trailing-edge stall

  7. Hybrid airfoil design methods for full-scale ice accretion simulation

    Saeed, Farooq

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a design method together with a design philosophy that allows the design of "subscale" or "hybrid" airfoils that simulate fullscale ice accretions. These subscale or hybrid airfoils have full-scale leading edges and redesigned aft-sections. A preliminary study to help develop a design philosophy for the design of hybrid airfoils showed that hybrid airfoils could be designed to simulate full-scale airfoil droplet-impingement characteristics and, therefore, ice accretion. The study showed that the primary objective in such a design should be to determine the aft section profile that provides the circulation necessary for simulating full-scale airfoil droplet-impingement characteristics. The outcome of the study, therefore, reveals circulation control as the main design variable. To best utilize this fact, this thesis describes two innovative airfoil design methods for the design of hybrid airfoils. Of the two design methods, one uses a conventional flap system while the other only suggests the use of boundary-layer control through slot-suction on the airfoil upper surface as a possible alternative for circulation control. The formulation of each of the two design methods is described in detail, and the results from each method are validated using wind-tunnel test data. The thesis demonstrates the capabilities of each method with the help of specific design examples highlighting their application potential. In particular, the flap-system based hybrid airfoil design method is used to demonstrate the design of a half-scale hybrid model of a full-scale airfoil that simulates full-scale ice accretion at both the design and off-design conditions. The full-scale airfoil used is representative of a scaled modern business-jet main wing section. The study suggests some useful advantages of using hybrid airfoils as opposed to full-scale airfoils for a better understanding of the ice accretion process and the related issues. Results

  8. Computational Modeling for the Flow Over a Multi-Element Airfoil

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun

    1999-01-01

    The flow over a multi-element airfoil is computed using two two-equation turbulence models. The computations are performed using the INS2D) Navier-Stokes code for two angles of attack. Overset grids are used for the three-element airfoil. The computed results are compared with experimental data for the surface pressure, skin friction coefficient, and velocity magnitude. The computed surface quantities generally agree well with the measurement. The computed results reveal the possible existence of a mixing-layer-like region of flow next to the suction surface of the slat for both angles of attack.

  9. A two element laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise. M.S. Thesis

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  10. Simulasi Numerik Dynamic Stall Pada Airfoil Yang Berosilasi

    Galih S.T.A. Bangga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kebutuhan analisa pada sudu helikopter, kompresor, kincir angin dan struktur streamline lainya yang beroperasi pada angle of attack yang tinggi dan melibatkan instationary effects yang disebut dynamic stall menjadi semakin penting. Fenomena ini ditandai dengan naiknya dynamic lift melewati static lift maksimum pada critical static stall angle, vortex yang terbentuk pada leading edge mengakibatkan naiknya suction contribution yang kemudian terkonveksi sepanjang permukaan hingga mencapai trailling edge diikuti terbentuknya trailling edge vortex yang menunjukkan terjadinya lift stall. Fenomena ini sangat berbahaya terhadap struktur airfoil itu sendiri. Secara umum, beban fatique yang ditimbulkan oleh adanya efek histerisis karena fluktuasi gaya lift akibat induksi vibrasi lebih besar dibandingkan kondisi statis. Simulasi numerik dilakukan secara 2D dengan menggunakan profil Boeing-Vertol V23010-1.58 pada α0 = 14.92°. Standard-kω dan SST-kω digunakan sebagai URANS turbulence modelling. Model osilasi dari airfoil disusun dalam suatu user defined function (UDF. Gerakan meshing beserta airfoil diakomodasi dengan menggunakan dynamic mesh approach. Simulasi numerik menunjukkan bahwa, model SST-kω menunjukkan performa yang lebih baik dibandingkan dengan Standard-kω. Fenomena travelling vortex yang terjadi mampu ditangkap dengan baik, meski pada angle of attack yang tinggi URANS turbulence model gagal memprediksikan fenomena yang terjadi karena dominasi efek 3D.

  11. Port Adriano, 2D-Model tests

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Meinert, Palle; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests (length scale 1:50) carried out in a waveflume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU). The objective of the tests was: To identify cross section design which restrict the overtopping to acceptable levels and to record the...

  12. Generation of thrust and lift with airfoils in plunging and pitching motion

    We present fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations of 2D flow over a moving airfoil, using an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of the incompressible flow with an Immersed Boundary Method. A combination of sinusoidal plunging and pitching motions is imposed to the airfoil. Starting from a thrust producing case (Reynolds number, Re = 1000, reduced frequency, k = 1.41, plunging amplitude h0/c = 1, pitching amplitude θ0 = 30°, phase shift φ = 90°), we increase the mean pitching angle (in order to produce lift) and vary the phase shift between pitching and plunging (to optimize the direction and magnitude of the net force on the airfoil). These cases are discussed in terms of their lift coefficient, thrust coefficient and propulsive efficiency

  13. Comparison of two design methods of aerodynamic biobjectives for airfoil and wing shapes

    ZHU; Ziqiang; FU; Hongyan; LIU; Hang; WANG; Xiaolu

    2004-01-01

    A simplified adaptive wing, which deflects its leading edge and trailing edge flaps to vary its shape, is calculated to investigate the potential aerodynamic gains and compared with a biobjective optimization (BO) wing in the present paper. In subsonic-transonic flights the deflection angle of a flap is determined through optimization using a deterministic method. In supersonic flight the flaps are not deflected due to the requirement of having a minimum drag. For comparison the aerodynamic characteristics of a BO airfoil and wing is calculated. A parallel genetic algorithm is used in BO. Euler equations served as governing equations in flow field calculation. Numerical results in both 2D (airfoil) and 3D (wing) cases show that aerodynamic performances of the two design airfoils and wings are much better than those of the original ones, with the adaptive design one the best.

  14. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Šidlof, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  15. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  16. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  17. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  18. Preliminary Design and Evaluation of an Airfoil with Continuous Trailing-Edge Flap

    Shen, Jinwei; Thornburgh, Robert P.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Liu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary design and evaluation of an airfoil with active continuous trailing-edge flap (CTEF) as a potential rotorcraft active control device. The development of structural cross-section models of a continuous trailing-edge flap airfoil is described. The CTEF deformations with MFC actuation are predicted by NASTRAN and UM/VABS analyses. Good agreement is shown between the predictions from the two analyses. Approximately two degrees of CTEF deflection, defined as the rotation angle of the trailing edge, is achieved with the baseline MFC-PZT bender. The 2D aerodynamic characteristics of the continuous trailing-edge flap are evaluated using a CFD analysis. The aerodynamic efficiency of a continuous trailing-edge flap is compared to that of a conventional discrete trailing-edge flap (DTEF). It is found that the aerodynamic characteristics of a CTEF are equivalent to those of a conventional DTEF with the same deflection angle but with a smaller flap chord. A fluid structure interaction procedure is implemented to predict the deflection of the continuous trailingedge flap under aerodynamic pressure. The reductions in CTEF deflection are overall small when aerodynamic pressure is applied: 2.7% reduction is shown with a CTEF deflection angle of two degrees and at angle of attack of six degrees. In addition, newly developed MFC-PMN actuator is found to be a good supplement to MFC-PZT when applied as the bender outside layers. A mixed MFC-PZT and MFC-PMN bender generates 3% more CTEF deformation than an MFC-PZT only bender and 5% more than an MFC-PMN only bender under aerodynamic loads.

  19. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  20. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  1. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two different airfoils at a Reynolds number of 3 million, the FFA- W3-301 and FFA-W3-360, respectively. The computations are compared with wind tunnel measurements from the Stuttgart Laminar Wind Tunnel with respect to lift and drag variation as function of angle of attack. Even though the method does not exactly capture the measured performance, it can be used to compare different VG setups qualitatively with respect to chord- wise position, inter and intra-spacing and inclination of the VGs already in the design phase

  2. A strong viscous–inviscid interaction model for rotating airfoils

    Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2014-01-01

    viscous and inviscid parts. The inviscid part is modeled by a 2D panel method, and the viscous part is modeled by solving the integral form of the laminar and turbulent boundary-layer equations with extension for 3D rotational effects. Laminar-to-turbulent transition is either forced by employing a...... version, a parametric study on rotational effects induced by the Coriolis and centrifugal forces in the boundary-layer equations shows that the effects of rotation are to decrease the growth of the boundary-layer and delay the onset of separation, hence increasing the lift coefficient slightly while......Two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three dimensional (3D), steady and unsteady, viscous–inviscid interactive codes capable of predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbine airfoils are presented. The model is based on a viscous–inviscid interaction technique using strong coupling between the...

  3. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  4. Generalized multi-point inverse airfoil design

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    In a rather general sense, inverse airfoil design can be taken to mean the problem of specifying a desired set of airfoil characteristics, such as the airfoil maximum thickness ratio, pitching moment, part of the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development, etc., then from this information determine the corresponding airfoil shape. This paper presents a method which approaches the design problem from this perspective. In particular, the airfoil is divided into segments along which, together with the design conditions, either the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development may be prescribed. In addition to these local desired distributions, single parameters like the airfoil thickness can be specified. The problem of finding the airfoil shape is determined by coupling an incompressible, inviscid, inverse airfoil design method with a direct integral boundary-layer analysis method and solving the resulting nonlinear equations via a multidimensional Newton iteration technique. The approach is fast and easily allows for interactive design. It is also flexible and could be adapted to solving compressible, inverse airfoil design problems.

  5. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoils/Blades and Wind Farm Layouts

    Chen, Xiaomin

    Shape optimization is widely used in the design of wind turbine blades. In this dissertation, a numerical optimization method called Genetic Algorithm (GA) is applied to address the shape optimization of wind turbine airfoils and blades. In recent years, the airfoil sections with blunt trailing edge (called flatback airfoils) have been proposed for the inboard regions of large wind-turbine blades because they provide several structural and aerodynamic performance advantages. The FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils are thick airfoils widely used for wind turbine blade application. They have several advantages in meeting the intrinsic requirements for wind turbines in terms of design point, off-design capabilities and structural properties. This research employ both single- and multi-objective genetic algorithms (SOGA and MOGA) for shape optimization of Flatback, FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils to achieve maximum lift and/or maximum lift to drag ratio. The commercially available software FLUENT is employed for calculation of the flow field using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in conjunction with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model and a three equation k-kl-o turbulence model. The optimization methodology is validated by an optimization study of subsonic and transonic airfoils (NACA0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils). In this dissertation, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and lambda and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated

  6. Lectures on 2D gravity and 2D string theory

    This report the following topics: loops and states in conformal field theory; brief review of the Liouville theory; 2D Euclidean quantum gravity I: path integral approach; 2D Euclidean quantum gravity II: canonical approach; states in 2D string theory; matrix model technology I: method of orthogonal polynomials; matrix model technology II: loops on the lattice; matrix model technology III: free fermions from the lattice; loops and states in matrix model quantum gravity; loops and states in the C=1 matrix model; 6V model fermi sea dynamics and collective field theory; and string scattering in two spacetime dimensions

  7. 2D-hahmoanimaation toteuttamistekniikat

    Smolander, Aku

    2009-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössä tutkitaan erilaisia 2D-hahmoanimaation toteuttamistekniikoita. Aluksi luodaan yleiskatsaus animoinnin historiaan ja tekniikoihin piirtämisestä mallintamiseen. Alkukatsauksen jälkeen tutkitaan 2D-hahmon suunnittelua ja liikkeitä koskevia sääntöjä. Hahmoanimaation liikkeissä huomionarvoisia asioita ovat muun muassa ajastus, liioittelu, ennakointi ja painovoima. Seuraavaksi perehdytään itse 2D-hahmoanimaation toteuttamistekniikoihin. Tavoitteena on selvittää, tutkia ja vertailla ...

  8. 2 D seismic sections interpretation for the Xareu field in the Mundau sub-basin (Ceara basin, Northeastern Brazil); Interpretacao de secoes sismicas 2D para o Campo de Xareu na sub-bacia de Mundau (Bacia do Ceara, NE do Brasil)

    Antunes, Alex Francisco [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil)]. E-mail: alex@geologia.ufrn.br; Jardim de Sa, Emanuel Ferraz [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geodinamica e Geofisica; Matos, Renato Marcos Darros de [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Keller Filho, Odilon [PETROBRAS S.A., Natal, RN (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios RN/CE; Lima Neto, Francisco Fontes [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents a reinterpretation of seismic sections of the Xareu Oil Field, located in the central portion of the Mundau Sub-basin (Ceara Basin, Northeast Brazil). These seismic sections were acquired during the 80's and the 90's. Their reinterpretation show that the field is structured by a main arrangement of N W-trending listric normal faults, with associated roll-over structures affecting the rocks of the rift (Mundau Formation) and transitional (Paracuru Formation) sections of the basin. Some of these faults also affect the basal and intermediate layers of the drift section (Ubarana Formation), what denotes their reactivation (or even the formation of new faults). the new interpretation allows a better understanding of the frequency, geometry, orientation, style and kinematic of the faults, important factors in the structural characterization of the Xareu Oil Field. (author)

  9. AN INVESTIGATION ON THE AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF 2-D AIRFIOL IN GROUND COLLISION

    AK KARTIGESH A/L KALAI CHELVEN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Near ground operation of airplanes represents a critical and an important aerodynamic practical problem due to the wing-ground collision. The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing are subjected to dramatic changes due to the flow field interference with the ground. In the present paper, the wing-ground collision was investigated experimentally and numerically. The investigation involved a series of wind tunnel measurements of a 2-D wing model having NACA4412 airfoil section. An experimental set up has been designed and constructed to simulate the collision phenomena in a low speed wind tunnel. The investigations were carried out at different Reynolds numbers ranging from 105 to 4×105, various model heights to chord ratios, H/C ranging from 0.1 to 1, and different angles of attack ranging from -4o to 20o. Numerical simulation of the wing-ground collision has been carried out using FLUENT software. The results of the numerical simulation have been validated by comparison with previous and recent experimental data and it was within acceptable agreement. The results have shown that the aerodynamic characteristics are considerably influenced when the wing is close to the ground, mainly at angles of attacks 4o to 8o. The take off and landing speeds are found to be very influencing parameters on the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing in collision status, mainly the lift.

  10. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  11. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Aerodynamics Characteristics of a Baseline Airfoil

    Md. Rasedul Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wind tunnel test of baseline airfoil NACA 0015 model was conducted in the Wind tunnel wall test section of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at KUET, Bangladesh . The primary goal of the test was to measure airfoil aerodynamic characteristics over a wide range of Angle of Attack (AOA mainly from Zero degree to 20 degree AOA and with a wind tunnel fixed free stream velocity of 12m/s and at Re = 1.89×105 . The pressure distribution in both upper and lower camber surface was calculated with the help of digital pressure manometer. After analysis the value of Cl and Cd was found around 1.3 and 0.31 respectively.

  13. A Computational Modeling Mystery Involving Airfoil Trailing Edge Treatments

    Choo, Yeunun; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    In a curious result, Fairman (2002) observed that steady RANS calculations predicted larger lift than the experimentally-measured data for six different airfoils with non-traditional trailing edge treatments, whereas the time average of unsteady RANS calculations matched the experiments almost exactly. Are these results reproducible? If so, is the difference between steady and unsteady RANS calculations a numerical artifact, or is there a physical explanation? The goals of this project are to solve this thirteen year old mystery and further to model viscous/load coupling for airfoils with non-traditional trailing edges. These include cupped, beveled, and blunt trailing edges, which are common anti-singing treatments for marine propeller sections. In this talk, we present steady and unsteady RANS calculations (ANSYS Fluent) with careful attention paid to the possible effects of asymmetric unsteady vortex shedding and the modeling of turbulence anisotropy. The effects of non-traditional trailing edge treatments are visualized and explained.

  14. Hybrid Optimization for Wind Turbine Thick Airfoils

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    One important element in aerodynamic design of wind turbines is the use of specially tailored airfoils to increase the ratio of energy capture and reduce cost of energy. This work is focused on the design of thick airfoils for wind turbines by using numerical optimization. A hybrid scheme is proposed in which genetic and gradient based algorithms are combined together to improve the accuracy and the reliability of the design. Firstly, the requirements and the constraints for this class of airfoils are described; then, the hybrid approach is presented. The final part of this work is dedicated to illustrate a numerical example regarding the design of a new thick airfoil. The results are discussed and compared to existing airfoils.

  15. Study of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    This paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise with special focus on airfoils with blunt trailing edges. Two methods are employed to calculate airfoil noise: The flow/acoustic splitting method and the semi-empirical method. The flow/acoustic splitting method is derived from compressible Navier......-Stokes equations. It provides us possibilities to study details about noise generation mechanism. The formulation of the semi-empirical model is based on acoustic analogy and then curve-fitted with experimental data. Due to its high efficiency, such empirical relation is used for purpose of low noise airfoil...... design or optimization. Calculations from both methods are compared with exist experiments. The airfoil blunt noise is found as a function of trailing edge bluntness, Reynolds number, angle of attack, etc....

  16. Aerodynamic, aeroacoustic, and aeroelastic investigations of airfoil-vortex interaction using large-eddy simulation

    Ilie, Marcel

    In helicopters, vortices (generated at the tip of the rotor blades) interact with the next advancing blades during certain flight and manoeuvring conditions, generating undesirable levels of acoustic noise and vibration. These Blade-Vortex Interactions (BVIs), which may cause the most disturbing acoustic noise, normally occur in descent or high-speed forward flight. Acoustic noise characterization (and potential reduction) is one the areas generating intensive research interest to the rotorcraft industry. Since experimental investigations of BVI are extremely costly, some insights into the BVI or AVI (2-D Airfoil-Vortex Interaction) can be gained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations. Numerical simulation of BVI or AVI has been of interest to CFD for many years. There are still difficulties concerning an accurate numerical prediction of BVI. One of the main issues is the inherent dissipation of CFD turbulence models, which severely affects the preservation of the vortex characteristics. Moreover this is not an issue only for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic analysis but also for aeroelastic investigations as well, especially when the strong (two-way) aeroelastic coupling is of interest. The present investigation concentrates mainly on AVI simulations. The simulations are performed for Mach number, Ma = 0.3, resulting in a Reynolds number, Re = 1.3 x 106, which is based on the chord, c, of the airfoil (NACA0012). Extensive literature search has indicated that the present work represents the first comprehensive investigation of AVI using the LES numerical approach, in the rotorcraft research community. The major factor affecting the aerodynamic coefficients and aeroacoustic field as a result of airfoil-vortex interaction is observed to be the unsteady pressure generated at the location of the interaction. The present numerical results show that the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, moment, and drag) and aeroacoustic field are strongly dependent on

  17. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  18. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous laminar and turbulent flow around the airfoil

    Slouka, Martin; Kozel, Karel

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox k-omega model. Calculations are done for NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoil profile for the different angles of upstream flow. Numerical results are compared and discussed with experimental data.

  19. Application of a chimera technique to the computation of subsonic and transonic bi-airfoil flows

    Yagua, L.C.Q.; Koren, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a composite overset-grid technique to flow computations around a two-dimensional bi-plane. The flow is described by the steady, 2D, compressible Euler equations of gas dynamics. The discretization method used is a central finite-difference method with artificial dissipation. The overset-grid technique is of chimera-type and the bi-plane a bi-NACA0012 airfoil.

  20. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompress...

  1. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  2. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  3. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  4. Accretion Disks Phase Transitions 2-D or not 2-D?

    Abramowicz, M A; Igumenshchev, I V; Abramowicz, Marek Artur; Bjornsson, Gunnlaugur; Igumenshchev, Igor V.

    2000-01-01

    We argue that the proper way to treat thin-thick accretion-disk transitions should take into account the 2-D nature of the problem. We illustrate the physical inconsistency of the 1-D vertically integrated approach by discussing a particular example of the convective transport of energy.

  5. Parameter study of simplified dragonfly airfoil geometry at Reynolds number of 6000.

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-10-21

    Aerodynamic study of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil in gliding flight at Reynolds numbers below 10,000 is motivated by both pure scientific interest and technological applications. At these Reynolds numbers, the natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development of Micro UAV's and more. Insect wings are typically characterized by corrugated airfoils. The present study follows a fundamental flow physics study (Levy and Seifert, 2009), that revealed the importance of flow separation from the first corrugation, the roll-up of the separated shear layer to discrete vortices and their role in promoting flow reattachment to the aft arc, as the leading mechanism enabling high-lift, low drag performance of the Dragonfly gliding flight. This paper describes the effect of systematic airfoil geometry variations on the aerodynamic properties of a simplified Dragonfly airfoil at Reynolds number of 6000. The parameter study includes a detailed analysis of small variations of the nominal geometry, such as corrugation placement or height, rear arc and trailing edge shape. Numerical simulations using the 2D laminar Navier-Stokes equations revealed that the flow accelerating over the first corrugation slope is followed by an unsteady pressure recovery, combined with vortex shedding. The latter allows the reattachment of the flow over the rear arc. Also, the drag values are directly linked to the vortices' magnitude. This parametric study shows that geometric variations which reduce the vortices' amplitude, as reduction of the rear cavity depth or the reduction of the rear arc and trailing edge curvature, will reduce the drag values. Other changes will extend the flow reattachment over the rear arc for a larger mean lift coefficients range; such as the negative deflection of the forward flat plate. These changes consequently reduce the drag values at higher mean lift coefficients. The detailed geometry study enabled the definition of a corrugated airfoil

  6. Unsteady separation experiments on 2-D airfoils, 3-D wings, and model helicopter rotors

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1992-01-01

    Information on unsteady separation and dynamic stall is being obtained from two experimental programs that have been underway at United Technologies Research Center since 1984. The first program is designed to obtain detailed surface pressure and boundary layer condition information during high amplitude pitching oscillations of a large (17.3 in. chord) model wing in a wind tunnel. The second program involves the construction and testing of a pressure-instrumented model helicopter rotor. This presentation describes some of the results of these experiments, and in particular compares the detailed dynamic stall inception information obtained from the oscillating wing with the unsteady separation and reverse flow results measured on the retreating blade side of the model rotor during wind tunnel testing.

  7. Low-fidelity 2D isogeometric aeroelastic optimization with application to a morphing airfoil

    Gillebaart, E.; De Breuker, R.

    2015-01-01

    Low-fidelity isogeometric aeroelastic analysis has not received much attention since the introduction of the isogeometric analysis (IGA) concept, while the combination of IGA and the boundary element method in the form of the potential flow theory shows great potential. This paper presents a two-dim

  8. Airfoil longitudinal gust response in separated vs. attached flows

    Granlund, K.; Monnier, B.; Ol, M.; Williams, D.

    2014-02-01

    Airfoil aerodynamic loads are expected to have quasi-steady, linear dependence on the history of input disturbances, provided that small-amplitude bounds are observed. We explore this assertion for the problem of periodic sinusoidal streamwise gusts, by comparing experiments on nominally 2D airfoils in temporally sinusoidal modulation of freestream speed in a wind tunnel vs. sinusoidal displacement of the airfoil in constant freestream in a water tunnel. In the wind tunnel, there is a streamwise unsteady pressure gradient causing a buoyancy force, while in the water tunnel one must subtract the inertial load of the test article. Both experiments have an added-mass contribution to aerodynamic force. Within measurement resolution, lift and drag, fluctuating and mean, were in good agreement between the two facilities. For incidence angle below static stall, small-disturbance theory was found to be in good agreement with measured lift history, regardless of oscillation frequency. The circulatory component of fluctuating drag was found to be independent of oscillation frequency. For larger incidence angles, there is marked departure between the measured lift history and that predicted from Greenberg's formula. Flow visualization shows coupling between bluff-body shedding and motion-induced shedding, identifiable with lift cancellation or augmentation, depending on the reduced frequency. Isolating the buoyancy effect in the wind tunnel and dynamic tares in the water tunnel, and theoretical calculation of apparent-mass in both cases, we arrive at good agreement in measured circulatory contribution between the two experiments whether the flow is attached or separated substantiating the linear superposition of the various constituents to total lift and drag, and supporting the idea that aerodynamic gust response can legitimately be studied in a steady freestream by oscillating the test article.

  9. Nonlinear aeroelastic behavior of compliant airfoils

    Since the beginning of aviation and up to the present time, airfoils have always been built as rigid structures. They are designed to fly under their divergence speed in order to avoid static aeroelastic instabilities and the resulting large deformations, which are not compatible with the typically low compliance of such airfoils. In recent years, research on airfoil morphing has generated interest in innovative ideas like the use of compliant systems, i.e. systems built to allow for large deformations without failure, in airfoil construction. Such systems can operate in the neighborhood of divergence and take advantage of large aeroelastic servo-effects. This, in turn, allows compact, advanced actuators to control the airfoil's deformation and loads, and hence complement or even replace conventional flaps. In order to analyze and design such compliant, active aeroelastic structures a nonlinear approach to static aeroelasticity is needed, which takes into account the effect of large deformations on aerodynamics and structure. Such an analytical approach is presented in this paper and applied to a compliant passive airfoil as the preliminary step in the realization of a piezoelectrically driven, active aeroelastic airfoil. Wind tunnel test results are also presented and compared with the analytic prediction. The good agreement and the observed behavior in the wind tunnel give confidence in the potential of this innovative idea

  10. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    Kahn, Daniel L. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  11. Design of a new urban wind turbine airfoil using a pressure-load inverse method

    Henriques, J.C.C.; Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques da Silva, F. [LNEC - Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Av. Brasil, 101, 1700-066 Lisboa (Portugal); Estanqueiro, A.I. [INETI - Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents the design methodology of a new wind turbine airfoil that achieves high performance in urban environment by increasing the maximum lift. For this purpose, an inverse method was applied to obtain a new wind turbine blade section with constant pressure-load along the chord, at the design inlet angle. In comparison with conventional blade section designs, the new airfoil has increased maximum lift, reduced leading edge suction peak and controlled soft-stall behaviour, due to a reduction of the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side. Wind tunnel experimental results confirmed the computational results. (author)

  12. Airfoil profile drag increase due to acoustic excitation

    Shearin, John G.; Jones, Michael G.

    1989-04-01

    A two-dimensional airfoil (NACA-0009) is subjected to high intensity pure-tone sound over a 1-5 kHz frequency range while immersed in a flow with 240 ft/sec velocity in a quiet flow facility with a Reynolds number of 3 million. Wake dynamic pressures are determined, and the momentum deficit is used to calculate a two-dimensional drag coefficient. Significant increases in drag are observed when the airfoil is subjected to high-intensity sound at critical frequencies. The increased drag is accompanied by movement of the natural transition location. When the transition is fixed by roughness at 10 percent chord, no further transition movement is observed in response to an acoustic Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance. However, a 4 percent increase in the sectional drag coefficient is noted. It is believed to be due to the sound exciting the flow near the airfoil surface (shear layer), thus causing the existing turbulence to become more intense, possess a higher mixing rate (momentum), and increase the skin friction.

  13. SES2D user's manual

    SES2D is an interactive graphics code designed to generate plots of equation of state data from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-4 computer libraries. This manual discusses the capabilities of the code. It describes the prompts and commands and illustrates their use with a sample run

  14. 2D-Oide effect

    Blanco, O R; Bambade, P

    2015-01-01

    The Oide effect considers the synchrotron radiation in the final focusing quadrupole and it sets a lower limit on the vertical beam size at the Interaction Point, particularly relevant for high energy linear colliders. The theory of the Oide effect was derived considering only the radiation in the focusing plane of the magnet. This article addresses the theoretical calculation of the radiation effect on the beam size consider- ing both focusing and defocusing planes of the quadrupole, refered to as 2D-Oide. The CLIC 3 TeV final quadrupole (QD0) and beam parameters are used to compare the theoretical results from the Oide effect and the 2D-Oide effect with particle tracking in PLACET. The 2D-oide demonstrates to be important as it increases by 17% the contribution to the beam size. Further insight into the aberrations induced by the synchrotron radiation opens the possibility to partially correct the 2D-Oide effect with octupole magn

  15. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    Marion, Lucas; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the...... separation point. A calibration of the code through comparison with experiments has been performed using one set of airfoils. A second set of airfoils has been used for the validation of the calibrated model. Predicted aerodynamic forces for a wide range of angles of attack (0 to 90 deg) are in overall good...

  16. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  17. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  18. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings. (paper)

  19. Assessment of Control Volume Estimation of Thrust for a Sinusoidally Pitching Airfoil at Low Reynolds Number

    Hammer, Patrick; Naguib, Ahmed; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr

    2015-11-01

    The proper estimation of thrust is very important for understanding the aerodynamics of oscillating airfoils at low chord Reynolds number Re. Although direct force measurement is possible, force values at low Re are often small, and separation of the test-model's inertia forces from the data may not be straightforward. A common alternative is a control-volume (CV) approach, where terms in the integral momentum equation are computed from measured wake velocity profiles. Although it is acceptable to use only the mean streamwise-velocity profile in estimating the streamwise force on stationary airfoils, recent work has highlighted the importance of terms relating the velocity fluctuation and pressure distribution in the wake for unsteady airfoils. The goal of the present work is to capitalize on 2D computational data for a harmonically pitching airfoil at Re in the range 2,000-22,000, where all terms in the momentum-integral equation are accessible, to evaluate the importance of the various terms in the equation and assess the accuracy of the assumptions that are typically made in experiments due to the difficulty in measuring certain terms (such as the wake pressure distribution) by comparing the CV results with the actual computed thrust. This work was supported by AFOSR grant number FA9550-10-1-0342.

  20. Airfoil computations using the gamma-Retheta model; Wind turbines

    Soerensen, Niels N.

    2009-05-15

    The present work addresses the validation of the implementation of the Menter, Langtry et al. gamma-theta correlation based transition model [1, 2, 3] in the EllipSys2D code. Firstly the 2. order of accuracy of the code is verified using a grid refinement study for laminar, turbulent and transitional computations. Based on this, an estimate of the error in the computations is determined to be approximately one percent in the attached region. Following the verification of the implemented model, the model is applied to four airfoils, NACA64-018, NACA64-218, NACA64-418 and NACA64-618 and the results are compared to measurements [4] and computations using the Xfoil code by Drela et al. [5]. In the linear pre stall region good agreement is observed both for lift and drag, while differences to both measurements and Xfoil computations are observed in stalled conditions. (au)

  1. Turbine airfoil to shroud attachment method

    Campbell, Christian X; Kulkarni, Anand A; James, Allister W; Wessell, Brian J; Gear, Paul J

    2014-12-23

    Bi-casting a platform (50) onto an end portion (42) of a turbine airfoil (31) after forming a coating of a fugitive material (56) on the end portion. After bi-casting the platform, the coating is dissolved and removed to relieve differential thermal shrinkage stress between the airfoil and platform. The thickness of the coating is varied around the end portion in proportion to varying amounts of local differential process shrinkage. The coating may be sprayed (76A, 76B) onto the end portion in opposite directions parallel to a chord line (41) of the airfoil or parallel to a mid-platform length (80) of the platform to form respective layers tapering in thickness from the leading (32) and trailing (34) edges along the suction side (36) of the airfoil.

  2. Airfoil for a gas turbine

    Liang, George

    2011-01-18

    An airfoil is provided for a gas turbine comprising an outer structure comprising a first wall, an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced relative to the first wall such that a cooling gap is defined between at least portions of the first and second walls, and seal structure provided within the cooling gap between the first and second walls for separating the cooling gap into first and second cooling fluid impingement gaps. An inner surface of the second wall may define an inner cavity. The inner structure may further comprise a separating member for separating the inner cavity of the inner structure into a cooling fluid supply cavity and a cooling fluid collector cavity. The second wall may comprise at least one first impingement passage, at least one second impingement passage, and at least one bleed passage.

  3. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  4. Computational investigation of subsonic torsional airfoil flutter

    Kakkavas, Constantinos

    1998-01-01

    In this thesis single-degree-of-freedom torsional airfoil flutter is investigated using an incompressible potential flow code, a compressible inviscid Euler code and a compressible viscous Navier-Stokes code. It is found that the classical linearized incompressible and compressible flow theories yield unconservative flutter estimates. The computations based on the non-linear codes show for NACA 0006, NACA 0009, NACA 0012 and NACA 0015 airfoils, that the regions of torsional flutter instabilit...

  5. An empirically derived basis for calculating the area, rate, and distribution of water-drop impingement on airfoils

    Bergrun, Norman R

    1952-01-01

    An empirically derived basis for predicting the area, rate, and distribution of water-drop impingement on airfoils of arbitrary section is presented. The concepts involved represent an initial step toward the development of a calculation technique which is generally applicable to the design of thermal ice-prevention equipment for airplane wing and tail surfaces. It is shown that sufficiently accurate estimates, for the purpose of heated-wing design, can be obtained by a few numerical computations once the velocity distribution over the airfoil has been determined. The calculation technique presented is based on results of extensive water-drop trajectory computations for five airfoil cases which consisted of 15-percent-thick airfoils encompassing a moderate lift-coefficient range. The differential equations pertaining to the paths of the drops were solved by a differential analyzer.

  6. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    Šidlof Petr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis and plunging (vertical motion. The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  7. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    Šidlof, Petr; Štěpán, Martin; Vlček, Václav; Řidký, Václav; Šimurda, David; Horáček, Jaromír

    2014-03-01

    The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis) and plunging (vertical motion). The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  8. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA-GRC) linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush-mounted, high-frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading ...

  9. Enhancement of Aerodynamic Properties of an Airfoil by Co Flow Jet (CFJ Flow

    Md. Amzad Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wind tunnel test of baseline airfoil NACA 0015 and CFJ0015-065-065 model was conducted in the Wind tunnel wall test section of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at KUET, Bangladesh. The primary goal of the test was to investigate and compare the airfoil aerodynamic characteristics over a wide range of Angle of Attack (AOA and with a wind tunnel free stream velocity of 12m/s , Re = 1.89×105, Cµ = 0.07 at M = 0.030 kg/s. The CFJ increases CL max by 82.5% and decreases Drag by 16.5% at Stall AOA when compared to the baseline air foil. The main goal is to proof that Flow separation is controlled and delayed with the use of CFJ Technique over an Airfoil.

  10. Probabilistic Design of Hollow Airfoil Composite Structure by Using Finite Element Method

    Mr. Sachin M. Shinde

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study represents simulation of Airfoil composite beam by using Monte Carlo method. A three dimensional static analysis of large displacement type has been carried out. Finite element analysis of NACA0012 airfoil composite structure has been carried out and uncertainty in bending stress is analyzed. Bending stress was objective function. Chord length , beam length ,elastic modulus in XY,YZ,XZ and shear modulus of epoxy graphite in XY,YZ,XZ, ply angle and ply thickness of airfoil section, force are varied within effective range and their effect on bending stress has been analyzed. In order to validate the results, one loop of simulation is benchmarked from results in literature. Ultimately, best set of probabilistic design variable is proposed to reduce bending stress under static loading condition.

  11. 2D-animaatiotuotannon optimointi

    Saturo, Reetta

    2015-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on tutkia 2D-animaatiotuotannon optimoinnin mahdollisuuksia tiukan tuotantoaikataulun vaatimuksissa. Tutkielmassa tarkastellaan kahta asiakasprojektia, jotka on toteutettu pienellä tuotantotiimillä. Työkaluna animaatioissa on käytetty pääosin Adoben After Effects -ohjelmistoa. Tutkielman alussa esitellään animaatiotuotannot, joiden tuloksena syntyi kaksi lyhyttä mainoselokuvaa. Sen jälkeen käydään läpi animaatioelokuvan tuotantoprosessia vaiheittain ja tark...

  12. Head First 2D Geometry

    Fallow), Stray

    2009-01-01

    Having trouble with geometry? Do Pi, The Pythagorean Theorem, and angle calculations just make your head spin? Relax. With Head First 2D Geometry, you'll master everything from triangles, quads and polygons to the time-saving secrets of similar and congruent angles -- and it'll be quick, painless, and fun. Through entertaining stories and practical examples from the world around you, this book takes you beyond boring problems. You'll actually use what you learn to make real-life decisions, like using angles and parallel lines to crack a mysterious CSI case. Put geometry to work for you, and

  13. Prediction of the aerodynamic performance of the Mexico rotor by using airfoil data extracted from CFD

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran;

    2013-01-01

    some models before they can be used in a BEM code. In this article, the airfoil data for the MEXICO (Model EXperiments in Controlled cOnditions) rotor are extracted from CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) results. The azimuthally averaged velocity is used as the sectional velocity to define the angle...

  14. AirfoilPrep.py Documentation: Release 0.1.0

    Ning, S. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    AirfoilPrep.py provides functionality to preprocess aerodynamic airfoil data. Essentially, the module is an object oriented version of the AirfoilPrep spreadsheet with additional functionality and is written in the Python language. It allows the user to read in two-dimensional aerodynamic airfoil data, apply three-dimensional rotation corrections for wind turbine applications, and extend the datato very large angles of attack. This document discusses installation, usage, and documentation of the module.

  15. 2D CFD Simulation of a Circulation Control Inlet Guide Vane

    Hill, Hugh Edward

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of two 2-D computational studies of a circulation control Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) that takes advantage of the Coanda effect for flow vectoring. The IGV in this thesis is an uncambered airfoil that alters circulation around itself by means of a Coanda jet that exhausts along the IGV's trailing edge surface. The IGV is designed for an axial inlet flow at a Mach number of 0.54 and an exit flow angle of 11 degrees. These conditions were selected to match the operat...

  16. Analysis of non-symmetrical flapping airfoils

    W.B.Tay; K.B.Lim

    2009-01-01

    Simulations have been done to assess the lift, thrust and propulsive efficiency of different types of nonsymmetrical airfoils under different flapping configurations. The variables involved are reduced frequency, Strouhal number, pitch amplitude and phase angle. In order to analyze the variables more efficiently, the design of experiments using the response surface methodology is applied. Results show that both the variables and shape of the airfoil have a profound effect on the lift, thrust, and efficiency. By using nonsymmetrical airfoils, average lift coefficient as high as 2.23 can be obtained. The average thrust coefficient and efficiency also reach high values of 2.53 and 0.6 I, respectively. The lift production is highly dependent on the airfoil's shape while thrust production is influenced more heavily by the variables. Efficiency falls somewhere in between. Two-factor interactions are found to exist among the variables. This shows that it is not sufficient to analyze each variable individually. Vorticity diagrams are analyzed to explain the results obtained. Overall, the S1020 airfoil is able to provide relatively good efficiency and at the same time generate high thrust and lift force. These results aid in the design of a better omithopter's wing.

  17. Personalized 2D color maps

    Waldin, Nicholas

    2016-06-24

    2D color maps are often used to visually encode complex data characteristics such as heat or height. The comprehension of color maps in visualization is affected by the display (e.g., a monitor) and the perceptual abilities of the viewer. In this paper we present a novel method to measure a user\\'s ability to distinguish colors of a two-dimensional color map on a given monitor. We show how to adapt the color map to the user and display to optimally compensate for the measured deficiencies. Furthermore, we improve user acceptance of the calibration procedure by transforming the calibration into a game. The user has to sort colors along a line in a 3D color space in a competitive fashion. The errors the user makes in sorting these lines are used to adapt the color map to his perceptual capabilities.

  18. DNTM/R2D, 2-D Transport in X-Y Geometry

    1 - Description of program or function: DNTM/R2D solves the neutron transport equation in two-dimensional X-Y geometry by the discrete nodal transport method. Source and eigenvalue problems can be solved. As compared to the two-dimensional nodal transport code DNTM/2D, the following new improved features are included: - Anisotropic scattering is considered. The order of anisotropic scattering is from P0 to P3. - The cross section input format is the same as for ANISN. Multi- group cross section libraries such as DLC-37 and DLC-BUGLE-80 can be used. 2 - Method of solution: DNTM/R2D uses the discrete nodal transport method. Anisotropic scattering is treated using Legendre expansion. Order of interior flux approximation is 2. Plane leakage approximation of surface flux is used. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of: anisotropic scattering order = 3; material composition = 20; energy groups = 2; angular quadrature = 8; zones = 30. When coarse-mesh re-balancing is used, the maximum number of coarse meshes is 12 in each direction. If the computer permits some arrays can be enlarged to reduce the above restrictions

  19. Comparative Study of Airfoil Flow Separation Criteria

    Laws, Nick; Kahouli, Waad; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow separation impacts a multitude of applications including turbomachinery, wind turbines, and bio-inspired micro-aerial vehicles. In order to achieve maximum performance, some devices operate near the edge of flow separation, and others use dynamic flow separation advantageously. Numerous criteria exist for predicting the onset of airfoil flow separation. This talk presents a comparative study of a number of such criteria, with emphasis paid to speed and accuracy of the calculations. We evaluate the criteria using a two-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method, which allows for rapid analysis (on the order of seconds instead of days for a full Navier-Stokes solution) and design of optimal airfoil geometry and kinematics. Furthermore, dynamic analyses permit evaluation of dynamic stall conditions for enhanced lift via leading edge vortex shedding, commonly present in small flapping-wing flyers such as the bumblebee and hummingbird.

  20. Turbine airfoil fabricated from tapered extrusions

    Marra, John J

    2013-07-16

    An airfoil (30) and fabrication process for turbine blades with cooling channels (26). Tapered tubes (32A-32D) are bonded together in a parallel sequence, forming a leading edge (21), a trailing edge (22), and pressure and suction side walls (23, 24) connected by internal ribs (25). The tapered tubes may be extruded without camber to simplify the extrusion process, then bonded along matching surfaces (34), forming a non-cambered airfoil (28), which may be cambered in a hot forming process and cut (48) to length. The tubes may have tapered walls that are thinner at the blade tip (T1) than at the base (T2), reducing mass. A cap (50) may be attached to the blade tip. A mounting lug (58) may be forged (60) on the airfoil base and then machined, completing the blade for mounting in a turbine rotor disk.

  1. Compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system

    Little, David A.; Pu, Zhengxiang

    2015-08-18

    A compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system for reducing a gap between a tip of a compressor airfoil and a radially adjacent component of a turbine engine is disclosed. The turbine engine may include ID and OD flowpath boundaries configured to minimize compressor airfoil tip clearances during turbine engine operation in cooperation with one or more clearance reduction systems that are configured to move the rotor assembly axially to reduce tip clearance. The configurations of the ID and OD flowpath boundaries enhance the effectiveness of the axial movement of the rotor assembly, which includes movement of the ID flowpath boundary. During operation of the turbine engine, the rotor assembly may be moved axially to increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  2. Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils

    Liang, George

    2011-06-28

    An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

  3. Blowing Circulation Control on a Seaplane Airfoil

    Guo, B. D.; Liu, P. Q.; Qu, Q. L.

    2011-09-01

    RANS simulations are presented for blowing circulation control on a seaplane airfoil. Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model and pressure-based coupled algorithm with second-order discretization were adopted to simulate the compressible flow. Both clear and simple flap configuration were simulated with blowing momentum coefficient Cμ = 0, 0.15 and 0.30. The results show that blowing near the airfoil trailing edge could enhance the Coanda effect, delay the flow separation, and increase the lift coefficient dramatically. The blowing circulation control is promising to apply to taking off and landing of an amphibious aircraft or seaplane.

  4. Learn Unity for 2D game development

    Thorn, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The only Unity book specifically covering 2D game development Written by Alan Thorn, experience game developer and author of seven books on game programming Hands-on examples of all major aspects of 2D game development using Unity

  5. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong; Zhu, Weijun; Wang, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  6. APPROXIMATION OF FREE-FORM CURVE – AIRFOIL SHAPE

    CHONG PERK LIN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximation of free-form shape is essential in numerous engineering applications, particularly in automotive and aircraft industries. Commercial CAD software for the approximation of free-form shape is based almost exclusively on parametric polynomial and rational parametric polynomial. The parametric curve is defined by vector function of one independent variable R(u = (x(u, y(u, z(u, where 0≤u≤1. Bézier representation is one of the parametric functions, which is widely used in the approximating of free-form shape. Given a string of points with the assumption of sufficiently dense to characterise airfoil shape, it is desirable to approximate the shape with Bézier representation. The expectation is that the representation function is close to the shape within an acceptable working tolerance. In this paper, the aim is to explore the use of manual and automated methods for approximating section curve of airfoil with Bézier representation.

  7. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  8. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  9. Causal mechanisms in airfoil-circulation formation

    Zhu, J. Y.; Liu, T. S.; Liu, L. Q.; Zou, S. F.; Wu, J. Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we trace the dynamic origin, rather than any kinematic interpretations, of lift in two-dimensional flow to the physical root of airfoil circulation. We show that the key causal process is the vorticity creation by tangent pressure gradient at the airfoil surface via no-slip condition, of which the theoretical basis has been given by Lighthill ["Introduction: Boundary layer theory," in Laminar Boundary Layers, edited by L. Rosenhead (Clarendon Press, 1963), pp. 46-113], which we further elaborate. This mechanism can be clearly revealed in terms of vorticity formulation but is hidden in conventional momentum formulation, and hence has long been missing in the history of one's efforts to understand lift. By a careful numerical simulation of the flow around a NACA-0012 airfoil, and using both Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions, we illustrate the detailed transient process by which the airfoil gains its circulation and demonstrate the dominating role of relevant dynamical causal mechanisms at the boundary. In so doing, we find that the various statements for the establishment of Kutta condition in steady inviscid flow actually correspond to a sequence of events in unsteady viscous flow.

  10. ANALYSIS OF TRANSONIC FLOW PAST CUSPED AIRFOILS

    Jiří Stodůlka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transonic flow past two cusped airfoils is numerically solved and achieved results are analyzed by means of flow behavior and oblique shocks formation.Regions around sharp trailing edges are studied in detail and parameters of shock waves are solved and compared using classical shock polar approach and verified by reduction parameters for symmetric configurations.

  11. Optimization Criteria and Sailplane Airfoil Design

    Popelka, Lukáš; Matějka, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2007), s. 74-78. ISSN 0744-8996 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2076403; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aerodynamic optimization * airfoil Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  12. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoil Using Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm and Pareto Optimal Front

    Ziaul Huque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and response surface-based multiobjective design optimization were performed for six different 2D airfoil profiles, and the Pareto optimal front of each airfoil is presented. FLUENT, which is a commercial CFD simulation code, was used to determine the relevant aerodynamic loads. The Lift Coefficient (CL and Drag Coefficient (CD data at a range of 0° to 12° angles of attack (α and at three different Reynolds numbers (Re=68,459, 479, 210, and 958, 422 for all the six airfoils were obtained. Realizable k-ε turbulence model with a second-order upwind solution method was used in the simulations. The standard least square method was used to generate response surface by the statistical code JMP. Elitist Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II was used to determine the Pareto optimal set based on the response surfaces. Each Pareto optimal solution represents a different compromise between design objectives. This gives the designer a choice to select a design compromise that best suits the requirements from a set of optimal solutions. The Pareto solution set is presented in the form of a Pareto optimal front.

  13. An airfoil for general aviation applications

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.; Somers, Dan M.

    1990-01-01

    A new airfoil, the NLF(1)-0115, has been recently designed at the NASA Langley Research Center for use in general-aviation applications. During the development of this airfoil, special emphasis was placed on experiences and observations gleaned from other successful general-aviation airfoils. For example, the flight lift-coefficient range is the same as that of the turbulent-flow NACA 23015 airfoil. Also, although beneficial for reducing drag and having large amounts of lift, the NLF(1)-0115 avoids the use of aft loading which can lead to large stick forces if utilized on portions of the wing having ailerons. Furthermore, not using aft loading eliminates the concern that the high pitching-moment coefficient generated by such airfoils can result in large trim drags if cruise flaps are not employed. The NASA NLF(1)-0115 has a thickness of 15 percent. It is designed primarily for general-aviation aircraft with wing loadings of 718 to 958 N/sq m (15 to 20 lb/sq ft). Low profile drag as a result of laminar flow is obtained over the range from c sub l = 0.1 and R = 9x10(exp 6) (the cruise condition) to c sub l = 0.6 and R = 4 x 10(exp 6) (the climb condition). While this airfoil can be used with flaps, it is designed to achieve c(sub l, max) = 1.5 at R = 2.6 x 10(exp 6) without flaps. The zero-lift pitching moment is held at c sub m sub o = 0.055. The hinge moment for a .20c aileron is fixed at a value equal to that of the NACA 63 sub 2-215 airfoil, c sub h = 0.00216. The loss in c (sub l, max) due to leading edge roughness, rain, or insects at R = 2.6 x 10 (exp 6) is 11 percent as compared with 14 percent for the NACA 23015.

  14. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  15. Computations of droplet impingement on airfoils in two-phase flow

    The aerodynamic effects of leading-edge accretion can raise important safety concerns since the formulation of ice causes severe degradation in aerodynamic performance as compared with the clean airfoil. The objective of this study is to develop a numerical simulation strategy for predicting the particle trajectory around an MS-0317 airfoil in the test section of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and to investigate the impingement characteristics of droplets on the airfoil surface. In particular, predictions of the mean velocity and turbulence diffusion using turbulent flow solver and continuous random walk method were desired throughout this flow domain in order to investigate droplet dispersion. The collection efficiency distributions over the airfoil surface in simulations with different numbers of droplets, various integration time-steps and particle sizes were compared with experimental data. The large droplet impingement data indicated the trends in impingement characteristics with respect to particle size; the maximum collection efficiency located at the upper surface near the leading edge, and the maximum value and total collection efficiency were increased as the particle size was increased. The extent of the area impinged on by particles also increased with the increment of the particle size, which is similar as compared with experimental data

  16. Imaging in 2D media

    Medvedev, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    Stacking by CDP technique is inapplicable for processing of data from bottom seismic stations or acoustic sonobuoys. In addition, big amount of unknown velocity and structural parameters of the real layered medium do not allow these parameters to be defined by standard processing methods. Local sloped stacking is proposed for simultaneous obtaining the stacked tracks, travel time curve of a chosen wave, and the first derivative of this travel time curve. The additionally defined parameters are second derivative of this travel time curve and integrated average of squared travel time curve. These data are sufficient to reduce the amount of unknown parameters (down to one-two for each boundary) when layer-by-layer top-to-bottom processing. As a result, the stable estimates of velocity parameters of the layered (isotropic or anisotropic) medium can be obtained and stacked tracks obtained by local sloped staking can be transformed into boundaries in the time and depth sections.

  17. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan L.

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  18. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  19. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  20. Surface modelling for 2D imagery

    Lieng, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Vector graphics provides powerful tools for drawing scalable 2D imagery. With the rise of mobile computers, of different types of displays and image resolutions, vector graphics is receiving an increasing amount of attention. However, vector graphics is not the leading framework for creating and manipulating 2D imagery. The reason for this reluctance of employing vector graphical frameworks is that it is difficult to handle complex behaviour of colour across the 2D domain. ...

  1. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    Han, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (re)discovery of various two dimensional (2D) materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  2. Perspectives for spintronics in 2D materials

    Wei Han

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has been especially creative for spintronics since the (rediscovery of various two dimensional (2D materials. Due to the unusual physical characteristics, 2D materials have provided new platforms to probe the spin interaction with other degrees of freedom for electrons, as well as to be used for novel spintronics applications. This review briefly presents the most important recent and ongoing research for spintronics in 2D materials.

  3. 2D Barcode for DNA Encoding

    Elena Purcaru

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solution for endcoding/decoding DNA information in 2D barcodes. First part focuses on the existing techniques and symbologies in 2D barcodes field. The 2D barcode PDF417 is presented as starting point. The adaptations and optimizations on PDF417 and on DataMatrix lead to the solution – DNA2DBC – DeoxyriboNucleic Acid Two Dimensional Barcode. The second part shows the DNA2DBC encoding/decoding process step by step. In conclusions are enumerated the most important features of 2D barcode implementation for DNA.

  4. 2D Barcode for DNA Encoding

    Purcaru, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a solution for endcoding/decoding DNA information in 2D barcodes. First part focuses on the existing techniques and symbologies in 2D barcodes field. The 2D barcode PDF417 is presented as starting point. The adaptations and optimizations on PDF417 and on DataMatrix lead to the solution - DNA2DBC - DeoxyriboNucleic Acid Two Dimensional Barcode. The second part shows the DNA2DBC encoding/decoding process step by step. In conclusions are enumerated the most important features of 2D barcode implementation for DNA.

  5. Bedform characterization through 2D spectral analysis

    Lefebvre, Alice; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Winter, Christian

    energetic peak of the 2D spectrum was found and its energy, frequency and direction were calculated. A power-law was fitted to the average of slices taken through the 2D spectrum; its slope and y-intercept were calculated. Using these results the test area was morphologically classified into 4 distinct...... characteristics using twodimensional (2D) spectral analysis is presented and tested on seabed elevation data from the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea, where large compound bedforms are found. The bathymetric data were divided into 20x20 m areas on which a 2D spectral analysis was applied. The most...

  6. UNITS IN $F_2D_{2p}$

    Kaur, Kuldeep; Khan, Manju

    2012-01-01

    Let $p$ be an odd prime, $D_{2p}$ be the dihedral group of order 2p, and $F_{2}$ be the finite field with two elements. If * denotes the canonical involution of the group algebra $F_2D_{2p}$, then bicyclic units are unitary units. In this note, we investigate the structure of the group $\\mathcal{B}(F_2D_{2p})$, generated by the bicyclic units of the group algebra $F_2D_{2p}$. Further, we obtain the structure of the unit group $\\mathcal{U}(F_2D_{2p})$ and the unitary subgroup $\\mathcal{U}_*(F_...

  7. Design Of An Aerodynamic Measurement System For Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airfoils

    L. Velázquez-Araque

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and validation of a measurement system for aerodynamic characteristics of unmanned aerial vehicles. An aerodynamic balance was designed in order to measure the lift, drag forces and pitching moment for different airfoils. During the design process, several aspects were analyzed in order to produce an efficient design, for instance the range of changes of the angle of attack with and a small increment and the versatility of being adapted to different type of airfoils, since it is a wire balance it was aligned and calibrated as well. Wind tunnel tests of a two dimensional NACA four digits family airfoil and four different modifications of this airfoil were performed to validate the aerodynamic measurement system. The modification of this airfoil was made in order to create a blowing outlet with the shape of a step on the suction surface. Therefore, four different locations along the cord line for this blowing outlet were analyzed. This analysis involved the aerodynamic performance which meant obtaining lift, drag and pitching moment coefficients curves as a function of the angle of attack experimentally for the situation where the engine of the aerial vehicle is turned off, called the no blowing condition, by means of wind tunnel tests. The experiments were performed in a closed circuit wind tunnel with an open test section. Finally, results of the wind tunnel tests were compared with numerical results obtained by means of computational fluid dynamics as well as with other experimental references and found to be in good agreement.

  8. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise

    Gill, James; Zhang, Xin; Joseph, Phillip F.

    2013-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge ra...

  9. Improving CAP-TSD steady pressure solutions through airfoil slope modification

    Mitterer, Kent F.; Maughmer, Mark D.; Silva, Walter A.; Batina, John T.

    1996-01-01

    A modification of airfoil section geometry is examined for improvement of the leading edge pressures predicted by the Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance (CAP-TSD). Results are compared with Eppler solutions to assess improvement. Preliminary results indicate that a fading function modification of section slopes is capable of significant improvements in the pressures near the leading edge computed by CAP-TSD. Application of this modification to airfoil geometry before use in CAP-TSD is shown to reduce the nonphysical pressure peak predicted by the transonic small disturbance solver. A second advantage of the slope modification is the substantial reduction in sensitivity of CAP-TSD steady pressure solutions to the computational mesh.

  10. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  11. Turbine engine airfoil and platform assembly

    Campbell, Christian X.; James, Allister W.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-07-31

    A turbine airfoil (22A) is formed by a first process using a first material. A platform (30A) is formed by a second process using a second material that may be different from the first material. The platform (30A) is assembled around a shank (23A) of the airfoil. One or more pins (36A) extend from the platform into holes (28) in the shank (23A). The platform may be formed in two portions (32A, 34A) and placed around the shank, enclosing it. The two platform portions may be bonded to each other. Alternately, the platform (30B) may be cast around the shank (23B) using a metal alloy with better castability than that of the blade and shank, which may be specialized for thermal tolerance. The pins (36A-36D) or holes for them do not extend to an outer surface (31) of the platform, avoiding stress concentrations.

  12. EUDP Project: Low Noise Airfoil - Final Report

    to develop and implement a design procedure to manufacture airfoil profiles with low noise emission. The project involved two experimental campaigns: one in the LM Wind Power wind tunnel, a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, in Lunderskov (DK), the second one in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind...... Tunnel at the Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Department of Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA,(USA), also a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel but equipped with an anechoic chamber that allow to perform acoustic measurements. On the theoretical side, the above experiments yield a series of model validations......This document summarizes the scientific results achieved during the EUDP-funded project `Low-Noise Airfoil'. The goals of this project are, on one side to develop a measurement technique that permits the evaluation of trailing edge noise in a classical aerodynamic wind tunnel, and on the other side...

  13. BIFURCATIONS OF AIRFOIL IN INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW

    LiuFei; YangYiren

    2005-01-01

    Bifurcations of an airfoil with nonlinear pitching stiffness in incompressible flow are investigated. The pitching spring is regarded as a spring with cubic stiffness. The motion equations of the airfoil are written as the four dimensional one order differential equations. Taking air speed and the linear part of pitching stiffness as the parameters, the analytic solutions of the critical boundaries of pitchfork bifurcations and Hopf bifurcations are obtained in 2 dimensional parameter plane. The stabilities of the equilibrium points and the limit cycles in different regions of 2 dimensional parameter plane are analyzed. By means of harmonic balance method, the approximate critical boundaries of 2-multiple semi-stable limit cycle bifurcations are obtained, and the bifurcation points of supercritical or subcritical Hopf bifurcation are found. Some numerical simulation results are given.

  14. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  15. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2013-01-01

    objective of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on the previous in-house airfoil family which were optimized at a Reynolds number of 3......-stream Mach number of 0.25 at the blade tip. Results show that these new airfoils achieve high power coefficient in a wide range of angles of attack (AOA) and they are extremely insensitive to surface roughness....

  16. Low Reynolds number airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    Giguere, Philippe; Selig, Michael S. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Chanpaign (United States). Dept. of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    To facilitate the airfoil selection process for small horizontal-axis wind turbines, an extensive database of low Reynolds number airfoils has been generated. The database, which consists of lift and drag data, was obtained from experiments conducted in the same wind tunnel testing facility. Experiments with simulated leading-edge roughness were also performed to model the effect of blade erosion and the accumulation of roughness elements, such as insect debris, on airfoil performance. Based on the lift curves and drag polars, guidelines that should be useful in selecting appropriate airfoils for particular blade designs are given. Some of these guidelines are also applicable to larger HAWTs. (author)

  17. CFD study of thick flatback airfoils using OpenFOAM

    Milián Sanz, José María

    2010-01-01

    New airfoil designs are created in order to improve both the structural and aerodynamic properties of a wind turbine blade, one example of these are flatback airfoils. Furthermore, a new CFD programme exists in order to study the behavior of the flow around an airfoil, OpenFOAM. The flow around these new airfoils using OpenFOAM is studied in the present thesis. It is used the turbulence model k-! SST for fully turbulent boundary layer and free transition at the boundary layer, modeled with th...

  18. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  19. 2D-ACAR investigations of PPT aramid fibres

    2D-ACAR spectra of PPT (poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide)) fibres which contain structural elongated open spaces in the crystallographic unit cell show a p-Ps peak with an elliptical cross-section and side lobes. Peak broadening suggests dimensions of ∝14-17 by 7-9 A for the open spaces and indicates some penetration of Ps into the interlayer spacing. The side lobes can be related to projected reciprocal lattice points and indicate Ps delocalization. 2D-ACAR has also been used to study the evolution of water release from the open spaces. (orig.)

  20. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables

  1. 2D NMR studies of biomolecules

    The work described in this thesis comprises two related subjects. The first part describes methods to derive high-resolution structures of proteins in solution using two-dimensional (2-D) NMR. The second part describes 2-D NMR studies on the interaction between proteins and DNA. (author). 261 refs.; 52 figs.; 23 tabs

  2. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...

  3. Annotated Bibliography of EDGE2D Use

    J.D. Strachan and G. Corrigan

    2005-06-24

    This annotated bibliography is intended to help EDGE2D users, and particularly new users, find existing published literature that has used EDGE2D. Our idea is that a person can find existing studies which may relate to his intended use, as well as gain ideas about other possible applications by scanning the attached tables.

  4. Security Issues for 2D Barcodes Ticketing Systems

    Cristian Toma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solution for endcoding/decoding access to the subway public transportation systems. First part of the paper is dedicated through section one and two to the most used 2D barcodes used in the market – QR and DataMatrix. The sample for DataMatrix is author propietary and the QR sample is from the QR standard [2]. The section three presents MMS and Digital Rights Management topics used for issuing the 2D barcodes tickets. The second part of the paper, starting with section four shows the architecture of Subway Ticketing Systems and the proposed procedure for the ticket issuing. The conclusions identify trends of the security topics in the public transportation systems.

  5. Inertial solvation in femtosecond 2D spectra

    Hybl, John; Albrecht Ferro, Allison; Farrow, Darcie; Jonas, David

    2001-03-01

    We have used 2D Fourier transform spectroscopy to investigate polar solvation. 2D spectroscopy can reveal molecular lineshapes beneath ensemble averaged spectra and freeze molecular motions to give an undistorted picture of the microscopic dynamics of polar solvation. The transition from "inhomogeneous" to "homogeneous" 2D spectra is governed by both vibrational relaxation and solvent motion. Therefore, the time dependence of the 2D spectrum directly reflects the total response of the solvent-solute system. IR144, a cyanine dye with a dipole moment change upon electronic excitation, was used to probe inertial solvation in methanol and propylene carbonate. Since the static Stokes' shift of IR144 in each of these solvents is similar, differences in the 2D spectra result from solvation dynamics. Initial results indicate that the larger propylene carbonate responds more slowly than methanol, but appear to be inconsistent with rotational estimates of the inertial response. To disentangle intra-molecular vibrations from solvent motion, the 2D spectra of IR144 will be compared to the time-dependent 2D spectra of the structurally related nonpolar cyanine dye HDITCP.

  6. Internal Photoemission Spectroscopy of 2-D Materials

    Nguyen, Nhan; Li, Mingda; Vishwanath, Suresh; Yan, Rusen; Xiao, Shudong; Xing, Huili; Cheng, Guangjun; Hight Walker, Angela; Zhang, Qin

    Recent research has shown the great benefits of using 2-D materials in the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET), which is considered a promising candidate for the beyond-CMOS technology. The on-state current of TFET can be enhanced by engineering the band alignment of different 2D-2D or 2D-3D heterostructures. Here we present the internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) approach to determine the band alignments of various 2-D materials, in particular SnSe2 and WSe2, which have been proposed for new TFET designs. The metal-oxide-2-D semiconductor test structures are fabricated and characterized by IPE, where the band offsets from the 2-D semiconductor to the oxide conduction band minimum are determined by the threshold of the cube root of IPE yields as a function of photon energy. In particular, we find that SnSe2 has a larger electron affinity than most semiconductors and can be combined with other semiconductors to form near broken-gap heterojunctions with low barrier heights which can produce a higher on-state current. The details of data analysis of IPE and the results from Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements will also be presented and discussed.

  7. 2D supergravity in p+1 dimensions

    Gustafsson, H.; Lindstrom, U.

    1998-01-01

    We describe new $N$-extended 2D supergravities on a $(p+1)$-dimensional (bosonic) space. The fundamental objects are moving frame densities that equip each $(p+1)$-dimensional point with a 2D ``tangent space''. The theory is presented in a $[p+1, 2]$ superspace. For the special case of $p=1$ we recover the 2D supergravities in an unusual form. The formalism has been developed with applications to the string-parton picture of $D$-branes at strong coupling in mind.

  8. 2D Barcode for DNA Encoding

    Elena Purcaru; Cristian Toma

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a solution for endcoding/decoding DNA information in 2D barcodes. First part focuses on the existing techniques and symbologies in 2D barcodes field. The 2D barcode PDF417 is presented as starting point. The adaptations and optimizations on PDF417 and on DataMatrix lead to the solution – DNA2DBC – DeoxyriboNucleic Acid Two Dimensional Barcode. The second part shows the DNA2DBC encoding/decoding process step by step. In conclusions are enumerated the most important features ...

  9. Electron excitation cross sections for the 2s(2)2p(3)4S(O) -- 2s(2)2p(3)2D(O) (forbidden) and 4S(O) -- 2s2p(4) 4P (resonance) transitions in O II

    Zuo, M.; Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I. D.; Tayal, S. S.; Mclaughlin, Brendan M.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition 4S(O) -- 2S(2)2p(3) 2D(O) (lambda-lambda 3726, 3729) and the first allowed (resonance) transition 4S(O) -- 2s2p(4) 4P(lambda-833) in O II. Use is made of electron energy loss and merged-beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 (threshold) to 15 eV for the S -- D transition, and 14.9 (threshold) to 40 eV for the S -- P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the O II beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically backscattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the 4S(O) -- 2s(2)2p(3)2P(O) (lambda-2470) transition.

  10. Electron Excitation Cross Sections for the S II Transitions: 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 3) 4S(exp o) approaches 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 3) 2D(exp o), 2P(exp o), and 3s3p(exp 4) 4P

    Liao, C.; Chutjian, A.; Hitz, D.; Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical collisional excitation cross sections are reported for the transitions 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 3)4S(exp o) approaches 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 3) 2D(exp o), 2P(exp o), and 3s3P(exp 4) 4P in S II. The transition wavelengths (energies) are 6716 A (1.85 eV), 4069 A (3.05 eV), and 1256 A (9.87 eV), respectively. In the experiments, use is made of the energy-loss merged-beams method. The metastable fraction of the S II beam was assessed and minimized. The contribution of elastically scattered electrons was reduced by the use of a lowered solenoidal magnetic field and a modulated radio-frequency voltage on the analyzing plates and by retarding grids to reject the elastically scattered electrons with larger Larmor radii. For each transition, comparisons are made among experiments, the new 19 state R-matrix calculation, and three other close-coupling calculations.

  11. S822 and S823 Airfoils: October 1992--December 1993

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of thick airfoils for 3- to 10-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines, the S822 and S823, has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  12. Investigations of the transonic flow around oscillating airfoils

    Tijdeman, H.

    1977-01-01

    Exploratory wind-tunnel experiments in high-subsonic and transonic flow on a conventional airfoil with oscillating flap and a supercritical airfoil oscillating in pitch are described. In the analysis of the experimental results, emphasis is placed upon the typical aspects of transonic flow, namely t

  13. Bifurcation and chaos analysis for aeroelastic airfoil with freeplay structural nonlinearity in pitch

    The dynamics character of a two degree-of-freedom aeroelastic airfoil with combined freeplay and cubic stiffness nonlinearities in pitch submitted to supersonic and hypersonic flow has been gaining significant attention. The Poincaré mapping method and Floquet theory are adopted to analyse the limit cycle oscillation flutter and chaotic motion of this system. The result shows that the limit cycle oscillation flutter can be accurately predicted by the Floquet multiplier. The phase trajectories of both the pitch and plunge motion are obtained and the results show that the plunge motion is much more complex than the pitch motion. It is also proved that initial conditions have important influences on the dynamics character of the airfoil system. In a certain range of airspeed and with the same system parameters, the stable limit cycle oscillation, chaotic and multi-periodic motions can be detected under different initial conditions. The figure of the Poincaré section also approves the previous conclusion

  14. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  15. A CFD Database for Airfoils and Wings at Post-Stall Angles of Attack

    Petrilli, Justin; Paul, Ryan; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Frink, Neal T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from an ongoing effort to develop an aerodynamic database from Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational analysis of airfoils and wings at stall and post-stall angles of attack. The data obtained from this effort will be used for validation and refinement of a low-order post-stall prediction method developed at NCSU, and to fill existing gaps in high angle of attack data in the literature. Such data could have potential applications in post-stall flight dynamics, helicopter aerodynamics and wind turbine aerodynamics. An overview of the NASA TetrUSS CFD package used for the RANS computational approach is presented. Detailed results for three airfoils are presented to compare their stall and post-stall behavior. The results for finite wings at stall and post-stall conditions focus on the effects of taper-ratio and sweep angle, with particular attention to whether the sectional flows can be approximated using two-dimensional flow over a stalled airfoil. While this approximation seems reasonable for unswept wings even at post-stall conditions, significant spanwise flow on stalled swept wings preclude the use of two-dimensional data to model sectional flows on swept wings. Thus, further effort is needed in low-order aerodynamic modeling of swept wings at stalled conditions.

  16. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date

  17. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  18. 2D Saturable Absorbers for Fibre Lasers

    Robert I. Woodward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D nanomaterials are an emergent and promising platform for future photonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we review recent progress demonstrating the application of 2D nanomaterials as versatile, wideband saturable absorbers for Q-switching and mode-locking fibre lasers. We focus specifically on the family of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, including MoS2, MoSe2 and WS2.

  19. Beltrami States in 2D Electron Magnetohydrodynamics

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the Hamiltonian formulations along with the Poisson brackets for two-dimensional (2D) electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) flows are developed. These formulations are used to deduce the Beltrami states for 2D EMHD flows. In the massless electron limit, the EMHD Beltrami states reduce to the force-free states, though there is no force-free Beltrami state in the general EMHD case.

  20. Matrix models and 2-D gravity

    In these lectures, I shall focus on the matrix formulation of 2-d gravity. In the first one, I shall discuss the main results of the continuum formulation of 2-d gravity, starting from the first renormalization group calculations which led to the concept of the conformal anomaly, going through the Polyakov bosonic string and the Liouville action, up to the recent results on the scaling properties of conformal field theories coupled to 2-d gravity. In the second lecture, I shall discuss the discrete formulation of 2-d gravity in term of random lattices, and the mapping onto random matrix models. The occurrence of critical points in the planar limit and the scaling limit at those critical points will be described, as well as the identification of these scaling limits with continuum 2-d gravity coupled to some matter field theory. In the third lecture, the double scaling limit in the one matrix model, and its connection with continuum non perturbative 2-d gravity, will be presented. The connection with the KdV hierarchy and the general form of the string equation will be discuted. In the fourth lecture, I shall discuss the non-perturbative effects present in the non perturbative solutions, in the case of pure gravity. The Schwinger-Dyson equations for pure gravity in the double scaling limit are described and their compatibility with the solutions of the string equation for pure gravity is shown to be somewhat problematic

  1. 2d index and surface operators

    In this paper we compute the superconformal index of 2d (2,2) supersymmetric gauge theories. The 2d superconformal index, a.k.a. flavored elliptic genus, is computed by a unitary matrix integral much like the matrix integral that computes the 4d superconformal index. We compute the 2d index explicitly for a number of examples. In the case of abelian gauge theories we see that the index is invariant under flop transition and under CY-LG correspondence. The index also provides a powerful check of the Seiberg-type duality for non-abelian gauge theories discovered by Hori and Tong. In the later half of the paper, we study half-BPS surface operators in N=2 superconformal gauge theories. They are engineered by coupling the 2d (2,2) supersymmetric gauge theory living on the support of the surface operator to the 4d N=2 theory, so that different realizations of the same surface operator with a given Levi type are related by a 2d analogue of the Seiberg duality. The index of this coupled system is computed by using the tools developed in the first half of the paper. The superconformal index in the presence of surface defect is expected to be invariant under generalized S-duality. We demonstrate that it is indeed the case. In doing so the Seiberg-type duality of the 2d theory plays an important role

  2. Active Control of Flow around NACA 0015 Airfoil by Using DBD Plasma Actuator

    Şanlısoy A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effect of plasma actuator on a flat plate and manipulation of flow separation on NACA0015 airfoil with plasma actuator at low Reynolds numbers were experimentally investigated. In the first section of the study, plasma actuator which consists of positive and grounded electrode couple and dielectric layer, located on a flat plate was actuated at different frequencies and peak to peak voltages in range of 3-5 kHz and 6-12 kV respectively. Theinduced air flow velocity on the surface of flat plate was measured by pitot tube at different locations behind the actuator. The influence of dielectricthickness and unsteady actuation with duty cycle was also examined. In the second section, the effect of plasma actuator on NACA0015 airfoil was studied atReynolds number 15000 and 30000. Four plasma actuators were placed at x/C = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.9, and different electrode combinations were activated by sinusoidal signal. Flow visualizations were done when the attack angles were 0°, 5°, 10°, 15° and 20°. The results indicate that up to the 15° attack angle, the separated flow was reattached by plasma actuator at 12kV peak to peak voltage and 4 kHz frequency. However, 12 kVpp voltage was insufficient to reattach the flow at 20° angle of attack. The separated flow could be reattached by increasing the voltage up to 13 kV. Lift coefficient was also increased by the manipulated flow over the airfoil. Results showed that even high attack angles, the actuators can control the flow separation and prevent the airfoil from stall at low Reynolds numbers.

  3. Tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil

    Moreau, Danielle J.; Doolan, Con J.

    2016-02-01

    This study is concerned with the flow-induced noise of a smooth wall-mounted finite airfoil with flat ended tip and natural boundary layer transition. Far-field noise measurements have been taken at a single observer location and with a microphone array in the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel for a wall-mounted finite airfoil with aspect ratios of L / C = 1 - 3, at a range of Reynolds numbers (ReC = 7.9 ×105 - 1.6 ×106, based on chord) and geometric angles of attack (α = 0 - 6 °). At these Reynolds numbers, the wall-mounted finite airfoil produces a broadband noise contribution with a number of discrete equispaced tones at non-zero angles of attack. Spectral data are also presented for the noise produced due to three-dimensional vortex flow near the airfoil tip and wall junction to show the contributions of these flow features to airfoil noise generation. Tonal noise production is linked to the presence of a transitional flow state to the trailing edge and an accompanying region of mildly separated flow on the pressure surface. The separated flow region and tonal noise source location shift along the airfoil trailing edge towards the free-end region with increasing geometric angle of attack due to the influence of the tip flow field over the airfoil span. Tonal envelopes defining the operating conditions for tonal noise production from a wall-mounted finite airfoil are derived and show that the domain of tonal noise production differs significantly from that of a two-dimensional airfoil. Tonal noise production shifts to lower Reynolds numbers and higher geometric angles of attack as airfoil aspect ratio is reduced.

  4. Reversible airfoils for stopped rotors in high speed flight

    This study starts with the design of a reversible airfoil rib for stopped-rotor applications, where the sharp trailing-edge morphs into the rounded leading-edge, and vice-versa. A NACA0012 airfoil is approximated in a piecewise linear manner and straight, rigid outer profile links used to define the airfoil contour. The end points of the profile links connect to control links, each set on a central actuation rod via an offset. Chordwise motion of the actuation rod moves the control and the profile links and reverses the airfoil. The paper describes the design methodology and evolution of the final design, based on which two reversible airfoil ribs were fabricated and used to assemble a finite span reversible rotor/wing demonstrator. The profile links were connected by Aluminum strips running in the spanwise direction which provided stiffness as well as support for a pre-tensioned elastomeric skin. An inter-rib connector with a curved-front nose piece supports the leading-edge. The model functioned well and was able to reverse smoothly back-and-forth, on application and reversal of a voltage to the motor. Navier–Stokes CFD simulations (using the TURNS code) show that the drag coefficient of the reversible airfoil (which had a 13% maximum thickness due to the thickness of the profile links) was comparable to that of the NACA0013 airfoil. The drag of a 16% thick elliptical airfoil was, on average, about twice as large, while that of a NACA0012 in reverse flow was 4–5 times as large, even prior to stall. The maximum lift coefficient of the reversible airfoil was lower than the elliptical airfoil, but higher than the NACA0012 in reverse flow operation. (paper)

  5. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong; Zhu, Weijun; Wang, Xudong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  6. 2-D DOA Estimation Based on 2D-MUSIC%基于2D-MUSIC算法的DOA估计

    康亚芳; 王静; 张清泉; 行小帅

    2014-01-01

    This paper discussed the performance of classical two-dimensional DOA estimation with 2D-MUSIC, based on the mathematical model of planar array and 2D-MUSIC DOA estimation, Taking uniform planar array for example, comput-er simulation experiment was carried for the effect of three kinds of different parameters on 2-D DOA estimation, and the simulation results were analyzed. And also verification test about the corresponding algorithm performance under the differ-ent parameters was discussed.%利用经典的2D-MUSIC算法对二维阵列的DOA估计进行了研究,在平面阵列数学模型以及2D-MUSIC算法的DOA估计模型基础上,以均匀平面阵列为例,对3种不同参数的DOA估计进行了计算机仿真,分析了仿真结果。得出了在不同参数变化趋势下DOA估计的相应变化情况。

  7. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades

  8. Transonic airfoil design for helicopter rotor applications

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Jackson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the fact that the flow over a rotor blade is strongly influenced by locally three-dimensional and unsteady effects, practical experience has always demonstrated that substantial improvements in the aerodynamic performance can be gained by improving the steady two-dimensional charateristics of the airfoil(s) employed. The two phenomena known to have great impact on the overall rotor performance are: (1) retreating blade stall with the associated large pressure drag, and (2) compressibility effects on the advancing blade leading to shock formation and the associated wave drag and boundary-layer separation losses. It was concluded that: optimization routines are a powerful tool for finding solutions to multiple design point problems; the optimization process must be guided by the judicious choice of geometric and aerodynamic constraints; optimization routines should be appropriately coupled to viscous, not inviscid, transonic flow solvers; hybrid design procedures in conjunction with optimization routines represent the most efficient approach for rotor airfroil design; unsteady effects resulting in the delay of lift and moment stall should be modeled using simple empirical relations; and inflight optimization of aerodynamic loads (e.g., use of variable rate blowing, flaps, etc.) can satisfy any number of requirements at design and off-design conditions.

  9. Airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    Liang, George

    2011-05-24

    An airfoil is provided for a turbine of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil comprises: an outer structure comprising a first wall including a leading edge, a trailing edge, a pressure side, and a suction side; an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced from the first wall and at least one intermediate wall; and structure extending between the first and second walls so as to define first and second gaps between the first and second walls. The second wall and the at least one intermediate wall define at least one pressure side supply cavity and at least one suction side supply cavity. The second wall may include at least one first opening near the leading edge of the first wall. The first opening may extend from the at least one pressure side supply cavity to the first gap. The second wall may further comprise at least one second opening near the trailing edge of the outer structure. The second opening may extend from the at least one suction side supply cavity to the second gap. The first wall may comprise at least one first exit opening extending from the first gap through the pressure side of the first wall and at least one second exit opening extending from the second gap through the suction side of the second wall.

  10. Computer-aided roll pass design in rolling of airfoil shapes

    Akgerman, N.; Lahoti, G. D.; Altan, T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes two computer-aided design (CAD) programs developed for modeling the shape rolling process for airfoil sections. The first program, SHPROL, uses a modular upper-bound method of analysis and predicts the lateral spread, elongation, and roll torque. The second program, ROLPAS, predicts the stresses, roll separating force, the roll torque and the details of metal flow by simulating the rolling process, using the slab method of analysis. ROLPAS is an interactive program; it offers graphic display capabilities and allows the user to interact with the computer via a keyboard, CRT, and a light pen. The accuracy of the computerized models was evaluated by (a) rolling a selected airfoil shape at room temperature from 1018 steel and isothermally at high temperature from Ti-6Al-4V, and (b) comparing the experimental results with computer predictions. The comparisons indicated that the CAD systems, described here, are useful for practical engineering purposes and can be utilized in roll pass design and analysis for airfoil and similar shapes.

  11. Effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on the aerodynamics of airfoil/vortex interactions

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Sankar, L. N.; Tadghighi, H.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed for predicting the two-dimensional parallel interaction between a free convecting vortex and a NACA 0012 airfoil having leading and trailing edge integral-type flaps. Special emphasis is placed on the unsteady flap motion effects which result in alleviating the interaction at subcritical and supercritical onset flows. The numerical procedure described here is based on the implicit finite-difference solutions to the unsteady two-dimensional full potential equation. Vortex-induced effects are computed using the Biot-Savart Law with allowance for a finite core radius. The vortex-induced velocities at the surface of the airfoil are incorporated into the potential flow model via the use of the velocity transpiration approach. Flap motion effects are also modeled using the transpiration approach. For subcritical interactions, our results indicate that trailing edge flaps can be used to alleviate the impulsive loads experienced by the airfoil. For supercritical interactions, our results demonstrate the necessity of using a leading edge flap, rather than a trailing edge flap, to alleviate the interaction. Results for various time-dependent flap motions and their effect on the predicted temporal sectional loads, differential pressures, and the free vortex trajectories are presented

  12. Indicial lift response function: an empirical relation for finite‐thickness airfoils, and effects on aeroelastic simulations

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac; Heinz, Joachim Christian

    2013-01-01

    profile undergoing harmonic pitching motion in the attached flow region; the resulting lift forces are compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The relevance for aeroelastic simulations of a wind turbine is also evaluated, and the effects are quantified in terms of variations of...... equivalent fatigue loads, ultimate loads, and stability limits. The agreement with CFD computations of a 2D profile in harmonic motion is improved by the indicial function accounting for the finite‐thickness of the airfoil. Concerning the full wind turbine aeroelastic behavior, the differences between...

  13. Optical modulators with 2D layered materials

    Sun, Zhipei; Martinez, Amos; Wang, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Light modulation is an essential operation in photonics and optoelectronics. With existing and emerging technologies increasingly demanding compact, efficient, fast and broadband optical modulators, high-performance light modulation solutions are becoming indispensable. The recent realization that 2D layered materials could modulate light with superior performance has prompted intense research and significant advances, paving the way for realistic applications. In this Review, we cover the state of the art of optical modulators based on 2D materials, including graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus. We discuss recent advances employing hybrid structures, such as 2D heterostructures, plasmonic structures, and silicon and fibre integrated structures. We also take a look at the future perspectives and discuss the potential of yet relatively unexplored mechanisms, such as magneto-optic and acousto-optic modulation.

  14. Automatic Contour Extraction from 2D Image

    Panagiotis GIOANNIS

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To develop a method for automatic contour extraction from a 2D image. Material and Method: The method is divided in two basic parts where the user initially chooses the starting point and the threshold. Finally the method is applied to computed tomography of bone images. Results: An interesting method is developed which can lead to a successful boundary extraction of 2D images. Specifically data extracted from a computed tomography images can be used for 2D bone reconstruction. Conclusions: We believe that such an algorithm or part of it can be applied on several other applications for shape feature extraction in medical image analysis and generally at computer graphics.

  15. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics.

    Spear, A G; Domier, C W; Hu, X; Muscatello, C M; Ren, X; Tobias, B J; Luhmann, N C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program. PMID:25430247

  16. 2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics

    Spear, A. G.; Domier, C. W., E-mail: cwdomier@ucdavis.edu; Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Luhmann, N. C. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tobias, B. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencies, large aperture optics image reflections from four density-dependent cutoff surfaces in the plasma over an extended region of the DIII-D plasma. Localized density fluctuations in the vicinity of the plasma cutoff surfaces modulate the plasma reflections, yielding a 2D image of electron density fluctuations. Details are presented of the receiver down conversion electronics that generate the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) reflectometer signals from which 2D density fluctuation data are obtained. Also presented are details on the control system and backplane used to manage the electronics as well as an introduction to the computer based control program.

  17. On the Spanwise Uniformity of Wind Tunnel Test Data of Transonic Airfoils

    Ito, Tadashi; Suzuki, Koichi; KAMIYA, Nobuhiko; 伊藤, 忠; 鈴木, 弘一; 神谷, 信彦

    1981-01-01

    The spanwise uniformity of the flow around two-dimensional models of airfoils has been examined for the 100×400 transonic wind tunnel and the 2M×2M transonic wind tunnel. For flows of free-stream Mach numbers below the drag-divergence Mach number, the spanwise uniformity of the section drag coefficient is good in the region around the center section. Although the spanwise uniformity is bad for flows of freestream Mach numbers above that, the drag-divergence Mach number can be obtained accurat...

  18. Performance analysis of double blade airfoil for hydrokinetic turbine applications

    Highlights: ► We computationally investigated the flow and performance characteristics of a double blade airfoil. ► The double blade airfoil shows high performance comparing with the standard airfoil. ► Using the double blade airfoil, wind and hydrokinetic energy potentials of countries may be redefined and increased accordingly. - Abstract: Hydrokinetic energy holds significant promise as a new, carbon-free energy source. The hydrokinetic turbine harnesses the power from moving water without the construction of a dam. Operational effectiveness of the wind and hydrokinetic turbines depend on the performance of the airfoils chosen. Traditionally, standard airfoils, like NACA and GOTINGEN, are used for wind and hydrokinetic turbines generating energy have the maximum lift coefficient about 1.3 at the stall angle of attack, about 12°. At these values, the flow velocities to produce electric energy are 7 m/s and 3 m/s for wind turbine and hydrokinetic turbine respectively. Using double blade airfoil, the fluid dynamics governing the flow field eliminates the separation bubble by the injection of the high momentum fluid through the gab of the double blade of airfoil by meaning of the flow control delays the stall up to an angle of attack of 20°, with a maximum lift coefficient of 2.06. Hence, using double blade airfoils in the wind and hydrokinetic turbines, minimum wind and hydrokinetic flow velocities to produce economical energies will be 3–4 m/s for wind turbines and 1–1.5 m/s or less for hydrokinetic turbines. Consequently, the wind power and hydrokinetic potentials of Turkey will be re-defined and increased accordingly.

  19. Influence of Isotope Effects on Product Polarizations of N(2D)+D2,N(2D)+H2 and N(2D)+HD Reactive Systems

    NIE Shan-shan; CHU Tian-shu

    2012-01-01

    To figure out the influence of isotope effect on product polarizations of the N(2D)+D2 reactive system and its isotope variants,quasi-classical trajectory(QCT) calculation was performed on Ho's potential energy surfacc(PES) of 2A" state.Product polarizations such as product distributions ofP(θr),P(φr) and P(θr,φr),as well as the generalized polarization-dependent differential cross sections(PDDCSs) were discussed and compared in detail among the four product channels of the title reactions.Both the intermolecular and intramolecular isotope effects were proved to be influential on product polarizations.

  20. Assessment of the aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds and moderate Ma numbers using CFD modeling

    Prospathopoulos, John M.; Papadakis, Giorgos; Sieros, Giorgos; Voutsinas, Spyros G.; Chaviaropoulos, Takis K.; Diakakis, Kostas

    2014-06-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of thick airfoils in high Reynolds number is assessed using two different CFD RANS solvers: the compressible MaPFlow and the incompressible CRES-flowNS-2D both equipped with the k-ω SST turbulence model. Validation is carried out by comparing simulations against existing high Reynolds experimental data for the NACA 63-018 airfoil in the range of -10° to 20°. The use of two different solvers aims on one hand at increasing the credibility in the results and on the other at quantifying the compressibility effects. Convergence of steady simulations is achieved within a mean range of -10° to 14° which refers to attached or light stall conditions. Over this range the simulations from the two codes are in good agreement. As stall gets deeper, steady convergence ceases and the simulations must switch to unsteady. Lift and drag oscillations are produced which increase in amplitude as the angle of attack increases. Finally in post stall, the average CL is found to decrease up to ~24° or 32° for the FFA or the NACA 63-018 airfoils respectively, and then recover to higher values indicating a change in the unsteady features of the flow.

  1. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    of 3 million. A novel shape perturbation function is introduced to optimize the geometry based on the existing airfoils which simplifies the design procedure. The viscous/inviscid interactive code XFOIL is used as the aerodynamic tool for airfoil optimization at a Reynolds number of 16 million and a...... free-stream Mach number of 0.25 near the tip. Results show that the new airfoils achieve a high power coefficient in a wide range of angles of attack (AOA) and are extremely insensitive to surface roughness. Finally, a full blade analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and blade element...

  2. Design and experimental results for the S805 airfoil

    Somers, D.M. [Airfoils, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, the S805, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  3. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    Somers, D M [Airfoils, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  4. Geometrical effects on the airfoil flow separation and transition

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-25

    We present results from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of incompressible flow over two airfoils, NACA-4412 and NACA-0012-64, to investigate the effects of the airfoil geometry on the flow separation and transition patterns at Re=104 and 10 degrees incidence. The two chosen airfoils are geometrically similar except for maximum camber (respectively 4%C and 0 with C the chord length), which results in a larger projection area with respect to the incoming flow for the NACA-4412 airfoil, and a larger leeward surface curvature at the leading edge for the NACA-0012-64 airfoil. The governing equations are discretized using an energy conservative fourth-order spatial discretization scheme. An assessment on the two-point correlation indicates that a spanwise domain size of 0.8C is sufficiently large for the present simulations. We discuss flow separation at the airfoil leading edge, transition of the separated shear layer to three-dimensional flow and subsequently to turbulence. Numerical results reveal a stronger adverse pressure gradient field in the leading edge region of the NACA-0012-64 airfoil due to the rapidly varying surface curvature. As a result, the flow experiences detachment at x/C=0.08, and the separated shear layer transition via Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism occurs at x/C=0.29 with fully developed turbulent flow around x/C=0.80. These flow development phases are delayed to occur at much downstream positions, respectively, observed around x/C=0.25, 0.71 and 1.15 for the NACA-4412 airfoil. The turbulent intensity, measured by the turbulent fluctuations and turbulent Reynolds stresses, are much larger for NACA-0012-64 from the transition onset until the airfoil trailing edge, while turbulence develops significantly downstream of the trailing edge for the NACA-4412 airfoil. For both airfoils, our DNS results indicate that the mean Reynolds stress u\\'u\\'/U02 reaches its maximum value at a distance from the surface approximately equal to the displacement

  5. Customized airfoils and their impact on VAWT cost of energy

    Berg, Dale E.

    1990-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a family of airfoils specifically designed for use in the equatorial portion of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) blade. An airfoil of that family has been incorporated into the rotor blades of the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed. The airfoil and rotor design process is reviewed. Comparisons with data recently acquired from flow visualization tests and from the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed illustrate the success that was achieved in the design. The economic optimization model used in the design is described and used to evaluate the effect of modifications to the current Test Bed blade.

  6. Experimental study of 2D scour and its protection at a rubble-mound breakwater

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    This study deals with the 2D scour at the trunk section of a rubble-mound breakwater. Two breakwater models with slopes of 1:1.2 and 1:1.75 are employed for the experimental study of the scour in a wave flume. 2D scour at a vertical-wall breakwater was also included as a reference case. Tests wer...

  7. Automatic guidance of robotized 2D ultrasound probes with visual servoing based on image moments.

    Mebarki, Rafik

    2010-01-01

    There is error in the front page of the first document (v1). This dissertation presents a new 2D ultrasound-based visual servoing method. The main goal is to automatically guide a robotized 2D ultrasound probe held by a medical robot in order to reach a desired cross-section ultrasound image of an object of interest. This method allows to control both the in-plane and out-of-plane motions of a 2D ultrasound probe. It makes direct use of the 2D ultrasound image in the visual servo scheme, w...

  8. Path integral quantization of 2 D- gravity

    2 D- gravity is investigated using the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. The equations of motion and the action integral are obtained as total differential equations in many variables. The integrability conditions, lead us to obtain the path integral quantization without any need to introduce any extra un-physical variables. (author)

  9. Baby universes in 2d quantum gravity

    Ambjorn, J.; S. Jain; G. Thorleifsson

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the fractal structure of $2d$ quantum gravity, both for pure gravity and for gravity coupled to multiple gaussian fields and for gravity coupled to Ising spins. The roughness of the surfaces is described in terms of baby universes and using numerical simulations we measure their distribution which is related to the string susceptibility exponent $\\g_{string}$.

  10. Horns Rev II, 2-D Model Tests

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), on behalf of Energy E2 A/S part of DONG Energy A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was: to investigate the combined influence of the pile...

  11. Calculation of wakefields in 2D rectangular structures

    We consider the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by an electron bunch passing through a vacuum chamber structure that, in general, consists of an entry pipe, followed by some kind of transition or cavity, and ending in an exit pipe. We limit our study to structures having rectangular cross-section, where the height can vary as function of longitudinal coordinate but the width and side walls remain fixed. For such structures, we derive a Fourier representation of the wake potentials through one-dimensional functions. A new numerical approach for calculating the wakes in such structures is proposed and implemented in the computer code ECHO(2D). The computation resource requirements for this approach are moderate and comparable to those for finding the wakes in 2D rotationally symmetric structures. Numerical examples obtained with the new numerical code are presented.

  12. Trailing Edge Noise Model Validation and Application to Airfoil Optimization

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is twofold. First, an existing trailing edge noise model is validated by comparing with airfoil surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound pressure levels measured in three different experiments. The agreement is satisfactory in one case but poor in two other cases....... Nevertheless, the model reproduces the main tendencies observed in the measurements with respect to varying flow conditions. Second, the model is implemented into an airfoil design code that is originally used for aerodynamic optimization. An existing wind turbine airfoil is optimized in order to reduce its...... noise emission, trying at the same time to preserve some of its aerodynamic and geometric characteristics. The new designs are characterized by less cambered airfoils and flatter suction sides. The resulting noise reductions seem to be mainly achieved by a reduction in the turbulent kinetic energy...

  13. Aerodynamic Analysis of Trailing Edge Enlarged Wind Turbine Airfoils

    Xu, Haoran; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Yang, Hua; Liu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils generated from the DU- 91-W2-250, DU-97-W-300 and DU-96-W-350 airfoils by enlarging the thickness of trailing edge symmetrically from the location of maximum thickness to chord to the trailing edge were analyzed by using CFD and RFOIL...... methods at a chord Reynolds number of 3 × 106. The goal of this study is to analyze the aerodynamic performance of blunt trailing edge airfoils with different thicknesses of trailing edge and maximum thicknesses to chord. The steady results calculated by the fully turbulent k-ω SST, transitional k-ω SST...... model and RFOIL all show that with the increase of thickness of trailing edge, the linear region of lift is extended and the maximum lift also increases, the increase rate and amount of lift become limited gradually at low angles of attack, while the drag increases dramatically. For thicker airfoils...

  14. Numerical simulation of airfoil trailing edge serration noise

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    In the present work, numerical simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with and without serrated Trailing Edge. The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustic analogy is implemented into the in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity...... field are obtained using Large Eddy Simulation. To obtain the time history data of sound pressure, the flow quantities are integrated around the airfoil surface through the FW-H approach. The extended length of the serration is about 16.7% of the airfoil chord and the geometric angle of the serration is...... 28 degrees. The chord based Reynolds number is around 1.5x106. Simulations are compared with existing wind tunnel experiments at various angles of attack. Even though the airfoil under investigation is already optimized for low noise emission, numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments show...

  15. Reduced-Order Model Development for Airfoil Forced Response

    Ramana V. Grandhi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new reduced-order models are developed to accurately and rapidly predict geometry deviation effects on airfoil forced response. Both models have significant application to improved mistuning analysis. The first developed model integrates a principal component analysis approach to reduce the number of defining geometric parameters, semianalytic eigensensitivity analysis, and first-order Taylor series approximation to allow rapid as-measured airfoil response analysis. A second developed model extends this approach and quantifies both random and bias errors between the reduced and full models. Adjusting for the bias significantly improves reduced-order model accuracy. The error model is developed from a regression analysis of the relationship between airfoil geometry parameters and reduced-order model error, leading to physics-based error quantification. Both models are demonstrated on an advanced fan airfoil's frequency, modal force, and forced response.

  16. Design and experimental results for the S814 airfoil

    Somers, D.M. [Airfoils, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A 24-percent-thick airfoil, the S814, for the root region of a horizontal-axis wind-turbine blade has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement with the exception of maximum lift which is overpredicted. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the higher maximum lift and the lower profile drag of the S814 airfoil, thus confirming the achievement of the objectives.

  17. ORION, Post-processor for Finite Elements Program NIKE2D and DYNA2D

    Description of program or function: ORION is an interactive post- processor for the analysis programs NIKE2D (NESC 9923), DYNA2D (NESC 9910), TOPAZ, TOPAZ2D (NESC9801), GEM2D (NESC9679), and TACO2D. ORION reads the binary plot data files generated by the two- dimensional finite element programs used at LLNL. Contours and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has the capability to plot color fringes, contour lines, vector plots, principal stress lines, deformed meshes and material outlines, time histories, reaction forces along constraint boundaries, interface pressures along slide lines, and user-supplied labels

  18. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials. PMID:26861346

  19. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Campbell, Christian X.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  20. Cooled airfoil in a turbine engine

    Vitt, Paul H; Kemp, David A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2015-04-21

    An airfoil in a gas turbine engine includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The outer wall includes a leading edge, a trailing edge opposed from the leading edge in a chordal direction, a pressure side, and a suction side. The inner wall is coupled to the outer wall at a single chordal location and includes portions spaced from the pressure and suction sides of the outer wall so as to form first and second gaps between the inner wall and the respective pressure and suction sides. The inner wall defines a chamber therein and includes openings that provide fluid communication between the respective gaps and the chamber. The gaps receive cooling fluid that provides cooling to the outer wall as it flows through the gaps. The cooling fluid, after traversing at least substantial portions of the gaps, passes into the chamber through the openings in the inner wall.

  1. AirborneWind Energy: Airfoil-Airmass Interaction

    Zanon, Mario; Gros, Sebastien; Meyers, Johan; Diehl, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The Airborne Wind Energy paradigm proposes to generate energy by flying a tethered airfoil across the wind flow at a high velocity. While Airborne Wind Energy enables flight in higher-altitude, stronger wind layers, the extra drag generated by the tether motion imposes a significant limit to the overall system efficiency. To address this issue, two airfoils with a shared tether can reduce overall system drag. A study proposed in Zanon et al. (2013) confirms this claim by showing that, in the ...

  2. Response of a Thin Airfoil Encountering a Strong Density Discontinuity

    Marble, F. E.

    1993-01-01

    Airfoil theory for unsteady motion has been developed extensively assuming the undisturbed medium to be of uniform density, a restriction accurate for motion in the atmosphere, G/auert (1929), Burgers (1935), Theodorsen (1935), Kussner (1936), Karman and Sears (1938), Kinney and Sears (1975). In some instances, notably for airfoils comprising fan, compressor and turbine blade rows, the undisturbed medium may carry density variations or "spots," resulting from non-uniformaties ...

  3. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Leloudas, Giorgos

    2016-01-01

    In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marco...

  4. Optimization of Flapping Airfoils for Maximum Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency

    Tuncer, I.H.; Kay, M.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical optimization algorithm based on the steepest decent along the variation of the optimization function is implemented for maximizing the thrust and/or propulsive efficiency of a single flapping airfoil. Unsteady, low speed laminar flows are computed using a Navier-Stokes solver on moving overset grids. The flapping motion of the airfoil is described by a combined sinusoidal plunge and pitching motion. Optimization parameters are taken to be the amplitudes of the plunge and pitching ...

  5. Development of Variable Camber Morphing Airfoil Using Corrugated Structure

    横関, 智弘; 杉浦, 綾; 平野, 義鎭; Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Aya; Hirano, Yoshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development and the wind tunnel test of a variable geometry morphing airfoil using corrugated structures. Proof-of-concept study of a morphing wing with corrugated flexible seamless flap-like structure is verified by finite element analysis, and a prototype is manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastics. For the actuation system, two servomotors are installed inside the prototype wing to control the airfoil shape by the chordwise tension of the connected wires...

  6. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number. PMID:24116405

  7. Branes in the 2D black hole

    Ribault, Sylvain E-mail: ribault@mth.kcl.ac.uk; Schomerus, Volker

    2004-02-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of branes in the Euclidean 2D black hole (cigar). In particular, exact boundary states and annulus amplitudes are provided for D0-branes which are localized at the tip of the cigar as well as for two families of extended D1 and D2-branes. Our results are based on closely related studies for the Euclidean AdS3 model and, as predicted by the conjectured duality between the 2D black hole and the sine-Liouville model, they share many features with branes in Liouville theory. New features arise here due to the presence of closed string modes which are localized near the tip of the cigar. The paper concludes with some remarks on possible applications to exact tachyon condensation and matrix models. (author)

  8. Branes in the 2D black hole

    Ribault, S; Ribault, Sylvain; Schomerus, Volker

    2004-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of branes in the Euclidean 2D black hole (cigar). In particular, exact boundary states and annulus amplitudes are provided for D0-branes which are localized at the tip of the cigar as well as for two families of extended D1 and D2-branes. Our results are based on closely related studies for the Euclidean AdS3 model and, as predicted by the conjectured duality between the 2D black hole and the sine-Liouville model, they share many features with branes in Liouville theory. New features arise here due to the presence of closed string modes which are localized near the tip of the cigar. The paper concludes with some remarks on possible applications to exact tachyon condensation and matrix models.

  9. Branes in the 2D black hole

    We present a comprehensive analysis of branes in the Euclidean 2D black hole (cigar). In particular, exact boundary states and annulus amplitudes are provided for D0-branes which are localized at the tip of the cigar as well as for two families of extended D1 and D2-branes. Our results are based on closely related studies for the Euclidean AdS3 model and, as predicted by the conjectured duality between the 2D black hole and the sine-Liouville model, they share many features with branes in Liouville theory. New features arise here due to the presence of closed string modes which are localized near the tip of the cigar. The paper concludes with some remarks on possible applications to exact tachyon condensation and matrix models. (author)

  10. 2-D geometrical analysis of deformation

    Engineering structures such as dams, bridges, high rise buildings, etc. are subject to deformation. Deformation survey is therefore necessary to determine the magnitude and direction of such movements for the purpose of safety assessment. In this study, a strategy for two-step analyses for deformation survey rising the two dimensional (2-D) geodetic method has been developed, consisting of independent least squares estimation (LSE) of each epoch followed by deformation detection. Important aspects on LSE include global and local testing. In deformation detection, the following aspects were implemented; datum definition by the user. determination of stable datum points, geometrical analysis of deformation and graphic presentation. The developed strategy has been implemented in three computer programs, COMPUT, DEFORM and STRANS. Tests carried out with simulated and known data show that the developed strategy and programs are applicable for 2-D geometrical detection of deformation. (Author)

  11. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  12. 2D materials: Graphene and others

    Bansal, Suneev Anil; Singh, Amrinder Pal; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-05-01

    Present report reviews the recent advancements in new atomically thick 2D materials. Materials covered in this review are Graphene, Silicene, Germanene, Boron Nitride (BN) and Transition metal chalcogenides (TMC). These materials show extraordinary mechanical, electronic and optical properties which make them suitable candidates for future applications. Apart from unique properties, tune-ability of highly desirable properties of these materials is also an important area to be emphasized on.

  13. 2D-Tasks for Cognitive Rehabilitation

    Caballero Hernandez, Ruth; Martinez Moreno, Jose Maria; García Molina, A.; Ferrer Celma, S.; Solana Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Carrion, R.; Fernandez Casado, E.; Pérez Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Gomez Pulido, A.; Anglès Tafalla, C.; Cáceres Taladriz, César; Ferre Vergada, M.; Roig Rovira, Teresa; Garcia Lopez, P.; Tormos Muñoz, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological Rehabilitation is a complex clinic process which tries to restore or compensate cognitive and behavioral disorders in people suffering from a central nervous system injury. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Biomedical Engineering play an essential role in this field, allowing improvement and expansion of present rehabilitation programs. This paper presents a set of cognitive rehabilitation 2D-Tasks for patients with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). These t...

  14. Engineering light outcoupling in 2D materials

    Lien, Derhsien

    2015-02-11

    When light is incident on 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), it engages in multiple reflections within underlying substrates, producing interferences that lead to enhancement or attenuation of the incoming and outgoing strength of light. Here, we report a simple method to engineer the light outcoupling in semiconducting TMDCs by modulating their dielectric surroundings. We show that by modulating the thicknesses of underlying substrates and capping layers, the interference caused by substrate can significantly enhance the light absorption and emission of WSe2, resulting in a ∼11 times increase in Raman signal and a ∼30 times increase in the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of WSe2. On the basis of the interference model, we also propose a strategy to control the photonic and optoelectronic properties of thin-layer WSe2. This work demonstrates the utilization of outcoupling engineering in 2D materials and offers a new route toward the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, such as 2D LEDs and solar cells.

  15. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  16. Computation of 2D Navier-Stokes equations

    Chakrabartty, Sunil Kumar

    Two schemes for computing two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are described and applied to laminar flow over a flat plate and viscous flow over a NACA0012 airfoil. The variation of local skin-friction coefficient with local Reynolds number is compared with the Blasius solution and that of Swanson and Turkel (1985). The effect of free-stream Mach number on the temperature profile is shown, and a comparison is made of velocity profile at M(infinity) = 0.50 and Re = 500, with no artificial viscosity used for stability. Pressure distributions, local skin friction distributions, and velocity profiles on the airfoil and wake are presented.

  17. Optimization Method for Turbine Airfoil Designing Using Genetic Algorithms, CFD and Parallel Computing

    2000-01-01

    An optimization method to design turbine airfoils using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) design shell coupled directly with a viscous CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis code is proposed in this paper. The blade geometry is parameterized and the optimization method is used to search for a blade geometry that will minimize the loss in the turbine cascade passage. The viscous flow prediction code is verified by the experimental data of cascade, which is typical for a gas turbine rotor blade section. A comparative study of the blades designed by the optimization technique and the original one is presented

  18. Analysis of Location of Laminar-Turbulent Transition on the FX 66-S-196 V1 Airfoil

    Laurynas Naujokaitis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition location on the FX 66‑S‑196 V1 wing section was analyzed with the using interactive program XFOIL of Mark Drela, MIT. Calculated results of transition location were compared with published measurement data from a wind tunnel at Delft University of Technology (Netherlands. The airfoil was analyzed at the Reynolds number Re = 0,5·106 and Re = 1,5·106. Article in Lithuanian

  19. Nomogram for correcting drag and angle of attack of an airfoil model in an air stream of finite diameter

    1924-01-01

    In experimenting with airfoil models in a wind tunnel, the magnitude of the forces acting on the model is affected by the fact that the air stream in which the model is suspended, has a restricted cross-section. In order to utilize the results for an airplane in an unlimited quantity of air, a correction must be made. The magnitude of this correction was determined by Prandtl by the application of his wing theory.

  20. Design and Validation of a Force Measurement System for the Analysis of Airfoil Lift and Drag Characteristics

    Manning, Niall

    2010-01-01

    One of the aims of this research was to reduce the flow separation and therefore the pressure drag generated by a wing section, through the adding of surface modifications. The modifications consisted of roughening the surface of polystyrene airfoils using a sand blasting technique, which resulted in a dimpled surface. This idea originated from the design of a golf ball, as the dimples are known to delay flow separation which allows the ball to travel further. In relation to wing design, ther...

  1. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made

  2. Wind turbine blade vibration at standstill conditions — the effect of imposing lag on the aerodynamic response of an elastically mounted airfoil

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated physical phenomena related to stall-induced vibrations potentially existing on wind turbine blades at standstill conditions. The study considered two-dimensional airfoil sections while it omitted three-dimensional effects. In the study, a new engineering...

  3. Studi Numerik dan Eksperimental Aliran 3-D pada Kombinasi Airfoil Pelat Datar dengan Variasi Permukaan Bawah dan Pengaruh Celah

    Gunawan Nugroho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the complexity of 3-D flow around airfoil/flat plate junction at endwall region has attracted many researchers of Aerodynamics. The majority of its experimental and numerical observations are conducted to compressor cascade. Because of that importance, stronger conceptual basis of 3-D flow is required, so the present study has stressed on single body airfoil/flat plate which clearance effect is exist. Variation of angle of attack and geometry on lower surface in this research have been carried out numerically and experimentally. Numerical study has been implemented by putting inlet velocity 25 m/s as initial condition while air density and viscosity are assumed constants. Trends of coefficient of pressure and velocity vector are studied accurately. Experimental study was conducted in wind tunnel with inlet velocity 25 m/s by means of measurement of static pressure on wall and airfoil which endwall and midspan are included. Two previous methods were supported by flow visualisation in the manner of examining the details of skin friction line. It was evidenced that 2-D history flow was strongly influenced 3-D flow characteristics. It was clarified by lower surface variation and by usage of wider blade thickness model, that was when incoming flow attached to leading edge would experience stronger adverse pressure gradient with the result that separated earlier and so was when it pass more curved surface, stronger adverse pressure gradient is responsible for generating greater pressure difference between upper and lower surface and finally, tip clearance flow is induced more intensivelly. Those effects are amplified when angle of attack is applied. Saddle point is formed further away in front of leading edge and tend to move on pressure side below, Wider branch separation line is detected and jet flow is amplified. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Kompleksnya aliran 3-D pada daerah endwall dan ujung dari kombinasi airfoil/plat datar telah

  4. Drag reduction of a blunt trailing-edge airfoil

    Baker, Jonathon Paul

    Wind-tunnel experimentation and Reynolds-averaged Navier--Stokes simulations were used to analyze simple, static trailing-edge devices applied to an FB-3500-1750 airfoil, a 35% thick airfoil with a 17.5% chord blunt trailing edge, in order to mitigate base drag. The drag reduction devices investigated include Gurney-type tabs, splitter plates, base cavities, and offset cavities. The Gurney-type tabs consisted of small tabs, attached at the trailing edge and distributed along the span, extending above the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. The Gurney-type devices were determined to have little drag reduction capabilities for the FB-3500-1750 airfoil. Splitter plates, mounted to the center of the trailing edge, with lengths between 50% and 150% of the trailing-edge thickness and various plate angles (0° and +/-10° from perpendicular) were investigated and shown to influence the lift and drag characteristics of the baseline airfoil. Drag reductions of up to 50% were achieved with the addition of a splitter plate. The base cavity was created by adding two plates perpendicular to the trailing edge, extending from the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. The base cavity demonstrated possible drag reductions of 25%, but caused significant changes to lift, primarily due to the method of device implementation. The offset cavity, created by adding two splitter plates offset from the upper and lower surfaces by 25% of the trailing-edge thickness, was shown to improve on the drag reductions of the splitter plate, while also eliminating unsteady vortex shedding prior to airfoil stall.

  5. Influence of Thickness Variation on the Flapping Performance of Symmetric NACA Airfoils in Plunging Motion

    Liangyu Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the impact of airfoil thickness on flapping performance, the unsteady flow fields of a family of airfoils from an NACA0002 airfoil to an NACA0020 airfoil in a pure plunging motion and a series of altered NACA0012 airfoils in a pure plunging motion were simulated using computational fluid dynamics techniques. The “class function/shape function transformation“ parametric method was employed to decide the coordinates of these altered NACA0012 airfoils. Under specified plunging kinematics, it is observed that the increase of an airfoil thickness can reduce the leading edge vortex (LEV in strength and delay the LEV shedding. The increase of the maximum thickness can enhance the time-averaged thrust coefficient and the propulsive efficiency without lift reduction. As the maximum thickness location moves towards the leading edge, the airfoil obtains a larger time-averaged thrust coefficient and a higher propulsive efficiency without changing the lift coefficient.

  6. Interparticle attraction in 2D complex plasmas

    Kompaneets, Roman; Ivlev, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas allow experimental studies of various physical processes occurring in classical liquids and solids by directly observing individual microparticles. A major problem is that the interaction between microparticles is generally not molecular-like. In this Letter, we propose how to achieve a molecular-like interaction potential in laboratory 2D complex plasmas. We argue that this principal aim can be achieved by using relatively small microparticles and properly adjusting discharge parameters. If experimentally confirmed, this will make it possible to employ complex plasmas as a model system with an interaction potential resembling that of conventional liquids.

  7. 2D vector-cyclic deformable templates

    Schultz, Nette; Conradsen, Knut

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the theory of deformable templates is a vector cycle in 2D is described. The deformable template model originated in (Grenander, 1983) and was further investigated in (Grenander et al., 1991). A template vector distribution is induced by parameter distribution from transformation...... matrices applied to the vector cycle. An approximation in the parameter distribution is introduced. The main advantage by using the deformable template model is the ability to simulate a wide range of objects trained by e.g. their biological variations, and thereby improve restoration, segmentation and...

  8. Limit theorems for 2D invasion percolation

    Damron, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We prove limit theorems and variance estimates for quantities related to ponds and outlets for 2D invasion percolation. We first exhibit several properties of a sequence (O(n)) of outlet variables, the n-th of which gives the number of outlets in the box centered at the origin of side length 2^n. The most important of these properties describe the sequence's renewal structure and exponentially fast mixing behavior. We use these to prove a central limit theorem and strong law of large numbers for (O(n)). We then show consequences of these limit theorems for the pond radii and outlet weights.

  9. Instant HTMl5 2D platformer

    Temple, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. The step-by-step approach taken by this book will show you how to develop a 2D HTML5 platformer-based game that you will be able to publish to multiple devices.This book is great for anyone who has an interest in HTML5 games development, and who already has a basic to intermediate grasp on both the HTML markup and JavaScript programming languages. Therefore, due to this requirement, the book will not discuss the inner workings of either of these languages but will instead attempt to

  10. Interparticle Attraction in 2D Complex Plasmas

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    Complex (dusty) plasmas allow experimental studies of various physical processes occurring in classical liquids and solids by directly observing individual microparticles. A major problem is that the interaction between microparticles is generally not molecularlike. In this Letter, we propose how to achieve a molecularlike interaction potential in laboratory 2D complex plasmas. We argue that this principal aim can be achieved by using relatively small microparticles and properly adjusting discharge parameters. If experimentally confirmed, this will make it possible to employ complex plasmas as a model system with an interaction potential resembling that of conventional liquids.

  11. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates

  12. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    Mutlu, Z; Wu, RJ; Wickramaratne, D.; Shahrezaei, S; Liu, C; Temiz, S; Patalano, A; M Ozkan; Lake, RK; Mkhoyan, KA; Ozkan, CS

    2016-01-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2...

  13. GRID GENERATION AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF 2-D RIVER FLOW GRID GENERATION AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF 2-D RIVER FLOW

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents new weighting functions in grid generation and new discretizing scheme of momentum equations in numerical simulation of river flow. By using the new weighting functions, the curvilinear grid could be concentrated as desired near the assigned points or lines in physical plane. By using the new discretizing scheme, the difficulties caused by movable boundary and dry riverbed can be overcome. As an application, the flow in the Wuhan Section of Yangtze River is simulated. The computational results are in good agreement with the measured results. The new method is applicable to the numerical simulation of 2-D river flow with irregular region and moveable boundary.

  14. Learning from graphically integrated 2D and 3D representations improves retention of neuroanatomy

    Naaz, Farah

    Visualizations in the form of computer-based learning environments are highly encouraged in science education, especially for teaching spatial material. Some spatial material, such as sectional neuroanatomy, is very challenging to learn. It involves learning the two dimensional (2D) representations that are sampled from the three dimensional (3D) object. In this study, a computer-based learning environment was used to explore the hypothesis that learning sectional neuroanatomy from a graphically integrated 2D and 3D representation will lead to better learning outcomes than learning from a sequential presentation. The integrated representation explicitly demonstrates the 2D-3D transformation and should lead to effective learning. This study was conducted using a computer graphical model of the human brain. There were two learning groups: Whole then Sections, and Integrated 2D3D. Both groups learned whole anatomy (3D neuroanatomy) before learning sectional anatomy (2D neuroanatomy). The Whole then Sections group then learned sectional anatomy using 2D representations only. The Integrated 2D3D group learned sectional anatomy from a graphically integrated 3D and 2D model. A set of tests for generalization of knowledge to interpreting biomedical images was conducted immediately after learning was completed. The order of presentation of the tests of generalization of knowledge was counterbalanced across participants to explore a secondary hypothesis of the study: preparation for future learning. If the computer-based instruction programs used in this study are effective tools for teaching anatomy, the participants should continue learning neuroanatomy with exposure to new representations. A test of long-term retention of sectional anatomy was conducted 4-8 weeks after learning was completed. The Integrated 2D3D group was better than the Whole then Sections group in retaining knowledge of difficult instances of sectional anatomy after the retention interval. The benefit

  15. Photocurrent spectroscopy of 2D materials

    Cobden, David

    Confocal photocurrent measurements provide a powerful means of studying many aspects of the optoelectronic and electrical properties of a 2D device or material. At a diffraction-limited point they can provide a detailed absorption spectrum, and they can probe local symmetry, ultrafast relaxation rates and processes, electron-electron interaction strengths, and transport coefficients. We illustrate this with several examples, once being the photo-Nernst effect. In gapless 2D materials, such as graphene, in a perpendicular magnetic field a photocurrent antisymmetric in the field is generated near to the free edges, with opposite sign at opposite edges. Its origin is the transverse thermoelectric current associated with the laser-induced electron temperature gradient. This effect provides an unambiguous demonstration of the Shockley-Ramo nature of long-range photocurrent generation in gapless materials. It also provides a means of investigating quasiparticle properties. For example, in the case of graphene on hBN, it can be used to probe the Lifshitz transition that occurs due to the minibands formed by the Moire superlattice. We also observe and discuss photocurrent generated in other semimetallic (WTe2) and semiconducting (WSe2) monolayers. Work supported by DoE BES and NSF EFRI grants.

  16. Multienzyme Inkjet Printed 2D Arrays.

    Gdor, Efrat; Shemesh, Shay; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mandler, Daniel

    2015-08-19

    The use of printing to produce 2D arrays is well established, and should be relatively facile to adapt for the purpose of printing biomaterials; however, very few studies have been published using enzyme solutions as inks. Among the printing technologies, inkjet printing is highly suitable for printing biomaterials and specifically enzymes, as it offers many advantages. Formulation of the inkjet inks is relatively simple and can be adjusted to a variety of biomaterials, while providing nonharmful environment to the enzymes. Here we demonstrate the applicability of inkjet printing for patterning multiple enzymes in a predefined array in a very straightforward, noncontact method. Specifically, various arrays of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx), invertase (INV) and horseradish peroxidase (HP) were printed on aminated glass surfaces, followed by immobilization using glutardialdehyde after printing. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used for imaging the printed patterns and to ascertain the enzyme activity. The successful formation of 2D arrays consisting of enzymes was explored as a means of developing the first surface confined enzyme based logic gates. Principally, XOR and AND gates, each consisting of two enzymes as the Boolean operators, were assembled, and their operation was studied by SECM. PMID:26214072

  17. Comments on Thermalization in 2D CFT

    de Boer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We revisit certain aspects of thermalization in 2D CFT. In particular, we consider similarities and differences between the time dependence of correlation functions in various states in rational and non-rational CFTs. We also consider the distinction between global and local thermalization and explain how states obtained by acting with a diffeomorphism on the ground state can appear locally thermal, and we review why the time-dependent expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor is generally a poor diagnostic of global thermalization. Since all 2D CFTs have an infinite set of commuting conserved charges, generic initial states might be expected to give rise to a generalized Gibbs ensemble rather than a pure thermal ensemble at late times. We construct the holographic dual of the generalized Gibbs ensemble and show that, to leading order, it is still described by a BTZ black hole. The extra conserved charges, while rendering $c < 1$ theories essentially integrable, therefore seem to have little effect o...

  18. Shallow and deep dynamic stall for flapping low Reynolds number airfoils

    Ol, Michael V. [Wright-Patterson AFB, Air Force Research Lab., Dayton, OH (United States); Bernal, Luis; Kang, Chang-Kwon; Shyy, Wei [University of Michigan, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We consider a combined experimental (based on flow visualization, direct force measurement and phase-averaged 2D particle image velocimetry in a water tunnel), computational (2D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and theoretical (Theodorsen's formula) approach to study the fluid physics of rigid-airfoil pitch-plunge in nominally two-dimensional conditions. Shallow-stall (combined pitch-plunge) and deep-stall (pure-plunge) are compared at a reduced frequency commensurate with flapping-flight in cruise in nature. Objectives include assessment of how well attached-flow theory can predict lift coefficient even in the presence of significant separation, and how well 2D velocimetry and 2D computation can mutually validate one another. The shallow-stall case shows promising agreement between computation and experiment, while in the deep-stall case, the computation's prediction of flow separation lags that of the experiment, but eventually evinces qualitatively similar leading edge vortex size. Dye injection was found to give good qualitative match with particle image velocimetry in describing leading edge vortex formation and return to flow reattachment, and also gave evidence of strong spanwise growth of flow separation after leading-edge vortex formation. Reynolds number effects, in the range of 10,000-60,000, were found to influence the size of laminar separation in those phases of motion where instantaneous angle of attack was well below stall, but have limited effect on post-stall flowfield behavior. Discrepancy in lift coefficient time history between experiment, theory and computation was mutually comparable, with no clear failure of Theodorsen's formula. This is surprising and encouraging, especially for the deep-stall case, because the theory's assumptions are clearly violated, while its prediction of lift coefficient remains useful for capturing general trends. (orig.)

  19. Airfoil model in Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel

    1939-01-01

    Airfoil model with pressure taps inside the test section of the Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The Two-Dimensional Low-Turbulence Tunnel was originally called the Refrigeration or 'Ice' tunnel because it was intended to support research on aircraft icing. The tunnel was built of wood, lined with sheet steel, and heavily insulated on the outside. Refrigeration equipment was installed to generate icing conditions inside the test section. The NACA sent out a questionnaire to airline operators, asking them to detail the specific kinds of icing problems they encountered in flight. The replies became the basis for a comprehensive research program begun in 1938 when the tunnel commenced operation. Research quickly focused on the concept of using exhaust heat to prevent ice from forming on the wing's leading edge. This project was led by Lewis Rodert, who later would win the Collier Trophy for his work on deicing. By 1940, aircraft icing research had shifted to the new Ames Research Laboratory, and the Ice tunnel was refitted with screens and honeycomb. Researchers were trying to eliminate all turbulence in the test section. From TN 1283: 'The Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel is a single-return closed-throat tunnel.... The tunnel is constructed of heavy steel plate so that the pressure of the air may be varied from approximately full vacuum to 10 atmospheres absolute, thereby giving a wide range of air densities. Reciprocating compressors with a capacity of 1200 cubic feet of free air per minute provide compressed air. Since the tunnel shell has a volume of about 83,000 cubic feet, a compression rate of approximately one atmosphere per hour is obtained. ... The test section is rectangular in shape, 3 feet wide, 7 1/2 feet high, and 7 1/2 feet long. ... The over-all size of the wind-tunnel shell is about 146 feet long and 58 feet wide with a maximum diameter of 26 feet. The test section and entrance and exit cones are surrounded by a 22-foot

  20. Integration of Airfoil Design during the design of new blades

    Sartori, L.; Bottasso, L.; Croce, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Power, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Despite the fact that the design of a new blade is a multidisciplinary task, often the different disciplines are combined together at later stage. Looking at the aerodynamic design, it is common practice design/select the airfoils first and then design the blade in terms of chord and twist based on the initial selection of the airfoils. Although this approach is quite diffused, it limits the potentialities of obtaining optimal performance. The present work is focused on investigating the benefits of designing the external shape of the blade including the airfoil shapes together with chord and twist. To accomplish this, a design approach has been developed, where an advanced gradient based optimization algorithm is able to control the shape of the blade. The airfoils described in the work are the NACA 4 digits, while the chord distribution and the twist distribution are described through Bezier curves. In this way, the complexity of the problem is limited while a versatile geometrical description is kept. After the details of the optimization scheme are illustrated, several numerical examples are shown, demonstrating the advantages in terms of performance and development time of integrating the design of the airfoils during the optimization of the blade.

  1. Energy Harvesting of a Flapping Airfoil in a Vortical Wake

    Zheng, Z. Charlie; Wei, Zhenglun

    2014-11-01

    We study the response of a two-dimensional flapping airfoil in the wake downstream of an oscillating D-shape cylinder. The airfoil has either heaving or pitching motions. The leading edge vortex (LEV) and trailing edge vortex (TEV) of the airfoil play important roles in energy harvesting. Two major interaction modes between the airfoil and incoming vortices, the suppressing mode and the reinforcing mode, are identified. However, distinctions exist between the heaving and pitching motion in terms of their contributions to the interaction modes and the efficiency of the energy extraction. A potential theory and the related fluid dynamics analysis are developed to analytically demonstrate that the topology of the incoming vortices corresponding to the airfoil is the primary factor that determines the interaction modes. Finally, the trade-off between the input and the output is discussed. It is found that appropriate operational parameters for the heaving motion are preferable in order to preserve acceptable input power for energy harvesters, while appropriate parameters for the pitching motion are essential to achieve decent output power.

  2. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  3. Design analysis of vertical wind turbine with airfoil variation

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Qaedy, T. Masykur Al; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    With an ever increasing electrical energy crisis occurring in the Banda Aceh City, it will be important to investigate alternative methods of generating power in ways different than fossil fuels. In fact, one of the biggest sources of energy in Aceh is wind energy. It can be harnessed not only by big corporations but also by individuals using Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). This paper presents a three-dimensional CFD analysis of the influence of airfoil design on performance of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The main objective of this paper is to develop an airfoil design for NACA 63-series vertical axis wind turbine, for average wind velocity 2,5 m/s. To utilize both lift and drag force, some of designs of airfoil are analyzed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such us Fluent. Simulation is performed for this airfoil at different angles of attach rearranging from -12°, -8°, -4°, 0°, 4°, 8°, and 12°. The analysis showed that the significant enhancement in value of lift coefficient for airfoil NACA 63-series is occurred for NACA 63-412.

  4. Uncertainty Analysis for a Jet Flap Airfoil

    Green, Lawrence L.; Cruz, Josue

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was performed to quantify the potential uncertainties of lift and pitching moment coefficient calculations from a computational fluid dynamics code, relative to an experiment, for a jet flap airfoil configuration. Uncertainties due to a number of factors including grid density, angle of attack and jet flap blowing coefficient were examined. The ANOVA software produced a numerical model of the input coefficient data, as functions of the selected factors, to a user-specified order (linear, 2-factor interference, quadratic, or cubic). Residuals between the model and actual data were also produced at each of the input conditions, and uncertainty confidence intervals (in the form of Least Significant Differences or LSD) for experimental, computational, and combined experimental / computational data sets were computed. The LSD bars indicate the smallest resolvable differences in the functional values (lift or pitching moment coefficient) attributable solely to changes in independent variable, given just the input data points from selected data sets. The software also provided a collection of diagnostics which evaluate the suitability of the input data set for use within the ANOVA process, and which examine the behavior of the resultant data, possibly suggesting transformations which should be applied to the data to reduce the LSD. The results illustrate some of the key features of, and results from, the uncertainty analysis studies, including the use of both numerical (continuous) and categorical (discrete) factors, the effects of the number and range of the input data points, and the effects of the number of factors considered simultaneously.

  5. Prediction of the wind turbine performance by using BEM with airfoil data extracted from CFD

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Xu, Haoran;

    2014-01-01

    Blade element momentum (BEM) theory with airfoil data is a widely used technique for prediction of wind turbine aerodynamic performance, but the reliability of the airfoil data is an important factor for the prediction accuracy of aerodynamic loads and power. The airfoil characteristics used in BEM...

  6. 2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

    Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D

    2005-06-06

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is

  7. Locality constraints and 2D quasicrystals

    The plausible assumption that long-range interactions between atoms are negligible in a quasicrystal leaks to the study of tilings that obey constraints on the local configurations of tiles. The theory of such constraints (called matching rules) for 2D quasicrystal tilings is reviewed here. Different types of matching rules are defined and examples of tilings obeying them are given where known. The role of tile decoration is discussed and is shown to be significant in at least two cases (octagonal and dodecagonal duals of periodic 4-grids and 6-grids). A new result is introduced: a constructive procedure is described for generating weak matching rules for tilings with N-fold symmetry, for any N that is either a prime number or twice a prime number. The physics associated with weak matching rules, results on local growth rules, and the case of icosahedral symmetry are all briefly discussed. (author). 29 refs, 4 figs

  8. Numerical Evaluation of 2D Ground States

    Kolkovska, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    A ground state is defined as the positive radial solution of the multidimensional nonlinear problem \\varepsilon propto k_ bot 1 - ξ with the function f being either f(u) =a|u|p-1u or f(u) =a|u|pu+b|u|2pu. The numerical evaluation of ground states is based on the shooting method applied to an equivalent dynamical system. A combination of fourth order Runge-Kutta method and Hermite extrapolation formula is applied to solving the resulting initial value problem. The efficiency of this procedure is demonstrated in the 1D case, where the maximal difference between the exact and numerical solution is ≈ 10-11 for a discretization step 0:00025. As a major application, we evaluate numerically the critical energy constant. This constant is defined as a functional of the ground state and is used in the study of the 2D Boussinesq equations.

  9. 2-D Model Test of Dolosse Breakwater

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The rational design diagram for Dolos armour should incorporate both the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The previous tests performed by Aalborg University (AU) made available such design diagram for the trunk of Dolos breakwater without superstructures (Burcharth et al. 1992). To...... extend the design diagram to cover Dolos breakwaters with superstructure, 2-D model tests of Dolos breakwater with wave wall is included in the project Rubble Mound Breakwater Failure Modes sponsored by the Directorate General XII of the Commission of the European Communities under Contract MAS-CT92......-0042. Furthermore, Task IA will give the design diagram for Tetrapod breakwaters without a superstructure. The more complete research results on Dolosse can certainly give some insight into the behaviour of Tetrapods armour layer of the breakwaters with superstructure. The main part of the experiment was on the...

  10. Graphene suspensions for 2D printing

    Soots, R. A.; Yakimchuk, E. A.; Nebogatikova, N. A.; Kotin, I. A.; Antonova, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that, by processing a graphite suspension in ethanol or water by ultrasound and centrifuging, it is possible to obtain particles with thicknesses within 1-6 nm and, in the most interesting cases, 1-1.5 nm. Analogous treatment of a graphite suspension in organic solvent yields eventually thicker particles (up to 6-10 nm thick) even upon long-term treatment. Using the proposed ink based on graphene and aqueous ethanol with ethylcellulose and terpineol additives for 2D printing, thin (~5 nm thick) films with sheet resistance upon annealing ~30 MΩ/□ were obtained. With the ink based on aqueous graphene suspension, the sheet resistance was ~5-12 kΩ/□ for 6- to 15-nm-thick layers with a carrier mobility of ~30-50 cm2/(V s).

  11. Area preserving diffeomorphisms and 2-d gravity

    La, H S

    1995-01-01

    Area preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-d compact Riemannian manifold with or without boundary are studied. We find two classes of decompositions of a Riemannian metric, namely, h- and g-decomposition, that help to formulate a gravitational theory which is area preserving diffeomorphism (SDiffM-) invariant but not necessarily diffeomorphism invariant. The general covariance of equations of motion of such a theory can be achieved by incorporating proper Weyl rescaling. The h-decomposition makes the conformal factor of a metric SDiffM-invariant and the rest of the metric invariant under conformal diffeomorphisms, whilst the g-decomposition makes the conformal factor a SDiffM scalar and the rest a SDiffM tensor. Using these, we reformulate Liouville gravity in SDiffM invariant way. In this context we also further clarify the dual formulation of Liouville gravity introduced by the author before, in which the affine spin connection is dual to the Liouville field.

  12. Metrology for graphene and 2D materials

    Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The application of graphene, a one atom-thick honeycomb lattice of carbon atoms with superlative properties, such as electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and strength, has already shown that it can be used to benefit metrology itself as a new quantum standard for resistance. However, there are many application areas where graphene and other 2D materials, such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), may be disruptive, areas such as flexible electronics, nanocomposites, sensing and energy storage. Applying metrology to the area of graphene is now critical to enable the new, emerging global graphene commercial world and bridge the gap between academia and industry. Measurement capabilities and expertise in a wide range of scientific areas are required to address this challenge. The combined and complementary approach of varied characterisation methods for structural, chemical, electrical and other properties, will allow the real-world issues of commercialising graphene and other 2D materials to be addressed. Here, examples of metrology challenges that have been overcome through a multi-technique or new approach are discussed. Firstly, the structural characterisation of defects in both graphene and MoS2 via Raman spectroscopy is described, and how nanoscale mapping of vacancy defects in graphene is also possible using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Furthermore, the chemical characterisation and removal of polymer residue on chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown graphene via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is detailed, as well as the chemical characterisation of iron films used to grow large domain single-layer h-BN through CVD growth, revealing how contamination of the substrate itself plays a role in the resulting h-BN layer. In addition, the role of international standardisation in this area is described, outlining the current work ongoing in both the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and the

  13. Optimization of Flapping Airfoils for Maximum Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency

    I. H. Tuncer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical optimization algorithm based on the steepest decent along the variation of the optimization function is implemented for maximizing the thrust and/or propulsive efficiency of a single flapping airfoil. Unsteady, low speed laminar flows are computed using a Navier-Stokes solver on moving overset grids. The flapping motion of the airfoil is described by a combined sinusoidal plunge and pitching motion. Optimization parameters are taken to be the amplitudes of the plunge and pitching motions, and the phase shift between them. Computations are performed in parallel in a work station cluster. The numerical simulations show that high thrust values may be obtained at the expense of reduced efficiency. For high efficiency in thrust generation, the induced angle of attack of the airfoil is reduced and large scale vortex formations at the leading edge are prevented. 

  14. CFD Analysis on Airfoil at High Angles of Attack

    Dr.P.PrabhakaraRao, Sri Sampath.V

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes a conceptual study of performance enhancing devices for an airfoil by using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Two simple passive devices are selected and examined for Lift improvement and for decrease in Drag. The motivation behind this project is to study these effective techniques to improve performance with fewer drawbacks then previously existing model. The effective position for the location of Dimples and Cylinder are found out. Among the two selected models, Dimple model shows good results compare to other. The CAD model is prepared in CATIA V5 R19, pre-processing is done in ANSYS ICEM CFD 14.0 and simulations are carried out in ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The overall aim of the project is to improve airfoil performance at high angle-of-attack. The results justify the optimum position for placing Dimple and cylinder for enhancing airfoil performance.

  15. Vortex scale of unsteady separation on a pitching airfoil.

    Fuchiwaki, Masaki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2002-10-01

    The streaklines of unsteady separation on two kinds of pitching airfoils, the NACA65-0910 and a blunt trailing edge airfoil, were studied by dye flow visualization and by the Schlieren method. The latter visualized the discrete vortices shed from the leading edge. The results of these visualization studies allow a comparison between the dynamic behavior of the streakline of unsteady separation and that of the discrete vortices shed from the leading edge. The influence of the airfoil configuration on the flow characteristics was also examined. Furthermore, the scale of a discrete vortex forming the recirculation region was investigated. The non-dimensional pitching rate was k = 0.377, the angle of attack alpha(m) = 16 degrees and the pitching amplitude was fixed to A = +/-6 degrees for Re = 4.0 x 10(3) in this experiment. PMID:12495998

  16. Automated CFD for Generation of Airfoil Performance Tables

    Strawn, Roger; Mayda, E. Q.; vamDam, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    A method of automated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been invented for the generation of performance tables for an object subject to fluid flow. The method is applicable to the generation of tables that summarize the effects of two-dimensional flows about airfoils and that are in a format known in the art as C81. (A C81 airfoil performance table is a text file that lists coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment of an airfoil as functions of angle of attack for a range of Mach numbers.) The method makes it possible to efficiently generate and tabulate data from simulations of flows for parameter values spanning all operational ranges of actual or potential interest. In so doing, the method also enables filling of gaps and resolution of inconsistencies in C81 tables generated previously from incomplete experimental data or from theoretical calculations that involved questionable assumptions.

  17. Response of a thin airfoil encountering strong density discontinuity

    Marble, F.E. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Karman Lab. of Fluid Mechanics

    1993-12-01

    Airfoil theory for unsteady motion has been developed extensively assuming the undisturbed medium to be of uniform density, a restriction accurate for motion in the atmosphere. In some instances, notably for airfoil comprising fan, compressor and turbine blade rows, the undisturbed medium may carry density variations or ``spots``, resulting from non-uniformities in temperature or composition, of a size comparable to the blade chord. This condition exists for turbine blades, immediately downstream of the main burner of a gas turbine engine where the density fluctuations of the order of 50 percent may occur. Disturbances of a somewhat smaller magnitude arise from the ingestion of hot boundary layers into fans, and exhaust into hovercraft. Because these regions of non-uniform density convect with the moving medium, the airfoil experiences a time varying load and moment which the authors calculate.

  18. Aerodynamic performance of an annular classical airfoil cascade

    Bergsten, D. E.; Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments that were performed in a large-scale subsonic annular cascade facility that was specifically designed to provide three-dimensional aerodynamic data for the verification of numerical-calculation codes. In particular, the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical flat-plate airfoil cascade is determined for angles of incidence of 0, 5, and 10 deg. The resulting data are analyzed and are correlated with predictions obtained from NASA's MERIDL and TSONIC numerical programs. It is found that: (1) at 0 and 5 deg, the airfoil surface data show a good correlation with the predictions; (2) at 10 deg, the data are in fair agreement with the numerical predictions; and (3) the two-dimensional Gaussian similarity relationship is appropriate for the wake velocity profiles in the mid-span region of the airfoil.

  19. Contribution to finite element modelling of airfoil aeroelastic instabilities

    Horáček J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear equations of motion for a flexibly supported rigid airfoil with additional degree of freedom for controlling of the profile motion by a trailing edge flap are derived for large vibration amplitudes. Preliminary results for numerical simulation of flow-induced airfoil vibrations in a laminar incompressible flow are presented for the NACA profile 0012 with three-degrees of freedom (vertical translation, rotation around the elastic axis and rotation of the flap. The developed numerical solution of the Navier – Stokes equations and the Arbitrary Eulerian-Lagrangian approach enable to consider the moving grid for the finite element modelling of the fluid flow around the oscillating airfoil. A sequence of numerical simulation examples is presented for Reynolds numbers up to about Re~10^5, when the system loses the aeroelastic stability, and when the large displacements of the profile and a post-critical behaviour of the system take place.

  20. Analysis of jet-airfoil interaction noise sources by using a microphone array technique

    Fleury, Vincent; Davy, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the characterization of jet noise sources and jet-airfoil interaction sources by using microphone array data. The measurements were carried-out in the anechoic open test section wind tunnel of Onera, Cepra19. The microphone array technique relies on the convected, Lighthill's and Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings' acoustic analogy equation. The cross-spectrum of the source term of the analogy equation is sought. It is defined as the optimal solution to a minimal error equation using the measured microphone cross-spectra as reference. This inverse problem is ill-posed yet. A penalty term based on a localization operator is therefore added to improve the recovery of jet noise sources. The analysis of isolated jet noise data in subsonic regime shows the contribution of the conventional mixing noise source in the low frequency range, as expected, and of uniformly distributed, uncorrelated noise sources in the jet flow at higher frequencies. In underexpanded supersonic regime, a shock-associated noise source is clearly identified, too. An additional source is detected in the vicinity of the nozzle exit both in supersonic and subsonic regimes. In the presence of the airfoil, the distribution of the noise sources is deeply modified. In particular, a strong noise source is localized on the flap. For high Strouhal numbers, higher than about 2 (based on the jet mixing velocity and diameter), a significant contribution from the shear-layer near the flap is observed, too. Indications of acoustic reflections on the airfoil are also discerned.

  1. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  2. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    Bertagnolio, F.

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model is tested and validated by comparing with other results from the literature. Finally, this model is used in the optimization process of two reference airfoils in order to reduce their noise signature: the RISOE-B1-18 and the S809 airfoils. (au)

  3. CFD Analysis of Circulation Control Airfoils Using Fluent

    McGowan, Gregory; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to validate computational fluid dynamics procedures for calculating flows around circulation control airfoils, the commercial flow solver FLUENT was utilized to study the flow around a general aviation circulation control airfoil. The results were compared to experimental and computational fluid dynamics results conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The current effort was conducted in three stages: 1. A comparison of the results for free-air conditions to those from experiments. 2. A study of wind-tunnel wall effects. and 3. A study of the stagnation-point behavior.

  4. Unsteady Double Wake Model for the Simulation of Stalled Airfoils

    Ramos García, Néstor; Cayron, Antoine; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the recent developed Unsteady Double Wake Model, USDWM, is used to simulate separated flows past a wind turbine airfoil at high angles of attack. The solver is basically an unsteady two-dimensional panel method which uses the unsteady double wake technique to model flow...... separation and its dynamics. In this paper, the calculated integral forces have been successfully validated against wind tunnel measurements for the FFA-W3-211 airfoil. Furthermore, the computed highly unsteady flow field is analyzed in detail for a set of angles of attack ranging from light to deep stall...

  5. Detached Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels; Davidson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The effect of resolving inflow turbulence in detached eddy simulations of airfoil flows is studied. Synthetic turbulence is used for inflow boundary condition. The generated turbulence fields are shown to decay according to experimental data as they are convected through the domain with the free...... stream velocity. The subsonic flow around a NACA 0015 airfoil is studied at Reynolds number 1.6 × 106 and at various angles of attack before and after stall. Simulations with turbulent inflow are compared to experiments and to simulations without turbulent inflow. The results show that the flow is...

  6. Trailing edge noise model applied to wind turbine airfoils

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    The aim of this work is firstly to provide a quick introduction to the theory of noise generation that are relevant to wind turbine technology with focus on trailing edge noise. Secondly, the socalled TNO trailing edge noise model developed by Parchen [1] is described in more details. The model i...... tested and validated by comparing with other results from the literature. Finally, this model is used in the optimization process of two reference airfoils in order to reduce their noise signature: the RISØ-B1-18 and the S809 airfoils....

  7. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Leloudas, Giorgos

    2016-01-01

    In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks......, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989). It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed that this was...

  8. Extraction of airfoil data using PIV and pressure measurements

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed technique for determining the angle of attack (AOA) on a rotating blade is used to extract AOAs and airfoil data from measurements obtained during the MEXICO (Model rotor EXperiments in COntrolled conditions) rotor experiment. Detailed surface pressure and Particle Image...... of the rotor. The extraction technique is verified by employing the derived airfoil characteristics as input to computations using the BEM technique and comparing the calculated axial and tangential forces to the measured data. The comparison also demonstrates that the used technique of determining...

  9. Wake instability issues: From circular cylinders to stalled airfoils

    Meneghini, J. R.; Carmo, B. S.; Tsiloufas, S. P.; Gioria, R. S.; Aranha, J. A. P.

    2011-07-01

    Some recent results regarding the global dynamical behaviour of the wake of circular cylinders and airfoils with massive separation are reviewed in this paper. In order to investigate the effect of interference, the three-dimensional instability modes are analysed for the flow around two circular cylinders in tandem. In the same way, the flow around a stalled airfoil is investigated in order to provide a better understanding of the three-dimensional characteristics of wakes forming downstream of a lifting body with massive separation. These results are compared with those found for an isolated cylinder. Some fundamental differences among these flows are discussed.

  10. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2010-01-01

    noise prediction model, the previously developed integrated design technique is further developed. The new code takes into account different airfoil requirements according to their local positions on a blade, such as sensitivity to leading edge roughness, design lift at off-design condition, stall......Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...

  11. Aspects of Numerical Simulation of Circulation Control Airfoils

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The mass-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoils. Numerical solutions are computed with a multigrid method that uses an implicit approximate factorization smoother. The effects of flow conditions (e.g., free-stream Mach number, angle of attack, momentum coefficient) and mesh on the prediction of circulation control airfoil flows are considered. In addition, the impact of turbulence modeling, including curvature effects and modifications to reduce eddy viscosity levels in the wall jet (i.e., Coanda flow), is discussed. Computed pressure distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  12. Assessment of spanwise domain size effect on the transitional flow past an airfoil

    Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-19

    In most large-eddy and direct numerical simulations of flow past an isolated airfoil, the flow is assumed periodic in the spanwise direction. The size of the spanwise domain is an important geometrical parameter determining whether the turbulent flow is fully developed, and whether the separation and transition patterns are accurately modeled. In the present study, we investigate the incompressible flow past an isolated NACA0012 airfoil at the angle of attack of 5 degrees and Reynolds number 5 × 104. The spanwise domain size Lz, represented by the aspect ratio AR=Lz/C where C is the airfoil chord length, is varied in the range 0.1−0.80.1−0.8. The effect of varying the normalized spanwise domain size AR is examined via direct numerical simulation (DNS) on several aspects of the turbulent flow quantities including the time-averaged and time-dependent behavior as well as the spanwise variation of the selected statistical quantities. DNS results reveal that different aspect ratios result in close predictions of the time-averaged aerodynamic quantities, and the velocity field except for a slight difference in the separation bubble. Smaller aspect ratios tend to underpredict the turbulent fluctuations near the separation point but overpredict them inside the separation bubble. Large differences are observed for multiple statistical quantities near the reattachment point, especially the turbulent kinetic energy budget terms. The leading edge separation is notably three-dimensional for simulation at AR=0.8, while remaining quasi-2D for smaller aspect ratios. The spanwise two-point correlation coefficient shows significant dependence on the position of the probe and the velocity component analyzed: small aspect ratios do not produce uncorrelated results for all the velocity components. The simulation results demonstrate that examining only a few statistical quantities may result in a misleading conclusion regarding the sufficiency of the spanwise domain size. Reliable

  13. Local 2D-2D tunneling in high mobility electron systems

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Sciambi, Adam; Bartel, John; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Lilly, Michael; Bank, Seth; Gossard, Arthur

    2012-02-01

    Many scanning probe techniques have been utilized in recent years to measure local properties of high mobility two-dimensional (2D) electron systems in GaAs. However, most techniques lack the ability to tunnel into the buried 2D system and measure local spectroscopic information. We report scanning gate measurements on a bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure that allows for a local modulation of tunneling between two 2D electron layers. We call this technique Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (VSTM) [1,2] as the influence of the scanning gate is analogous to an STM tip, except at a GaAs/AlGaAs interface instead of a surface. We will discuss the spectroscopic capabilities of the technique, and show preliminary results of measurements on a high mobility 2D electron system.[1] A. Sciambi, M. Pelliccione et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 132103 (2010).[2] A. Sciambi, M. Pelliccione et al., Phys. Rev. B 84, 085301 (2011).

  14. Face recognition method based on 2D-PCA and 2D-LDA%基于2D-PCA和2D-LDA的人脸识别方法

    温福喜; 刘宏伟

    2007-01-01

    提出了基于2D-PCA、2D-LDA两种特征采用融合分类器的人脸识别方法.首先提取人脸图像的2D-PCA和2D-LDA特征,对不同特征在决策层对分类器进行融合.在ORL人脸库上的试验结果表明,分类器决策层融合方法在识别性能上优于2D-PCA和2D-LDA,更具有鲁棒性.

  15. Aerodynamic shape optimization for alleviating dynamic stall characteristics of helicopter rotor airfoil

    Wang Qing

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to alleviate the dynamic stall effects in helicopter rotor, the sequential quadratic programming (SQP method is employed to optimize the characteristics of airfoil under dynamic stall conditions based on the SC1095 airfoil. The geometry of airfoil is parameterized by the class-shape-transformation (CST method, and the C-topology body-fitted mesh is then automatically generated around the airfoil by solving the Poisson equations. Based on the grid generation technology, the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations are chosen as the governing equations for predicting airfoil flow field and the highly-efficient implicit scheme of lower–upper symmetric Gauss–Seidel (LU-SGS is adopted for temporal discretization. To capture the dynamic stall phenomenon of the rotor more accurately, the Spalart–Allmaras turbulence model is employed to close the RANS equations. The optimized airfoil with a larger leading edge radius and camber is obtained. The leading edge vortex and trailing edge separation of the optimized airfoil under unsteady conditions are obviously weakened, and the dynamic stall characteristics of optimized airfoil at different Mach numbers, reduced frequencies and angles of attack are also obviously improved compared with the baseline SC1095 airfoil. It is demonstrated that the optimized method is effective and the optimized airfoil is suitable as the helicopter rotor airfoil.

  16. Predicting Non-Square 2D Dice Probabilities

    Pender, G A T

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of the final state probabilities of a general cuboid randomly thrown onto a surface is a problem that naturally arises in the minds of men and women familiar with regular cubic dice and the basic concepts of probability. Indeed, it was considered by Newton in 1664 [1]. In this paper we make progress on the 2D problem (which can be realised in 3D by considering a long cuboid, or alternatively a rectangular cross-sectioned dreidel). For the two-dimensional case we suggest a model that predicts this based on the side length ratio. We test this theory both experimentally and computationally, and find good agreement between our theory, experimental and computational results. Our theory is known, from its derivation, to be an approximation for particularly bouncy or grippy surfaces where the die rolls through many revolutions before settling. On real surfaces we would expect (and we observe) that the true probability ratio for a 2D die is a somewhat closer to unity than predicted by our theory. This ...

  17. Predicting non-square 2D dice probabilities

    Pender, G. A. T.; Uhrin, M.

    2014-07-01

    The prediction of the final state probabilities of a general cuboid randomly thrown onto a surface is a problem that naturally arises in the minds of men and women familiar with regular cubic dice and the basic concepts of probability. Indeed, it was considered by Newton in 1664 (Newton 1967 The Mathematical Papers of Issac Newton vol I (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) pp 60-1). In this paper we make progress on the 2D problem (which can be realized in 3D by considering a long cuboid, or alternatively a rectangular cross-sectioned dreidel). For the two-dimensional case we suggest that the ratio of the probabilities of landing on each of the two sides is given by \\frac{\\sqrt{{{k}^{2}}+{{l}^{2}}}-k}{\\sqrt{{{k}^{2}}+{{l}^{2}}}-l}\\frac{arctan \\frac{l}{k}}{arctan \\frac{k}{l}} where k and l are the lengths of the two sides. We test this theory both experimentally and computationally, and find good agreement between our theory, experimental and computational results. Our theory is known, from its derivation, to be an approximation for particularly bouncy or ‘grippy’ surfaces where the die rolls through many revolutions before settling. On real surfaces we would expect (and we observe) that the true probability ratio for a 2D die is a somewhat closer to unity than predicted by our theory. This problem may also have wider relevance in the testing of physics engines.

  18. Design and validation of the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 airfoils

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and validation of the high performance and low noise Chong Qing University and Technical University of Denmark LN1 (CQU-DTU-LN1) series of airfoils for wind turbine applications. The new design method uses target characteristics of wind turbine airfoils in the design...... objective, such as airfoil lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift-drag ratio, and minimizes trailing edge noise as a constraint. To express airfoil shape, an analytical expression is used. One of the main advantages of the present designmethod is that it produces a highly smooth airfoil shape that can...... blade element momentum theory, the viscous-inviscid XFOIL code and an airfoil self-noise prediction model, an optimization algorithm has been developed for designing the high performance and low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils with targets of maximum power coefficient and low noise emission. To...

  19. 2D DIGITAL SIMPLIFIED FLOW VALVE

    Ruan Jian; Li Sheng; Pei Xiang; Burton R; Ukrainetz P; Bitner D

    2004-01-01

    The 2D digital simplified flow valve is composed of a pilot-operated valve designed with both rotary and linear motions of a single spool,and a stepper motor under continual control.How the structural parameters affect the static and dynamic characteristics of the valve is first clarified and a criterion for stability is presented.Experiments are designed to test the performance of the valve.It is necessary to establish a balance between the static and dynamic characteristics in deciding the structural parameters.Nevertheless,it is possible to maintain the dynamic response at a fairly high level,while keeping the leakage of the pilot stage at an acceptable level.One of the features of the digital valve is stage control.In stage control the nonlinearities,such as electromagnetic saturation and hysteresis,are greatly reduced.To a large extent the dynamic response of the valve is decided by the executing cycle of the control algorithm.

  20. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules.

  1. 2D manifold-independent spinfoam theory

    A number of background-independent quantization procedures have recently been employed in 4D nonperturbative quantum gravity. We investigate and illustrate these techniques and their relation in the context of a simple 2D topological theory. We discuss canonical quantization, loop or spin network states, path integral quantization over a discretization of the manifold, spin foam formulation and the fully background-independent definition of the theory using an auxiliary field theory on a group manifold. While several of these techniques have already been applied to this theory by Witten, the last one is novel: it allows us to give a precise meaning to the sum over topologies, and to compute background-independent and, in fact, 'manifold-independent' transition amplitudes. These transition amplitudes play the role of Wightman functions of the theory. They are physical observable quantities, and the canonical structure of the theory can be reconstructed from them via a C* algebraic GNS construction. We expect an analogous structure to be relevant in 4D quantum gravity

  2. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  3. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  4. Competing coexisting phases in 2D water.

    Zanotti, Jean-Marc; Judeinstein, Patrick; Dalla-Bernardina, Simona; Creff, Gaëlle; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale; Bonetti, Marco; Ollivier, Jacques; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    The properties of bulk water come from a delicate balance of interactions on length scales encompassing several orders of magnitudes: i) the Hydrogen Bond (HBond) at the molecular scale and ii) the extension of this HBond network up to the macroscopic level. Here, we address the physics of water when the three dimensional extension of the HBond network is frustrated, so that the water molecules are forced to organize in only two dimensions. We account for the large scale fluctuating HBond network by an analytical mean-field percolation model. This approach provides a coherent interpretation of the different events experimentally (calorimetry, neutron, NMR, near and far infra-red spectroscopies) detected in interfacial water at 160, 220 and 250 K. Starting from an amorphous state of water at low temperature, these transitions are respectively interpreted as the onset of creation of transient low density patches of 4-HBonded molecules at 160 K, the percolation of these domains at 220 K and finally the total invasion of the surface by them at 250 K. The source of this surprising behaviour in 2D is the frustration of the natural bulk tetrahedral local geometry and the underlying very significant increase in entropy of the interfacial water molecules. PMID:27185018

  5. Resolution Independent 2D Cartoon Video Conversion

    MSF. Fayaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel system for vectorizing 2D raster cartoon. The output videos are the resolution independent, smaller in file size. As a first step, input video is segment to scene thereafter all processes are done for each scene separately. Every scene contains foreground and background objects so in each and every scene foreground background classification is performed. Background details can occlude by foreground objects but when foreground objects move its previous position such occluded details exposed in one of the next frame so using that frame can fill the occluded area and can generate static background. Classified foreground objects are identified and the motion of the foreground objects tracked for this simple user assistance is required from those motion details of foreground object’s animation generated. Static background and foreground objects segmented using K-means clustering and each and every cluster’s vectorized using potrace. Using vectored background and foreground object animation path vector video regenerated.

  6. Identification of novel CYP2D7-2D6 hybrids: non-functional and functional variants

    Andrea Gaedigk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphic expression of CYP2D6 contributes to the wide range of activity observed for this clinically important drug metabolizing enzyme. In this report we describe novel CYP2D7/2D6 hybrid genes encoding non-functional and functional CYP2D6 protein and a CYP2D7 variant that mimics a CYP2D7/2D6 hybrid gene. Five kb long PCR products encompassing the novel genes were entirely sequenced. A quantitative assay probing in different gene regions was employed to determine CYP2D6 and 2D7 copy number variations and the relative position of the hybrid genes within the locus was assessed by long-range PCR. In addition to the previously known CYP2D6*13 and *66 hybrids, we describe three novel non-functional CYP2D7-2D6 hybrids with gene switching in exon 2 (CYP2D6*79, intron 2 (CYP2D6*80 and intron 5 (CYP2D6*67. A CYP2D7-specific T-ins in exon 1 causes a detrimental frame shift. One subject revealed a CYP2D7 conversion in the 5’-flanking region of a CYP2D6*35 allele, was otherwise unaffected (designated CYP2D6*35B. Finally, three DNAs revealed a CYP2D7 gene with a CYP2D6-like region downstream of exon 9 (designated CYP2D7[REP6]. Quantitative copy number determination, sequence analyses and long-range PCR mapping were in agreement and excluded the presence of additional gene units. Undetected hybrid genes may cause over-estimation of CYP2D6 activity (CYP2D6*1/*1 vs *1/hybrid, etc, but may also cause results that may interfere with the genotype determination. Detection of hybrid events, ‘single’ and tandem, will contribute to more accurate phenotype prediction from genotype data.

  7. The effects of leading-edge serrations on reducing flow unsteadiness about airfoils, an experimental and analytical investigation

    Schwind, R. G.; Allen, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    High frequency surface pressure measurements were obtained from wind-tunnel tests over the Reynolds number range 1.2 times one million to 6.2 times one million on a rectangular wing of NACA 63-009 airfoil section. Measurements were also obtained with a wide selection of leading-edge serrations added to the basic airfoil. Under a two-dimensional laminar bubble very close to the leading edge of the basic airfoil there is a large apatial peak in rms pressure. Frequency analysis of the pressure signals in this region show a large, high-frequency energy peak which is interpreted as an oscillation in size and position of the bubble. The serrations divide the bubble into segments and reduce the peak rms pressures. A low Reynolds number flow visualization test on a hydrofoil in water was also conducted. A von Karman vortex street was found trailing from the rear of the foil. Its frequency is at a much lower Strouhal number than in the high Reynolds number experiment, and is related to the trailing-edge and boundary-layer thicknesses.

  8. Ice Accretions and Full-Scale Iced Aerodynamic Performance Data for a Two-Dimensional NACA 23012 Airfoil

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Lee, Sam; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, Emmanuel; Moens, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the data collected during the large wind tunnel campaigns conducted as part of the SUNSET project (StUdies oN Scaling EffecTs due to ice) also known as the Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation study: a joint effort by NASA, the Office National d'Etudes et Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA), and the University of Illinois. These data form a benchmark database of full-scale ice accretions and corresponding ice-contaminated aerodynamic performance data for a two-dimensional (2D) NACA 23012 airfoil. The wider research effort also included an analysis of ice-contaminated aerodynamics that categorized ice accretions by aerodynamic effects and an investigation of subscale, low- Reynolds-number ice-contaminated aerodynamics for the NACA 23012 airfoil. The low-Reynolds-number investigation included an analysis of the geometric fidelity needed to reliably assess aerodynamic effects of airfoil icing using artificial ice shapes. Included herein are records of the ice accreted during campaigns in NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Two different 2D NACA 23012 airfoil models were used during these campaigns; an 18-in. (45.7-cm) chord (subscale) model and a 72-in. (182.9-cm) chord (full-scale) model. The aircraft icing conditions used during these campaigns were selected from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 25 Appendix C icing envelopes. The records include the test conditions, photographs of the ice accreted, tracings of the ice, and ice depth measurements. Model coordinates and pressure tap locations are also presented. Also included herein are the data recorded during a wind tunnel campaign conducted in the F1 Subsonic Pressurized Wind Tunnel of ONERA. The F1 tunnel is a pressured, high- Reynolds-number facility that could accommodate the full-scale (72-in. (182.9-cm) chord) 2D NACA 23012 model. Molds were made of the ice accreted during selected test runs of the full-scale model

  9. Assessment of the 2D/1D implementation in MPACT

    The 2D/1D method is used in the MPACT code to obtain 3D solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation for practical reactor geometries. The OECD C5G7 transport benchmark problem is used first to assess the accuracy of the method with a fixed set of cross-sections. The VERA Core Physics Progression Problems are then used to compare the accuracy of the transport solver using a 56-group library based on ENDFB-VII.0. Single assembly PWR designs are simulated, and the eigenvalue and pin powers are compared to continuous-energy Monte Carlo results. A 3x3 assembly cluster with a control rod inserted into the center assembly is then compared to Monte Carlo to assess the ability of MPACT to predict a control rod worth curve. Finally, MPACT is used to simulate the initial critical states of a full 3D initial core of a PWR at zero power conditions. (author)

  10. Preliminary wind-tunnel investigation of an NACA 23012 airfoil with various arrangements of venetian-blind flaps

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Harris, Thomas A

    1940-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation made in the NACA 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel of a large-chord NACA 23012 airfoil with several arrangements of venetian-blind flaps to determine the aerodynamic section characteristics as affected by the over-all flap chord, the chords of the slats used to form the flap, the slat spacing, the number of slats and the position of the flap with respect to the wing. Complete section data are given in the form of graphs for all the combinations tested.

  11. Finite state models of constrained 2d data

    Justesen, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers a class of discrete finite alphabet 2D fields that can be characterized using tools front finite state machines and Markov chains. These fields have several properties that greatly simplify the analysis of 2D coding methods.......This paper considers a class of discrete finite alphabet 2D fields that can be characterized using tools front finite state machines and Markov chains. These fields have several properties that greatly simplify the analysis of 2D coding methods....

  12. Airfoil Computations using the γ - Reθ Model

    Sørensen, Niels N.

    computations. Based on this, an estimate of the error in the computations is determined to be approximately one percent in the attached region. Following the verification of the implemented model, the model is applied to four airfoils, NACA64- 018, NACA64-218, NACA64-418 and NACA64-618 and the results are...

  13. Numerical Investigations of an Optimized Airfoil with a Rotary Cylinder

    Gada, Komal; Rahai, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    Numerical Investigations of an optimized thin airfoil with a rotary cylinder as a control device for reducing separation and improving lift to drag ratio have been performed. Our previous investigations have used geometrical optimization for development of an optimized airfoil with increased torque for applications in a vertical axis wind turbine. The improved performance was due to contributions of lift to torque at low angles of attack. The current investigations have been focused on using the optimized airfoil for micro-uav applications with an active flow control device, a rotary cylinder, to further control flow separation, especially during wind gust conditions. The airfoil has a chord length of 19.66 cm and a width of 25 cm with 0.254 cm thickness. Previous investigations have shown flow separation at approximately 85% chord length at moderate angles of attack. Thus the rotary cylinder with a 0.254 cm diameter was placed slightly downstream of the location of flow separation. The free stream mean velocity was 10 m/sec. and investigations have been performed at different cylinder's rotations with corresponding tangential velocities higher than, equal to and less than the free stream velocity. Results have shown more than 10% improvement in lift to drag ratio when the tangential velocity is near the free stream mean velocity. Graduate Assistant, Center for Energy and Environmental Research and Services (CEERS), College of Engineering, California State University, Long Beach.

  14. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Genç, Mustafa Serdar; Koca, Kemal; Hakan Açıkel, Halil; Özkan, Gökhan; Sadık Kırış, Mehmet; Yıldız, Rahime

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  15. High frequency microphone measurements for transition detection on airfoils

    Døssing, Mads

    Time series of pressure fluctuations has been obtained using high frequency microphones distributed over the surface of airfoils undergoing wind tunnel tests in the LM Windtunnel, owned by ’LM Glasfiber’, Denmark. The present report describes the dataanalysis, with special attention given to...

  16. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation

  17. Large Eddy Simulations of an Airfoil in Turbulent Inflow

    Gilling, Lasse; Sørensen, Niels

    Wind turbines operate in the turbulent boundary layer of the atmosphere and due to the rotational sampling effect the blades experience a high level of turbulence [1]. In this project the effect of turbulence is investigated by large eddy simulations of the turbulent flow past a NACA 0015 airfoil...

  18. Flow characteristics over NACA4412 airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the flow phenomena over NACA4412 were experimentally observed at various angle of attack and Reynolds number of 25000, 50000 and 75000, respectively. NACA4412 airfoil was manufactured at 3D printer and each tips of the wing were closed by using plexiglas to obtain two-dimensional airfoil. The experiments were conducted at low speed wind tunnel. The force measurement and hot-wire experiments were conducted to obtain data so that the flow phenomenon at the both top and bottom of the airfoil such as the flow separation and vortex shedding were observed. Also, smoke-wire experiment was carried out to visualize the surface flow pattern. After obtaining graphics from both force measurement experiment and hot-wire experiment compared with smoke wire experiment, it was noticed that there is a good coherence among the experiments. It was concluded that as Re number increased, the stall angle increased. And the separation bubble moved towards leading edge over the airfoil as the angle of attack increased.

  19. The Ultimate Flow Controlled Wind Turbine Blade Airfoil

    Seifert, Avraham; Dolgopyat, Danny; Friedland, Ori; Shig, Lior

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control is being studied as an enabling technology to enhance and maintain high efficiency of wind turbine blades also with contaminated surface and unsteady winds as well as at off-design operating conditions. The study is focused on a 25% thick airfoil (DU91-W2-250) suitable for the mid blade radius location. Initially a clean airfoil was fabricated and tested, as well as compared to XFoil predictions. From these experiments, the evolution of the separation location was identified. Five locations for installing active flow control actuators are available on this airfoil. It uses both Piezo fluidic (``Synthetic jets'') and the Suction and Oscillatory Blowing (SaOB) actuators. Then we evaluate both actuation concepts overall energy efficiency and efficacy in controlling boundary layer separation. Since efficient actuation is to be found at low amplitudes when placed close to separation location, distributed actuation is used. Following the completion of the baseline studies the study has focused on the airfoil instrumentation and extensive wind tunnel testing over a Reynolds number range of 0.2 to 1.5 Million. Sample results will be presented and outline for continued study will be discussed.

  20. Mechanism of unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of an elliptic airfoil

    Sun Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of elliptic airfoil are quite different from the case of conventional airfoil for Reynolds number varying from about 104 to 106. In order to reveal the fundamental mechanism, the unsteady flow around a stationary two-dimensional elliptic airfoil with 16% relative thickness has been simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations and the γ-Reθt‾ transition turbulence model at different angles of attack for flow Reynolds number of 5 × 105. The aerodynamic coefficients and the pressure distribution obtained by computation are in good agreement with experimental data, which indicates that the numerical method works well. Through this study, the mechanism of the unconventional aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed and discussed based on the computational predictions coupled with the wind tunnel results. It is considered that the boundary layer transition at the leading edge and the unsteady flow separation vortices at the trailing edge are the causes of the case. Furthermore, a valuable insight into the physics of how the flow behavior affects the elliptic airfoil’s aerodynamics is provided.

  1. Ultrasonic 2D matrix PVDF transducer

    Ptchelintsev, A.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2000-05-01

    During the past decade a substantial amount of work has been done in the area of ultrasonic imaging technology using 2D arrays. The main problems arising for the two-dimensional matrix transducers at megahertz frequencies are small size and huge count of the elements, high electrical impedance, low sensitivity, bad SNR and slower data acquisition rate. The major technological difficulty remains the high density of the interconnect. To solve these problems numerous approaches have been suggested. In the present work, a 24×24 elements (24 transmit+24 receive) matrix and a switching board were developed. The transducer consists of two 52 μm PVDF layers each representing a linear array of 24 elements placed one on the top of the other. Electrodes in these two layers are perpendicular and form the grid of 0.5×0.5 mm pitch. The layers are bonded together with the ground electrode being monolithic and located between the layers. The matrix is backed from the rear surface with an epoxy composition. During the emission, a linear element from the emitting layer generates a longitudinal wave pulse propagating inside the test object. Reflected pulses are picked-up by the receiving layer. During one transmit-receive cycle one transmit element and one receive element are selected by corresponding multiplexers. These crossed elements emulate a small element formed by their intersection. The present design presents the following advantages: minimizes number of active channels and density of the interconnect; reduces the electrical impedance of the element improving electrical matching; enables the transmit-receive mode; due to the efficient backing provides bandwidth and good time resolution; and, significantly reduces the electronics complexity. The matrix can not be used for the beam steering and focusing. Owing to this impossibility of focusing, the penetration depth is limited as well by the diffraction phenomena.

  2. Polynomial solution of 2D Kalman-Bucy filtering problem

    Sebek, M.

    1992-01-01

    The 2D version of the Kalman-Bucy filtering problem is formulated and then solved via 2D polynomial methods. The optimal filter is restricted to be a linear causal system. The design procedure is shown to consist of one 2D spectral factorization equation only. In fact, it works for n-D signals (n>2)

  3. Polynomial solution of 2D Kalman-Bucy filtering problem

    Sebek, M.

    1992-01-01

    The 2D version of the Kalman-Bucy filtering problem is formulated and then solved via 2D polynomial methods. The optimal filter is restricted to be a linear causal system. The design procedure is shown to consist of one 2D spectral factorization equation only. In fact, it works for n-D signals (n>2) as well.

  4. FEM-2D, 2-D MultiGroup Diffusion in X-Y Geometry

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: FEM-2D solves the two-dimensional diffusion equation in x-y geometry. This is done by the finite elements method. 2 - Method of solution: FEM-2D uses triangular elements with first and second order Lagrange approximations. The systems equations are formulated in multigroup form and solved by Cholesky procedure which operates only on nonzero elements. Various acceleration techniques are available for the outer iteration. Fluxes along various lines and rates in arbitrary zones may be output. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The code uses variable dimensioning. Thus, the problem size is restricted by the largest array which usually is the systems matrix. Fluxes of all groups are kept in memory. This might become another restrictive data set for a large number of groups. The validity of the results is restricted by the approximations used. FEM-2D requires a finite element net which allows the approximation of fluxes by at most parabolas. The node distribution should be more dense in areas of heavy flux changes (near absorbers or the reflector)

  5. Vortical Flow Structures in the Near-Wake of a Heaving Airfoil with Passively Actuated Leading and Trailing Flaps.

    Siala, Firas; Totpal, Alexander; Liburdy, James

    2015-11-01

    The flow physics of flying animals has recently received significant attention, mostly in the context of developing bio-inspired micro air vehicles and oscillating flow energy harvesters. Of particular interest is the understanding of the impact of airfoil flexibility on the flow physics. Research efforts showed that some degree of surface flexibility enhanced the strength and size of the leading edge vortex. In this study, the influence of flexibility on the near-wake dynamics and flow structures is investigated using 2D PIV measurements. The experiments are conducted in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 30,000 and a range of reduced frequencies from 0.09 to 0.2. The flexibility is attained using a torsion rod forming a hinge between the flap and the main wing. Vortex flow structures are visualized using large eddy scale decomposition technique and quantified using swirling strength analysis. It is found that trailing edge flexibility increases the vortex swirling strength compared to a rigid airfoil, whereas leading edge flexibility decreases the swirling strength. Furthermore, the integral length scale determined from the autocorrelation of the velocity fluctuations is found to be approximately equal to the actual vortex size. The vortex convective velocity is shown to be independent of flexibility and oscillation frequency, and it is represented by a trimodal distribution, with peak values at 0.8, 0.95 and 1 times the free stream velocity. Oregon State University.

  6. Airfoil Selection for a Lift Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine%升力型垂直轴风力机翼型的选择

    孙晓晶; 陆启迪; 黄典贵; 吴国庆

    2012-01-01

    At present,there are many different types of airfoils that have been used in lift-type vertical axis wind turbines.In order to study the influence of different airfoils on the lift-type vertical axis wind turbine performance,two-dimensional numerical simulation of flow around a Darrieus-type straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine was conducted in this paper with the aid of computational fluid dynamics software and sliding mesh method.Numerical results suggest that NACA0018 airfoil is the most suitable airfoil section used by a lift-type vertical axis wind turbine rotors as it can allow the wind turbine to achieve the highest wind energy utilization efficiency.%目前升力型垂直轴风力机采用的翼型多种多样,为了研究不同翼型对升力型垂直轴风力机风能利用率的影响,本文采用计算流体力学软件和滑移网格技术对升力型直叶片垂直轴风力机进行二维流场的数值模拟。结果表明,对于升力型垂直轴风力机,当选择NACA0018翼型可以达到最高的风能利用率。

  7. A comparison of two-and three-dimensional S809 airfoil properties for rough and smooth HAWT (Horizontal-Axis Wind Tunnel) rotor operation

    Musial, W. D.; Butterfield, C. P.; Jenks, M. D.

    1990-02-01

    At the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), we carried out tests to measure the effects of leading-edge roughness on an S809 airfoil using a 10-m, three-bladed, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). The rotor employed a constant-chord (.457 m) blade geometry with zero twist. Blade structural loads were measured with strain gages mounted at 9 spanwise locations. Airfoil pressure measurements were taken at the 80 percent spanwise station using 32 pressure taps distributed around the airfoil surface. Detailed inflow measurements were taken using nine R.M. Young Model 8002 propvane anemometers on a vertical plane array (VPA) located 10 m upwind of the test turbine in the prevailing wind direction. The major objective of this test was to determine the sensitivity of the S809 airfoil to roughness on a rotating wind turbine blade. We examined this effect by comparing several parameters. We compared power curves to show the sensitivity of whole rotor performance to roughness. We used pressure measurements to generate pressure distributions at the 80 percent span which operates at a Reynolds number (Re) of 800,000. We then integrated these distributions to determine the effect of roughness on the section's lift and pressure-drag coefficients.

  8. Stability Test for 2-D Continuous-Discrete Systems

    2002-01-01

    Models of 2-D continuous-discrete systems are introduced, which can be used to describe some complex systems. Different from classical 2-D continuous systems or 2-D discrete systems, the asymptotic stability of the continuous-discrete systems is determined by Hurwitz-Schur stability (hybrid one) of 2-D characteristic polynomials of the systems. An algebraic algorithm with simpler test procedure for Hurwitz-Schur stability test of 2-D polynomials is developed. An example to illustrate the applications of the test approach is provided.

  9. Correlated Electron Phenomena in 2D Materials

    Lambert, Joseph G.

    In this thesis, I present experimental results on coherent electron phenomena in layered two-dimensional materials: single layer graphene and van der Waals coupled 2D TiSe2. Graphene is a two-dimensional single-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms first derived from bulk graphite by the mechanical exfoliation technique in 2004. Low-energy charge carriers in graphene behave like massless Dirac fermions, and their density can be easily tuned between electron-rich and hole-rich quasiparticles with electrostatic gating techniques. The sharp interfaces between regions of different carrier densities form barriers with selective transmission, making them behave as partially reflecting mirrors. When two of these interfaces are set at a separation distance within the phase coherence length of the carriers, they form an electronic version of a Fabry-Perot cavity. I present measurements and analysis of multiple Fabry-Perot modes in graphene with parallel electrodes spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) TiSe2 is part of the family of materials that coined the term "materials beyond graphene". It contains van der Waals coupled trilayer stacks of Se-Ti-Se. Many TMD materials exhibit a host of interesting correlated electronic phases. In particular, TiSe2 exhibits chiral charge density waves (CDW) below TCDW ˜ 200 K. Upon doping with copper, the CDW state gets suppressed with Cu concentration, and CuxTiSe2 becomes superconducting with critical temperature of T c = 4.15 K. There is still much debate over the mechanisms governing the coexistence of the two correlated electronic phases---CDW and superconductivity. I will present some of the first conductance spectroscopy measurements of proximity coupled superconductor-CDW systems. Measurements reveal a proximity-induced critical current at the Nb-TiSe2 interfaces, suggesting pair correlations in the pure TiSe2. The results indicate that superconducting order is present concurrently with CDW in

  10. Robust Airfoil Optimization with Multi-objective Estimation of Distribution Algorithm

    Zhong Xiaoping; Ding Jifeng; Li Weiji; Zhang Yong

    2008-01-01

    A transonic airfoil designed by means of classical point-optimization may result in its dramatically inferior performance under off-design conditious. To overcome this shortcoming, robust design is proposed to fred out the optimal profile of an airfoil to maintain its performance in an uncertain environment. The robust airfoil optimization is aimed to minimize mean values and variances of drag coefficients while satisfying the lift and thickness constraints over a range of Maeb numbers. A multi-objective estimation of distribution algorithm is applied to the robust airfoil optimization on the base of the RAE2822 benchmark airfoil. The shape of the airfoil is obtained through superposing ten Hick-Heune shape functions upon the benchmark airfoil. A set of design points is selected according to a uniform design table for aerodynamic evaluation. A Kriging model of drag coefficient is coustrueted with those points to reduce eumputing costs. Over the Maeh range fi'om 0.7 to 0.8, the airfoil generated by the robust optimization has a configuration characterized by supercritical airfoil with low drag coefficients. The small fluctuation in its drag coefficients means that the performance of the robust airfoil is insensitive to variation of Mach number.

  11. Program package for 2D burnup calculation

    The program package for 2 dimension burnup calculation was developed for TRIGA Mark III reactor. The package consists of 3 modules: PRESIX, SIXTUS-2, and BURN; 1 library, and 2 input files. PRESIX module prepared cross sections for diffusion calculation. SIXTUS-2 module, a two dimensional diffusion code in hexagonal geometry, calculates keff, neutron fluxes and power distributions. BURN module performs the burnup of fuel elements and stored the result in the ELEM.DAT file. PRESIX.LIB is two group cross section library for major reactor core components prepared using WIMS-D4 code. PRES.INP, the first input file, reads information on reactor power and core loading pattern. ELEM.DAT, the second input file, is prepared for specific TRIGA reactor and dependent on operation history. To verify the reactor model and computational methods, the calculated excess reactivities were compared to the measurement. The results are in good agreement. (author)

  12. Development of a 2D sampler

    JAUMOUILLIE, P; LARRARTE, F

    2003-01-01

    Two phase particle-laden flows have a wide range applications. Sewage flows may be not the best known but a precise knowledge of pollutant loads is important for designing and operating sewer systems. Sewer systems are often considered as one-dimensional; thus, concentration measurement devices typically regard the sewer cross-section as a whole. Previous research results show that the hypothesis about homogeneity is too restrictive, and that the actual repartition of particles and associated...

  13. CYP2D7 sequence variation interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 genotyping

    Amanda K Riffel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35 which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696 SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe

  14. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  15. Mechanisms of sound amplification and sound reduction in the flapping flight of side-by-side airfoils

    Manela, A.; Halachmi, M.

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic signature of side-by-side airfoils, subject to small-amplitude harmonic pitching and incoming flow unsteadiness, is investigated. The two-dimensional near-field problem is formulated using thin-airfoil theory, where flow unsteadiness is modeled as a passing line vortex, and wake evolution is calculated via the Brown and Michael formula. Assuming that the setup is acoustically compact, acoustic radiation is obtained by means of the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. The associated compact Green's function is calculated numerically using potential-flow analysis of the fluid-structure flow domain. Results, comparing the acoustic radiation of the double-airfoil system to a reference case of a single airfoil, point to several mechanisms of sound attenuation and sound amplification, caused by airfoil-airfoil and airfoils-wake interactions. It is found that counter-phase pitching of the airfoils results in effective cloaking of the system, which otherwise becomes significantly noisy (as a 5/2-power of the pitching frequency) at large frequencies. In addition, depending on the distance between airfoils, in-phase pitching may result in an acoustic signature equivalent to a single airfoil (when the airfoils are adjacent) or to two separate airfoils (when the airfoils are far apart). In general, flow unsteadiness produces more sound when interacting with a double (compared with a single) airfoil setup. However, airfoils' nonlinear wake-wake interactions give rise to a sound reduction mechanism, which becomes most efficient at times when incoming vorticity passes above airfoils' leading and trailing edges. The present scheme can be readily extended to consider the acoustic properties of various double-airfoil configurations, as well as multiple (> 2) airfoil setups.

  16. Non-rigid consistent registration of 2D image sequences

    We present a novel algorithm for the registration of 2D image sequences that combines the principles of multiresolution B-spline-based elastic registration and those of bidirectional consistent registration. In our method, consecutive triples of images are iteratively registered to gradually extend the information through the set of images of the entire sequence. The intermediate results are reused for the registration of the following triple. We choose to interpolate the images and model the deformation fields using B-spline multiresolution pyramids. Novel boundary conditions are introduced to better characterize the deformations at the boundaries. In the experimental section, we quantitatively show that our method recovers from barrel/pincushion and fish-eye deformations with subpixel error. Moreover, it is more robust against outliers-occasional strong noise and large rotations-than the state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we show that our method can be used to realign series of histological serial sections, which are often heavily distorted due to folding and tearing of the tissues.

  17. Fabrication of 2D arrays of multi-component nanoparticles

    The paper presents a study of a physical method for fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) arrays composed of multi-component nanoparticles on a dielectric substrate. The method consists of two steps. In the first one, thin films composed of different metals are deposited by a classical PLD technique by using targets consisting of sections of different materials. Thin films composed of mixtures of different metals, as gold, silver, nickel, cobalt, iron, platinum, are thus deposited on a quartz substrate. By changing the area of the different sections in the target, thin films with different concentration of the metals are produced. The films fabricated are then annealed by nanosecond laser pulses delivered by a Nd:YAG laser system operating at its third harmonic. The modification of the films is studied as a function of the parameters of the incident radiation, as number of pulses and laser pulse fluence. It is found that the laser annealing can lead to a decomposition of the film into a monolayer of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. The optical properties of the structures produced are analyzed on the basis of their transmission spectra. The structures can be used in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and magneto-optics.

  18. Functional characterization of a first avian cytochrome P450 of the CYP2D subfamily (CYP2D49.

    Hua Cai

    Full Text Available The CYP2D family members are instrumental in the metabolism of 20-25% of commonly prescribed drugs. Although many CYP2D isoforms have been well characterized in other animal models, research concerning the chicken CYP2Ds is limited. In this study, a cDNA encoding a novel CYP2D enzyme (CYP2D49 was cloned from the chicken liver for the first time. The CYP2D49 cDNA contained an open reading frame of 502 amino acids that shared 52%-57% identities with other CYP2Ds. The gene structure and neighboring genes of CYP2D49 are conserved and similar to those of human CYP2D6. Additionally, similar to human CYP2D6, CYP2D49 is un-inducible in the liver and expressed predominantly in the liver, kidney and small intestine, with detectable levels in several other tissues. Metabolic assays of the CYP2D49 protein heterologously expressed in E. coli and Hela cells indicated that CYP2D49 metabolized the human CYP2D6 substrate, bufuralol, but not debrisoquine. Moreover, quinidine, a potent inhibitor of human CYP2D6, only inhibited the bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation activity of CYP2D49 to a negligible degree. All these results indicated that CYP2D49 had functional characteristics similar to those of human CYP2D6 but measurably differed in the debrisoquine 4'-hydroxylation and quinidine inhibitory profile. Further structure-function investigations that employed site-directed mutagenesis and circular dichroism spectroscopy identified the importance of Val-126, Glu-222, Asp-306, Phe-486 and Phe-488 in keeping the enzymatic activity of CYP2D49 toward bufuralol as well as the importance of Asp-306, Phe-486 and Phe-488 in maintaining the conformation of CYP2D49 protein. The current study is only the first step in characterizing the metabolic mechanism of CYP2D49; further studies are still required.

  19. MAZE, Input Generator for Program DYNA2D and NIKE2D

    Description of program or function: MAZE is an interactive input generator for two-dimensional finite element codes. MAZE has three phases. In the first phase, lines and parts are defined. The first phase is terminated by the 'ASSM' or 'PASSM' command which merges all parts. In the second phase, boundary conditions may be specified, slide-lines may be defined, parts may be merged to eliminate nodes along common interfaces, boundary nodes may be moved for graded zoning, the mesh may be smoothed, and load curves may be defined. The second phase is terminated by the 'WBCD' command which causes MAZE to write the output file as soon as the 'T' terminate command is typed. In the third phase, material properties may be defined. Commands that apply to the first phase may not be used in the second or third; likewise, commands that apply in the second may not be used in the first and third, or commands that apply in the third in the first and second. Nine commands - TV, Z, GSET, PLOTS, GRID, NOGRID, FRAME, NOFRAME, and RJET are available in all phases. Comments may be added anywhere in the input stream by prefacing the comment with 'C'. Any DYNA2D or NIKE2D material and equation-of- state model may be defined via the MAT and EOS commands respectively. Maze may be terminated after phase two; it is not necessary to define the materials

  20. Modeling Creep-Induced Stress Relaxation at the Leading Edge of SiC/SiC Airfoils

    Lang, Jerry; DiCarlo, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Anticipating the implementation of advanced SiC/SiC composites into internally cooled airfoil components within the turbine section of future aero-propulsion engines, the primary objective of this study was to develop physics-based analytical and finite-element modeling tools to predict the effects of composite creep and stress relaxation at the airfoil leading edges, which will generally experience large thermal gradients at high temperatures. A second objective was to examine how some advanced NASA-developed SiC/SiC systems coated with typical EBC materials would behave as leading edge materials in terms of long-term steady-state operating temperatures. Because of the complexities introduced by mechanical stresses inherent in internally cooled airfoils, a simple cylindrical thin-walled tube model subjected to thermal stresses only is employed for the leading edge, thereby obtaining a best-case scenario for the material behavior. In addition, the SiC/SiC composite materials are assumed to behave as isotropic materials with temperature-dependent viscoelastic creep behavior as measured in-plane on thin-walled panels. Key findings include: (1) without mechanical stresses and for typical airfoil geometries, as heat flux is increased through the leading edge, life-limiting tensile crack formation will occur first in the hoop direction on the inside wall of the leading edge; (2) thermal gradients through all current SiC/SiC systems should be kept below approx.300 F at high temperatures to avoid this cracking; (3) at temperatures near the maximum operating temperatures of advanced SiC/SiC systems, thermal stresses induced by the thermal gradients will beneficially relax with time due to creep; (4) although stress relaxation occurs, the maximum gradient should still not exceed 300oF because of residual tensile stress buildup on the airfoil outer wall during cool-down; and (5) without film cooling and mechanical stresses, the NASA-developed N26 SiC/SiC system with thru

  1. A critical evaluation of the predictions of the NASA-Lockheed multielement airfoil computer program

    Brune, G. W.; Manke, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of several versions of the multielement airfoil computer program are evaluated. The computed results are compared with experimental high lift data of general aviation airfoils with a single trailing edge flap, and of airfoils with a leading edge flap and double slotted trailing edge flaps. Theoretical and experimental data include lift, pitching moment, profile drag and surface pressure distributions, boundary layer integral parameters, skin friction coefficients, and velocity profiles.

  2. S833, S834, and S835 Airfoils: November 2001--November 2002

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S833, S834, and S835, for 1 - 3-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  3. S830, S831, and S832 Airfoils: November 2001-November 2002

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S830, S831, and S832, for 40 - 50-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  4. Investigation on Improved Correlation of CFD and EFD for Supercritical Airfoil

    Xin Xu; Da-wei Liu; De-hua Chen; Zhi Wei; Yuan-jing Wang

    2014-01-01

    It is necessary to improve the correlation between CFD and EFD through the correction of EFD results and validation of CFD method, thus investigating the aerodynamic characteristics of supercritical airfoil perfectly. In this study, NASA SC (2) -0714 airfoil is numerically simulated and compared with NASA corrected experimental results to validate the CFD method. The Barnwell-Sewell method is applied to correct sidewall effects for experimental results of typical supercritical airfoil CH obta...

  5. Effects of real airfoil geometry on leading edge gust interaction noise

    Gill, James; Zhang, Xin; Joseph, Phillip; Node-Langlois, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    High-order computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and in-dependently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with airfoils of varying geometry at zero angle of attack. Increases in both l...

  6. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  7. Surface Approximation Using the 2D FFENN Architecture

    Panagopoulos S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional feed-forward functionally expanded neural network (2D FFENN used to produce surface models in two dimensions is presented. New nonlinear multilevel surface basis functions are proposed for the network's functional expansion. A network optimization technique based on an iterative function selection strategy is also described. Comparative simulation results for surface mappings generated by the 2D FFENN, multilevel 2D FFENN, multilayered perceptron (MLP, and radial basis function (RBF architectures are presented.

  8. Maximizing entropy of image models for 2-D constrained coding

    Forchhammer, Søren; Danieli, Matteo; Burini, Nino; Zamarin, Marco; Ukhanova, Ann

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers estimating and maximizing the entropy of two-dimensional (2-D) fields with application to 2-D constrained coding. We consider Markov random fields (MRF), which have a non-causal description, and the special case of Pickard random fields (PRF). The PRF are 2-D causal finite context models, which define stationary probability distributions on finite rectangles and thus allow for calculation of the entropy. We consider two binary constraints and revisit the hard square const...

  9. Characterization of the Flow Separation of a Variable Camber Airfoil

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the flow separation behaviors of a variable camber airfoil. The aerodynamic load measurements and related flow visualization show that there are two types of stalls caused by the deformation on the camber: the leading-edge stall and the trailing-edge stall. Static measurements of aerodynamic force show a drastic leading-edge stall, while the serial measurements on an airfoil with camber deformation illustrate a trailing-edge stall and gradual bending-over on the aerodynamic coefficient curve. Under flow separation circumstances, the flow structure is related not only to current boundary conditions, but also the previous flow characteristics, so the quasi-steady aerodynamic characteristics are significantly distinct from those of the static measurements. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  10. Effect of oscillation frequency on wind turbine airfoil dynamic stall

    At the same oscillation amplitude, Reynolds Number, mean angle of attack, the dynamic stall characteristics of the NREL S809 airfoil undergoing sinusoidal pitch oscillations of different oscillation frequencies were investigated with modified k-ω SST turbulence model of CFD solution for two-dimensional numerical simulation. The predicted lift, drag coefficients and moment coefficients were compared with the Ohio State University wind tunnel test results, which showed a good agreement. The birth, development and breaking off of eddies were analyzed through streamline distribution around airfoil and the influence of oscillation frequencies on dynamic stall characteristics was also described and analyzed in detail, which enrich the database of dynamic stall characteristics needed by the quantization of oscillation frequencies on dynamic characteristics and prove that sliding mesh method is reliable when dealing with dynamic stall problems

  11. Turbulent flow simulation of the NREL S809 airfoil

    Guerri, Ouahiba; Bouhadef, Khadidja; Harhad, Ameziane

    2006-05-15

    Numerical computations are carried out for the NREL S809 airfoil. The flow is modelled using an unsteady incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Two turbulence models (SST {kappa}/{omega}of Menter and RNG {kappa}/{epsilon}) are applied to close the RANS equations. All computations are performed assuming fully turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed at various angles of attack from 0 to 20 degrees. Lift and drag forces are obtained from the computations by integrating the pressure and shear stress over the blade surface. The performance of the two turbulence models is compared and the influence of the free stream turbulence intensity is checked. The results confirm the satisfactory performance of the SST {kappa}/{omega} model of Menter for modelling turbulent flow around airfoils. (author)

  12. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  13. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control by Suction and Injection on a Subsonic Airfoil

    M. H. Shojaefard; A. R. Noorpoor; A. Avanesians; M. Ghaffarpour

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a numerical study concerning flow control by suction and injection. The case studied is the flow field over a subsonic airfoil with four suction and injection slots on the suction side of the airfoil. Five different angles of attack, 0, 5, 10, 13.3 and 20 with the Mach number of 0.15 are studied. Three cases are studied in each angle of attack. The three cases are airfoil with surface suction, surface injection and the base airfoil. A commercial CFD code, the FLUENT, is us...

  15. Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Kartuzova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Motivation - Higher loading on Low-Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoils: Reduce airfoil count, weight, cost. Increase efficiency, and Limited by suction side separation. Growing understanding of transition, separation, wake effects: Improved models. Take advantage of wakes. Higher lift airfoils in use. Further loading increases may require flow control: Passive: trips, dimples, etc. Active: plasma actuators, vortex generator jets (VGJs). Can increased loading offset higher losses on high lift airfoils. Objectives: Advance knowledge of boundary layer separation and transition under LPT conditions. Demonstrate, improve understanding of separation control with pulsed VGJs. Produce detailed experimental data base. Test and develop computational models.

  16. Airfoil lance apparatus for homogeneous humidification and sorbent dispersion in a gas stream

    Myers, Robert B.; Yagiela, Anthony S.

    1990-12-25

    An apparatus for spraying an atomized mixture into a gas stream comprises a stream line airfoil member having a large radius leading edge and a small radius trailing edge. A nozzle assembly pierces the trailing edge of the airfoil member and is concentrically surrounded by a nacelle which directs shielding gas from the interior of the airfoil member around the nozzle assembly. Flowable medium to be atomized and atomizing gas for atomizing the medium are supplied in concentric conduits to the nozzle. A plurality of nozzles each surrounded by a nacelle are spaced along the trailing edge of the airfoil member.

  17. An Exploratory Investigation of a Slotted, Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil

    Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A 15-percent-thick, slotted, natural-laminar-flow (SNLF) airfoil, the S103, for general aviation applications has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. The airfoil exhibits a rapid stall, which does not meet the design goal. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparison with the baseline, NASA NLF(1)-0215F airfoil confirms the achievement of the objectives.

  18. Some practical issues in the computational design of airfoils for the helicopter main rotor blades

    Kostić Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Very important requirement for the helicopter rotor airfoils is zero, or nearly zero moment coefficient about the aerodynamic center. Unlike the old technologies used for metal blades, modern production involving application of plastic composites has imposed the necessity of adding a flat tab extension to the blade trailing edge, thus changing the original airfoil shape. Using computer program TRANPRO, the author has developed and verified an algorithm for numerical analysis in this design stage, applied it on asymmetrical reflex camber airfoils, determined the influence of angular tab positioning on the moment coefficient value and redesigned some existing airfoils to include properly positioned tabs that satisfy very low moment coefficient requirement. .

  19. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Fischer, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    The CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils were designed with an objective of high lift and low noise emission. In the design process, the aerodynamic performance is obtained using XFOIL while noise emission is obtained with the BPM model. In this paper we present some validations of the designed CQU......, the designed Cl and Cl/Cd agrees well with the experiment and are in general higher than those of the NACA airfoil. For the acoustic features, the noise emission of the LN118 airfoil is compared with the acoustic measurements and that of the NACA airfoil. Comparisons show that the BPM model can predict...

  20. A comparison of turbulence models in computing multi-element airfoil flows

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Menter, Florian; Durbin, Paul A.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    1994-01-01

    Four different turbulence models are used to compute the flow over a three-element airfoil configuration. These models are the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, a two-equation k-omega model, and a new one-equation Durbin-Mansour model. The flow is computed using the INS2D two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. An overset Chimera grid approach is utilized. Grid resolution tests are presented, and manual solution-adaptation of the grid was performed. The performance of each of the models is evaluated for test cases involving different angles-of-attack, Reynolds numbers, and flap riggings. The resulting surface pressure coefficients, skin friction, velocity profiles, and lift, drag, and moment coefficients are compared with experimental data. The models produce very similar results in most cases. Excellent agreement between computational and experimental surface pressures was observed, but only moderately good agreement was seen in the velocity profile data. In general, the difference between the predictions of the different models was less than the difference between the computational and experimental data.

  1. Theoretical Considerations of Sidewall Interference Corrections for Transonic Shock Tube Airfoil Testing

    Kashitani, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Sunahara, Eisaku; Kitano, Hideki

    The effects of the sidewall boundary layers in transonic shock tube airfoil flow were investigated. We attempted to correct the effects of the sidewall boundary layers using the Barnwell-Sewall and Murthy methods for shock tube boundary layers. Petersen’s boundary layer theory, which evaluates the modern wall-skin friction coefficients for shock tubes, was used in this analysis, and the results showed that the Mach number correction ΔM (the difference between the free stream Mach number (hot gas Mach number) and the corrected Mach number) increases as the hot gas Mach number M2 increases under the condition of fixed time for the shock tube. This is caused by the boundary layer development, which grows thicker as the hot gas Mach number increases. Furthermore, when analysis is performed under the condition of constant displacement thickness 2δ*⁄b, the Mach number correction ΔM gradually increases with an increase in the hot gas Mach number. This trend becomes very pronounced with increasing displacement thickness. In addition, after performing a comparison, we found that the correction of the shock wave location is in the direction of the improved agreement with the 2D CFD results when applied to the shock tube experiment.

  2. Free-stream turbulence effects on the flow around an S809 wind turbine airfoil

    Torres-Nieves, Sheilla; Maldonado, Victor; Lebron, Jose [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Kang, Hyung-Suk [United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Meneveau, Charles [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Castillo, Luciano [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Two-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (2-D PIV) measurements were performed to study the effect of free-stream turbulence on the flow around a smooth and rough surface airfoil, specifically under stall conditions. A 0.25-m chord model with an S809 profile, common for horizontal-axis wind turbine applications, was tested at a wind tunnel speed of 10 m/s, resulting in Reynolds numbers based on the chord of Re{sub c} {approx} 182,000 and turbulence intensity levels of up to 6.14%. Results indicate that when the flow is fully attached, turbulence significantly decreases aerodynamic efficiency (from L/D {approx} 4.894 to L/D {approx} 0.908). On the contrary, when the flow is mostly stalled, the effect is reversed and aerodynamic performance is slightly improved (from L/D {approx} 1.696 to L/D {approx} 1.787). Analysis of the mean flow over the suction surface shows that, contrary to what is expected, free-stream turbulence is actually advancing separation, particularly when the turbulent scales in the free-stream are of the same order as the chord. This is a result of the complex dynamics between the boundary layer scales and the free-stream turbulence length scales when relatively high levels of active-grid generated turbulence are present. (orig.)

  3. Maximizing entropy of image models for 2-D constrained coding

    Forchhammer, Søren; Danieli, Matteo; Burini, Nino;

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers estimating and maximizing the entropy of two-dimensional (2-D) fields with application to 2-D constrained coding. We consider Markov random fields (MRF), which have a non-causal description, and the special case of Pickard random fields (PRF). The PRF are 2-D causal finite...... of the Markov random field defined by the 2-D constraint is estimated to be (upper bounded by) 0.8570 bits/symbol using the iterative technique of Belief Propagation on 2 £ 2 finite lattices. Based on combinatorial bounding techniques the maximum entropy for the constraint was determined to be 0.848....

  4. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Kercher, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in th...

  5. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  6. CFD and experimental study of aerodynamic degradation of iced airfoils

    Horák, V.; Rozehnal, D.; Chára, Zdeněk; Hyll, A.

    Praha: Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR v. v. i, 2008 - (Jonáš, P.; Uruba, V.), č. 007 ISBN 978-80-87012-14-7. [Colloquium FLUID DYNAMICS 2008. Praha (CZ), 22.10.2008-24.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/07/0136; GA MPO FT-TA4/044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : CFD * lift coefficient * iced airfoil Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  7. Klassifikation von Standardebenen in der 2D-Echokardiographie mittels 2D-3D-Bildregistrierung

    Bergmeir, Christoph; Subramanian, Navneeth

    Zum Zweck der Entwicklung eines Systems, das einen unerfahrenen Anwender von Ultraschall (US) zur Aufnahme relevanter anatomischer Strukturen leitet, untersuchen wir die Machbarkeit von 2D-US zu 3D-CT Registrierung. Wir verwenden US-Aufnahmen von Standardebenen des Herzens, welche zu einem 3D-CT-Modell registriert werden. Unser Algorithmus unterzieht sowohl die US-Bilder als auch den CT-Datensatz Vorverarbeitungsschritten, welche die Daten durch Segmentierung auf wesentliche Informationen in Form von Labein für Muskel und Blut reduzieren. Anschließend werden diese Label zur Registrierung mittels der Match-Cardinality-Metrik genutzt. Durch mehrmaliges Registrieren mit verschiedenen Initialisierungen ermitteln wir die im US-Bild sichtbare Standardebene. Wir evaluierten die Methode auf sieben US-Bildern von Standardebenen. Fünf davon wurden korrekt zugeordnet.

  8. 2D Four-Channel Perfect Reconstruction Filter Bank Realized with the 2D Lattice Filter Structure

    Sezen S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel orthogonal 2D lattice structure is incorporated into the design of a nonseparable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction filter bank. The proposed filter bank is obtained by using the polyphase decomposition technique which requires the design of an orthogonal 2D lattice filter. Due to constraint of perfect reconstruction, each stage of this lattice filter bank is simply parameterized by two coefficients. The perfect reconstruction property is satisfied regardless of the actual values of these parameters and of the number of the lattice stages. It is also shown that a separable 2D four-channel perfect reconstruction lattice filter bank can be constructed from the 1D lattice filter and that this is a special case of the proposed 2D lattice filter bank under certain conditions. The perfect reconstruction property of the proposed 2D lattice filter approach is verified by computer simulations.

  9. Electron Excitation Cross Sections for the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 4)S -> 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3) (sup 2d) ->2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4p) (Resonance) Transitions in Oil

    Zuo, M.; Smith, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, I.; Tayal, S.; McLaughlin, B.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical excitation cross sections are reported for the first forbidden transition xxx and the first allowed (resonance) transition xxx in OII. Use is made of electron-energy loss and merged beams methods. The electron energy range covered is 3.33 eV (threshold) to 15 eV for the S->D transition, and 14.9 eV (threshold) to 40 eV for the S->P transition. Care was taken to assess and minimize the metastable fraction of the OII beam. An electron mirror was designed and tested to reflect inelastically back-scattered electrons into the forward direction to account for the full range of polar scattering angles. Comparisons are made between present experiments and 11-state R-Matrix calculations. Calculations are also presented for the xxx transition.

  10. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  11. Symmetries and solvable models for evaporating 2D black holes

    Cruz Muñoz, José Luis; Navarro-Salas, José; Navarro Navarro, Miguel; Talavera, C. F.

    1997-01-01

    We study the evaporation process of a 2D black hole in thermal equilibrium when the ingoing radiation is suddenly switched off. We also introduce global symmetries of generic 2D dilaton gravity models which generalize the extra symmetry of the CGHS model. © Elsevier Science B.V

  12. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes....... Numerical results for the capacities are presented....

  13. 2D gravity, random surfaces and all that

    I review the recent progress in 2d gravity and discuss the new numerical simulations for 2d gravity and for random surfaces in d>2. The random surface theories of interest in d>2 have extrinsic curvature terms, and for a finite value of the extrinsic curvature coupling there seems to be a second order phase transition where the string tension scales. (orig.)

  14. Chaotic advection in 2D anisotropic porous media

    Varghese, Stephen; Speetjens, Michel; Trieling, Ruben; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Traditional methods for heat recovery from underground geothermal reservoirs employ a static system of injector-producer wells. Recent studies in literature have shown that using a well-devised pumping scheme, through actuation of multiple injector-producer wells, can dramatically enhance production rates due to the increased scalar / heat transport by means of chaotic advection. However the effect of reservoir anisotropy on kinematic mixing and heat transport is unknown and has to be incorporated and studied for practical deployment in the field. As a first step, we numerically investigate the effect of anisotropy (both magnitude and direction) on (chaotic) advection of passive tracers in a time-periodic Darcy flow within a 2D circular domain driven by periodically reoriented diametrically opposite source-sink pairs. Preliminary results indicate that anisotropy has a significant impact on the location, shape and size of coherent structures in the Poincare sections. This implies that the optimal operating parameters (well spacing, time period of well actuation) may vary strongly and must be carefully chosen so as to enhance subsurface transport. This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). This research program is co-financed by Shell Global Solutions International B.V.

  15. Van der Waals stacked 2D layered materials for optoelectronics

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Qixing; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhuo; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The band gaps of many atomically thin 2D layered materials such as graphene, black phosphorus, monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides and hBN range from 0 to 6 eV. These isolated atomic planes can be reassembled into hybrid heterostructures made layer by layer in a precisely chosen sequence. Thus, the electronic properties of 2D materials can be engineered by van der Waals stacking, and the interlayer coupling can be tuned, which opens up avenues for creating new material systems with rich functionalities and novel physical properties. Early studies suggest that van der Waals stacked 2D materials work exceptionally well, dramatically enriching the optoelectronics applications of 2D materials. Here we review recent progress in van der Waals stacked 2D materials, and discuss their potential applications in optoelectronics.

  16. Cell counting in human endobronchial biopsies--disagreement of 2D versus 3D morphometry.

    Vlad A Bratu

    Full Text Available QUESTION: Inflammatory cell numbers are important endpoints in clinical studies relying on endobronchial biopsies. Assumption-based bidimensional (2D counting methods are widely used, although theoretically design-based stereologic three-dimensional (3D methods alone offer an unbiased quantitative tool. We assessed the method agreement between 2D and 3D counting designs in practice when applied to identical samples in parallel. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biopsies from segmental bronchi were collected from healthy non-smokers (n = 7 and smokers (n = 7, embedded and sectioned exhaustively. Systematic uniform random samples were immunohistochemically stained for macrophages (CD68 and T-lymphocytes (CD3, respectively. In identical fields of view, cell numbers per volume unit (NV were assessed using the physical disector (3D, and profiles per area unit (NA were counted (2D. For CD68+ cells, profiles with and without nucleus were separately recorded. In order to enable a direct comparison of the two methods, the zero-dimensional CD68+/CD3+-ratio was calculated for each approach. Method agreement was tested by Bland-Altmann analysis. RESULTS: In both groups, mean CD68+/CD3+ ratios for NV and NA were significantly different (non-smokers: 0.39 and 0.68, p<0.05; smokers: 0.49 and 1.68, p<0.05. When counting only nucleated CD68+ profiles, mean ratios obtained by 2D and 3D counting were similar, but the regression-based Bland-Altmann analysis indicated a bias of the 2D ratios proportional to their magnitude. This magnitude dependent deviation differed between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: 2D counts of cell and nuclear profiles introduce a variable size-dependent bias throughout the measurement range. Because the deviation between the 3D and 2D data was different in the two groups, it precludes establishing a 'universal conversion formula'.

  17. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved

  18. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved.

  19. DYNA-2D, 2-D Hydrodynamic Finite Elements Method Program with Interactive Rezoning

    1 - Description of program or function: DYNA2D is an explicit, two-dimensional, axisymmetric and plane strain finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic and hydrodynamic response of inelastic solids. A contact-impact algorithm permits gaps and sliding with friction along material interfaces. By a specialization of this algorithm, such interfaces can be rigidly tied to admit variable zoning with no need for transition regions. Spatial discretization is achieved by the use of 4-node solid elements, and the equations-of-motion are integrated by the central difference method. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic elastic-plastic, thermo- elastic-plastic, soil and crushable foam, linear visco-elastic, rubber, isotropic elastic-plastic, and temperature-dependent elastic-plastic. The latter two models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 9 equations of state. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 60,000 elements (Cray 1), 5,000 elements (CDC7600)

  20. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples. PMID:27378648

  1. Nanoparticle plasmonics for 2D-photovoltaics: mechanisms, optimization, and limits.

    Hägglund, Carl; Kasemo, Bengt

    2009-07-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures placed within or near photovoltaic (PV) layers are of high current interest for improving thin film solar cells. We demonstrate, by electrodynamics calculations, the feasibility of a new class of essentially two dimensional (2D) solar cells based on the very large optical cross sections of plasmonic nanoparticles. Conditions for inducing absorption in extremely thin PV layers via plasmon near-fields, are optimized in 2D-arrays of (i) core-shell particles, and (ii) plasmonic particles on planar layers. At the plasmon resonance, a pronounced optimum is found for the extinction coefficient of the PV material. We also characterize the influence of the dielectric environment, PV layer thickness and nanoparticle shape, size and spatial distribution. The response of the system is close to that of a 2D effective medium layer, and subject to a 50% absorption limit when the dielectric environment around the 2D layer is symmetric. In this case, a plasmon induced absorption of about 40% is demonstrated in PV layers as thin as 10 nm, using silver nanoparticle arrays of only 1 nm effective thickness. In an asymmetric environment, the useful absorption may be increased significantly for the same layer thicknesses. These new types of essentially 2D solar cells are concluded to have a large potential for reducing solar electricity costs. PMID:19582109

  2. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  3. S819, S820, and S821 Airfoils: October 1992--November 1993

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of thick airfoils for 10- to 20-meter, stall regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines, the S819, S820, and S821, has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  4. Aerodynamic Force and Flow Structures of Two Airfoils in Flapping Motions

    Lan, S L; Lan, Shi Long; Sun, Mao

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and flow structures of two airfoils in tandem configuration performing flapping motions are studied, using the method of solving the Navier-Stokes equations in moving overset grids. Three typical phase differences between the fore- and aft-airfoil flapping cycles are considered.

  5. Rime ice accretion and its effect on airfoil performance. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Bragg, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the growth of rime ice, and the resulting aerodynamic penalty on unprotected, subcritical, airfoil surfaces. The system of equations governing the trajectory of a water droplet in the airfoil flowfield is developed and a numerical solution is obtained to predict the mass flux of super cooled water droplets freezing on impact. A rime ice shape is predicted. The effect of time on the ice growth is modeled by a time-stepping procedure where the flowfield and droplet mass flux are updated periodically through the ice accretion process. Two similarity parameters, the trajectory similarity parameter and accumulation parameter, are found to govern the accretion of rime ice. In addition, an analytical solution is presented for Langmuir's classical modified inertia parameter. The aerodynamic evaluation of the effect of the ice accretion on airfoil performance is determined using an existing airfoil analysis code with empirical corrections. The change in maximum lift coefficient is found from an analysis of the new iced airfoil shape. The drag correction needed due to the severe surface roughness is formulated from existing iced airfoil and rough airfoil data. A small scale wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the change in airfoil performance due to a simulated rime ice shape.

  6. Surface pressure and aerodynamic loads determination of a transonic airfoil based on particle image velocimetry

    Ragni, D.; Ashok, A.; van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation assesses a procedure to extract the aerodynamic loads and pressure distribution on an airfoil in the transonic flow regime from particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The wind tunnel model is a two-dimensional NACA-0012 airfoil, and the PIV velocity data are used to

  7. 2D vs. 3D mammography observer study

    Fernandez, James Reza F.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using a mammography phantom was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this ne 3D mammography technique. In comparing 3D and 2D mammography there was no difference in calcification detection, and mass detection was better in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Given the limitations of the mammography phantom used, however, a clearer picture in comparing 3D and 2D mammography may be better acquired with the incorporation of human studies in the future.

  8. Experimental studies of flow separation and stalling on two-dimensional airfoils at low speeds. Phase 2: Studies with Fowler flap extended

    Seetharam, H. C.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results were given on experimental studies of flow separation and stalling on a two-dimensional GA(W)-1 17 percent thick airfoil with an extended Fowler flap. Experimental velocity profiles obtained from a five tube probe survey with optimum flap gap and overlap setting (flap at 40 deg) are shown at various stations above, below, and behind the airfoil/flap combination for various angles of attack. The typical zones of steady flow, intermittent turbulence, and large scale turbulence were obtained from a hot wire anemometer survey and are depicted graphically for an angle of attack of 12.5 deg. Local skin friction distributions were obtained and are given for various angles of attack. Computer plots of the boundary layer profiles are shown for the case of the flap at 40 deg. Static pressure contours are also given. A GA(W)-2 section model was fabricated with 30 percent Fowler flaps and with pressure tabs.

  9. Influences of surface temperature on a low camber airfoil aerodynamic performances

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The current note refers to the comparison between a NACA 2510 airfoil with adiabatic walls and the same airfoil with heated patches. Both suction and pressure sides were divided into two regions covering the leading edge (L.E. and trailing edge (T.E.. A RANS method sensitivity test has been performed in the preliminary stage while for the extended 3D cases a DES-SST approach was used. Results indicate that surface temperature distribution influences the aerodynamics of the airfoil, in particular the viscous drag component but also the lift of the airfoil. Moreover, the influence depends not only on the surface temperature but also on the positioning of the heated surfaces, particularly in the case of pressure lift and drag. Further work will be needed to optimize the temperature distribution for airfoil with higher camber.

  10. Experimental Investigation on the Aerodynamic Performance of NLF-0414 Iced-Airfoil

    abbas ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Icing phenomenon on a natural laminar flow airfoil (NLF-0414 has been experimentally investigated. Double horn glaze ice geometry which was acquired during a 15 minutes spray time at-2.23℃ with liquid water content and a median volumetric diameter of 1.0 g/m3 and 20 μm, has been extracted from database of NASA Lewis Research Center. Pressure distribution over airfoil surfacewas evaluated at angles of attack between -2 to 6 degrees for both iced and clean airfoils. Aerodynamics performance degradation of the iced airfoil has been studied and it is shown that double horn ice accretion, due to its unique geometry, severely affects aerodynamic characteristics of natural laminar flow airfoils. Reattachment locations have been evaluated for upper and lower separation bubbles. The upper surface separation bubble was seen to increase in size in contrary to the lower surface separation bubble.

  11. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  12. The NH$_2$D hyperfine structure revealed by astrophysical observations

    Daniel, F.; Coudert, L. H.; Punanova, A.; Harju, J.; Faure, A.; Roueff, E.; Sipilä, O.; Caselli, P.; Güsten, R.; Pon, A.; Pineda, J E

    2016-01-01

    The 1$_{11}$-1$_{01}$ lines of ortho and para--NH$_2$D (o/p-NH$_2$D), respectively at 86 and 110 GHz, are commonly observed to provide constraints on the deuterium fractionation in the interstellar medium. In cold regions, the hyperfine structure due to the nitrogen ($^{14}$N) nucleus is resolved. To date, this splitting is the only one which is taken into account in the NH$_2$D column density estimates. We investigate how the inclusion of the hyperfine splitting caused by the deuterium (D) n...

  13. Materials for Flexible, Stretchable Electronics: Graphene and 2D Materials

    Kim, Sang Jin; Choi, Kyoungjun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Yuna; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-07-01

    Recently, 2D materials have been intensively studied as emerging materials for future electronics, including flexible electronics, photonics, and electrochemical energy storage devices. Among representative 2D materials (such as graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides) that exhibit extraordinary properties, graphene stands out in the flexible electronics field due to its combination of high electron mobility, high thermal conductivity, high specific surface area, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility, and environmental stability. This review covers the synthesis, transfer, and characterization methods of graphene and 2D materials and graphene's application to flexible devices as well as comparison with other competing materials.

  14. Introduction to game physics with Box2D

    Parberry, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Written by a pioneer of game development in academia, Introduction to Game Physics with Box2D covers the theory and practice of 2D game physics in a relaxed and entertaining yet instructional style. It offers a cohesive treatment of the topics and code involved in programming the physics for 2D video games. Focusing on writing elementary game physics code, the first half of the book helps you grasp the challenges of programming game physics from scratch, without libraries or outside help. It examines the mathematical foundation of game physics and illustrates how it is applied in practice thro

  15. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Bosca, Ryan [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); O’Daniel, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  16. Optimization and practical implementation of ultrafast 2D NMR experiments

    Luiz H. K. Queiroz Júnior

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast 2D NMR is a powerful methodology that allows recording of a 2D NMR spectrum in a fraction of second. However, due to the numerous non-conventional parameters involved in this methodology its implementation is no trivial task. Here, an optimized experimental protocol is carefully described to ensure efficient implementation of ultrafast NMR. The ultrafast spectra resulting from this implementation are presented based on the example of two widely used 2D NMR experiments, COSY and HSQC, obtained in 0.2 s and 41 s, respectively.

  17. Optimization and practical implementation of ultrafast 2D NMR experiments

    Queiroz Junior, Luiz H. K., E-mail: professorkeng@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSC), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSC), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Giraudeau, Patrick [Universite de Nantes (France). CNRS, Chimie et Interdisciplinarite: Synthese, Analyse, Modelisation

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast 2D NMR is a powerful methodology that allows recording of a 2D NMR spectrum in a fraction of second. However, due to the numerous non-conventional parameters involved in this methodology its implementation is no trivial task. Here, an optimized experimental protocol is carefully described to ensure efficient implementation of ultrafast NMR. The ultrafast spectra resulting from this implementation are presented based on the example of two widely used 2D NMR experiments, COSY and HSQC, obtained in 0.2 s and 41 s, respectively. (author)

  18. Kalman Filter for Generalized 2-D Roesser Models

    SHENG Mei; ZOU Yun

    2007-01-01

    The design problem of the state filter for the generalized stochastic 2-D Roesser models, which appears when both the state and measurement are simultaneously subjected to the interference from white noise, is discussed. The wellknown Kalman filter design is extended to the generalized 2-D Roesser models. Based on the method of "scanning line by line", the filtering problem of generalized 2-D Roesser models with mode-energy reconstruction is solved. The formula of the optimal filtering, which minimizes the variance of the estimation error of the state vectors, is derived. The validity of the designed filter is verified by the calculation steps and the examples are introduced.

  19. 2D electron cyclotron emission imaging at ASDEX Upgrade (invited)

    Classen, I. G. J. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Boom, J. E.; Vries, P. C. de [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Suttrop, W.; Schmid, E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Schneider, P. A. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Tobias, B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Donne, A. J. H. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Park, H. K. [POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Munsat, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The newly installed electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic on ASDEX Upgrade provides measurements of the 2D electron temperature dynamics with high spatial and temporal resolution. An overview of the technical and experimental properties of the system is presented. These properties are illustrated by the measurements of the edge localized mode and the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode, showing both the advantage of having a two-dimensional (2D) measurement, as well as some of the limitations of electron cyclotron emission measurements. Furthermore, the application of singular value decomposition as a powerful tool for analyzing and filtering 2D data is presented.

  20. SALE-2D, 2-D Fluid Flow, Navier Stokes Equation Using Lagrangian or Eulerian Method

    1 - Description of problem or function: SALE2D calculates two- dimensional fluid flows at all speeds, from the incompressible limit to highly supersonic. An implicit treatment of the pressure calculation similar to that in the Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) technique provides this flow speed flexibility. In addition, the computing mesh may move with the fluid in a typical Lagrangian fashion, be held fixed in an Eulerian manner, or move in some arbitrarily specified way to provide a continuous rezoning capability. This latitude results from use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) treatment of the mesh. The partial differential equations solved are the Navier-Stokes equations and the mass and internal energy equations. The fluid pressure is determined from an equation of state and supplemented with an artificial viscous pressure for the computation of shock waves. The computing mesh consists of a two-dimensional network of quadrilateral cells for either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinates, and a variety of user-selectable boundary conditions are provided in the program. 2 - Method of solution: The basic hydrodynamic part of each cycle of SALE is divided into three phases. Phase 1 is a typical explicit Lagrangian calculation in which the velocity field is updated by the effects of all forces. Phase 2 is a Newton-Raphson iteration that provides time-advanced pressures and velocities. It is used for calculations in the low-speed and even completely incompressible regimes. Phase 3 performs all the advective flux calculations. It is required for runs that are Eulerian or contain some other form of mesh rezoning. A powerful feature of SALE is the ease with which different phases can be combined to suit the requirements of individual problems