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Sample records for 29-kda cysteine-rich surface

  1. Variant cysteine-rich surface proteins of Giardia isolates from human and animal sources.

    Bruderer, T; Papanastasiou, P; Castro, R; P. Köhler

    1993-01-01

    Cloned Giardia isolates obtained from a sheep, a calf, and a human possessed a major membrane protein that showed marked intraspecific variations in size as demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis following surface biotinylation and radioiodination. Metabolic labeling with [35S] cysteine and electrophoretic analysis also revealed for each cloned isolate a predominant protein that corresponded in size to the major surface protein demonstrated by surface labeli...

  2. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    A λgt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically 35S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface-125I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4 degree C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested

  3. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    Torian, B.E.; Stroeher, V.L.; Stamm, W.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Flores, B.M. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans (USA)); Hagen, F.S. (Zymogenetics Incorporated, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    A {lambda}gt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically {sup 35}S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface-{sup 125}I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4{degree}C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested.

  4. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  5. Cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) supports tumor cell adhesion

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B J;

    1999-01-01

    tumor cell adhesion. We found that the disintegrin-like domain of human ADAM 15 supported adhesion of alphavbeta3-expressing A375 melanoma cells. In the case of human ADAM 12, however, recombinant polypeptides of the cysteine-rich domain but not the disintegrin-like domain supported cell adhesion of a...... panel of carcinoma cell lines. On attachment to recombinant polypeptides from the cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12, most tumor cell lines, such as MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, were rounded and associated with numerous actin-containing filopodia and used a cell surface heparan sulfate...... proteoglycan to attach. Finally, we demonstrated that authentic full-length human ADAM 12 could bind to heparin Sepharose. Together these results suggest a novel role of the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM 12 -- that of supporting tumor cell adhesion....

  6. Convergent evolution of cysteine-rich proteins in feathers and hair

    Strasser, Bettina; Mlitz, Veronika; Hermann, Marcela; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Background Feathers and hair consist of cornified epidermal keratinocytes in which proteins are crosslinked via disulfide bonds between cysteine residues of structural proteins to establish mechanical resilience. Cysteine-rich keratin-associated proteins (KRTAPs) are important components of hair whereas the molecular components of feathers have remained incompletely known. Recently, we have identified a chicken gene, named epidermal differentiation cysteine-rich protein (EDCRP), that encodes ...

  7. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  8. Antibody mapping and tissue localization of globular and cysteine-rich regions of perlecan domain III

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V; Sthanam, M;

    1995-01-01

    Perlecan is the best-characterized basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It has a large (approximately 400 KD) core protein consisting of five distinct domains. Domain III, a centrally located domain, contains three globular domains separated by cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF...... blotting showed that six of the nine MAbs recognized Domain III of perlecan, three of them mapping to globular Subdomain IIIc, and the other three recognized epitopes within the cysteine-rich regions. All six MAbs stained every basement membrane of several mouse organs as well as some connective tissues...

  9. Structure and function of epididymal protein cysteine-rich secretory protein-1

    Kenneth P. Roberts; Daniel S. Johnston; Michael A. Nolan; Joseph L. Wooters; Nicole C. Waxmonsky; Laura B. Piehl; Kathy M. Ensrud-Bowlin; David W. Hamilton

    2007-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein-1 (CRISP-1) is a glycoprotein secreted by the epididymal epithelium. It is a member of a large family of proteins characterized by two conserved domains and a set of 16 conserved cysteine residues. In mammals, CRISP-1 inhibits sperm-egg fusion and can suppress sperm capacitation. The molecular mechanism of action of the mammalian CRISP proteins remains unknown, but certain non-mammalian CRISP proteins can block ion channels. In the rat, CRISP-1 comprises two forms referred to as Proteins D and E. Recent work in our laboratory demonstrates that the D form of CRISP-1 associates transiently with the sperm surface, whereas the E form binds tightly. When the spermatozoa are washed, the E form of CRISP-1 persists on the sperm surface after all D form has dissociated. Cross-linking studies demonstrate different protein-protein interaction patterns for D and E, although no binding partners for either protein have yet been identified. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed a potential post-translational modification on the E form that is not present on the D form. This is the only discernable difference between Proteins D and E, and presumably is responsible for the difference in behavior of these two forms of rat CRISP- 1. These studies demonstrate that the more abundant D form interacts with spermatozoa transiently,possibly with a specific receptor on the sperm surface, consistent with a capacitation-suppressing function during sperm transit and storage in the epididymis, and also confirm a tightly bound population of the E form that could act in the female reproductive tract.

  10. Impaired sperm fertilizing ability in mice lacking Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein 1 (CRISP1)

    Da Ros, Vanina G; Maldera, Julieta A; Willis, William D; Cohen, Débora J.; Goulding, Eugenia H.; Gelman, Diego M.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Eddy, Edward M.; Cuasnicu, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a complex multi-step process mediated by different molecules present on both gametes. Epididymal protein CRISP1, a member of the Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein (CRISP) family, was identified by our laboratory and postulated to participate in both sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction and gamete fusion by binding to egg-complementary sites. To elucidate the functional role of CRISP1 in vivo, we disrupted the Crisp1 gene and evaluated the effect on animal fertility a...

  11. A comparison between the recombinant expression and chemical synthesis of a short cysteine-rich insecticidal spider peptide

    Clement, Herlinda; Flores, Vianey; Diego-Garcia, Elia; Corrales-Garcia, Ligia; Villegas, Elba; Corzo, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice between heterologous expression versus chemical synthesis for synthesizing short cysteine-rich insecticidal peptides from arthropods may impact the obtainment of yields and well-folded bioactive molecules for scientific research. Therefore, two recombinant expression systems were compared to that of chemical synthesis for producing Ba1, a cysteine-rich spider neurotoxin. Methods The transcription of the insecticidal neurotoxin Ba1 was obtained from a cDNA library of veno...

  12. Cloning and expression of the Chinese wheat mosaic virus RNA2 coat protein read- through and 19 ku cysteine- rich domains and localization of these proteins

    2002-01-01

    The 5′-terminal (RTn) and 3′-terminal (RTc) halves of the coat protein readthrough domain and the 19 ku cysteine-rich protein of Chinese wheat mosaic virus (CWMV) were amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and expressed in E. coli. Antisera and monoclonal antibodies against these proteins were prepared by immunising these purified proteins to mice. Detection of RTn, RTc and 19 ku proteins in CWMV infected wheat sap and leaf tissue indicated that the RTn and RTc proteins were distributed on the surface of virus particles whereas the 19 ku protein was in the cytoplasm of the infected wheat cells.

  13. Deletion in the first cysteine-rich repeat of low density lipoprotein receptor impairs its transport but not lipoprotein binding in fibroblasts from a subject with familial hypercholesterolemia

    The ligand-binding domain of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor is composed of seven cysteine-rich repeats, each ∼ 40 amino acids long. Previous studies showed that if the first repeat of the ligand-binding domain (encoded by exon 2) is deleted, the receptor fails to bind an anti-LDL receptor monoclonal antibody (IgG-C7) but continues to bind LDL with high affinity. Cultured fibroblasts from a Black South African Xhosa patient (TT) with the clinical syndrome of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia demonstrated high-affinity cell-surface binding of 125I-labeled LDL but not 125I-labeled IgG-C7. previous haplotype analysis, using 10 restriction fragment length polymorphic sites, suggested that the patient inherited two identical LDL receptor alleles. The polymerase chain reaction technique was used to selectively amplify exon 2 of the LDL receptor gene from this patient. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragment disclosed a deletion of six base pairs that removes two amino acids, aspartic acid and glycine, from the first cysteine-rich ligand binding repeat. The mutation creates a new Pst I restriction site that can be used to detect the deletion. The existence of this mutant allele confirms that the epitope of IgG-C7 is located in the first cysteine-rich repeat and that this repeat is not necessary for LDL binding. The mutant gene produced a normally sized 120-kilodalton LDL receptor precursor protein that matured to the 160-kilodalton form at less than one-fourth the normal rate

  14. Cloning and characterization of SCART1, a novel scavenger receptor cysteine-rich type I transmembrane molecule

    Holm, Dorte; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Grønlund, Jørn;

    2009-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a novel murine transmembrane molecule, mSCART1 belonging to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide chain of 989 amino acids, organized as a type I transmembrane protein that contains eight extracellular SRCR domains followed...... related to the WC1 family of the SRCR superfamily. Finally, a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule with high homology to mSCART1 was identified by searching in the human genomic databases using the mSCART1 cDNA sequence....

  15. Determination of Disulfide Bond Connectivity of Cysteine-rich Peptide IpTx{sub a}

    Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Jim Il [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Sato, Kazuki [Fukuoka Women' s Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Cysteine-rich peptides stabilized by intramolecular disulfide bonds have often been isolated from venoms of microbes, animals and plants. These peptides typically have much higher stability and improved biopharmaceutical properties compared to their linear counterparts. Therefore the correct disulfide bond formation of small proteins and peptides has been extensively studied for a better understanding of their folding mechanism and achieving efficient generation of the naturally occurring biologically active product. Imperatoxin A (IpTx{sub a}), a peptide toxin containing 6 cysteine residues, was isolated from the venom of scorpion Pandinus imperator, selectively binds the ryanodine receptors and activates Ca{sup 2+} release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IpTx{sub a} increases the binding of ryanodine to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and encourages reconstituted single channel to induce subconductance states.

  16. Determination of Disulfide Bond Connectivity of Cysteine-rich Peptide IpTxa

    Cysteine-rich peptides stabilized by intramolecular disulfide bonds have often been isolated from venoms of microbes, animals and plants. These peptides typically have much higher stability and improved biopharmaceutical properties compared to their linear counterparts. Therefore the correct disulfide bond formation of small proteins and peptides has been extensively studied for a better understanding of their folding mechanism and achieving efficient generation of the naturally occurring biologically active product. Imperatoxin A (IpTxa), a peptide toxin containing 6 cysteine residues, was isolated from the venom of scorpion Pandinus imperator, selectively binds the ryanodine receptors and activates Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IpTxa increases the binding of ryanodine to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and encourages reconstituted single channel to induce subconductance states

  17. Cysteine-rich protein 1 (CRP1 regulates actin filament bundling

    Fraley Tamara S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine-rich protein 1 (CRP1 is a LIM domain containing protein localized to the nucleus and the actin cytoskeleton. CRP1 has been demonstrated to bind the actin-bundling protein α-actinin and proposed to modulate the actin cytoskeleton; however, specific regulatory mechanisms have not been identified. Results CRP1 expression increased actin bundling in rat embryonic fibroblasts. Although CRP1 did not affect the bundling activity of α-actinin, CRP1 was found to stabilize the interaction of α-actinin with actin bundles and to directly bundle actin microfilaments. Using confocal and photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET microscopy, we demonstrate that there are two populations of CRP1 localized along actin stress fibers, one associated through interaction with α-actinin and one that appears to bind the actin filaments directly. Consistent with a role in regulating actin filament cross-linking, CRP1 also localized to the membrane ruffles of spreading and PDGF treated fibroblasts. Conclusion CRP1 regulates actin filament bundling by directly cross-linking actin filaments and stabilizing the interaction of α-actinin with actin filament bundles.

  18. The cysteine-rich region of T1R3 determines responses to intensely sweet proteins.

    Jiang, Peihua; Ji, Qingzhou; Liu, Zhan; Snyder, Lenore A; Benard, Lumie M J; Margolskee, Robert F; Max, Marianna

    2004-10-22

    A wide variety of chemically diverse compounds taste sweet, including natural sugars such as glucose, fructose, sucrose, and sugar alcohols, small molecule artificial sweeteners such as saccharin and acesulfame K, and proteins such as monellin and thaumatin. Brazzein, like monellin and thaumatin, is a naturally occurring plant protein that humans, apes, and Old World monkeys perceive as tasting sweet but that is not perceived as sweet by other species including New World monkeys, mouse, and rat. It has been shown that heterologous expression of T1R2 plus T1R3 together yields a receptor responsive to many of the above-mentioned sweet tasting ligands. We have determined that the molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to brazzein sweetness depends on a site within the cysteine-rich region of human T1R3. Other mutations in this region of T1R3 affected receptor activity toward monellin, and in some cases, overall efficacy to multiple sweet compounds, implicating this region as a previously unrecognized important determinant of sweet receptor function. PMID:15299024

  19. Successful production of recombinant buckwheat cysteine-rich aspartic protease in Escherichia coli

    MIRA D. MILISAVLJEVIĆ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the expression of recombinant cysteine-rich atypical buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum aspartic protease (FeAPL1 in five Escherichia coli strains differing in their expression capabilities is presented. It was shown that the expression success depended highly on the choice of FeAPL1 fusion partner. His6-FeAPL1 was produced in large quantities as an insoluble protein localized in inclusion bodies. On the other hand, MBP-FeAPL1 was localized in both the cytoplasm and inclusion bodies in BL21 and Rosetta-gami strains. Only purified soluble MBP-FeAPL1 from Rosetta-gami cells showed proteolytic activity at pH 3.0 with BSA as the substrate. The results also indicated that FeAPL1 contained a PRO segment that had to be removed for the enzyme activity to appear. The activity of FeAPL1 produced in the Rosetta-gami strain, which enables disulfide bond formation indicated the importance of the twelve cysteine residues for correct folding and functionality.

  20. Purification and characterization of a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Philodryas patagoniensis snake venom.

    Peichoto, María E; Mackessy, Stephen P; Teibler, Pamela; Tavares, Flávio L; Burckhardt, Paula L; Breno, María C; Acosta, Ofelia; Santoro, Marcelo L

    2009-07-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRiSPs) are widespread in reptile venoms, but most have functions that remain unknown. In the present study we describe the purification and characterization of a CRiSP (patagonin) from the venom of the rear-fanged snake Philodryas patagoniensis, and demonstrate its biological activity. Patagonin is a single-chain protein, exhibiting a molecular mass of 24,858.6 Da, whose NH(2)-terminal and MS/MS-derived sequences are nearly identical to other snake venom CRiSPs. The purified protein hydrolyzed neither azocasein nor fibrinogen, and it could induce no edema, hemorrhage or inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. In addition, patagonin did not inhibit contractions of rat aortic smooth muscle induced by high K(+). However, it caused muscular damage to murine gastrocnemius muscle, an action that has not been previously described for any snake venom CRiSPs. Thus, patagonin will be important for studies of the structure-function and evolutionary relationships of this family of proteins that are widely distributed among snake venoms. PMID:19285568

  1. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  2. Cloning and isolation of a conus cysteine-rich protein homologous to Tex31 but without proteolytic activity

    Jing Qian; Zhanyun Guo; Chengwu Chi

    2008-01-01

    We cloned and isolated a cysteine-rich protein, designated Mr30, from Conus marmoreus. Mr30 belongs to the cysteinerich secretory protein family that is highly homologous to Tex31 previously obtained from Conus textile and reported as a protease responsible for processing of pro-conotoxins. Mr30, purified by a procedure similar to that of Tex31,indeed showed low proteolytic activity. However, further investigations revealed that the detected protease activity actually resulted from a trace amount of protease(s) contamination rather than from Mr30 itself. This finding led us to rethink the role of conus cysteine-rich secretory proteins: they were probably not responsible for the processing of pro-conotoxins as previously deduced, but their real biological functions remained to be clarified.

  3. Rapid turnover of antimicrobial-type cysteine-rich protein genes in closely related Oryza genomes.

    Shenton, Matthew R; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Nagata, Toshifumi; Feng, Qi; Han, Bin; Kurata, Nori

    2015-10-01

    Defensive and reproductive protein genes undergo rapid evolution. Small, cysteine-rich secreted peptides (CRPs) act as antimicrobial agents and function in plant intercellular signaling and are over-represented among reproductively expressed proteins. Because of their roles in defense, reproduction and development and their presence in multigene families, CRP variation can have major consequences for plant phenotypic and functional diversification. We surveyed the CRP genes of six closely related Oryza genomes comprising Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and ssp. indica, Oryza glaberrima and three accessions of Oryza rufipogon to observe patterns of evolution in these gene families and the effects of variation on their gene expression. These Oryza genomes, like other plant genomes, have accumulated large reservoirs of CRP sequences, comprising 26 groups totaling between 676 and 843 genes, in contrast to antimicrobial CRPs in animal genomes. Despite the close evolutionary relationships between the genomes, we observed rapid changes in number and structure among CRP gene families. Many CRP sequences are in gene clusters generated by local duplications, have undergone rapid turnover and are more likely to be silent or specifically expressed. By contrast, conserved CRP genes are more likely to be highly and broadly expressed. Variable CRP genes created by repeated duplication, gene modification and inactivation can gain new functions and expression patterns in newly evolved gene copies. For the CRP proteins, the process of gain/loss by deletion or duplication at gene clusters seems to be an important mechanism in evolution of the gene families, which also contributes to their expression evolution. PMID:25842177

  4. The cysteine-rich interdomain region from the highly variable plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 exhibits a conserved structure.

    Michael M Klein

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites, living in red blood cells, express proteins of the erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP1 family on the red blood cell surface. The binding of PfEMP1 molecules to human cell surface receptors mediates the adherence of infected red blood cells to human tissues. The sequences of the 60 PfEMP1 genes in each parasite genome vary greatly from parasite to parasite, yet the variant PfEMP1 proteins maintain receptor binding. Almost all parasites isolated directly from patients bind the human CD36 receptor. Of the several kinds of highly polymorphic cysteine-rich interdomain region (CIDR domains classified by sequence, only the CIDR1alpha domains bind CD36. Here we describe the CD36-binding portion of a CIDR1alpha domain, MC179, as a bundle of three alpha-helices that are connected by a loop and three additional helices. The MC179 structure, containing seven conserved cysteines and 10 conserved hydrophobic residues, predicts similar structures for the hundreds of CIDR sequences from the many genome sequences now known. Comparison of MC179 with the CIDR domains in the genome of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain provides insights into CIDR domain structure. The CIDR1alpha three-helix bundle exhibits less than 20% sequence identity with the three-helix bundles of Duffy-binding like (DBL domains, but the two kinds of bundles are almost identical. Despite the enormous diversity of PfEMP1 sequences, the CIDR1alpha and DBL protein structures, taken together, predict that a PfEMP1 molecule is a polymer of three-helix bundles elaborated by a variety of connecting helices and loops. From the structures also comes the insight that DBL1alpha domains are approximately 100 residues larger and that CIDR1alpha domains are approximately 100 residues smaller than sequence alignments predict. This new understanding of PfEMP1 structure will allow the use of better-defined PfEMP1 domains for functional studies, for the design of candidate

  5. Enhanced Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity by overexpression of cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Yu-Hung eYeh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs such as the bacterial flagellin (or the derived peptide flg22 by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs such as the FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2, plants activate the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI response. The L-type lectin receptor kinase-VI.2 (LecRK-VI.2 is a positive regulator of Arabidopsis thaliana PTI. Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs possess two copies of the C-X8-C-X2-C (DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains and are thought to be involved in plant stress resistance, but data about CRK functions are scarce. Here we show that Arabidopsis overexpressing the LecRK-VI.2-responsive CRK4, CRK6 and CRK36 demonstrated an enhanced PTI response and were resistant to virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Notably, the flg22-triggered oxidative burst was primed in CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 transgenics and up-regulation of the PTI-responsive gene FLG22-INDUCED RECEPTOR-LIKE 1 (FRK1 was potentiated upon flg22 treatment in CRK4 and CRK6 overexpression lines or constitutively increased by CRK36 overexpression. PTI-mediated callose deposition was not affected by overexpression of CRK4 and CRK6, while CRK36 overexpression lines demonstrated constitutive accumulation of callose. In addition, Pst DC3000-mediated stomatal reopening was blocked in CRK4 and CRK36 overexpression lines, while overexpression of CRK6 induced constitutive stomatal closure suggesting a strengthening of stomatal immunity. Finally, bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation analyses in Arabidopsis protoplasts suggested that the plasma membrane localized CRK4, CRK6 and CRK36 associate with the PRR FLS2. Association with FLS2 and the observation that overexpression of CRK4, CRK6, and CRK36 boosts specific PTI outputs and resistance to bacteria suggest a role for these CRKs in Arabidopsis innate immunity.

  6. Regulation of basal resistance by a powdery mildew-induced cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase in barley

    Rayapuram, Channabasavangowda; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Maiser, Fabian;

    2012-01-01

    The receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs) constitute a large and diverse group of proteins controlling numerous plant physiological processes, including development, hormone perception and stress responses. The cysteine-rich RLKs (CRKs) represent a prominent subfamily of transmembrane-anchored RLKs...... affect R-gene-mediated resistance. Silencing of HvCRK1 phenocopied the effective penetration resistance found in mlo-resistant barley plants, and the possible link between HvCRK1 and MLO was substantiated by the fact that HvCRK1 induction on Bgh inoculation was dependent on Mlo. Finally, using both...

  7. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is a ligand of alpha1B-glycoprotein in human plasma

    Udby, Lene; Sørensen, Ole E; Pass, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    -like substances found in lizard saliva or snake venom. Human CRISP-3 is present in exocrine secretions and in secretory granules of neutrophilic granulocytes and is believed to play a role in innate immunity. On the basis of the relatively high content of CRISP-3 in human plasma and the small size of the protein...... (28 kDa), we hypothesized that CRISP-3 in plasma was bound to another component. This was supported by size-exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation of plasma proteins. The binding partner was identified by mass spectrometry as alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG), which is a known plasma protein of......Human cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3; also known as SGP28) belongs to a family of closely related proteins found in mammals and reptiles. Some mammalian CRISPs are known to be involved in the process of reproduction, whereas some of the CRISPs from reptiles are neurotoxin...

  8. cDNA Cloning, Sequence Analysis of the Porcine LIM and Cysteine-rich Domain 1 Gene

    Jun WANG; Chang-Yan DENG; Yuan-Zhu XIONG; Bo ZUO; Lei XING; Feng-E LI; Ming-Gang LEI; Rong ZHENG; Si-Wen JIANG

    2005-01-01

    LIM domain proteins are important regulators in cell growth, cell fate determination, cell differentiation and remodeling of the cell cytoskeleton by their interaction with various structural proteins, kinases and transcriptional regulators. Using molecular biology combined with in silico cloning, we have cloned the complete coding sequence of pig LIM and the cysteine-rich domain 1 gene (LMCD1) which encodes a 363 amino acid protein. The estimated molecular weight of the LMCD1 protein is 40,788 Da with a pI of 8.39. It was found to be highly expressed in both skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle. Alignment analysis revealed that the deduced protein sequence shares 86%, 91% and 93% homology with that of its human, mouse and rat counterparts, respectively. The LMCD1 protein was predicted by bioinformatics software to contain a novel cysteine-rich domain in the N-terminal region, two LIM domains in the C-terminal region, nine potential protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, seven casein kinase Ⅱ phosphorylation sites, a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, seven N-glycosylation and N-myristoylation sites and a single potential N-glycosylation site, which is similar to the protein's human counterpart. Phylogenetic tree was constructed by aligning the amino acid sequences of the LIM domain from different species. In addition, four base mutations were detected by comparing the sequences of Large White pigs with those of Chinese Meishan pigs. The G294A mutation site was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Its allele frequencies were studied in five pig breeds.

  9. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of 3H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion

  10. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby;

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...

  11. The cysteine rich necrotrophic effector SnTox1 produced by Stagonospora nodorum triggers susceptibility of wheat lines harboring Snn1

    The gene encoding SnTox1, a necrotrophic effector from Stagonospora nodorum that causes necrosis of wheat lines expressing Snn1, has been verified by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. SnTox1 encodes a 117 amino acid cysteine rich protein with the first 17 amino acids predicted as a signal ...

  12. Isolation and characterization of a novel wheat cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase gene induced by Rhizoctonia cerealis

    Yang, Kun; Rong, Wei; Qi, Lin; Li, Jiarui; Wei, Xuening; Zhang, Zengyan

    2013-10-01

    Cysteine-rich receptor kinases (CRKs) belong to the receptor-like kinase family. Little is known about CRK genes in wheat. We isolated a wheat CRK gene TaCRK1 from Rhizoctonia cerealis-resistant wheat CI12633 based on a differentially expressed sequence identified by RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. TaCRK1 was more highly expressed in CI12633 than in susceptible Wenmai 6. Transcription of TaCRK1 in wheat was induced in CI12633 after R. cerealis infection and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. The deduced TaCRK1 protein contained a signal peptide, two DUF26 domains, a transmembrane domain, and a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Transient expression of a green fluorescence protein fused with TaCRK1 in wheat and onion indicated that TaCRK1 may localize to plasma membranes. Characterization of TaCRK1 silencing induced by virus-mediated method in CI12633 showed that the downregulation of TaCRK1 transcript did not obviously impair resistance to R. cerealis. This study paves the way to further CRK research in wheat.

  13. Expression, purification and characterization of the recombinant cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide snakin-1 in Pichia pastoris.

    Kuddus, Md Ruhul; Rumi, Farhana; Tsutsumi, Motosuke; Takahashi, Rika; Yamano, Megumi; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Demura, Makoto; Aizawa, Tomoyasu

    2016-06-01

    Snakin-1 (SN-1) is a small cysteine-rich plant antimicrobial peptide with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity which was isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum). Here, we carried out the expression of a recombinant SN-1 in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, along with its purification and characterization. A DNA fragment encoding the mature SN-1 was cloned into pPIC9 vector and introduced into P. pastoris. A large amount of pure recombinant SN-1 (approximately 40 mg/1L culture) was obtained from a fed-batch fermentation culture after purification with a cation exchange column followed by RP-HPLC. The identity of the recombinant SN-1 was verified by MALDI-TOF MS, CD and (1)H NMR experiments. All these data strongly indicated that the recombinant SN-1 peptide had a folding with six disulfide bonds that was identical to the native SN-1. Our findings showed that SN-1 exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against test microorganisms and produced very weak hemolysis of mammalian erythrocytes. The mechanism of its antimicrobial action against Escherichia coli was investigated by both outer membrane permeability assay and cytoplasmic membrane depolarization assay. These assays demonstrated that SN-1 is a membrane-active antimicrobial peptide which can disrupt both outer and cytoplasmic membrane integrity. This is the first report on the recombinant expression and purification of a fully active SN-1 in P. pastoris. PMID:26854372

  14. Sequence of a cysteine-rich galactose-specific lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Mann, B J; Torian, B E; Vedvick, T S; Petri, W A

    1991-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites adhere to human colonic mucins and epithelial cells by a cell surface galactose-specific lectin. This lectin, which is composed of two subunits linked by disulfide bonds, has been shown to be a protective antigen in an animal model of amebiasis. We have determined the sequence of the mature form of the 170-kDa heavy subunit from cDNA clones and PCR-amplified fragments. The heavy subunit sequence consisted of a putative extracellular domain containing 1209 am...

  15. Cysteine- rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3), ERG and PTEN define a molecular subtype of prostate cancer with implication to patients’ prognosis

    Al Bashir, Samir; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Hegazy, Samar A.; Dolph, Michael; Donnelly, Bryan; Bismar, Tarek A.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine- rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) prognostic significance in prostate cancer (PCA) has generated mixed result. Herein, we investigated and independently validated CRISP3 expression in relation to ERG and PTEN genomic aberrations and clinical outcome. CRISP3 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry using a cohort of patients with localized PCA (n = 215) and castration resistant PCA (CRPC) (n = 46). The Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSKCC) and Swedish cohorts were used for ...

  16. AB035. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator mir-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia

    Zhou, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Qi-Zhao; Lyu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zi-Jian; Chen, Ming-kun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan; Qi, Tao; LI, XIN; Liu, Cun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia Methods Spermatozoa were isolated fr...

  17. Retinoids Suppress Cysteine-rich Protein 61 (CCN1), a Negative Regulator of Collagen Homeostasis, in Skin Equivalent Cultures and Aged Human Skin in vivo

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Shao, Yuan; Xu, Yiru; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations of connective tissue collagen are prominent features of both chronologically aged and photoaged (aging due to sun exposure) human skin. These age-related abnormalities are mediated in part by CCN family member, CCN1 (cysteine-rich protein 61). CCN1 is elevated in the dermis of both chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo, and promotes aberrant collagen homeostasis by down-regulating type I collagen, the major structural protein in skin, and promoting collagen degrada...

  18. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Morimoto, Mayuka [Department of Immunobiology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68 Koshien Kyuban-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan); Toda, Ken-ichi [Department of Dermatology, Kitano Hospital, The Tazuke Kofukai Nedical Institute, 2-4-20 Ohgimachi, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-8480 (Japan); Shinya, Tomohiro; Sato, Keizo [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, Nobeoka, Miyazaki 882-8508 (Japan); Takahashi, Satoru, E-mail: imwalrus@mukogawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunobiology, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68 Koshien Kyuban-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan); Institute for Biosciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68 Koshien Kyuban-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan)

    2015-07-03

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells.

  19. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells

  20. Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase 45 functions in the responses to abscisic acid and abiotic stresses

    Zhang, Xiujuan

    2013-06-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed germination, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses such as drought and salt stresses. Receptor-like kinases are well known signaling components that mediate plant responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Here, we characterized the biological function of an ABA and stress-inducible cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK45, in ABA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The crk45 mutant was less sensitive to ABA than the wild type during seed germination and early seedling development, whereas CRK45 overexpression plants were more sensitive to ABA compared to the wild type. Furthermore, overexpression of CRK45 led to hypersensitivity to salt and glucose inhibition of seed germination, whereas the crk45 mutant showed the opposite phenotypes. In addition, CRK45 overexpression plants had enhanced tolerance to drought. Gene expression analyses revealed that the expression of representative stress-responsive genes was significantly enhanced in CRK45 overexpression plants in response to salt stress. ABA biosynthetic genes such as NCED3,. 22NCED3, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 3.NCED5,. 33NCED5, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 5.ABA2,. 44ABA2, Abscisic Acid Deficient 2. and AAO355AAO3, Abscisic Aldehyde Oxidase 3. were also constitutively elevated in the CRK45 overexpression plants. We concluded that CRK45 plays an important role in ABA signaling that regulates Arabidopsis seeds germination, early seedling development and abiotic stresses response, by positively regulating ABA responses in these processes. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagged Cysteine-rich Domains from Protein Kinase C as Fluorescent Indicators for Diacylglycerol Signaling in Living Cells

    Oancea, Elena; Teruel, Mary N.; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Meyer, Tobias

    1998-01-01

    Cysteine-rich domains (Cys-domains) are ∼50–amino acid–long protein domains that complex two zinc ions and include a consensus sequence with six cysteine and two histidine residues. In vitro studies have shown that Cys-domains from several protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms and a number of other signaling proteins bind lipid membranes in the presence of diacylglycerol or phorbol ester. Here we examine the second messenger functions of diacylglycerol in living cells by monitoring the membrane tra...

  2. Expression of Magnaporthe oryzae genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins secreted during nitrogen starvation and interaction with its host, Oryza sativa.

    Yang, J; Liang, M L; Yan, J L; Yang, Y Q; Liu, L; Liu, C; Yang, L J; L, C Y

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, may experience nitrogen starvation during infection of its plant host (rice,Oryza sativa). Here, we studied the expression of seven genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins with N-terminal signal peptides during nitrogen limitation and throughout the infection process. Some genes were upregulated to a greater extent in weak pathogenic strains than in strong pathogenic strains when they were cultured in complete media, and the expression of some genes was higher in both weak and strong pathogenic strains cultured in 1/10-N and nitrogen starvation media. Furthermore, the expression of these genes was upregulated to different extents in the early stages of M. oryzae infection. These data demonstrate that the genes of interest are highly expressed in weak and strong pathogenic strains cultured under nitrogen limitation and at the early stage of the infection process. This indicates that cysteine-rich secreted proteins in the blast fungus might be involved in establishing disease in the host and that they are sensitive to nitrogen levels. Thus, their role in sensing nitrogen availability within the host is implied, which provides a basis for further functional identification of these genes and their products during plant infection. PMID:26681057

  3. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran;

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... containing exclusively SRCR and SID domains that binds to S. mutans. To define more closely the S. mutans-binding domain, consensus-based peptides of the SRCR domains and SIDs were designed and synthesized. Only one of the SRCR peptides, designated SRCRP2, and none of the SID peptides bound to S. mutans....... Strikingly, this peptide was also able to induce agglutination of S. mutans and a number of other bacteria. The repeated presence of this peptide in the native molecule endows agglutinin/DMBT1 with a general bacterial binding feature with a multivalent character. Moreover, our studies demonstrate for the...

  4. The cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 supports cell adhesion through syndecans and triggers signaling events that lead to beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B;

    2000-01-01

    spread on ADAM 12. However, spreading could be efficiently induced by the addition of either 1 mM Mn(2+) or the beta1 integrin-activating monoclonal antibody 12G10, suggesting that in these carcinoma cells, the ADAM 12-syndecan complex fails to modulate the function of beta1 integrin.......-dependent manner attach to ADAM 12 via members of the syndecan family. After binding to syndecans, mesenchymal cells spread and form focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. Integrin beta1 was responsible for cell spreading because function-blocking monoclonal antibodies completely inhibited cell spreading, and...... chondroblasts lacking beta1 integrin attached but did not spread. These data suggest that mesenchymal cells use syndecans as the initial receptor for the ADAM 12 cysteine-rich domain-mediated cell adhesion, and then the beta1 integrin to induce cell spreading. Interestingly, carcinoma cells attached but did not...

  5. Endometrial cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is inhibited by human chorionic gonadotrophin, and is increased in the decidua of tubal ectopic pregnancy

    Horne, A W; Duncan, W C; King, A E;

    2009-01-01

    endometrium from women with ectopic and intrauterine gestations could be used to identify candidate diagnostic biomarkers for EP. The aim of this study was to further investigate the decidual gene with the highest fold increase in EP, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3). Decidualized endometrium from...... chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels. Immortalized endometrial epithelial cells were cultured with physiological concentrations of hCG. CRISP-3 mRNA and protein expression were greater in endometrium from ectopic when compared with intrauterine pregnancies (P < 0.05). CRISP-3 protein was localized to...... epithelium and granulocytes of endometrium. CRISP-3 serum concentrations were not different in women with ectopic compared with intrauterine pregnancies. CRISP-3 expression in endometrium was not related to the degree of decidualization or to serum progesterone levels. Endometrial CRISP-3 expression was...

  6. Three-dimensional solution structure and conformational plasticity of the N-terminal scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain of human CD5.

    Garza-Garcia, Acely; Esposito, Diego; Rieping, Wolfgang; Harris, Richard; Briggs, Cherry; Brown, Marion H; Driscoll, Paul C

    2008-04-18

    The lymphocyte receptor CD5 influences cell activation by modifying the strength of the intracellular response initiated by antigen engagement. Regulation through CD5 involves the interaction of one or more of its three scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains present in the extracellular region. Here, we present the 3D solution structure of a non-glycosylated double mutant of the N-terminal domain of human CD5 expressed in Escherichia coli (eCD5d1m), which has enhanced solubility compared to the non-glycosylated wild-type (eCD5d1). In common with a glycosylated form expressed in Pichia pastoris, the [(15)N,(1)H]-correlation spectra of both eCD5d1 and eCD5d1m exhibit non-uniform temperature-dependent signal intensities, indicating extensive conformational fluctuations on the micro-millisecond timescale. Although approximately one half of the signals expected for the domain are absent at 298 K, essentially complete resonance assignments and a solution structure could be obtained at 318 K. Because of the sparse nature of the experimental restraint data and the potentially important contribution of conformational exchange to the nuclear Overhauser effect peak intensity, we applied inferential structure determination to calculate the eCD5d1m structure. The inferential structure determination ensemble has similar features to that obtained by traditional simulated annealing methods, but displays superior definition and structural quality. The eCD5d1m structure is similar to other members of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily, but the position of the lone alpha helix differs due to interactions with the unique N-terminal region of the domain. The availability of an experimentally tractable form of CD5d1, together with its 3D structure, provides new tools for further investigation of its function within intact CD5. PMID:18339402

  7. Variant size- and glycoforms of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein gp-340 with differential bacterial aggregation

    Eriksson, Christer; Frängsmyr, Lars; Danielsson Niemi, Liza;

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein gp-340 aggregates bacteria in saliva as part of innate defence at mucosal surfaces. We have detected size- and glycoforms of gp-340 between human saliva samples (n = 7) and lung gp-340 from a proteinosis patient using antibodies and lectins in Western blots and ELISA measurements. We...

  8. A Genetic Screen Identifies a Requirement for Cysteine-Rich-Receptor-Like Kinases in Rice NH1 (OsNPR1-Mediated Immunity.

    Mawsheng Chern

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance, mediated by the Arabidopsis NPR1 gene and the rice NH1 gene, confers broad-spectrum immunity to diverse pathogens. NPR1 and NH1 interact with TGA transcription factors to activate downstream defense genes. Despite the importance of this defense response, the signaling components downstream of NPR1/NH1 and TGA proteins are poorly defined. Here we report the identification of a rice mutant, snim1, which suppresses NH1-mediated immunity and demonstrate that two genes encoding previously uncharacterized cysteine-rich-receptor-like kinases (CRK6 and CRK10, complement the snim1 mutant phenotype. Silencing of CRK6 and CRK10 genes individually in the parental genetic background recreates the snim1 phenotype. We identified a rice mutant in the Kitaake genetic background with a frameshift mutation in crk10; this mutant also displays a compromised immune response highlighting the important role of crk10. We also show that elevated levels of NH1 expression lead to enhanced CRK10 expression and that the rice TGA2.1 protein binds to the CRK10 promoter. These experiments demonstrate a requirement for CRKs in NH1-mediated immunity and establish a molecular link between NH1 and induction of CRK10 expression.

  9. [Dexamethasone increases the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) in lung tissues of bronchial asthmatic mice].

    Li, Zhenxing; He, Sheng; Wei, Liping; Lin, Lin; Xiong, Hanzhen; Li, Junhong; Chen, Peifen; Lai, Wenyan

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) in the lung tissues of bronchial asthmatic mice and the effect of dexamethasone treatment on its expression. Methods Thirty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three equal groups: a control group, an asthmatic group and a dexamethasone-treated group. The asthmatic mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection and inhalation with ovalbumin (OVA). The number of eosinophils (EOS) and lymphocytes (Lym) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. HE staining was used to observe airway inflammation and remodeling. The mRNA and protein expression of RECK were determined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results Compared with the control group and the dexamethasone-treated group, the total cell number and EOS number in the BALF of the asthma group significantly increased. The expression of RECK mRNA in the asthmatic group was significantly lower than that in the control group and the dexamethasone-treated group. Immunohistochemistry showed that RECK was mainly expressed in the airway epithelial cells and inflammatory cells. RECK protein expression was highest in the control group and lowest in the asthmatic group. Conclusion Dexamethasone can increase the expression of RECK in the lung tissues of asthmatic mice. PMID:27126937

  10. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed Highly Expressed Genes Encoding Secondary Metabolite Pathways and Small Cysteine-Rich Proteins in the Sclerotium of Lignosus rhinocerotis.

    Yap, Hui-Yeng Y; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Fung, Shin-Yee; Ng, Szu-Ting; Tan, Chon-Seng; Tan, Nget-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerotis (Cooke) Ryvarden (tiger milk mushroom) has long been known for its nutritional and medicinal benefits among the local communities in Southeast Asia. However, the molecular and genetic basis of its medicinal and nutraceutical properties at transcriptional level have not been investigated. In this study, the transcriptome of L. rhinocerotis sclerotium, the part with medicinal value, was analyzed using high-throughput Illumina HiSeqTM platform with good sequencing quality and alignment results. A total of 3,673, 117, and 59,649 events of alternative splicing, novel transcripts, and SNP variation were found to enrich its current genome database. A large number of transcripts were expressed and involved in the processing of gene information and carbohydrate metabolism. A few highly expressed genes encoding the cysteine-rich cerato-platanin, hydrophobins, and sugar-binding lectins were identified and their possible roles in L. rhinocerotis were discussed. Genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glucans, six gene clusters encoding four terpene synthases and one each of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase, and 109 transcribed cytochrome P450 sequences were also identified in the transcriptome. The data from this study forms a valuable foundation for future research in the exploitation of this mushroom in pharmacological and industrial applications. PMID:26606395

  11. The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK20 modulates host responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection

    Ederli, Luisa

    2011-10-01

    In plants, the cysteine-rich repeat kinases (CRKs) are a sub-family of receptor-like protein kinases that contain the DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains. It has been shown that in Arabidopsis thaliana, CRK20 is transcriptionally induced by pathogens, salicylic acid and ozone (O3). However, its role in responses to biotic and abiotic stress remains to be elucidated. To determine the function of CRK20 in such responses, two CRK20 loss-of-function mutants, crk20-1 and crk20-2, were isolated from public collections of Arabidopsis T-DNA tagged lines and examined for responses to O3 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. crk20-1 and crk20-2 showed similar O3 sensitivities and no differences in the expression of defense genes when compared with the wild-type. However, pathogen growth was significantly reduced, while there were no differences in the induction of salicylic acid related defense genes or salicylic acid accumulation. Furthermore, correlation analysis of CRK20 gene expression suggests that it has a role in the control of H2O and/or nutrient transport. We therefore propose that CRK20 promotes conditions that are favorable for Pst DC3000 growth in Arabidopsis, possibly through the regulation of apoplastic homeostasis, and consequently, of the environment of this biotrophic pathogen. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Anti-tumour effects of antibodies targeting the extracellular cysteine-rich region of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB4.

    Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Douglas, Evelyn L; Mertens-Walker, Inga; Lisle, Jessica E; Maharaj, Mohanan S N; Herington, Adrian C

    2015-04-10

    EphB4 is a membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) commonly over-produced by many epithelial cancers but with low to no expression in most normal adult tissues. EphB4 over-production promotes ligand-independent signaling pathways that increase cancer cell viability and stimulate migration and invasion. Several studies have shown that normal ligand-dependent signaling is tumour suppressive and therefore novel therapeutics which block the tumour promoting ligand-independent signaling and/or stimulate tumour suppressive ligand-dependent signaling will find application in the treatment of cancer. An EphB4-specific polyclonal antibody, targeting a region of 200 amino acids in the extracellular portion of EphB4, showed potent in vitro anti-cancer effects measured by an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in anchorage independent growth. Peptide exclusion was used to identify the epitope targeted by this antibody within the cysteine-rich region of the EphB4 protein, a sequence defined as a potential ligand interacting interface. Addition of antibody to cancer cells resulted in phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of the EphB4 protein, suggesting a mechanism that is ligand mimetic and tumour suppressive. A monoclonal antibody which specifically targets this identified extracellular epitope of EphB4 significantly reduced breast cancer xenograft growth in vivo confirming that EphB4 is a useful target for ligand-mimicking antibody-based anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25831049

  13. Bacteria-zinc co-localization implicates enhanced synthesis of cysteine-rich peptides in zinc detoxification when Brassica juncea is inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    Adediran, Gbotemi A; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Heal, Kate V

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are enigmatic in enhancing plant growth in the face of increased metal accumulation in plants. Since most PGPB colonize the plant root epidermis, we hypothesized that PGPB confer tolerance to metals through changes in speciation at the root epidermis. We employed a novel combination of fluorophore-based confocal laser scanning microscopic imaging and synchrotron based microscopic X-ray fluorescence mapping with X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize bacterial localization, zinc (Zn) distribution and speciation in the roots of Brassica juncea grown in Zn contaminated media (400 mg kg(-1) Zn) with the endophytic Pseudomonas brassicacearum and rhizospheric Rhizobium leguminosarum. PGPB enhanced epidermal Zn sequestration relative to PGBP-free controls while the extent of endophytic accumulation depended on the colonization mode of each PGBP. Increased root accumulation of Zn and increased tolerance to Zn was associated predominantly with R. leguminosarum and was likely due to the coordination of Zn with cysteine-rich peptides in the root endodermis, suggesting enhanced synthesis of phytochelatins or glutathione. Our mechanistic model of enhanced Zn accumulation and detoxification in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum has particular relevance to PGPB enhanced phytoremediation of soils contaminated through mining and oxidation of sulphur-bearing Zn minerals or engineered nanomaterials such as ZnS. PMID:26263508

  14. AB087. The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator miR-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia

    Zhou, Junhao; Zhou, Qizhao; Lyu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Ting; Chen, Zijian; Chen, Mingkun; Xia, Hui; Wang, Chunyan; Qi, Tao; LI, XIN; Liu, Cundong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia. Methods Spermatozoa were isolated fr...

  15. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 plays a role in prostate cancer cell invasion and affects expression of PSA and ANXA1.

    Pathak, Bhakti R; Breed, Ananya A; Apte, Snehal; Acharya, Kshitish; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) is upregulated in prostate cancer as compared to the normal prostate tissue. Higher expression of CRISP-3 has been linked to poor prognosis and hence it has been thought to act as a prognostic marker for prostate cancer. It is proposed to have a role in innate immunity but its role in prostate cancer is still unknown. In order to understand its function, its expression was stably knocked down in LNCaP cells. CRISP-3 knockdown did not affect cell viability but resulted in reduced invasiveness. Global gene expression changes upon CRISP-3 knockdown were identified by microarray analysis. Microarray data were quantitatively validated by evaluating the expression of seven candidate genes in three independent stable clones. Functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes identified cell adhesion, cell motility, and ion transport to be affected among other biological processes. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, also known as Kallikrein 3) was the top most downregulated gene whose expression was also validated at protein level. Interestingly, expression of Annexin A1 (ANXA1), a known anti-inflammatory protein, was upregulated upon CRISP-3 knockdown. Re-introduction of CRISP-3 into the knockdown clone reversed the effect on invasiveness and also led to increased PSA expression. These results suggest that overexpression of CRISP-3 in prostate tumor may maintain higher PSA expression and lower ANXA1 expression. Our data also indicate that poor prognosis associated with higher CRISP-3 expression could be due to its role in cell invasion. PMID:26369530

  16. RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) regulates migration, differentiation and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Mahl, Christian; Egea, Virginia; Megens, Remco T A; Pitsch, Thomas; Santovito, Donato; Weber, Christian; Ries, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The membrane-anchored glycoprotein RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) inhibits expression and activity of certain matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby suppressing tumor cell metastasis. However, RECK's role in physiological cell function is largely unknown. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are able to differentiate into various cell types and represent promising tools in multiple clinical applications including the regeneration of injured tissues by endogenous or transplanted hMSCs. RNA interference of RECK in hMSCs revealed that endogenous RECK suppresses the transcription and biosynthesis of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-2 but does not influence the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, membrane type (MT)1-MMP and TIMP-1 in these cells. Knockdown of RECK in hMSCs promoted monolayer regeneration and chemotactic migration of hMSCs, as demonstrated by scratch wound and chemotaxis assay analyses. Moreover, expression of endogenous RECK was upregulated upon osteogenic differentiation and diminished after adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. RECK depletion in hMSCs reduced their capacity to differentiate into the osteogenic lineage whereas adipogenesis was increased, demonstrating that RECK functions as a master switch between both pathways. Furthermore, knockdown of RECK in hMSCs attenuated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway as indicated by reduced stability and impaired transcriptional activity of β-catenin. The latter was determined by analysis of the β-catenin target genes Dickkopf1 (DKK1), axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and a luciferase-based β-catenin-activated reporter (BAR) assay. Our findings demonstrate that RECK is a regulator of hMSC functions suggesting that modulation of RECK may improve the development of hMSC-based therapeutical approaches in regenerative medicine. PMID:26459448

  17. Substitution of a conserved cysteine-996 in a cysteine-rich motif of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in congenital muscular dystrophy with partial deficiency of the protein

    Nissinen, M.; Xu Zhang; Tryggvason, K. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    1996-06-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are autosomal recessive muscle disorders of early onset. Approximately half of CMD patients present laminin {alpha}2-chain (merosin) deficiency in muscle biopsies, and the disease locus has been mapped to the region of the LAMA2 gene (6q22-23) in several families. Recently, two nonsense mutations in the laminin {alpha}2-chain gene were identified in CMD patients exhibiting complete deficiency of the laminin {alpha}2-chain in muscle biopsies. However, a subset of CMD patients with linkage to LAMA2 show only partial absence of the laminin {alpha}2-chain around muscle fibers, by immunocytochemical analysis. In the present study we have identified a homozygous missense mutation in the {alpha}2-chain gene of a consanguineous Turkish family with partial laminin {alpha}2-chain deficiency. The T{r_arrow}C transition at position 3035 in the cDNA sequence results in a Cys996{r_arrow}Arg substitution. The mutation that affects one of the conserved cysteine-rich repeats in the short arm of the laminin {alpha}2-chain should result in normal synthesis of the chain and in formation and secretion of a heterotrimeric laminin molecule. Muscular dysfunction is possibly caused either by abnormal disulfide cross-links and folding of the laminin repeat, leading to the disturbance of an as yet unknown binding function of the laminin {alpha}2-chain and to shorter half-life of the muscle-specific laminin-2 and laminin-4 isoforms, or by increased proteolytic sensitivity, leading to truncation of the short arm. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  18. SCR96, a small cysteine-rich secretory protein of Phytophthora cactorum, can trigger cell death in the Solanaceae and is important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance.

    Chen, Xiao-Ren; Li, Yan-Peng; Li, Qi-Yuan; Xing, Yu-Ping; Liu, Bei-Bei; Tong, Yun-Hui; Xu, Jing-You

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and small molecules produced by both the plant pathogen Phytophthora and host plants in the apoplastic space mediate the relationship between the interplaying organisms. Various Phytophthora apoplastic effectors, including small cysteine-rich (SCR) secretory proteins, have been identified, but their roles during interaction remain to be determined. Here, we identified an SCR effector encoded by scr96, one of three novel genes encoding SCR proteins in P. cactorum with similarity to the P. cactorum phytotoxic protein PcF. Together with the other two genes, scr96 was transcriptionally induced throughout the developmental and infection stages of the pathogen. These genes triggered plant cell death (PCD) in the Solanaceae, including Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato. The scr96 gene did not show single nucleotide polymorphisms in a collection of P. cactorum isolates from different countries and host plants, suggesting that its role is essential and non-redundant during infection. Homologues of SCR96 were identified only in oomycetes, but not in fungi and other organisms. A stable protoplast transformation protocol was adapted for P. cactorum using green fluorescent protein as a marker. The silencing of scr96 in P. cactorum caused gene-silenced transformants to lose their pathogenicity on host plants and these transformants were significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress. Transient expression of scr96 partially recovered the virulence of gene-silenced transformants on plants. Overall, our results indicate that the P. cactorum scr96 gene encodes an important virulence factor that not only causes PCD in host plants, but is also important for pathogenicity and oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:26307454

  19. A multifaceted study of stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA)-like Arabidopsis lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) suggests diversified roles for these LTPs in plant growth and reproduction

    Chae, Keun; Gonong, Benedict J.; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kieslich, Chris A.; Morikis, Dimitrios; Balasubramanian, Shruthi; Lord, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    Lily stigma/style cysteine-rich adhesin (SCA), a plant lipid transfer protein (LTP) which is secreted into the extracellular matrix, functions in pollen tube guidance in fertilization. A gain-of-function mutant (ltp5-1) for Arabidopsis LTP5, an SCA-like molecule, was recently shown to display defects in sexual reproduction. In the current study, it is reported that ltp5-1 plants have dwarfed primary shoots, delayed hypocotyl elongation, various abnormal tissue fusions, and display multibranch...

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Hatano, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  2. Identification of a novel small cysteine-rich protein in the fraction from the biocontrol Fusarium oxysporum strain CS-20 that mitigates Fusarium wilt symptoms and triggers defense responses in tomato

    Larisa A. Shcherbakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol effect of the nonpathogenic F. oxysporum strain CS-20 against the tomato wilt pathogen F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL has been previously reported to be primarily plant-mediated. This study shows that CS-20 produces proteins, which elicit defense responses in tomato plants. Three protein-containing fractions were isolated from CS-20 biomass using size exclusion chromatography. Exposure of seedling roots to one of these fractions prior to inoculation with pathogenic FOL strains significantly reduced wilt severity. This fraction initiated an ion exchange response in cultured tomato cells resulting in a reversible alteration of extracellular pH; increased tomato chitinase activity, and induced systemic resistance by enhancing PR-1 expression in tomato leaves. Two other protein fractions were inactive in seedling protection. The main polypeptide (designated CS20EP, which was specifically present in the defense-inducing fraction and was not detected in inactive protein fractions, was identified. The nucleotide sequence encoding this protein was determined, and its complete amino acid sequence was deduced from direct Edman degradation (25 N-terminal amino acid residues and DNA sequencing. The CS20EP was found to be a small basic cysteine-rich protein with a pI of 9.87 and 23.43% of hydrophobic amino acid residues. BLAST search in the NCBI database showed that the protein is new; however, it displays 48% sequence similarity with a hypothetical protein FGSG_10784 from F. graminearum strain PH-1. The contribution of CS20EP to elicitation of tomato defense responses resulting in wilt mitigating is discussed.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress inducible factor cysteine-rich with EGF-like domains 2 (Creld2 is an important mediator of BMP9-regulated osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Jiye Zhang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitors that can undergo osteogenic differentiation under proper stimuli. We demonstrated that BMP9 is one of the most osteogenic BMPs. However, the molecular mechanism underlying BMP9-initiated osteogenic signaling in MSCs remains unclear. Through gene expression profiling analysis we identified several candidate mediators of BMP9 osteogenic signaling. Here, we focus on one such signaling mediator and investigate the functional role of cysteine-rich with EGF-like domains 2 (Creld2 in BMP9-initiated osteogenic signaling. Creld2 was originally identified as an ER stress-inducible factor localized in the ER-Golgi apparatus. Our genomewide expression profiling analysis indicates that Creld2 is among the top up-regulated genes in BMP9-stimulated MSCs. We confirm that Creld2 is up-regulated by BMP9 in MSCs. ChIP analysis indicates that Smad1/5/8 directly binds to the Creld2 promoter in a BMP9-dependent fashion. Exogenous expression of Creld2 in MSCs potentiates BMP9-induced early and late osteogenic markers, and matrix mineralization. Conversely, silencing Creld2 expression inhibits BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation. In vivo stem cell implantation assay reveals that exogenous Creld2 promotes BMP9-induced ectopic bone formation and matrix mineralization, whereas silencing Creld2 expression diminishes BMP9-induced bone formation and matrix mineralization. We further show that Creld2 is localized in ER and the ER stress inducers potentiate BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation. Our results strongly suggest that Creld2 may be directly regulated by BMP9 and ER stress response may play an important role in regulating osteogenic differentiation.

  4. Purification and characterization of 29 kda acid phosphatase from germinating melon seeds

    Not much progress on the purification and characterization of low molecular weight acid phosphatases from plants has been made as yet. In the current study a low molecular weight acid phosphatase from seedling of melon was purified about 114-fold with specific activity of 45 U/ mg of protein and a recovery of 3 %. The enzyme was found to be homogeneous and showed a single band corresponding to 29 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The Km for p-nitrophenyl phosphate was found to be 0.175 mM and Vmax was 42 micro mol of substrate hydrolyzed /min/mg of protein at pH 5.5 and at 37 degree C. The enzyme showed its optimum activity at pH 5.0 and 50 degree C. The enzyme was thermostable and it retained 70 % activity for 45 min at 60 degree C. The pH stability was 4.8-6.0. Phosphate, vanadate, molybdate and fluoride acted as strong inhibitors. Metal ions such as Zn /sup +2/, Cu /sup +2/, Ag /sup +2/ and Hg /sup +2/ deactivated the enzyme while other divalent ions such as Ca /sup +2/ and Mg /sup +2/ had no effect. (author)

  5. Soluble forms of tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNF-Rs). The cDNA for the type I TNF-R, cloned using amino acid sequence data of its soluble form, encodes both the cell surface and a soluble form of the receptor

    Nophar, Y; Kemper, O; Brakebusch, C;

    1990-01-01

    Two proteins which specifically bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) have recently been isolated from human urine in our laboratory. The two proteins cross-react immunologically with two species of cell surface TNF receptors (TNF-R). Antibodies against one of the two TNF binding proteins (TBPI) were...... that although this receptor can signal the phosphorylation of cellular proteins, it appears from its amino acid sequence to be devoid of intrinsic protein kinase activity. The extracellular domain of the receptor is composed of four internal cysteine-rich repeats, homologous to structures repeated four...

  6. Unfolding Thermodynamics of Cysteine-Rich Proteins and Molecular Thermal-Adaptation of Marine Ciliates

    Giorgia Cazzolli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Euplotes nobilii and Euplotes raikovi are phylogenetically closely allied species of marine ciliates, living in polar and temperate waters, respectively. Their evolutional relation and the sharply different temperatures of their natural environments make them ideal organisms to investigate thermal-adaptation. We perform a comparative study of the thermal unfolding of disulfide-rich protein pheromones produced by these ciliates. Recent circular dichroism (CD measurements have shown that the two psychrophilic (E. nobilii and mesophilic (E. raikovi protein families are characterized by very different melting temperatures, despite their close structural homology. The enhanced thermal stability of the E. raikovi pheromones is realized notwithstanding the fact that these proteins form, as a rule, a smaller number of disulfide bonds. We perform Monte Carlo (MC simulations in a structure-based coarse-grained (CG model to show that the higher stability of the E. raikovi pheromones is due to the lower locality of the disulfide bonds, which yields a lower entropy increase in the unfolding process. Our study suggests that the higher stability of the mesophilic E. raikovi phermones is not mainly due to the presence of a strongly hydrophobic core, as it was proposed in the literature. In addition, we argue that the molecular adaptation of these ciliates may have occurred from cold to warm, and not from warm to cold. To provide a testable prediction, we identify a point-mutation of an E. nobilii pheromone that should lead to an unfolding temperature typical of that of E. raikovi pheromones.

  7. The conserved scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily in therapy and diagnosis

    Martínez, Vanesa Gabriela; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Holmskov, Uffe;

    2011-01-01

    members of the SRCR-SF, but also of the sequence versatility of the SRCR domains. Indeed, involvement of SRCR-SF members in quite different functions, such as pathogen recognition, modulation of the immune response, epithelial homeostasis, stem cell biology, and tumor development, have all been described....... This has brought to us new information, unveiling the possibility that targeting or supplementing SRCR-SF proteins could result in diagnostic and/or therapeutic benefit for a number of physiologic and pathologic states. Recent research has provided structural and functional insight into these proteins...

  8. Characterization of a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule SCART1 expressed by lymphocytes

    Holm, D.; Fink, D. R.; Steffensen, M. A.;

    2013-01-01

    of hSCART1 in the small intestine and colon. An antibody raised against an N-terminal hSCART1 peptide stains a subset of cells in the small intestine, stomach, and gall bladder, and it also stains placental villi. In conclusion, the characterization of hSCART1 at the mRNA and protein level suggests...

  9. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    Piñeiro Galvin, Manuel; García Olmedo, Francisco; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1...

  10. New Cysteine-Rich Ice-Binding Protein Secreted from Antarctic Microalga, Chloromonas sp.

    Jung, Woongsic; Campbell, Robert L; Gwak, Yunho; Kim, Jong Im; Davies, Peter L; Jin, EonSeon

    2016-01-01

    Many microorganisms in Antarctica survive in the cold environment there by producing ice-binding proteins (IBPs) to control the growth of ice around them. An IBP from the Antarctic freshwater microalga, Chloromonas sp., was identified and characterized. The length of the Chloromonas sp. IBP (ChloroIBP) gene was 3.2 kb with 12 exons, and the molecular weight of the protein deduced from the ChloroIBP cDNA was 34.0 kDa. Expression of the ChloroIBP gene was up- and down-regulated by freezing and warming conditions, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that native ChloroIBP was secreted into the culture medium. This protein has fifteen cysteines and is extensively disulfide bonded as shown by in-gel mobility shifts between oxidizing and reducing conditions. The open-reading frame of ChloroIBP was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli to investigate the IBP's biochemical characteristics. Recombinant ChloroIBP produced as a fusion protein with thioredoxin was purified by affinity chromatography and formed single ice crystals of a dendritic shape with a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.4±0.02°C at a concentration of 5 mg/ml. In silico structural modeling indicated that the three-dimensional structure of ChloroIBP was that of a right-handed β-helix. Site-directed mutagenesis of ChloroIBP showed that a conserved region of six parallel T-X-T motifs on the β-2 face was the ice-binding region, as predicted from the model. In addition to disulfide bonding, hydrophobic interactions between inward-pointing residues on the β-1 and β-2 faces, in the region of ice-binding motifs, were crucial to maintaining the structural conformation of ice-binding site and the ice-binding activity of ChloroIBP. PMID:27097164

  11. Genetic analysis of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein functional domains involved in cell-surface expression and cell-to-cell fusion

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. To delineate functional domains of the SARS-CoV S glycoprotein, single point mutations, cluster-to-lysine and cluster-to-alanine mutations, as well as carboxyl-terminal truncations were investigated in transient expression experiments. Mutagenesis of either the coiled-coil domain of the S glycoprotein amino terminal heptad repeat, the predicted fusion peptide, or an adjacent but distinct region, severely compromised S-mediated cell-to-cell fusion, while intracellular transport and cell-surface expression were not adversely affected. Surprisingly, a carboxyl-terminal truncation of 17 amino acids substantially increased S glycoprotein-mediated cell-to-cell fusion suggesting that the terminal 17 amino acids regulated the S fusogenic properties. In contrast, truncation of 26 or 39 amino acids eliminating either one or both of the two endodomain cysteine-rich motifs, respectively, inhibited cell fusion in comparison to the wild-type S. The 17 and 26 amino-acid deletions did not adversely affect S cell-surface expression, while the 39 amino-acid truncation inhibited S cell-surface expression suggesting that the membrane proximal cysteine-rich motif plays an essential role in S cell-surface expression. Mutagenesis of the acidic amino-acid cluster in the carboxyl terminus of the S glycoprotein as well as modification of a predicted phosphorylation site within the acidic cluster revealed that this amino-acid motif may play a functional role in the retention of S at cell surfaces. This genetic analysis reveals that the SARS-CoV S glycoprotein contains extracellular domains that regulate cell fusion as well as distinct endodomains that function in intracellular transport, cell-surface expression, and cell fusion

  12. Structural analysis of the outermost hair surface using TOF-SIMS with gas cluster ion beam sputtering.

    Lshikawa, Kazutaka; Okamoto, Masayuki; Aoyagi, Satoka

    2016-06-01

    A hair cuticle, which consists of flat overlapping scales that surround the hair fiber, protects inner tissues against external stimuli. The outermost surface of the cuticle is covered with a thin membrane containing proteins and lipids called the epicuticle. In a previous study, the authors conducted a depth profile analysis of a hair cuticle's amino acid composition to characterize its multilayer structure. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with a bismuth primary ion source was used in combination with the C60 sputtering technique for the analysis. It was confirmed that the lipids and cysteine-rich layer exist on the outermost cuticle surface, which is considered to be the epicuticle, though the detailed structure of the epicuticle has not been clarified. In this study, depth profile analysis of the cuticle surface was conducted using the argon gas cluster ion beam (Ar-GCIB) sputtering technique, in order to characterize the structure of the epicuticle. The shallow depth profile of the cuticle surface was investigated using an Ar-GCIB impact energy of 5 keV. Compared to the other amino acid peaks rich in the epicuticle, the decay of 18-methyleicosanic acid (18-MEA) thiolate peak was the fastest. This result suggests that the outermost surface of the hair is rich in 18-MEA. In conclusion, our results indicate that the outermost surfaces of cuticles have a multilayer (lipid and protein layers), which is consistent with the previously proposed structure. PMID:26822506

  13. Copy number variation of scavenger-receptor cysteine-rich domains within DMBT1 and Crohn's disease

    Polley, Shamik; Prescott, Natalie; Nimmo, Elaine;

    2016-01-01

    the number of bacteria-binding domains, different alleles may alter host-microbe interactions in the gut. Our aim was to investigate the role of this complex variation in susceptibility to Crohn's disease by assessing the previously reported association. We analysed the association of both copy number...

  14. Cysteine-rich peptides are responsible for intracellular sequestration of silver in silver-hyperaccumulating fungus Amanita strobiliformis

    Urban, V.; Borovička, Jan; Jedelský, P.; Řanda, Zdeněk; Macek, Tomáš; Ruml, Tomáš; Kotrba, P.

    Chania: Technical University of Crete, 2008 - (Kalogerakis, N.; Fava, F.; Banwart, S.). s. 268-268 ISBN 978-960-8475-12-0. [European Bioremediation Conference /4./. 03.09.2008-06.09.2008, Chania] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600480801; GA MŠk 1M06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Amanita strobiliformis * silver hyperaccumulation * Cys-containing peptides Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  15. Oxidation of the cysteine-rich regions of parkin perturbs its E3 ligase activity and contributes to protein aggregation

    Ma Yuliang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of aberrant proteins to form Lewy bodies (LBs is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of aberrant, misfolded proteins is critical for maintaining normal cell function. Emerging evidence suggests that oxidative/nitrosative stress compromises the precisely-regulated network of ubiquitination in PD, particularly affecting parkin E3 ligase activity, and contributes to the accumulation of toxic proteins and neuronal cell death. Results To gain insight into the mechanism whereby cell stress alters parkin-mediated ubiquitination and LB formation, we investigated the effect of oxidative stress. We found significant increases in oxidation (sulfonation and subsequent aggregation of parkin in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenlypyridinium (MPP+, representing an in vitro cell-based PD model. Exposure of these cells to direct oxidation via pathological doses of H2O2 induced a vicious cycle of increased followed by decreased parkin E3 ligase activity, similar to that previously reported following S-nitrosylation of parkin. Pre-incubation with catalase attenuated H2O2 accumulation, parkin sulfonation, and parkin aggregation. Mass spectrometry (MS analysis revealed that H2O2 reacted with specific cysteine residues of parkin, resulting in sulfination/sulfonation in regions of the protein similar to those affected by parkin mutations in hereditary forms of PD. Immunohistochemistry or gel electrophoresis revealed an increase in aggregated parkin in rats and primates exposed to mitochondrial complex I inhibitors, as well as in postmortem human brain from patients with PD with LBs. Conclusion These findings show that oxidative stress alters parkin E3 ligase activity, leading to dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and potentially contributing to LB formation.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of surface proteins of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae and intestinal infective larvae.

    Liu, Ruo Dan; Cui, Jing; Liu, Xiao Lin; Jiang, Peng; Sun, Ge Ge; Zhang, Xi; Long, Shao Rong; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhong Quan

    2015-10-01

    The critical step for Trichinella spiralis infection is that muscle larvae (ML) are activated to intestinal infective larvae (IIL) and invade intestinal epithelium to further develop. The IIL is its first invasive stage, surface proteins are directly exposed to host environment and are crucial for larval invasion and development. In this study, shotgun LC-MS/MS was used to analyze surface protein profiles of ML and IIL. Totally, 41 proteins common to both larvae, and 85 ML biased and 113 IIL biased proteins. Some proteins (e.g., putative scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain protein and putative onchocystatin) were involved in host-parasite interactions. Gene ontology analysis revealed that proteins involved in generation of precursor metabolites and energy; and nucleobase, nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolic process were enriched in IIL at level 4. Some IIL biased proteins might play important role in larval invasion and development. qPCR results confirmed the high expression of some genes in IIL. Our study provides new insights into larval invasion, host-Trichinella interaction and for screening vaccine candidate antigens. PMID:26184560

  17. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1 is present in hyaline membranes and modulates surface tension of surfactant

    Griese Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1 is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds various bacteria and is thought to participate in innate pulmonary host defense. We hypothesized that pulmonary DMBT1 could contribute to respiratory distress syndrome in neonates by modulating surfactant function. Methods DMBT1 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization in post-mortem lungs of preterm and full-term neonates with pulmonary hyaline membranes. The effect of human recombinant DMBT1 on the function of bovine and porcine surfactant was measured by a capillary surfactometer. DMBT1-levels in tracheal aspirates of ventilated preterm and term infants were determined by ELISA. Results Pulmonary DMBT1 was localized in hyaline membranes during respiratory distress syndrome. In vitro addition of human recombinant DMBT1 to the surfactants increased surface tension in a dose-dependent manner. The DMBT1-mediated effect was reverted by the addition of calcium depending on the surfactant preparation. Conclusion Our data showed pulmonary DMBT1 expression in hyaline membranes during respiratory distress syndrome and demonstrated that DMBT1 increases lung surface tension in vitro. This raises the possibility that DMBT1 could antagonize surfactant supplementation in respiratory distress syndrome and could represent a candidate target molecule for therapeutic intervention in neonatal lung disease.

  18. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    McClafferty Heather

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP

  19. cDNA cloning of a mouse mammary epithelial cell surface protein reveals the existence of epidermal growth factor-like domains linked to factor VIII-like sequences

    A 2.1-kilobase cDNA coding for a surface protein of mammary epithelial cells has been isolated from a mouse mammary gland λgt11 cDNA library. Sequence analysis of this cDNA reveals an open reading frame of 1,389 base pairs that defines a protein with a molecular mass of 51.5 dKa. Structural analysis of the predicted sequence identifies two putative functional domains of the protein: (i) an N-terminal cysteine-rich region that is similar to epidermal growth factor-like domains of Drosophila Notch-1 protein and (ii) a large segment of the sequence that exhibited 54.5% identify with C-terminal domains of human coagulation factors VIII and V. These similarities in structure are used to predict the possible functions of the protein and its means of interaction with the cell surface. mRNA expression was detectable in mammary tissue from nonpregnant animals but was maximal in the lactating gland. In cultured cells, mRNA levels also correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation

  20. Neutralizing monoclonal antibody epitopes of the Entamoeba histolytica galactose adhesin map to the cysteine-rich extracellular domain of the 170-kilodalton subunit.

    Mann, B J; Chung, C Y; Dodson, J M; Ashley, L S; Braga, L L; Snodgrass, T L

    1993-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucins and colonic epithelial cells via a galactose-binding adhesin. The adhesin is a heterodimeric glycoprotein composed of 170- and 35-kDa subunits. Fragments of the hgl1 gene encoding the 170-kDa subunit were expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and reacted with anti-adhesin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or pooled human immune sera. The MAbs tested recognize seven distinct epitopes on the 170-kDa subunit and have distinc...

  1. Dissecting a Role of Evolutionary-conserved but Non-critical Disulfide Bridges in Cysteine-Rich Peptides Using ω-Conotoxin GVIA and its Selenocysteine Analogs

    Gowd, Konkallu Hanumae; Blais, Kirk D.; Elmslie, Keith S.; Andrew M Steiner; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Conotoxins comprise a large group of peptidic neurotoxins that employ diverse disulfide-rich scaffolds. Each scaffold is determined by an evolutionarily conserved pattern of cysteine residues. Although many structure-activity relationship studies confirm the functional and structural importance of disulfide crosslinks, there is growing evidence that not all disulfide bridges are critical in maintaining activities of conotoxins. To answer the fundamental biological question of what the role of...

  2. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Mouse S5D-SRCRB: A New Group B Member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Superfamily

    Miró-Julià, Cristina; Roselló, Sandra; Martínez, Vanesa G; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Escoda-Ferran, Cristina; Padilla, Olga; Vázquez-Echeverría, Citlali; Espinal-Marin, Paula; Pujades, Cristina; García-Pardo, Angeles; Vila, Jordi; Serra-Pagès, Carles; Holmskov, Uffe; Yélamos, José; Lozano, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    of mouse S5D-SRCRB, a new group B member of the SRCR-SF. The s5d-srcrb gene maps at mouse chromosome 7 and encompasses 14 exons extending over 15 kb. The longest cDNA sequence found is 4286 bp in length and encodes a mature protein of 1371 aa, with a predicted M(r) of 144.6 kDa. Using an episomal......-SRCRB was shown to bind endogenous extracellular matrix proteins (laminin and galectin-1), as well as PAMPs present on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. PAMP binding by S5D-SRCRB induced microbial aggregation and subsequent inhibition of PAMP-induced cytokine release. These abilities...

  3. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) is present in hyaline membranes and modulates surface tension of surfactant

    Griese Matthias; Hartl Dominik; Weiss Christel; Gassler Nikolaus; Helmke Burkhard M; Renner Marcus; End Caroline; Müller Hanna; Hafner Mathias; Poustka Annemarie; Mollenhauer Jan; Poeschl Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds various bacteria and is thought to participate in innate pulmonary host defense. We hypothesized that pulmonary DMBT1 could contribute to respiratory distress syndrome in neonates by modulating surfactant function. Methods DMBT1 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization in post-mortem lungs of preterm and full-term neonates with ...

  4. ADAM12/syndecan-4 signaling promotes beta 1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through protein kinase Calpha and RhoA

    Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Grauslund, Morten;

    2002-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a large family of multidomain proteins with cell-binding and metalloprotease activities. The ADAM12 cysteine-rich domain (rADAM12-cys) supports cell attachment using syndecan-4 as a primary cell surface receptor that subsequently triggers bet...

  5. Minimal surfaces

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Sauvigny, Friedrich; Jakob, Ruben; Kuster, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    Minimal Surfaces is the first volume of a three volume treatise on minimal surfaces (Grundlehren Nr. 339-341). Each volume can be read and studied independently of the others. The central theme is boundary value problems for minimal surfaces. The treatise is a substantially revised and extended version of the monograph Minimal Surfaces I, II (Grundlehren Nr. 295 & 296). The first volume begins with an exposition of basic ideas of the theory of surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, followed by an introduction of minimal surfaces as stationary points of area, or equivalently

  6. Levels of plasma immunoglobulin G with specificity against the cysteine-rich interdomain regions of a semiconserved Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1, VAR4, predict protection against malarial anemia and febrile episodes

    Lusingu, John P A; Jensen, Anja T R; Vestergaard, Lasse S;

    2006-01-01

    , and a control CIDR1 domain were measured. VAR4-CIDR1alpha antibodies were acquired at an earlier age in Mkokola than in Kwamasimba, but after the age of 10 years the levels were comparable in the two villages. After controlling for age and other covariates, the risk of having anemia at enrollment was reduced...

  7. Salivary agglutinin and lung scavenger receptor cysteine-rich glycoprotein 340 have broad anti-influenza activities and interactions with surfactant protein D that vary according to donor source and sialylation

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Ligtenberg, Antoon; White, Mitchell R.; van Eijk, Martin; Hartshorn, Max; Pemberton, Lily; Holmskov, Uffe; Crouch, Erika

    2006-01-01

    salivary gp-340 are identical in protein sequence, salivary gp-340 from one donor had significantly greater antiviral activity against avian-like IAV strains which preferentially bind sialic acids in alpha(2,3) linkage. A greater density of alpha(2,3)-linked sialic acids was present on the salivary gp-340...... from this donor as compared with salivary gp-340 from another donor or several preparations of lung gp-340. Hence, the specificity of sialic acid linkages on gp-340 is an important determinant of anti-IAV activity. Gp-340 binds to SP-D (surfactant protein D), and we previously showed that lung gp-340...

  8. Fine mapping of a dominantly inherited powdery mildew resistance major-effect QTL, Pm1.1, in cucumber identifies a 41.1 kb region containing two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a severe fungal disease in cucumber, but the molecular genetic mechanisms of PM resistance in cucumber are still poorly understood. In this study, through marker-assisted backcrossing with an elite susceptible inbred line D8, we developed a single segment substitution line SSS...

  9. IgG antibodies to endothelial protein C receptor-binding Cysteine-rich interdomain region domains of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 are acquired early in life in individuals exposed to malaria

    Turner, Louise; Lavstsen, Thomas; Mmbando, Bruno P;

    2015-01-01

    Severe malaria syndromes are precipitated by Plasmodium falciparum parasites binding to endothelial receptors on the vascular lining. This binding is mediated by members of the highly variant P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. We have previously identified a subset of Pf...

  10. Analysis of the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus receptor: the 40-residue, cysteine-rich, low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat motif of Tva is sufficient to mediate viral entry.

    Rong, L; P. Bates

    1995-01-01

    The genes encoding the receptor for subgroup A Rous sarcoma viruses (tva) were recently cloned from both chicken and quail cells (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993; J. A. T. Young, P. Bates, and H. E. Varmus, J. Virol. 67:1811-1816, 1993). Previous work suggested that only the extracellular domain of Tva interacts with the virus (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993). Tva is a small membrane-associated protein containing in its ...

  11. Analysis of the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus receptor: the 40-residue, cysteine-rich, low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat motif of Tva is sufficient to mediate viral entry.

    Rong, L; Bates, P

    1995-08-01

    The genes encoding the receptor for subgroup A Rous sarcoma viruses (tva) were recently cloned from both chicken and quail cells (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993; J. A. T. Young, P. Bates, and H. E. Varmus, J. Virol. 67:1811-1816, 1993). Previous work suggested that only the extracellular domain of Tva interacts with the virus (P. Bates, J. A. T. Young, and H. E. Varmus, Cell 74:1043-1051, 1993). Tva is a small membrane-associated protein containing in its extracellular domain a 40-amino-acid region which is closely related to the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) repeat motif. To determine the region of the Tva extracellular domain responsible for viral receptor function, we created chimeric proteins containing various regions of the Tva extracellular domain fused with a murine CD8 membrane anchor. Analysis of these proteins demonstrates that any chimera containing the Tva LDLR repeat motif can specifically bind the envelope protein of subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses. Furthermore, NIH 3T3 cell lines expressing these chimeric proteins were efficiently infected by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus vectors. Our results demonstrate that the 40-residue-long LDLR repeat motif of Tva is responsible for viral receptor function. PMID:7609052

  12. Surface Tension

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  13. Surface thermodynamics

    Basic thermodynamics of a system consisting of two bulk phases with an interface. Solid surfaces: general. Discussion of experimental data on surface tension and related concepts. Adsorption thermodynamics in the Gibbsian scheme. Adsorption on inert solid adsorbents. Systems with electrical charges: chemistry and thermodynamics of imperfect crystals. Thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Simple models of charge transfer chemisorption. Adsorption heat and related concepts. Surface phase transitions

  14. Surface chemistry

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  15. Orthogonal surfaces

    Felsner, Stefan; Kappes, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Orthogonal surfaces are nice mathematical objects which have interesting connections to various fields, e.g., integer programming, monomial ideals and order dimension. While orthogonal surfaces in one or two dimensions are rather trivial already the three dimensional case has a rich structure with connections to Schnyder woods, planar graphs and 3-polytopes. Our objective is to detect more of the structure of orthogonal surfaces in four and higher dimensions. In particular we are driven by th...

  16. Surface waves

    Two dimensional surface waves including surface tension are considered in this paper. The disturbance potential φ created by a moving concentrated pressure has been determined uniquely following Peters. Linearized free surface conditions have been utilized. The free surface elevations η(x) have been obtained and discussed for stream velocities U ≥ = min, the minimum wave velocity. The results obtained are satisfactory. It is hoped that a similar approach may help to solve the three dimensional problem. It is, of course, apprehended that it may lead to complications which may not be easy to handle theoretically. (author). 11 refs, 5 figs

  17. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  18. Trapped Surfaces

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2013-03-01

    I review the definition and types of (closed) trapped surfaces. Surprising global properties are pointed out, such as their "clairvoyance" and the possibility that they enter into flat portions of the spacetime. Several results on the interplay of trapped surfaces with vector fields and with spatial hypersurfaces are presented. Applications to the quasi-local definition of Black Holes are analyzed, with particular emphasis set onto marginally trapped tubes, trapping horizons and the boundary of the region with closed trapped surfaces. Finally, the core of a trapped region is introduced, and its importance briefly discussed.

  19. Trapped surfaces

    Senovilla, José M M

    2011-01-01

    I review the definition and types of (closed) trapped surfaces. Surprising global properties are shown, such as their "clairvoyance" and the possibility that they enter into flat portions of the spacetime. Several results on the interplay of trapped surfaces with vector fields and with spatial hypersurfaces are presented. Applications to the quasi-local definition of Black Holes are discussed, with particular emphasis set onto marginally trapped tubes, trapping horizons and the boundary of the region with closed trapped surfaces. Finally, the core of a trapped region is introduced, and its importance discussed.

  20. Surface cuts

    Woof, M.

    2003-12-01

    The paper reports on mechanical rock cutting in surface mining. Mining technology has moved a long way in recent years and the mining equipments achieved considerable success in direct rock cutting. 3 figs.

  1. Surface boxplots

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-22

    In this paper, we introduce a surface boxplot as a tool for visualization and exploratory analysis of samples of images. First, we use the notion of volume depth to order the images viewed as surfaces. In particular, we define the median image. We use an exact and fast algorithm for the ranking of the images. This allows us to detect potential outlying images that often contain interesting features not present in most of the images. Second, we build a graphical tool to visualize the surface boxplot and its various characteristics. A graph and histogram of the volume depth values allow us to identify images of interest. The code is available in the supporting information of this paper. We apply our surface boxplot to a sample of brain images and to a sample of climate model outputs.

  2. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores. PMID:27375261

  3. Surface decontamination

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.)

  4. Trapped surfaces

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2011-01-01

    I review the definition and types of (closed) trapped surfaces. Surprising global properties are shown, such as their "clairvoyance" and the possibility that they enter into flat portions of the spacetime. Several results on the interplay of trapped surfaces with vector fields and with spatial hypersurfaces are presented. Applications to the quasi-local definition of Black Holes are discussed, with particular emphasis set onto marginally trapped tubes, trapping horizons and the boundary of th...

  5. Surface phonons

    Wette, Frederik

    1991-01-01

    In recent years substantial progress has been made in the detection of surface phonons owing to considerable improvements in inelastic rare gas scattering tech­ niques and electron energy loss spectroscopy. With these methods it has become possible to measure surface vibrations in a wide energy range for all wave vectors in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone and thus to deduce the complete surface phonon dispersion curves. Inelastic atomic beam scattering and electron energy loss spectroscopy have started to play a role in the study of surface phonons similar to the one played by inelastic neutron scattering in the investigation of bulk phonons in the last thirty years. Detailed comparison between experimen­ tal results and theoretical studies of inelastic surface scattering and of surface phonons has now become feasible. It is therefore possible to test and to improve the details of interaction models which have been worked out theoretically in the last few decades. At this point we felt that a concise, co...

  6. Surfacing Moves

    Lutz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    -management policies that pressure such care in practice. Some scholars analyze this situation as opposition between ‘objective’ and ‘subjective’ time. This article takes a different route. It explores how time surfaces in Swedish senior home care through relational movements of care. These enlist things such as...... schedules, machines, and aging bodies. To this end, the article also experiments with ‘surfacing’ as an ethnographic heuristic for figuring these different ‘spatial-timings’. The article concludes that surfacing matters not only in senior home care but also in the field-desks of ethnographic analysis....

  7. Attack surfaces

    Gruschka, Nils; Jensen, Meiko

    The new paradigm of cloud computing poses severe security risks to its adopters. In order to cope with these risks, appropriate taxonomies and classification criteria for attacks on cloud computing are required. In this work-in-progress paper we present one such taxonomy based on the notion of at...... attack surfaces of the cloud computing scenario participants. © 2010 IEEE....

  8. Surface stress stabilizes vicinal surfaces

    Hecquet, Pascal

    2004-07-01

    Vicinal surfaces have been used as a model for improving our fundamental understanding of the stability of self-organized surfaces. Steps on vicinal surfaces and their regularity result from the repulsive interaction between steps. According to the Marchenko-Parshin (MP) model, this interaction varies as 1/ L2, where L is the distance between steps. Here, I show (1) that the interaction between steps in the MP model is actually attractive and is due to second order deformations within the bulk material, (2) that the MP model does not correctly account for surface stress overlineσ 0yy, and (3) that the repulsion between steps results from first order deformations and from one negative step stress σSyy. The latter interaction is more important than that proposed by the MP model. To the first approximation, it varies with σSyyɛyy(0), where ɛyy(0) is the deformation at the step position including two interaction terms which vary as u1/ L and u2/ L2.

  9. Surface Texture

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03191 Surface Texture Now that all the frost is gone, the south polar region is exhibiting more than just layering and surface markings. As this image shows, the polar surface is not smooth at this resolution. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85.9S, Longitude 192.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Gene amplification of the Hps locus in Glycine max

    Kuflu Kuflom; Gijzen Mark; Moy Pat

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Hydrophobic protein from soybean (HPS) is an 8 kD cysteine-rich polypeptide that causes asthma in persons allergic to soybean dust. HPS is synthesized in the pod endocarp and deposited on the seed surface during development. Past evidence suggests that the protein may mediate the adherence or dehiscence of endocarp tissues during maturation and affect the lustre, or glossiness of the seed surface. Results A comparison of soybean germplasm by genomic DNA blot hybridization ...

  11. On surface approximation using developable surfaces

    Chen, H. Y.; Lee, I. K.; Leopoldseder, s.; Pottmann, H.; Randrup, Thomas; Wallner, S.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a method for approximating a given surface by a developable surface. It will be either a G(1) surface consisting of pieces of cones or cylinders of revolution or a G(r) NURBS developable surface. Our algorithm will also deal properly with the problems of reverse engineering and produce...

  12. Surface texture metrology for high precision surfaces

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido

    This paper introduces some of the challenges related to surface texture measurement of high precision surfaces. The paper is presenting two case studies related to polished tool surfaces and micro part surfaces. In both cases measuring instrumentation, measurement procedure and the measurement...

  13. On surface approximation using developable surfaces

    Chen, H. Y.; Lee, I. K.; Leopoldseder, S.; Pottmann, H.; Randrup, Thomas; Wallner, S.

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a method for approximating a given surface by a developable surface. It will be either a G_1 surface consisting of pieces of cones or cylinders of revolution or a G_r NURBS developable surface. Our algorithm will also deal properly with the problems of reverse engineering and produce...

  14. β-Microseminoprotein binds CRISP-3 in human seminal plasma

    Udby, Lene; Lundwall, Åke; Johnsen, Anders H.; Fernlund, Per; Valtonen-André, Camilla; Blom, Anna M.; Lilja, Hans; Borregaard, Niels; Kjeldsen, Lars; Bjartell, Anders

    2005-01-01

    β -Microseminoprotein (MSP) and cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) are abundant constituents of human seminal plasma. Immunoprecipitation and gel filtration of seminal plasma proteins combined with examination of the proteins in their pure form showed that MSP and CRISP-3 form stable, non-covalent complexes. CRISP-3 binds MSP with very high affinity, as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance. Due to far higher abundance of MSP in prostatic fluid, it manifests large overcapacity for C...

  15. Algebraically periodic translation surfaces

    Calta, Kariane; Smillie, John

    2007-01-01

    Algebraically periodic directions on translation surfaces were introduced by Calta in her study of genus two translation surfaces. We say that a translation surface with three or more algebraically periodic directions is an algebraically periodic surface. We show that for an algebraically periodic surface the slopes of the algebraically periodic directions are given by a number field which we call the periodic direction field. We show that translation surfaces with pseudo-Anosov automorphisms...

  16. Conchoid surfaces of spheres

    Peternell, Martin; Sendra, Juana

    2011-01-01

    The conchoid of a surface $F$ with respect to given fixed point $O$ is roughly speaking the surface obtained by increasing the radius function with respect to $O$ by a constant. This paper studies {\\it conchoid surfaces of spheres} and shows that these surfaces admit rational parameterizations. Explicit parameterizations of these surfaces are constructed using the relations to pencils of quadrics in $\\R^3$ and $\\R^4$. Moreover we point to remarkable geometric properties of these surfaces and their construction.

  17. Overview on surface representations for freeform surfaces

    Gross, H.; Brömel, A.; Beier, M.; Steinkopf, R.; Hartung, J.; Zhong, Y.; Oleszko, M.; Ochse, D.

    2015-09-01

    Freeform surfaces are a new and exciting opportunity in lens design. The technological boundary conditions for manufacturing surfaces with reduced symmetry are complicated. Recently the progress in understanding and controlling this kind of components is ready for use in commercial products. Nearly all procedures of classical design development are changing, if freeform surfaces are used. The mathematical description of the surfaces, the optimization algorithms in lens design and their convergence, the initial design approaches, the evaluation of performance over the field of view, the data transfer in the mechanical design software and in the manufacturing machines, the metrology for characterization of real surfaces and the return of the real surfaces into the simulation are affected. In this contribution, in particular an overview on possible mathematical formulations of the surfaces is given. One of the requirements on the descriptions is a good performance to correct optical aberrations. After fabrication of real surfaces, there are typical deviations seen in the shape. First more localized deformations are observed, which are only poorly described by mode expansions. Therefore a need in describing the surface with localized finite support exists. Secondly the classical diamond turning grinding process typically shows a regular ripple structure. These midfrequency errors are best described by special approaches. For all these cases it would be the best to have simple, robust solutions, that allow for fast calculation in fitting measured surfaces and in raytrace.

  18. Surfaces with Natural Ridges

    Brander, David; Markvorsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    We discuss surfaces with singularities, both in mathematics and in the real world. For many types of mathematical surface, singularities are natural and can be regarded as part of the surface. The most emblematic example is that of surfaces of constant negative Gauss curvature, all of which...

  19. Approximation by Cylinder Surfaces

    Randrup, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    We present a new method for approximation of a given surface by a cylinder surface. It is a constructive geometric method, leading to a monorail representation of the cylinder surface. By use of a weighted Gaussian image of the given surface, we determine a projection plane. In the orthogonal...... projection of the surface onto this plane, a reference curve is determined by use of methods for thinning of binary images. Finally, the cylinder surface is constructed as follows: the directrix of the cylinder surface is determined by a least squares method minimizing the distance to the points in the...

  20. Surface and Interfacial Forces

    Butt, Hans-Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    This systematic introduction to the topic includes theoretical concepts to help readers understand and predict surface forces, while also integrating experimental techniques and practical applications with up-to-date examples plus motivating exercises. Starting with intermolecular forces, the authors discuss different surfaces forces, with a major part devoted to surface forces between solid surfaces in liquid media. In addition, they cover surface forces between liquid-vapor interfaces and between liquid-liquid interfaces.

  1. Computer aided surface representation

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  2. Reactions at Solid Surfaces

    Ertl, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Expanding on the ideas first presented in Gerhard Ertl's acclaimed Baker Lectures at Cornell University, Reactions at Solid Surfaces comprises an authoritative, self-contained, book-length introduction to surface reactions for both professional chemists and students alike. Outlining our present understanding of the fundamental processes underlying reactions at solid surfaces, the book provides the reader with a complete view of how chemistry works at surfaces, and how to understand and probe the dynamics of surface reactions. Comparing traditional surface probes with more modern ones, and brin

  3. Regularity of Minimal Surfaces

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Tromba, Anthony J; Kuster, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    "Regularity of Minimal Surfaces" begins with a survey of minimal surfaces with free boundaries. Following this, the basic results concerning the boundary behaviour of minimal surfaces and H-surfaces with fixed or free boundaries are studied. In particular, the asymptotic expansions at interior and boundary branch points are derived, leading to general Gauss-Bonnet formulas. Furthermore, gradient estimates and asymptotic expansions for minimal surfaces with only piecewise smooth boundaries are obtained. One of the main features of free boundary value problems for minimal surfaces is t

  4. Advanced Surface Technology

    Møller, Per; Nielsen, Lars Pleht

    This new significant book on advanced modern surface technology in all its variations, is aimed at both teaching at engineering schools and practical application in industry. The work covers all the significant aspects of modern surface technology and also describes how new advanced techniques make...... the components. It covers everything from biocompatible surfaces of IR absorbent or reflective surfaces to surfaces with specific properties within low friction, hardness, corrosion, colors, etc. The book includes more than 400 pages detailing virtually all analysis methods for examining at surfaces....

  5. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Brown, Philip S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials to provide the low surface energy that, when combined with bioinspired surface topography, is the key to unlocking oil-repellency. This review presents the state-of-the-art in the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces.

  6. Laser textured surface gradients

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  7. Durable superoleophobic polypropylene surfaces.

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a popular plastic material used in consumer packaging. It would be desirable if such plastic containers were liquid repellent and not so easily fouled by their contents. Existing examples of superoleophobic surfaces typically rely on poorly adhered coatings or delicate surface structures, resulting in poor mechanical durability. Here, we report a facile method for creating superoleophobic PP surfaces via incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into the polymer surface. A solvent-NP-PP mixture was spin coated at high temperature to achieve the necessary roughness. Such surfaces were further functionalized with fluorosilane to result in a durable, super-repellent surface. They were also found to exhibit some repellency towards shampoos. This method of incorporating NPs into polymer surfaces could also prove useful in improving the anti-bacterial, mechanical and liquid-repellent properties of plastic devices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354730

  8. Apollo Surface Panoramas

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Apollo Surface Panoramas is a digital library of photographic panoramas that the Apollo astronauts took while exploring the Moon's surface. These images provide a...

  9. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  10. Biomaterials surface science

    Taubert, Andreas; Rodriguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an overview of the highly interdisciplinary field of surface science in the context of biological and biomedical applications. The covered topics range from micro- and nanostructuring for imparting functionality in a top-down manner to the bottom-up fabrication of gradient surfaces by self-assembly, from interfaces between biomaterials and living matter to smart, stimuli-responsive surfaces, and from cell and surface mechanics to the elucidation of cell-chip interactions in biomedical devices.

  11. Mapping leaf surface landscapes.

    Mechaber, W.L.; Marshall, D B; Mechaber, R A; Jobe, R T; Chew, F S

    1996-01-01

    Leaf surfaces provide the ecologically relevant landscapes to those organisms that encounter or colonize the leaf surface. Leaf surface topography directly affects microhabitat availability for colonizing microbes, microhabitat quality and acceptability for insects, and the efficacy of agricultural spray applications. Prior detailed mechanistic studies that examined particular fungi-plant and pollinator-plant interactions have demonstrated the importance of plant surface topography or roughne...

  12. Surface and Interface Characterisation

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    Surface physical analysis, i.e. topography characterisation, encompasses measurement, visualisation, and quantification. This is critical for both component form and for surface finish at macro-, micro- and nano-scales. The principal methods of surface topography measurement are stylus profilometry...... representing some average property of the surface under examination. Measurement methods, as well as their application and limitations, are briefly reviewed, including standardisation and traceability issues....

  13. Nuclear spins of surfaces

    Nuclear spin polarized atomic probes (alkali atoms) can be used to investigate the microscopic properties of solid surfaces. NMR and relaxation studies are discussed for nuclear spin polarized alkali atoms chemisorbed on hot metal surfaces. The use of nuclear spin-polarized radioactive nuclei, which allows the extension of this method to cold surfaces, is mentioned briefly. (orig.)

  14. Strongly irreducible surface automorphisms

    Schleimer, Saul

    2002-01-01

    A surface automorphism is strongly irreducible if every essential simple closed curve in the surface has nontrivial geometric intersection with its image. We show that a three-manifold admits only finitely many inequivalent surface bundle structures with strongly irreducible monodromy.

  15. Architectural Knitted Surfaces

    Mossé, Aurélie

    2010-01-01

    WGSN reports from the Architectural Knitted Surfaces workshop recently held at ShenkarCollege of Engineering and Design, Tel Aviv, which offered a cutting-edge insight into interactive knitted surfaces. With the increasing role of smart textiles in architecture, the Architectural Knitted Surfaces...

  16. Surface for dummies

    Rathbone, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Make Microsoft's Surface work-and play-just the way you want it to Microsoft's Surface tablet has the features and personality you're looking for, with a robust environment for business computing that doesn't skimp on fun. Surface for Dummies, 2nd Edition explains how Windows 8.1 Pro and Windows RT differ, and helps you decide which Surface model is best for you. Step by step, this book walks you through both the hardware and software features of the Surface, including the touch cover and type cover, Windows RT and Windows 8.1 Pro operating systems, and the coveted Office Home & Student 2013 s

  17. Computer aided surface representation

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  18. Simple views on surface stress and surface energy concepts

    Some aspects of the thermodynamics and mechanics of solid surfaces, in particular with respect to surface stress and surface energy, are reviewed. The purpose is to enlighten the deep differences between these two physical quantities. We consider successively the case of atomic flat surfaces and the case of vicinal surfaces characterized by surface stress discontinuities. Finally, experimental examples, concerning Si surfaces, are described. (review)

  19. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  20. Drops on hydrophobic surfaces & vibrated fluid surfaces

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein

    model can be used for determining a characteristic slip parameter, associated with slip lengths and drag reduction for hydrophobic surfaces. In situation b), we observe that the droplet oscillations (frequency, amplitude and decay time) in the potential is not linear with respect to the forcing, i...

  1. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Philip S. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials to provide the low surface energy that, when combined with bioinspired surface topography, is the key to unlocking oil-repellency. This review presents the state-of-the-art in the fabrication of superoleophobic surfaces.

  2. Ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces

    Skopenkov, Mikhail

    2011-10-30

    A Laguerre minimal surface is an immersed surface in ℝ 3 being an extremal of the functional ∫ (H 2/K-1)dA. In the present paper, we prove that the only ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces are up to isometry the surfaces ℝ (φλ) = (Aφ, Bφ, Cφ + D cos 2φ) + λ(sin φ, cos φ, 0), where A,B,C,D ε ℝ are fixed. To achieve invariance under Laguerre transformations, we also derive all Laguerre minimal surfaces that are enveloped by a family of cones. The methodology is based on the isotropic model of Laguerre geometry. In this model a Laguerre minimal surface enveloped by a family of cones corresponds to a graph of a biharmonic function carrying a family of isotropic circles. We classify such functions by showing that the top view of the family of circles is a pencil. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Mirror reactor surface study

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  4. Laser-surface interactions

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the interaction of laser radiation with various surfaces at variable parameters of radiation. As a basic principle of classification we chose the energetic or intensity level of interaction of laser radiation with the surfaces. These two characteristics of laser radiation are the most important parameters defining entire spectrum of the processes occurring on the surfaces during interaction with electromagnetic waves. This is a first book containing a whole spectrum of the laser-surface interactions distinguished by the ranges of used laser intensity. It combines the surface response starting from extremely weak laser intensities (~1 W cm-2) up to the relativistic intensities (~1020 W cm-2 and higher). The book provides the basic information about lasers and acquaints the reader with both common applications of laser-surface interactions (laser-related printers, scanners, barcode readers, discs, material processing, military, holography, medicine, etc) and unusual uses of the processes on t...

  5. Designing bioinspired superoleophobic surfaces

    Philip S. Brown; Bharat Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a range of functional surfaces, for example, water-repellent or superhydrophobic surfaces, most common among them the lotus leaf. While water-repellency is widespread in nature, oil-repellency is typically limited to surfaces submerged in water, such as fish scales. To achieve oleophobicity in air, inspiration must be taken from natural structures and chemistries that are not readily available in nature need to be introduced. Researchers usually turn to fluorinated materials t...

  6. Impact of surface chemistry

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2010-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  7. Divisors on Burniat surfaces

    Alexeev, Valery

    2013-01-01

    In this short note, we extend the results of [Alexeev-Orlov, 2012] about Picard groups of Burniat surfaces with $K^2=6$ to the cases of $2\\le K^2\\le 5$. We also compute the semigroup of effective divisors on Burniat surfaces with $K^2=6$. Finally, we construct an exceptional collection on a nonnormal semistable degeneration of a 1-parameter family of Burniat surfaces with $K^2=6$.

  8. Catastrophes in surface scattering

    Theoretical and experimental studies concerning atom-surface interactions in the energy range from hyperthermal to approximately 100 eV are reported. An extended study of the interaction of low energetic alkalis (sodium and potassium) with a silver crystal is presented. Finally the ultimate experimental result in this research, the first observation of catastrophes in surface scattering, is shown. The results clearly indicate the strength of the catastrophe analysis in gas-surface scattering. 218 refs.; 40 figs.; 170 schemes; 4 tabs

  9. Encyclopedia of analytical surfaces

    Krivoshapko, S N

    2015-01-01

    This encyclopedia presents an all-embracing collection of analytical surface classes. It provides concise definitions  and description for more than 500 surfaces and categorizes them in 38 classes of analytical surfaces. All classes are cross references to the original literature in an excellent bibliography. The encyclopedia is of particular interest to structural and civil engineers and serves as valuable reference for mathematicians.

  10. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    Sumetsky, M.; Fini, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger e...

  11. Demand and Supply Surfaces

    Ruiz Estrada, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows a new optical visualization of demand and supply based on the application of surfaces. The objective of initiating the demand and supply surfaces is to propose the application of multi-dimensional graphs among academics, economists and policy makers in the study of microeconomics and macroeconomics analyses in the short and long term. To create the demand and supply surfaces, this research suggests applying “the Infinity Cartesian space (I-Cartesian space)” (Ruiz 2006). In ap...

  12. Water near intracellular surfaces

    Parsegian, V A; Rau, D C

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we make the following points: Water is perturbed within several angstroms of the surfaces of soluble molecules. Removal of this water can require significant amounts of work, seen as an exponentially varying "hydration force" with respect to molecular separation. The favorable and specific attractions that occur in molecular assembly or in ligand binding imply that the specific association between the molecular surfaces is stronger than the association of those surfaces with wat...

  13. Cleaning and surface properties

    Taborelli, M

    2007-01-01

    Principles of precision cleaning for ultra high vacuum applications are reviewed together with the techniques for the evaluation of surface cleanliness. Methods to verify the effectiveness of cleaning procedures are discussed. Examples are presented to illustrate the influence of packaging and storage on the recontamination of the surface after cleaning. Finally, the effect of contamination on some relevant surface properties, like secondary electron emission and wettability is presented.

  14. Surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-07-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains on immersed substrates which can survive for days. They were first speculated to exist about 20 years ago, based on stepwise features in force curves between two hydrophobic surfaces, eventually leading to the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) image in 2000. While in the early years it was suspected that they may be an artifact caused by AFM, meanwhile their existence has been confirmed with various other methods, including through direct optical observation. Their existence seems to be paradoxical, as a simple classical estimate suggests that they should dissolve in microseconds, due to the large Laplace pressure inside these nanoscopic spherical-cap-shaped objects. Moreover, their contact angle (on the gas side) is much smaller than one would expect from macroscopic counterparts. This review will not only give an overview on surface nanobubbles, but also on surface nanodroplets, which are nanoscopic droplets (e.g., of oil) on (hydrophobic) substrates immersed in water, as they show similar properties and can easily be confused with surface nanobubbles and as they are produced in a similar way, namely, by a solvent exchange process, leading to local oversaturation of the water with gas or oil, respectively, and thus to nucleation. The review starts with how surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets can be made, how they can be observed (both individually and collectively), and what their properties are. Molecular dynamic simulations and theories to account for the long lifetime of the surface nanobubbles are then reported on. The crucial element contributing to the long lifetime of surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets is pinning of the three-phase contact line at chemical or geometric surface heterogeneities. The dynamical evolution of the surface nanobubbles then follows from the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation, and Henry's law. In particular, one obtains stable surface nanobubbles when the gas influx from

  15. Surface chemistry essentials

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  16. Surface science an introduction

    Hudson, John

    1991-01-01

    The whole field of surface science is covered in this work. Starting with a description of the structure and thermodynamics of clean surfaces, the book goes on to discuss kinetic theory of gases and molecular beam formation. This is followed by a largesection on gas-surface interactions, and another major section on energetic particle-surface interactions. The final chapter provides the background to crystal nucleation and growth. The approach adopted is interdisciplinary and slanted towards theexperimental side, with practical analytical techniques being used to illustrate general princi

  17. Pseudospherical surfaces with singularities

    Brander, David

    2016-01-01

    We study a generalization of constant Gauss curvature −1 surfaces in Euclidean 3-space, based on Lorentzian harmonic maps, that we call pseudospherical frontals. We analyse the singularities of these surfaces, dividing them into those of characteristic and non-characteristic type. We give methods...

  18. Anatomically Correct Surface Recovery

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Larsen, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for 3D surface recovery in partial surface scans. The method is based on an Active Shape Model, which is used to predict missing data. The model is constructed using a bootstrap framework, where an initially small collection of hand-annotated samples is used to fit to and...

  19. Histophilus somni Surface Proteins.

    Corbeil, Lynette B

    2016-01-01

    The pathogen surface is usually the first site of interaction with the host. Histophilus somni was earlier thought to only have an outer membrane on its surface. Now it is known that the surface is composed of many virulence factors, including outer membrane proteins, lipooligosaccharide or endotoxin, a fibrillar network, and an exopolysaccharide. Outer membrane blebs, endotoxin, the fibrillar network, and the exopolysaccharide are also shed from the surface. This review will focus on the surface proteins of this pathogen that may colonize the mucosal surface of ruminants as a commensal or may cause pneumonia, septicemia, myocarditis, thrombotic meningoencephalitis, arthritis, and/or abortion. The major outer membrane protein has been well studied. Since its size and epitopes vary from strain to strain, it may be useful for typing strains. Iron-regulated OMPs have also received much attention because of their role in iron uptake for in vivo growth of H. somni. Other OMPs may be protective, based on passive immunization with monospecific antibodies and active immunization experiments. The surface and shed fibrillar network has been shown to be an immunoglobulin-binding protein in that it binds bovine IgG2 by the Fc portion. Two repeat domains (DR1 and DR2) have cytotoxic Fic motifs. Vaccine studies with recombinant DR2 are promising. Studies of the bacterial genome as well as comparison of surface proteins of different strains from the various H. somni syndromes and carrier states will be discussed and have provided much insight into pathogenesis and protection. PMID:26728061

  20. Random surfaces and strings

    The theory of strings is the theory of random surfaces. I review the present attempts to regularize the world sheet of the string by triangulation. The corresponding statistical theory of triangulated random surfaces has a surprising rich structure, but the connection to conventional string theory seems non-trivial. (orig.)

  1. Response Surface Methodology

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This chapter first summarizes Response Surface Methodology (RSM), which started with Box and Wilson’s article in 1951 on RSM for real, non-simulated systems. RSM is a stepwise heuristic that uses first-order polynomials to approximate the response surface locally. An estimated polynomial m

  2. Surface miner MTS 1250

    Hoffmann, D. [MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Mining and Machinery Planning dept.

    1999-10-01

    The German manufacturer MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH has developed a new series of surface miners with capacities ranging between 500-2000 bm{sup 3}/h. The Surface Miner MTS 1250, launched at MINETIME '99, is described in this article. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  3. On rationally supported surfaces

    Gravesen, Jens; Juttler, B.; Sir, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the class of surfaces which are equipped with rational support functions. Any rational support function can be decomposed into a symmetric (even) and an antisymmetric (odd) part. We analyze certain geometric properties of surfaces with odd and even rational support functions. In partic...

  4. Surface crystallography of haematite

    The surface crystallography of haematite (α-Fe2O3) has been investigated for a number of faces using atomic resolution surface profile imaging and computer-simulated image-matching. A remarkable variety of surface depolarizing mechanisms was observed, which included monolayer relaxation and reconstruction, as well as oriented overgrowth with monolayer compound formation and essentially electronic transitions without significant atomic displacements which mechanisms were found to apply with different emphasis for different facets. The structural results are discussed in terms of surface depolarization including double-layer and electronic mechanisms, coherency strains for monolayer compound formation of spinel-type structure onto haematite, electro-induced and chemical oxygen desorption mechanisms. Comparisons of haematite and sapphire surface crystallographies has been included in the discussion. (authors) 16 refs., figs., 1 tab

  5. Electrohydrodynamics Near Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Maduar, S. R.; Belyaev, A. V.; Lobaskin, V.; Vinogradova, O. I.

    2015-03-01

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Defects at oxide surfaces

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  7. Surface preparation of niobium

    Any discussion of surface preparation for superconducting rf-surfaces is certainly connected with the question what is the best recipe for achieving high Q-values and high break-down fields. Since the break-down in a cavity is not understood so far and because several mechanisms play a role, it also is not possible to give one recipe which always works. Nevertheless in the past certain preparation techniques for niobium surfaces have been developed and certain rules for preparation can be applied. In the following the to-days state of the art will be described and it is attempted to give a short description of the surface in conjunction with the methods of surface treatments, which generally can be applied to niobium cavities. (orig./WTR)

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  9. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  10. Electrochemical approach for superoleophobic surfaces

    Bellanger, Hervé; Darmanin, Thierry; Guittard, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    International audience The obtaining of surfaces with superoleophobic properties is a very recent field of investigation. Oils have a low surface tension and thus a high ability to wet any surfaces. Surfaces that can repel oils must have peculiar surface roughness, as double scale (micro and nano) surface structuration and are consequently very difficult to produce. The elaboration of superoleophobic surfaces usually involves multi-step processes to create the surface morphology and to mod...

  11. Dynamics at Surfaces

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  12. Electrokinetics on superhydrophobic surfaces

    On a superhydrophobic surface a liquid is exposed to a large air-water interface. The reduced wall friction is expected to cause a higher electro-osmotic mobility. On the other hand, the low charge density of a superhydrophobic surface reduces the electro-osmotic mobility. Due to a lack of experimental data it has not been clear so far whether the reduced wall friction or the reduced charge density dominate the electrokinetic mobilities. To separate the relative contributions of electrophoresis and electro-osmosis, the mobilities of colloids on a negatively charged hydrophilic, a superhydrophobic (Cassie) and a partially hydrophilized superhydrophobic (Cassie composite) coating were measured. To vary the charge density as well as its sign with respect to those of the colloids the partially hydrophilized surfaces were coated with polyelectrolytes. We analyzed the electrokinetic mobilities of negatively charged polystyrene colloids dispersed in aqueous medium on porous hydrophilic and superhydrophobic surfaces by confocal laser scanning electron microscopy. In all cases, the external electric field was parallel to the surface. The total electrokinetic mobilities on the superhydrophobic (Cassie) and negatively charged partially hydrophilized (Cassie composite) surfaces were similar, showing that electro-osmosis is small compared to electrophoresis. The positively charged Cassie composite surfaces tend to ‘trap’ the colloids due to attracting electrostatic interactions and rough morphology, reducing the mobility. Thus, either the charge density of the coatings in the Cassie composite state or its slip length is too low to enhance electro-osmosis.

  13. Nonlinear surface electromagnetic phenomena

    Ponath, H-E

    1991-01-01

    In recent years the physics of electromagnetic surface phenomena has developed rapidly, evolving into technologies for communications and industry, such as fiber and integrated optics. The variety of phenomena based on electromagnetism at surfaces is rich and this book was written with the aim of summarizing the available knowledge in selected areas of the field. The book contains reviews written by solid state and optical physicists on the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves at and with surfaces and films. Both the physical phenomena and some potential applications are

  14. Surface modes in physics

    Sernelius, Bo E

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic surface modes are present at all surfaces and interfaces between material of different dielectric properties. These modes have very important effects on numerous physical quantities: adhesion, capillary force, step formation and crystal growth, the Casimir effect etc. They cause surface tension and wetting and they give rise to forces which are important e.g. for the stability of colloids.This book is a useful and elegant approach to the topic, showing how the concept of electromagnetic modes can be developed as a unifying theme for a range of condensed matter physics. The

  15. Nanoscale surface chemistry

    Madey, Theodore E.; Pelhos, Kalman; WU, QIFEI; Barnes, Robin; Ermanoski, Ivan; Chen, Wenhua; Kolodziej, Jacek J.; Rowe, John E.

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence in several experiments for nanometer-size effects in surface chemistry. The evidence concerns bimetallic systems, monolayer films of Pt or Pd on W(111) surfaces. Pyramidal facets with {211} faces are formed on annealing on physical monolayer of Pt, Pd on a W(111) substrate, and facet sizes increase with annealing temperature. We used synchrotron radiation-based soft x-ray photoemission to show that monolayer films of Pt, Pd, on W “float” on the outer surface, whereas multil...

  16. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  17. Surface science techniques

    Walls, JM

    2013-01-01

    This volume provides a comprehensive and up to the minute review of the techniques used to determine the nature and composition of surfaces. Originally published as a special issue of the Pergamon journal Vacuum, it comprises a carefully edited collection of chapters written by specialists in each of the techniques and includes coverage of the electron and ion spectroscopies, as well as the atom-imaging methods such as the atom probe field ion microscope and the scanning tunnelling microscope. Surface science is an important area of study since the outermost surface layers play a crucial role

  18. Characterisation of Functional Surfaces

    Lonardo, P.M.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bruzzone, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterisation of surfaces is of fundamental importance to control the manufacturing process and the functional performance of the part. Many applications concern contact and tribology problems, which include friction, wear and lubrication. This paper presents the techniques and instruments for...... characterisation of surfaces, discussing their operating principles and metrological properties. A review of the conventional 2D and new 3D roughness parameters is given, considering both the current standards and new proposals for texture quantification, with a particular attention to the methods orientated...... towards a functional characterisation of surfaces....

  19. SURFACE: a database of protein surface regions for functional annotation

    Ferrè, Fabrizio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Zanzoni, Andreas; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2004-01-01

    The SURFACE (SUrface Residues and Functions Annotated, Compared and Evaluated, URL http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/surface/) database is a repository of annotated and compared protein surface regions. SURFACE contains the results of a large-scale protein annotation and local structural comparison project. A non-redundant set of protein chains is used to build a database of protein surface patches, defined as putative surface functional sites. Each patch is annotated with sequence and structure-der...

  20. Prepotentials and Riemann surfaces

    Carroll, Robert

    1998-01-01

    We organize and review some material from various sources about prepotentials, Riemann surfaces and kernels, WDVV, and the renormalization group, provide some further connections and information, and indicate some directions and problems.

  1. Land Surface Weather Observations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  2. Lunar Surface Navigation Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To support extended lunar operations, precision localization and route mapping is required for planetary EVA, manned rovers and lunar surface mobility units. A...

  3. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    Murdoch, Naomi; Schwartz, Stephen R; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging towards a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that...

  4. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  5. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  6. Iowa Bedrock Surface Elevation

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface elevation in Iowa was compiled using all available data, principally information from GEOSAM, supplemented...

  7. Average nuclear surface properties

    The definition of the nuclear surface energy is discussed for semi-infinite matter. This definition is extended also for the case that there is a neutron gas instead of vacuum on the one side of the plane surface. The calculations were performed with the Thomas-Fermi Model of Syler and Blanchard. The parameters of the interaction of this model were determined by a least squares fit to experimental masses. The quality of this fit is discussed with respect to nuclear masses and density distributions. The average surface properties were calculated for different particle asymmetry of the nucleon-matter ranging from symmetry beyond the neutron-drip line until the system no longer can maintain the surface boundary and becomes homogeneous. The results of the calculations are incorporated in the nuclear Droplet Model which then was fitted to experimental masses. (orig.)

  8. Surfactants and Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Ferrari, Michele; Ravera, Francesca; Liggieri, Libero

    2006-01-01

    On superhydrophobic surfaces (contact angle with water greater than 150?), liquid drainage is enhanced with inhibition of adhesion phenomena: the small area shown when in contact with water make interactions in this environment usually strongly limited. The extreme hydrophobicity of a solid substrate is governed by chemical composition and geometrical structure of the surface including physico-chemical conditions acting from micro to nanoscale affecting the organisation of material at the int...

  9. Perspectives on surface nanobubbles

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    Materials of nanoscale size exhibit properties that macroscopic materials often do not have. The same holds for bubbles on the nanoscale: nanoscale gaseous domains on a solid-liquid interface have surprising properties. These include the shape, the long life time, and even superstability. Such so-called surface nanobubbles may have wide applications. This prospective article covers the basic properties of surface nanobubbles and gives several examples of potential nanobubble applications in n...

  10. Surface vortex solitons

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Egorov, Alexey A.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Torner, Lluis

    2006-01-01

    We discover the existence of vortex solitons supported by the surface between two optical lattices imprinted in Kerr-type nonlinear media. Such solitons can feature strongly noncanonical profiles, and we found that their properties are dictated by the location of the vortex core relative to the surface. The refractive index modulation forming the lattices at both sides of the interface results in complete stability of the vortex solitons in wide domains of their existence, thus introducing th...

  11. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface

    Pietro Cataldi; Bayer, Ilker S.; Roberto Cingolani; Sergio Marras; Ryad Chellali; Athanassia Athanassiou

    2016-01-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Ba...

  12. Surface modification of solids

    The use of ion beam and pulsed laser processing is reviewed for the near-surface modification of a wide range of materials. The techniques of ion implantation doping, ion beam and laser mixing, and pulsed-laser annealing are stressed with particular emphasis on the nonequilibrium aspects of these processing techniques and on new materials properties which can result. Examples are presented illustrating the utility of these techniques for fundamental materials research as well as practical surface modifications

  13. Lights Illuminate Surfaces Superluminally

    Nemiroff, Robert J; Lilleskov, Elias

    2015-01-01

    When a light bulb is turned on, light moves away from it at speed $c$, by definition. When light from this bulb illuminates a surface, however, this illumination front is not constrained to move at speed $c$. A simple proof is given that this illumination front always moves {\\it faster} than $c$. Generalized, when any compact light source itself varies, this information spreads across all of the surfaces it illuminates at speeds faster than light.

  14. Lights illuminate surfaces superluminally

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Zhong, Qi; Lilleskov, Elias

    2016-07-01

    When a light bulb is turned on, light moves away from it at speed c, by definition. When light from this bulb illuminates a surface, however, this illumination front is not constrained to move at speed c. A simple proof is given that this illumination front always moves faster than c. Generalized, when any compact light source itself varies, this information spreads across all of the surfaces it illuminates at speeds faster than light.

  15. Automated galaxy surface photometry

    Two-dimensional surface photometry of a very large number of galaxies on a deep Schmidt plate has been obtained using the Automatic Plate Measuring System (APM). A method of photometric calibration, suitable for APM measurements, via pixel-by-pixel comparison with CCD frames of a number of the brighter galaxies is described and its advantages are discussed. The same method is used to demonstrate the consistency of measurement of the APM machine when used for surface photometry. (author)

  16. Computer aided surface representation

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1989-02-09

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation and display of surfaces, interpolating to given information, in three or more dimensions. In a typical problem, we wish to create a surface from some discrete information. If this information is itself on another surface, the problem is to determine a surface defined on a surface,'' which is discussed below. Often, properties of an already constructed surface are desired: such geometry processing'' is described below. The Summary of Proposed Research from our original proposal describes the aims of this research project. This Summary and the Table of Contents from the original proposal are enclosed as an Appendix to this Progress Report. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through algorithms and computer graphics displays is utilized in the research. The wide range of activity, directed in both theory and applications, makes this project unique. Last month in the first Ardent Titan delivered in the State of Arizona came to our group, funded by the DOE and Arizona State University. Although the Titan is a commercial product, its newness requires our close collaboration with Ardent to maximize results. During the past year, four faculty members and several graduate research assistants have worked on this DOE project. The gaining of new professionals is an important aspect of this project. A listing of the students and their topics is given in the Appendix. The most significant publication during the past year is the book, Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design, by Dr. Gerald Farin. This 300 page volume helps fill a considerable gap in the subject and includes many new results on Bernstein-Bezier curves and surfaces.

  17. Large Curved Surface Measurement

    2002-01-01

    The measurement principle of large curved surface through theodolite industry survey system is introduced. Two methods are suggested with respect to the distribution range of curved surface error. The experiments show that the measurement precision can be up to 0.15mm with relative precision of 3×10-5. Finally, something needed paying attention to and the application aspects on theodolite industry survey system are given.

  18. Dyakonov surface waves

    Takayama, Osamu; Crasovan, Lucian Cornel; Johansen, Steffen Kjær;

    2008-01-01

    The interface of two semi-infinite media, where at least one of them is a birefringent crystal, supports a special type of surface wave that was predicted theoretically by D'yakonov in 1988. Since then, the properties of such waves, which exist in transparent media only under very special......, the existence of these surface waves in specific material examples is analyzed, discussing the challenge posed by their experimental observation....

  19. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    Murdoch, Naomi; Sanchez, Paul; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique micro-gravity environment that these bodies posses, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesised through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied ...

  20. Absolute surface energy determination

    Metois, J. J.; Muller, P.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental determination of absolute surface energies remains a challenge. We propose a simple method based on two independent measurements on 3D and 2D equilibrium shapes completed by the analysis of the thermal fluctuation of an isolated step. Using then basic equations (Wulff' theorem, Gibbs-Thomson equation, thermodynamics fluctuation of an isolated step) allows us to extract the absolute surface free energy of a singular face. The so-proposed method can be applied when (i) all orientat...

  1. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  2. Mars Surface Environmental Issues

    Charles, John

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration by astronauts will require extended periods of habitation on a planet's surface, under the influence of environmental factors that are different from those of Earth and the spacecraft that delivered the crew to the planet. Human exploration of Mars, a possible near-term planetary objective, can be considered a challenging scenario. Mission scenarios currently under consideration call for surface habitation periods of from 1 to 18 months on even the earliest expeditions. Methods: Environmental issues associated with Mars exploration have been investigated by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as part of the Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap Project (see http ://criticalpath.jsc.nasa.gov). Results: Arrival on Mars will immediately expose the crew to gravity only 38% of that at Earth's surface in possibly the first prolonged exposure to gravity other than the 1G of Earth's surface and the zero G of weightless space flight, with yet unknown effects on crew physiology. The radiation at Mars' surface is not well documented, although the planet's bulk and even its thin atmosphere may moderate the influx of galactic cosmic radiation and energetic protons from solar flares. Secondary radiation from activated components of the soil must also be considered. Ultrafine and larger respirable and nonrespirable particles in Martian dust introduced into the habitat after surface excursions may induce pulmonary inflammation exacerbated by the additive reactive and oxidizing nature of the dust. Stringent decontamination cannot eliminate mechanical and corrosive effects of the dust on pressure suits and exposed machinery. The biohazard potential of putative indigenous Martian microorganisms may be assessed by comparison with analog environments on Earth. Even in their absence, human microorganisms, if not properly controlled, can be a threat to the crew's health. Conclusions: Mars' surface offers a substantial challenge to the

  3. Surface chemistry theory and applications

    Bikerman, J J

    2013-01-01

    Surface Chemistry Theory and Applications focuses on liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-gas, solid-liquid, and solid-solid surfaces. The book first offers information on liquid-gas surfaces, including surface tension, measurement of surface tension, rate of capillarity rise, capillary attraction, bubble pressure and pore size, and surface tension and temperature. The text then ponders on liquid-liquid and solid-gas surfaces. Discussions focus on surface energy of solids, surface roughness and cleanness, adsorption of gases and vapors, adsorption hysteresis, interfacial tension, and interfacial t

  4. Stability of surface nanobubbles

    Maheshwari, Shantanu; van der Hoef, Martin; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the stability and dissolution of surface nanobubbles on the chemical heterogenous surface by performing Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of binary mixture consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. Recently our group has derived the exact expression for equilibrium contact angle of surface nanobubbles as a function of oversaturation of the gas concentration in bulk liquid and the lateral length of bubble. It has been showed that the contact line pinning and the oversaturation of gas concentration in bulk liquid is crucial in the stability of surface nanobubbles. Our simulations showed that how pinning of the three-phase contact line on the chemical heterogenous surface lead to the stability of the nanobubble. We have calculated the equilibrium contact angle by varying the gas concentration in bulk liquid and the lateral length of the bubble. Our results showed that the equilibrium contact angle follows the expression derived analytically by our group. We have also studied the bubble dissolution dynamics and showed the ''stick-jump'' mechanism which was also observed experimentally in case of dissolution of nanodrops.

  5. Oxidation of ruthenium surfaces

    Multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications are threatened by various deterioration processes of the surface. During exposure, the dominating contamination processes are carbonization and oxidation due to adsorption of hydrocarbons and oxygen and their reaction with the mirror surface, reducing the mirror lifetime. One possibility to extent the lifetime is to coat the mirror with a dedicated capping material, such as Si, Ti, Mo, Pd, Ru, or their oxides. To study the influence of oxidative species (O2 and H2O), in this work Ru single crystals were used as model systems for real mirror capping layers. The (0001) surface of a Ru single crystal was exposed to oxidative environments with a total pressure ranging from 10 9 mbar to 10-4 mbar and analyzed with low energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Depending on pressure and exposure, different surface reconstructions could be found. At oxygen partial pressures higher than 10-4 mbar and sufficiently long oxygen exposure, bulk oxide formed, the thickness of which was analyzed with ellipsometry. The oxidation behaviour of single crystalline surfaces was compared with the oxidation of thin evaporated Ru layers.

  6. Iron oxide surfaces

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  7. Surface-water surveillance

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995)

  8. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  9. Surface Hopping by Consensus.

    Martens, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    We present a new stochastic surface hopping method for modeling molecular dynamics with electronic transitions. The approach, consensus surface hopping (CSH), is a numerical framework for solving the semiclassical limit Liouville equation describing nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces using ensembles of trajectories. In contrast to existing techniques based on propagating independent classical trajectories that undergo stochastic hops between the electronic states, the present method determines the probabilities of transition of each trajectory collectively with input from the entire ensemble. The full coherent dynamics of the coupled system arise naturally at the ensemble level and ad hoc corrections, such as momentum rescaling to impose strict trajectory energy conservation and artificial decoherence to avoid the overcoherence of the quantum states associated with independent trajectories, are avoided. PMID:27345103

  10. Surface-water surveillance

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  11. Vortices on closed surfaces

    Boatto, Stefanella

    2008-01-01

    We consider $N$ point vortices $s_j$ of strengths $\\kappa_j$ moving on a closed (compact, boundaryless, orientable) surface $S$ with riemannian metric $g$. As far as we know, only the sphere or surfaces of revolution, the latter qualitatively, have been treated in the available literature. The aim of this note is to present an intrinsic geometric formulation for the general case. We give a simple proof of Kimura's conjecture that a dipole describes geodesic motion. Searching for integrable vortex pairs systems on Liouville surfaces is in order. The vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid extends Jacobi's geodesics. Is it Arnold-Liouville integrable? Not in our wildest dreams is another possibility: that quantizing a vortex system could relate with a million dollars worth question, but we took courage - nerve is more like it - to also present it.

  12. Dual surface interferometer

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  13. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design for the...... acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design was...... simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  14. Surface and nanomolecular catalysis

    Richards, Ryan

    2006-01-01

    Using new instrumentation and experimental techniques that allow scientists to observe chemical reactions and molecular properties at the nanoscale, the authors of Surface and Nanomolecular Catalysis reveal new insights into the surface chemistry of catalysts and the reaction mechanisms that actually occur at a molecular level during catalysis. While each chapter contains the necessary background and explanations to stand alone, the diverse collection of chapters shows how developments from various fields each contributed to our current understanding of nanomolecular catalysis as a whole. The

  15. Surfaces : works on paper

    Kivland, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The idea of ‘skin deep’ is a commonplace of our culture, but some thinkers have sought to overturn the notion of the superficial and place significance, complexity and profundity in the surface. Works in this exhibition engage with meaning captured in the surface. Curated by Steve Perfect and John McDowall as part of AMBruno. Kivland exhibited works from a series entitled 'Mes plus belles (1968)'. Working from her collection of French women’s magazines, published at particular moments of ...

  16. Photochemistry on solid surfaces

    Matsuura, T

    1989-01-01

    The latest developments in photochemistry on solid surfaces, i.e. photochemistry in heterogeneous systems, including liquid crystallines, are brought together for the first time in a single volume. Distinguished photochemists from various fields have contributed to the book which covers a number of important applications: molecular photo-devices for super-memory, photochemical vapor deposition to produce thin-layered electronic semiconducting materials, sensitive optical media, the control of photochemical reactions pathways, etc. Photochemistry on solid surfaces is now a major field and this

  17. Surface science techniques

    Bracco, Gianangelo

    2013-01-01

    The book describes the experimental techniques employed to study surfaces and interfaces. The emphasis is on the experimental method. Therefore all chapters start with an introduction of the scientific problem, the theory necessary to understand how the technique works and how to understand the results. Descriptions of real experimental setups, experimental results at different systems are given to show both the strength and the limits of the technique. In a final part the new developments and possible extensions of the techniques are presented. The included techniques provide microscopic as well as macroscopic information. They cover most of the techniques used in surface science.

  18. Quantizing Earth surface deformations

    C. O. Bowin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global analysis of Bowin (2010 used the global 14 absolute Euler pole set (62 Myr history from Gripp and Gordon (1990 and demonstrated that plate tectonics conserves angular momentum. We herein extend that analysis using the more detailed Bird (2003 52 present-day Euler pole set (relative to a fixed Pacific plate for the Earth's surface, after conversion to absolute Euler poles. Additionally, new analytical results now provide new details on upper mantle mass anomalies in the outer 200 km of the Earth, as well as an initial quantizing of surface deformations.

  19. Supersymmetric null-surfaces

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    Single trace operators with the large R-charge in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory correspond to the null-surfaces in $AdS_5\\times S^5$. We argue that the moduli space of the null-surfaces is the space of contours in the super-Grassmanian parametrizing the complex $(2|2)$-dimensional subspaces of the complex $(4|4)$-dimensional space. The odd coordinates on this super-Grassmanian correspond to the fermionic degrees of freedom of the superstring.

  20. Emerging trends in surface metrology

    Lonardo, P.M.; Lucca, D.A.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    Recent advancements and some emerging trends in the methods and instruments used for surface and near surface characterisation are presented, considering the measurement of both topography and physical properties. In particular, surfaces that present difficulties in measurement or require new...

  1. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures

  2. Tritium-surface interactions

    The report deals broadly with tritium-surface interactions as they relate to a fusion power reactor enterprise, viz., the vacuum chamber, first wall, peripherals, pumping, fuel recycling, isotope separation, repair and maintenance, decontamination and safety. The main emphasis is on plasma-surface interactions and the selection of materials for fusion chamber duty. A comprehensive review of the international (particularly U.S.) research and development is presented based upon a literature review (about 1 000 reports and papers) and upon visits to key laboratories, Sandia, Albuquerque, Sandia, Livermore and EGβG Idaho. An inventory of Canadian expertise and facilities for RβD on tritium-surface interactions is also presented. A number of proposals are made for the direction of an optimal Canadian RβD program, emphasizing the importance of building on strength in both the technological and fundamental areas. A compendium of specific projects and project areas is presented dealing primarily with plasma-wall interactions and permeation, anti-permeation materials and surfaces and health, safety and environmental considerations. Potential areas of industrial spinoff are identified

  3. Laser surface cleaning

    The objective of this work is a laboratory demonstration that red-lead primer and two-part epoxy paints can be stripped from concrete and metal surfaces using surface cleaning systems based on pulsed-repetition CO2 lasers. The three goals are to: (1) demonstrate coatings removal, including surface pore cleaning; (2) demonstrate that there is negligible release of ablated contaminants to the environment; and (3) demonstrate that the process will generate negligible amounts of additional waste compared to competing technologies. Phase 1 involved site visits to RMI and Fernald to assess the cleaning issues for buildings and parts. In addition, Phase 1 included detailed designs of a more powerful system for industrial cleaning rates, including laser, articulating optics, ablated-material capture suction nozzle attached to a horizontal raster scanner for floor cleaning, and filtration system. Some concept development is also being done for using robots, and for parts cleaning. In Phase 2 a transportable 6 kW system will be built and tested, with a horizontal surface scanner for cleaning paint from floors. The laboratory tests will again be instrumented. Some concept development will continue for using robots, and for parts cleaning. This report describes Phase 1 results

  4. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  5. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-25

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, so-called panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects.

  6. Optimization of surface maintenance

    The present conference paper deals with methods of optimizing the surface maintenance of steel-made offshore installations. The paper aims at identifying important approaches to the problems regarding the long-range planning of an economical and cost effective maintenance program. The methods of optimization are based on the obtained experiences from the maintenance of installations on the Norwegian continental shelf. 3 figs

  7. Wetting of real surfaces

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  8. Paneling architectural freeform surfaces

    Eigensatz, Michael

    2010-07-26

    The emergence of large-scale freeform shapes in architecture poses big challenges to the fabrication of such structures. A key problem is the approximation of the design surface by a union of patches, socalled panels, that can be manufactured with a selected technology at reasonable cost, while meeting the design intent and achieving the desired aesthetic quality of panel layout and surface smoothness. The production of curved panels is mostly based on molds. Since the cost of mold fabrication often dominates the panel cost, there is strong incentive to use the same mold for multiple panels. We cast the major practical requirements for architectural surface paneling, including mold reuse, into a global optimization framework that interleaves discrete and continuous optimization steps to minimize production cost while meeting user-specified quality constraints. The search space for optimization is mainly generated through controlled deviation from the design surface and tolerances on positional and normal continuity between neighboring panels. A novel 6-dimensional metric space allows us to quickly compute approximate inter-panel distances, which dramatically improves the performance of the optimization and enables the handling of complex arrangements with thousands of panels. The practical relevance of our system is demonstrated by paneling solutions for real, cutting-edge architectural freeform design projects. © 2010 ACM.

  9. Biofunctional surface engineering

    Scholz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceRegulatory issuesSterilization of combination devicesPolyelectrolyte monolayers (I)Polyelectrolyte monolayers (II)Surface modificationsThree dimensional characterization of immobilized biomolecules Aptamers for biofunctionalization of stentsCoating of implants with antibioticsMicroneedles and nanopatchesfor vaccinationMicrochips for antibody binding analysesBiofunctionalized wound dressingsExtracorporeal device for trapping circulating tumor cellsOutlook

  10. Surface tension and microgravity

    The behaviour of confined liquids on board an orbiting spacecraft is mainly driven by surface tension phenomena, which cause an apparently anomalous response of the liquid when compared with the behaviour that can be observed on an Earth laboratory provided that the amount of liquid is high enough. The reason is that in an orbiting spacecraft the different inertial forces acting on the bulk of the liquid are almost zero, causing thus capillary forces to be the dominant ones. Of course, since gravity forces are proportional to the liquid volume, whereas surface tension forces are proportional to the liquid surface, there are situations on Earth where capillarity can be the dominant effect, as it happens when very small volume liquid samples are considered. However, work with small size samples may require the use of sophisticated optical devices. Leaving aside the neutral buoyancy technique, a way of handling large liquid interfaces is by using drop towers, where the sample falls subjected to the action of Earth’s gravity. This approach is suitable when the characteristic time of the problem under consideration is much smaller than the drop time. In this work the transformation of an out-of-use chimney into a drop tower is presented. Because of the miniaturization, hardiness and low cost of current electronic devices, a drop tower can be used as an inexpensive tool for undergraduate students to experimentally analyse a large variety of surface tension driven phenomena. (paper)

  11. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface

    Cataldi, Pietro; Bayer, Ilker S.; Cingolani, Roberto; Marras, Sergio; Chellali, Ryad; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-06-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Based on detailed X-ray diffraction measurements, this long-lasting, repeatable and hysteresis-free thermochromic effect is attributed to the enhancement of the Bragg peak associated with the d-spacing of interchain directional packing (100) which remains unaltered during several heating-cooling cycles. We propose that the superhydrophobic surface confines π–π interchain stacking in P3HT with uniform d-spacing into its nanostructured texture resulting in better packing and reduction in face-on orientation. The rapid response of the system to sudden temperature changes is also demonstrated by water droplet impact and bounce back on heated surfaces. This effect can be exploited for embedded thin film temperature sensors for metal coatings.

  12. Critical Heegaard Surfaces and Index 2 Minimal Surfaces

    Bachman, David

    2002-01-01

    This paper contains the motivation for the study of critical surfaces. In previous work the only justification given for the definition of this new class of surfaces is the strength of the results. However, when viewed as the topological analogue to index 2 minimal surfaces, critical surfaces become quite natural.

  13. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    Chen, Fan W., E-mail: fanchen@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Jauregui, Luis A. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Tan, Yaohua [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Manfra, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Klimeck, Gerhard [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Chen, Yong P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Kubis, Tillmann [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects.

  14. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    Chen, Fan W.; Jauregui, Luis A.; Tan, Yaohua; Manfra, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Chen, Yong P.; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-09-01

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi2Te3 nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects.

  15. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi2Te3 nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects

  16. Invariants of Lagrangian surfaces

    Yau, Mei-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We define a nonnegative integer $\\la(L,L_0;\\phi)$ for a pair of diffeomorphic closed Lagrangian surfaces $L_0,L$ embedded in a symplectic 4-manifold $(M,\\w)$ and a diffeomorphism $\\phi\\in\\Diff^+(M)$ satisfying $\\phi(L_0)=L$. We prove that if there exists $\\phi\\in\\Diff^+_o(M)$ with $\\phi(L_0)=L$ and $\\la(L,L_0;\\phi)=0$, then $L_0,L$ are symplectomorphic. We also define a second invariant $n(L_1,L_0;[L_t])=n(L_1,L_0,[\\phi_t])$ for a smooth isotopy $L_t=\\phi_t(L_0)$ between two Lagrangian surfac...

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...... application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model of a...... output waveguide and the MZI can thus be used as an optical switch. It is explained how the mechanical model of the SAW is coupled to a model of the optical waves such that the change in effective refractive index introduced in the MZI arms by the SAW can be calculated. Results of a parameter study of...

  18. Surface Plasmon Nanophotonics

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2007-01-01

    The development of advanced dielectric photonic structures has enabled tremendous control over the propagation and manipulation of light. Structures such as waveguides, splitters, mixers, and resonators now play a central role in the telecommunications industry. This book will discuss an exciting new class of photonic devices, known as surface plasmon nanophotonic structures. Surface plasmons are easily accessible excitations in metals and semiconductors and involve a collective motion of the conduction electrons. These excitations can be exploited to manipulate electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies ("light") in new ways that are unthinkable in conventional dielectric structures. The field of plasmon nanophotonics is rapidly developing and impacting a wide range of areas including: electronics, photonics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The book will highlight several exciting new discoveries that have been made, while providing a clear discussion of the underlying physics, the nanofabrication issues...

  19. Surface decontamination compositions and methods

    Wright; Karen E.; Cooper, David C.; Peterman, Dean R.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Tripp, Julia L.; Hull, Laurence C.

    2011-03-29

    Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

  20. Picard numbers of quintic surfaces

    Schutt, M.

    2014-01-01

    We solve the Picard number problem for complex quintic surfaces by proving that every number between 1 and 45 occurs as Picard number of a quintic surface over the rationals. Our main technique consists in arithmetic deformations of Delsarte surfaces, but we also use K3 surfaces and wild automorphisms.

  1. Drop Impact on Superheated Surfaces

    Tran, A.T.; Staat, H.J.J.; Prosperetti, A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.

    2012-01-01

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid’s boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface (“contact boiling”), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back (“gentle film

  2. Surface piercing propeller performance

    Peterson, Derek T.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis addresses possible improvements in the efficiency (thrust) of surface piercing propellers; in particular with respect to the angle of the propeller shaft came to mind. Preliminary calculations based on the basic pitch/diameter geometry suggest that about 3-5% efficiency is lost if the shaft is parallel to the flow, compared to skewed a few degrees in the "paddlewheel" direction at certain speeds. More accurate calculations based on the lift characteristics of each blade, on the an...

  3. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Homola, Jiří

    MALDEN: WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2009. Roč. 276, Suppl. 1 (2009), s. 63-63. ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation-of-European-Biochemical-Societies /34.00/. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * Biosensor * Protein detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  4. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Kvasnička, Pavel

    Bellingham: SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007 - (Cutolo, A.; Culshaw, B.; Lopéz-Higuera, J.), s. 661909.1-661909.6. (Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 6619). ISBN 978-0-8194-6761-4. ISSN 0277-786X. [EWOFS 2007 - European Workshop on Optical Fibre Sensors /3./. Napoli (IT), 04.07.2007-06.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * biosensors * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation

  5. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    Homola, Jiří

    Praha: Agentura Action M, 2006. 3--. [Czech-Polish-Slovak Optical Conference Wave and Quantum Aspects of Contemporary Optics /15./. 11.09.2006-15.09.2006, Liberec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/05/0628; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400500507 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : optical sensors * biosensors * surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Surface Mapping using Quadcopter

    Haugen, Kenneth Eide

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the use of unmanned aerial vehicles to perform ice managementin the Arctic Ocean by gathering information about and physically control the iceenvironment. Such a system is needed for safety reasons as marine operations aremoving further north. In order to gather information about the ice environment, aUAV will be used for surface mapping. The quadcopter Parrot AR. Drone 2.0 will be used as a testbed for implementing proposed strategies for guidance, navigation and control ...

  7. Minimal Surfaces for Stereo

    Cohen, Michael F.; Buehler, Chris; Gortler, Steven; Mcmillan, Leonard

    2002-01-01

    Determining shape from stereo has often been posed as a global minimization problem. Once formulated, the minimization problems are then solved with a variety of algorithmic approaches. These approaches include techniques such as dynamic programming min-cut and alpha-expansion. In this paper we show how an algorithmic technique that constructs a discrete spatial minimal cost surface can be brought to bear on stereo global minimization problems. This problem can then be reduced to a single min...

  8. Fermi surface of yttrium

    Kontrym-Sznajd, G. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych; Sormann, H. [Technische Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; West, R.N. [Texas Univ., Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    Electron-positron momentum densities in Y, reconstructed from two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectra, are compared with the theoretical predictions of fully-relativistic augmented plane-wave calculations. Knowledge of the theoretical densities and of the effects on them of certain symmetry selection rules has allowed us to separate two hole Fermi surfaces in the third and fourth bands and to establish some Fermi momenta for each of them. (orig.)

  9. Music Mixing Surface

    Gelineck, Steven; Büchert, Morten; Andersen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-touch based interface for mixing music. The goal of the interface is to provide users with a more intuitive control of the music mix by implementing the so-called stage metaphor control scheme, which is especially suitable for multi-touch surfaces. Specifically, we...... discuss functionality important for the professional music technician (main target user) - functionality, which is especially challenging to integrate when implementing the stage metaphor. Finally we propose and evaluate solutions to these challenges....

  10. Surface plasmon enhanced LED

    Vučković, Jelena; Lončar, Marko; Painter, Oskar; Scherer, Axel

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only given. We designed and fabricated an LED based on a thin semiconductor membrane (λ/2) with silver mirrors. A large spontaneous emission enhancement and a high modulation speed are obtainable due to the strong localization of the electromagnetic field in the microcavity. The coupling to surface plasmon modes which are subsequently scattered out by means of a grating is used to improve the extraction efficiency of the LED. The bottom mirror is thick and unpatterned. The top mi...