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Sample records for 28-day repeat dose

  1. Acute and repeated dose (28 days) oral safety studies of ALIBIRD in rats.

    Anadón, Arturo; Martínez, María A; Ares, Irma; Castellano, Victor; Martínez-Larrañaga, Maria R; Corzo, Nieves; Olano, Agustin; Montilla, Antonia; Recio, Isidra; Martínez-Maqueda, Daniel; Miralles, Beatriz; Fornari, Tiziana; García-Risco, Mónica R; Gonzalez, Monserrat; Reglero, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    ALIBIRD, a test substance composed of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, a hydrolysate of a whey protein concentrate, and a supercritical extract of rosemary (1:0.5:0.05), was prepared in the laboratory and evaluated for its safety as a multifunctional food additive. In oral toxicity studies (acute and 28 days repeated dose) using Wistar rats, ALIBIRD was administered in a single oral gavage dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight and resulted in no adverse events or mortality; a daily dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight for 28 days by gavage also resulted in no adverse effects or mortality. No abnormal clinical signs, behavioral changes, body weight changes, or changes in food and water consumption occurred in either study. There were no changes in hematological and serum chemistry values, organ weights, or gross or histological characteristics. Based on test results, it is concluded that ALIBIRD is well tolerated in rats at an acute and subchronic (28 days) dose of 2,000 mg/kg of body weight. PMID:23834798

  2. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    Ramaswamy Ramaswamy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuna Kadugu (NK, a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats

  3. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    2010-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... study in rodents. 799.9305 Section 799.9305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (9) Pathology—(i)Gross necropsy....

  4. Repeated Dose 28-Days Oral Toxicity Study of Carica papaya L. Leaf Extract in Sprague Dawley Rats

    Hussin Muhammad

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Carica papaya L. leaves have been used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of fevers and cancers. Despite its benefits, very few studies on their potential toxicity have been described. The aim of the present study was to characterize the chemical composition of the leaf extract from ‘Sekaki’ C. papaya cultivar by UPLC-TripleTOF-ESI-MS and to investigate the sub-acute oral toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 0.01, 0.14 and 2 g/kg by examining the general behavior, clinical signs, hematological parameters, serum biochemistry and histopathology changes. A total of twelve compounds consisting of one piperidine alkaloid, two organic acids, six malic acid derivatives, and four flavonol glycosides were characterized or tentatively identified in the C. papaya leaf extract. In the sub-acute study, the C. papaya extract did not cause mortality nor were treatment-related changes in body weight, food intake, water level, and hematological parameters observed between treatment and control groups. Some biochemical parameters such as the total protein, HDL-cholesterol, AST, ALT and ALP were elevated in a non-dose dependent manner. Histopathological examination of all organs including liver did not reveal morphological alteration. Other parameters showed non-significant differences between treatment and control groups. The present results suggest that C. papaya leaf extract at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in practical use in traditional medicine in Malaysia could be considered safe as a medicinal agent.

  5. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome. PMID:26525505

  6. Acute and 28-day repeated dose toxicology studies in mice with aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase (AAD-1) protein expressed in 2,4-D tolerant DAS-40278-9 maize.

    Stagg, Nicola J; Thomas, Johnson; Herman, Rod A; Juberg, Daland R

    2012-03-01

    DAS-40278-9 maize (corn) plants have been genetically modified by the insertion of the aad-1 gene (aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase), which confers tolerance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and aryloxyphenoxypropionate (AOPP) acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors ("fop" herbicides) to enable the effective use of these herbicides on maize. The aad-1 gene, derived from Sphingobium herbicidovorans, encodes the aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase (AAD-1) enzyme. As part of the safety assessment of the AAD-1 protein expressed in maize, acute and repeated dose mammalian toxicology studies were conducted. AAD-1 protein (heterologously produced) was orally administered to mice at a dose of 2000mg/kg, and no acute lethality or adverse effects were observed. Similarly, no adverse effects were observed in mice in a 28-day repeated-dose dietary toxicity study that incorporated the AAD-1 protein into diets at concentrations up to 1000-fold greater than the highest estimate of human exposure to maize. These results support the conclusion that the AAD-1 protein, as expressed in biotechnology derived DAS-40278-9 maize, represents a negligible risk to human health. PMID:22100718

  7. Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in Wistar rats with a mixture of five pesticides often found as residues in food: alphacypermethrin, bromopropylate, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos and mancozeb

    Jacobsen, H.; Østergaard, G.; Lam, Henrik Rye; Poulsen, Mette Erecius; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Ladefoged, Ole; Meyer, Otto A.

    2004-01-01

    Six dose groups of 8 male and female rats respectively received a daily dose equivalent to 0, 0.15, 0.006, 0.03, 0.15 or 0.3 mg/kg b.w./day chlorpyrifos (groups 1-6) and the last four dose groups (groups 3-6) received in addition daily doses equivalent to 18 mg/kg b.w./day alphacypermethrin, 30 m...

  8. Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in Wistar rats with a mixture of five pesticides often found as residues in food: alphacypermethrin, bromopropylate, carbendazim, chlorpyrifos and mancozeb

    Jacobsen, H.; Østergaard, G.; Lam, Henrik Rye;

    2004-01-01

    Six dose groups of 8 male and female rats respectively received a daily dose equivalent to 0, 0.15, 0.006, 0.03, 0.15 or 0.3 mg/kg b.w./day chlorpyrifos (groups 1-6) and the last four dose groups (groups 3-6) received in addition daily doses equivalent to 18 mg/kg b.w./day alphacypermethrin, 30 mg...... acetylcholinesterase activity in plasma and brain by chlorpyrifos was not enhanced by coadministration of the other four pesticides. Effects were seen in liver, thyroid, thymus and blood in the combination groups. However, identification of the pesticide(s) responsible for these changes would require further studies...

  9. A 28-day repeat dose toxicity study of steroidal glycoalkaloids a-solanine and a-chaconine in the Syrian Golden Hamster

    Langkilde, S.; Mandimika, T.; Schroder, M.; Meyer, O.; Slob, W.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Poulsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Glycoalkaloids ¿-solanine and ¿-chaconine are naturally present toxicants in the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum). Human intake of high doses of glycoalkaloids has led to acute intoxication, in severe cases coma and death. Previous studies have indicated that the ratio of ¿-solanine to ¿-chaconine m

  10. A 28-day repeat dose toxicity study of steroidal glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine in the Syrian Golden hamster

    Langkilde, Søren; Mandimika, T.; Schrøder, Malene;

    2009-01-01

    resulted in distended and fluid filled small intestines and stomach. Animals receiving the ratio with the reduced content of alpha-solanine were less affected compared to those receiving the other ratio. Gene expression profiling experiments were conducted using RNA from epithelial scrapings from the small...... intestines of the hamsters administered the highest doses of the glycoalkaloid treatments. In general, more differential gene expression was observed in the epithelial scrapings of the hamsters fed the ratio of 1:3.7. Mostly, pathways involved in lipid and energy metabolism were affected by the ratio of 1:3.7....

  11. Differences in gene expression profiles in the liver between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic isomers of compounds given to rats in a 28-day repeat-dose toxicity study.

    Nakayama, Koji; Kawano, Yukiko; Kawakami, Yuuki; Moriwaki, Norichika; Sekijima, Masaru; Otsuka, Masanori; Yakabe, Yoshikuni; Miyaura, Hideki; Saito, Koichi; Sumida, Kayo; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2006-12-15

    Some compounds have structural isomers of which one is apparently carcinogenic, and the other not. Because of the similarity of their chemical structures, comparisons of their effects can allow gene expression elicited in response to the basic skeletons of the isomers to be disregarded. We compared the gene expression profiles of male Fischer 344 rats administered by daily oral gavage up to 28 days using an in-house oligo microarray. 2-Acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), 2-nitropropane (2-NP), and 2-nitro-p-phenylenediamine (2-NpP) are hepatocarcinogenic. However, their isomers, 4-acetylaminofluorene (4-AAF), 2,6-diaminotoluene (2,6-DAT), 1-nitropropane (1-NP), and 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (4-NoP), are non-hepatocarcinogenic. Because of the limited carcinogenicity of 2-NpP, we attempted to perform two-parametric comparison analyses with (1) a set of 4 isomers: 2-AAF, 2,4-DAT, 2-NP, and 2-NpP as "carcinogenic", and 4-AAF, 2,6-DAT, 1-NP, and 4-NoP as "non-carcinogenic"; and (2) a set of 3 isomers: 2-AAF, 2,4-DAT, and 2-NP, as "carcinogenic", and 4-AAF, 2,6-DAT, and 1-NP as "non-carcinogenic". After ratio filtering and Welch's approximate t-test analysis, 54 and 28 genes were selected from comparisons between the sets of 3 and 4 isomers, respectively, for day 28 data. Using hierarchical clustering analysis with the 54 or 28 genes, 2-AAF, 2,4-DAT, and 2-NP clustered into a "carcinogenic" branch. 2-NpP was in the same cluster as 4-NoP and 4-AAF. This clustering corresponded to the previous finding that 2-NpP is not carcinogenic in male Fischer 344 rats, which indicates that comparing the differences in gene expression elicited by different isomers is an effective method of developing a prediction system for carcinogenicity. PMID:17070881

  12. Genotoxic effects of chromium oxide nanoparticles and microparticles in Wistar rats after 28 days of repeated oral exposure.

    Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Kamal, Sarika Srinivas Kalyan; Rahman, M F; Mahboob, M; Grover, Paramjit

    2016-02-01

    The nanotechnology industry has advanced rapidly in the last 10 years giving rise to the growth of the nanoparticles (NPs) with great potential in various arenas. However, the same properties that make NPs interesting raise concerns because their toxicity has not been explored. The in vivo toxicology of chromium oxide (Cr2O3)-NPs is not known till date. Therefore, this study investigated the 28-day repeated toxicity after 30, 300 and 1000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day oral treatment with Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3 microparticles (MPs) in Wistar rats. The mean size of Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3-MPs was 34.89 ± 2.65 nm and 3.76 ± 3.41 μm, respectively. Genotoxicity was assessed using comet, micronucleus and chromosomal aberration (CA) assays. The results revealed a significant increase in DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes and liver, micronuclei and CA in bone marrow after exposure of 300 and 1000 mg/kg doses of Cr2O3-NPs and Cr2O3-MPs only at 1000 mg/kg bw/day. Cr biodistribution was observed in all the tissues in a dose-dependent manner. The maximum amount of Cr was found in the kidneys and least in the brain of the treated rats. More of the Cr was excreted in the faeces than in the urine. Furthermore, nanotreated rats displayed much higher absorption and tissue accumulation. These findings provide initial data of the probable genotoxicity and biodistribution of NPs and MPs of Cr2O3 generated through repeated oral treatment. PMID:26503004

  13. Distribution of silver in rats following 28 days of repeated oral exposure to silver nanoparticles or silver acetate

    Mortensen Alicja; Vogel Ulla; Gao Xueyun; Larsen Agnete; Qvortrup Klaus; Hadrup Niels; Loeschner Katrin; Lam Henrik; Larsen Erik H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The study investigated the distribution of silver after 28 days repeated oral administration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver acetate (AgAc) to rats. Oral administration is a relevant route of exposure because of the use of silver nanoparticles in products related to food and food contact materials. Results AgNPs were synthesized with a size distribution of 14 ± 4 nm in diameter (90% of the nanoparticle volume) and stabilized in aqueous suspension by the polymer ...

  14. Distribution of silver in rats following 28 days of repeated oral exposure to silver nanoparticles or silver acetate

    Mortensen Alicja

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study investigated the distribution of silver after 28 days repeated oral administration of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and silver acetate (AgAc to rats. Oral administration is a relevant route of exposure because of the use of silver nanoparticles in products related to food and food contact materials. Results AgNPs were synthesized with a size distribution of 14 ± 4 nm in diameter (90% of the nanoparticle volume and stabilized in aqueous suspension by the polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The AgNPs remained stable throughout the duration of the 28-day oral toxicity study in rats. The organ distribution pattern of silver following administration of AgNPs and AgAc was similar. However the absolute silver concentrations in tissues were lower following oral exposure to AgNPs. This was in agreement with an indication of a higher fecal excretion following administration of AgNPs. Besides the intestinal system, the largest silver concentrations were detected in the liver and kidneys. Silver was also found in the lungs and brain. Autometallographic (AMG staining revealed a similar cellular localization of silver in ileum, liver, and kidney tissue in rats exposed to AgNPs or AgAc. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nanosized granules were detected in the ileum of animals exposed to AgNPs or AgAc and were mainly located in the basal lamina of the ileal epithelium and in lysosomes of macrophages within the lamina propria. Using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy it was shown that the granules in lysosomes consisted of silver, selenium, and sulfur for both AgNP and AgAc exposed rats. The diameter of the deposited granules was in the same size range as that of the administered AgNPs. No silver granules were detected by TEM in the liver. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrate that the organ distribution of silver was similar when AgNPs or AgAc were administered orally to rats. The presence of silver

  15. The benchmark approach applied to a 28-day toxicity study with Rhodorsil Silane in rats. the impact of increasing the number of dose groups.

    Woutersen, R A; Jonker, D; Stevenson, H; te Biesebeek, J D; Slob, W

    2001-07-01

    The OECD study design, aimed at obtaining a no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL), may be suboptimal for deriving a benchmark dose. Therefore the present subacute (28-day) study was carried out to evaluate a multiple dose study design and to compare the results with the common OECD design. Seven groups of 10 female rats each were intragastrically administered corn oil without (controls) or with 50, 150, 300, 450, 600 or 750 mg Rhodorsil Silane/kg body weight/day, once daily (7 days/week) for 4 weeks. From the complete dataset, two subsets were selected, one representing a study design with seven dose groups of five animals (7 x 5 design), the other representing a study design with four dose groups of 10 animals (4 x 10 design). Under the conditions of the present study, the NOAEL for Rhodorsil Silane 198 was assessed at 50 mg/kg body weight/day, based on the data of the 4 x 10 design. The benchmark approach resulted in a benchmark dose of 19 mg/kg body weight/day, based on the data of the 7 x 5 design. Comparison of the results demonstrated that the multiple dose (7 x 5) design led to a more reliable result than the OECD (4 x 10) design, despite the smaller total number of animals. The dose-response analysis showed that at "the NOAEL" the effect on relative spleen weight was larger than 10%, illustrating that at the NOAEL, adverse effects may occur. PMID:11397516

  16. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3+ apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB+ interneurons, although the number of reelin+ interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of cholinergic

  17. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshinori [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Shibutani, Makoto, E-mail: mshibuta@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB{sup +} interneurons, although the number of reelin{sup +} interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of

  18. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study. PMID:25892624

  19. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study of ispinesib, a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor, administered on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day schedule in patients with no prior treatment for advanced breast cancer.

    Gomez, Henry L; Philco, Manuel; Pimentel, Patricia; Kiyan, Miriam; Monsalvo, Maria Laura; Conlan, Maureen G; Saikali, Khalil G; Chen, Michael M; Seroogy, Joseph J; Wolff, Andrew A; Escandon, Rafael D

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of ispinesib, a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor. Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who had received only prior neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy were treated with escalating doses of ispinesib administered as a 1-h infusion on days 1 and 15 every 28 days until toxicity or progression of disease. Doses were escalated until dose-limiting toxicity was observed in two out of six patients during cycle 1. A total of 16 patients were treated at three dose levels: 10 mg/m (n=3), 12 mg/m (n=6), and 14 mg/m (n=7). Forty-four percent of the patients had locally advanced disease and 56% had metastatic disease; 50% were estrogen receptor positive, 44% were progesterone receptor positive, 25% human epidermal growth factor 2 were positive, and 31% triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor 2) negative. Sixty-nine percent of patients were chemo-naive. The maximum tolerated dose was 12 mg/m and dose-limiting toxicity was grade 3 increased aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. The most common toxicities included neutropenia (88%; 38% grade 3 and 44% grade 4), increased alanine aminotransferase (56%), anemia (38%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (31%), and diarrhea (31%). No neuropathy, mucositis, or alopecia was reported. Among the 15 patients evaluable for antitumor activity, there were three partial responses, one confirmed by the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (7% response rate). Nine patients (60%) had stable disease lasting at least 42 days, with four (27%) lasting for at least 90 days. Disease stabilization (partial responses+stable disease) was observed in 11 (73.3%) patients. In conclusion, ispinesib was well tolerated when administered on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Limited activity was observed with this schedule in patients with previously untreated advanced breast cancer

  20. Clenbuterol residues in pig muscle after repeat administration in a growth-promoting dose.

    Pleadin, Jelka; Vulić, Ana; Persi, Nina; Vahcić, Nada

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of clenbuterol residues in muscle tissue of pigs after repeat administration in a growth-promoting dose. An anabolic dose of clenbuterol (20 μg/kg body mass per day) was administered orally to experimental group (n=12) for 28 days, whereas control animals (n=3) were left untreated. Clenbuterol treated pigs were randomly sacrificed (n=3) on days 0, 3, 7 and 14 of treatment discontinuation and clenbuterol residues determined in muscle tissue. Determination of residual clenbuterol was by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a screening method and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as a confirmation method. The highest clenbuterol content in the muscle of treated animals was recorded on day 0 of treatment cessation (4.40±0.37 ng/g) and significantly (pmeat for human consumption up to 7 days after treatment discontinuation. PMID:20667663

  1. Biokinetics in repeated-dosing in vitro drug toxicity studies

    Kramer, Nynke I; Di Consiglio, Emma; Blaauboer, Bas J; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the EU FP7 Predict-IV project was to improve the predictivity of in vitro assays for unwanted effects of drugs after repeated dosing. The project assessed the added benefit of integrating long-lived in vitro organotypic cell systems with 'omics' technologies and in silico modelling, inclu

  2. In vivo genotoxicity evaluation of lung cells from Fischer 344 rats following 28 days of inhalation exposure to MWCNTs, plus 28 days and 90 days post-exposure.

    Kim, Jin Sik; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Choi, Byung Gil; Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Song, Kyung Seuk; Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jong Seong; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Gun Ho; Jeon, Kisoo; Ahn, Kang Ho; Yu, Il Je

    2014-03-01

    Despite their useful physico-chemical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) continue to cause concern over occupational and human health due to their structural similarity to asbestos. Thus, to evaluate the toxic and genotoxic effect of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on lung cells in vivo, eight-week-old rats were divided into four groups (each group = 25 animals), a fresh air control (0 mg/m(3)), low (0.17 mg/m(3)), middle (0.49 mg/m(3)), and high (0.96 mg/m(3)) dose group, and exposed to MWCNTs via nose-only inhalation 6 h per day, 5 days per week for 28 days. The count median length and geometric standard deviation for the MWCNTs determined by TEM were 330.18 and 1.72 nm, respectively, and the MWCNT diameters ranged from 10 to 15 nm. Lung cells were isolated from five male and five female rats in each group on day 0, day 28 (only from males) and day 90 following the 28-day exposure. The total number of animals used was 15 male and 10 female rats for each concentration group. To determine the genotoxicity of the MWCNTs, a single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) was conducted on the rat lung cells. As a result of the exposure, the olive tail moments were found to be significantly higher (p air control. In addition, the high-dose exposed male and middle and high-dose exposed female rats retained DNA damage, even 90 days post-exposure (p < 0.05). To investigate the mode of genotoxicity, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, TGF- β, IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ) were also measured. For the male rats, the H2O2 levels were significantly higher in the middle (0 days post-exposure) and high- (0 days and 28 days post-exposure) dose groups (p < 0.05). Conversely, the female rats showed no changes in the H2O2 levels. The inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid did not show any statistically significant difference

  3. Late occurring lesions in the skin of rats after repeated doses of X-rays

    Late radiation damage, characterized by atrophy and necrosis in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, has been demonstrated in both the tail and feet of rats. The incidence of necrosis increased with total dose. These total doses, in the range 72-144 Gy, were given as 4-8 treatment of 18 Gy, each dose separated from the next by an interval of 28 days. This treatment protocol minimized acute epithelial skin reactions. The same regime applied to the skin on the back of rats resulted in a very severe acute reaction occurring after the second to fifth dose of 18 Gy. This was surprising since back skin, like tail skin, is less sensitive to large single doses of radiation than that of the foot. The late radiation reaction in the foot and tail of rats are compared and contrasted with other attempts to assess late effects in rodent skin and with late changes seen in pig skin. (author)

  4. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD5 dose of sarin (42 μg/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD5 of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD5 of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD5 sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD5 sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD5 sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD5 sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 and 0.5 x LD5 doses of sarin failed to

  5. Clenbuterol Distribution and Residues in Goat Tissues After the Repeated Administration of a Growth-Promoting Dose.

    Zhao, Zhen; Yao, Ting; Qin, Yuchang; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Jun; Li, Junguo; Gu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the deposition and depletion process of clenbuterol (CL) in goat tissues, plasma and urine after the repeated administration of a growth-promoting dose. The experiment was conducted in 24 goats (21 treated and 3 controls). Treated animals were administered orally in a dose of 16 µg/kg body mass once daily for 21 consecutive days and randomly sacrificed on days 0.25, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 of the withdrawal period. CL in goat tissues was extracted with organic solvents and determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The depletion rates of tissue differed significantly. The highest concentrations of CL in all tissues are detected on day 0.25 of treatment discontinuation. After administration had been discontinued for 28 days, CL still residues in all tissues, especially, in whole eye, where the concentrations reach 363.29 ± 31.60 μg/kg. These findings confirmed that the whole eye, which are rich in pigment, showed a much higher concentration than any other studied tissue during the withdrawal period. PMID:25910488

  6. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats

    Hansen, Deborah K., E-mail: deborah.hansen@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, U.S. FDA/NCTR, 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); George, Nysia I. [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, U.S. FDA/NCTR, 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); White, Gene E. [Toxicological Pathology Associates, 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Pellicore, Linda S. [Office of New Drugs, U.S. FDA/Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20903 (United States); Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Fabricant, Daniel [Office of Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements, U.S. FDA/Center for Food Safety and Nutrition, HFS-810, College Park, MD 20740 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Background: Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Method: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Results and conclusion: Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine.

  7. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats

    Background: Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Method: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Results and conclusion: Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine.

  8. 28-Day inhalation toxicity of graphene nanoplatelets in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Kim, Jin Kwon; Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jong Seong; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Ee; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Boo Wook; Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Gun Ho; Ahn, Kangho; Han, Sung Gu; Bello, Dhimiter; Yu, Il Je

    2016-09-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional engineered nanomaterial, is now being used in many applications, such as electronics, biological engineering, filtration, lightweight and strong nanocomposite materials, and energy storage. However, there is a lack of information on the potential health effects of graphene in humans based on inhalation, the primary engineered nanomaterial exposure pathway in workplaces. Thus, an inhalation toxicology study of graphene was conducted using a nose-only inhalation system for 28 days (6 h/day and 5 days/week) with male Sprague-Dawley rats that were then allowed to recover for 1-, 28-, and 90-day post-exposure period. Animals were separated into 4 groups (control, low, moderate, and high) with 15 male rats (5 rats per time point) in each group. The measured mass concentrations for the low, moderate, and high exposure groups were 0.12, 0.47, and 1.88 mg/m(3), respectively, very close to target concentrations of 0.125, 0.5, and 2 mg/m(3). Airborne graphene exposure was monitored using several real-time instrumentation over 10 nm to 20 μm for size distribution and number concentration. The total and respirable elemental carbon concentrations were also measured using filter sampling. Graphene in the air and biological media was traced using transmission electron microscopy. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, the body weights and food consumption were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for blood biochemical tests, and the organ weights were measured. No dose-dependent effects were recorded for the body weights, organ weights, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid inflammatory markers, and blood biochemical parameters at 1-day post-exposure and 28-day post-exposure. The inhaled graphenes were mostly ingested by macrophages. No distinct lung pathology was observed at the 1-, 28- and 90-day post-exposure. The inhaled graphene was translocated to lung

  9. Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Repeated Doses of Rifapentine or Rifampin and a Single Dose of Bedaquiline in Healthy Adult Subjects

    Winter, Helen; Egizi, Erica; Murray, Stephen; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann; Rouse, Doris J.; Severynse-Stevens, Diana; Pauli, Elliott

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of rifapentine or rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite in healthy subjects using a two-period single-sequence design. In period 1, subjects received a single dose of bedaquiline (400 mg), followed by a 28-day washout. In period 2, subjects received either rifapentine (600 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) from day 20 to day 41, as well as a single bedaquiline dose (400 mg) on day 29. The pharmacokinetic profiles of bedaq...

  10. Dietary tryptophan and threonine supply to 28 days old weaned piglets

    Fernández, José Adalberto; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    2009-01-01

    The effects of dietary levels of tryptophan (TRP) and threonine (THR) on appetite, growth performance and faecal score were assessed in an experiment with 360 weaned piglets. Littermate male castrates and females (1:1), weaned at 28 days of age, were given free access to feed during 28 days. Six...

  11. Acute and 28-Day Subchronic Oral Toxicity of an Ethanol Extract of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith in Rodents

    Yuan-Shiun Chang; Shorong-Shii Liou; I-Min Liu; Thing-Fong Tzeng; Chia Ju Chang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity (28 days) of the ethanol extract of Z. zerumbet rhizomes (EEZZ) via the oral route in Wistar rats of both sexes. In the acute toxicity study, Wistar rats were administered a single dose of 15 g kg−1 of body weight by gavage, and were monitored for 14 days. EEZZ did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the 50% lethal dose must be higher than 15 g kg−1. In the subchronic toxicity study, EEZZ was administered by gavage...

  12. The added value of the 90-day repeated dose oral toxicity test for industrial chemicals with a low (sub)acute toxicity profile in a high quality dataset.

    Taylor, Katy; Andrew, David J; Rego, Laura

    2014-08-01

    A survey conducted on the EU Notification of New Substances (NONS) database suggested that for industrial chemicals with a profile of low toxicity in (sub)acute toxicity tests there is little added value to the conduct of the 90-day repeated dose study. Avoiding unnecessary animal testing is a central aim of the EU REACH chemicals legislation; therefore we sought to verify the profile using additional data. The OECD's eChemPortal was searched for substances that had both a 28-day and a 90-day study and their robust study summaries were then examined from the ECHA CHEM database. Out of 182 substances with high quality 28-day and 90-day study results, only 18 reported no toxicity of any kind in the (sub)acute tests. However, for 16 of these there were also no reported signs of toxicity at or close to the limit dose (1000mg/kgbw/d) in the 90-day study. Restricting the 'low (sub)acute toxicity in a high quality dataset' profile to general industrial chemicals of no known biological activity, whilst allowing irritant substances, increases the data set and improves the prediction to 95% (20 substances out of 21 substances). The low toxicity profile appears to be of low prevalence within industrial chemicals (10-15%), nevertheless, avoidance of the conduct of a redundant 90-day study for this proportion of the remaining REACH phase-in substances would avoid the use of nearly 50,000 animals and save industry 50million Euros, with no impact on the assessment of human health. PMID:24768988

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Repeated-Dose Intravenous Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression

    aan het Rot, Marije; Collins, Katherine A.; Murrough, James W.; Perez, Andrew M.; Reich, David L.; Charney, Dennis S.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A single subanesthetic (intravenous) IV dose of ketamine might have rapid but transient antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Here we tested the tolerability, safety, and efficacy of repeated-dose open-label IV ketamine (six infusions over 12 days)

  14. Acute and 28-day subchronic toxicity studies of mangiferin, a glucosylxanthone isolated from Mangifera indica L. stem bark.

    Yalena Prado

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pharmacological properties of mangiferin have been reported, but few studies have investigated mangiferin toxicity. Aims: To study the acute and 28-day toxicity effects of mangiferin in rodents. Methods: Single doses of mangiferin were administered by oral or i.p. route or were applied dermally to Sprague-Dawley rats and Balb/C mice. Clinical symptoms of animals were observed during 14 days after treatment. Animals also received single oral doses daily for 28 consecutive days. Blood biochemistry, hematology and pathology findings were reported. Results: In the acute study, no toxic effects were observed after dermal exposure to mangiferin 2000 mg/kg but transient dyspnea, flank position and piloerection were observed after oral administration to this xanthone. I.p. administration induced similar toxicity signs, but at the highest dose (2000 mg/kg all mice, one female rat and one male rat died. Rats orally treated with mangiferin (250-1000 mg/kg for 28 days did not show any abnormal clinical signs or hematology alterations, when compared to control group animals. Histopathological alterations like vacuolar degeneration, necrosis and increment of apoptosis of the acinar cells were observed in the exocrine pancreas of rats at 1000 mg/kg. This suggesting that exocrine pancreas was the target organ for mangiferin’s toxicity. Conclusions: These studies indicated that acute and subchronic toxicities of mangiferin for oral exposure are low.

  15. Tissue distribution of naringenin conjugated metabolites following repeated dosing of naringin to rats

    Lin, Shiuan-Pey; Hou, Yu-Chi; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Wang, Meng-Ju; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Naringin is a major antioxidant in Citrus fruits and herbs. To clarify molecular forms distributed to various tissues, we investigated tissue distribution of naringin and relevant metabolites in rats after repeated dosing. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered naringin (210 mg/kg) twice daily for eight days. At 6 h post the 17th dose, various tissues including liver, kidney, heart, spleen and brain were collected and analyzed by HPLC method before and after hy...

  16. In vivo flow cytometric Pig-a and micronucleus assays: highly sensitive discrimination of the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene and pyrene using acute and repeated-dose designs.

    Torous, Dorothea K; Phonethepswath, Souk; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Mereness, Jared; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Weller, Pamela; Bell, Sara; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura L; MacGregor, James T; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Combining multiple genetic toxicology endpoints into a single in vivo study, and/or integrating one or more genotoxicity assays into general toxicology studies, is attractive because it reduces animal use and enables comprehensive comparative analysis using toxicity, metabolism, and pharmacokinetic information from the same animal. This laboratory has developed flow cytometric scoring techniques for monitoring two blood-based genotoxicity endpoints-micronucleated reticulocyte frequency and gene mutation at the Pig-a locus-thereby making combination and integration studies practical. The ability to effectively monitor these endpoints in short-term and repeated dosing schedules was investigated with the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and pyrene (Pyr). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated via oral gavage for 3 or 28 consecutive days with several dose levels of Pyr, including maximum tolerated doses. BP exposure was administered by the same route but at one dose level, 250 or 125 mg/kg/day for 3-day and 28-day studies, respectively. Serial blood samples were collected up to Day 45, and were analyzed for Pig-a mutation with a dual labeling method (SYTO 13 in combination with anti-CD59-PE) that facilitated mutant cell frequency measurements in both total erythrocytes and the reticulocyte subpopulation. A mutant cell enrichment step based on immunomagnetic column separation was used to increase the statistical power of the assay. BP induced robust mutant reticulocyte responses by Day 15, and elevated frequencies persisted until study termination. Mutant erythrocyte responses lagged mutant reticulocyte responses, with peak incidences observed on Day 30 of the 3-day study (43-fold increase) and on Day 42 of the 28-day study (171-fold increase). No mutagenic effects were apparent for Pyr. Blood samples collected on Day 4, and Day 29 for the 28-day study, were evaluated for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency. Significant increases in micronucleus

  17. Comparison of methionine sources around requirement levels using a methionine efficacy method in 0 to 28 day old broilers.

    Agostini, P S; Dalibard, P; Mercier, Y; Van der Aar, P; Van der Klis, J D

    2016-03-01

    The addition of methionine in the poultry feed industry is still facing the relative efficacy dilemma between DL-methionine (DLM) and hydroxy-methionine (HMTBA). The aim of this study was to compare the effect of dietary DLM and HMTBA on broiler performance at different levels of total sulfur amino acids (TSAA). The treatments consisted of a basal diet without methionine addition, and 4 increasing methionine doses for both sources resulting in TSAA/Lysine ratios from 0.62 to 0.73 in the starter phase and 0.59 to 0.82 in the grower phase. The comparison of product performance was performed by three-way ANOVA analysis and by methionine efficacy calculation as an alternative method of comparison. Growth results obtained during the starter phase with the different methionine supplementations did not show significant growth responses to TSAA levels, indicating a lower methionine requirement in the starter phase than currently assumed. However, a significant methionine dose effect was obtained for the period 10 to 28 day of age and for the entire growth period of 0 to 28 day of age. Excepting a significant gender effect, the statistical analysis did not allow for the discrimination of methionine sources, and no interaction between source and dose level was observed up to 28 days of age. A significant interaction between source and dose level was observed for methionine efficacy for the grower phase, and the total growth period showed better HMTBA efficacy at higher TSAA value. The exponential model fitted to each methionine source for body weight response depending on methionine intake or for feed conversion ratio (FCR) depending on methionine doses did not allow the methionine sources to be distinguished. Altogether, these results conclude that methionine sources lead to similar performances response when compared at TSAA values around the broiler requirement level. These results also showed that at TSAA values above requirement, HMTBA had a better methionine efficacy

  18. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PATHOLOGY IN CATS EXPOSED 28 DAYS TO DIESEL EXHAUST

    Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hours per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and ...

  19. Different dosing regimens of repeated ketamine administration have opposite effects on novelty processing in rats.

    Schumacher, Anett; Sivanandan, Brindan; Tolledo, Edgor Cole; Woldegabriel, Jacob; Ito, Rutsuko

    2016-08-01

    Repeated exposure to sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine in rats has been shown to induce cognitive deficits, as well as behavioral changes akin to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, giving much face validity to the use of ketamine administration as a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. This study sought to further characterize the behavioral effects of two different ketamine pre-treatment regimens, focusing primarily on the effects of repeated ketamine administration on novelty processing, a capacity that is disrupted in schizophrenia. Rats received 5 or 14 intra-peritoneal injections of 30mg/kg ketamine or saline across 5 or 7days, respectively. They were then tested in an associative mismatch detection task to examine their ability to detect novel configurations of familiar audio-visual sequences. Furthermore, rats underwent a sequential novel object and novel object location exploration task. Subsequently, rats were also tested on the delayed matching to place T-maze task, sucrose preference task and locomotor tests involving administering a challenge dose of amphetamine (AMPH). The high-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen elicited impairments in mismatch detection and working memory. In contrast, the low-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen improved performance of novelty detection. In addition, low-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed locomotor sensitization following an AMPH challenge, while the high-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed an attenuated locomotor response to AMPH, compared to control rats. These findings demonstrate that different regimens of repeated ketamine administration induce alterations in novelty processing in opposite directions, and that differential neural adaptations occurring in the mesolimbic dopamine system may underlie these effects. PMID:27064663

  20. Proposal of an in silico profiler for categorisation of repeat dose toxicity data of hair dyes.

    Nelms, M D; Ates, G; Madden, J C; Vinken, M; Cronin, M T D; Rogiers, V; Enoch, S J

    2015-05-01

    This study outlines the analysis of 94 chemicals with repeat dose toxicity data taken from Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety opinions for commonly used hair dyes in the European Union. Structural similarity was applied to group these chemicals into categories. Subsequent mechanistic analysis suggested that toxicity to mitochondria is potentially a key driver of repeat dose toxicity for chemicals within each of the categories. The mechanistic hypothesis allowed for an in silico profiler consisting of four mechanism-based structural alerts to be proposed. These structural alerts related to a number of important chemical classes such as quinones, anthraquinones, substituted nitrobenzenes and aromatic azos. This in silico profiler is intended for grouping chemicals into mechanism-based categories within the adverse outcome pathway paradigm. PMID:24888375

  1. 4-Week repeated oral dose toxicity study of 1,4-dichlorobutane in rats

    Yu, Wook-Joon; Lee, In-Chul; Lee, Jinsoo; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Baek, Hyung-Seon; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential subacute toxicity of 1,4-dichlorobutane by a 4-week repeated oral dose in Sprague-Dawley rats. The test article was administered once daily by gavage to male rats at dose levels of 0, 100, 300, and 1,000 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. All rats were sacrificed at the end of the treatment period. During the test period, clinical signs, mortality, body weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, and organ weight were examined. At 1,000 mg/kg/day, ...

  2. Inclusion of Safety Pharmacology Endpoints in Repeat-Dose Toxicity Studies.

    Redfern, Will S

    2015-01-01

    Whereas pharmacological responses tend to be fairly rapid in onset and are therefore detectable after a single dose, some diminish on repeated dosing, and others increase in magnitude and therefore can be missed or underestimated in single-dose safety pharmacology studies. Safety pharmacology measurements can be incorporated into repeat-dose toxicity studies, either routinely or on an ad hoc basis. Drivers for this are both scientific (see above) and regulatory (e.g. ICH S6, S7, S9). There are inherent challenges in achieving this: the availability of suitable technical and scientific expertise in the test facility, unsuitable laboratory conditions, use of simultaneous (as opposed to staggered) dosing, requirement for toxicokinetic sampling, unsuitability of certain techniques (e.g. use of anaesthesia, surgical implantation, food restriction), equipment availability at close proximity and sensitivity of the methods to detect small, clinically relevant, changes. Nonetheless, 'fit-for-purpose' data can still be acquired without requiring additional animals. Examples include assessment of behaviour, sensorimotor, visual and autonomic functions, ambulatory ECG and blood pressure, echocardiography, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic function. This is entirely achievable if the safety pharmacology measurements are relatively unobtrusive, both with respect to the animals and to the toxicology study itself. Careful pharmacological validation of any methods used, and establishing their detection sensitivity, is vital to ensure the credibility of generated data. PMID:26091647

  3. The Role of Exposure History on HIV Acquisition: Insights from Repeated Low-dose Challenge Studies

    Regoes, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccine candidates or preventive treatment, many research groups have started to challenge monkeys repeatedly with low doses of the virus. Such challenge data provide a unique opportunity to assess the importance of exposure history for the acquisition of the infection. I developed stochastic models to analyze previously published challenge data. In the mathematical models, I allowed for variation of the animals' susceptibility to infection across challenge repea...

  4. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of cefuroxime axetil in volunteers during repeated dosing.

    Sommers, D K; van Wyk, M.; Williams, P. E.; Harding, S M

    1984-01-01

    A total of 158 volunteers each received 21 repeated oral doses of 500 mg of cefuroxime axetil (CAE) during four comparative cross-over trials. Pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 volunteers (CAE versus ampicillin), relative bioavailability and tolerance were studied in 100 volunteers (CAE versus pivmecillinam and CAE versus pivampicillin), and tolerance alone was studied in 50 volunteers (CAE versus ampicillin). Overall, urinary recoveries of the active antibiotics ranked absorption of the dru...

  5. Identification of structural alerts for liver and kidney toxicity using repeated dose toxicity data

    Pizzo, Fabiola; Gadaleta, Domenico; Lombardo, Anna; Nicolotti, Orazio; Benfenati, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for a compound to cause hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity is a matter of extreme interest for human health risk assessment. To assess liver and kidney toxicity, repeated-dose toxicity (RDT) studies are conducted mainly on rodents. However, these tests are expensive, time-consuming and require large numbers of animals. For early toxicity screening, in silico models can be applied, reducing the costs, time and animals used. Among in silico approaches, structure–activity...

  6. Subacute (28-day) toxicity of furfural in Fischer 344 rats: a comparison of the oral and inhalation route.

    Arts, Josje H E; Muijser, Hans; Appel, Marko J; Frieke Kuper, C; Bessems, Jos G M; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2004-09-01

    The subacute oral and inhalation toxicity of furfural vapour was studied in Fischer 344 rats to investigate whether route-to-route extrapolation could be employed to derive the limit value for inhalation exposure from oral toxicity data. Groups of 5 rats per sex were treated by gavage daily for 28 days at dose levels of 6-192 mg/kg bw/day, or exposed by inhalation to concentrations of 20-1280 mg/m3 (6 h/day, 5 days/week) or 160-1280 mg/m3 (3 h/day, 5 days/week) for 28 days. Controls received vehicle (corn oil) or were exposed to clean air. Daily oral treatment with the highest dose of furfural (initially 192 mg/kg bw/day, later reduced to 144 mg/kg bw/day and finally to 120 mg/kg bw/day) resulted in mortality, and in increases in absolute and relative kidney and liver weight in surviving females of this group. Exposure of rats by inhalation for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 28 days induced mortality at concentrations of 640 mg/m3 and above within 1-8 days. At 640 mg/m3 (3 h/day) and at 320 mg/m3 (3 and 6 h/day) and below, however, exposure was tolerated without serious clinical effects. In contrast, histopathological nasal changes were seen even at the lowest concentration of 20 mg/m3. With increasing exposure concentration, the nasal effects increased in incidence and severity and also expanded from the anterior part to the posterior part, including the olfactory epithelium. It was concluded that the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for oral toxicity was 96 mg/kg bw/day. The NOAEL for systemic inhalation toxicity was comparable, i.e. 92 mg/kg bw/day (corresponding to 320 mg/m3 (6 h/day) or 640 mg/m3 (3 h/day)) assuming 100% absorption. The presence of the histopathological nasal changes at the lowest tested concentration of 20 mg/m3 (corresponding to 6 mg/kg bw/day) proves that for locally acting substances like furfural extrapolation from the oral to the inhalation route is not valid. PMID:15234069

  7. Treating glioblastoma multiforme with selective high-dose liposomal doxorubicin chemotherapy induced by repeated focused ultrasound

    Yang FY

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Feng-Yi Yang1, Ming-Che Teng1, Maggie Lu2, Hsiang-Fa Liang2, Yan-Ru Lee1, Chueh-Chuan Yen3, Muh-Lii Liang4,5, Tai-Tong Wong51Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 2Drug Delivery Laboratory, Biomedical Technology and Device Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, 4Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, 5Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: High-dose tissue-specific delivery of therapeutic agents would be a valuable clinical strategy. We have previously shown that repeated transcranial focused ultrasound is able to increase the delivery of Evans blue significantly into brain tissue. The present study shows that repeated pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU can be used to deliver high-dose atherosclerotic plaque-specific peptide-1 (AP-1-conjugated liposomes selectively to brain tumors.Methods: Firefly luciferase (Fluc-labeled human GBM8401 glioma cells were implanted into NOD-scid mice. AP-1-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin or liposomal doxorubicin alone was administered followed by pulsed HIFU and the doxorubicin concentration in the treated brains quantified by fluorometer. Growth of the labeled glioma cells was monitored through noninvasive bioluminescence imaging and finally the brain tissue was histologically examined after sacrifice.Results: Compared with the control group, the animals treated with 5 mg/kg injections of AP-1 liposomal doxorubicin or untargeted liposomal doxorubicin followed by repeated pulsed HIFU not only showed significantly enhanced accumulation of drug at the sonicated tumor site but also a significantly elevated tumor-to-normal brain drug

  8. Repeated exposure to sublethal doses of the organophosphorus compound VX activates BDNF expression in mouse brain.

    Pizarro, Jose M; Chang, Wenling E; Bah, Mariama J; Wright, Linnzi K M; Saviolakis, George A; Alagappan, Arun; Robison, Christopher L; Shah, Jinesh D; Meyerhoff, James L; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Midboe, Eric G; Lumley, Lucille A

    2012-04-01

    The highly toxic organophosphorus compound VX [O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]methylphosphonate] is an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Prolonged inhibition of AChE increases endogenous levels of acetylcholine and is toxic at nerve synapses and neuromuscular junctions. We hypothesized that repeated exposure to sublethal doses of VX would affect genes associated with cell survival, neuronal plasticity, and neuronal remodeling, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We examined the time course of BDNF expression in C57BL/6 mouse brain following repeated exposure (1/day × 5 days/week × 2 weeks) to sublethal doses of VX (0.2 LD(50) and 0.4 LD(50)). BDNF messenger RNA expression was significantly (p LD(50) VX exposure. BDNF protein expression, however, was only increased in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Whether increased BDNF in response to sublethal doses of VX exposure is an adaptive response to prevent cellular damage or a precursor to impending brain damage remains to be determined. If elevated BDNF is an adaptive response, exogenous BDNF may be a potential therapeutic target to reduce the toxic effects of nerve agent exposure. PMID:22240983

  9. Differential effects of clozapine and pimozide on fixed-ratio responding during repeated dosing.

    Wiley, J L; Compton, A D; Porter, J H

    1994-05-01

    Previous research has shown that the differential development of tolerance to the disruption of operant responding produced by repeated dosing with pimozide (PMZ) or clozapine (CLZ) can distinguish these two drugs. In the present study, the effects of PMZ (1 mg/kg) and CLZ (10 mg/kg) on response rate and response duration in rats lever pressing for food reward under a fixed-ratio 30 (FR-30) operant schedule were examined. PMZ suppressed response rates across all 10 days of drug dosing; CLZ produced an initial response rate decrease, with partial recovery (50%) occurring within the 10 day period. Similarly, PMZ produced an increase in response duration that persisted into the postdrug vehicle-injection period, while CLZ did not significantly change response duration. The prolonged suppression of FR responding produced by PMZ is similar to the lack of tolerance to this drug in other types of operant schedules. In contrast, CLZ's effects on response rate are schedule dependent. These results suggest that changes in response duration with repeated dosing may more reliably differentiate typical and atypical neuroleptics than do changes in response rate under FR schedules. PMID:8029297

  10. Treatment of hyperthyroidism by possibly repeated low doses of iodine 131

    The use of low doses of iodine 131, eventually repeated, allows to get the recovery without consequences in 61 to 70% of cases with the passing of time under 10 years. One can estimate the risk of hypothyroidism at 25% and this one of residual hyperthyroidism at 5 to 10 %. The average period of curing is about six months. The interest of this treatment is in its efficiency, its easiness, its cost and its very low risks. However, it could be desirable that the precautions of use can be standardized in a strict way. (N.C.)

  11. Acute and 28-Day Subchronic Oral Toxicity of an Ethanol Extract of Zingiber zerumbet (L. Smith in Rodents

    Chia Ju Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity (28 days of the ethanol extract of Z. zerumbet rhizomes (EEZZ via the oral route in Wistar rats of both sexes. In the acute toxicity study, Wistar rats were administered a single dose of 15 g kg−1 of body weight by gavage, and were monitored for 14 days. EEZZ did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the 50% lethal dose must be higher than 15 g kg−1. In the subchronic toxicity study, EEZZ was administered by gavage at doses of 1000, 2000 and 3000 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks to Wistar rats. The subacute treatment with EEZZ did not alter either the body weight gain or the food and water consumption. The hematological and biochemical analysis did not show significant differences in any of the parameters examined in female or male groups. Necropsy and histopathological examination, did not reveal any remarkable and treatment related changes. A no-observed adverse-effect level for EEZZ is 3000 mg kg−1 for rats under the conditions of this study. Hence, consumption of EEZZ for various medicinal purposes is safe.

  12. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  13. Study of four week repeated dose toxic test of Sweet Bee Venom in Beagle Dogs

    Jae-Seuk Park

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyse four week repeated dose toxicity of Sweet Bee Venom(Sweet BV extracted from the bee venom in Beagle dogs. Methods: All experiments were conducted under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP at Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical study authorized institution. Male and female Beagle dogs of 5-6 months old were chosen for the pilot study of four week repeated dose toxicity of Sweet BV which was administered at the level of 0.56㎎/㎏ body weight which is eighty times higher than the clinical application dosage as the high dosage, followed by 0.28 and 0.14㎎/㎏ as midium and low dosage, respectively. Equal amount of excipient(normal saline to the Sweet BV experiment groups was administered as the control group every day for four weeks. Results: 1. No mortality was witnessed in all of the experiment groups. 2. All experiment groups were appealed pain sense in the treating time compared to the control group, and hyperemia and movement disorder were observed around the area of administration in all experiment groups, and higher occurrence in the higher dosage treatment. 3. For weight measurement, Neither male nor female groups showed significant changes. 4. In the urine analysis, CBC and biochemistry didn't show any significant changes in the experiment groups compared with control group. 5. For weight measurement of organs, experiment groups didn't show any significant changes compared with control group. 6. To verify abnormalities of organs and tissues, thigh muscle which treated with Sweet BV, cerebrum, liver, lung, kidney, and spinal cords were removed and conducted histologocal observation with H-E staining. In the histologocal observation of thigh muscle, cell infiltration, inflammatory, degeneration, necrosis of muscle fiber, and fibrosis were found in both thigh tissue. And the changes were depend on the dose of Sweet BV. But another organs were not detected in any abnormalities. 7

  14. Distribution of silver in rats following 28 days of repeated oral exposure to silver nanoparticles or silver acetate

    Löschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    NPs or AgAc. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanosized granules were detected in the ileum of animals exposed to AgNPs or AgAc and were mainly located in the basal lamina of the ileal epithelium and in lysosomes of macrophages within the lamina propria. Using energy dispersive x...

  15. Consuming a multi-ingredient thermogenic supplement for 28 days is apparently safe in healthy adults

    Roxanne M. Vogel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thermogenic (TRM supplements are often used by people seeking to decrease body weight. Many TRM supplements are formulated with multiple ingredients purported to increase energy expenditure and maximize fat loss. However, in the past some TRM ingredients have been deemed unsafe and removed from the market. Therefore, it is important to verify the safety of multi-ingredient TRM supplements with chronic consumption. Objective: To assess the safety of daily consumption of a multi-ingredient TRM supplement over a 28-day period in healthy adults. Design: Twenty-three recreationally active adults (11M, 12F; 27.1±5.4 years, 171.6±9.6 cm, 76.8±16.1 kg, 26±5 BMI were randomly assigned either to consume a multi-ingredient TRM supplement (SUP; n=9 or remain unsupplemented (CRL; n=14 for 28 days. Participants maintained their habitual dietary and exercise routines for the duration of the study. Fasting blood samples, resting blood pressure, and heart rate were taken before and after the supplementation period. Samples were analyzed for complete blood counts, comprehensive metabolic, and lipid panels. Results: Significant (p<0.05 group by time interactions were present for diastolic BP, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, chloride, CO2, globulin, albumin:globulin (A/G, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL. Dependent t-tests conducted on significant variables revealed significant (p<0.05 within-group differences in SUP for diastolic BP (+6.2±5.3 mmHG, creatinine (+0.09±0.05 mg/dL, eGFR (−11.2±5.8 mL/min/1.73, globulin (−0.29±0.24 g/dL, A/G (+0.27±0.23, and HDL (−5.0±5.5 mg/dL, and in CRL for CO2 (−1.9±1.5 mmol/L between time points. Each variable remained within the accepted physiological range. Conclusion: Results of the present study support the clinical safety of a multi-ingredient TRM containing caffeine, green tea extract, and cayenne powder. Although there were statistically significant (p<0.05 intragroup

  16. The Role Of Nitric Oxide After Repeated Low Dose Photodynamic Treatments In Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    Valentina Rapozzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically approved treatment that causes a selective cytotoxic effect in cancer cells. In addition to the production of singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species, PDT can induce the release of nitric oxide (NO by up-regulating nitric oxide synthases (NOS. Since non-optimal PDT often causes tumor recurrence, understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the photoprocess is a challenging task for scientists. The present study has examined the response of the PC3 human metastatic prostate cancer cell line, following repeated low-dose pheophorbide a treatments, mimicking non-optimal PDT treatment. The analysis was focused on the NF-kB/YY1/RKIP circuitry as it is (i dysregulated in cancer cells (ii modulated by NO and (iii correlated with the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. We hypothesized that a repeated treatment of non-optimal PDT induces low levels of NO that lead to cell growth and EMT via regulation of the above circuitry. The expressions of gene products involved in the circuitry and in EMT were analyzed by western blot. The findings demonstrate the cytoprotective role of NO following non-optimal PDT treatments that was corroborated by the use of l-NAME, an inhibitor of NOS.

  17. Haematological and immunological effects of repeated dose exposure of rats to integerrimine N-oxide from Senecio brasiliensis.

    Elias, Fabiana; Latorre, Andreia O; Pípole, Fernando; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Górniak, Silvana L; Hueza, Isis M

    2011-09-01

    This study is the first in the literature to focus attention on the possible immunotoxic effect of integerrimine N-oxide content in the butanolic residue (BR) of Senecio brasiliensis, a poisonous hepatotoxic plant that contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). PAs have been reported as a pasture and food contaminant and as herbal medicine used worldwide and are responsible for poisoning events in livestock and human beings. After the plant extraction, BR extracted from Senecio brasiliensis was found to contain approximately 70% integerrimine N-oxide by elemental and spectral analyses ((1)H and (13)C NMR), which was administered to adult male Wistar Hannover rats at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg for 28 days. Body weight gain, food consumption, lymphoid organs, neutrophil analysis, humoural immune response, cellular immune response and lymphocyte analysis were evaluated. Our study showed that integerrimine N-oxide could promote an impairment in the body weight gain, interference with blood cell counts and a reducing T cell proliferative activity in rats; however, no differences in the neutrophil activities, lymphocytes phenotyping and humoural and cellular immune responses were observed. It is concluded that doses of integerrimine N-oxide here employed did not produce marked immunotoxic effects. PMID:21722699

  18. Immunotoxicity evaluation of jet a jet fuel in female rats after 28-day dermal exposure.

    Mann, Cynthia M; Peachee, Vanessa L; Trimmer, Gary W; Lee, Ji-Eun; Twerdok, Lorraine E; White, Kimber L

    2008-01-01

    The potential for jet fuel to modulate immune functions has been reported in mice following dermal, inhalation, and oral routes of exposure; however, a functional evaluation of the immune system in rats following jet fuel exposure has not been conducted. In this study potential effects of commercial jet fuel (Jet A) on the rat immune system were assessed using a battery of functional assays developed to screen potential immunotoxic compounds. Jet A was applied to the unoccluded skin of 6- to 7-wk-old female Crl:CD (SD)IGS BR rats at doses of 165, 330, or 495 mg/kg/d for 28 d. Mineral oil was used as a vehicle to mitigate irritation resulting from repeated exposure to jet fuel. Cyclophosphamide and anti-asialo GM1 were used as positive controls for immunotoxic effects. In contrast to reported immunotoxic effects of jet fuel in mice, dermal exposure of rats to Jet A did not result in alterations in spleen or thymus weights, splenic lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody-forming cell response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep red blood cells (sRBC), spleen cell proliferative response to anti-CD3 antibody, or natural killer (NK) cell activity. In each of the immunotoxicological assays conducted, the positive control produced the expected results, demonstrating the assay was capable of detecting an effect if one had occurred. Based on the immunological parameters evaluated under the experimental conditions of the study, Jet A did not adversely affect immune responses of female rats. It remains to be determined whether the observed difference between this study and some other studies reflects a difference in the immunological response of rats and mice or is the result of other factors. PMID:18338284

  19. The effect of repeated exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation on the liver functions in the rat

    Radiation exposure is known to induce progressive biological effects on different cells, tissues and organs which may be more or less profound, depending on the radiosensitivity of the system, the dose level, rate and frequency of exposure. However, information is available on the biological effects of single and relatively high doses of radiation . In contrast, very little information is available on such effects after the exposure to small doses of radiation either delivered as single or repeated doses. The present study was planned to investigate the effects of repeated exposure to ionizing radiation (γ- rays) on some physiological and biochemical parameters of the liver function. A total number of 336 male albino rats (100-150 gm b.wt.) were used in four experiments which were designed to serve the objectives of this investigation

  20. Effect of dose and repeated dosing on the disposition and metabolism of sodium Omadine reg-sign (Na pyrithione; NaOM)

    NaOM is an antimicrobial used to preserve industrial fluids. 14C-NaOM was administered to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 0.5 mg/kg i.v., 0.5 mg/kg p.o., 0.5 mg/kg p.o. after NaOM at 0.5 mg/kg p.o. daily for 14 days, or at 25 mg/kg p.o. 14C was determined is serial blood samples, in urine and feces at intervals up to 96 hr and in tissues (not i.v.) at 96 hr. Urine was analyzed by HPLC. 14C-NaOM was well absorbed orally, ca. or >90% of the dose. Blood kinetics of 14C-NaOM equivalents were complex, with secondary peak concentrations, several rates of elimination and a terminal t1/2 of ca. 14 days. For all treatment groups 73-85% of the dose was excreted in urine and 3-12% in feces. Urinary excretion was somewhat less extensive and slower after repeated and high p.o. doses. Tissues and carcasses of orally treated rats contained 2-3% of the dose. Total recoveries were 85-95%. Of the 12 metabolites found in urine, the major metabolite, K, 47-67% of the dose, was identified as 2-pyridinethiol-1-oxide-S-glucuronide. Differences were found in relative amounts of metabolites excreted, between routes, doses, schedules and sexes, e.g. K decreased from 59-67% at the low p.o. dose to 41-49% at the repeated and high p.o. doses. These data show that some changes occurred in disposition and metabolism with repeated dosing and increased dose

  1. Delayed Reduction of Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission and Spines Following Exposure to Repeated Subclinical Doses of Organophosphorus Pesticide in Adult Mice

    Speed, Haley E.; Blaiss, Cory A.; Kim, Ahleum; Haws, Michael E.; Melvin, Neal R.; Jennings, Michael; Eisch, Amelia J.; Powell, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and household organophosphorus (OP) pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AchE), resulting in increased acetylcholine (Ach) in the central nervous system. In adults, acute and prolonged exposure to high doses of AchE inhibitors causes severe, clinically apparent symptoms, followed by lasting memory impairments and cognitive dysfunction. The neurotoxicity of repeated environmental exposure to lower, subclinical doses of OP pesticides in adults is not as well studied. However, r...

  2. Utility of repeated praziquantel dosing in the treatment of schistosomiasis in high-risk communities in Africa: a systematic review.

    Charles H King

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Controversy persists about the optimal approach to drug-based control of schistosomiasis in high-risk communities. In a systematic review of published studies, we examined evidence for incremental benefits from repeated praziquantel dosing, given 2 to 8 weeks after an initial dose, in Schistosoma-endemic areas of Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed systematic searches of electronic databases PubMed and EMBASE for relevant data using search terms 'schistosomiasis', 'dosing' and 'praziquantel' and hand searches of personal collections and bibliographies of recovered articles. In 10 reports meeting study criteria, improvements in parasitological treatment outcomes after two doses of praziquantel were greater for S. mansoni infection than for S. haematobium infection. Observed cure rates (positive to negative conversion in egg detection assays were, for S. mansoni, 69-91% cure after two doses vs. 42-79% after one dose and, for S. haematobium, 46-99% cure after two doses vs. 37-93% after a single dose. Treatment benefits in terms of reduction in intensity (mean egg count were also different for the two species-for S. mansoni, the 2-dose regimen yielded an weighted average 89% reduction in standardized egg counts compared to a 83% reduction after one dose; for S. haematobium, two doses gave a 93% reduction compared to a 94% reduction with a single dose. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed based on Markov life path modeling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although schedules for repeated treatment with praziquantel require greater inputs in terms of direct costs and community participation, there are incremental benefits to this approach at an estimated cost of $153 (S. mansoni-$211 (S. haematobium per additional lifetime QALY gained by double treatment in school-based programs. More rapid reduction of infection-related disease may improve program adherence, and if, as an externality of the program, transmission can be

  3. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pamidronate after oral administration: a study on dose proportionality, absolute bioavailability, and effect of repeated administration

    Hyldstrup, Lars; Flesch, G; Hauffe, S A

    1993-01-01

    30 minutes at constant infusion rate. Repeated peroral doses (75 and 150 mg) were administered to 12 females (aged 51-70 years) for 10 consecutive days. Urinary excretion of pamidronate after peroral and i.v. administration was used for estimation of pamidronate absorption. Renal excretion of...

  4. Discrimination of Carcinogens by Hepatic Transcript Profiling in Rats Following 28-day Administration

    Hiroshi Matsumoto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at discriminating carcinogens on the basis of hepatic transcript profiling in the rats administrated with a variety of carcinogens and non-carcinogens. We conducted 28-day toxicity tests in male F344 rats with 47 carcinogens and 26 non- carcinogens, and then investigated periodically the hepatic gene expression profiles using custom microarrays. By hierarchical cluster analysis based on significantly altered genes, carcinogens were clustered into three major groups (Group 1 to 3. The formation of these groups was not affected by the gene sets used as well as the administration period, indicating that the grouping of carcinogens was universal independent of the conditions of both statistical analysis and toxicity testing. Seventeen carcinogens belonging to Group 1 were composed of mainly rat hepatocarcinogens, most of them being mutagenic ones. Group 2 was formed by three subgroups, which were composed of 23 carcinogens exhibiting distinct properties in terms of genotoxicity and target tissues, namely nonmutagenic hepatocarcinogens, and mutagenic and nonmutagenic carcinogens both of which are targeted to other tissues. Group 3 contained 6 carcinogens including 4 estrogenic substances, implying the group of estrogenic carcinogens. Gene network analyses revealed that the significantly altered genes in Group 1 included Bax, Tnfrsf6, Btg2, Mgmt and Abcb1b, suggesting that p53-mediated signaling pathway involved in early pathologic alterations associated with preceding mutagenic carcinogenesis. Thus, the common transcriptional signatures for each group might reflect the early molecular events of carcinogenesis and hence would enable us to identify the biomarker genes, and then to develop a new assay for carcinogenesis prediction.

  5. Single and 2-week repeated intravenous dose toxicity studies of disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate in rats

    Disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) is a boron compound used in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for malignant brain tumors. Intravenous single and 2-week repeated dose toxicity studies of BSH were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the single-dose study, BSH was administered at doses of 100, 300 or 600 mg/kg. Death occurred within 10 min (acute type) or from 5 hr to 2 days (delayed type) after dosing in the 600 mg/kg group. No differences in mortality by sex and dosing speed were observed. Major causes of death were considered to be circulatory disorder in acute death and renal injury in delayed death. The renal injury was observed in the 300 and 600 mg/kg groups. In the 2-week repeated dose study, BSH was administered at doses of 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day for 14 days. Body weight gain was suppressed in the 100 and 300 mg/kg groups. One male in the 300 mg/kg group died due to renal and pulmonary lesions at day 8. Slight anemia was observed in the 300 mg/kg group. Pathologically, the kidney showed tubular regeneration with increase of weight in the 300 mg/kg. From these results, the NOAEL of BSH is 30 mg/kg/day. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic interaction between repeated doses of rifapentine or rifampin and a single dose of bedaquiline in healthy adult subjects.

    Winter, Helen; Egizi, Erica; Murray, Stephen; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann; Rouse, Doris J; Severynse-Stevens, Diana; Pauli, Elliott

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the effects of rifapentine or rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite in healthy subjects using a two-period single-sequence design. In period 1, subjects received a single dose of bedaquiline (400 mg), followed by a 28-day washout. In period 2, subjects received either rifapentine (600 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) from day 20 to day 41, as well as a single bedaquiline dose (400 mg) on day 29. The pharmacokinetic profiles of bedaquiline and M2 were compared over 336 h after the administration of bedaquiline alone and in combination with steady-state rifapentine or rifampin. Coadministration of bedaquiline with rifapentine or rifampin resulted in lower bedaquiline exposures. The geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the maximum observed concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve to the last available concentration time point (AUC0-t), and AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-inf) of bedaquiline were 62.19% (53.37 to 72.47), 42.79% (37.77 to 48.49), and 44.52% (40.12 to 49.39), respectively, when coadministered with rifapentine. Similarly, the GMRs and 90% CIs for the Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of bedaquiline were 60.24% (51.96 to 69.84), 41.36% (37.70 to 45.36), and 47.32% (41.49 to 53.97), respectively, when coadministered with rifampin. The Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of M2 were also altered when bedaquiline was coadministered with rifapentine or rifampin. Single doses of bedaquiline, administered alone or with multiple doses of rifapentine or rifampin, were well tolerated, with no safety concerns related to coadministration. Daily administration of rifapentine to patients with tuberculosis presents the same drug interaction challenges as rifampin and other rifamycins. Strong inducers of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 should be avoided when considering the use of bedaquiline. (This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT02216331

  7. Drug- not carrier-dependent haematological and biochemical changes in a repeated dose study of cyclosporine encapsulated polyester nano- and micro-particles: Size does not matter

    Highlights: • The particulate delivery allows an increase in dose range without accrual of toxicities. • The altered haematological and biochemical changes are drug, but not particle dependent. • PLGA nano/microparticles are safe on subacute peroral dosing over 28 days. • Nano-toxicology, drug needs to be considered. - Abstract: Biodegradable nanoparticles are being considered more often as drug carriers to address pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic issues, yet nano-product safety has not been systematically proven. In this study, haematological, biochemical and histological parameters were examined on 28 day daily dosing of rats with nano- or micro-particle encapsulated cyclosporine (CsA) to confirm if any changes observed were drug or carrier dependent. CsA encapsulated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) [PLGA] nano- (nCsA) and micro-particles (mCsA) were prepared by emulsion techniques. CsA (15, 30, 45 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage to Sprague Dawley (SD) rats over 28 days. Haematological and biochemical metrics were followed with tissue histology performed on sacrifice. Whether presented as nCsA or mCsA, 45 mg/kg dose caused significant loss of body weight and lowered food consumption compared to untreated control. Across the doses, both nCsA and mCsA produce significant decreases in lymphocyte numbers compared to controls, commensurate with the proprietary product, Neoral® 15. Dosing with nCsA showed higher serum drug levels than mCsA presumably owing to the smaller particle size facilitating absorption. The treatment had no noticeable effects on inflammatory/oxidative stress markers or antioxidant enzyme levels, except an increase in ceruloplasmin (CP) levels for high dose nCsA/mCsA group. Further, only subtle, sub-lethal changes were observed in histology of nCsA/mCsA treated rat organs. Blank (drug-free) particles did not induce changes in the parameters studied. Therefore, it is extremely important that the encapsulated drug in the nano-products is

  8. Lack of histological cerebellar changes in Wistar rats given pulegone for 28 days. Comparison of immersion and perfusion tissue fixation

    Mølck, Anne-Marie; Poulsen, Morten; Lauridsen, Søren Tindgard; Olsen, Preben

    1998-01-01

    Pulegone was given orally by gavage to groups of 28 SPF Wistar rats at dosage levels of 0 or 160 mg/kg body weight per day for 28 days. Clinically treated animals showed slackness, depression, decreased food consumption, and body weight. The loss of body weight was accompanied by a marked decreas...

  9. Lack of histological cerebellar changes in Wistar rats given pulegone for 28 days. Comparison of immersion and perfusion tissue fixation

    Mølck, Anne-Marie; Poulsen, Morten; Lauridsen, Søren Tindgard;

    1998-01-01

    Pulegone was given orally by gavage to groups of 28 SPF Wistar rats at dosage levels of 0 or 160 mg/kg body weight per day for 28 days. Clinically treated animals showed slackness, depression, decreased food consumption, and body weight. The loss of body weight was accompanied by a marked decrease...

  10. Dietary Lysine Responses of Male Broilers From 14 to 28 Days of Age Subjected to Different Environmental Conditions

    Dietary amino acid requirements are influenced by environmental conditions. Two experiments examined growth responses of Ross × Ross TP 16 male broilers fed diets varying in digestible (dig) Lys concentrations from 14 to 28 days of age under different environmental conditions. Experiment 1 was condu...

  11. Dose Regimens, Variability, and Complications Associated with Using Repeat-Bolus Dosing to Extend a Surgical Plane of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice

    Jaber, Samer M.; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B.; Marx, James O

    2014-01-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redo...

  12. Collaborative study on fifteen compounds in the rat-liver Comet assay integrated into 2- and 4-week repeat-dose studies.

    Rothfuss, Andreas; O'Donovan, Mike; De Boeck, Marlies; Brault, Dominique; Czich, Andreas; Custer, Laura; Hamada, Shuichi; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Hayashi, Makoto; Howe, Jonathan; Kraynak, Andrew R; van der Leede, Bas-jan; Nakajima, Madoka; Priestley, Catherine; Thybaud, Veronique; Saigo, Kazuhiko; Sawant, Satin; Shi, Jing; Storer, Richard; Struwe, Melanie; Vock, Esther; Galloway, Sheila

    2010-09-30

    A collaborative trial was conducted to evaluate the possibility of integrating the rat-liver Comet assay into repeat-dose toxicity studies. Fourteen laboratories from Europe, Japan and the USA tested fifteen chemicals. Two chemicals had been previously shown to induce micronuclei in an acute protocol, but were found negative in a 4-week Micronucleus (MN) Assay (benzo[a]pyrene and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine; Hamada et al., 2001); four genotoxic rat-liver carcinogens that were negative in the MN assay in bone marrow or blood (2,6-dinitrotoluene, dimethylnitrosamine, 1,2-dibromomethane, and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline); three compounds used in the ongoing JaCVAM (Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods) validation study of the acute liver Comet assay (2,4-diaminotoluene, 2,6-diaminotoluene and acrylamide); three pharmaceutical-like compounds (chlordiazepoxide, pyrimethamine and gemifloxacin), and three non-genotoxic rodent liver carcinogens (methapyrilene, clofibrate and phenobarbital). Male rats received oral administrations of the test compounds, daily for two or four weeks. The top dose was meant to be the highest dose producing clinical signs or histopathological effects without causing mortality, i.e. the 28-day maximum tolerated dose. The liver Comet assay was performed according to published recommendations and following the protocol for the ongoing JaCVAM validation trial. Laboratories provided liver Comet assay data obtained at the end of the long-term (2- or 4-week) studies together with an evaluation of liver histology. Most of the test compounds were also investigated in the liver Comet assay after short-term (1-3 daily) administration to compare the sensitivity of the two study designs. MN analyses were conducted in bone marrow or peripheral blood for most of the compounds to determine whether the liver Comet assay could complement the MN assay for the detection of genotoxins after long-term treatment. Most of the liver genotoxins

  13. BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL CHANGES IN RATS DOSED REPEATEDLY WITH DIISOPROPYLFLUOROPHOSPHATE (DFP)

    Behavioral effects of organophosphates (OPs) typically decrease with repeated exposure, despite persistence of OP-induced inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and downregulation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors. o characterize this tolerance phenomenon, rats were ...

  14. Estimation of breast doses and breast cancer risk associated with repeated fluoroscopic chest examinations of women with tuberculosis

    A methodology is presented to estimate cumulative breast dose and breast cancer risk for women exposed to repeated fluoroscopic chest examinations during air collapse therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis. Medical record abstraction, physician interview, patient contact, machine exposure measurements, and absorbed dose computations were combined to estimate average breast doses for 1047 Massachusetts women who were treated between 1930 and 1954. The methodology presented considers breast size and composition, patient orientation, x-ray field size and location, beam quality, type of examination, machine exposure rate, and exposure time during fluoroscopic examinations. The best estimate for the risk of radiation-induced cancer for the women living longer than 10 years after initial fluoroscopic exposure is 6.2 excess breast cancers per million woman-year-rad with 90% confidence limits of 2.8 and 10.7 cancers/106 WY-rad. When breast cancer risk is considered as a function of absorbed dose in the breast, instead of as a function of the number of fluoroscopic examinations, a linear dose--response relationship over the range of estimated doses is consistent with the data. However, because of the uncertainty due to small-sample variability and because of the wide range of assumptions regarding certain fluoroscopy conditions, other dose--response relationships are compatible with the data

  15. Toxicogenomic analysis of gene expression changes in rat liver after a 28-day oral benzene exposure

    Heijne, W.H.M.; Jonker, D.; Stierum, R.H.; Ommen, B. van; Groten, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is an industrial chemical, component of automobile exhaust and cigarette smoke. After hepatic bioactivation benzene induces bone marrow, blood and hepatic toxicity. Using a toxicogenomics approach this study analysed the effects of benzene at three dose levels on gene expression in the liver

  16. Dose regimens, variability, and complications associated with using repeat-bolus dosing to extend a surgical plane of anesthesia in laboratory mice.

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-11-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine-xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine-xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  17. Response of Lolium perenne to repeated flame treatments with various doses of propane

    Rask, Anne Merete; Andreasen, Christian; Kristoffersen, Palle

    2012-01-01

    In many urban areas, use of herbicides is either unwanted or prohibited and replaced with flame weeding. The influence of dose (kg propane ha-1) and treatment interval of flame weed control was studied on Lolium perenne. Lolium perenne is a perennial grass that is very difficult to control with non......-chemical weed control methods, because of its extensive regrowth. Treatments of eight different doses and five treatment intervals were applied during two seasons from May to October. The response was measured as plant dry weight, 14 days after last treatment. All weeds were killed with doses above 80 kg...... in dry weight). Split applications generally increased the effect of the treatments, especially when the number of treatments was increased from four to six. The results are in accordance with the assumption that repeated flame treatments are necessary to kill larger plants and heat tolerant weeds...

  18. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol

    Akane, Hirotoshi [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Saito, Fumiyo [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Shiraki, Ayako [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Takeyoshi, Masahiro; Imatanaka, Nobuya [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Itahashi, Megu [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Murakami, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Veterinary Toxicology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Shibutani, Makoto, E-mail: mshibuta@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200 mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200 mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc{sup +} neurons at 1000 ppm and Fos{sup +} neurons at ≥ 300 ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure. - Highlights: • Neuronal toxicity parameters after 28-day glycidol treatment were examined in rats. • Region-specific global gene expression profiling was conducted in brain regions. • Cortical tissues downregulated genes on axonogenesis and synaptic transmission. • Cortical tissues

  19. Downregulation of immediate-early genes linking to suppression of neuronal plasticity in rats after 28-day exposure to glycidol

    We previously found that the 28-day oral toxicity study of glycidol at 200 mg/kg/day in rats resulted in axonopathy in both the central and peripheral nervous systems and aberrations in the late-stage of hippocampal neurogenesis targeting the process of neurite extension. To capture the neuronal parameters in response to glycidol toxicity, these animals were subjected to region-specific global gene expression profiling in four regions of cerebral and cerebellar architectures, followed by immunohistochemical analysis of selected gene products. Expression changes of genes related to axonogenesis and synaptic transmission were observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis at 200 mg/kg showing downregulation in most genes. In the corpus callosum, genes related to growth, survival and functions of glial cells fluctuated their expression. Immunohistochemically, neurons expressing gene products of immediate-early genes, i.e., Arc, Fos and Jun, decreased in their number in the dentate granule cell layer, cingulate cortex and cerebellar vermis. We also applied immunohistochemical analysis in rat offspring after developmental exposure to glycidol through maternal drinking water. The results revealed increases of Arc+ neurons at 1000 ppm and Fos+ neurons at ≥ 300 ppm in the dentate granule cell layer of offspring only at the adult stage. These results suggest that glycidol suppressed neuronal plasticity in the brain after 28-day exposure to young adult animals, in contrast to the operation of restoration mechanism to increase neuronal plasticity at the adult stage in response to aberrations in neurogenesis after developmental exposure. - Highlights: • Neuronal toxicity parameters after 28-day glycidol treatment were examined in rats. • Region-specific global gene expression profiling was conducted in brain regions. • Cortical tissues downregulated genes on axonogenesis and synaptic transmission. • Cortical tissues decreased

  20. Airway responses and inflammation in subjects with asthma after four days of repeated high-single-dose allergen challenge

    Schulze Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both standard and low-dose allergen provocations are an established tool in asthma research to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of allergic asthma. However, clinical symptoms are less likely to be induced. Therefore, we designed a protocol for repetitive high-dose bronchial allergen challenges to generate clinical symptoms and airway inflammation. Methods A total of 27 patients aged 18 to 40 years with positive skin-prick tests and mild asthma underwent repetitive high-dose allergen challenges with household dust mites for four consecutive days. Pulmonary function and exhaled NO were measured at every visit. Induced sputum was analysed before and after the allergen challenges for cell counts, ECP, IL-5, INF-γ, IL-8, and the transcription factor Foxp3. Results We found a significant decrease in pulmonary function, an increased use of salbutamol and the development of a late asthmatic response and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, as well as a significant induction of eNO, eosinophils, and Th-2 cytokines. Repeated provocation was feasible in the majority of patients. Two subjects had severe adverse events requiring prednisolone to cope with nocturnal asthma symptoms. Conclusions Repeated high-dose bronchial allergen challenges resulted in severe asthma symptoms and marked Th-2-mediated allergic airway inflammation. The high-dose challenge model is suitable only in an attenuated form in diseased volunteers for proof-of-concept studies and in clinical settings to reduce the risk of severe asthma exacerbations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.govNCT00677209

  1. Effects of methiothepin on changes in brain serotonin release induced by repeated administration of high doses of anorectic serotoninergic drugs

    Gardier, A. M.; Kaakkola, S.; Erfurth, A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We previously observed, using in vivo microdialysis, that the potassium-evoked release of frontocortical serotonin (5-HT) is suppressed after rats receive high doses (30 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 3 days) of fluoxetine, a selective blocker of 5-HT reuptake. We now describe similar impairments in 5-HT release after repeated administration of two other 5-HT uptake blockers, zimelidine and sertraline (both at 20 mg/kg, i.p. for 3 days) as well as after dexfenfluramine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p. daily for 3 days), a drug which both releases 5-HT and blocks its reuptake. Doses of these indirect serotonin agonists were about 4-6 times the drug's ED50 in producing anorexia, a serotonin-related behavior. In addition, methiothepin (20 microM), a non-selective receptor antagonist, locally perfused through the dialysis probe 24 h after the last drug injection, enhanced K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT at serotoninergic nerve terminals markedly in control rats and slightly in rats treated with high doses of dexfenfluramine or fluoxetine. On the other hand, pretreatment with methiothepin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) one hour before each of the daily doses of fluoxetine or dexfenfluramine given for 3 days, totally prevented the decrease in basal and K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT. Finally, when methiothepin was injected systemically the day before the first of 3 daily injections of dexfenfluramine, it partially attenuated the long-term depletion of brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels induced by repeated administration of high doses of dexfenfluramine. These data suggest that drugs which bring about the prolonged blockade of 5-HT reuptake - such as dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine - can, by causing prolonged increases in intrasynaptic 5-HT levels as measured by in vivo microdialysis, produce receptor-mediated long-term changes in the processes controlling serotonin levels and dynamics.

  2. Assessment of the drug interaction potential and single- and repeat-dose pharmacokinetics of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib.

    Suttle, A Benjamin; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Ouellet, Daniele; Richards-Peterson, Lauren E; Aktan, Gursel; Gordon, Michael S; LoRusso, Patricia M; Infante, Jeffrey R; Sharma, Sunil; Kendra, Kari; Patel, Manish; Pant, Shubham; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Middleton, Mark R; Blackman, Samuel C; Botbyl, Jeff; Carson, Stanley W

    2015-04-01

    The induction of CYP2C9 by dabrafenib using S-warfarin as a probe and the effects of a CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole) and a CYP2C8 inhibitor (gemfibrozil) on dabrafenib pharmacokinetics were evaluated in patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive tumors. Dabrafenib single- and repeat-dose pharmacokinetics were also evaluated. S-warfarin AUC(0- ∞) decreased 37% and Cmax increased 18% with dabrafenib. Dabrafenib AUC(0- τ) and C(max) increased 71% and 33%, respectively, with ketoconazole. Hydroxy- and desmethyl-dabrafenib AUC(0-τ) increased 82% and 68%, respectively, and AUC for carboxy-dabrafenib decreased 16%. Dabrafenib AUC(0-τ) increased 47%, with no change in C(max), after gemfibrozil co-administration. Gemfibrozil did not affect systemic exposure to dabrafenib metabolites. Single- and repeat-dose dabrafenib pharmacokinetics were consistent with previous reports. All cohorts used the commercial capsules. More-frequent monitoring of international normalized ratios is recommended in patients receiving warfarin during initiation or discontinuation of dabrafenib. Substitution of strong inhibitors or strong inducers of CYP3A or CYP2C8 is recommended during treatment with dabrafenib. PMID:25449654

  3. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds. PMID:27481023

  4. Successful repeated treatment with high dose cyclophosphamide and autologous blood stem cell transplantation in CIDP

    Axelson, Hans W.; Öberg, Gunnar; Askmark, Håkan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is characterised by the occurrence of symmetrical weakness and sensory impairment in arms and legs. The course is relapsing or chronic and progressing. CIDP is considered to be an autoimmune disease, which is supported by the beneficial response to immunomodulating therapies in most patients. We report on a patient with CIDP who has been in remission for more than 3 years after treatment with high dose cyclophosphamide and autologous bl...

  5. Repeated Administration of High-Dose Intermittent Rifapentine Reduces Rifapentine and Moxifloxacin Plasma Concentrations▿

    Dooley, Kelly; Flexner, Charles; Hackman, Judith; Peloquin, Charles A.; Nuermberger, Eric; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Moxifloxacin- and rifapentine-based regimens are under investigation for the treatment of tuberculosis. However, rifapentine may induce enzymes that metabolize moxifloxacin, resulting in decreased moxifloxacin concentrations. In this phase I, two-period, sequential-design study, 13 subjects received 400 mg moxifloxacin daily for 4 days followed by daily moxifloxacin coadministered with 900 mg rifapentine thrice weekly. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed after the 4th and 19th doses of mo...

  6. A flow-cytometric NK-cytotoxicity assay adapted for use in rat repeated dose toxicity studies

    A recent regulatory document for immunotoxicity testing of new pharmaceutical drugs includes cytotoxic natural killer (NK)-cell function as a required parameter in repeated dose toxicity studies. The classical 51Cr-release assay is the conventional test for cytotoxicity testing but several drawbacks with this assay has increased the demand for new reliable test systems. Here, we describe the optimisation of a flow-cytometric cytotoxicity assay especially adapted for regulatory rat studies in drug development. The test principle is based on target cell labelling with 5-(6)-carboxy-fluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) and subsequent DNA-labelling with propidium iodide (PI) for identification of target cells with compromised cell membranes. The results are expressed as percentage of dead targets on a cell-to-cell basis. The final format of the assay includes 0.5 ml peripheral blood, 1.25x105 effector cells per sample, and collection of 500 target events by flow-cytometry. When NKR-P1+ cells were removed from the effector cell population by magnetic depletion the relative proportion decreased from 6 to 0.08%. The corresponding cytotoxic activity decreased from 68 to 8%. Also, the cytotoxic activity showed a significant and positive correlation with the proportion of NK-cells present in the effector cell suspension. Thus, the cytotoxicity measured is almost exclusively exerted by NK-cells. The current flow-cytometric test benefits from using peripheral blood as a source for effector cells since it will not conflict with the use of spleen for histopathological investigations in repeated dose toxicity studies. Additionally, since only a minimal number of effector cells are required per sample repeated testing of the same animal is enabled

  7. Repeated exposure to an ambient level of NO{sub 2} enhances asthmatic response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose

    Strand, V. [The Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Svartengren, M. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Rak, S. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Allergy Center, Gothenburg (Sweden); Barck, C.; Bylin, G. [Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, and the Institute of Medicine at the Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-06-01

    We investigated the effects of NO{sub 2} and allergen on lung function in a repeated exposure model. For 4 subsequent days, 16 subjects with mild asthma and allergy to birch or grass pollen were exposed at rest to either purified air or 500 {mu}g x m{sup -3} NO{sub 2} for 30 min in an exposure chamber. Four hours later, an individually determined nonsymptomatic allergen dose was inhaled. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)) was measured by a portable spirometer at early phase (EP) 15 min after allergen and at late phase (LP) 3-10 h after allergen. Subjective symptoms and medication were followed by diary cards. Asthmatic response was significantly increased after repeated exposure to NO{sub 2} and allergen compared to air and allergen. The 4-day mean fall in FEV1 after NO{sub 2} was at EP-2.5% versus -0.4% for air (p=0.02) and at LP -4.4% versus -1.9% for air (p=0.01, ANOVA). An increase in EP response was seen already after a single NO{sub 2} exposure (p=0.03). There was a tendency (p=0.07) towards increased night-time symptoms of asthma after NO{sub 2} plus allergen. Although the effects were small, the results indicate that a repeated short exposure to an ambient level of NO{sub 2} enhances the airway response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose. (au) 28 refs.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of voriconazole in body fluids of dogs after repeated oral dosing.

    Lemetayer, J D; Dowling, P M; Taylor, S M; Papich, M G

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole and its concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), aqueous humor, and synovial fluid in five healthy dogs following once daily oral dose of 6 mg/kg for 2 weeks. Body fluid and plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mild to moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects were seen. The mean AUC0-24 : minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio was 15.23 for a chosen MIC of 1 μg/mL, which is lower than the recommended target of 20-25 and also lower than previously reported in dogs, perhaps reflecting induction of metabolizing enzymes by multiple dosing. Voriconazole concentrations in the CSF, aqueous humor, and synovial fluid were only 13-30% the concurrent plasma concentration, which is lower than previously reported in other species. Results of this study suggest that twice daily, administration may be necessary to maintain therapeutic plasma concentrations in dogs but further studies are warranted. PMID:25691353

  9. Defining upper gastrointestinal bleeding from linked primary and secondary care data and the effect on occurrence and 28 day mortality

    Crooks Colin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care records from the UK have frequently been used to identify episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in studies of drug toxicity because of their comprehensive population coverage and longitudinal recording of prescriptions and diagnoses. Recent linkage within England of primary and secondary care data has augmented this data but the timing and coding of concurrent events, and how the definition of events in linked data effects occurrence and 28 day mortality is not known. Methods We used the recently linked English Hospital Episodes Statistics and General Practice Research Database, 1997–2010, to define events by; a specific upper gastrointestinal bleed code in either dataset, a specific bleed code in both datasets, or a less specific but plausible code from the linked dataset. Results This approach resulted in 81% of secondary care defined bleeds having a corresponding plausible code within 2 months in primary care. However only 62% of primary care defined bleeds had a corresponding plausible HES admission within 2 months. The more restrictive and specific case definitions excluded severe events and almost halved the 28 day case fatality when compared to broader and more sensitive definitions. Conclusions Restrictive definitions of gastrointestinal bleeding in linked datasets fail to capture the full heterogeneity in coding possible following complex clinical events. Conversely too broad a definition in primary care introduces events not severe enough to warrant hospital admission. Ignoring these issues may unwittingly introduce selection bias into a study’s results.

  10. Optimization of Hyalella azteca IQ Toxicity Test{trademark} for prediction of 28-day sediment toxicity tests

    Novotny, A.N.; Ezzard, C.L.; Douglas, W.S.; Home, M.T. [Aqua Survey, Inc., Flemington, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The IQ Toxicity Test, which is a rapid screening toxicity test consisting of the observation of in-vivo inhibition of an enzymatic process using a fluorescent substrate, has proven successful for the determination of 24 and 48-hour EC50`s of D. magna, C. dubia, D. pulex and M. bahia. The application of this concept to utilize the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca may be an excellent way in which to reduce the standard 28-day chronic sediment toxicity test to possibly one hour`s time. This study incorporates an additive experimental design to explore the effects of and interactions between five specific variables: size of the amphipod, exposure time to the toxicant, concentration of substrate, exposure time to the substrate, and length of time starved prior to testing. The results of the IQ toxicity test were compared to those of a 28-day chronic sediment toxicity test. Preliminary data indicate that there is an optimal combination of these variables which results in a concise, reproducible toxicity test for use with Hyalella azteca, and would potentially be applicable to other freshwater amphipods in the future.

  11. Clinical evaluation of the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (SR-4233): phase I experience with repeated dose administration during fractionated irradiation

    Purpose: Regions of chronic or transient hypoxia are common in many human tumors and are thought to limit tumor cell killing and tumor control with conventional irradiation and some chemotherapeutic agents. Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-di-N-oxide) forms a cytotoxic free radical during reductive metabolism in regions of hypoxia. In well oxygenated regions, the tirapazamine radical reacts with molecular oxygen to form the inactive parent drug. This results in markedly greater toxicity for hypoxic cells than for the well oxygenated cells that comprise most normal tissues. Tirapazamine increased the anti-tumor effects of single dose or fractionated irradiation or cis-platin chemotherapy in murine tumors,in vivo . This study evaluated the ability to repeat the administration of Tirapazamine during courses of fractionated irradiation in humans after an earlier phase I trial established a maximum tolerated dose of 390 mg per square meter of body surface area (mg/m2) when given as a single dose with radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between December 1993 and August 1995 22 patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors of varying histology, normal renal, hepatic, and hematologic functions, and Karnofsky performance status ≥ 60 received repeated doses of Tirapazamine during a planned, 6 weeks course of standardly fractionated radiotherapy. After anti-emetic treatment with ondansetron (32 mg) and dexamethasone (16 mg), Tirapazamine was administered during a 2 hour intravenous infusion that ended from 30 to 90 minutes before a radiation treatment. Patients were monitored for acute toxicity during the course of treatment and for a minimum of one month after radiotherapy. Results: The study was initiated with three, biweekly doses of Tirapazamine at 330 mg/m2. Four of 7 patients who initiated treatment at this dose refused the second (1 patient) or third dose of Tirapazamine (3 patients). Two of the three patients who received three doses developed

  12. The treatment of multinodular large non-toxic goiter using repeated doses of radioiodine (preliminary report)

    Introduction: The aim of study was to establish the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy using 131I in the group of patients with multinodular large non-toxic goiter. Material and methods: Therapy was undertaken in female patients disqualified from surgery due to high risk and these patients who didn't agree to surgery. Studies were performed in 7 women (age range: 62.82 yrs) with large goiters (2nd degree according to WHO classification and goiter volume assessed by USG over 100 cm3). Serum TSH, fT4, fT3, antithyroid antibodies (TPOAb, TgAb, TRAb) levels, urinary iodine concentration (UIE) were estimated in all patients parallel with radioiodine uptake test (after 5 and 24 hours), 131I thyroid scintigraphy and fine needle biopsy to exclude neoplasmatic transformation. These studies and therapy with 22 mCi 131I were repeated every 3 months. Results: Before therapy median thyroid volume was approximately 145 cm3 and during therapy gradually decreased to 76 cm3 after 6 months and to 65 cm3 after 12 months. Increase of TRAb can be a inhibiting factor of thyroid volume reduction. Other antithyroid antibodies showed marked tendency to rise but without significant correlation with radioiodine uptake and goiter reduction. After 12 months we found 2 patients with clinical and laboratory hypothyroidism. Conclusions: In some cases of multinodular large non-toxic goiter, the radioiodine therapy can be the best alternative way for L-thyroxine treatment or surgery therapy. The fractionated radioiodine therapy of multinodular large non-toxic goiter is safe and effective method but continuation of nodules observation is necessary. (author)

  13. A 4-Week, Repeated, Intravenous Dose, Toxicity Test of Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Kwangho Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP is a pharmacopuncture made by distilling extract from mountain cultivated ginseng or mountain wild ginseng. This pharmacopuncture is injected intravenously, which is a quick, lossless way of strongly tonifying Qi function. The present study was undertaken to evaluate a 4-week, repeated, intravenous injection, toxicity test of MGP in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods: Twenty male and female 6-week-old SD rats were used as subjects. We divided the SD rats into 4 groups: the high-dosage (10 mL/kg, medium-dosage (5 mL/kg, low-dosage (2.5 mL/kg and control (normal saline groups. MGP or normal saline was injected intravenously into the caudal vein of the rats once daily for 4 weeks. Clinical signs, body weights, and food consumption were monitored during the observation period, and hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weight, necropsy, and histological examinations were conducted once the observations had been completed. Results: No mortality was observed in any of the groups during the observation period. No changes due to MGP were observed in the experimental groups regarding clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, organ weight and necropsy. No histological changes due to MGP were observed in any of the male or female rats in the high-dosage group. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, intravenous injection, toxicity test of MGP in SD rats, no toxic changes due to MGP were observed in any of the male or female rats in the high-dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the high and the low doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 10 mL/kg and 2.5 mL/kg, respectively.

  14. Real-time PCR quantification of infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chicken tissues, faeces, isolator-dust and bedding material over 28 days following infection reveals high levels in faeces and dust.

    Roy, Parimal; Fakhrul Islam, A F M; Burgess, Susan K; Hunt, Peter W; McNally, Jody; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important disease of chickens caused by ILT virus (ILTV). We used the Australian SA2 and A20 vaccine strains of ILTV to determine tissue distribution and excretion characteristics of ILTV in specific-pathogen-free chickens and to determine whether ILTV is readily detectable in environmental samples such as faeces, bedding material and dust using real-time quantitative PCR. Three groups of 10 freshly hatched chicks were placed in isolators and infected orally with high doses of the two strains of vaccine virus or left unchallenged as controls. Over a 28-day post-infection (p.i.) period, faecal and serum samples were collected at frequent intervals from six individually identified chickens in each group. Dust and litter samples from the isolators were collected less frequently. Tissue samples were collected from three to four sacrificed or dead/euthanized birds at 6, 14 and 28 days p.i. Infection resulted in clinical ILT, a pronounced antibody response and sustained qPCR detection of the viral genome in the trachea, Harderian gland, lung and kidney up to 28 days p.i. A high level of the viral genome was also detected in faeces between 2 and 7 days p.i., declining by about approximately four orders of magnitude to low, but detectable, levels at 21 and 28 days p.i. The finding of high-level shedding of ILTV in faeces warrants further investigation into the epidemiological role of this, and the sustained high levels of ILTV observed in dust suggest that it may be a useful sample material for monitoring ILTV status in flocks. PMID:26294959

  15. Combined repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity screening test of 4-methoxy-2-nitroaniline in rats.

    Tsubokura, Yasuhiro; Aso, Sunao; Koga, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Junichi; Kobayashi, Toshio; Hoshuyama, Satsuki; Oshima, Yutaka; Miyata, Katsumi; Kusune, Yuji; Muroi, Takako; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Ryuichi; Ajimi, Shozo; Furukawa, Kotaro

    2015-10-01

    4-Methoxy-2-nitroaniline (4M2NA) is widely used as an intermediate for the synthesis of dyes, pigments and other chemical compounds. Since 4M2NA has amino-group and nitro-group on the benzene ring, it was expected that it induced obvious hemolytic anemia. We conducted a combined repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity screening test according to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guideline No. 422 (OECD TG 422) to enrich the toxic information and ensure the safety of 4M2NA. 4M2NA was administered to Crl:CD(SD) male and female rats by gavage at 0, 12.5, 75 or 450 mg/kg/day for 42 to maximum of 54 days through pre-mating, mating, pregnancy and lactation periods. An extramedullary hematopoiesis and congestion in spleen, and higher reticulocyte ratio were noted in only females at 450 mg/kg/day without decreased anemic parameters in the hematological examination. Hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes in both sexes was observed with increased relative liver weight at 450 mg/kg/day. Furthermore, the diffuse follicular cell hypertrophy of the thyroid was observed in females at 450 mg/kg/day. No abnormalities were detected in the reproductive indices of copulation, delivery or fetal viability. We concluded the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for repeated-dose toxicity was 75 mg/kg/day based on the trace evidences of hemolytic anemia, and the NOAEL for reproductive/developmental toxicity as 450 mg/kg/day based on no toxicological concerns for reproductive endpoints. The hemolytic anemia was much milder than expected. Thus, we discussed the reason of this much less hemolytic effect from the point of view of the structural characteristics of 4M2NA. PMID:25367778

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  17. Study of four weeks repeated-dose toxic test of Sweet Bee Venom in rats Original Articles

    Kwon Hae-Yon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyse four weeks repeated -dose toxicity of Sweet Bee Venom (SBV-pure melittin, the major component of honey bee venom in rats. Methods: All experiments were conducted under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLPat Biotoxtech Company, a non-clinical study authorized institution. Male and female rats of 5 weeks old were chosen for the pilot study of four weeks repeated-dose toxicity and was injected at the level of 0.56 mg/kg body weight (eighty times higher than the clinical application dosage as the high dosage, followed by 0.28 and 0.14 mg/kg as midium and low dosage, respectively. Equal amount of normal saline was injected as the control group every day for four weeks. Results: 1. No mortality was witnessed in all of the experiment groups. 2. All experiment groups appealed pain sense in the treating time compared to the control group, and side effects such as hyperemia and movement disorder were observed around the area of injection in all experiment groups, and the higher dosage in treatment, the higher occurrence in side effects. 3. Concerning weight measurement, neither male nor female groups showed significant changes compared to the control group. 4. Concerning to the CBC and biochemistry, all experiment groups didn't show any significant changes compared to the control group. 5. Concerning weight measurement of organs, experiment groups didn't show any significant changes compared to the control group. 6. To verify abnormalities of organs and tissues, those such as cerebellum, cerebrum, liver, lung, kidney,and spinal cords were removed and we conducted histologocal observation with H-E staining.Concerning the histologocal observation of liver tissues, some fatty changes were observed around portal vein in 0.56 mg/kg experiment group. But another organs were not detected in any abnormalities. 7. The proper high dosage of SBV for the thirteen weeks repeated test in rats may be 0.28 mg

  18. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention within 12 Hours to 28 Days of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in a Real-World Chinese Population

    Xingli Wu; Dingyou Yang; Yusheng Zhao; Caiyi Lu; Yu Wang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Percutaneous coronary intervention( PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been widely accepted for patient who come within 12 hours, but for those who come to the hospital late (12 hours to 28 days) the long-term data and possible predictors are limited regarding 'hard' endpoints in 'real world'. METHODS: The registry data of all 5523 consecutive patients admitted due to an incident STEMI (12 hours to 28 days) in our center were analyzed. Patients were divided in...

  19. Modeling in-Hospital Patient Survival During the First 28 Days After Intensive Care Unit Admission: a Prognostic Model for Clinical Trials in General Critically Ill Patients

    Moreno, R; Metnitz, P; Metnitz, B; Bauer, P.; Afonso de Carvalho, S; Hoechtl, A; SAPS 3 Investigators

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to develop a model for estimating patient 28-day in-hospital mortality using 2 different statistical approaches. DESIGN: The study was designed to develop an outcome prediction model for 28-day in-hospital mortality using (a) logistic regression with random effects and (b) a multilevel Cox proportional hazards model. SETTING: The study involved 305 intensive care units (ICUs) from the basic Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 cohort. ...

  20. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  1. Comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the ICRP 30 and ICRP 60 models for a repeated incorporation by inhalation of I-125

    Presently work, a comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the models of the ICRP 30 and those of the ICRP 60 for the analysis of internal dose due to repeated incorporation of I-125 is shown. The estimations of incorporated activity are obtained starting from the proportionate data for an exercise of inter comparison, with which it should be determined the internal dose later on. For to estimate the initial activity incorporated by repeated dose was assumed that this it was given through of multiple individual incorporations which happened in the middle points of the monitoring periods. The results using the models of the ICRP 30 and of the ICRP 60 are compared and the causes of the differences are analyzed. (Author)

  2. Intakes of culinary herbs and spices from a food frequency questionnaire evaluated against 28-days estimated records

    Blomhoff Rune

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, herbs and spices are much used food flavourings. However, little data exist regarding actual dietary intake of culinary herbs and spices. We developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ for the assessment of habitual diet the preceding year, with focus on phytochemical rich food, including herbs and spices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intakes of herbs and spices from the FFQ with estimates of intake from another dietary assessment method. Thus we compared the intake estimates from the FFQ with 28 days of estimated records of herb and spice consumption as a reference method. Methods The evaluation study was conducted among 146 free living adults, who filled in the FFQ and 2-4 weeks later carried out 28 days recording of herb and spice consumption. The FFQ included a section with questions about 27 individual culinary herbs and spices, while the records were open ended records for recording of herbs and spice consumption exclusively. Results Our study showed that the FFQ obtained slightly higher estimates of total intake of herbs and spices than the total intake assessed by the Herbs and Spice Records (HSR. The correlation between the two assessment methods with regard to total intake was good (r = 0.5, and the cross-classification suggests that the FFQ may be used to classify subjects according to total herb and spice intake. For the 8 most frequently consumed individual herbs and spices, the FFQ obtained good estimates of median frequency of intake for 2 herbs/spices, while good estimates of portion sizes were obtained for 4 out of 8 herbs/spices. Conclusions Our results suggested that the FFQ was able to give good estimates of frequency of intake and portion sizes on group level for several of the most frequently used herbs and spices. The FFQ was only able to fairly rank subjects according to frequency of intake of the 8 most frequently consumed herbs and spices. Other studies are warranted

  3. Admission cell free DNA levels predict 28-day mortality in patients with severe sepsis in intensive care.

    Avital Avriel

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to assess the mortality prediction accuracy of circulating cell-free DNA (CFD level at admission measured by a new simplified method.CFD levels were measured by a direct fluorescence assay in severe sepsis patients on intensive care unit (ICU admission. In-hospital and/or twenty eight day all-cause mortality was the primary outcome.Out of 108 patients with median APACHE II of 20, 32.4% have died in hospital/or at 28-day. CFD levels were higher in decedents: median 3469.0 vs. 1659 ng/ml, p<0.001. In multivariable model APACHE II score and CFD (quartiles were significantly associated with the mortality: odds ratio of 1.05, p = 0.049 and 2.57, p<0.001 per quartile respectively. C-statistics for the models was 0.79 for CFD and 0.68 for APACHE II. Integrated discrimination improvement (IDI analyses showed that CFD and CFD+APACHE II score models had better discriminatory ability than APACHE II score alone.CFD level assessed by a new, simple fluorometric-assay is an accurate predictor of acute mortality among ICU patients with severe sepsis. Comparison of CFD to APACHE II score and Procalcitonin (PCT, suggests that CFD has the potential to improve clinical decision making.

  4. Toxicological Assessment of β-(1à6-Glucan (Lasiodiplodan in Mice during a 28-Day Feeding Study by Gavage

    Janaína A. Túrmina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the toxicity caused by fungal exopolysaccharides of the β-(1®6-D-glucan type are rare. In this study, the toxicological effects of sub-chronic treatments with lasiodiplodan (β-(1®6-D-glucan from Lasiodiplodia theobromae MMPI were evaluated in mice through the assessment of biochemical, hematological, and histopathological alterations. Thirty-two mice (16 male, 16 female were used in this study divided in two groups; one group received lasiodiplodan (50 mg/kg body weight daily for 28 days via gavage, and another (control group received saline during the same period. Blood samples were collected via cardiac puncture for hematological and biochemical analyses. Liver, heart, kidney, and spleen were collected for histopathological analysis. Statistical analysis was performed through one-way analysis of variance and only p < 0.05 F-values were presented. Significant reduction in blood glucose in the male group (35%; p < 0.01, transaminases activity in both sexes (AST and ALT; ~35%; p < 0.05, and urea (20%; p < 0.01 in the female group was observed with the lasiodiplodan treatment. The results showed that sub-chronic treatments with lasiodiplodan did not generate hematological and histopathological alterations leading to signs of toxicity in healthy mice, independent of gender.

  5. Phenolic acid protects of renal damage induced by ochratoxin A in a 28-days-oral treatment in rats.

    Cariddi, L N; Escobar, F M; Sabini, M C; Campra, N A; Bagnis, G; Decote-Ricardo, D; Freire-de-Lima, C G; Mañas, F; Sabini, L I; Dalcero, A M

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the chlorogenic acid (ChlA) capacity to reverse the toxic effects induced by ochratoxin A (OTA) in a subacute toxicity test in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed orally by gavage for 28 days with OTA (0.4mg/kg bw/day), ChlA (5mg/kg bw/day) or the combination OTA (0.4mg/kg bw/day)+ChlA (5mg/kg bw/day). No deaths, no decrease in feed intake or body weight in any experimental group were recorded. The negative control group and the animals treated with ChlA alone showed no changes in any parameters evaluated. In OTA-treated group significant changes such as decrease in urine volume, proteinuria, occult blood, increase in serum creatinine values; decrease in absolute and relative kidney weight and characteristics histopathological lesions that indicated kidney damage were observed. However, limited effect on oxidative stress parameters were detected in kidneys of OTA-treated group. Animals treated with the combination OTA+ChlA were showed as negative control group in the evaluation of several parameters of toxicity. In conclusion, ChlA, at given concentration, improved biochemical parameters altered in urine and serum and pathological damages in kidneys induced by OTA exposure, showing a good protective activity, but not by an apparent antioxidant mechanism. PMID:26987112

  6. Psychomotor performance during a 28 day head-down tilt with and without lower body negative pressure

    Traon, A. Pavy-le; de Feneyrols, A. Rous; Cornac, A.; Abdeseelam, R.; N'uygen, D.; Lazerges, M.; Güell, A.; Bes, A.

    Several factors may affect psychomotor performance in space: sensory-motor changes, sleep disturbances, psychological modifications induced by the social isolation and confinement. However, psychomotor performance is difficult to assess. A battery of standardized and computerized tests, so-called "Automated Portable Test System" (APTS) was devised to ascertain the cognitive, perceptive and motor abilities and their possible fluctuations according to environmental effects. Antiorthostatic bedrest, often used to simulate weightlessness, (particularly cardiovascular modifications) also constitutes a situation of social confinement and isolation. During two bedrest experiments (with head-down tilt of -6°) of 28 days each, we intended to assess psychomotor performance of 6 males so as to determine whether: —on the one hand, it could be altered by remaining in decubitus; —on the other, the Lower Body Negative Pressure sessions, designed to prevent orthostatic intolerance back on Earth, could improve the performance. To accomplish this, part of the APTS tests as well as an automated perceptive attention test were performed. No downgrading of psychomotor performance was observed. On the contrary, the tasks were more accurately performed over time. In order to assess the experimental conditions on the acquisition phase, the learning curves were modelled. A beneficial effect of the LBNP sessions on simple tests involving the visual-motor coordination and attention faculties can only be regarded as a mere trend. Methods used in this experiment are also discussed.

  7. Neurotoxicity of low-dose repeatedly intranasal instillation of nano- and submicron-sized ferric oxide particles in mice

    Olfactory tract has been demonstrated to be an important portal for inhaled solid nanoparticle transportation into the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously demonstrated that intranasally instilled Fe2O3 nanoparticles could transport into the CNS via olfactory pathway. In this study, we investigated the neurotoxicity and size effect of repeatedly low-dose (130 μg) intranasal exposure of nano- and submicron-sized Fe2O3 particles (21 nm and 280 nm) to mice. The biomarkers of oxidative stress, activity of nitric oxide synthases and release of monoamine neurotransmitter in the brain were studied. Our results showed that significant oxidative stress was induced by the two sizes of Fe2O3 particles. The activities of GSH-Px, Cu,Zn-SOD, and cNOS significantly elevated and the total GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio significantly decreased in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus after the nano- and submicron-sized Fe2O3 particle treatment (p 2O3 generally induced greater alteration and more significant dose-effect response than the submicron-sized particle did. Some slight perturbation of monoamine neurotransmitters were found in the hippocampus after exposure to the two sizes of Fe2O3 particle. The TEM image showed that some ultrastructural alterations in nerve cells, including neurodendron degeneration, membranous structure disruption and lysosome increase in the olfactory bulb, slight dilation in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome increase in the hippocampus were induced by the nano-sized Fe2O3 treatment. In contrast, in the submicron-sized Fe2O3 treated mice, slightly swollen mitochondria and some vacuoles were observed in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus, respectively. These results indicate that intranasal exposure of Fe2O3 nanoparticles could induce more severe oxidative stress and nerve cell damage in the brain than the larger particle did. This is the first study to compare the neurotoxicity of nano- and submicron-sized Fe2O3 particles in the central

  8. Neurotoxicity of low-dose repeatedly intranasal instillation of nano- and submicron-sized ferric oxide particles in mice

    Wang Bing; Feng Weiyue, E-mail: fengwy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Zhu Motao; Wang Yun; Wang Meng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Gu Yiqun [Maternity Hospital of Haidian District (China); Ouyang Hong; Wang Huajian; Li Ming; Zhao Yuliang, E-mail: zhaoyuliang@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Chai Zhifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety and Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Wang Haifang [Peking University, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China)

    2009-01-15

    Olfactory tract has been demonstrated to be an important portal for inhaled solid nanoparticle transportation into the central nervous system (CNS). We have previously demonstrated that intranasally instilled Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles could transport into the CNS via olfactory pathway. In this study, we investigated the neurotoxicity and size effect of repeatedly low-dose (130 {mu}g) intranasal exposure of nano- and submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles (21 nm and 280 nm) to mice. The biomarkers of oxidative stress, activity of nitric oxide synthases and release of monoamine neurotransmitter in the brain were studied. Our results showed that significant oxidative stress was induced by the two sizes of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The activities of GSH-Px, Cu,Zn-SOD, and cNOS significantly elevated and the total GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio significantly decreased in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus after the nano- and submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle treatment (p < 0.05). The nano-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} generally induced greater alteration and more significant dose-effect response than the submicron-sized particle did. Some slight perturbation of monoamine neurotransmitters were found in the hippocampus after exposure to the two sizes of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle. The TEM image showed that some ultrastructural alterations in nerve cells, including neurodendron degeneration, membranous structure disruption and lysosome increase in the olfactory bulb, slight dilation in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome increase in the hippocampus were induced by the nano-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment. In contrast, in the submicron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} treated mice, slightly swollen mitochondria and some vacuoles were observed in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus, respectively. These results indicate that intranasal exposure of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles could induce more severe oxidative stress and nerve cell damage in the brain than the

  9. No increases in biomarkers of genetic damage or pathological changes in heart and brain tissues in male rats administered methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) for 28 days.

    Witt, Kristine L; Malarkey, David E; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Davis, Jeffrey P; Kissling, Grace E; Caspary, William; Travlos, Gregory; Recio, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Following a 2005 report of chromosomal damage in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who were treated with the commonly prescribed medication methylphenidate (MPH), numerous studies have been conducted to clarify the risk for MPH-induced genetic damage. Although most of these studies reported no changes in genetic damage endpoints associated with exposure to MPH, one recent study (Andreazza et al. [2007]: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 31:1282-1288) reported an increase in DNA damage detected by the Comet assay in blood and brain cells of Wistar rats treated by intraperitoneal injection with 1, 2, or 10 mg/kg MPH; no increases in micronucleated lymphocyte frequencies were observed in these rats. To clarify these findings, we treated adult male Wistar Han rats with 0, 2, 10, or 25 mg/kg MPH by gavage once daily for 28 consecutive days and measured micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) frequencies in blood, and DNA damage in blood, brain, and liver cells 4 hr after final dosing. Flow cytometric evaluation of blood revealed no significant increases in MN-RET. Comet assay evaluations of blood leukocytes and cells of the liver, as well as of the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of the brain showed no increases in DNA damage in MPH-treated rats in any of the three treatment groups. Thus, the previously reported observations of DNA damage in blood and brain tissue of rats exposed to MPH for 28 days were not confirmed in this study. Additionally, no histopathological changes in brain or heart, or elevated serum biomarkers of cardiac injury were observed in these MPH-exposed rats. PMID:19634155

  10. In vivo study with quartz-containing ceramic dusts: Inflammatory effects of two factory samples in lungs after intratracheal instillation in a 28-day study with rats

    Creutzenberg, O; Ziemann, C; Hansen, T; Ernst, H [Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Jackson, P; Cartlidge, D [CERAM Research Ltd., Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Brown, R, E-mail: otto.creutzenberg@item.fraunhofer.d [TOXSERVICES, Stretton (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    As various quartz polymorphs react differently in lungs, a differentiation of effects is needed while setting occupational exposure levels. The objective of this European Collective Research Project SILICERAM was to characterize differences in biological activity of four quartz species, i.) 2 quartz-containing materials collected at typical ceramic manufacturing sites (Tableware granulate, TG and Tableware cast, TC) versus ii.) a designed ceramic dust sample (Contrived Sample, CS) and iii.) ground quartz DQ12 (well-characterised standard quartz (Positive Control, PC) and TiO{sub 2} (negative control). TG and TC had been selected as the most promising two candidates based on a preceding in vitro screening of 5 factory samples. Total doses of 5 mg per rat of the TG and TC, 1.1 mg of the CS and 0.33 mg of the PC corresponding to 0.29, 0.16, 0.29 and 0.29 mg quartz per rat, respectively, were administered to rats by intratracheal instillation. After 3 days, bronchoalveolar lavagate (BAL) analysis resulted in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) levels of 15%, 25%, 0.6% and 25% in the TG, TC, CS and PC groups, respectively. At 28 days, the values were 29%, 20%, 7% and 45%. Histopathologically, the TG and TC groups showed very slight to slight effects, the PC group, however, stronger effects after the same period. In conclusion, the following ranking was found: PC > TG > TC > CS > TiO{sub 2} > Vehicle Control. Thus, a clear differentiation of effects for TG and TC, CS and PC was found. From a regulatory point of view, the substance-specific toxic potentials of TG and TC may need to be considered when devising occupational exposure limits.

  11. In vivo study with quartz-containing ceramic dusts: Inflammatory effects of two factory samples in lungs after intratracheal instillation in a 28-day study with rats

    As various quartz polymorphs react differently in lungs, a differentiation of effects is needed while setting occupational exposure levels. The objective of this European Collective Research Project SILICERAM was to characterize differences in biological activity of four quartz species, i.) 2 quartz-containing materials collected at typical ceramic manufacturing sites (Tableware granulate, TG and Tableware cast, TC) versus ii.) a designed ceramic dust sample (Contrived Sample, CS) and iii.) ground quartz DQ12 (well-characterised standard quartz (Positive Control, PC) and TiO2 (negative control). TG and TC had been selected as the most promising two candidates based on a preceding in vitro screening of 5 factory samples. Total doses of 5 mg per rat of the TG and TC, 1.1 mg of the CS and 0.33 mg of the PC corresponding to 0.29, 0.16, 0.29 and 0.29 mg quartz per rat, respectively, were administered to rats by intratracheal instillation. After 3 days, bronchoalveolar lavagate (BAL) analysis resulted in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) levels of 15%, 25%, 0.6% and 25% in the TG, TC, CS and PC groups, respectively. At 28 days, the values were 29%, 20%, 7% and 45%. Histopathologically, the TG and TC groups showed very slight to slight effects, the PC group, however, stronger effects after the same period. In conclusion, the following ranking was found: PC > TG > TC > CS > TiO2 > Vehicle Control. Thus, a clear differentiation of effects for TG and TC, CS and PC was found. From a regulatory point of view, the substance-specific toxic potentials of TG and TC may need to be considered when devising occupational exposure limits.

  12. Effect of 28 days of creatine ingestion on muscle metabolism and performance of a simulated cycling road race

    Hatley Holly

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The effects of creatine supplementation on muscle metabolism and exercise performance during a simulated endurance road race was investigated. Methods Twelve adult male (27.3 ± 1.0 yr, 178.6 ± 1.4 cm, 78.0 ± 2.5 kg, 8.9 ± 1.1 %fat endurance-trained (53.3 ± 2.0 ml* kg-1* min-1, cycling ~160 km/wk cyclists completed a simulated road race on a cycle ergometer (Lode, consisting of a two-hour cycling bout at 60% of peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak with three 10-second sprints performed at 110% VO2 peak every 15 minutes. Cyclists completed the 2-hr cycling bout before and after dietary creatine monohydrate or placebo supplementation (3 g/day for 28 days. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and five minutes before the end of the two-hour ride. Results There was a 24.5 ± 10.0% increase in resting muscle total creatine and 38.4 ± 23.9% increase in muscle creatine phosphate in the creatine group (P 2 peak, were not affected by creatine supplementation. Submaximal oxygen consumption near the end of the two-hour ride was decreased by approximately 10% by creatine supplementation (P +14.0 ± 6.3% than the placebo group (-10.4 ± 4.4%; P Conclusions It can be concluded that although creatine supplementation may increase resting muscle total creatine, muscle creatine phosphate, and plasma volume, and may lead to a reduction in oxygen consumption during submaximal exercise, creatine supplementation does not improve sprint performance at the end of endurance cycling exercise.

  13. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times) at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion), and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy) for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100) based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p < 0.05), and to the number of interventions. In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation (p = 0.037) between D90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy). This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied

  14. Study of a 13-weeks, Repeated, Intramuscular Dose, Toxicity Test of Sweet Bee Venom in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Hyunmin Kang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:This study was performed to analyze a 13-week repeated dose toxicity test of Sweet Bee Venom (SBV extracted from bee venom and administered in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods:Male and female 5-week-old SD rats were treated once daily with SBV (high-dosage group: 0.28 mg/kg; medium-dosage group: 0.14 mg/kg; or low-dosage group: 0.07 mg/kg for 13 weeks. Normal saline was administered to the control group in a similar manner (0.2 mL/kg. We conducted clinical observations, body weight measurements, ophthalmic examinations, urinalyses, hematology and biochemistry tests, and histological observations using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining to identify any abnormalities caused by the SBV treatment. Results:During this study, no mortality was observed in any of the experimental groups. Hyperemia and a movement disorder were observed around the area of in all groups that received SBV treatment, with a higher occurrence in rats treated with a higher dosage. Male rats receiving in the high-dosage group showed a significant decrease in weight during the treatment period. Compared to the control group, no significant changes in the ophthalmic parameters, the urine analyses, the complete blood cell count (CBC, and the biochemistry in the groups treated with SBV. Compared to the control group, some changes in organ weights were observed in the medium-and the high-dosage groups, but the low-dosage group showed no significant changes. Histological examination of thigh muscle indicated cell infiltration, inflammation, degeneration, and necrosis of muscle fiber, as well as fibrosis, in both the medium- and the high-dosage groups. Fatty liver change was observed in the periportal area of rats receiving medium and high dosages of SBV. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion:Our findings suggest that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL of SBV is approximately 0.07 mg/kg in male and female SD rats.

  15. Characterization of allergic response induced by repeated dermal exposure of IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic mice to low dose formaldehyde

    Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Kim, Ji-Eun; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun-Kyoung; Song, Sung-Hwa; Sung, Ji-Eun; Yang, Seung-Yun; An, Beum-Soo; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lim, Yong; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2014-01-01

    Although formaldehyde (FA) is known to be a major allergen responsible for allergic contact dermatitis, there are conflicting reports regarding correlation between FA exposure and interleukin (IL-4) expression. To investigate whether allergic responses including IL-4 expression were induced by repeated dermal exposure to low dose FA, alterations in the luciferase signal and allergic phenotypes were measured in IL-4/Luc/CNS-1 transgenic (Tg) mice containing luciferase cDNA under control of the...

  16. Nutrition Composition and Single, 14-Day and 13-Week Repeated Oral Dose Toxicity Studies of the Leaves and Stems of Rubus coreanus Miquel

    Ae-Son Om; Yu-Na Song; GeonMin Noh; HaengRan Kim; JeongSook Choe

    2016-01-01

    The leaves and stems of the plant Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCMLS) are rich in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals which have antioxidant, anti-hemolytic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fatigue and anti-cancer effects. However, RCMLS is not included in the Korean Food Standards Codex due to the lack of safety assurance concerning RCMLS. We evaluated single and repeated oral dose toxicity of RCMLS in Sprague-Dawley rats. RCMLS did not induce any significant toxicological changes in both male and femal...

  17. Modes-of-Action Related to Repeated Dose Toxicity: Tissue-Specific Biological Roles of PPAR γ Ligand-Dependent Dysregulation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Merilin Al Sharif; Petko Alov; Vessela Vitcheva; Ilza Pajeva; Ivanka Tsakovska

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the precise mode of action/adverse outcome pathway (MoA/AOP) of chemicals becomes a key step towards superseding the current repeated dose toxicity testing methodology with new generation predictive toxicology tools. The description and characterization of the toxicological MoA leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are of specific interest, due to its increasing incidence in the modern society. Growing evidence stresses on the PPAR γ ligand-depend...

  18. PHARMACODYNAMIC EQUIVALENCE OF USING 3-MONTH AND 28-DAY SUSTAINED-RELEASE DECAPEPTYL DEPOT FORMULATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER

    P. Teillac

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the pharmacodynamic equivalence of 3-month and 28-day formulations of tryptoreline, a sustained-release luteininghormone (LH-releasing hormone analogue.Subjects and methods. The patients who had a verified diagnosis of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer were randomized intogroups to have either one injection of a 3-month dosage form (n = 63 or 3 injections of a 28-day formulation at 28-day intervals (n = 68.The onset rate of drug-induced castration, which was defined as a percentage of the patients achieving a plasma testosterone level of ≤0.5ng/ml, was compared on day 84 (i.e. thrice every 28 days. The plasma profiles of testosterone, LH, and tryptoreline, as well as the changesin the plasma concentration of prostate-specific antigen (PCA from the baseline values were estimated within 3 months (from the initiationof therapy to day 91.Results. In the 3-month and 28-day groups, the onset rate of drug-induced castration was 98 and 96%, respectively (at confidenceintervals (94.2% bilaterally in [-8.1%; 9.6%]. The median time for drug-induced castration was 18.8 and 18.5 days, respective-ly (p = 0.86; log-rank test. The ratios of the mean peak plasma concentrations to AUC91 of the two formulations for testosteroneand LH were within 0.80; 1.25 equivalence interval. By day 91, the mean PSA level was decreased by 91.0 and 91.7%, respec-tively (p = 0.73.Conclusion. The use of the two formulations during 3 months is pharmacologically equal.  

  19. Repeated irradiations with γ-rays at a dose of 0.5 Gy may exacerbate asthma

    We previously showed that 0.5 Gy whole-body γ-ray irradiation with a single or small number of repeated exposures inhibits tumor growth in mice, via elevation of the IFNγ/IL-4 ratio concomitantly with a decrease in the percentage of B cells. Here we examined whether repeated 0.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation can improve asthma in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthmatic mouse model. We found that repeated irradiation (10 times) with 0.5 Gy of γ-rays significantly increased total IgE in comparison with the disease-control group. The levels of IL-4 and IL-5 were also significantly higher in the γ-ray-irradiated group, while that of IFN-γ was significantly lower, resulting in a further decrease of the IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio from the normal value. These results indicate that the repeated irradiation with γ-rays may exacerbate asthma, and may have opposite effects on different immune reactions unlike the irradiation with a single or small number of repeated exposures. (author)

  20. Analgesia induced by repeated exposure to low dose X-rays in mice, and involvement of the accessory olfactory system in modulation of the radiation effects

    The effects of low-dose X-rays on mouse nociceptive behavior were examined using a formalin injected test which rated the amount of time the animals spent licking the injected hind-paw. Male ICR White Swiss mice showed a marked suppression of licking behavior after repeated low-dose X-irradiation (5 cGy/day, 6 consecutive days). The most profound effect was observed on the day 30 after irradiation. The decline of licking behavior, however, was not observed at all following olfactory bulbectomy or vomeronasal tract cut. The analgesic effects could be observed in writhing animals administered acetic-acid intraperitoneally. Moreover, analgesia was totally blocked by the administration of N-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to accessory olfactory bulbs prior to the exposure. The present results indicate that the olfactory system plays an important role in modulation of radiation-induced analgesia, and a possible involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of recognition memory subjected to repeated X-rays. Relatively higher doses (5 cGy x 9 days, 5 cGy x 12 days), however, did not induce such effects, namely, the decline of nociceptive response was limited to the animals irradiated with the smaller dose. (author)

  1. Effect of repeated ('binge') dosing of MDMA to rats housed at normal and high temperature on neurotoxic damage to cerebral 5-HT and dopamine neurones.

    Sanchez, Veronica; O'shea, Esther; Saadat, Kathryn S; Elliott, J Martin; Colado, M Isabel; Green, A Richard

    2004-09-01

    The technique of 'binge' dosing (several doses in one session) by recreational users of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) requires evaluation in terms of its consequences on the acute hyperthermic response and long-term neurotoxicity. We examined the neurotoxic effects of this dosing schedule on 5-HT and dopamine neurones in the rat brain. When repeated (three) doses of MDMA (2, 4 and 6 mg/kg i.p.) were given 3 h apart to rats housed at 19 degrees C, a dose-dependent acute hyperthermia and long-term loss of 5-HT was observed in several brain regions (hippocampus, cortex and striatum), with an approximate 50% loss following 3 x 4 mg/kg and 65% decrease following 3 x 6 mg/kg. No decrease in striatal dopamine content was detected. When MDMA (4 mg/kg i.p.) was given repeatedly to rats housed at 30 degrees C, a larger acute hyperthermic response than that observed in rats treated at 19 degrees C environment was seen (maximum response 2.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C versus 1.3 +/- 0.2 degrees C). A long-term cerebral 5-HT loss of approximately 65% was also detected in both the cortex and hippocampus, but no loss in striatal dopamine content occurred. These data emphasize the increased acute hyperthermic response and neurotoxicity which occurs when MDMA is administered in a hot room environment compared to normal room temperature conditions, and support the view that MDMA is a selective 5-HT neurotoxin, even when a binge dosing schedule is employed and the rats are present in a hot environment. PMID:15358986

  2. Study on a 4-Week Recovery Test of Sweet Bee Venom after a 13-Week, Repeated, Intramuscular Dose Toxicity Test in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Chungsan Lim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:This study was performed to check for reversibility in the changes induced by a 13-week, repeated, dose toxicity test of Sweet Bee Venom (SBV in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. Methods:Fifteen male and 15 female SD rats were treated with 0.28 mg/kg of SBV (high-dosage group and the same numbers of male and female SD rats were treated with 0.2 mL/kg of normal saline (control group for 13 weeks. We selected five male and five female SD rats from the high-dosage group and the same numbers of male and female SD rats from the control group, and we observed these rats for four weeks. We conducted body-weight measurements, ophthalmic examinations, urinalyses and hematology, biochemistry, histology tests. Results:(1 Hyperemia and movement disorder were observed in the 13-week, repeated, dose toxicity test, but these symptoms were not observed during the recovery period. (2 The rats in the high-dose group showed no significant changes in weight compared to the control group. (3 No significant differences in the ophthalmic parameters, urine analyses, complete blood cell counts (CBCs, and biochemistry were observed among the recovery groups. (4 No changes in organ weights were observed during the recovery period. (5 Histological examination of the thigh muscle indicated cell infiltration, inflammation, degeneration, necrosis of muscle fiber, and fibrosis during the treatment period, but these changes were not observed during the recovery period. The fatty liver change that was observed during the toxicity test was not observed during the recovery period. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion:The changes that occurred during the 13-week, repeated, dose toxicity test are reversible, and SBV can be safely used as a treatment modality.

  3. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pamidronate after oral administration: a study on dose proportionality, absolute bioavailability, and effect of repeated administration

    Hyldstrup, Lars; Flesch, G; Hauffe, S A

    1993-01-01

    pamidronate ranged from 0.01% to 0.35% of dose, with mean values of 0.11, 0.16, and 0.18% for 75, 150, and 300 mg, respectively. After i.v. infusion, the renal excretion of pamidronate was 26-53% of the dose, lower than for other bisphosphonates. The absolute bioavailability was 0.31% (range 0.08-0.7%) after......To evaluate dose proportionality and absolute bioavailability of a new enteric-coated pellet formulation of pamidronate disodium (AREDIA), nine females (aged 52-66 years) were given three different single peroral doses of pamidronate disodium (75, 150, and 300 mg) and an i.v. infusion of 15 mg over...

  4. Airway responses and inflammation in subjects with asthma after four days of repeated high-single-dose allergen challenge

    Schulze Johannes; Voss Sandra; Zissler Ulrich; Rose Markus A; Zielen Stefan; Schubert Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Both standard and low-dose allergen provocations are an established tool in asthma research to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of allergic asthma. However, clinical symptoms are less likely to be induced. Therefore, we designed a protocol for repetitive high-dose bronchial allergen challenges to generate clinical symptoms and airway inflammation. Methods A total of 27 patients aged 18 to 40 years with positive skin-prick tests and mild asthma ...

  5. Anti-tumor effect of repeated low dose of pEgr-IFN γ-Endostatin gene-radiotherapy on mice bearing lewis lung carcinoma

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effect of repeated low dose pEgr-IFN γ-Endostatin gene-radiotherapy on mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma. Methods: Mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma were divided randomly into control, 10 Gy, 4 x 2.5 Gy, 4 x P, P + 10 Gy and 4 x (P + 2.5 Gy) group. The pEgr-IFN γ-Endostatin plasmid packaged with liposome was injected into tumors which were irradiated by X-ray 36 h later. Tumor growth rates at different time were observed after gene-radiotherapy. Number of lung metastatic nodes and tumor weight of the mice were detected 18 d after gene-radiotherapy. Results: Tumor growth rate of the mice in gene-radiotherapy for four-time group was significantly lower than that for only once group 12-18 d after gene-radiotherapy. Number of lung metastatic nodes and tumor weight of the mice in gene-radiotherapy for four-time group were significantly lower than those for only once group 18 d after gene-radiotherapy. Conclusion: Anti-tumor effect of repeated low dose pEgr- IFN γ-Endostatin gene-radiotherapy is better than that of high dose for only once. (authors)

  6. Plasma levels of a low-dose constant-rate-infusion of ketamine and its effect on single and repeated nociceptive stimuli in conscious dogs.

    Bergadano, Alessandra; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Theurillat, Regula; Thormann, Wolfgang; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    This study quantitatively investigated the analgesic action of a low-dose constant-rate-infusion (CRI) of racemic ketamine (as a 0.5 mg kg(-1) bolus and at a dose rate of 10 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) in conscious dogs using a nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and with enantioselective measurement of plasma levels of ketamine and norketamine. Withdrawal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous single and repeated electrical stimulation (10 pulses, 5 Hz) of the digital plantar nerve were recorded from the biceps femoris muscle using surface electromyography. Ketamine did not affect NWR thresholds or the recruitment curves after a single nociceptive stimulation. Temporal summation (as evaluated by repeated stimuli) and the evoked behavioural response scores were however reduced compared to baseline demonstrating the antinociceptive activity of ketamine correlated with the peak plasma concentrations. Thereafter the plasma levels at pseudo-steady-state did not modulate temporal summation. Based on these experimental findings low-dose ketamine CRI cannot be recommended for use as a sole analgesic in the dog. PMID:18706837

  7. A 4-Week, Repeated, Intravenous Dose, Toxicity Test of Mountain Ginseng Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Kwangho Lee; Junsang Yu; Seungho Sun; Kirok Kwon; Chungsan Lim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) is a pharmacopuncture made by distilling extract from mountain cultivated ginseng or mountain wild ginseng. This pharmacopuncture is injected intravenously, which is a quick, lossless way of strongly tonifying Qi function. The present study was undertaken to evaluate a 4-week, repeated, intravenous injection, toxicity test of MGP in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: Twenty male and female 6-week-old SD rats were used as subjects. We divi...

  8. Development of QSAR models using artificial neural network analysis for risk assessment of repeated-dose, reproductive, and developmental toxicities of cosmetic ingredients.

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Aiba Née Kaneko, Maki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    Use of laboratory animals for systemic toxicity testing is subject to strong ethical and regulatory constraints, but few alternatives are yet available. One possible approach to predict systemic toxicity of chemicals in the absence of experimental data is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Here, we present QSAR models for prediction of maximum "no observed effect level" (NOEL) for repeated-dose, developmental and reproductive toxicities. NOEL values of 421 chemicals for repeated-dose toxicity, 315 for reproductive toxicity, and 156 for developmental toxicity were collected from Japan Existing Chemical Data Base (JECDB). Descriptors to predict toxicity were selected based on molecular orbital (MO) calculations, and QSAR models employing multiple independent descriptors as the input layer of an artificial neural network (ANN) were constructed to predict NOEL values. Robustness of the models was indicated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors after 10-fold cross-validation (0.529 for repeated-dose, 0.508 for reproductive, and 0.558 for developmental toxicity). Evaluation of the models in terms of the percentages of predicted NOELs falling within factors of 2, 5 and 10 of the in-vivo-determined NOELs suggested that the model is applicable to both general chemicals and the subset of chemicals listed in International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). Our results indicate that ANN models using in silico parameters have useful predictive performance, and should contribute to integrated risk assessment of systemic toxicity using a weight-of-evidence approach. Availability of predicted NOELs will allow calculation of the margin of safety, as recommended by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). PMID:25786522

  9. Evaluation of a New Method for Calculation of Cumulative Doses in the Rectum Wall using Repeat CT Scans

    The rectum wall is an important organ at risk during irradiation of the prostate, the bladder and other organs in the pelvis. It is therefore of great interest to be able reliably to predict normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for this organ. Because the rectum wall is a hollow organ capable of large deformations between fractions, dose estimates from a single CT are unreliable, and thereby also NTCP estimates. In this study two methods for calculations of cumulative dose distributions from repetitive CT scans are compared. The first is a method presented in this article that uses tracking of volume elements for a direct summation of the doses delivered in the treatment fractions. The other, presented earlier, is based on information from dose-volume histograms. The comparisons were made in terms of equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) and NTCPs. The methods were also compared with mean values of EUD and NTCP values from individual CT scans. The study showed that with the relatively symmetric beam arrangements normally used for treatment of prostate and bladder cancer, it is not necessary to use the more laborious method of element tracking. However, an introduction of artificial lateral rectum movements revealed that element tracking is necessary in less symmetric situations

  10. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    2010-07-01

    ... in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The following... of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (11) Pathology—(i) Gross necropsy....

  11. Dose escalation of cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    Objective: To define the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and observe the side effect of escalating cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma in Chinese, with toxicity studied. Methods: Previously untreated fifteen Chinese patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma received conventional fractionation radiotherapy, with 5 daily fractions of 2.0 Gy per week. The total radiation dose was 60 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy dose escalation was given by the relatively safe and kidney-sparing modified Fibonacci sequence. The starting dose was cisplatin 37.5 mg/m2 D1 and 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2 D1-5, respectively. This regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. Escalation dose was cisplatin 7.5 mg/m2 and 5- fluorouracil 100 mg/m2. Every. cohort contained at least 3 patients. If no dose-limiting toxicity(DLT) was observed, the next dose level was opened for entry. These courses were repeated until DLT appeared. MTD was declared as one dose level below which DLT appeared. Results: DLT was defined as grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at the level of cisplatin 60 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 700 mg/m2. MTD was defined as cisplatin 52.5 mg/m2, 5- fiuorouracil 700 mg/m2. The major side effect were radiation-induced esophagitis, leucopenia, nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Conclusion: Maximun tolerated dose of cisplatin with 5-fiuorouracil in concurrent ehemoradiotherapy in the Chinese people with esophageal carcinoma were eisplatin 52.5 mg/m2 D1,5-fluorouracil 700 mg/m2 D1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days. (authors)

  12. Acute and repeated inhalation lung injury by 3-methoxybutyl chloroformate in rats: CT-pathologic correlation

    Objectives: To investigate the acute and repeated pulmonary damage in Sprague-Dawley rats caused by the inhalation of 3-methoxybutyl chloroformate (3-MBCF) using computed tomography (CT), and to correlate these results with those obtained from a pathological study. Methods: Sixty, 7-week-old rats were exposed to 3-MBCF vapor via inhalation (6 h/day) for 1 day (N = 20), 3 days (N = 20), and 28 days (5 days/week) (N = 20) using whole body exposure chambers at a concentration of 0 (control), 3, 6 and 12 ppm. CT examinations including densitometry and histopathologic studies were carried out. For the follow-up study, the rats exposed for 3 days were scanned using CT and their pathology was examined at 7, 14, and 28 days. Results: There was a significant decrease in the parenchymal density in the groups exposed to the 3-MBCF vapors for 1 day at 3 ppm (p = 0.022) or 6 ppm (p = 0.010), compared with the control. The parenchymal density of the rats exposed to12 ppm was significantly higher. The pathological findings in this period, the grades of vascular congestion, tracheobronchial exfoliation, and alveolar rupture were significant. In the groups exposed for 3 days, there was a large decrease in the parenchymal density with increasing dose (control: -675.48 ± 32.82 HU, 3 ppm: -720.65 ± 34.21 HU, 6 ppm: -756.41 ± 41.68 HU, 12 ppm: -812.56 ± 53.48 HU) (p = 0.000). There were significant density differences between each dose in the groups exposed for 28 days (p = 0.000). The CT findings include an irregular lung surface, areas of multifocal, wedge-shaped increased density, a heterogeneous lung density, bronchial dilatation, and axial peribronchovascular bundle thickening. The histopathology examination revealed the development of alveolar interstitial thickening and vasculitis, and an aggravation of the mainstem bronchial exudates and bronchial inflammation. The alveolar wall ruptures and bronchial dilatation became severe during this period. On the follow-up study, the

  13. Acute and repeated inhalation lung injury by 3-methoxybutyl chloroformate in rats: CT-pathologic correlation

    Lim, Yeon Soo [Department of Radiology, Holy Family Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 2, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Pucheon, Kyung gi-do 420-717 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Hee [Department of Radiology, Holy Family Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 2, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Pucheon, Kyung gi-do 420-717 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: mhchung@catholic.ac.kr; Park, Seog Hee [Department of Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-040 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon-Yeong [Industrial Chemicals Research Center, Industrial Safety and Health Research Institute KISCO, 104-8, Moonji-dong, Yusong-gu, Taejon-si 305-380 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Gil [Department of Radiology, Kangnam St. Mary Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-040 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyun Wook [Department of Radiology, Holy Family Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 2, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Pucheon, Kyung gi-do 420-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Ah [Department of Pathology, Holy Family Hospital, Catholic University of Korea, 2, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Pucheon-si, Kyung gi-do 420-717 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Won Jong [Department of Radiology, Holy Family Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 2, Sosa-dong, Wonmi-gu, Pucheon, Kyung gi-do 420-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Objectives: To investigate the acute and repeated pulmonary damage in Sprague-Dawley rats caused by the inhalation of 3-methoxybutyl chloroformate (3-MBCF) using computed tomography (CT), and to correlate these results with those obtained from a pathological study. Methods: Sixty, 7-week-old rats were exposed to 3-MBCF vapor via inhalation (6 h/day) for 1 day (N = 20), 3 days (N = 20), and 28 days (5 days/week) (N = 20) using whole body exposure chambers at a concentration of 0 (control), 3, 6 and 12 ppm. CT examinations including densitometry and histopathologic studies were carried out. For the follow-up study, the rats exposed for 3 days were scanned using CT and their pathology was examined at 7, 14, and 28 days. Results: There was a significant decrease in the parenchymal density in the groups exposed to the 3-MBCF vapors for 1 day at 3 ppm (p = 0.022) or 6 ppm (p = 0.010), compared with the control. The parenchymal density of the rats exposed to12 ppm was significantly higher. The pathological findings in this period, the grades of vascular congestion, tracheobronchial exfoliation, and alveolar rupture were significant. In the groups exposed for 3 days, there was a large decrease in the parenchymal density with increasing dose (control: -675.48 {+-} 32.82 HU, 3 ppm: -720.65 {+-} 34.21 HU, 6 ppm: -756.41 {+-} 41.68 HU, 12 ppm: -812.56 {+-} 53.48 HU) (p = 0.000). There were significant density differences between each dose in the groups exposed for 28 days (p = 0.000). The CT findings include an irregular lung surface, areas of multifocal, wedge-shaped increased density, a heterogeneous lung density, bronchial dilatation, and axial peribronchovascular bundle thickening. The histopathology examination revealed the development of alveolar interstitial thickening and vasculitis, and an aggravation of the mainstem bronchial exudates and bronchial inflammation. The alveolar wall ruptures and bronchial dilatation became severe during this period. On the follow

  14. Repeated low-dose kainate administration in C57BL/6J mice produces temporal lobe epilepsy pathology but infrequent spontaneous seizures.

    Umpierre, Anthony D; Bennett, Isaiah V; Nebeker, Lismore D; Newell, Thomas G; Tian, Bruce B; Thomson, Kyle E; White, H Steve; White, John A; Wilcox, Karen S

    2016-05-01

    More efficient or translationally relevant approaches are needed to model acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in genetically tractable mice. The high costs associated with breeding and maintaining transgenic, knock-in, or knock-out lines place a high value on the efficiency of induction and animal survivability. Herein, we describe our approaches to model acquired epilepsy in C57BL/6J mice using repeated, low-dose kainate (KA) administration paradigms. Four paradigms (i.p.) were tested for their ability to induce status epilepticus (SE), temporal lobe pathology, and the development of epilepsy. All four paradigms reliably induce behavioral and/or electrographic SE without mortality over a 7d period. Two of the four paradigms investigated produce features indicative of TLE pathology, including hippocampal cell death, widespread astrogliosis, and astrocyte expression of mGluR5, a feature commonly reported in TLE models. Three of the investigated paradigms were able to produce aberrant electrographic features, such as interictal spiking in cortex. However, only one paradigm, previously published by others, produces spontaneous recurrent seizures over an eight week period. Presentation of spontaneous seizures is rare (N=2/14), with epilepsy preferentially developing in animals having a high number of seizures during SE. Overall, repeated, low-dose KA administration improves the efficiency and pathological relevance of a systemic KA insult, but does not produce a robust epilepsy phenotype under the experimental paradigms described herein. PMID:26896834

  15. Repeat high-dose external beam irradiation for in-breast tumor recurrence after previous lumpectomy and whole breast irradiation

    Purpose: To determine whether excision of an in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) plus 5000 cGy in 25 fractions to the new operative area is both tolerated and effective as treatment for an IBTR after previous lumpectomy and whole breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine women with an IBTR after lumpectomy and breast irradiation for invasive carcinoma (n 31) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 8) were treated with excision of the IBTR and radiotherapy (RT), 5000 cGy in 25 fractions, to the operative area using electrons of appropriate energy. The interval from completion of the first course of RT to diagnosis of the IBTR ranged from 16 to 291 months (median 63). Results: The repeat course of RT to the new operative area was well tolerated in all patients, and no late sequelae occurred other than skin pigmentation changes. Eight patients, including 2 with suspicious bone scans at the time of IBTR, developed distant metastases, and 7 died 21-71 months (median 48) after retreatment. One patient was alive with distant metastases at 27 months after retreatment. Four of the 8 patients who developed distant metastases also had a second IBTR, and 3 died with persistent disease in the breast. An additional 4 patients, for a total of 8, had a second IBTR. Three were alive and free of disease after mastectomy, and 1 was alive and free of disease after mastectomy and additional RT for chest wall recurrence. An additional patient developed recurrence in the axilla 9 months after reirradiation and was treated with surgery; she died free of disease at 63 months. One patient underwent mastectomy for suspected persistent disease 2 months after completion of repeat RT; no evidence of recurrent tumor was found in the removed breast. Thus, 30 women (76.9%) had an intact breast free of tumor at death or at last follow-up 1-180 months (median 51.5) after reirradiation. Using the Kaplan-Meier life table analysis, the estimated overall and disease-free 5-year survival rate for the

  16. 26-week repeated oral dose toxicity study of UP446, a combination of defined extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu, in beagle dogs.

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The needs for relatively safe botanical alternatives to relieve symptoms associated to arthritis have continued to grow in parallel with the ageing population. UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been used as over the counter joint care dietary supplements and a prescription medical food. Significant safety data have been documented in rodents and human for this composition. Here we evaluated the potential adverse effects of orally administered UP446 in beagle dogs following a 26-week repeated oral dose toxicity study. UP446 at doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg/day were administered orally to beagle dogs for 26 weeks. A 4-week recovery group from the high dose (1000 mg/kg) and vehicle treated groups were included. No morbidity or mortality was observed for the duration of the study. No significant differences between groups in body weights, food consumption, ophthalmological examinations, electrocardiograms, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weights, gross pathology and histopathology were documented. Emesis, loose feces and diarrhea were noted in both genders at the 1000 mg/kg treatment groups. These clinical signs were considered to be reversible as they were not evident in the recovery period. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of UP446 was considered to be 500 mg/kg/day both in male and female beagle dogs. PMID:27125835

  17. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study

    Pan CH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hong Pan,1,2,* Kai-Jen Chuang,3,4,* Jen-Kun Chen,5 Ta-Chih Hsiao,6 Ching-Huang Lai,2 Tim P Jones,7 Kelly A BéruBé,8 Gui-Bing Hong,9 Kin-Fai Ho,10,11 Hsiao-Chi Chuang12,13 1Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Executive Yuan, 2School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, 3School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, 4Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, 6Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 7School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, 8School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK; 9Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 11Shenzhen Municipal Key Laboratory for Health Risk Analysis, Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China; 12School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, 13Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential

  18. Differential effects of repeated low dose treatment with the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in experimental models of bone cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Hald, Andreas; Ding, Ming; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme;

    2008-01-01

    Pain due to bone malignancies is one of the most difficult types of cancer pain to fully control and may further decrease the patients' quality of life. Animal models of chronic pain conditions resulting from peripheral inflammatory reactions or nerve injuries are responsive to treatment with....... Furthermore, this treatment strategy was not found to induce measurable CNS related side effects or tolerance. Cancer cell viability assays and bone volume fraction assessed by micro computed tomography (microCT) demonstrated that these effects were not due to changes in cancer progression. The difference in...... cannabinoid agonists. However, the use of cannabinoid agonists in humans may be hampered by CNS related side effects and development of tolerance. In the present study, we investigated the effect of repeated low dose administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 on bone cancer pain and...

  19. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  20. Selected oxidative stress parameters after single and repeated administration of octabromodiphenyl ether to rats

    Elżbieta Bruchajzer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Octabromodiphenyl ether (OctaBDE was used as a flame retardant applied mostly in the manufacture of plastics utilized in the electrical and electronic industries. Owing to its long half-life and being regarded as an environmental pollutant, OctaBDE, like other polybrominated diphenyl ethers, has been classified as a persistent organic pollutant (POP. This study was carried out to assess the effects of oxidative stress (redox homeostasis induced in rats by OctaBDE. Material and Methods: Female Wistar rats exposed intragastrically to OctaBDE at single (25, 200 or 2000 mg/kg b.w., or repeated (0.4, 2, 8, 40 or 200 mg/kg/day doses during 7–28 days were used in the experiment. Selected oxidative stress parameters were determined in the liver and blood serum. Results: Administration (single or repeated of OctaBDE to rats resulted in the impaired redox homeostasis, as evidenced by the increased levels of reduced (GSH and oxidized (GSSG glutathione in the liver, the reduced total antioxidant status (TAS in serum and the increased concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA in the liver. After multiple doses of OctaBDE, elevated activity of glutathione transferase (GST in the liver was also noted. Conclusions: After repeated administration of OctaBDE at the lowest dose (0.4 mg/kg/day, changes were observed in the parameters (MDA, TAS, GSSG indicative of oxidative stress.

  1. Development of immunity against viral and bacterial antigens after repeated exposures to suberythemal doses of ultraviolet light

    S. A. Snopov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of ultraviolet (UV radiation on human infectious immunity are not well studied. On the one hand, solar and artificial UU sources have been shown to change cytokine levels in human skin, lymphocyte subpopulation counts in parepheral blood, lymphocyte DNA synthesis and prolifarative response to mitogens. On the other hand, there are just only one or two observations suggesting an influence of UV radiation on human infection course. For instance, UV irradiations have been reported to induce a reccurence of orofacial vesicular lesions caused by herpes siplex virus. Moreover, there is a lack of data concerning immune effects of suberythtemal doses of UV in spite of a long history of using them by Russian prophylactic medicine. In this work we questioned whether such suberythemal UV exposures can affect the immune responses of children to infectious conjunctivitis, to simultaneous measles and polio vaccinations and to simultaneous polio and diphtheria-tetanus vaccinations. In peripheral blood of vaccinated children we examined leukocyte counts (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3+, CD20+, CD4+, CD8+, CD25+, HLADR+, concentrations of cytokines (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IFN- amma и IL-10, DNA-synthetic activity of lymphocytes and titres of antibodies against measles and diphtheria toxin. We observed no local or systemic reactions to the vaccines in the UV-group while a moderate rise in body temperature occured in several children from unexposed group. In the blood of childeren from UV-group we found increases in CD25+ и HLADR+ cell percentages, IL- 1 beta and IL-10 concentrations, PWMinduced DNA synthesis in mononuclears, and no decreases in formation of antibodies against measles and diphreria. We concluded that suberythemal UV exposures of children modulated their further responses to imminisations perhaps through the activation of a T helper 2-like

  2. Foxp3(+)-Treg cells enhanced by repeated low-dose gamma-irradiation attenuate ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma in mice.

    Park, Bum Soo; Hong, Gwan Ui; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-05-01

    Gamma radiation is used for several therapeutic indications such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Low-dose whole-body γ irradiation has been shown to activate immune responses in several ways, however, the effect and mechanism of irradiation on allergic asthma remains poorly understood. This study investigated whether or not irradiation exacerbates allergic asthma responses and its potential mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma. The mice received whole-body irradiation once daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 0.667 Gy using (137)Cs γ rays 24 h before every OVA challenge. Repeated low-dose irradiation reduced OVA-specific IgE levels, the number of inflammatory cells including mast cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway hyperresponsiveness, expression of inflammatory cytokines, CCL2/CCR2, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 activities. All of these factors were increased in BAL cells and lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Irradiation increased the number of Treg cells, expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2 and IL-35 in BAL cells and lung tissue. Irradiation also increased Treg cell-expressed Foxp3 and IL-10 by NF-κB and RUNX1 in OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, while Treg cell-expressing OX40 and IL-10 were enhanced in lung tissue or act-bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with Treg cells, but BMMCs-expressing OX40L and TGF-β were decreased. The data suggest that irradiation enhances Foxp3(+)- and IL-10-producing Treg cells, which reduce OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation and tissue remodeling through the down-regulation of migration by the CCL2/CCR2 axis and activation of mast cells via OX40/OX40L in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. PMID:23560633

  3. Phase I Trial of Escalating-dose Cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Chinese Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Zhao,Yan-Nan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We defined the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD of chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin (CDDP with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer. Twenty-one previously untreated patients with primary esophageal cancer were entered into this study. Escalating doses of CDDP with 5-FU were administered in a modified Fibonacci sequence, with concurrent conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFR of 60 Gy or 50 Gy. The starting doses were CDDP 37.5 mg/m2 on day 1, and 5-FU 500 mg/m2 on days 1-5, respectively. The regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT was observed, the next dose level was applied. The procedures were repeated until DLT appeared. The MTD was declared to be 1 dose level below the level at which DLT appeared. DLT was grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at a dose level of CDDP 60 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 60 Gy CFR. MTD was defined as CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. The MTD of CDDP with 5-FU and in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer is CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 on day 1 and 5FU 700 mg/m2 on days 1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days, and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. Further evaluation of this regimen in a prospective phase II trial is ongoing.

  4. Hyperplasia of the lymphoepithelium of NALT in rats but not in mice upon 28-day exposure to 15 ppm formaldehyde vapor.

    Kuper, C Frieke; van Oostrum, Lidy; Ma-Hock, Lan; Durrer, Stefan; Woutersen, Ruud A

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if local lymphoid tissues are a target of FA, nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) and upper-respiratory tract-draining lymph nodes were examined in a 28-day inhalation study with FA vapor in Fischer-344 rats and B6C3F1 mice. Paraffin-embedded tissues were sectioned and stained with H&E or stained immunohistochemically for cell proliferation (BrdU incorporation). Light microscopy revealed simple hyperplasia of NALT lymphoepithelium of rats exposed to 15 ppm and an increased proliferation rate of the epithelial cells. Principal component (discriminant) analysis of rat NALT and lymph nodes data did not reveal other effects or effects at lower exposure levels. Mice tissues were not affected. It was concluded that hyperplasia of the lymphoepithelium of NALT of rats exposed to 15 ppm was the only distinct effect of FA vapor on local lymphoid tissues (NALT and lymph nodes) of Fischer-344 rats and B3C3F1 mice. PMID:19783130

  5. Risk of sensitization in healthy adults following repeated administration of rdESAT-6 skin test reagent by the Mantoux injection technique

    Lillebaek, Troels; Bergstedt, Winnie; Tingskov, Pernille N;

    2009-01-01

    Limited specificity of the tuberculin skin test incited the development of the intradermal Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific rdESAT-6 skin test. Animal studies have shown, however, that there is a possible risk of sensitization when repeated injections of rdESAT-6 are given. The aim of this phase...... 31 (3%) volunteers showed a positive skin reaction (sensitization) upon a second injection of rdESAT-6 after 28days and an increased IFN-gamma response to ESAT-6. For 7 (23%) of the volunteers, local adverse reactions related to the product were registered, but all reactions were mild and predictable....... In conclusion, repeated injections of the rdESAT-6 skin test reagent are safe, and sensitization occurs at a low rate, especially if the time span between succeeding doses is wide....

  6. Repeated Miscarriage

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ100 PREGNANCY Repeated Miscarriages • What is recurrent pregnancy loss? • What is the likelihood of having repeated miscarriages? • What is the most common cause of miscarriage? • ...

  7. Repeated treatment of recurrent uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Senegal with fixed-dose artesunate plus amodiaquine versus fixed-dose artemether plus lumefantrine: a randomized, open-label trial

    Barry Aichatou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is currently recommended for treating uncomplicated malaria. The objective was to assess the efficacy and safety of repeated administrations of two fixed-dose presentations of ACT - artesunate plus amodiaquine (ASAQ and artemether-lumefantrine (AL - in subsequent episodes of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods A randomized comparative study was conducted in a rural community of central Senegal from August 2007 to January 2009. Children and adults with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were randomized to receive open-label ASAQ once daily or AL twice daily for three days. Drug doses were given according to body weight. Treatments for first episodes were supervised. For subsequent episodes, only the first intake of study drug was supervised. ECGs and audiograms were performed in patients ≥12 years of age. Primary outcome was adequate clinical and parasitological response rate (ACPR after polymerase chain reaction (PCR correction on day 28 for the first episode. Results A total of 366 patients were enrolled in the two groups (ASAQ 184, AL 182 and followed up during two malaria transmission seasons. In the intent-to-treat population, PCR-corrected ACPRs at day 28 for the first episode were 98.4% and 96.2%, respectively, in the ASAQ and AL groups. For the per-protocol population (ASAQ 183, AL 182, PCR-corrected ACPRs at day 28 for the first episode were 98.9% and 96.7%, respectively. A 100% ACPR rate was obtained at day 28 in the 60 and four patients, respectively, who experienced second and third episodes. Treatment-related adverse events were reported in 11.7% of the patients, without significant differences between the two groups. A better improvement of haemoglobin at day 28 was noted in the ASAQ versus the AL group (12.2 versus 11.8 g/dL; p = 0.03. No sign of ototoxicity was demonstrated. A prolongation of the QTc interval was observed in both groups during

  8. Effect of acute kidney injury requiring extended dialysis on 28 day and 1 year survival of patients undergoing interventional lung assist membrane ventilator treatment

    Hadem Johannes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracorporeal lung assist devices are increasingly used in the intensive care unit setting to improve extracorporeal gas exchange mainly in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. ARDS is frequently accompanied by acute kidney injury; however it is so far unknown how the combination of these two conditions affects long term survival of critically ill patients. Methods In a retrospective analysis of a tertiary care hospital we evaluated all patients undergoing interventional lung assist (iLA treatment between January 1st 2005 and December 31st 2009. Data from all 61 patients (31 F/30 M, median age 40 (28 to 52 years were obtained by chart review. Follow up data up to one year were obtained. Results Of the 61 patients undergoing iLA membrane ventilator treatment 21 patients had acute kidney injury network (AKIN stage 3 and were treated by extended dialysis (ED. Twenty-eight day survival of all patients was 33%. While patients without ED showed a 28 day survival of 40%, the survival of patients with ED was only 19%. Patients on ED were not different in respect to age, weight, Horowitz index and underlying disease. Conclusions AKI requiring ED therapy in patients undergoing iLA treatment increases mortality in ICU patients. Patients in whom iLA was placed as a bridge to lung transplantation and that were successfully transplanted showed the best outcome. Future studies have to clarify whether it is possible to identify patients that truly benefit from the combination of these two extracorporeal treatment methods.

  9. Effects of 28 days of resistance exercise and consuming a commercially available pre-workout supplement, NO-Shotgun®, on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of satellite cell activation, and clinical safety markers in males

    Leutholtz Brian; Redd Liz; Hudson Geoffrey; Buford Thomas; Cooke Matt; Shelmadine Brian; Willoughby Darryn S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This study determined the effects of 28 days of heavy resistance exercise combined with the nutritional supplement, NO-Shotgun®, on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of satellite cell activation, and clinical safety markers. Methods Eighteen non-resistance-trained males participated in a resistance training program (3 × 10-RM) 4 times/wk for 28 days while also ingesting 27 g/day of placebo (PL) or NO-Shotgun® (NO) 30 min prior to exercise. Data were analyzed...

  10. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events. PMID:11559561

  11. Should Patient Setup in Lung Cancer Be Based on the Primary Tumor? An Analysis of Tumor Coverage and Normal Tissue Dose Using Repeated Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging

    Purpose: Evaluation of the dose distribution for lung cancer patients using a patient setup procedure based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. Methods and materials: For 39 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, the planning fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan was registered to a repeated FDG-PET/CT scan made in the second week of treatment. Two patient setup methods were analyzed based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. The original treatment plan was copied to the repeated scan, and target and normal tissue structures were delineated. Dose distributions were analyzed using dose–volume histograms for the primary tumor, lymph nodes, lungs, and spinal cord. Results: One patient showed decreased dose coverage of the primary tumor caused by progressive disease and required replanning to achieve adequate coverage. For the other patients, the minimum dose to the primary tumor did not significantly deviate from the planned dose: −0.2 ± 1.7% (p = 0.71) and −0.1 ± 1.7% (p = 0.85) for the bony anatomy setup and the primary tumor setup, respectively. For patients (n = 31) with nodal involvement, 10% showed a decrease in minimum dose larger than 5% for the bony anatomy setup and 13% for the primary tumor setup. The mean lung dose exceeded the maximum allowed 20 Gy in 21% of the patients for the bony anatomy setup and in 13% for the primary tumor setup, whereas for the spinal cord this occurred in 10% and 13% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: In 10% and 13% of patients with nodal involvement, setup based on bony anatomy or primary tumor, respectively, led to important dose deviations in nodal target volumes. Overdosage of critical structures occurred in 10–20% of the patients. In cases of progressive disease, repeated imaging revealed underdosage of the primary tumor. Development of practical ways for setup procedures based on repeated high-quality imaging of all tumor sites during

  12. Distribution of radio-labeled N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Sprague-Dawley rats and its effect on glutathione metabolism following single and repeat dosing by oral gavage.

    Arfsten, Darryl P; Johnson, Eric W; Wilfong, Erin R; Jung, Anne E; Bobb, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    were measured in the skin and kidney in association with repeat administration of 1,200 mg/kg NAC. Glutathione peroxidase (GxP) activity was increased in the skin, kidney, and liver suggesting that oxidative stress was occurring in these tissues in response to repeat dosing with NAC. Overall, the results of this study present the possibility that NAC could provide some benefit in preventing or reducing toxicity related to exposure to chemical irritants (particularly sulfur mustard) in some tissues by increasing tissue NAC and/or cysteine levels, GSH concentrations, and GST activity. However, follow-on studies in animals are needed to confirm that oral administration of single and multiple doses of NAC can significantly reduce skin, eye, and lung toxicity associated with sulfur mustard exposure. The finding that GxP activity is elevated, albeit transiently, following repeat administration of NAC suggests that repeat administration of NAC may induce oxidative stress in some tissues and further studies are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:17612979

  13. Exploring mechanisms of fatigue during repeated exercise and the dose dependent effects of carbohydrate and protein ingestion: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Tsintzas, Kostas; Thompson, Dylan; Bilzon, James; Betts, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle glycogen has been well established as the primary metabolic energy substrate during physical exercise of moderate- to high-intensity and has accordingly been implicated as a limiting factor when such activity is sustained for a prolonged duration. However, the role of this substrate during repeated exercise after limited recovery is less clear, with ongoing debate regarding how recovery processes can best be supported via nutritional intervention. The aim of this project is ...

  14. The Safety and Effectiveness of Single and Repeat Dosing of Intra-Articular Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor Treatment after Failure of Intra-Articular Steroids

    Chia, Justin; POPE, JANET

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if intra-articular (ia) anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) yielded benefit in patients failing ia steroid injections and determine the safety and durability of single and repeated ia anti-TNF treatment in inflammatory arthritis. Methods: Patients with inflammatory arthritis having one or two active joints, and having failed previous ia steroids were injected with ia adalimumab or ia etanercept mixed with triamcinolone and lidocaine via a retrospective chart audit. Resu...

  15. Predictors of non-invasive therapy and 28-day-case fatality in elderly compared to younger patients with acute myocardial infarction: an observational study from the MONICA/KORA Myocardial Infarction Registry

    Amann, Ute; Kirchberger, Inge; Heier, Margit; Thilo, Christian; Kuch, Bernhard; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Background A substantial proportion of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) did not receive invasive therapy, defined as percutaneous coronary intervention and/or coronary artery bypass grafting. Aims of this study were to evaluate predictors of non-invasive therapy in elderly compared to younger AMI patients and to assess the association between invasive therapy and 28-day-case fatality. Methods From the German population-based registry, 3475 persons, consecutively hospitalized wi...

  16. Action of 50 R X-ray doses on the breeding function of C3H strain mice - effect of splitting the dose, action of repeated irradiations on successive generations

    X-rays exposure effect was studied on C3H strain mice, at the standpoint of the effects produced on breeding function. The method used with this purpose was the following: single doses 20 - 30 - 40 and 50 R/dose, fractional doses: 50 R/total dose, divided in 2 - 5 - 10 or 25 irradiations distributed in one month duration. The offsprings were irradiated at the same doses than the parents, consanguinity being maintained. Statistical treatment of results was carried out, that led at the following conclusions: 1) Couples receiving single exposure of 50 R or two exposures of 25 R at one month interval give comparable results. Fractional doses do not involve the slightest diminution of X-rays effect. 2) 30 R exposure brings about a decrease in fertility, with an increase in abortions. Fertility of 20 R irradiated couples remains below controls. 3) After ten times 5 R and twenty-five 2 R, the number of abortions is the largest. Ovarian function is particularly sensitive to X-rays; one may think that twenty-five 2 R give injuries conditioning non-viability of conception products, smaller doses should produce mutations and yield births of altered genotype individuals. (author)

  17. Action of thrice- and five-times repeated exposures of rats to a low dose of X-rays on the carbonhydrate-energy metabolism of the brain

    Rats have been subjected to whole-body X-irradiation either 3 times with 2- and 3-day intervals and the total dose of 40 R or 5 times with 3-day intervals and the total dose of 50 R. One day after the end of the 3 times irradiation course the following concentrational changes have been observed in brain hemispheres: increase in the biologically active glycogen-protein complex and creatine phosphate, and decrease in glucose-1-phosphate; after the 5 times irradiation course the changes have not been significant, though an elevated corticosterone level in blood has been noted in both cases. 9 to 15 days after the quintuple irradiation a discoordination of glycogenolysis processes against the background of lowered corticosterone level has been observed. The trend towards restitution of metabolism becomes apparent at the normal hormone level. The glycogenlipid complex has probably an adaptive function

  18. The effect of repeated small doses of radiation on recovery from sub-lethal damage by Chinese Hamster cells irradiated in the plateau phase of growth

    Unfed plateau-phase cells have been irradiated with either single doses or up to ten fractions of X-rays 6 hours apart. The single-dose survival curve had an extrapolation number of 11.4, and the oxygen-enhancement ratio (o.e.r.) was 3.1. Cells were exposed to multiple fractions of 200 rad or 150 rad in air and 600 rad or 450 rad in hypoxia. The resulting survival curves did not fit a multi-target, single-hit model of cell survival, being much steeper than that would predict. The curves were exponential up to five fractions of X-rays, but tended to bend downwards with increasing number of fractions. Cells that had survived five fractions of 200 rad (or 600 rad in hypoxia) 6 hours apart, were less able to absorb damage as sub-lethal than those which had not previously been exposed to radiation. The ratio of the initial slopes of the fractionated survival curves for irradiation in air and hypoxia was 2.1, implying that the o.e.r. 'on the shoulder' may be less than that in the exponential region of survival. (author)

  19. Safety evaluation of AB-LIFE(®) (Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 7527, 7528 and 7529): Antibiotic resistance and 90-day repeated-dose study in rats.

    Mukerji, Pushkor; Roper, Jason M; Stahl, Buffy; Smith, Amy B; Burns, Frank; Rae, Jessica Caverly; Yeung, Nicolas; Lyra, Anna; Svärd, Laura; Saarinen, Markku T; Alhoniemi, Esa; Ibarra, Alvin; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2016-06-01

    AB-LIFE(®) is a probiotic product consisting of equal parts of three strains of Lactobacillus plantarum (CECT 7527, 7528, and 7529) blended with inert excipients. Whole genome sequencing was performed on each of the three strains. Antibiotic resistance was evaluated by genomic mining for resistance genes, and assessment for transferability. No risk of transfer potential was identified for any antibiotic resistance genes in the three strains. AB-LIFE(®) was evaluated for potential subchronic oral toxicity in rats, with dosages of 300 and 1000 mg/kg BW/day (equivalent to 5.55 × 10(10) and 1.85 × 10(11) CFU/kg BW/day). Survival of the three test strains through the gastrointestinal tract was supported by fecal analysis. No adverse effects were identified with respect to in-life parameters, clinical or anatomic pathology, translocation, or fecal chemical analyses. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for AB-LIFE(®) in male and female rats was 1000 mg/kg BW/day (1.85 × 10(11) CFU of AB-LIFE(®)/kg BW/day), the highest dose level evaluated. These results, in conjunction with a previous acute toxicity study in rats, support the conclusion that AB-LIFE(®) is safe for human consumption. PMID:27016492

  20. Effects of 28 days of resistance exercise and consuming a commercially available pre-workout supplement, NO-Shotgun®, on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of satellite cell activation, and clinical safety markers in males

    Leutholtz Brian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose This study determined the effects of 28 days of heavy resistance exercise combined with the nutritional supplement, NO-Shotgun®, on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of satellite cell activation, and clinical safety markers. Methods Eighteen non-resistance-trained males participated in a resistance training program (3 × 10-RM 4 times/wk for 28 days while also ingesting 27 g/day of placebo (PL or NO-Shotgun® (NO 30 min prior to exercise. Data were analyzed with separate 2 × 2 ANOVA and t-tests (p Results Total body mass was increased in both groups (p = 0.001, but without any significant increases in total body water (p = 0.77. No significant changes occurred with fat mass (p = 0.62; however fat-free mass did increase with training (p = 0.001, and NO was significantly greater than PL (p = 0.001. Bench press strength for NO was significantly greater than PL (p = 0.003. Myofibrillar protein increased with training (p = 0.001, with NO being significantly greater than PL (p = 0.019. Serum IGF-1 (p = 0.046 and HGF (p = 0.06 were significantly increased with training and for NO HGF was greater than PL (p = 0.002. Muscle phosphorylated c-met was increased with training for both groups (p = 0.019. Total DNA was increased in both groups (p = 0.006, while NO was significantly greater than PL (p = 0.038. For DNA/protein, PL was decreased and NO was not changed (p = 0.014. All of the myogenic regulatory factors were increased with training; however, NO was shown to be significantly greater than PL for Myo-D (p = 0.008 and MRF-4 (p = 0.022. No significant differences were located for any of the whole blood and serum clinical chemistry markers (p > 0.05. Conclusion When combined with heavy resistance training for 28 days, NO-Shotgun® is not associated with any negative side effects, nor does it abnormally impact any of the clinical chemistry markers. Rather, NO-Shotgun® effectively increases muscle strength and mass

  1. Ketoprofen versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen in the management of fever: results of two randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies in children.

    Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja

    2010-01-01

    Fever is a common symptom in children and one of the major concerns of parents of younger and preschool-age children. To compare the efficacy and safety of ketoprofen with that of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen in the treatment of febrile conditions in children. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies with two parallel groups in each study were conducted in primary-care outpatient clinics. Children aged 6 months to 6 years presenting with a febrile condition and an oral body temperature of > or =38.8 degrees C or rectal temperature of > or =39 degrees C were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomized to receive either ketoprofen syrup 0.5 mg/kg, ibuprofen suspension 5 mg/kg or paracetamol suspension 15 mg/kg every 6 hours by the oral route. The primary outcome measure was the change in temperature at 3 hours (H3), compared with baseline (H0). All three treatments provided similar mean maximum decreases of 1.4-1.5 degrees C in body temperature at H3 compared with H0. Use of ketoprofen was not associated with any increased risk of adverse events compared with the two reference compounds. Ketoprofen 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be equivalent to the standard antipyretic doses of the reference products ibuprofen 5 mg/kg and paracetamol 15 mg/kg. Ketoprofen at the 0.5 mg/kg dose should be an effective and safe option for symptomatic management of fever in children. PMID:20380479

  2. Comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the ICRP 30 and ICRP 60 models for a repeated incorporation by inhalation of I-125; Comparacion en el calculo de la dosis efectiva comprometida usando los modelos del ICRP 30 y del ICRP 60 para una incorporacion repetida por inhalacion de I-125

    Carreno P, A.L.; Cortes C, A. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alonso V, G.; Serrano P, F. [IPN, Edificio de Fisica Avanzada Zacatenco, 07300 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    Presently work, a comparison in the calculation of committed effective dose using the models of the ICRP 30 and those of the ICRP 60 for the analysis of internal dose due to repeated incorporation of I-125 is shown. The estimations of incorporated activity are obtained starting from the proportionate data for an exercise of inter comparison, with which it should be determined the internal dose later on. For to estimate the initial activity incorporated by repeated dose was assumed that this it was given through of multiple individual incorporations which happened in the middle points of the monitoring periods. The results using the models of the ICRP 30 and of the ICRP 60 are compared and the causes of the differences are analyzed. (Author)

  3. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  4. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80–90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60–90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  5. Effects of 28 days of resistance exercise while consuming commercially available pre- and post-workout supplements, NO-Shotgun® and NO-Synthesize® on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of protein synthesis, and clinical safety markers in males

    Spillane Mike; Schwarz Neil; Leddy Sarah; Correa Tracie; Minter Melodie; Longoria Victoria; Willoughby Darryn S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the pre- and post-workout supplements, NO-Shotgun® and NO-Synthesize® were determined on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of protein synthesis, and clinical safety markers. Methods Nineteen non-resistance-trained males participated in a resistance training program 4 times/week for 28 days while either ingesting 27 g/day of carbohydrate (CARB) or NO-Shotgun® 30 min pre-exercise and 27 g/day ...

  6. The Efficacy of Magnesium Sulfate Loading on Microalbuminuria Following SIRS:One Step forward in Dosing

    Atabak Najafi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds:Magnesium has been known for its antioxidative and antiinflammatory properties in many studies. In this study two dosing regimens of magnesium were compared with a placebocontrol group in order to investigate safety and efficacy of high doses of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on critically ill trauma patients. Inflammatory and oxidative factors were measured in this trial.Methods:45 trauma patients with systemic inflammatory response syndromes (SIRS were randomly assigned into 2 treatment and one placebo groups. The high dose group received 15 g MgSO4, low dose group received 7.5 g of MgSO4 over 4 hour infusion, and placebo groupreceived saline alone. The initial and post magnesium sulfate injections levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, total antioxidant power and lipid peroxidation were measured after 6, 18 and 36 hours. The pre-infusion along with 6 and 36 hour level ofmicroalbuminuria were also determined.Results:Repeated measurements illustrated that there was no significant difference in TNF-α, total antioxidant power and lipid peroxidation levels among groups during the period of analysis.The microalbuminuria at 36 hour post infusion of high dose group was lower than that of control group (p = 0.024. Patient’s mortality (28 day was similar among all treatment groups. Both magnesium infusion groups tolerated the drug without experiencing anycomplications.Conclusion:No evidence for antioxidative and antiinflammatory effects of magnesium in traumatic SIRS positive patients was found. Magnesium in high doses may be recommended for traumaticpatients with SIRS status to prevent microalbuminuria.

  7. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  8. The effect of repeated small doses of radiation on recovery from sublethal damage by Chinese hamster cells irradiated in oxic or hypoxic conditions in the plateau phase of growth

    Unfed plateau phase Chinese hamster cells have been irradiated with either single doses or up to ten fractions of x-rays six hours apart. These cells remained in an extended G1-like phase throughout the irradiation period. The single-dose log survival curve had an extrapolation number of about 9 and the oxygen enhancement ratio was three. Cells were exposed either to 200 rad per fraction in air and 600 rad per fraction in hypoxia (during irradiation only), or 150 rad per fraction in air and 450 rad per fraction in hypoxia. The resulting fractionated log survival curves did not fit a multitarget model of cell survival, being much steeper than that would predict. The addition of a single-hit component to the lethal effect of the radiation gave reasonable agreement for the first five fractions although the curves tended to bend downwards with increasing number of fractions. The log survival curve for cells irradiated with five fractions of 200 rad (or 600 rad in hypoxia) six hours apart and graded doses six hours after the fifth fraction had an extrapolation number much less than that following single doses, implying a decreased ability to absorb radiation damage as sublethal. The ratio of the initial slopes of the fractionated log survival curves for irradiation in air and hypoxia was less than three, implying that the oxygen enhancement ratio on the shoulder may be less than that in the exponential region of survival. (author)

  9. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  10. Serial observations after high dose talc slurry in the rabbit model for pleurodesis.

    Xie, C; Teixeira, L R; Wang, N; McGovern, J P; Light, R W

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to a pleurodesis after the intrapleural injection of a sclerosing agent are not completely understood. The purpose of the present study was to make serial observations over 28 days on the pleural fluid findings and the gross and microscopic changes in the pleura after talc slurry administered intrapleurally at a high dose. Sixty-six rabbits received 400 mg/kg talc slurry. Ten to 12 rabbits were sacrificed 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days after the intrapleural injection. At sacrifice the pleural fluid was measured and analyzed, and the pleural surfaces were studied grossly and microscopically. The intrapleural injection of 400 mg/kg talc slurry resulted in an acute exudative pleural effusion that persisted for 4 days. There was a progressive increase in the gross and microscopic fibrosis over the 28 days. Talc was present at the time of sacrifice in all animals. At 28 days there was a clinically significant pleurodesis in all rabbits; pleurodesis was not observed before this time. From this study we conclude that the intrapleural injection of 400 mg/kg talc slurry leads to an acute exudative pleural effusion and clinically significant pleurodesis that is present on day 28 but not day 14. It appears that the production of a pleurodesis requires higher doses of talc in rabbits without a chest tube than in humans with a chest tube. PMID:9685526

  11. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors. PMID:16421768

  12. Honesty through repeated interactions.

    Rich, Patricia; Zollman, Kevin J S

    2016-04-21

    In the study of signaling, it is well known that the cost of deception is an essential element for stable honest signaling in nature. In this paper, we show how costs for deception can arise endogenously from repeated interactions between individuals. Utilizing the Sir Philip Sidney game as an illustrative case, we show that repeated interactions can sustain honesty with no observable signal costs, even when deception cannot be directly observed. We provide a number of potential experimental tests for this theory which distinguish it from the available alternatives. PMID:26869213

  13. Effect of high-dose ciclosporin on the immune response to primary and booster vaccination in immunocompetent cats.

    Roberts, Elizabeth S; VanLare, Karen A; Roycroft, Linda M; King, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Ciclosporin (Atopica oral solution for cats 100 mg/ml; Novartis Animal Health) was recently approved for use in cats with feline hypersensitivity dermatitis. The immunosuppressant effect of ciclosporin on the ability of cats to mount an immune response following vaccination was determined. Thirty-two healthy, immunocompetent adult cats (16 cats/group) were treated with either ciclosporin for 56 days at a dose of 24 mg/kg once daily or sham dosed. Prior to treatment, cats had an adequate antibody response to primary vaccination against feline calicivirus (FCV), feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and rabies. Booster vaccination or novel vaccination with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was administered 28 days after initiation of treatment with ciclosporin. There were no differences between the ciclosporin-treated and control cats for FCV and FPV antibody titers following booster vaccination. There were delays/reductions in antibody response to FHV-1, FeLV and rabies in treated cats; however, adequate protection was achieved in response to all booster vaccinations. Following primary vaccination with FIV, control cats showed a response, but treated cats showed no antibody production. Adverse events commonly associated with ciclosporin treatment, including diarrhea/loose stool, vomiting, salivation and regurgitation, were reported. In adult cats treated with 24 mg/kg/day of ciclosporin (more than three times the therapeutic dose), vaccine titer levels were adequate for protection following booster vaccination. In contrast, treated cats failed to mount a humoral response to a novel (FIV) vaccination, suggesting that memory B-cell immune responses remain intact during repeated high-dose ciclosporin administration in cats, but that primary immune responses are impaired. PMID:24820998

  14. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  15. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  16. Repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    Awad, Ahmed J; Walcott, Brian P; Stapleton, Christopher J; Ding, Dale; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Loeffler, Jay S

    2015-06-01

    We perform a systematic review of repeat radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) with an emphasis on lesion obliteration rates and complications. Radiosurgery is an accepted treatment modality for AVM located in eloquent cortex or deep brain structures. For residual or persistent lesions, repeat radiosurgery can be considered if sufficient time has passed to allow for a full appreciation of treatment effects, usually at least 3years. A systematic review was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. References for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. A total of 14 studies comprising 733 patients met the review criteria and were included. For series that reported target dose at both first and repeat treatments, the weighted means were 19.42Gy and 19.06Gy, respectively. The mean and median obliteration rate for the repeat radiosurgery treatments were 61% (95% confidence interval 51.9-71.7%) and 61.5%, respectively. The median follow up following radiosurgery ranged from 19.5 to 80months. Time to complete obliteration after the repeat treatment ranged from 21 to 40.8months. The most common complications of repeat radiosurgery for AVM included hemorrhage (7.6%) and radiation-induced changes (7.4%). Repeat radiosurgery can be used to treat incompletely obliterated AVM with an obliteration rate of 61%. Complications are related to treatment effect latency (hemorrhage risk) as well as radiation-induced changes. Repeat radiosurgery can be performed at 3 years following the initial treatment, allowing for full realization of effects from the initial treatment prior to commencing therapy. PMID:25913746

  17. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver’s cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51–71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction

  18. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  19. Digital Repeat Analysis; Setup and Operation

    Nol, J.; Isouard, G.; Mirecki, J.

    2006-01-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiolo...

  20. Clinical experience and results of treatment with suprofen in pediatrics. 3rd communication: Antipyretic effect and tolerability of repeat doses of suprofen and paracetamol syrup in hospitalized children/A single-blind study.

    Weippl, G; Michos, N; Sundal, E J; Stocker, H

    1985-01-01

    Antipyretic effect and tolerability of alpha-methyl-4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)-phenyl acetic acid (suprofen, Suprol), syrup and paracetamol (acetaminophen) were compared within the scope of the present randomized single-blind study; the test population included a total of 115 children ranging in age from 6 months to 12 years. All patients were admitted to the hospital with an average temperature of 39.3 degrees C, their disease being caused by bacterial or viral infections. The dose levels for treatment with syrup depended upon the children's age and body weight. Treatment was in most cases given for two days; a three-times-a-day schedule was used. The (rectal) temperature as well as pulse and respiratory rates were measured prior to treatment and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 h after first administration of the test preparations. The results showed that the antipyretic effect of suprofen was in both age groups at all rating times statistically significantly superior to that of paracetamol. Pulse and respiratory rates dropped in both age groups after treatment; the means were within the normal range at all rating times. Adverse drug reactions were seen in 5 patients on suprofen and in 3 cases on paracetamol. It is, however, questionable whether such reactions are drug-dependent. PMID:3911963

  1. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  2. Heart failure re-admission: measuring the ever shortening gap between repeat heart failure hospitalizations.

    Jeffrey A Bakal

    Full Text Available Many quality-of-care and risk prediction metrics rely on time to first rehospitalization even though heart failure (HF patients may undergo several repeat hospitalizations. The aim of this study is to compare repeat hospitalization models. Using a population-based cohort of 40,667 patients, we examined both HF and all cause re-hospitalizations using up to five years of follow-up. Two models were examined: the gap-time model which estimates the adjusted time between hospitalizations and a multistate model which considered patients to be in one of four states; community-dwelling, in hospital for HF, in hospital for any reason, or dead. The transition probabilities and times were then modeled using patient characteristics and number of repeat hospitalizations. We found that during the five years of follow-up roughly half of the patients returned for a subsequent hospitalization for each repeat hospitalization. Additionally, we noted that the unadjusted time between hospitalizations was reduced ∼40% between each successive hospitalization. After adjustment each additional hospitalization was associated with a 28 day (95% CI: 22-35 reduction in time spent out of hospital. A similar pattern was seen when considering the four state model. A large proportion of patients had multiple repeat hospitalizations. Extending the gap between hospitalizations should be an important goal of treatment evaluation.

  3. OECD 28-days oral toxicity study on fumonisin B1

    Nijs M de; Egmond HP van; Jong WH de; Loveren H van; LPI; ARO; MGB

    1999-01-01

    Het beschreven experiment werd uitgevoerd om inzicht te verkrijgen over effecten van lage doseringen fumonisine B1 op target organen en het immuunsysteem. Mannelijke ratten van drie weken oud werden oraal via maagsonde behandeld met 0, 0,19, 0,75 of 3 mg/kg lichaamsgewicht fumonisine B1, dagelij

  4. PERINATAL TUBERCULOSIS WITH MILLIARY PATTERN IN INFANT AGED 28 DAYS

    Dian Savitri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal  tuberculosis  (TB was a very  rare  case.  Its  clinical manifestations  could mimic bacterialinfection. The clinical course was often fulminant and characterized by dissemination and meningitis.Its mortality was very high, could achieve 100% in untreated patient. We reported a case of infant aged28  days  admitted with  breathlessness,  fever,  and  poor  feeding.  Physical  examination  showedbreathlessness, pale, lethargy, and hepatomegaly. Chest radiograph showed a feature of milliary patternwith fine tubercles in both lung, supported with positive result on gastric aspirates for acid fast bacilli3 days respectively. Gastric aspirate culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed positive result.Patient then diagnosed with perinatal TB with milliary pattern. This condition was accompanied withsevere sepsis and meningitis. Four TB regimens (isoniazid, rifampisin, pirazinamide, and ethambutol,corticosteroid, antibiotics were given. The patient was eventually died after receiving TB therapy for 13days. [MEDICINA 2014;45:208-212].

  5. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  6. Effects of 28 days of resistance exercise while consuming commercially available pre- and post-workout supplements, NO-Shotgun® and NO-Synthesize® on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of protein synthesis, and clinical safety markers in males

    Spillane Mike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the pre- and post-workout supplements, NO-Shotgun® and NO-Synthesize® were determined on body composition, muscle strength and mass, markers of protein synthesis, and clinical safety markers. Methods Nineteen non-resistance-trained males participated in a resistance training program 4 times/week for 28 days while either ingesting 27 g/day of carbohydrate (CARB or NO-Shotgun® 30 min pre-exercise and 27 g/day of carbohydrate or NO- Synthesize® 30 min post-exercise (NOSS. Data were analyzed with separate 2 × 2 ANOVA (p Results Total body mass was increased in both groups (p = 0.001, but not different between groups. Fat mass was unchanged with CARB, but NOSS decreased fat mass (p = 0.026. Both groups increased fat-free mass (p = 0.001; however, the increases were greater with NOSS (p = 0.023. NOSS underwent greater increases in upper-body (p = 0.023 and lower-body (p = 0.035 strength than CARB. Myofibrillar protein significantly increased in both groups (p = 0.041, with NOSS being greater than CARB (p = 0.049. All of the MHC isoforms were significantly increased in both groups; however, NOSS was greater than CARB for MHC 1 (p = 0.013 and MHC 2A (p = 0.046. All of the myogenic regulatory factors were significantly increased in both groups; however, NOSS was greater than CARB for Myo-D (p = 0.038 and MRF-4 (p = 0.001. For the whole blood and serum clinical chemistry markers, all variables remained within normal clinical ranges. Conclusions Heavy resistance training for 28 days, with NO-Shotgun® and NO-Synthesize® ingested before and after exercise, respectively, significantly improved body composition and increased muscle mass and performance without abnormally impacting any of the clinical chemistry markers.

  7. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  8. Pharmacokinetics of rectal paracetamol after repeated dosing in children

    Hahn, T W; Henneberg, S W; Holm-Knudsen, R J;

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-three children (aged between 9 weeks and 11 yr) were given paracetamol suppositories 25 mg kg-1 every 6 h (maximum 5 days) after major surgery and serum and saliva concentrations were measured. There was a good correlation (r = 0.91, P <0.05) between saliva and serum concentrations. A one-...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of rectal paracetamol after repeated dosing in children

    Hahn, T W; Henneberg, S W; Holm-Knudsen, R J;

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-three children (aged between 9 weeks and 11 yr) were given paracetamol suppositories 25 mg kg-1 every 6 h (maximum 5 days) after major surgery and serum and saliva concentrations were measured. There was a good correlation (r = 0.91, P <0.05) between saliva and serum concentrations. A one...

  10. Changes in Liver Proteome Expression of Senegalese Sole (Solea senegalensis) in Response to Repeated Handling Stress

    Cordeiro, O. D.; Silva, Tomé Santos; Alves, R. N.;

    2012-01-01

    , cathepsin B, disulfide-isomerase A3 precursor, cell-division cycle 48, and five distinct heat shock proteins), amino acid metabolism, urea cycle and methylation/folate pathways (methionine adenosyltransferase I α, phenylalanine hydroxylase, mitochondrial agmatinase, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, 3......The Senegalese sole, a high-value flatfish, is a good candidate for aquaculture production. Nevertheless, there are still issues regarding this species’ sensitivity to stress in captivity. We aimed to characterize the hepatic proteome expression for this species in response to repeated handling and...... identify potential molecular markers that indicate a physiological response to chronic stress. Two groups of fish were reared in duplicate for 28 days, one of them weekly exposed to handling stress (including hypoxia) for 3 min, and the other left undisturbed. Two-dimensional electrophoresis enabled the...

  11. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  12. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  13. Phase I trial of low-dose oral Clofarabine in myelodysplastic syndromes patients who have failed frontline therapy.

    Rudrapatna, Venkatesh K; Morley, Kimberly; Boucher, Kenneth M; Pierson, Andrew S; Shull, Christian T; Kushner, James P; Shami, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    We investigated protracted low-dose oral Clofarabine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Adults with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-1 or higher who had failed first line therapy were eligible. INT-1 patients had to be transfusion-dependent. We started with oral Clofarabine at 5mg (fixed dose) daily for 10 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. Toxicity prompted a modification to 1mg PO daily for 10 days and then 1mg PO daily for 7 days. Patients received treatment indefinitely until loss of response or unacceptable toxicity. Nine patients (5 women) were enrolled and evaluable (median age 65 years; range 55-81). A 10-day regimen of oral Clofarabine at 5mg/day induced Grade IV pancytopenia. A dose of 1 mg/day for 7/28 days was very well tolerated without significant toxicity. Three patients had responses (2 with responses lasting up to 21 and 51 cycles) defined as stable disease in spite of no significant change on bone marrow evaluation. Low-dose oral Clofarabine (1mg daily for 7/28 days) proved both effective and safe for patients with MDS who had failed prior therapy. This patient population is particularly sensitive to more protracted Clofarabine treatment schedules. PMID:26038120

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose to neonates in a special care baby unit

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Yousif, A.; Babikir, E.; Salih, I.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient entrance surface dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose for neonates in the special care baby unit (SCBU) up to 28 days after birth. A total of 135 patients were examined during 4 months. ESDs were calculated from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. Effective doses were calculated using software from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean patient ESD per procedure was 80±0.02 μGy. The mean and range of the effective dose per procedure were 0.02 (0.01-0.3) mSv. The radiation dose in this study was higher compared to previous studies. A dedicated X-ray machine with additional filtration is recommended for patient dose reductions.

  15. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO2 via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO2 in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO2 in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p 2 in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO2 were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose group

  16. 78 FR 65594 - Vehicular Repeaters

    2013-11-01

    ... Proceedings, 63 FR 24121 (May 1, 1998). Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed electronically using the... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 90 Vehicular Repeaters AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed... the Commission's rules to allow the licensing and operation of vehicular repeater systems and...

  17. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  18. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  19. Repeated treatments of drooling with botulinum toxin B in neurology

    Møller, Eigild; Daugaard, Dorthe; Holm, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate efficacy, saliva flow, and composition in repeated BoNT-B treatments of drooling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventeen neurological patients (median 66 years), referred for treatment of drooling participated in this observational study. Median total doses of 4000 units...

  20. TAK-228 (formerly MLN0128), an investigational oral dual TORC1/2 inhibitor: A phase I dose escalation study in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Siegel, David S; Vij, Ravi; Berdeja, Jesus G; Richardson, Paul G; Neuwirth, Rachel; Patel, Chirag G; Zohren, Fabian; Wolf, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways are frequently dysregulated in multiple human cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). This was the first clinical study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, maximal-tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics, and preliminary clinical activity of TAK-228, an oral TORC1/2 inhibitor, in patients with MM, NHL, or WM. Thirty-nine patients received TAK-228 once daily (QD) at 2, 4, 6, or 7 mg, or QD for 3 days on and 4 days off each week (QDx3d QW) at 9 or 12 mg, in 28-day cycles. The overall median age was 61.0 years (range 46-85); 31 patients had MM, four NHL, and four WM. Cycle 1 DLTs occurred in five QD patients (stomatitis, urticaria, blood creatinine elevation, fatigue, and nausea and vomiting) and four QDx3d QW patients (erythematous rash, fatigue, asthenia, mucosal inflammation, and thrombocytopenia). The MTDs were determined to be 4 mg QD and 9 mg QDx3d QW. Thirty-six patients (92%) reported at least one drug-related toxicity; the most common grade ≥3 drug-related toxicities were thrombocytopenia (15%), fatigue (10%), and neutropenia (5%). TAK-228 exhibited a dose-dependent increase in plasma exposure and no appreciable accumulation with repeat dosing; mean plasma elimination half-life was 6-8 hr. Of the 33 response-evaluable patients, one MM patient had a minimal response, one WM patient achieved partial response, one WM patient had a minor response, and 18 patients (14 MM, two NHL, and two WM) had stable disease. These findings encourage further studies including combination strategies. Am. J. Hematol. 91:400-405, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800393

  1. Absence of bacterial resistance following repeat exposure to photodynamic therapy

    Pedigo, Lisa A.; Gibbs, Aaron J.; Scott, Robert J.; Street, Cale N.

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria necessitates exploration of alternative approaches to treat hospital and community acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) during repeated sub-lethal challenge. Antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus and antibiotic sensitive E. coli were subjected to repeat PDT treatments using a methylene blue photosensitizer formulation and 670 nm illumination from a non-thermal diode laser. Parameters were adjusted such that kills were Oxacillin resistance was induced in S. aureus using a disc diffusion method. For each experiment, "virgin" and "repeat" cultures were exposed to methylene blue at 0.01% w/v and illuminated with an energy dose of 20.6 J/cm2. No significant difference in killing of E. coli (repeat vs. virgin culture) was observed through 11 repeat exposures. Similar results were seen using MSSA and MRSA, wherein kill rate did not significantly differ from control over 25 repeat exposures. In contrast, complete oxacillin resistance could be generated in S. aureus over a limited number of exposures. PDT is effective in the eradication of pathogens including antibiotic resistance strains. Furthermore, repeated sub-lethal exposure does not induce resistance to subsequent PDT treatments. The absence of resistance formation represents a significant advantage of PDT over traditional antibiotics.

  2. Lisina digestível em dietas de baixa proteína para frangos de corte tipo caipira de um aos 28 dias Digestible lysine in diets containing low protein concentrations for broiler type redneck from 1 to 28 days

    H.G. Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a inclusão de diferentes porcentagens de lisina digestível em dietas de baixa proteína para frangos de corte tipo caipira, machos e fêmeas, com idade entre um e 28 dias. Utilizaram-se 792 machos e 792 fêmeas de linhagem comercial, de um dia de idade, distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, em esquema fatorial 2x6 (sexo x porcentagem de lisina digestível: 0,85; 0,90; 0,95; 1,00; 1,05 e 1,10% com seis repetições de 22 aves. Não foi constatada interação (P>0,05 de sexo versus inclusão de lisina. Observou-se superioridade (P0,05 para conversão alimentar. Da composição centesimal da carcaça, apenas o percentual de matéria mineral foi influenciada (PThe inclusion of different percentages of digestible lysine in low-protein diets was evaluated for male and female free-range broiler chickens, from 1 to 28 days. We used 792 female and 792 male naked neck chickens a day in a completely randomized 2x6 factorial scheme (sex x percentages of digestible lysine: 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, 1.00, 1.05 and1.10% with six replicates of 22 broilers. No interaction of sex versus lysine was found. Superiority was observed (P0.05 in food conversion.In the chemical composition of the carcass, only thepercentage of mineral matter was influenced (P<0.05 bydigestible lysine levels.It was concluded that the level of 0.85% for type redneck broiler meets the nutritional requirement of digestible lysine in diets containing lower protein concentrations.

  3. Evaluating dose response from flexible dose clinical trials

    Baron David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true dose effect in flexible-dose clinical trials may be obscured and even reversed because dose and outcome are related. Methods To evaluate dose effect in response on primary efficacy scales from 2 randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials of patients with bipolar mania who received olanzapine (N = 234, 5–20 mg/day, or patients with schizophrenia who received olanzapine (N = 172, 10–20 mg/day, we used marginal structural models, inverse probability of treatment weighting (MSM, IPTW methodology. Dose profiles for mean changes from baseline were evaluated using weighted MSM with a repeated measures model. To adjust for selection bias due to non-random dose assignment and dropouts, patient-specific time-dependent weights were determined as products of (i stable weights based on inverse probability of receiving the sequence of dose assignments that was actually received by a patient up to given time multiplied by (ii stable weights based on inverse probability of patient remaining on treatment by that time. Results were compared with those by unweighted analyses. Results While the observed difference in efficacy scores for dose groups for the unweighted analysis strongly favored lower doses, the weighted analyses showed no strong dose effects and, in some cases, reversed the apparent "negative dose effect." Conclusion While naïve comparison of groups by last or modal dose in a flexible-dose trial may result in severely biased efficacy analyses, the MSM with IPTW estimators approach may be a valuable method of removing these biases and evaluating potential dose effect, which may prove useful for planning confirmatory trials.

  4. Níveis de plasma sanguíneo em dietas pós-desmame para leitões desmamados aos 28 dias de idade Spray-dried plasma levels in post-weaning diets for piglets weaned at 28 days of age

    Félix Inácio de Assis Júnior

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar níveis de plasma sanguíneo (PS em dietas para leitões desmamados aos 28 dias de idade, foi realizado um experimento utilizando-se 128 leitões com peso inicial de 7,64 ± 0,103 kg, distribuídos em delineamento em blocos, composto por quatro níveis de plasma, oito blocos e quatro animais por unidade experimental. Para avaliação dos níveis de plasma, utilizaram-se as seguintes dietas: ração com leite desnatado (LD e sem plasma sanguíneo (PS dos 29 aos 42 dias; ração com LD mais 2,8% de PS dos 29 aos 35 dias (período 1 e 2,0% de PS dos 36 aos 42 dias (período 2; ração com LD mais 4,2% de PS no período 1 e 3,0% de PS no período 2; e ração sem LD e com 5,6% de PS no período 1 e 4,0% de PS no período 2. Na fase dos 42 aos 56 dias (período 3, a mesma ração de creche foi fornecida para os animais. Não se verificou efeito da inclusão de plasma sanguíneo nas dietas sobre o consumo de ração médio diário. No período 1 verificou-se efeito linear dos níveis de plasma sanguíneo sobre o índice bionutricional (IBN = 6,8371GPMD - 3,5732CRMD e o ganho de peso médio diário (^Y = 0,1364 + 0,0100X. Não houve efeito dos níveis de plasma na dieta sobre o índice de diarréia. O melhor nível de plasma sanguíneo em dietas para o período dos 29 aos 35 dias de idade de leitões desmamados aos 28 dias de idade é de 5,6% e não há efeitos benéficos da adição de plasma sanguíneo na segunda semana após o desmame.Aiming to evaluate the spray-dried plasma levels (BP in diets for piglets weaned at 28 days of age, an experiment with 128 piglets with initial body weight of 7.635 ± 0.103 kg was conducted and allocated in a experimental block design composed of four treatments, eight replicates and four animals per replicate. The treatments used were: diets with dried milk (DM and without spray-dried plasma (BP from 29 to 42 days of age; diets with DM and 2.8% of BP from 29 to 35 days of age (period I and 2

  5. Evaluation of DNB test repeatability

    The repeatability of DNB tests was evaluated by carrying out DNB runs at the same conditions in two different test sections. The resulting matched pairs of DNB runs were then subjected to an extensive statistical analysis. This analysis indicates that individual runs using different test sections are repeatable within approximately 8 percent, and that the means of two different data sets should fall within approximately 2 percent of each other. The repeatability within a set, i.e., from the same test section, was found to be approximately 6.4 percent. An evaluation of the uncertainties by analysis of errors inherent in geometrical and physical parameters results in an estimated set-to-set repeatability for an individual run of 7.6 percent which is in good agreement with the 8 percent error found in the data analysis. For repeatability of an individual run within a set, 6.8 percent was estimated from the test parameters, compared to 6.4 percent determined by data analysis. (U.S.)

  6. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A

  7. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol. PMID:25903096

  8. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  9. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  10. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of [3H]Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in [14C]iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress [an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures], although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results

  11. Repeating seismic events in China.

    Schaff, David P; Richards, Paul G

    2004-02-20

    About 10% of seismic events in and near China from 1985 to 2000 were repeating events not more than about 1 kilometer from each other. We cross-correlated seismograms from approximately 14,000 earthquakes and explosions and measured relative arrival times to approximately 0.01 second, enabling lateral location precision of about 100 to 300 meters. Such precision is important for seismic hazard studies, earthquake physics, and nuclear test ban verification. Recognition and measurement of repeating signals in archived data and the resulting improvement in location specificity quantifies the inaccuracy of current procedures for picking onset times and locating events. PMID:14976310

  12. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    Olajumoke Omolara Ojo

    Full Text Available Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1 were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of

  13. 简化急性生理学评分Ⅲ与其他评分方法对急诊严重脓毒症患者28 d死亡的预测能力比较%Comparison of simplified acute physiology score Ⅲ and other scoring systems in prediction of 28-day ;prognosis in patients with severe sepsis

    李岩; 李春盛

    2015-01-01

    SAPSⅡ评分预测能力相当,可用于对急诊ICU严重脓毒症患者的预后进行预测,但SAPSⅢ评分有不适合预测急诊ICU脓毒症患者预后的选项,导致SAPSⅢ评分在预测急诊ICU脓毒症患者的预后方面并未优于其他评分。%Objective To investigate the power of the simplified acute physiology score Ⅲ ( SAPSⅢ) for prediction of outcome for patients with severe sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit ( ICU ). Methods A retrospective study was conducted. 677 severe sepsis patients with age ≥ 18 years old and the survival time in emergency ICU≥24 hours admitted to the emergency ICU of Beijing Chaoyang Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University from January 2008 to December 2011 were enrolled. The acute physiology and chronic health evaluationⅡ ( APACHEⅡ), sequential organ failure assessment ( SOFA ), SAPSⅡ, SAPSⅢ, and mortality in emergency department sepsis ( MEDS ) scores were recorded based on the poorest value within 24 hours of ICU admission. The 28-day result as denoted as survival or death was considered as the end point of the study. The ability to predict mortality by the score systems was assessed by using receiver operating characteristic ( ROC ) curve analysis and binary logistic regression models. Results Among the 677 patients with severe sepsis, 284 cases died within 28 days after admission, and the mortality rate was 41.9%. Compared with survivors, the patients in non-survival group was older with higher APACHEⅡ, SOFA, SAPSⅡ, SAPSⅢ, and MEDS scores and higher ratio of underlying diseases, such as primary hypertension and renal dysfunction, and they had more organ injury, higher ratio of lung infection and bacterial infection ( P 0.05 ). The MEDS score in predicting the prognosis was obviously better than that of APACHEⅡ, SOFA, SAPSⅡ, and SAPSⅢscores ( all P<0.05 ). The MEDS score showed the best sensitivity ( 91.5%), and specificity ( 89.1%). The 28-day mortality in cases

  14. Dose limits

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  15. A Semiparametric Bayesian Model for Repeatedly Repeated Binary Outcomes

    Quintana, Fernando A.; Müller, Peter; Rosner, Gary L.; Mary V Relling

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the analysis of data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays comparing tumor and normal tissues. The data consist of sequences of indicators for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and involve three nested levels of repetition: chromosomes for a given patient, regions within chromosomes, and SNPs nested within regions. We propose to analyze these data using a semiparametric model for multi-level repeated binary data. At the top level of the hierarchy we assume a sampling model fo...

  16. Reject/repeat analysis and the effect prior film viewing has on a department's reject/repeat rate

    Purpose: Achieving cost-effectiveness within the NHS is an old initiative but one that has again been highlighted by recent government policies (The New NHS-Modern and Dependable, Stationary Office, London, 1997). It has been reiterated that it is the responsibility of individual Trusts to devise means to provide such a service. Reject/repeat analyses have long been the primary tool used to assess the cost-effectiveness of radiography departments (Quality Assurance in Diagnostic Radiology, WHO, Geneva, 1982). This research paper examines an in-house initiative (viewing patients' previous films) commonly employed in other Health Trusts in order to reduce departmental repeat/reject rates. Method: Three hundred orthopaedic patients with hip, knee and ankle prostheses were included in a reject/repeat analysis. The aim was to investigate whether or not viewing patient's previous relevant radiographs would be advantageous to the practicing radiographer. This was done through an audit cycle consisting of two audit periods each lasting for 3 months. The primary audit period recorded the baseline repeat/reject rate, with the secondary audit period recording the repeat/reject rate under an experimental condition of viewing the relevant radiographs. Results: The baseline audit revealed repeat rates of 33% in orthopaedic patients with hip, knee and ankle prostheses. The availability of prior film viewing to the radiographer reduced this repeat rate to 10.6%. Conclusion: Prior film viewing dramatically reduced the department's repeat/reject rate by 22.4%. This provides scope for significant patient dose reductions as well as reducing departmental film expenses. This is an underestimated initiative and should be used appropriately in routine clinical practice

  17. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  18. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  19. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Péter Kovács; András Csontos; Balázs Heilig; András Koppán

    2013-01-01

    The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried ...

  20. Controllable dose

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  1. A repeating fast radio burst

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  2. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  3. Repeated inhalation exposure of rats to aerosols of 239PuO2. V

    The biological responses following protracted alpha irradiation of rat lungs are being studied. Groups of rats have been exposed once, or repeatedly, to aerosols of 239PuO2 to achieve, or to re-establish, lung burdens of 239Pu that will result in projected lifetime alpha-radiation doses to the lungs of 20, 60, 200, or 600 rad. There were dose related increases in the incidence of primary lung tumors In the rats exposed once or repeatedly to 239PuO2. Repeated inhalation exposure of rats to 239PuO2 did not increase the incidence of lung tumors, their time of occurrence nor the risk of death with a lung tumor per unit of absorbed alpha dose to the lung compared to doses received following single exposures. These findings are consistent with those in Beagle dogs repeatedly exposed to 239PuO2 in other studies, but are not consistent with previous observations In mice. The findings in mice indicated protraction of the alpha dose to the lung by repeated inhalation exposure was more carcinogenic than similar doses after a single inhalation exposure. (author)

  4. Glasses for high doses dosimetry; Vidros para dosimetria de altas doses

    Quezada, Valeria A.C.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    A routine dosimetric system, of low cost, for gamma high doses measurements was established using commercially available glass samples and a special densitometer. Glasses of different kinds, origins and dimensions were studied in relation to their dosimetric properties: repeatability, batch uniformity, re-utilization, thermal fading and dose range. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Immune Responses to Single-Dose Versus Double-Dose Hepatitis B Vaccines in Healthcare Workers not Responding to the Primary Vaccine Series: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Joukar, Farahnaz; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Naghipour, Mohammad-Reza; Asgharnezhad, Mehrnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Recommendations to immunize healthcare workers (HCWs) against hepatitis B are well known. However, a proportion of individuals do not respond to the primary standard three-dose HB vaccination schedule. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate whether a double-dose HB booster vaccine could induce better protective anti-HB titers than a single-dose booster in non-protected HCWs. Materials and Methods This was a randomized clinical trial. A total of 91 HCWs not responding to the primary vaccine series in 2014 were enrolled. The participants were randomized into two groups that received a double dose of the HB vaccine containing 40 µg of antigen or a single dose of the HB vaccine containing 20 µg of antigen in three doses (at zero, one and six months after vaccination). Blood samples were collected before vaccinations and 28 days after the third dose to assess the seroconversion rate, according to the anti-HB antibody titer threshold of > 10 mIU/mL. Results The seroconversion rates were 93.2% and 87.2% after the first booster doses of the double-dose and single-dose HB vaccines, respectively (P = 0.64). In the double-dose HB vaccine group, the seroconversion rate was 97.8% compared with 89.6% in the single-dose group following the second vaccine dose (P = 0.83). All of the participants in both groups were seroprotected after the third HB vaccine dose. Conclusions Both the single- and double-dose HB vaccines were adequately immunogenic, and the double-dose HB vaccine was not significantly more immunogenic than the single-dose vaccine in terms of the seroconversion rates of HCWs who had not responded to the primary vaccine series.

  6. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  8. Telomerase Repeated Amplification Protocol (TRAP)

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are found at the end of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, and proteins that bind to telomeres protect DNA from being recognized as double-strand breaks thus preventing end-to-end fusions (Griffith et al., 1999). However, due to the end replication problem and other factors such as oxidative damage, the limited life span of cultured cells (Hayflick limit) results in progressive shortening of these protective structures (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex telomerase-consisting of a protein catalytic component hTERT and a functional RNA component hTR or hTERC- counteracts telomere shortening by adding telomeric repeats to the end of chromosomes in ~90% of primary human tumors and in some transiently proliferating stem-like cells (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). This results in continuous proliferation of cells which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, telomere biology has a central role in aging, cancer progression/metastasis as well as targeted cancer therapies. There are commonly used methods in telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) (Mender and Shay, 2015b), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this detailed protocol we describe Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP). The TRAP assay is a popular method to determine telomerase activity in mammalian cells and tissue samples (Kim et al., 1994). The TRAP assay includes three steps: extension, amplification, and detection of telomerase products. In the extension step, telomeric repeats are added to the telomerase substrate (which is actually a non telomeric oligonucleotide, TS) by telomerase. In the amplification step, the extension products are amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers (TS upstream primer and ACX downstream primer) and in the detection step, the presence or absence of telomerase is

  9. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    Cui Zhi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs and thromboxane A2 (TXA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2 after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187 induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells.

  10. Radiation Tests of the VELO ECS and Analogue Repeater Mezzanines

    Eklund, L; Van der Gracht, A; Vollhardt, A

    2006-01-01

    The VELO front-end control system and analogue link is based on commercial components where the radiation tolerance is assured by a radiation qualification procedure. This note reports on the radiation qualification of the components required for the VELO ECS mezzanine and analogue repeater mezzanines. They are located at the VELO vacuum vessel where the expected maximal dose is 73 kRad during 10 years of operation. The qualification was done by irradiating prototype circuits at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Villigen, Switzerland. The ECS mezzanine prototypes were irradiated to a dose of 780 kRad and the analogue driver test channels were irradiated to a dose of 600 kRad. All devices were fully functional after the irradiation and only a small increase in current consumption was observed.

  11. Efficacy analysis on simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy with high or conventional dose and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with N1 esophageal carcinoma

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy against neck and upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. Methods: sIMRT plans were designed for 44 patients of neck and upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma with lymph node metastasis, 20 of which underwent high dose sIMRT (hsIMRT group) and 24 underwent conventional dose sIMRT (csIMRT group). Three target volumes were defined: PGTVnd, target volume of lymph node lesion, irradiated to 68.1 Gy (2.27 Gy × 30 fractions) for the hsIMRT group, and 60 Gy (2.0 Gy ×30 fractions) the csIMRT group; PTV1, the target volume of primary lesion, to be irradiate to 63.9 Gy (2.13 Gy × 30 fractions) for the hsIMRT group and 60 Gy (2.0 Gy × 30 fractions) for the csIMRT group; PTV2, the prophylactically irradiated volume, to be irradiated to 54 Gy (1.8 Gy ×30) for both groups. The sIMRT plan included 5 equiangular coplanar beams. All patients received DDP + 5-FU regimen concurrently with radiotherapy at 1 -5 d and 29- 33 d, respectively. Chemotherapy was repeated for two cycles 28 days after the radiotherapy was finished. Results: The treatment was completed for all patients within 6 weeks. During the treatment only one patient with grade 3 acute bronchitis was observed in the hsIMRT group. The complete response (CR) rate for the lymph node lesion of the hsIMRT group was 75% (15/20), significantly higher than that of the csIMRT group [45.8% (11/24), χ2=3.84, P<0.05]. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year progression-free survival rates of the hsIMRT group were 60%, 40%, and 25%, respectively, all significantly higher than those of the csIMRT group (41.7%, 25%, and 8.3% respectively, χ2=4.11, P<0.05). However, there were not significant differences in the total survival rate, and the CR and PR of the esophageal lesion between these 2 groups. The major toxicity observed was grade Ⅰ -Ⅱ leukoctyopenia. Conclusions: sIMRT generates desirable dose

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    ... MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... live birth before age 20. Problem Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 ...

  13. Essays in the theory of repeated games

    Osório-Costa, António Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This thesis comprises three essays in economic theory. The first two are in the theory of repeated games. The third is also a theoretical contribution, which mixes con- cepts both from repeated games and the theory of incentives. The first chapter is a novel contribution to frequent monitoring in repeated games. The second one, studies for the first time, infinitely repeated games where the repetitions of the stage game are random. The last chapter, studies the provision of incentives in a pr...

  14. Lambda Exonuclease Digestion of CGG Trinucleotide Repeats

    Conroy, R. S.; Koretsky, A P; Moreland, J.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome and other triplet repeat diseases are characterized by an elongation of a repeating DNA triplet. The ensemble-averaged lambda exonuclease digestion rate of different substrates, including one with an elongated FMR1 gene containing 120 CGG repeats, was measured using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using magnetic tweezers sequence-dependent digestion rates and pausing was measured for individual lambda exonucleases. Within the triplet repeats a lower average and na...

  15. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  16. Dose and dose rate monitor

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137Cs, 241Am and 109Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10-2 to 103 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  17. Effect of high-dose growth hormone and glutamine on body composition, urine creatinine excretion, fatty acid absorption, and essential fatty acids status in short bowel patients - A randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study

    Jeppesen, P.B.; Szkudlarek, J.; Høy, Carl-Erik;

    2001-01-01

    Background: Positive effects of high dose growth hormone and glutamine (GH+GLN) on body composition in short bowel patients have been described. Lack of effects on intestinal absorption found in some studies has been ascribed to concomitant essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency. This study...... hormone (mean, 0.12 mg/kg/day) plus oral (mean, 28 g/day) and parenteral glutamine (mean, 5.28/day) for 28 days. Body composition was measured by dual-energy absorptiometry (DEXA) scans. intestinal fatty acid absorption was evaluated in balance studies, and EFAs were measured in plasma phospholipids by...... index above 0.2, indicative of EFA deficiency. Air developed peripheral oedema. Conclusions: Combined high dose growth hormone and glutamine administered far 4 weeks, did not improve absorption of fatty acids or EFA status in short bowel patients. No changes in BW or composition were seen when comparing...

  18. Efeitos da relação metionina + cistina: lisina sobre os desempenhos produtivo e econômico e a qualidade interna e externa dos ovos antes e após 28 dias de armazenamento Effects of methionine + cystine: lysine ratio on the productive and economic performance and internal and external egg quality, before and 28 days after storage

    José Jordão Filho

    2006-08-01

    .75% of total Lys; T4 = 0.86 Met+Cys: total Lys ratio or 0.70% of Met+Cys and 0.81% of total Lys. The performance variables and economical analysis were evaluated from 44 to 56 weeks old. At the end of trial, ten eggs per treatment were collected ad stored during 28 days for evaluation of internal/external egg quality before and after storage. With the exception of egg mass, no treatment effect on feed intake, egg production, egg weight and egg:mass ratio and egg:dozen ratio and egg shell specific quality was observed. The Met+Cys:Lys ratio of 0.76 or the estimate of 0.70% of total Met+Cys and 0.92% of total Lys can be recommended for the feeding of semiheavily laying hens. It was concluded that the storage affect internal egg quality.

  19. Evaluation of radiation dose to neonates in a special care baby unit

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient entrance surface dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose for neonates in the special care baby unit (SCBU) up to 28 days after birth. A total of 135 patients were examined during 4 months. ESDs were calculated from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. Effective doses were calculated using software from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean patient ESD per procedure was 80±0.02 μGy. The mean and range of the effective dose per procedure were 0.02 (0.01–0.3) mSv. The radiation dose in this study was higher compared to previous studies. A dedicated X-ray machine with additional filtration is recommended for patient dose reductions. - Highlights: • Neonate radiation dose has been evaluated using mathematical equation. • Neonates are exposed to unnecessary radiation due to use of unsuitable X-ray machines. • Radiation dose is of concern due to neonate sensitivity and multiple exposures during neonate treatment. • Mathematical equation based on exposure factors is suitable for neonate dose measurements

  20. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  1. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility

  2. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  3. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  4. Structural basis for triplet repeat disorders

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    1999-01-01

    ? Results: Using several different computational models of DNA structure, we show that the triplets involved in the pathological repeats generally fall into extreme classes. Thus, CAG/CTG repeats are particularly flexible, whereas GCC, CGG and GAA repeats appear to display both flexible and rigid (but...... curved) characteristics depending on the method of analysis. The fact that (1) trinucleotide repents often become increasingly unstable when they exceed a length of approximately 50 repeats, and (2) repented 12-mers display a similar increase in instability above 13 repeats, together suggest that......, which we predict to have very high flexibility, may play a role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorder multiple system atrophy (MSA)....

  5. Metabolic response at repeat PET/CT predicts pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oesophageal cancer

    Reports have suggested that a reduction in tumour 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET) examination during or after neoadjuvant chemotherapy may predict pathological response in oesophageal cancer. Our aim was to determine whether metabolic response predicts pathological response to a standardised neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen within a prospective clinical trial. Consecutive patients staged with potentially curable oesophageal cancer who underwent treatment within a non-randomised clinical trial were included. A standardised chemotherapy regimen (two cycles of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil) was used. PET/CT was performed before chemotherapy and repeated 24-28 days after the start of cycle 2. Forty-eight subjects were included: mean age 65 years; 37 male. Using the median percentage reduction in SUVmax (42%) to define metabolic response, pathological response was seen in 71% of metabolic responders (17/24) compared with 33% of non-responders (8/24; P = 0.009, sensitivity 68%, specificity 70%). Pathological response was seen in 81% of subjects with a complete metabolic response (13/16) compared with 38% of those with a less than complete response (12/32; P = 0.0042, sensitivity 52%, specificity 87%). There was no significant histology-based effect. There was a significant association between metabolic response and pathological response; however, accuracy in predicting pathological response was relatively low. (orig.)

  6. Profile of water contents in concrete under dry-absorption repeated condition by neutron radiography

    The authors have examined the moisture content distribution inside concrete, which is closely associated with the durability evaluation of reinforced concrete, using neutron radiography. In particular, they experimentally examined water content distribution in the concrete under environments of repeated drying and water-absorption, and the effects of cracks and temperature on drying. As a result, it was confirmed that moisture was further diffused into the inside and water was accumulated during drying, while generating the increase or decrease of moisture content on the surface. Under the temperature of 20degC, the existence of cracks under 0.05 mm in width did not significantly affect the drying rate of the part within 1 cm from the cracks. The existence of cracks 0.3 mm in width was confirmed to have slightly fastened the drying rate around the cracks. It was also confirmed that under the temperature of 20degC, the change in drying rate was little, and under 50degC, relative moisture content decreased to 60% or less at the position up to 8 cm in depth after 28 days of drying. It was clarified that moisture content was fluctuated inside concrete, and its temporal change was not homogeneous. (A.O.)

  7. Repeated apomorphine administration alters dopamine D1 and D2 receptor densities in pigeon basal telencephalon

    Acerbo, Martin J.; Výboh, Pavel; Košťál, Ľubor; Kubíková, Ľubica; Delius, Juan

    2005-01-01

    When pigeons are repeatedly administered a dose of apomorphine they show an increasing behavioral response, much as rodents do. In birds this expresses itself in an augmented pecking response. This sensitization is assumed to be largely due to a conditioning process. Here we present evidence that sensitization is accompanied by an alteration of the D1 to D2 dopamine receptor densities. An experimental group of pigeons was repeatedly injected with apomorphine, and a control group with saline. ...

  8. A Randomized, Crossover, Single-Dose Bioequivalence Study of Two Extended-Release Tablets of Donepezil 23 mg in Healthy Human Volunteers under Fasting and Fed States

    Gadiko, Chaitanya; Tippabhotla, Sudhakar Koundinya; Thota, Satyanarayana; Battula, Ramakrishna; Khan, Sohel Md.; Vobalaboina, Venkateswarlu

    2013-01-01

    To assess the bioequivalence of two extended-release tablets of donepezil 23 mg, open label, randomized, single-dose, two-sequence, two-period crossover studies under fasting (n=74) and fed (n=94) conditions in healthy adult human volunteers were conducted. Subjects were randomized to either of the two treatment arms (test or reference) separated by a washout period of 28 days. Blood samples were collected up to 72 h post-dose and plasma samples were analyzed for donepezil using a validated L...

  9. SU-E-T-315: The Change of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters (OSLDs) Sensitivity by Accumulated Dose and High Dose

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate radiation sensitivity of optical stimulated luminance dosimeters (OSLDs) by accumulated dose and high dose. Methods: This study was carried out in Co-60 unit (Theratron 780, AECL, and Canada) and used InLight MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) for reading. We annealed for 30 min using optical annealing system which contained fluorescent lamps (Osram lumilux, 24 W, 280 ∼780 nm). To evaluate change of OSLDs sensitivity by repeated irradiation, the dosimeters were repeatedly irradiated with 1 Gy. And whenever a repeated irradiation, we evaluated OSLDs sensitivity. To evaluate OSLDs sensitivity after accumulated dose with 5 Gy, We irradiated dose accumulatively (from 1 Gy to 5 Gy) without annealing. And OSLDs was also irradiated with 15, 20, 30 Gy to certify change of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation. After annealing them, they were irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly. Results: The OSLDs sensitivity increased up to 3% during irradiating seven times and decreased continuously above 8 times. That dropped by about 0.35 Gy per an irradiation. Finally, after 30 times irradiation, OSLDs sensitivity decreased by about 7%. For accumulated dose from 1 Gy to 5 Gy, OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy increased until 4.4% after second times accumulated dose compared with before that. OSLDs sensitivity about 1 Gy decreased by 1.6% in five times irradiation. When OSLDs were irradiated ten times with 1Gy after irradiating high dose (10, 15, 20 Gy), OSLDs sensitivity decreased until 6%, 9%, 12% compared with it before high dose irradiation, respectively. Conclusion: This study certified OSLDs sensitivity by accumulated dose and high dose. When irradiated with 1Gy, repeatedly, OSLDs sensitivity decreased linearly and the reduction rate of OSLDs sensitivity after high dose irradiation had dependence on irradiated dose

  10. Repeated inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to aerosols of 239PuO2. XII

    Beagle dogs were exposed once or semi-annually for 10 yr by inhalation to aerosols of 239PuO2 to study the relative doses and effects of these two types of exposures. All exposures have been completed. Dogs exposed at high levels died predominantly of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Dogs exposed at lower levels, either once or repeatedly, are dying of a variety of causes including lung cancer. Dogs have survived up to 11 yr after their first exposure. Preliminary results suggest that single and repeated exposures cause similar health effects for equal accumulated radiation doses. (author)

  11. Competition impedes the recovery of Daphnia magna from repeated insecticide pulses.

    Dolciotti, Ida; Foit, Kaarina; Herkelrath, Anna; Liess, Matthias

    2014-02-01

    The effects of multiple insecticide pulses on non-target organisms have rarely been investigated in combination with relevant biotic interactions, such as competition. In this study, we examined the effects of two repeated pulses of the insecticide pirimicarb (3, 10, 24 μg/L) on populations of Daphnia magna with or without competition. To investigate the influence of competition, half of the test systems were supplemented with the pirimicarb-insensitive species Culex pipiens. The pesticide pulses were followed by a recovery period of 28 days, which corresponded to approximately three generation times for D. magna. The one-species setup with the Daphnia populations and the two-species setup with both the Daphnia and Culex populations had a precontamination period of 30 days so that intra- and interspecific competitions were present prior to the insecticide pulse. Short-term effects on the survival of the Daphnia population were observed in both setups immediately after each insecticide pulse at the highest concentration level. In the one-species setup, the short-term effects on population survival were increased by intraspecific competition. However, the Daphnia populations in the one-species setup recovered and reached the control level within approximately two weeks after each insecticide pulse. In contrast, in the two-species setup at the highest concentration, we observed culmination of insecticide effects: the Daphnia populations did not recover and their abundance was below the control level until the end of the observation time. Their recovery was impeded by the presence of the competing species C. pipiens for at least four weeks. At low concentrations, no culmination of effects was observed. We conclude that repeated toxicant pulses on populations that are challenged with interspecific competition may result in a multigenerational culmination of toxicant effects. PMID:24373889

  12. Repeated Sprints: An Independent Not Dependent Variable.

    Taylor, Jonathan M; Macpherson, Tom W; Spears, Iain R; Weston, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    The ability to repeatedly perform sprints has traditionally been viewed as a key performance measure in team sports, and the relationship between repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and performance has been explored extensively. However, when reviewing the repeated-sprint profile of team-sports match play it appears that the occurrence of repeated-sprint bouts is sparse, indicating that RSA is not as important to performance as commonly believed. Repeated sprints are, however, a potent and time-efficient training strategy, effective in developing acceleration, speed, explosive leg power, aerobic power, and high-intensity-running performance--all of which are crucial to team-sport performance. As such, we propose that repeated-sprint exercise in team sports should be viewed as an independent variable (eg, a means of developing fitness) as opposed to a dependent variable (eg, a means of assessing fitness/performance). PMID:27197118

  13. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    β-cells against superoxide generated by glycation reaction evoked by high glucose environment. Continuous irradiation at 0.63 mGy/hr from 28 days of age elongates life span, and recovers splenic inflammatory response in Klotho-mice bearing ageing syndrome. The radiation increases anti-oxidants in liver, implicating the prevention of ageing through the suppression of cellular oxidative damages. Our results suggest that low dose/low dose-rate radiation effectively ameliorates diseases related to reactive oxygen species, and elongates life span of animals, at least in part through the stimulation of protective responses against oxidative stress. These findings are important not only for clinical use of low dose/low dose-rate radiation for human diseases, but also for non-cancerous risk estimation at dose and dose rate range argued in legal restrictions. (author)

  14. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval en...

  15. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  16. Repeat prescribing: a role for community pharmacists in controlling and monitoring repeat prescriptions.

    Bond, C.; Matheson, C.; Williams, S; Williams, P.; Donnan, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditional systems of managing repeat prescribing have been criticised for their lack of clinical and administrative controls. AIM: To compare a community pharmacist-managed repeat prescribing system with established methods of managing repeat prescribing. METHOD: A randomised controlled intervention study (19 general medical practices, 3074 patients, 62 community pharmacists). Patients on repeat medication were given sufficient three-monthly scripts, endorsed for monthly dispens...

  17. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis. PMID:26519414

  18. DNA Damage Following Pulmonary Exposure by Instillation to Low Doses of Carbon Black (Printex 90) Nanoparticles in Mice

    Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Saber, Anne T.;

    2015-01-01

    for the genotoxic effects of carbon black. In this study, we investigated inflammatory and acute phase response in addition to genotoxic effects occurring following exposure to nanoparticulate carbon black (NPCB) at even lower doses. C57BL/6JBomTac mice were examined 1, 3, and 28 days after a single...... instillation of 0.67, 2, 6, and 162 mu g Printex 90 NPCB and vehicle. Cellular composition and protein concentration was evaluated in BAL fluid as markers of inflammatory response and cell damage. DNA strand breaks in BAL cells, lung, and liver tissue were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. The pulmonary...... acute phase response was analyzed by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Instillation of the low doses of NPCB induced a slight neutrophil influx one day after exposure. Pulmonary exposure to small doses of NPCB caused an increase in DNA strand breaks in BAL cells and lung tissue measured using the...

  19. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola, E-mail: ola.hammarsten@clinchem.gu.se

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  20. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  1. Prediction, Optimization and Learning in Repeated Games

    Nachbar, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Consider a two-player discounted repeated game in which each player optimizes with respect to prior beliefs about his opponent's repeated game strategy. One would like to argue that if beliefs are cautious then players will learn as the game unfolds to predict the continuation path of play. If this conjecture were true then a convergence result due to Kalai and Lehrer would imply that the continuation path would asymptotically resemble the path of a Nash equilibrium. One would thus have const...

  2. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    Husain, Mainul, E-mail: mainul.husain@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Guo, Charles, E-mail: charles.guo@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Jacobsen, Nicklas R., E-mail: nrj@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Jensen, Keld A., E-mail: kaj@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Vogel, Ulla, E-mail: ubv@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Wallin, Hakan, E-mail: hwa@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-1014 (Denmark); Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Eric Laille

    Full Text Available CC-486 (oral azacitidine is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML or acute myeloid leukemia (AML from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05 reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle, with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983.

  4. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind

    Objectives: The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Methods: Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Results: Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7 mSv and 168 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients’ families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT.

  5. The reaction of lymphatic component of hemopoiesis to fractionated irradiation and repeated bone marrow transplantation

    Mice were repeatedly subjected to individual doses of 60Co-gamma rays at intervals of four days up to total doses of 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 Gy. Under these conditions, signs of partial adaptation of the lymphatic component of hemopoiesis to conditions of repeated irradiations were found in mice which were given transplants of 106 nuclear cells of syngenetic bone marrow after each irradiation. Systematic findings of statistically significant differences in the values of the lymphatic hemopoietic component parameters studied between bone marrow recipients and animals subjected only to repeated irradiations were recorded after 24th day of experiment in mice which received total doses of 21 and 24 Gy. A positive influence of repeated transplantations in bone marrow recipients became manifested in these experimental groups already upon withdrawals made on day 4 after the last irradiation. A quite pronounced increase in the values of the bone marrow recipients' lymphatic hemopoietic component studied was then recorded upon withdrawals made on day 9 after the last irradiation. (orig.)

  6. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind

    Michel, Morgane; Jacob, Sophie [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Roger, Gilles [Otolaryngology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Pelosse, Beatrice [Ophthalmology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Laurier, Dominique [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Le Pointe, Hubert Ducou [Radiology Department, Trousseau Hospital, Paris (France); Bernier, Marie-Odile, E-mail: marie-odile.bernier@irsn.fr [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/Laboratoire d' Epidemiologie, BP 17, 92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Methods: Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Results: Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7 mSv and 168 mGy, respectively. Conclusion: A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients' families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT.

  7. Tumorigenic responses from single or repeated inhalation exposures to relatively insoluble aerosols of Ce-144

    Human occupational or environmental inhalation exposures may involve repeated or chronic exposures, but most laboratory studies of inhaled radionuclides have involved single exposures. This study was designed to compare the biological effects of repeated inhalation exposures of dogs to a relatively insoluble form of 144Ce with existing data for singly-exposed dogs that had the same cumulative dose to the lungs two years after exposure. To date, the biological effects observed in these repeatedly-exposed dogs have been substantially different from those seen in singly-exposed dogs, particularly during the first 5 years after the initial exposure. Although pulmonary hemangiosarcoma was the prominent biological effect seen in singly-exposed dogs between 2 and 4 years after exposure, no lung tumors were seen during the 5 years after the first of the repeated exposures. This response plus other clinical observations are discussed in relation to the patterns of dose rate and cumulative dose for the different exposure conditions. (H.K.)

  8. Preferential induction of the AhR gene battery in HepaRG cells after a single or repeated exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) are two of the most common heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) produced during cooking of meat, fish and poultry. Both HAA produce different tumor profiles in rodents and are suspected to be carcinogenic in humans. In order to better understand the molecular basis of HAA toxicity, we have analyzed gene expression profiles in the metabolically competent human HepaRG cells using pangenomic oligonucleotide microarrays, after either a single (24-h) or a repeated (28-day) exposure to 10 μM PhIP or MeIQx. The most responsive genes to both HAA were downstream targets of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR): CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 after both time points and CYP1B1 and ALDH3A1 after 28 days. Accordingly, CYP1A1/1A2 induction in HAA-treated HepaRG cells was prevented by chemical inhibition or small interference RNA-mediated down-regulation of the AhR. Consistently, HAA induced activity of the CYP1A1 promoter, which contains a consensus AhR-related xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). In addition, several other genes exhibited both time-dependent and compound-specific expression changes with, however, a smaller magnitude than previously reported for the prototypical AhR target genes. These changes concerned genes mainly related to cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cancer. In conclusion, these results identify the AhR gene battery as the preferential target of PhIP and MeIQx in HepaRG cells and further support the hypothesis that intake of HAA in diet might increase human cancer risk.

  9. Evaluation of Radiographic Repeat Rate Data and Film Reject Analysis of Radiology Departments in Several Hospitals of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

    Simak Sabzevari; Karim Ghazikhanlou Sani

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Rejected and repeated"nradiographies are one of the most frequent difficulties"nin radiography. The dose received by patients,"nequipment fault, costs and patients wait time increases"nby increasing film rejection and repeat rate. Moreover,"nthis leads to decreasing the care level because of the"ndelay in film report. This study aims to evaluate the"nfilm rejection and repeat rate in university-affiliated"nhospitals of Hamadan City...

  10. Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Razavi, Mohsen; Majedi, A. Hamed

    2010-09-01

    A feasible route toward implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/35106500 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases with and without a repeater node. We find the crossover distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the nonrepeater one. That provides us with the optimum internode distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal excitation probability at which the QKD rate peaks. Such an optimum probability, in most regimes of interest, is insensitive to the total distance.

  11. Impact of repeated insecticide application on soil microbial activity

    The effects of repeated insecticide application on soil microbial activity were studied both in a cotton field and in the laboratory. The results of experiment show that there are some effects on soil microbial activities, such as the population of soil microorganisms, soil respiration, dehydrogenase activity and nitrogen fixation. The degree of effects depends on the chemical dosage. Within the range of 0.5-10.0 μg/g air-dry-soil, the higher the concentration, the stronger effect. In this experiment, the effect disappeared within 4, 8 or 16 days after treatment, depending on the dose applied. In field conditions, the situation is more complex and the data of field experiment show greater fluctuation. (author)

  12. Repeated exposure to MDMA provides neuroprotection against subsequent MDMA-induced serotonin depletion in brain

    Bhide, Nirmal S.; Lipton, Jack; Cunningham, Jacobi; Yamamoto, Bryan K.; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated exposure to sub-lethal insults has been reported to result in neuroprotection against a subsequent deleterious insult. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether repeated exposure (preconditioning) to a non-5-HT depleting dose of MDMA in adult rats provides neuroprotection against subsequent MDMA induced 5-HT depletion. Treatment of rats with MDMA (10 mg/kg, ip every 2 hrs for 4 injections) resulted in a 50-65% depletion of 5-HT in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, and the...

  13. Haemopoiesis in murine bone marrow and spleen after fractionated irradiation and repeated bone marrow transplantation. II

    Granulopoiesis was studied in mice repeatedly exposed to doses of 3 Gy of 60Co γ-rays at 4-day intervals up to a total dose of 24 Gy on the basis of total bone marrow cellularity follow-up and analysis of myelograms and splenograms. Half the number of the mice received lO6 nuclear cells of syngeneic bone marrow after each fractional radiation dose. After an initial steep decrease, the number of granuloid cells in the spleen increased about 30-fold between days 12 and 16 of the experiment (total dose 9 and 12 Gy, respectively). This increase was temporary and between days 20 and 24 (total dose 15 and 18 Gy, respectively) a steep decrease again occurred. At a low level (below 10% of the control value) the granuloid cells remained in the spleens of bone marrow recipients until the end of the experiment (day 37, total dose 24 Gy). The behavior of the granuloid compartment of hemopoiesis thus contrasts with findings in the erythroid compartment (Hofer et al., 1989) when high numbers of erythroid nuclear cells remained in the spleens of bone marrow recipients until the end of the experiment. On the whole, the influence of repeated bone marrow transplantation on granulopoiesis in the bone marrow and spleen is positive. Of the 22 comparisons made between bone marrow recipients and mice only irradiated, 14 differences are statistically significant, always in favor of bone marrow recipients. (author)

  14. Impact of repeat computerized tomography replans in the radiation therapy of head and neck cancers

    Virendra Bhandari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical changes can occur during course of head-and-neck (H and N radiotherapy like tumor shrinkage, decreased edema and/or weight loss. This can lead to discrepancies in planned and delivered dose increasing the dose to organs at risk. A study was conducted to determine the volumetric and dosimetric changes with the help of repeat computed tomography (CT and replanning for selected H and N cancer patients treated with IMRT plans to see for these effects. In 15 patients with primary H and N cancer, a repeat CT scan after 3 rd week of radiotherapy was done when it was clinically indicated and then two plans were generated on repeat CT scan, actual plan (AP planned on repeat CT scan, and hybrid plan (HP, which was generated by applying the first intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plan (including monitoring units to the images of second CT scan. Both plans (AP and HP on repeat CT scan were compared for volumetric and dosimetric parameter. The mean variation in volumes between CT and repeat CT were 44.32 cc, 82.2 cc, and 149.83 cc for gross tumor volume (GTV, clinical target volumes (CTV, and planning target volume (PTV, respectively. Mean conformity index and homogeneity index was 0.68 and 1.07, respectively for AP and 0.5 and 1.16, respectively for HP. Mean D 95 and D 99 of PTV was 97.92% (standard deviation, SD 2.32 and 93.4% (SD 3.75, respectively for AP and 92.8% (SD 3.83 and 82.8% (SD 8.0, respectively for HP. Increase in mean doses to right parotid, left parotid, spine, and brainstem were 5.56 Gy (D mean , 3.28 Gy (D mean , 1.25 Gy (D max , and 3.88 Gy (D max , respectively in HP compared to AP. Repeat CT and replanning reduces the chance of discrepancies in delivered dose due to volume changes and also improves coverage to target volume and further reduces dose to organ at risk.

  15. Learning with repeated-game strategies

    Ioannou, Christos A.; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the “Grim-Trigger.” In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates betwe...

  16. Repeating pneumatic pellet injector in JAERI

    A repeating pneumatic pellet injector has been developed and constructed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This injector can provide repetitive pellet injection to fuel tokamak plasmas for an extended period of time, aiming at the improvement of plasma performance. The pellets with nearly identical speed and mass can be repeatedly injected with a repetition rate of 2-3.3 Hz and a speed of up to 1.7 km/s by controlling the temperature of the cryogenic system, the piston speed and the pressure of the propellant gas. (author)

  17. Jet Fuel Kerosene is not Immunosuppressive in Mice or Rats Following Inhalation for 28 Days

    White, Kimber L.; DeLorme, Michael P.; Beatty, Patrick W.; Smith, Matthew J; Peachee, Vanessa L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that inhalation of JP-8 aviation turbine fuel is immunosuppressive. However, in some of those studies, the exposure concentrations were underestimated, and percent of test article as vapor or aerosol was not determined. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the observed effects are attributable to the base hydrocarbon fuel (jet fuel kerosene) or to the various fuel additives in jet fuels. The present studies were conducted, in compliance with Good Laboratory Practice (...

  18. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; ZHENG, FEI; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is stil...

  19. Consuming a multi-ingredient thermogenic supplement for 28 days is apparently safe in healthy adults

    Vogel, Roxanne M.; Jordan M. Joy; Falcone, Paul H.; Matt M. Mosman; Michael P Kim; Jordan R Moon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thermogenic (TRM) supplements are often used by people seeking to decrease body weight. Many TRM supplements are formulated with multiple ingredients purported to increase energy expenditure and maximize fat loss. However, in the past some TRM ingredients have been deemed unsafe and removed from the market. Therefore, it is important to verify the safety of multi-ingredient TRM supplements with chronic consumption.Objective: To assess the safety of daily consumption of a multi-ing...

  20. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  1. High dose gamma-ray standard

    The high gamma-ray doses produced in a gamma irradiator are used, mainly, for radiation processing, i.e. sterilization of medical products, processing of food, modifications of polymers, irradiation of electronic devices, a.s.o. The used absorbed doses are depending on the application and are covering the range between 10 Gy and 100 MGy. The regulations in our country require that the response of the dosimetry systems, used for the irradiation of food and medical products, be calibrated and traceable to the national standards. In order to be sure that the products receive the desired absorbed dose, appropriate dosimetric measurements must be performed, including the calibration of the dosemeters and their traceability to the national standards. The high dose gamma-ray measurements are predominantly based on the use of reference radiochemical dosemeters. Among them the ferrous sulfate can be used as reference dosemeter for low doses (up to 400 Gy) but due to its characteristics it deserves to be considered a standard dosemeter and to be used for transferring the conventional absorbed dose to other chemical dosemeters used for absorbed doses up to 100 MGy. The study of the ferrous sulfate dosemeter consisted in preparing many batches of solution by different operators in quality assurance conditions and in determining for all batches the linearity, the relative intrinsic error, the repeatability and the reproducibility. The principal results are the following: the linear regression coefficient - 0.999, the relative intrinsic error - max.6%, the repeatability (for P*=95%) - max.3%, the reproducibility (P*=95%) - max.5%

  2. Evaluation of averted doses to infants by tap water restrictions after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    There has been some concern in reviewing the effectiveness of making decisions on the implementation of protective measures in emergency exposure situations. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, temporal changes in the concentration of iodine 131 in tap water were studied using published data from several authorities in Fukushima, Ibaraki, and Tokyo. Averted doses to infants (1-year-old children) due to the intake of iodine 131 through tap water restrictions were also evaluated. Consequently, it was found that the apparent half-life of iodine 131 in tap water was 2.8 days. The averted equivalent doses to the thyroids of 1-year-old children were found to have a maximum value of 8.3 mSv in a local area of Fukushima. Hence, the tap water restrictions implemented by the authorities were considered to be effective in the early phase of the emergency exposure situation. (author)

  3. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    1995-01-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattl

  4. Cumulative Intertrial Inhibition in Repeated Visual Search

    Takeda, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    In the present study the author examined visual search when the items remain visible across trials but the location of the target varies. Reaction times for inefficient search cumulatively increased with increasing numbers of repeated search trials, suggesting that inhibition for distractors carried over successive trials. This intertrial…

  5. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  6. Is Retrieval Mediated after Repeated Testing?

    Kole, James A.; Healy, Alice F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2 main experiments, the mediated priming effect was used to determine whether retrieval continues to be mediated after repeated testing. In each experiment, participants used the keyword method to learn French vocabulary, then completed a modified lexical decision task in which they first translated a French word, and then made a lexical…

  7. On balanced minimal repeated measurements designs

    Shakeel Ahmad Mir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated Measurements designs are concerned with scientific experiments in which each experimental unit is assigned more than once to a treatment either different or identical. This class of designs has the property that the unbiased estimators for elementary contrasts among direct and residual effects are obtainable. Afsarinejad (1983 provided a method of constructing balanced Minimal Repeated Measurements designs p < t , when t is an odd or prime power, one or more than one treatment may occur more than once in some sequences and  designs so constructed no longer remain uniform in periods. In this paper an attempt has been made to provide a new method to overcome this drawback. Specifically, two cases have been considered                RM[t,n=t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=1 for balanced minimal repeated measurements designs and  RM[t,n=2t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=2 for balanced  repeated measurements designs. In addition , a method has been provided for constructing              extra-balanced minimal designs for special case RM[t,n=t2/(p-1,p], λ2=1.

  8. Tacit Collusion in Repeated Contests with Noise

    James W. Boudreau; Shunda, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of tacit collusion in an infinitely repeated contest with noise in the contest success function. Sustaining collusion via Nash reversion strategies is easier the more noise there is, and is more difficult the larger is the contest's prize value. An increase in the contest's number of players can make sustaining collusion either more or less difficult.

  9. Testing Multiple Outcomes in Repeated Measures Designs

    Lix, Lisa M.; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates procedures for controlling the familywise error rate (FWR) when testing hypotheses about multiple, correlated outcome variables in repeated measures (RM) designs. A content analysis of RM research articles published in 4 psychology journals revealed that 3 quarters of studies tested hypotheses about 2 or more outcome…

  10. Building Fluency through the Repeated Reading Method

    Cohen, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years the author has used Repeated Reading (RR) to teach reading fluency in English as a Foreign Language classrooms in colleges and universities in Japan. RR is a method where the student reads and rereads a text silently or aloud from two to four times to reach a predetermined level of speed, accuracy, and comprehension. RR…

  11. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P;

    1991-01-01

    that the psychological climate of the home may be more important than the rupture of early home life. It is noteworthy that the group of repeaters, as against the first-evers, could be characterized by personality disorders and abuse, especially of alcohol: disorders known to be precipitated by a discordant childhood...

  12. Longer-Baseline Telescopes Using Quantum Repeaters

    Gottesman, Daniel; Jennewein, Thomas; Croke, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to building interferometric telescopes using ideas of quantum information. Current optical interferometers have limited baseline lengths, and thus limited resolution, because of noise and loss of signal due to the transmission of photons between the telescopes. The technology of quantum repeaters has the potential to eliminate this limit, allowing in principle interferometers with arbitrarily long baselines.

  13. A Structured Group Program for Repeat Dieters.

    McNamara, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a structured group program for women who repeatedly diet and may be at risk of developing more serious eating disorders. Discusses sessions focusing on eating behavior as well as internal factors that contribute to low body esteem and food and weight preoccupation. Evaluates effectiveness of program by self-reports of members of two…

  14. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    2013-04-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  15. Accuracy of velocities from repeated GPS measurements

    Akarsu, V.; Sanli, D. U.; Arslan, E.

    2015-04-01

    Today repeated GPS measurements are still in use, because we cannot always employ GPS permanent stations due to a variety of limitations. One area of study that uses velocities/deformation rates from repeated GPS measurements is the monitoring of crustal motion. This paper discusses the quality of the velocities derived using repeated GPS measurements for the aim of monitoring crustal motion. From a global network of International GNSS Service (IGS) stations, we processed GPS measurements repeated monthly and annually spanning nearly 15 years and estimated GPS velocities for GPS baseline components latitude, longitude and ellipsoidal height. We used web-based GIPSY for the processing. Assuming true deformation rates can only be determined from the solutions of 24 h observation sessions, we evaluated the accuracy of the deformation rates from 8 and 12 h sessions. We used statistical hypothesis testing to assess the velocities derived from short observation sessions. In addition, as an alternative control method we checked the accuracy of GPS solutions from short observation sessions against those of 24 h sessions referring to statistical criteria that measure the accuracy of regression models. Results indicate that the velocities of the vertical component are completely affected when repeated GPS measurements are used. The results also reveal that only about 30% of the 8 h solutions and about 40% of 12 h solutions for the horizontal coordinates are acceptable for velocity estimation. The situation is much worse for the vertical component in which none of the solutions from campaign measurements are acceptable for obtaining reliable deformation rates.

  16. Assessment of immune response to repeat stimulation with BCG vaccine using in vitro PBMC model

    Kashyap, Rajpal S; Husain, Aliabbas A.; Morey, Shweta H; Panchbhai, Milind S.; Deshpande, Poonam S; Purohit, Hemant J.; Taori, Girdhar M.; Daginawala, Hatim F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most prevalent cause of death due to a single pathogen. Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) is the only vaccine available for clinical use that protects against miliary TB; however, this vaccine has shown variable levels of efficacy against pulmonary TB. In India, a single dose of BCG vaccine is given and there are few countries where repeated doses of BCG are given. The incidence of TB in India is very high inspite of primary vaccination in neonatal peri...

  17. From cellular doses to average lung dose

    Sensitive basal and secretory cells receive a wide range of doses in human bronchial and bronchiolar airways. Variations of cellular doses arise from the location of target cells in the bronchial epithelium of a given airway and the asymmetry and variability of airway dimensions of the lung among airways in a given airway generation and among bronchial and bronchiolar airway generations. To derive a single value for the average lung dose which can be related to epidemiologically observed lung cancer risk, appropriate weighting scenarios have to be applied. Potential biological weighting parameters are the relative frequency of target cells, the number of progenitor cells, the contribution of dose enhancement at airway bifurcations, the promotional effect of cigarette smoking and, finally, the application of appropriate regional apportionment factors. Depending on the choice of weighting parameters, detriment-weighted average lung doses can vary by a factor of up to 4 for given radon progeny exposure conditions. (authors)

  18. Dose from radiological examinations

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  19. Late effects of single and repeated sublethal gamma radiations on haemopoietic stem cells in mice (bone marrow transplantation)

    The effects were compared of single (1x5 Gy) and repeated (4x5 Gy) γ-ray doses separated by 21 days, on femoral CFU-S (colony forming units in the spleen) numbers in mice during 12 months after irradiation. Nucleated cell and CFU-S numbers were recovered 21 days after whole-body irradiation with 5 Gy. Marrow regeneration was not sufficient after the second irradiation and the nucleated cell and CFU-S numbers reached 50% of the level of the control 21 days after the second dose. The decrease in CFU-S numbers was more marked after the third and fourth doses reaching 35% of the control. While CFU-S numbers were recovered by the 21st day after a single dose of 5 Gy, the level of the control group was reached 60 days after the last dose of repeated (4x5 Gy) gamma irradiation. A decrease in femoral CFU-S numbers occurred in both irradiated groups 6 months after the last dose, the decrease being more marked in the group exposed to repeated irradiations. The decrease was more pronounced 12 months after irradiation although bone marrow cellularity was at a level of the unirradiated group. Femoral CFU-S numbers were lower in unirradiated 480-day-old mice than in those at 120 days of age. (author) 2 figs., 9 refs

  20. Dose-repetition increases the mutagenic effectiveness of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in mouse spermatogonia.

    Hitotsumachi, S; Carpenter, D A; Russell, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to maximize the mutagenic effectiveness of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia, advantage was taken of the fact that these cells can accumulate mutations from repeated doses given over relatively long time periods. Repeated doses (100 mg/kg) of ethylnitrosourea injected intraperitoneally into male mice at weekly intervals were found to allow adequate survival and fertility with total dosages of 300 and 400 mg/kg. The specific-locus mutation frequencies at these dos...

  1. Learning with repeated-game strategies.

    Ioannou, Christos A; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the "Grim-Trigger." In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the "Win-Stay, Lose-Shift" and "Grim-Trigger" strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes. PMID:25126053

  2. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  3. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium

  4. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    Bruneau, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.bruneau@u-cergy.fr [Laboratoire AGM, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Site Saint-Martin, BP 222, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Joye, Alain, E-mail: Alain.Joye@ujf-grenoble.fr [Institut Fourier, UMR 5582, CNRS-Université Grenoble I, BP 74, 38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères (France); Merkli, Marco, E-mail: merkli@mun.ca [Department of Mathematics and Statistics Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL Canada A1C 5S7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  5. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    Carroll, R. J.

    2009-05-20

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements. We allow for a working covariance matrix for the regression errors, showing that our method is most efficient when the correct covariance matrix is used. The component functions achieve the known asymptotic variance lower bound for the scalar argument case. Smooth backfitting also leads directly to design-independent biases in the local linear case. Simulations show our estimator has smaller variance than the usual kernel estimator. This is also illustrated by an example from nutritional epidemiology. © 2009 Biometrika Trust.

  6. Learning With Repeated-Game Strategies

    Christos A. Ioannou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2x2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we fi□nd that the strategy with the most occurrences is the Grim-Trigger. In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the Win-Stay, Lose-Shift and Grim-Trigger strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  7. Soft gamma repeaters activity in time

    Popov, S B

    2008-01-01

    In this short note I discuss the hypothesis that bursting activity of magnetars evolves in time analogously to the glitching activity of normal radio pulsars (i.e. sources are more active at smaller ages), and that the increase of the burst rate follows one of the laws established for glitching radio pulsars. If the activity of soft gamma repeaters decreases in time in the way similar to the evolution of core-quake glitches ($\\propto t^{5/2}$), then it is more probable to find the youngest soft gamma repeaters, but the energy of giant flares from these sources should be smaller than observed $10^{44}$ --$10^{46}$ ergs as the total energy stored in a magnetar's magnetic field is not enough to support thousands of bursts similar to the prototype 5 March 1979 flare.

  8. Hypoglycaemic hemiplegia: a repeat SPECT study.

    Shintani, S; Tsuruoka, S; Shiigai, T

    1993-01-01

    During a hypoglycaemic right hemiplegia induced by a deliberate overdose of oral hypoglycaemics, brain CT and angiography revealed no abnormalities. SPECTs made one day and six days later showed relative hypoperfusion in the left hemisphere. Repeat SPECT study suggested that the left hemisphere was more vulnerable than the right in the cerebral blood perfusion. This vulnerability might provoke the right hemiplegia in a critical condition, such as severe hypoglycaemia.

  9. Engineering RNA sequence specificity of Pumilio repeats

    Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    Puf proteins bind RNA sequence specifically and regulate translation and stability of target mRNAs. A “code” for RNA recognition has been deduced from crystal structures of the Puf protein, human Pumilio1, where each of eight repeats binds an RNA base via a combination of three side chains at conserved positions. Here, we report the creation of seven soluble mutant proteins with predictably altered sequence specificity, including one that binds tightly to adenosine-uracil-rich element RNA. Th...

  10. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range.

  11. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    Bonnet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  12. Identical repeated backbone of the human genome

    Gonzaga-Jauregui Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identical sequences with a minimal length of about 300 base pairs (bp have been involved in the generation of various meiotic/mitotic genomic rearrangements through non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR events. Genomic disorders and structural variation, together with gene remodelling processes have been associated with many of these rearrangements. Based on these observations, we identified and integrated all the 100% identical repeats of at least 300 bp in the NCBI version 36.2 human genome reference assembly into non-overlapping regions, thus defining the Identical Repeated Backbone (IRB of the reference human genome. Results The IRB sequences are distributed all over the genome in 66,600 regions, which correspond to ~2% of the total NCBI human genome reference assembly. Important structural and functional elements such as common repeats, segmental duplications, and genes are contained in the IRB. About 80% of the IRB bp overlap with known copy-number variants (CNVs. By analyzing the genes embedded in the IRB, we were able to detect some identical genes not previously included in the Ensembl release 50 annotation of human genes. In addition, we found evidence of IRB gene copy-number polymorphisms in raw sequence reads of two diploid sequenced genomes. Conclusions In general, the IRB offers new insight into the complex organization of the identical repeated sequences of the human genome. It provides an accurate map of potential NAHR sites which could be used in targeting the study of novel CNVs, predicting DNA copy-number variation in newly sequenced genomes, and improve genome annotation.

  13. Capacities of repeater-assisted quantum communications

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We establish the ultimate rates for transmitting quantum information, distilling entanglement, and distributing secret keys in repeater-assisted quantum communications, under the most fundamental decoherence models for both discrete and continuous variable systems, including lossy channels, quantum-limited amplifiers, dephasing and erasure channels. These capacities are derived considering the most general adaptive protocols for quantum and private communication between the two end-points of ...

  14. Aging and Repeated Thought Suppression Success

    Ann E Lambert; Smyth, Frederick L.; Jessica R Beadel; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differe...

  15. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    Sarah Lonneville; Carine Delbrouck; Cécile Renier; Daniel Devriendt; Nicolas Massager

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods : A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The me...

  16. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Razavi, Mohsen; Majedi, A. Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss a...

  17. Androgen receptor polymorphism (CAG repeats) and androgenicity.

    Canale, D; Caglieresi, C; Moschini, C; Liberati, C D; Macchia, E; Pinchera, A; Martino, E

    2005-09-01

    Objective Polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) has been related to various pathophysiological conditions, such as osteoporosis and infertility. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of distribution in a normal Italian population and to assess CAG repeats (CAGr) in other conditions, such as hypoandrogenism, potentially influenced by AR polymorphism. Patients and measurements CAGr polymorphism was determined in a group of 91 healthy normoandrogenized subjects, 29 hypoandrogenized patients (hypoplasia of prostate and seminal vesicles, reduced beard or body hair, etc.) and 29 infertile patients by direct sequencing. Results The mean (+/- SD) number of CAG repeats [(CAGr)n] was 21.5 (+/- 1.7) in the control group, 21.4 (+/- 2.0) in the infertile patients and 24.0 (+/- 2.9) in the hypoandrogenic males. The difference was statistically significant between this last group and the other two (P CAGr repeats was 38% among hypoandrogenized patients, 7% among infertile patients and 5% among the control group. In hypoandrogenized subjects (CAGr)n correlated slightly with testis and prostate volume. The number of CAG repeats was not associated with any of the hormonal parameters, including testosterone, evaluated in the three groups. Conclusions Our normal population, representing subjects from Central Italy, is superimposable on other European populations with regard to (CAGr)n distribution. Hypoandrogenic males have a shift in the frequency distribution towards longer (CAGr)n. Infertile patients are not statistically different from the control group. These findings suggest that, given the same amount of circulating testosterone, as in our hypoandrogenized and control group, the final net androgenic phenotypical effect is due to AR polymorphism. PMID:16117826

  18. Electrochemical detection of DNA triplet repeat expansion

    Fojta, Miroslav; Havran, Luděk; Vojtíšková, Marie; Paleček, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 21 (2004), s. 6532-6533. ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004402; GA AV ČR IBS5004355; GA AV ČR KJB4004302; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : DNA triplet repeat expansion * PCR amplification * neurodegenerative diseases Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.903, year: 2004

  19. Multiplexed Memory-Insensitive Quantum Repeaters

    Collins, O. A.; Jenkins, S. D.; Kuzmich, A.; Kennedy, T. A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Long-distance quantum communication via distant pairs of entangled quantum bits (qubits) is the first step towards more secure message transmission and distributed quantum computing. To date, the most promising proposals require quantum repeaters to mitigate the exponential decrease in communication rate due to optical fiber losses. However, these are exquisitely sensitive to the lifetimes of their memory elements. We propose a multiplexing of quantum nodes that should enable the construction...

  20. Repeated Optional Gambles and Risk Aversion

    Christian Gollier

    1996-01-01

    We analyze in this paper the effect of age on the optimal dynamic strategy toward repeated independent gambles. When deciding to accept or to reject a lottery that is offered today, the gambler knows how many lotteries can yet be played in the future. We first characterize the optimal dynamic strategy when future lotteries are identically distributed. We show that the existence of future lotteries always increases the willingness to gamble today. When the sequence of lotteries is independent ...

  1. Reinforcement, repeated games, and local interaction

    Kirchkamp, Oliver; Nagel, Rosemarie

    2002-01-01

    We investigate and compare different approaches to derive strategies from laboratory data in prisoners' dilemmas experiments. While theory suggests more cooperation in spatial structures than in spaceless ones, we find in our experiments either the opposite or no difference. In this paper we investigate to which degree learning and reinforcement explains this dependence on structure and information. Starting from a very simple model we gradually develop a setup where players use repeated game...

  2. Cataractogenesis after Repeat Laser in situ Keratomileusis

    Ahmad M. Mansour; Ghabra, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    There has been the unsubstantiated clinical impression that laser refractive surgery accelerates cataract development along with solid experimental data about the cataractogenic effects of excimer laser treatment. We present the first documented case of significant cataract formation in a young myope after repeat excimer laser ablation necessitating phacoemulsification with a posterior chamber implant. Proposed explanations include focusing of the ablation wave on the posterior capsule (acous...

  3. Multiplexing schemes for quantum repeater networks

    Aparicio, Luciano; Van Meter, Rodney

    2011-08-01

    When built, quantum repeaters will allow the distribution of entangled quantum states across large distances, playing a vital part in many proposed quantum technologies. Enabling multiple users to connect through the same network will be key to their real-world deployment. Previous work on repeater technologies has focussed only on simple entanglment production, without considering the issues of resource scarcity and competition that necessarily arise in a network setting. In this paper we simulated a thirteen-node network with up to five flows sharing different parts of the network, measuring the total throughput and fairness for each case. Our results suggest that the Internet-like approach of statistical multiplexing use of a congested link gives the highest aggregate throughput. Time division multiplexing and buffer space multiplexing were slightly less effective, but all three schemes allow the sum of multiple flows to substantially exceed that of any one flow, improving over circuit switching by taking advantage of resources that are forced to remain idle in circuit switching. All three schemes proved to have excellent fairness. The high performance, fairness and simplicity of implementation support a recommendation of statistical multiplexing for shared quantum repeater networks.

  4. [Effect of dosed diet restriction on physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone].

    Levashov, M I; Ianko, R V; Chaka, E G; Safonov, S L

    2014-07-01

    The effect of dosed diet restriction on the physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone tissue was studied in 48 male Wistar rats 3- and 18-months of age. The rate of bone tissue apposition was studied by the dynamic histomorphometry method (intravital tetracycline labeling). Electric potentials on the periosteal surface of the freshly isolated femurs were recorded. The magnitude of dielectric loss factor was determined to assess the quality of bone tissue. The control rats received a standard diet. The experimental rats received a limited diet (60 % of the standard mass) for 28 days. The magnitude and rate of the bone tissue apposition on the endosteal and periosteal surface of the tibia were less by 38.4% and 122.7% respectively in experimental rats after dosed diet restriction. Electric potential in the metaphyseal-epiphyseal growth zones of the femur was 29.7% lower, and the dielectric loss factor increased by 15.8%. The bone tissue apposition rate and the electric potential magnitude were increased 10 days after completion of the dosed diet restriction. The magnitude of the dielectric loss factor decreased after returning to the standard diet. Key words: dosed diet restriction, bone, remodelling, bioelectric properties. PMID:25669112

  5. Haemopoiesis in murine bone marrow and spleen after fractionated irradiation and repeated bone marrow transplantation. I

    Erythropoiesis was studied in mice repeatedly exposed to doses of 3 Gy of 60Co γ-rays at 4-day intervals up to a total dose of 24 Gy on the basis of total bone marrow and spleen cellularity follow-up and analysis of myelograms and splenograms. Half the number of the mice received 106 nuclear cells of syngeneic bone marrow after each fractional radiation dose. It was mainly the spleen which was involved in the adaptation and regeneration of erythropoiesis, its contribution to total erythropoiesis in bone marrow recipients having been as high as 73.9% (day 20 of experiment, total dose 15 Gy). In mice only irradiated, the number of nuclear cells of erythroid lineage decreased to zero values sooner in the spleen (day 16 of experiment, total dose 12 Gy) than in the bone marrow (day 24 of experiment, total dose 18 Gy). The analysis of the results of collections made on day 9 after the last irradiation revealed, however, that the hemopoietic microenvironment of the spleen and hemopoietic cells capable of differentiation in the erythroid direction were so resistant to irradiation in mice only irradiated that erythropoiesis in their spleens exhibited signs of regeneration even after the highest total dose of 24 Gy. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs., 12 refs

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    An, Seong Soo A

    2014-01-01

    Hwa Jung Ryu,1,* Mu Yeb Seo,2,* Sung Kyu Jung,1 Eun Ho Maeng,2 Seung-Young Lee,2 Dong-Hyouk Jang,2 Taek-Jin Lee,2 Ki-Yeon Jo,2 Yu-Ri Kim,3 Kyu-Bong Cho,4 Meyoung-Kon Kim,3 Beom Jun Lee,5 Sang Wook Son1 1Department of Dermatology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Korea Testing and Research Institute, Gyunggido, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, 4Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Shinheung College, Uijeongbu, 5...

  7. A Complete and Accurate Ab Initio Repeat Finding Algorithm.

    Lian, Shuaibin; Chen, Xinwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoli; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-03-01

    It has become clear that repetitive sequences have played multiple roles in eukaryotic genome evolution including increasing genetic diversity through mutation, changes in gene expression and facilitating generation of novel genes. However, identification of repetitive elements can be difficult in the ab initio manner. Currently, some classical ab initio tools of finding repeats have already presented and compared. The completeness and accuracy of detecting repeats of them are little pool. To this end, we proposed a new ab initio repeat finding tool, named HashRepeatFinder, which is based on hash index and word counting. Furthermore, we assessed the performances of HashRepeatFinder with other two famous tools, such as RepeatScout and Repeatfinder, in human genome data hg19. The results indicated the following three conclusions: (1) The completeness of HashRepeatFinder is the best one among these three compared tools in almost all chromosomes, especially in chr9 (8 times of RepeatScout, 10 times of Repeatfinder); (2) in terms of detecting large repeats, HashRepeatFinder also performed best in all chromosomes, especially in chr3 (24 times of RepeatScout and 250 times of Repeatfinder) and chr19 (12 times of RepeatScout and 60 times of Repeatfinder); (3) in terms of accuracy, HashRepeatFinder can merge the abundant repeats with high accuracy. PMID:26272474

  8. Modeling the effects of repeated systemic administrations of small activity amounts In radionuclide therapy with beta emitters

    Full text: Good results for radionuclide therapy treatments where repeated short time spaced systemic injection of small activity amounts are given have been reported. Bone marrow and kidneys are usually considered as dose-limiting organs in radionuclide therapy. The treatments in radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be optimized if irradiation effects in those one might be estimated. Xeno-grafted mice is the often biological model used during the evaluation of candidates for radionuclide therapy. A mathematical model of tumor cell kinetics was combined with another one reported for marrow cell kinetics which allows the calculation of marrow cell survival and proliferation in response to different irradiation schemes. Radionuclide therapy treatment with repeated administrations with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with beta emitters were simulated. The effects on fast-growing and slow-growing tumors were evaluated, as well as radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. For more realistic estimation of absorbed dose in mice organs the cross-irradiation due to high energy beta particles was included into the MIRD's formula. Tumor and kidneys responses to the irradiation were estimated on the linear-quadratic model framework which was adapted for a multi-exponential dose rate function describing radionuclide therapy treatments with repeated administrations. Published values for murine tumors kinetics, marrows cellular turnover rates and radiosensitivities were used during the calculations. Iso-effective schemes were also determined varying the interval between fractions and the number of administration. For a given tolerated level of thrombocytopenia and absorbed dose in kidneys an optimal regime of radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be found. The mathematical model presented here allows the prediction of the nadir and duration of thrombocytopenia, the effects on kidneys and the tumor cell response to various treatment schemes

  9. Dose conversion factors

    The following is discussed in this report: concepts and quantities used in calculating radiation dose from internal and external exposure. Tabulations of dose conversion factor for internal and external exposure to radionuclides. Dose conversion factors give dose per unit intake (internal) or dose per unit concentration in environment (external). Intakes of radionuclides for internal exposure and concentrations of radionuclides in environment for external exposure are assumed to be known. Intakes and concentrations are obtained, e.g., from analyses of environmental transport and exposure pathways. differences between dosimetry methods for radionuclides and hazardous chemicals are highlighted

  10. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    Teraporn Vutyavanich; Worashorn Lattiwongsakorn; Waraporn Piromlertamorn; Sudarat Samchimchom

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing.Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots:non-frozen,rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing.Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<O.01) after the first,second and third cycles of freezing/thawing,but there was no difference in morphology.In the second experiment,rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects.The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay.DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing,but to a level that was not clinically important.In the third experiment,rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects,until no motile sperm were observed after thawing.The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range:5-8,mean:6.8).In conclusion,we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing.This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology.

  11. A tandem repeat gene in a picornavirus.

    Forss, S; Schaller, H

    1982-01-01

    Three closely related genes for the small genome-linked protein (VPg) of picornaviruses have been identified by sequence analysis as a tandem repeat in the genome of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), strain O1K. This unusual structure was also found in the genome of strain C1O, belonging to a different FMDV serotype. Predicted biochemical properties of the three VPg gene products are in excellent agreement with the data from protein analysis of a heterogeneous VPg population from a third F...

  12. Engineering RNA sequence specificity of Pumilio repeats

    Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    Puf proteins bind RNA sequence specifically and regulate translation and stability of target mRNAs. A “code” for RNA recognition has been deduced from crystal structures of the Puf protein, human Pumilio1, where each of eight repeats binds an RNA base via a combination of three side chains at conserved positions. Here, we report the creation of seven soluble mutant proteins with predictably altered sequence specificity, including one that binds tightly to adenosine-uracil-rich element RNA. These data show that Pumilio1 can be used as a scaffold to engineer RNA-binding proteins with designed sequence specificity. PMID:16954190

  13. Hypermnesia: the role of repeated testing.

    Roediger, H L; Payne, D G

    1982-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether the increased recall of pictures across repeated tests (hypermnesia) is due to increasing strength of imaginal traces during the retention interval or to increased retrieval practice from prior tests. Subjects studied 60 pictures and then recalled them after various delays that were filled with instructions and, in two cases, reading a passage. Recall on a first test showed no change with retention interval. With retention interval held constant, however, the number of pictures recalled varied directly with the number of prior tests subjects had been given. This finding points up the critical nature of retrieval factors in producing hypermnesia. PMID:6210744

  14. Source coding model for repeated snapshot imaging

    Li, Junhui; Yang, Dongyue; wu, Guohua; Yin, Longfei; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Imaging based on successive repeated snapshot measurement is modeled as a source coding process in information theory. The necessary number of measurement to maintain a certain level of error rate is depicted as the rate-distortion function of the source coding. Quantitative formula of the error rate versus measurement number relation is derived, based on the information capacity of imaging system. Second order fluctuation correlation imaging (SFCI) experiment with pseudo-thermal light verifies this formula, which paves the way for introducing information theory into the study of ghost imaging (GI), both conventional and computational.

  15. Adaptation and complexity in repeated games

    Maenner, Eliot Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a learning model for two-player infinitely repeated games. In an inference step players construct minimally complex inferences of strategies based on observed play, and in an adaptation step players choose minimally complex best responses to an inference. When players randomly...... select an inference from a probability distribution with full support the set of steady states is a subset of the set of Nash equilibria in which only stage game Nash equilibria are played. When players make ‘cautious' inferences the set of steady states is the subset of self-confirming equilibria with...

  16. Repeated ketamine treatment induces sex-specific behavioral and neurochemical effects in mice.

    Thelen, Connor; Sens, Jonathon; Mauch, Joseph; Pandit, Radhika; Pitychoutis, Pothitos M

    2016-10-01

    One of the most striking discoveries in the treatment of major depression was the finding that infusion of a single sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine induces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant depressed patients. However, ketamine's antidepressant-like actions are transient and can only be sustained by repeated drug treatment. Despite the fact that women experience major depression at roughly twice the rate of men, research regarding the neurobiological antidepressant-relevant effects of ketamine has focused almost exclusively on the male sex. Importantly, knowledge regarding the sex-differentiated effects, the frequency and the dose on which repeated ketamine administration stops being beneficial, is limited. In the current study, we investigated the behavioral, neurochemical and synaptic molecular effects of repeated ketamine treatment (10mg/kg; 21days) in male and female C57BL/6J mice. We report that ketamine induced beneficial antidepressant-like effects in male mice, but induced both anxiety-like (i.e., decreased time spent in the center of the open field arena) and depressive-like effects (i.e., enhanced immobility duration in the forced swim test; FST) in their female counterparts. Moreover, repeated ketamine treatment induced sustained sex-differentiated neurochemical and molecular effects, as it enhanced hippocampal synapsin protein levels and serotonin turnover in males, but attenuated glutamate and aspartate levels in female mice. Taken together, our findings indicate that repeated ketamine treatment induces opposite behavioral effects in male and female mice, and thus, present data have far-reaching implications for the sex-oriented use of ketamine in both experimental and clinical research settings. PMID:27343934

  17. Establishment of a dosimetric system for high doses using glasses

    A routine dosimetric system was developed using commercial glass samples. The dosimetric characteristics of national and imported samples were studied: batch uniformity, response repeatability, reutilization, absorbed dose response, detection range, response stability as a function of absorbed dose, storage temperature and thermal treatments pre- and post-irradiation, using the optical absorption technique. As an application, the dosimetric system was tested in a flower irradiation process at IPEN. All the obtained results show the usefulness of the proposed system for high dose dosimetry. (author)

  18. Beneficial and adverse effects of irradiation in patients repeatedly subjected to high-dosage treatment

    During the period between 1978 and 1983 a total of 156 patients showing different types of tumours were subjected to high-dosage radiotherapy. The patients were treated repeatedly for primary or recurrent tumours using a radiation dose of >79 Gy. Each of the three largest groups, which were mammary carcinomas (33), cerebral tumours (25) and orohypopharyngeal tumours (22), was analysed individually. In the majority of patients the local effects of this radiotherapy were such that total or at least partial remission of the primary or recurrent tumour appeared most likely. In the groups receiving doses in the lower range the results were just as good as those achieved in subjects exposed to high doses. The survival times determined here for bearers of mammary or cerebral carcinomas were better than the relevant values given in the literature. (orig./MG)

  19. Dose-dependent effects of a soluble dietary fibre (pectin) on food intake, adiposity, gut hypertrophy and gut satiety hormone secretion in rats.

    Adam, Clare L; Williams, Patricia A; Garden, Karen E; Thomson, Lynn M; Ross, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    Soluble fermentable dietary fibre elicits gut adaptations, increases satiety and potentially offers a natural sustainable means of body weight regulation. Here we aimed to quantify physiological responses to graded intakes of a specific dietary fibre (pectin) in an animal model. Four isocaloric semi-purified diets containing 0, 3.3%, 6.7% or 10% w/w apple pectin were offered ad libitum for 8 or 28 days to young adult male rats (n = 8/group). Measurements were made of voluntary food intake, body weight, initial and final body composition by magnetic resonance imaging, final gut regional weights and histology, and final plasma satiety hormone concentrations. In both 8- and 28-day cohorts, dietary pectin inclusion rate was negatively correlated with food intake, body weight gain and the change in body fat mass, with no effect on lean mass gain. In both cohorts, pectin had no effect on stomach weight but pectin inclusion rate was positively correlated with weights and lengths of small intestine and caecum, jejunum villus height and crypt depth, ileum crypt depth, and plasma total glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) concentrations, and at 8 days was correlated with weight and length of colon and with caecal mucosal depth. Therefore, the gut's morphological and endocrine adaptations were dose-dependent, occurred within 8 days and were largely sustained for 28 days during continued dietary intervention. Increasing amounts of the soluble fermentable fibre pectin in the diet proportionately decreased food intake, body weight gain and body fat content, associated with proportionately increased satiety hormones GLP-1 and PYY and intestinal hypertrophy, supporting a role for soluble dietary fibre-induced satiety in healthy body weight regulation. PMID:25602757

  20. Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives.

    Sitti, Metin; Cusick, Brian; Aksak, Burak; Nese, Alper; Lee, Hyung-il; Dong, Hongchen; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on repeatable adhesive materials prepared by controlled grafting of dangling hetero chains from polymer elastomers. The dangling chain elastomer system was prepared by grafting poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) chains from prefunctionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer networks using atom transfer radical polymerization. To study the effects of chain growth and network strain as they relate to network adhesion mechanics, various lengths of PBA chains with degree of polymerizations (DP) of 65, 281, 508, and 1200 were incorporated into the PDMS matrix. PBA chains with a DP value of 281 grafted from a flat PDMS substrate showed the highest (approximately 3.5-fold) enhancement of nano- and macroscale adhesion relative to a flat raw (ungrafted and not prefunctionalized) PDMS substrate. Moreover, to study the effect of PBA dangling chains on adhesion in fibrillar elastomer structures inspired by gecko foot hairs, a dip-transfer fabrication method was used to graft PBA chains with a DP value of 296 from the tip endings of mushroom-shaped PDMS micropillars. A PBA chain covered micropillar array showed macroscale adhesion enhancement up to approximately 7 times relative to the flat ungrafted prefunctionalized PDMS control substrate, showing additional nonoptimized approximately 2-fold adhesion enhancement due to fibrillar structuring and mushroom-shaped tip ending. These dangling hetero chains on elastomer micro-/nanofibrillar structures may provide a novel fabrication platform for multilength scale, repeatable, and high-strength fibrillar adhesives inspired by gecko foot hairs. PMID:20355863

  1. Extending Teach and Repeat to Pivoting Wheelchairs

    Guillermo Del Castillo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper extends the teach-and-repeat paradigm that has been successful for the control of holonomic robots to nonholonomic wheelchairs which may undergo pivoting action over the course of their taught movement. Due to the nonholonomic nature of the vehicle kinematics, estimation is required -- in the example given herein, based upon video detection of wall-mounted cues -- both in the teaching and the tracking events. In order to accommodate motion that approaches pivoting action as well as motion that approaches straight-line action, the estimation equations of the Extended Kalman Filter and the control equations are formulated using two different definitions of a nontemporal independent variable. The paper motivates the need for pivoting action in real-life settings by reporting extensively on the abilities and limitations of estimation-based teach-and-repeat action where pivoting and near-pivoting action is disallowed. Following formulation of the equations in the near-pivot mode, the paper reports upon experiments where taught trajectories which entail a seamless mix of near-straight and near-pivot action are tracked.

  2. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  3. Automated Planning in Repeated Adversarial Games

    de Cote, Enrique Munoz; Sykulski, Adam M; Jennings, Nicholas R

    2012-01-01

    Game theory's prescriptive power typically relies on full rationality and/or self-play interactions. In contrast, this work sets aside these fundamental premises and focuses instead on heterogeneous autonomous interactions between two or more agents. Specifically, we introduce a new and concise representation for repeated adversarial (constant-sum) games that highlight the necessary features that enable an automated planing agent to reason about how to score above the game's Nash equilibrium, when facing heterogeneous adversaries. To this end, we present TeamUP, a model-based RL algorithm designed for learning and planning such an abstraction. In essence, it is somewhat similar to R-max with a cleverly engineered reward shaping that treats exploration as an adversarial optimization problem. In practice, it attempts to find an ally with which to tacitly collude (in more than two-player games) and then collaborates on a joint plan of actions that can consistently score a high utility in adversarial repeated gam...

  4. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  5. Establishment of a dosimetric system for high doses using glasses; Estabelecimento de um sistema dosimetrico para doses altas utilizando vidros

    Correa Quezada, Valeria de la Asuncion

    1997-07-01

    A routine dosimetric system was developed using commercial glass samples. The dosimetric characteristics of national and imported samples were studied: batch uniformity, response repeatability, reutilization, absorbed dose response, detection range, response stability as a function of absorbed dose, storage temperature and thermal treatments pre- and post-irradiation, using the optical absorption technique. As an application, the dosimetric system was tested in a flower irradiation process at IPEN. All the obtained results show the usefulness of the proposed system for high dose dosimetry. (author)

  6. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap resul...

  7. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats i...

  8. PILER-CR: Fast and accurate identification of CRISPR repeats

    Edgar Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Sequencing of prokaryotic genomes has recently revealed the presence of CRISPR elements: short, highly conserved repeats separated by unique sequences of similar length. The distinctive sequence signature of CRISPR repeats can be found using general-purpose repeat- or pattern-finding software tools. However, the output of such tools is not always ideal for studying these repeats, and significant effort is sometimes needed to build additional tools and perform manual analys...

  9. Quantum Correlations over Long-distances Using Noisy Quantum Repeaters

    Bae, Joonwoo; Kim, Jeong San

    2008-01-01

    Quantum correlations as the resource for quantum communication can be distributed over long distances by quantum repeaters. In this Letter, we introduce the notion of a noisy quantum repeater, and examine its role in quantum communication. Quantum correlations shared through noisy quantum repeaters are then characterized and their secrecy properties are studied. Remarkably, noisy quantum repeaters naturally introduce private states in the key distillation scenario, and consequently key distil...

  10. Quantum repeaters free of polarization disturbance and phase noise

    Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Zhao, Yi-bo; Yong YANG; Han, Zheng-Fu; Guo, Guang-Can

    2009-01-01

    Original quantum repeater protocols based on single-photon interference suffer from phase noise of the channel, which makes the long-distance quantum communication infeasible. Fortunately, two-photon interference type quantum repeaters can be immune to phase noise of the channel. However, this type quantum repeaters may still suffer from polarization disturbance of the channel. Here we propose a quantum repeaters protocol which is free of polarization disturbance of the channel based on the i...

  11. The effects of multiple UV exposures on HIV-LTR (long terminal repeat) expression

    Previous studies have shown that cellular stress agents such as UV radiation induce transcription from the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Using HeLa cells stably transfected with the HIV-LTR sequence, which transcriptionally drives the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene, we examined the effects of multiple exposures to UVC (254 nm) on HIV-LTR-CAT expression. Low doses (≤ 5 J m-2) had no effect on CAT expression, but up to 29-fold induction was observed with 10 J m-2 when cells were harvested 48 h after completion of the exposure. Little difference was noted in induction levels when cells were exposed to one 25 J m-2 dose, viable cells were harvested at 24 h, 48 h or 72 h, and cell lysates were assayed for CAT expression. Two sequential 12.5 J m-2 exposures, given 24 h apart, resulted in an additive effect on CAT expression; these two exposures produced CAT activity equivalent to that induced following a single 25 J m-2 dose. Our data suggest that HIV-LTR requires a specific threshold UV dose in order to elicit induction; a maximal induction dose is also evident; exposures higher than this maximal dose contribute no more to HIV-LTR induction in viable cells. (author)

  12. Repeated intranasal TLR7 stimulation reduces allergen responsiveness in allergic rhinitis

    Greiff Lennart

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between Th1 and Th2 immune responses are of importance to the onset and development of allergic disorders. A Toll-like receptor 7 agonist such as AZD8848 may have potential as a treatment for allergic airway disease by skewing the immune system away from a Th2 profile. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal AZD8848. Methods In a placebo-controlled single ascending dose study, AZD8848 (0.3-600 μg was given intranasally to 48 healthy subjects and 12 patients with allergic rhinitis (NCT00688779. In a placebo-controlled repeat challenge/treatment study, AZD8848 (30 and 60 μg was given once weekly for five weeks to 74 patients with allergic rhinitis out of season: starting 24 hours after the final dose, daily allergen challenges were given for seven days (NCT00770003. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and biomarkers were monitored. During the allergen challenge series, nasal symptoms and lavage fluid levels of tryptase and α2-macroglobulin, reflecting mast cell activity and plasma exudation, were monitored. Results AZD8848 produced reversible blood lymphocyte reductions and dose-dependent flu-like symptoms: 30–100 μg produced consistent yet tolerable effects. Plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was elevated after administration of AZD8848, reflecting interferon production secondary to TLR7 stimulation. At repeat challenge/treatment, AZD8848 reduced nasal symptoms recorded ten minutes after allergen challenge up to eight days after the final dose. Tryptase and α2-macroglobulin were also reduced by AZD8848. Conclusions Repeated intranasal stimulation of Toll-like receptor 7 by AZD8848 was safe and produced a sustained reduction in the responsiveness to allergen in allergic rhinitis. Trial registration NCT00688779 and NCT00770003 as indicated above.

  13. Repeat Whole Brain Radiation Therapy with a Simultaneous Infield Boost: A Novel Technique for Reirradiation

    The treatment of patients who experience intracranial progression after whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is a clinical challenge. Novel radiation therapy delivery technologies are being applied with the objective of improving tumor and symptom control in these patients. The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical outcomes of the application of a novel technology to deliver repeat WBRT with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and a simultaneous infield boost (WB-SIB) to gross disease. A total of 16 patients were initially treated with WBRT between 2000 and 2008 and then experienced intracranial progression, were treated using repeat WB-SIB, and were analyzed. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range: 30–50.4 Gy). Median time between the initial course of WBRT and repeat WB-SIB was 11.3 months. The median dose at reirradiation was 20 Gy to the whole brain with a median boost dose of 30 Gy to gross disease. A total of 2 patients demonstrated radiographic disease progression after treatment. The median overall survival (OS) time from initial diagnosis of brain metastases was 18.9 months (range: 7.1–66.6 (95% CI: 0.8–36.9)). The median OS time after initiation of reirradiation for all patients was 2.7 months (range: 0.46–14.46 (95% CI: 1.3–8.7)). Only 3 patients experienced CTCAE grade 3 fatigue. No other patients experienced any ≥ CTCAE grade 3 toxicity. This analysis reports the result of a novel RT delivery technique for the treatment of patients with recurrent brain metastases. Side effects were manageable and comparable to other conventional repeat WBRT series. Repeat WB-SIB using the VMAT RT delivery technology is feasible and appears to have acceptable short-term acute toxicity. These results may provide a foundation for further exploration of the WB-SIB technique for repeat WBRT in future prospective clinical trials.

  14. Intradermal fractional booster dose of inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine with a jet injector in healthy adults.

    Soonawala, Darius; Verdijk, Pauline; Wijmenga-Monsuur, Alienke J; Boog, Claire J; Koedam, Patrick; Visser, Leo G; Rots, Nynke Y

    2013-08-12

    For global eradication of poliomyelitis, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) needs to become available in all countries. Using fractional-doses (reduced-doses) may impact affordability and optimize the utilization of the production capacity. Intradermal administration has the potential to lower the dose without reducing immunogenicity. A needle-free jet injector may be a reliable way to administer vaccines intradermally. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the immunogenicity and tolerability of fractional-dose intradermal IPV (Netherlands Vaccine Institute, NVI) booster vaccination administered with a jet injector (PharmaJet) to full-dose and fractional-dose intramuscular vaccination with a needle and syringe. Immunogenicity was assessed by comparing the differences in the post-vaccination log2 geometric mean concentrations of neutralizing antibodies (GMC) between the study groups. A total of 125 Dutch adult volunteers with a well-documented vaccination history were randomized to one of four groups: full-dose intramuscular needle (IM-NS-0.5), full-dose intramuscular jet injector (IM-JI-0.5), 1/5th dose intramuscular needle (IM-NS-0.1), 1/5th dose intradermal jet injector (ID-JI-0.1). Vaccination with the JI was less painful (87% no pain) than vaccination with a NS (60% no pain), but caused more transient erythema (JI 85%, NS 24%) and swelling (JI 50%, NS 5%). Intradermal vaccination caused less vaccination site soreness (ID 16%, IM 52%). At baseline all subjects had seroprotective antibody concentrations. After 28 days, GMC were slightly lower in the ID-JI-0.1 group than in the reference group (IM-NS-0.5). The differences were not statistically significant, but the stringent non-inferiority criterion (i.e. a difference of 1 serum dilution in the microneutralization assay) was not met. After one year, differences in GMC were no longer apparent. In contrast, intramuscular vaccination with a fractional dose administered with a

  15. Erroneous Memories Arising from Repeated Attempts to Remember

    Henkel, Linda A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of repeated and prolonged attempts at remembering on false memory rates was assessed in three experiments. Participants saw and imagined pictures and then made repeated recall attempts before taking a source memory test. Although the number of items recalled increased with repeated tests, the net gains were associated with more source…

  16. Registration of radiation doses

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  17. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  18. Statistical Properties of repeating FRB 121102

    Wang, F Y

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio signals possibly occurring at cosmological distances. However the physical model of FRBs is mystery, many models have been proposed. Here we study the frequency distributions of peak flux, fluence, duration and waiting time for repeating FRB 121102. The cumulative distributions of peak flux, fluence and duration show power-law forms. The waiting time distribution also shows power-law distribution, and is consistent with a non-stationary Poisson process. We also use the statistical results to test the proposed models for FRBs. Comparing with the model predications, we find that the theoretical models proposed by Dai et al. (2016) and Katz (2016) are favored. These distributions are consistent with the predications from avalanche models of driven systems.

  19. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    Ann E Lambert

    Full Text Available Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility.

  20. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility. PMID:23776442

  1. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions. PMID:24491104

  2. Design principles for efficient, repeated jumpgliding

    Combined jumping and gliding locomotion, or ‘jumpgliding’, can be an efficient way for small robots or animals to travel over cluttered terrain. This paper presents functional requirements and models for a simple jumpglider which formalize the benefits and limitations of using aerodynamic surfaces to augment jumping ability. Analysis of the model gives insight into design choices and control strategies for higher performance and to accommodate special conditions such as a slippery launching surface. The model informs the design of a robotic platform that can perform repeated jumps using a carbon fiber spring and a pivoting wing. Experiments with two different versions of the platform agree with predictions from the model and demonstrate a significantly greater range, and lower cost-of-transport, than a comparable ballistic jumper. (papers)

  3. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  4. Trichosanthin inhibits integration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 through depurinating the long-terminal repeats.

    Zhao, Wen-Long; Feng, Du; Wu, Ju; Sui, Sen-Fang

    2010-04-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS) is a type I ribosome-inactivating protein with potent inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1. However, the anti-viral mechanism remains elusive. By a well-accepted HIV-1 integration assay, we demonstrated that TCS prevents HIV-1 DNA integration in a dose dependent manner in cell culture. At the same condition, TCS fails to induce obvious cytotoxicity and is also unable to interference viral early events such as viral entry, uncoating or reverse transcription. The HIV-1 integrase can integrate HIV-1 long-terminal repeats into cellular chromosome. The interaction of TCS with these viral integration components was also examined, indicating that TCS does not interact with HIV-1 integrase by the GST-pull down assay, but binds to the long terminal repeats in a transient manner. We further revealed that TCS can efficiently depurinate HIV-1 long-terminal repeats, which may be responsible for the inhibitory activity on HIV-1 integration. In conclusion, we elucidated that TCS specifically inhibits HIV-1 integration by depurinating the long-terminal repeats. PMID:19669933

  5. Ceftriaxone attenuates locomotor activity induced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure in mice.

    Tallarida, Christopher S; Corley, Gladys; Kovalevich, Jane; Yen, William; Langford, Dianne; Rawls, Scott M

    2013-11-27

    Ceftriaxone (CTX) decreases locomotor activation produced by initial cocaine exposure and attenuates development of behavioral sensitization produced by repeated cocaine exposure. An important question that has not yet been answered is whether or not CTX reduces behavioral sensitization to cocaine in cases in which the antibiotic is administered only during the period of cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure and precedes reintroduction to cocaine. We investigated this question using C57BL/6 mice. Mice pretreated with cocaine (15mg/kg×14 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15mg/kg) after 30 days of cocaine absence displayed sensitization of locomotor activity. For combination experiments, CTX injected during the 30 days of cocaine absence attenuated behavioral sensitization produced by cocaine challenge. In the case in which CTX was injected together with cocaine for 14 days, development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine challenge was also reduced. CTX attenuated the increase in locomotor activity produced by acute cocaine exposure; however, its efficacy was dependent on the dose of cocaine as inhibition was detected against 30mg/kg, but not 15mg/kg, of cocaine. These results from mice indicate that CTX attenuates locomotor activity produced by acute and repeated cocaine exposure and counters cocaine's locomotor activating properties in a paradigm in which the antibiotic is injected during the period of forced cocaine absence that follows repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:24120434

  6. INFLUENCE OF MORINGA OLEIFERA (DRUM-STICK FRUIT EXTRACT ON HAEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE FOLLOWING REPEATED EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVELS OF ARSENIC THROUGH FEED ON RATS

    Vaibhav R. Pachade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Moringa oleifera fruits hot methanolic extract (MFE, if any, in minimizing the adverse reactions of repeated exposure to arsenic trioxide (AT in feed was investigated in Wistar rats with reference to haematological profile. Three groups of rats each containing 10 (5male+5female were used. The group I served as negative control. Rats of group II were fed arsenic trioxide (AT alone @ 100 ppm in feed while those of group III simultaneously received AT (@100 ppm and MFE (50 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Blood samples were collected from retroorbital plexus for estimation of hematological parameters (haemoglobin, PCV, TEC, MCH, MCHC, MCV of different groups on 0 day, 15th day and 29th day respectively. Exposure to AT through feed in group II resulted in significant (P<0.05 decrease in haemoglobin, TEC and MCHC, accompanied by increased MCV, with no significant alteration of PCV or MCH of the rats. While rats of group III treated with AT (@100 ppm and MFE (50 mg/kg/day also resulted in same consequences as it was in group II but it was slightly less than that of group II suggesting of mild non significant protective effect.

  7. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  8. Selective Cumulative Inhibition of Platelet Thromboxane Production by Low-dose Aspirin in Healthy Subjects

    Patrignani, Paola; Filabozzi, Paola; Patrono, Carlo

    1982-01-01

    Acetylation of platelet cyclooxygenase by oral aspirin is dose dependent and cumulative with repeated administration. However, no single dose of aspirin has been found to be completely selective of platelet thromboxane (TX) synthesis inhibition in man. We determined the dose dependence, cumulative nature and selectivity of aspirin effects on platelet TXB2 and renal prostaglandin (PG) and prostacyclin (PGI2) production. We measured, by radioimmunoassay, serum TXB2 levels after whole blood clot...

  9. Irradiation dose to the lens of the eye during CT of the head

    The irradiation dose to the lens of the eye during CT scanning has been measured in 16 patients. The dose is greatly influenced by changes in gantry angulation, the position of the patient, the thickness and number of slices, KV, and milliamperage. The total lens dose has been measured to be higher than previously reported. Repeated CT scans imply the risk of irradiation cataract, especially in infants and children. (orig.)

  10. Toxicology study assessing efficacy and safety of repeated administration of lipid/DNA complexes to mouse lung.

    Alton, E W F W; Boyd, A C; Cheng, S H; Davies, J C; Davies, L A; Dayan, A; Gill, D R; Griesenbach, U; Higgins, T; Hyde, S C; Innes, J A; McLachlan, G; Porteous, D; Pringle, I; Scheule, R K; Sumner-Jones, S

    2014-01-01

    For gene therapy to improve lung function in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects, repeated administration of the gene transfer agent over the lifetime of patients is likely to be necessary. This requirement limits the utility of adenoviral and adeno-associated viral vectors (both previously evaluated in CF gene therapy trials) because of induced adaptive immune responses that render repeated dosing ineffective. For CF gene therapy trials, non-viral vectors are currently the only viable option. We previously showed that the cationic lipid formulation GL67A is the most efficient of several non-viral vectors analysed for airway gene transfer. Here, we assessed the efficacy and safety of administering 12 inhaled doses of GL67A complexed with pGM169, a CpG-free plasmid encoding human CFTR complementary DNA, into mice. We show that repeated administration of pGM169/GL67A to murine lungs is feasible, safe and achieves reproducible, dose-related and persistent gene expression (>140 days after each dose) using an aerosol generated by a clinically relevant nebuliser. This study supports progression into the first non-viral multidose lung trial in CF patients. PMID:24196086

  11. Dose response relationship at low doses

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  12. Radiation dose measurements in intravenous pyelography

    Intravenous pyelography (IVP) and micturition cystourethrography (MCU) are the standard procedures in the radiological examination of children with urinary tract infections and in the control of these children. Gonad protection against radiation is not possible in MCU, but concerning the girls partly possible in IVP. It is of major importance to know the radiation dose in these procedures, especially since the examination is often repeated in the same patients. All IVP were done by means of the usual technique including possible gonad protection. The thermoluminescence dosimeter was placed rectally in the girls and fixed on the scrota in the boys. A total of 50 children was studied. Gonad dose ranged from 140 to 200mR in the girls and from 20 to 70mR in the boys (mean values). The radiation dose in IVP is very low compared to that of MCU, and from this point of view IVP is a dose saving examination in the control of children with urinary tract infections

  13. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Xiao Ying; Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology at the Jefferson Medical College and Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  14. Measuring pacemaker dose: A clinical perspective

    Recently in our clinic, we have seen an increased number of patients presenting with pacemakers and defibrillators. Precautions are taken to develop a treatment plan that minimizes the dose to the pacemaker because of the adverse effects of radiation on the electronics. Here we analyze different dosimeters to determine which is the most accurate in measuring pacemaker or defibrillator dose while at the same time not requiring a significant investment in time to maintain an efficient workflow in the clinic. The dosimeters analyzed here were ion chambers, diodes, metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFETs), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters. A simple phantom was used to quantify the angular and energy dependence of each dosimeter. Next, 8 patients plans were delivered to a Rando phantom with all the dosimeters located where the pacemaker would be, and the measurements were compared with the predicted dose. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image was obtained to determine the dosimeter response in the kilovoltage energy range. In terms of the angular and energy dependence of the dosimeters, the ion chamber and diode were the most stable. For the clinical cases, all the dosimeters match relatively well with the predicted dose, although the ideal dosimeter to use is case dependent. The dosimeters, especially the MOSFETS, tend to be less accurate for the plans, with many lateral beams. Because of their efficiency, we recommend using a MOSFET or a diode to measure the dose. If a discrepancy is observed between the measured and expected dose (especially when the pacemaker to field edge is <10 cm), we recommend analyzing the treatment plan to see whether there are many lateral beams. Follow-up with another dosimeter rather than repeating multiple times with the same type of dosimeter. All dosimeters should be placed after the CBCT has been acquired.

  15. Ataxin-2 repeat-length variation and neurodegeneration

    Ross, Owen A.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Adamson, Jennifer; Li, Ma; Volkening, Kathryn; Finger, Elizabeth; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Woodruff, Bryan K.; Knopman, David S.; White, Charles L.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Meschia, James F.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boylan, Kevin; Boeve, Bradley F.; Miller, Bruce L.; Strong, Michael J.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Younkin, Steven G.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Expanded glutamine repeats of the ataxin-2 (ATXN2) protein cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a rare neurodegenerative disorder. More recent studies have suggested that expanded ATXN2 repeats are a genetic risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) via an RNA-dependent interaction with TDP-43. Given the phenotypic diversity observed in SCA2 patients, we set out to determine the polymorphic nature of the ATXN2 repeat length across a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we genotyped the ATXN2 repeat in 3919 neurodegenerative disease patients and 4877 healthy controls and performed logistic regression analysis to determine the association of repeat length with the risk of disease. We confirmed the presence of a significantly higher number of expanded ATXN2 repeat carriers in ALS patients compared with healthy controls (OR = 5.57; P= 0.001; repeat length >30 units). Furthermore, we observed significant association of expanded ATXN2 repeats with the development of progressive supranuclear palsy (OR = 5.83; P= 0.004; repeat length >30 units). Although expanded repeat carriers were also identified in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients, these were not significantly more frequent than in controls. Of note, our study identified a number of healthy control individuals who harbor expanded repeat alleles (31–33 units), which suggests caution should be taken when attributing specific disease phenotypes to these repeat lengths. In conclusion, our findings confirm the role of ATXN2 as an important risk factor for ALS and support the hypothesis that expanded ATXN2 repeats may predispose to other neurodegenerative diseases, including progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:21610160

  16. BNCT and dose fractionation

    Some portion of the radiation dose received by a patient during BNCT consists of primary and secondary gammas. The biological effect of that portion of the dose will depend upon the time history of the delivered dose. The well-known models for relating time-dose effects to clinical experience, are of questionable value in understanding dose effects in the time regime of a few hours, and for doses of less than tolerance. In order to examine the time-dose effect in the regime of interest to BNCT a simple phenomenological model was developed and normalized to the accepted body of clinical experience. The model has been applied to the question of fractionation of BNCT and the results are presented. The model is simply a linear healing model with two time constants. In other words, a first hit of radiation is assumed to wound (or potentiate) a cell. Given time, the cell will fully repair itself. If a second hit occurs before the cell has healed, the cell is killed. Apparently, there are two kinds of healing, one which occurs in 30 to 60 minutes, the other in two to four days. A small fraction of the cells will die on the first hit

  17. Radiobiological responses for two cell lines following continuous low dose-rate (CLDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy

    The iso-effective irradiation of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation was compared with that of various schedules of pulsed dose rate (PDR) irradiation for cells of two established human lines, T-47D and NHIK 3025. Complete single-dose response curves were obtained for determination of parameters α and β by fitting of the linear quadratic formula. Sublethal damage repair constants μ and T1/2 were determined by split-dose recovery experiments. On basis of the acquired parameters of each cell type the relative effectiveness of the two regimens of irradiation (CLDR and PDR) was calculated by use of Fowler's radiobiological model for iso-effect irradiation for repeated fractions of dose delivered at medium dose rates. For both cell types the predicted and observed relative effectiveness was compared at low and high iso-effect levels. The results indicate that the effect of PDR irradiation predicted by Fowler's model is equal to that of CLDR irradiation for both small and large doses with T-47D cells. With NHIK 3025 cells PDR irradiation induces a larger effect than predicted by the model for small doses, while it induces the predicted effect for high doses. The underlying cause of this difference is unclear, but cell-cycle parameters, like G2-accumulation is tested and found to be the same for the two cell lines

  18. Multineuronal Spike Sequences Repeat with Millisecond Precision

    Yuji Ikegaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microcircuits are nonrandomly wired by neurons. As a natural consequence, spikes emitted by microcircuits are also nonrandomly patterned in time and space. One of the prominent spike organizations is a repetition of fixed patterns of spike series across multiple neurons. However, several questions remain unsolved, including how precisely spike sequences repeat, how the sequences are spatially organized, how many neurons participate in sequences, and how different sequences are functionally linked. To address these questions, we monitored spontaneous spikes of hippocampal CA3 neurons ex vivo using a high-speed functional multineuron calcium imaging technique that allowed us to monitor spikes with millisecond resolution and to record the location of spiking and nonspiking neurons. Multineuronal spike sequences were overrepresented in spontaneous activity compared to the statistical chance level. Approximately 75% of neurons participated in at least one sequence during our observation period. The participants were sparsely dispersed and did not show specific spatial organization. The number of sequences relative to the chance level decreased when larger time frames were used to detect sequences. Thus, sequences were precise at the millisecond level. Sequences often shared common spikes with other sequences; parts of sequences were subsequently relayed by following sequences, generating complex chains of multiple sequences.

  19. Modelling repeatedly flaring delta-sunspots

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Active regions (AR) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into $\\alpha$, $\\beta$, $\\gamma$, and $\\delta$ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the $\\delta$-sunspots are known to be super-active and produce the most X-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin sub-photospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux-tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic $\\delta$-sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  20. Global Seismic Oscillations in Soft $\\gamma$ Repeaters

    Duncan, R C

    1998-01-01

    There is evidence that soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are neutron stars which experience frequent starquakes, possibly driven by an evolving, ultra-strong magnetic field. The empirical power-law distribution of SGR burst energies, analogous to the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes, exhibits a turn-over at high energies consistent with a global limit on the crust fracture size. With such large starquakes occurring, the significant excitation of global seismic oscillations (GSOs) seems likely. Moreover, GSOs may be self-exciting in a stellar crust that is strained by many, randomly-oriented stresses. We explain why low-order toroidal modes, which preserve the shape of the star and have observable frequencies as low as ~ 30 Hz, may be especially susceptible to excitation. We estimate the eigenfrequencies as a function of stellar mass and radius, and their magnetic and rotational shiftings/splittings. We also describes ways in which these modes might be detected and damped. There is marginal evidence for 23 ms o...

  1. Local tolerance and systemic toxicity of single and repeated intramuscular administrations of two different formulations of the RTS,S malaria candidate vaccine in rabbits.

    Segal, Lawrence; Morelle, Danielle; Blee, Mark; Moore, Emma; Damsten, Micaela; Liu, Kai Chiu; Destexhe, Eric; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    RTS,S malaria antigen is weakly immunogenic as such and needs to be formulated with an adjuvant to improve the magnitude and duration of the immune responses to RTS,S. Two Adjuvant Systems, AS01 and AS02 were evaluated during the development of the RTS,S vaccine. The evaluation included non-clinical studies in rabbits to evaluate the local intramuscular tolerance following administration on a single occasion, and the local and systemic effects following repeated administrations of RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S/AS02 formulations. In the first study, rabbits were injected on one occasion with RTS,S/AS01, RTS,S/AS02 or controls, and the local intramuscular tolerance was evaluated up to 3 days after injection. In the second study, the different formulations were injected on Days 0, 14, 28 and 42. General health status, haematology and blood chemistry parameters were monitored on a regular basis. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluations were made after termination of the study. No sign of toxicity was detected following single or repeated administrations of the adjuvanted RTS,S formulations. Changes in haematology or clinical chemistry parameters were indicative of a developing immune response in the groups receiving either RTS,S formulation. All examined parameters returned to normal within 28 days after the last injection. The absence of toxicological effects following the injection of RTS,S/AS01 or RTS,S/AS02 in rabbits was supportive of further clinical evaluation of these two formulations. PMID:25545314

  2. Comparative response of dogs and monkeys to sublethal acute and continuous low dose-rate gamma-ray exposure

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (injury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with 35 R/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injury remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50 percent) and monkeys (8 percent) died from injury incurred during the conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what might be expected from a single acute dose. Mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approximately 1400 h). Thus, hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35 R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater than for their control counterparts. Thus, the long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than four times the acute LD50-30 in dogs and approximately two times that of monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 R/day

  3. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study (ISIDE-BT-1) of Accelerated IMRT With Temozolomide in Patients With Glioblastoma

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had surgically resected or biopsy-proven glioblastoma. Patients started TMZ (75 mg/day) during IMRT and continued for 1 year (150-200 mg/day, Days 1-5 every 28 days) or until disease progression. Clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) was the tumor bed ± enhancing lesion with a 10-mm margin; CTV2 was the area of perifocal edema with a 20-mm margin. Planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2 were defined as the corresponding CTV plus a 5-mm margin. IMRT was delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Only the dose for PTV1 was escalated (planned dose escalation: 60 Gy, 62.5 Gy, 65 Gy) while maintaining the dose for PTV2 (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction). Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were defined as any treatment-related nonhematological adverse effects rated as Grade ≥3 or any hematological toxicity rated as ≥4 by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Nineteen consecutive glioblastoma were treated with step-and-shoot IMRT, planned with the inverse approach (dose to the PTV1: 7 patients, 60 Gy; 6 patients, 62.5 Gy; 6 patients, 65 Gy). Five coplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the 95% isodose line. Median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 8-40 months). No patient experienced DLT. Grade 1-2 treatment-related neurologic and skin toxicity were common (11 and 19 patients, respectively). No Grade >2 late neurologic toxicities were noted. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT to a dose of 65 Gy in 25 fractions is well tolerated with TMZ at a daily dose of 75 mg.

  4. Deriving adaptive MRF coefficients from previous normal-dose CT scan for low-dose image reconstruction via penalized weighted least-squares minimization

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Wang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated computed tomography (CT) scans are required for some clinical applications such as image-guided interventions. To optimize radiation dose utility, a normal-dose scan is often first performed to set up reference, followed by a series of low-dose scans for intervention. One common strategy to achieve the low-dose scan is to lower the x-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) or tube voltage (kVp) setting in the scanning protocol, but the resulted image quality by the conventi...

  5. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1. PMID:27382061

  6. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-01-01

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs. PMID:23979890

  7. [Tandem repeats in rodents genome and their mapping].

    Ostromyshenskii, D I; Kuznetsova, L S; Komissarov, A S; Kartavtseva, I V; Podgornaya, L

    2015-01-01

    Tandemly-repeated sequences represent a unique class of eukaryotic DNA. Their content in the genome of higher eukaryotes mounts to tens of percents. However, the evolution of this class of sequences is poorly-studied. In our paper, 62 families of Mus musculus tandem repeats are analyzed by bioinformatic methods, and 7 of them are analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. It is shown that the same tandem repeat sets co-occure only in closely related species of mice. But even in such species we observe differences in localization on the chromosomes and the number of individual tandem repeats. With increasing evolutionary distance only some of the tandem repeat families remain common for different species. It is shown, that the use of a combination of bioinformatics and molecular biology techniques is very perspective for further studies of the evolution of tandem repeats. PMID:26035967

  8. Radiation dose in vertebroplasty

    Mehdizade, A.; Lovblad, K.O.; Wilhelm, K.E.; Somon, T.; Wetzel, S.G.; Kelekis, A.D.; Yilmaz, H.; Abdo, G.; Martin, J.B.; Viera, J.M.; Ruefenacht, D.A. [Neuroradiology DRRI, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Micheli-du-Crest 24, 1211, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2004-03-01

    We wished to measure the absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopically controlled vertebroplasty and to assess the possibility of deterministic radiation effects to the operator. The dose was measured in 11 consecutive procedures using thermoluminescent ring dosimeters on the hand of the operator and electronic dosimeters inside and outside of the operator's lead apron. We found doses of 0.022-3.256 mGy outside and 0.01-0.47 mGy inside the lead apron. Doses on the hand were higher, 0.5-8.5 mGy. This preliminary study indicates greater exposure to the operator's hands than expected from traditional apron measurements. (orig.)

  9. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jtar@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  10. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    Taking acetaminophen (Tylenol) can help children with colds and fever feel better. As with all drugs, it is important to give children the correct dose. Acetaminophen is safe when taken as directed. But taking ...

  11. Toward a theory of repeat purchase drivers for consumer services

    Paul, M; Hennig-Thurau, T.; Gremler, D.D.; Gwinner, K. P.; Wiertz, C.

    2009-01-01

    The marketing discipline’s knowledge about the drivers of service customers’ repeat purchase behavior is highly fragmented. This research attempts to overcome that fragmented state of knowledge by making major advances toward a theory of repeat purchase drivers for consumer services. Drawing on means–end theory, the authors develop a hierarchical classification scheme that organizes repeat purchase drivers into an integrative and comprehensive framework. They then identify drivers on the basi...

  12. Repeatability of nest morphology in African weaver birds

    Walsh, Patrick T.; Hansell, Mike; Borello, Wendy D.; Healy, Susan D.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally assumed that birds build nests according to a genetic 'template', little influenced by learning or memory. One way to confirm the role of genetics in nest building is to assess the repeatability of nest morphology with repeated nest attempts. Solitary weaver birds, which build multiple nests in a single breeding season, are a useful group with which to do this. Here we show that repeatability of nest morphology was low, but significant, in male Southern Masked weaver birds and...

  13. Triplet repeat length bias and variation in the human transcriptome

    Molla, Michael; Delcher, Arthur; Sunyaev, Shamil; Cantor, Charles; Kasif, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Length variation in short tandem repeats (STRs) is an important family of DNA polymorphisms with numerous applications in genetics, medicine, forensics, and evolutionary analysis. Several major diseases have been associated with length variation of trinucleotide (triplet) repeats including Huntington's disease, hereditary ataxias and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. Using the reference human genome, we have catalogued all triplet repeats in genic regions. This data revealed a bias in noncoding D...

  14. Ataxin-2 repeat-length variation and neurodegeneration

    Ross, Owen A.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Adamson, Jennifer; Li, Ma; Volkening, Kathryn; Finger, Elizabeth; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H

    2011-01-01

    Expanded glutamine repeats of the ataxin-2 (ATXN2) protein cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a rare neurodegenerative disorder. More recent studies have suggested that expanded ATXN2 repeats are a genetic risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) via an RNA-dependent interaction with TDP-43. Given the phenotypic diversity observed in SCA2 patients, we set out to determine the polymorphic nature of the ATXN2 repeat length across a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In...

  15. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  16. Practical quantum repeaters with parametric down-conversion sources

    Krovi, Hari; Guha, Saikat; Dutton, Zachary; Slater, Joshua A.; Simon, Christoph; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that realistic quantum repeaters will require quasi-deterministic sources of entangled photon pairs. In contrast, we here study a quantum repeater architecture that uses simple parametric down-conversion sources, as well as frequency-multiplexed multimode quantum memories and photon-number-resolving detectors. We show that this approach can significantly extend quantum communication distances compared to direct transmission. This shows that important trade-offs are possible between the different components of quantum repeater architectures.

  17. Repeatability of nest morphology in African weaver birds

    Walsh, Patrick T.; Hansell, Mike; Borello, Wendy D.; Healy, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    It is generally assumed that birds build nests according to a genetic 'template', little influenced by learning or memory. One way to confirm the role of genetics in nest building is to assess the repeatability of nest morphology with repeated nest attempts. Solitary weaver birds, which build multiple nests in a single breeding season, are a useful group with which to do this. Here we show that repeatability of nest morphology was low, but significant, in male Southern Masked weaver birds and...

  18. Physiological Consequences of Repeated Exposures to Conditioned Fear

    Thompson, Robert S.; Strong, Paul V; Monika Fleshner

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the stress response evokes a cascade of physiological reactions that may be detrimental when repeated or chronic, and when triggered after exposure to psychological/emotional stressors. Investigation of the physiological mechanisms responsible for the health damaging effects requires animal paradigms that repeatedly evoke a response to psychological/emotional stressors. To this end, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed (2X per day for 20 days) to a context that...

  19. Bayesian Benchmark Dose Analysis

    Fang, Qijun; Piegorsch, Walter W.; Barnes, Katherine Y.

    2014-01-01

    An important objective in environmental risk assessment is estimation of minimum exposure levels, called Benchmark Doses (BMDs) that induce a pre-specified Benchmark Response (BMR) in a target population. Established inferential approaches for BMD analysis typically involve one-sided, frequentist confidence limits, leading in practice to what are called Benchmark Dose Lower Limits (BMDLs). Appeal to Bayesian modeling and credible limits for building BMDLs is far less developed, however. Indee...

  20. Gonadal doses from radiotherapy

    The method of calculation of gonadal doses arising from different radiotherapeutic procedures is described. The measurement of scatter factors to the gonads from superficial and deep therapy is detailed and the analytic fits to the experimental data, as a function of field position, field size and beam energy are given. The data used to calculate the gonadal doses from treatments using linear accelerators, teletherapy and sealed sources are described and the analytic fits to the data given

  1. Effects of low doses

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  2. Intragenic tandem repeat variation between Legionella pneumophila strains

    Jarraud Sophie

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial genomes harbour a large number of tandem repeats, yet the possible phenotypic effects of those found within the coding region of genes are only beginning to be examined. Evidence exists from other organisms that these repeats can be involved in the evolution of new genes, gene regulation, adaptation, resistance to environmental stresses, and avoidance of the immune system. Results In this study, we have investigated the presence and variability in copy number of intragenic tandemly repeated sequences in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Within the genome of the Philadelphia strain, we have identified 26 intragenic tandem repeat sequences using conservative selection criteria. Of these, seven were "polymorphic" in terms of repeat copy number between a large number of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. These strains were collected from a wide variety of environments and patients in several geographical regions. Within this panel of strains, all but one of these seven genes exhibited statistically different patterns in repeat copy number between samples from different origins (environmental, clinical, and hot springs. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that intragenic tandem repeats could play a role in virulence and adaptation to different environments. While tandem repeats are an increasingly popular focus of molecular typing studies in prokaryotes, including in L. pneumophila, this study is the first examining the difference in tandem repeat distribution as a function of clinical or environmental origin.

  3. Outbreak of sarcoptic mange in alpacas (Vicugna pacos) and control with repeated subcutaneous ivermectin injections.

    Twomey, D F; Birch, E S; Schock, A

    2009-02-01

    An outbreak of sarcoptic mange was investigated in an alpaca herd. Clinical disease occurred 2 months after the introduction of four alpacas with dry seborrhoeic skin lesions, the cause of which was not investigated. Initially a group of females was affected, despite repeated topical treatment with ivermectin at a dose of 0.5mg/kg bodyweight. One female died and post-mortem examination indicated sarcoptic mange as the cause of death. Infection with Sarcoptes scabiei was also demonstrated on microscopic examination of skin scrapes taken from clinically affected cohorts. Later in the outbreak, a separate group of male alpacas was also affected. Treatment using subcutaneous ivermectin injections at a dose of 0.2mg/kg, administered at 14-day intervals, was evaluated. During this course of treatment, another female died. A successful response in the other alpacas was eventually reached following 12 treatments of the female group and 8 treatments of the male group. PMID:19019545

  4. A multiple-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon in cancer patients.

    Sherwin, S A; Knost, J A; Fein, S; Abrams, P G; Foon, K A; Ochs, J J; Schoenberger, C; Maluish, A E; Oldham, R K

    1982-11-19

    Eighty-one patients with a variety of refractory disseminated malignant neoplasms have been treated in the first multiple fixed-dose phase I trial of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFL-rA). Each patient received IFL-rA by intramuscular injection, three times weekly for 28 days. Dosages were escalated in different patients from 1 to 136 x 10(6) units per injection. The toxic reactions seen with IFL-rA resembled those of nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon and included fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, myalgia, headache, occasional nausea and vomiting, and dose-dependent reversible leukopenia and hepatic transaminase elevations. The pharmacokinetics of IFL-rA were also comparable with nonrecombinant leukocyte interferon. Objective evidence of antitumor activity was seen in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, and melanoma, indicating that IFL-rA, the first genetically engineered biological response modifier available for testing in cancer patients, is biologically active in vivo. PMID:6752447

  5. Effects of exercise conditioning on thermoregulatory responses to repeated administration of chlorpyrifos

    little is known about the effects of physical activity (i.e., exercise training) on susceptibility to environmental toxicants. Chloropyrifos (CHP), an organophosphate (OP) insecticide, affects thermoregulation, causing a cute period of hypothermia followed by a delayed fever. Since exercise conditioning alters the thermo regulatory responses of rodents, this study examined whether exercise training would alter the thermo regulatory response to repeated CHP administration in the female Sprague-Dawley rat. Core temperature (Tc) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radio telemetry in rats housed at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 22 deg. C. The rats either were provided with continuous access to running wheels (exercise group) or were housed in standard cages without wheels (sedentary group). The exercise group rats ran predominately at night with an average of 7.6 km/24 h. After 8 weeks the rats in both groups were garaged daily with corn oil or 10 mg/kg HP (dissolved in corn oil) for 4 days. CHP induced an immediate hypothermic response followed by a delayed fever throughout the next day in the sedentary group rats after the first three doses of CHP. The exercise group rats showed no hypothermia after the first dose of CHP. However, they became hypothermic after the second and third doses of CHP. The exercise group rats developed a smaller daytime fever after each dose of CHP compared to the sedentary group rats. Overall, exercise training attenuated the hypothermic and febrile effects of repeated CHP. Thus, the data suggest that a sedentary lifestyle may increase the sensitivity to OP insecticides. Exercise training was also associated with a more rapid recovery of plasma cholinesterase activity

  6. Biological effects of repeated exposure of beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. IV

    This experiment is being conducted to study the behavior and long-term biological effects in Beagle dogs of 144Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles in repeated inhalation exposures for comparison with similar data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every eight weeks for two years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. The 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures in the first and second groups were planned to yield a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approximately equal to 35,000 rads and those in the third group approximately equal to 17,000 rads within two years after the first exposure. Singly exposed dogs that had died with pulmonary tumors when this experiment was initiated had cumulative doses to death of 29,000 to 61,000 rads. All 13 exposures have been completed. One dog in the 4.5-μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 771 days after first exposure with emaciation, adrenal cortical degeneration and bone marrow aplasia. One control dog died accidentally during anesthesia. During the past year, two additional dogs have died. One dog in the repeated 2.5-μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 1256 days after the first exposure with radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis and a control dog died at 1052 days with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The remaining 32 dogs appear to be in good physical condition except for a persistent lymphopenia at approximately equal to 4 years after the first exposure. They are being maintained for life span observations

  7. Global Repeat Map Method for Higher Order Repeat Alpha Satellites in Human and Chimpanzee Genomes (Build 37.2 Assembly)

    Glunčić, Matko; Rosandić, Marija; Jelovina, Denis; Dekanić, Krešimir; Vlahović, Ines; Paar, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Alpha satellites are tandemly repeated sequences found in all human centromeres. In addition to the functional and structural role within centromere they are also a suitable model for evolutionary stud-ies, because of being subject to concerted evolution. The Global Repeat Map (GRM) algorithm is a convenient computational tool to determine consensus repeat units and their exact size within a given genomic sequence, both of monomeric and higher-order (HOR) type. Using GRM, we identify in Build...

  8. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B.; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility...

  9. Effect of Intraperitoneal Administered Ginseng Total Saponins on Hyperalgesia Induced by Repeated Intramuscular Injection of Acidic Saline in Rats

    Kim, Won Joong; Kang, Hyun; Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Geun Joo; Shin, Hwa Yong; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Choel; Kim, Su Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive activity of ginseng total saponins (GTS) on hyperalgesia induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline in rats and to examine the mechanisms involved. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with a 0.9% saline vehicle or various doses of GTS after the development of hyperalgesia. Rats were then injected with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or naloxone 10 min before GTS injection. The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was ass...

  10. Development of simple sequence repeat markers in cymbopogon species.

    Kumar, Jitendra; Verma, Vijeshwar; Shahi, Ashok Kumar; Qazi, Gulam Nab; Balyan, Harindra Singh

    2007-03-01

    The genus Cymbopogon comprises about 140 species, which produce characteristic aromatic essential oils. However, the phenotypic identification of species of Cymbopogon has been difficult as a result of widespread occurrence of natural variants, which differ in ploidy levels and chemotaxonomic complexities. Therefore, we have developed a set of simple sequence repeat markers from a genomic library of Cymbopogon jwarancusa to help in the precise identification of the species (including accessions) of Cymbopogon. For this purpose, we isolated 16 simple sequence repeat containing genomic deoxyribonucleic acid clones of C. jwarancusa, which contained a total of 32 simple sequence repeats with a range of 1 to 3 simple sequence repeats per clone. The majority (68.8%) of the 32 simple sequence repeats comprised dinucleotide repeat motifs followed by simple sequence repeats with trinucleotide (21.8%) and other higher order repeat motifs. Eighteen (81.8%) of the 22 designed primers for the above simple sequence repeats amplified products of expected sizes, when tried with genomic DNA of C. jwarancusa, the source species. Thirteen (72.2%) of the 18 functional primers detected polymorphism among the three species of Cymbopogon (C. flexuosus, C. pendulus and C. jwarancusa) and amplified a total of 95 alleles (range 1-18 alleles) with a PIC value of 0.44 to 0.96 per simple sequence repeat. Thus, the higher allelic range and high level of polymorphism demonstrated by the newly developed simple sequence repeat markers are likely to have many applications such as in improvement of essential oil quality by authentication of Cymbopogon species and varieties and mapping or tagging the genes controlling agronomically important traits of essential oils, which can further be utilized in marker assisted breeding. PMID:17318781

  11. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    Judge Bryan S; James Laura P; Green Jody L; Heard Kennon J; Zolot Liza; Rhyee Sean; Dart Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS) are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from ...

  12. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  13. Biological effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    A study was performed with the aim to examine whether the progeny of cells that had been repeatedly irradiated with low doses of gamma rays will change their sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Four mammalian cell lines were used in the experiment. It was found that the progeny of cells irradiated in this way do not change their sensitivity to gamma rays but would change their sensitivity to various cytostatics drugs. (A.K.)

  14. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  15. Low chronic radiation doses

    In the context of the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents where large territories have been contaminated durably and as consequence where local populations are submitted to chronic low radiation doses, IRSN (French institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety) has led various studies to assess the impact of chronic low doses. Studies about the effects of uranium on marine life show that the impact is strongly dependent on the initial state of the individual (zebra Danio rerio fish). The studies about the impact of chronic low doses due to cesium and strontium contamination show different bio-accumulations: 137Cs is found in the animal's whole body with higher concentrations in muscles and kidneys while 90Sr is found almost exclusively in bones and it accumulates more in female mice than in males. The study dedicated to the sanitary impact of chronic low doses on the workers of the nuclear industry shows a higher risk for developing a leukemia, a pleural cancer or a melanoma but no correlation appears between doses and the appearance of the pleural cancer or the melanoma. (A.C.)

  16. Turkish population data on the short tandem repeat locus TPOX

    Vural, B; Poda, M; Atlioglu, E;

    1998-01-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals.......Allele and genotype frequencies were determined for the STR (short tandem repeat) locus TPOX in a random Turkish population sample of 200 individuals....

  17. Large Polyglutamine Repeats Cause Muscle Degeneration in SCA17 Mice

    Shanshan Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases, large polyQ repeats cause juvenile cases with different symptoms than those of adult-onset patients, who carry smaller expanded polyQ repeats. The mechanisms behind the differential pathology mediated by different polyQ repeat lengths remain unknown. By studying knockin mouse models of spinal cerebellar ataxia-17 (SCA17, we found that a large polyQ (105 glutamines in the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP preferentially causes muscle degeneration and reduces the expression of muscle-specific genes. Direct expression of TBP with different polyQ repeats in mouse muscle revealed that muscle degeneration is mediated only by the large polyQ repeats. Different polyQ repeats differentially alter TBP’s interaction with neuronal and muscle-specific transcription factors. As a result, the large polyQ repeat decreases the association of MyoD with TBP and DNA promoters. Our findings suggest that specific alterations in protein interactions by large polyQ repeats may account for the unique pathology in juvenile polyQ diseases.

  18. Vocabulary Learning through Assisted and Unassisted Repeated Reading

    Webb, Stuart; Chang, Anna C-S.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research investigating the effects of unassisted and assisted repeated reading has primarily focused on how each approach may contribute to improvement in reading comprehension and fluency. Incidental learning of the form and meaning of unknown or partially known words encountered through assisted and unassisted repeated reading has yet…

  19. Development of Repeated Sprint Ability in Talented Youth Basketball Players

    te Wierike, Sanne C. M.; de Jong, Mark C.; Tromp, Eveline J. Y.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Malina, Robert M.; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Visscher, Chris

    2014-01-01

    te Wierike, SCM, de Jong, MC, Tromp, EJY, Vuijk, PJ, Lemmink, KAPM, Malina, RM, Elferink-Gemser, MT, and Visscher, C. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 928-934, 2014-Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated i

  20. PILER-CR: Fast and accurate identification of CRISPR repeats

    Edgar Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of prokaryotic genomes has recently revealed the presence of CRISPR elements: short, highly conserved repeats separated by unique sequences of similar length. The distinctive sequence signature of CRISPR repeats can be found using general-purpose repeat- or pattern-finding software tools. However, the output of such tools is not always ideal for studying these repeats, and significant effort is sometimes needed to build additional tools and perform manual analysis of the output. Results We present PILER-CR, a program specifically designed for the identification and analysis of CRISPR repeats. The program executes rapidly, completing a 5 Mb genome in around 5 seconds on a current desktop computer. We validate the algorithm by manual curation and by comparison with published surveys of these repeats, finding that PILER-CR has both high sensitivity and high specificity. We also present a catalogue of putative CRISPR repeats identified in a comprehensive analysis of 346 prokaryotic genomes. Conclusion PILER-CR is a useful tool for rapid identification and classification of CRISPR repeats. The software is donated to the public domain. Source code and a Linux binary are freely available at http://www.drive5.com/pilercr.

  1. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty;

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original resu...

  2. Contagion and Repeat Offending among Urban Juvenile Delinquents

    Mennis, Jeremy; Harris, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the role of repeat offending and spatial contagion in juvenile delinquency recidivism using a database of 7166 male juvenile offenders sent to community-based programs by the Family Court of Philadelphia. Results indicate evidence of repeat offending among juvenile delinquents, particularly for drug offenders. The…

  3. Exploring bacterial community structure and function associated with atrazine biodegradation in repeatedly treated soils.

    Fang, Hua; Lian, Jianjun; Wang, Huifang; Cai, Lin; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-04-01

    Substantial application of the herbicide atrazine in agriculture leads to persistent contamination, which may damage the succeeding crops and pose potential threats to soil ecology and environmental health. Here, the degradation characteristics of atrazine and dynamic change of soil bacterial community structure and function as well as their relations were studied during three repeated treatments at the recommended, double, and five-fold doses. The results showed that the degradation half-life of atrazine obviously decreased with increased treatment frequency. Soil microbial functional diversity displayed a variation trend of suppression-recovery-stimulation, which was associated with increased degradation rate of atrazine. 16S amplicon sequencing was conducted to explore bacterial community structure and correlate the genus to potential atrazine degradation. A total of seven potentially atrazine-degrading bacterial genera were found including Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Bradyrhizobium, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium, Mycobacterium, and Clostridium. These bacterial genera showed almost complete atrazine degradation pathways including dechlorination, dealkylation, hydroxylation, and ring cleavage. Furthermore, the relative abundance of four of them (i.e., Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Methylobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium) increased with treatment frequency and atrazine concentration, suggesting that they may participate in atrazine degradation during repeated treatments. Our findings reveal the potential relationship between atrazine degradation and soil bacterial community structure in repeatedly treated soils. PMID:25603295

  4. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  5. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  7. Assessment of internal doses

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  8. Dose Reduction Techniques

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program

  9. Progressive GAA.TTC repeat expansion in human cell lines.

    Scott Ditch

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansion is the genetic basis for a sizeable group of inherited neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA.TTC repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene. The expanded repeat reduces FXN mRNA expression and the length of the repeat tract is proportional to disease severity. Somatic expansion of the GAA.TTC repeat sequence in disease-relevant tissues is thought to contribute to the progression of disease severity during patient aging. Previous models of GAA.TTC instability have not been able to produce substantial levels of expansion within an experimentally useful time frame, which has limited our understanding of the molecular basis for this expansion. Here, we present a novel model for studying GAA.TTC expansion in human cells. In our model system, uninterrupted GAA.TTC repeat sequences display high levels of genomic instability, with an overall tendency towards progressive expansion. Using this model, we characterize the relationship between repeat length and expansion. We identify the interval between 88 and 176 repeats as being an important length threshold where expansion rates dramatically increase. We show that expansion levels are affected by both the purity and orientation of the repeat tract within the genomic context. We further demonstrate that GAA.TTC expansion in our model is independent of cell division. Using unique reporter constructs, we identify transcription through the repeat tract as a major contributor to GAA.TTC expansion. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for GAA.TTC expansion in human cells.

  10. Alu repeats: A source for the genesis of primate microsatellites

    Arcot, S.S.; Batzer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wang, Zhenyuan [Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    As a result of their abundance, relatively uniform distribution, and high degree of polymorphism, microsatellites and minisatellites have become valuable tools in genetic mapping, forensic identity testing, and population studies. In recent years, a number of microsatellite repeats have been found to be associated with Alu interspersed repeated DNA elements. The association of an Alu element with a microsatellite repeat could result from the integration of an Alu element within a preexisting microsatellite repeat. Alternatively, Alu elements could have a direct role in the origin of microsatellite repeats. Errors introduced during reverse transcription of the primary transcript derived from an Alu {open_quotes}master{close_quote} gene or the accumulation of random mutations in the middle A-rich regions and oligo(dA)-rich tails of Alu elements after insertion and subsequent expansion and contraction of these sequences could result in the genesis of a microsatellite repeat. We have tested these hypotheses by a direct evolutionary comparison of the sequences of some recent Alu elements that are found only in humans and are absent from nonhuman primates, as well as some older Alu elements that are present at orthologous positions in a number of nonhuman primates. The origin of {open_quotes}young{close_quotes} Alu insertions, absence of sequences that resemble microsatellite repeats at the orthologous loci in chimpanzees, and the gradual expansion of microsatellite repeats in some old Alu repeats at orthologous positions within the genomes of a number of nonhuman primates suggest that Alu elements are a source for the genesis of primate microsatellite repeats. 48 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  12. Lopinavir/ritonavir dosing during pregnancy in Brazil and maternal/infant laboratory abnormalities

    Mario Ferreira Peixoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe laboratory abnormalities among HIV-infected women and their infants with standard and increased lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r dosing during the third trimester of pregnancy. METHODS: We evaluated data on pregnant women from NISDI cohorts (2002-2009 enrolled in Brazil, who received at least 28 days of LPV/r during the third pregnancy trimester and gave birth to singleton infants. RESULTS: 164 women received LPV/r standard dosing [(798/198 or 800/200 mg/day (Group 1] and 70 increased dosing [(> 800/200 mg/day (Group 2]. Group 1 was more likely to have advanced clinical disease and to use ARVs for treatment, and less likely to have CD4 counts > 500 cells/mm³. Mean plasma viral load was higher in Group 2. There were statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful, differences between groups in mean AST, ALT, cholesterol, and triglycerides. The proportion of women with Grade 3 or 4 adverse events was very low, with no statistically significant differences between groups in severe adverse events related to ALT, AST, total bilirubin, cholesterol, or triglycerides. There were statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful, differences between infant groups in ALT and creatinine. The proportion of infants with Grade 3 or 4 adverse events was very low, and there were no statistically significant differences in severe adverse events related to ALT, AST, BUN, or creatinine. CONCLUSION: The proportions of women and infants with severe laboratory adverse events were very low. Increased LPV/r dosing during the third trimester of pregnancy appears to be safe for HIV-infected women and their infants.

  13. Toxicological Profile of Ultrapure 2,29,3,4,49,5,59- Heptachlorbiphenyl (PCB 180) in Adult Rats

    Viluksela, Matti; Heikkinen, Päivi; van der Ven, Leo T. M.; Rendel, Filip; Roos, Robert; Esteban, Javier; Korkalainen, Merja; Lensu, Sanna; Miettinen, Hanna M.; Savolainen, Kari; Sankari, Satu; Lilienthal, Hellmuth; Adamsson, Annika; Toppari, Jorma; Herlin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: PCB 180 is a persistent non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (NDL-PCB) abundantly present in food and the environment. Risk characterization of NDL-PCBs is confounded by the presence of highly potent dioxin-like impurities. We used ultrapure PCB 180 to characterize its toxicity profile in a 28-day repeat dose toxicity study in young adult rats extended to cover endocrine and behavioral effects. Using a loading dose/maintenance dose regimen, groups of 5 males and 5 ...

  14. Breast dose variability in a bi-racial population undergoing screening mammography

    This study evaluated individual and population dose variability during screening mammography among 570 white and black women in South Carolina, USA. Aspects of dosimetry that were considered include compressed breast thickness (CBT), number of films per screening session, and dose in previous or subsequent sessions. Breast dose was log-normally distributed in the population, with a geometric mean of 6.6 mGy per session. Doses were significantly higher for black women, for women with high CBT or who receive more than two views per breast, and for the mediolateral oblique, compared to the craniocaudal view. No relationship was observed between age and dose. Total dose per breast varied by a factor of 20 across the study population, but the individual's dose varied little among repeat screening sessions, especially after adjusting for the number of films received per session. These results may inform assessments of the projected risks of inducing breast cancer from screening mammography. (author)

  15. Actual trends in patients dose reduction in radiodiagnostic

    In our contribution we tried to survey the entrance surface doses, as well as dose area product measurements by studying 3 types of radiodiagnostic examinations (mammography, chest examination of children and fluoroscopy). The analysis of the obtained data and their comparison with reference values of European Union has demonstrated the significant role of radiation protection dosimetry as an integral part of quality assurance strategy in radiology. Optimisation in radiodiagnostic requires fulfilling the following criteria: - patient doses to be in accordance with accepted diagnostic practice; - patient doses to be as low as reasonably practicable in order to achieve the required diagnostic results; - professionals clinically and physically directing medical exposures to be familiar with typical doses, methods of measurements and means of dose reduction. One of the basic requirements for continuous quality improvement is the repeating cycle of patient dose measurements for determining the level of risk associated with particular radiological examination at given radiodiagnostic department. Beside the undeniable positive influence of Quality Assurance (QA) procedures possible negative effects should be avoided. The danger exist that the development of new techniques is slowed down by standardising all procedures and wide agreement in implementing of required modifications. Reaching of a consensus of a certain procedure became therefore a labour intensive and time-consuming process. (authors)

  16. Multiple-dose acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    Sahajwalla, C G; Ayres, J W

    1991-09-01

    Four different treatments of acetaminophen (Tylenol) were administered in multiple doses to eight healthy volunteers. Each treatment (325, 650, 825, and 1000 mg) was administered five times at 6-h intervals. Saliva acetaminophen concentration versus time profiles were determined. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared to determine whether acetaminophen exhibited linear or dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. For doses less than or equal to 18 mg/kg, area under the curve (AUC), half-life (t1/2), mean residence time (MRT), and ratio of AUC to dose for the first dose were compared with the last dose. No statistically significant differences were observed in dose-corrected AUC for the first or last dose among subjects or treatments. Half-lives and MRT were not significantly different among treatments for the first or the last dose. Statistically significant differences in t1/2 and MRT were noted (p less than 0.05) among subjects for the last dose. A plot of AUC versus dose for the first and the last doses exhibited a linear relationship. Dose-corrected saliva concentration versus time curves for the treatments were superimposable. Thus, acetaminophen exhibits linear pharmacokinetics for doses of 18 mg/kg or less. Plots of AUC versus dose for one subject who received doses higher than 18 mg/kg were curved, suggesting nonlinear behavior of acetaminophen in this subject. PMID:1800709

  17. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  18. Radiation doses to Finns

    The estimated annual radiation doses to Finns have been reduced in the recent years without any change in the actual radiation environment. This is because the radiation types have been changed. The risk factors will probably be changed again in the future, because recent studies show discrepancies in the neutron dosimetry concerning the city of Hiroshima. Neutron dosimetry discrepancy has been found between the predicted and estimated neutron radiation. The prediction of neutron radiation is calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, which have also been used when designing recommendations for the limits of radiation doses (ICRP60). Estimation of the neutron radiation is made on the basis of measured neutron activation of materials in the city. The estimated neutron dose beyond 1 km is two to ten, or more, times as high as the predicted dose. This discrepancy is important, because the most relevant distances with respect to radiation risk evaluation are between 1 and 2 km. Because of this discrepancy, the present radiation risk factors for gamma and neutron radiation, which rely on the Monte Carlo calculations, are false, too. The recommendations of ICRP60 have been adopted in a few countries, including Finland, and they affect the planned common limits of the EU. It is questionable whether happiness is increased by adopting false limits, even if they are common. (orig.) (2 figs., 1 tab.)

  19. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  20. Correlation between zoledronic acid infusion and repeat vertebroplasty surgery in osteoporotic patients.

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Niu, Chi-Chien; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2016-05-01

    Objective The incidence of bone fractures rapidly increases as people age, mostly due to bone loss resulting from osteoporosis. The purpose of this study is to compare the rates of repeat vertebroplasty in osteoporotic patients treated with or without zoledronic acid (ZOL) infusion following initial vertebroplasty. Research design and methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of osteoporotic patients who underwent vertebroplasty from June 2009 to June 2012. Patients with existing vertebral fracture(s) were retrospectively divided into two groups according to whether or not they received zoledronic acid infusion after initial vertebroplasty. Zoledronic acid infusion was intravenously administered once a year for three consecutive years, as a single 5 mg dose in 100 mL solution infused over at least 15 minutes. The primary efficacy variable was the number of patients requiring repeat vertebroplasty procedures after the initial surgery due to subsequent vertebral fractures. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the risk ratios of repeat vertebroplasty between these two groups. Results A total of 1646 patients, including 456 males and 1190 females (age range: 65-89 years), were enrolled. Compared to the 1595 patients who did not receive osteoporosis medication, the 51 patients treated with zoledronic acid infusion demonstrated a significantly lower rate of repeat vertebroplasty. In the ZOL-treated group, only 4% of the patients (2/51) required a second vertebroplasty, compared to 13% (206/1595) in the non-ZOL-treated group (p = 0.032). Conclusions The results indicate that osteoporotic patients who undergo vertebroplasty are significantly less likely to require reoperation if treated with zoledronic acid infusion. However, since the number of male patients in the ZOL-treated group was limited, and since Taiwan's National Health System program does not cover the cost of receiving zoledronic acid infusions for male patients, the

  1. Repeating and not so Repeating Large Earthquakes in the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Singh, S.; Iglesias, A.; Perez-Campos, X.

    2013-12-01

    The rupture area and recurrence interval of large earthquakes in the mexican subduction zone are relatively small and almost the entire length of the zone has experienced a large (Mw≥7.0) earthquake in the last 100 years (Singh et al., 1981). Several segments have experienced multiple large earthquakes in this time period. However, as the rupture areas of events prior to 1973 are only approximately known, the recurrence periods are uncertain. Large earthquakes occurred in the Ometepec, Guerrero, segment in 1937, 1950, 1982 and 2012 (Singh et al., 1981). In 1982, two earthquakes (Ms 6.9 and Ms 7.0) occurred about 4 hours apart, one apparently downdip from the other (Astiz & Kanamori, 1984; Beroza et al. 1984). The 2012 earthquake on the other hand had a magnitude of Mw 7.5 (globalcmt.org), breaking approximately the same area as the 1982 doublet, but with a total scalar moment about three times larger than the 1982 doublet combined. It therefore seems that 'repeat earthquakes' in the Ometepec segment are not necessarily very similar one to another. The Central Oaxaca segment broke in large earthquakes in 1928 (Mw7.7) and 1978 (Mw7.7) . Seismograms for the two events, recorded at the Wiechert seismograph in Uppsala, show remarkable similarity, suggesting that in this area, large earthquakes can repeat. The extent to which the near-trench part of the fault plane participates in the ruptures is not well understood. In the Ometepec segment, the updip portion of the plate interface broke during the 25 Feb 1996 earthquake (Mw7.1), which was a slow earthquake and produced anomalously low PGAs (Iglesias et al., 2003). Historical records indicate that a great tsunamigenic earthquake, M~8.6, occurred in the Oaxaca region in 1787, breaking the Central Oaxaca segment together with several adjacent segments (Suarez & Albini 2009). Whether the updip portion of the fault broke in this event remains speculative, although plausible based on the large tsunami. Evidence from the

  2. Repeatability of agronomic traits in Panicum maximum (Jacq.) hybrids.

    Braz, T G S; Fonseca, D M; Jank, L; Cruz, C D; Martuscello, J A

    2015-01-01

    When evaluating plants, in particular perennial species, it is common to obtain repeated measures of a given trait from the same individual to evaluate the traits' repeatability in successive harvests. The degree of correlation among these measures defines the coefficient of repeatability, which has been widely utilized in the study of forage traits of interest for breeding. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the repeatability of agronomic traits in Panicum maximum hybrids. Hybrids from three progenies totaling 320 hybrids were evaluated in an incomplete-block design, with consideration of production and morpho-agronomic traits. Of the production traits, total dry matter and leaf dry matter showed the highest repeatability and varied from 0.540 to 0.769, whereas stem dry matter had lower coefficients (0.265-0.632). Among the morpho-agronomic traits, plant height and incidence of Bipolaris maydis had higher coefficients (0.118-0.460). The repeatability values of the agronomic traits were low-to-moderate, and six evaluations were sufficient to provide accuracy in the selection of hybrids regarding total dry matter, leaf dry matter, plant height, and incidence of B. maydis, whereas the other traits require more repeated measures to increase reliability in the prediction of their response. PMID:26782581

  3. A De Novo Genome Assembly Algorithm for Repeats and Nonrepeats

    Shuaibin Lian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Next generation sequencing platforms can generate shorter reads, deeper coverage, and higher throughput than those of the Sanger sequencing. These short reads may be assembled de novo before some specific genome analyses. Up to now, the performances of assembling repeats of these current assemblers are very poor. Results. To improve this problem, we proposed a new genome assembly algorithm, named SWA, which has four properties: (1 assembling repeats and nonrepeats; (2 adopting a new overlapping extension strategy to extend each seed; (3 adopting sliding window to filter out the sequencing bias; and (4 proposing a compensational mechanism for low coverage datasets. SWA was evaluated and validated in both simulations and real sequencing datasets. The accuracy of assembling repeats and estimating the copy numbers is up to 99% and 100%, respectively. Finally, the extensive comparisons with other eight leading assemblers show that SWA outperformed others in terms of completeness and correctness of assembling repeats and nonrepeats. Conclusions. This paper proposed a new de novo genome assembly method for resolving complex repeats. SWA not only can detect where repeats or nonrepeats are but also can assemble them completely from NGS data, especially for assembling repeats. This is the advantage over other assemblers.

  4. Response to the argument on the risk of cancer with chest CT screening. Is low-dose chest CT safe?

    The steady increase in the annual number of chest CT screening has become a worldwide concern because of its associated risk of lung cancer. Epidemiological studies, however, have shown that repeated exposure to low-dose radiation does not increase the risk of lung cancer. In addition, a recent randomized controlled study on chest CT screening has shown its usefulness for reducing lung cancer mortality. We reviewed the risk of lung cancer after repeated exposure to low-dose radiation, the efficacy of chest CT screening, and device technology for reducing the irradiation dose. (author)

  5. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    Kraan, Aafke C., E-mail: aafke.kraan@pi.infn.it [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive

  6. Sequence conservation of an avian centromeric repeated DNA component.

    Madsen, C S; Brooks, J E; de Kloet, E; de Kloet, S R

    1994-06-01

    The approximately 190-bp centromeric repeat monomers of the spur-winged lapwing (Vanellus spinosus, Charadriidae), the Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis, Phoenicopteridae), the sarus crane (Grus antigone, Gruidae), parrots (Psittacidae), waterfowl (Anatidae), and the merlin (Falco columbarius, Falconidae) contain elements that are interspecifically highly variable, as well as elements (trinucleotides and higher order oligonucleotides) that are highly conserved in sequence and relative location within the repeat. Such conservation suggests that the centromeric repeats of these avian species have evolved from a common ancestral sequence that may date from very early stages of avian radiation. PMID:8034177

  7. Analysis of repeated outcome measures from longitudinal studies

    Yuanjia WANG; Naihua DUAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ In many clinical studies repeated measurements of an outcome are collected over time.For example,in an 8-week study of treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder,the severity of the disorder may be measured weekly using the Yale-Brown-Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder-Scale (YBOCS).For each study participant who completes the study,there will be nine repeated measures of YBOCS (a baseline assessment plus eight assessments during the course of treatment).Such a study in which participants are followed and measured repeatedly over time is called a longitudinal study and the resulting data are called longitudinal data.

  8. Repeatability of nest morphology in African weaver birds

    Walsh, Patrick T.; Hansell, Mike; Borello, Wendy D.; Healy, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    It is generally assumed that birds build nests according to a genetic ‘template’, little influenced by learning or memory. One way to confirm the role of genetics in nest building is to assess the repeatability of nest morphology with repeated nest attempts. Solitary weaver birds, which build multiple nests in a single breeding season, are a useful group with which to do this. Here we show that repeatability of nest morphology was low, but significant, in male Southern Masked weaver birds and...

  9. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-07-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  10. Elimination of Repeated Occurrences in Image Search Engines

    Al Qaraleh, Saed

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method for elimination of repeated occurrences in image search engines. We have built software that: Compares images in a database, and marks only one copy of repeating files using a hashing technique. Marking one of the repeating images will lead to faster access and will eliminate the repetition of the same images more than once. The software can work periodically, for dealing with any updates on the image database. We have developed another version of the software to be mu...

  11. On the error analysis of quantum repeaters with encoding

    Epping, Michael; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2016-03-01

    Losses of optical signals scale exponentially with the distance. Quantum repeaters are devices that tackle these losses in quantum communication by splitting the total distance into shorter parts. Today two types of quantum repeaters are subject of research in the field of quantum information: Those that use two-way communication and those that only use one-way communication. Here we explain the details of the performance analysis for repeaters of the second type. Furthermore we compare the two different schemes. Finally we show how the performance analysis generalizes to large-scale quantum networks.

  12. Secure quantum network coding for controlled repeater networks

    Shang, Tao; Li, Jiao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2016-04-01

    To realize efficient quantum communication based on quantum repeater, we propose a secure quantum network coding scheme for controlled repeater networks, which adds a controller as a trusted party and is able to control the process of EPR-pair distribution. As the key operations of quantum repeater, local operations and quantum communication are designed to adopt quantum one-time pad to enhance the function of identity authentication instead of local operations and classical communication. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can defend against active attacks for quantum communication and realize long-distance quantum communication with minimal resource consumption.

  13. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  14. Effects of Proton Radiation Dose, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    Ware, J.H.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X. S.; Rusek, A.; Kennedy, A R

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05–0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals...

  15. Feasibility of stopping paclitaxel premedication after two doses in patients not experiencing a previous infusion hypersensitivity reaction

    Berger, Michael J.; Dunlea, Leslie J.; Rettig, Amy E.; Lustberg, Maryam B.; Phillips, Gary S.; Charles L Shapiro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Paclitaxel-based chemotherapy continues to be an integral component in the treatment of many solid tumors. Prolonged use of paclitaxel may result in repeated doses of premedications and potential unwanted side effects. Infusion hypersensitivity reactions occurring beyond the second dose are infrequent and not well characterized. We hypothesized that patients whose paclitaxel premedications were discontinued after two doses were unlikely to experience infusion hypersensitivity reaction...

  16. Repeated morphine treatment influences operant and spatial learning differentially

    Mei-Na WANG; Zhi-Fang DONG; Jun CAO; Lin XU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether repeated morphine exposure or prolonged withdrawal could influence operant and spatial learning differentially. Methods Animals were chronically treated with morphine or subjected to morphine withdrawal. Then, they were subjected to two kinds of learning: operant conditioning and spatial learning.Results The acquisition of both simple appetitive and cued operant learning was impaired after repeated morphine treatment. Withdrawal for 5 weeks alleviated the impairments. Single morphine exposure disrupted the retrieval of operant memory but had no effect on rats after 5-week withdrawal. Contrarily, neither chronic morphine exposure nor 5-week withdrawal influenced spatial learning task of the Morris water maze. Nevertheless, the retrieval of spatial memory was impaired by repeated morphine exposure but not by 5-week withdrawal. Conclusion These observations suggest that repeated morphine exposure can influence different types of learning at different aspects, implicating that the formation of opiate addiction may usurp memory mechanisms differentially.

  17. Quantitation of Leishmania lipophosphoglycan repeat units by capillary electrophoresis.

    Barron, Tamara L; Turco, Salvatore J

    2006-04-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored lipophosphoglycan (LPG) of Leishmania is the dominant cell surface glycoconjugate of these pathogenic parasites. LPG is structurally characterized by a series of phosphoglycan repeat units. Determining the number of repeat units per LPG molecule has proven difficult using current technologies, such as mass spectrometry. As an alternative method to quantitate the number of repeat units in LPG, a procedure based on capillary electrophoretic analysis of the proportion of mannose to 2,5-anhydromannose (derived from the nonacetylated glucosamine of the GPI anchor of LPG) was developed. The CE-based technique is sensitive and relatively rapid compared to GC-MS-based protocols. Its application was demonstrated in quantitating the number of LPG repeat units from several species of Leishmania as well as from two life-cycle stages of these organisms. PMID:16310310

  18. Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Genomes of Rhizobia

    GAO Ya-mei; HAN Yi-qiang; TANG Hui; SUN Dong-mei; WANG Yan-jie; WANG Wei-dong

    2008-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites, as genetic markers, are ubiquitous in genomes of various organisms. The analysis of SSR in rhizobia genome provides useful information for a variety of applications in population genetics of rhizobia. We analyzed the occurrences, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs, the most common in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Mesorhizobium loti, and Sinorhizobium meliloti genomes se-quenced in the microorganisms tandem repeats database, and SSRs in the three species genomes were compared with each other. The result showed that there were 1 410, 859, and 638 SSRs in B. japonicum, M. loti, and 5. meliloti genomes, respectively. In the genomes of B. japonicum, M. loti, and 5. meliloti, tetranucleotide, pentanucleotide, and hexanucleotide repeats were more abundant and indicated higher mutation rates in these species. The least abundance was mononucleotide repeat. The SSRs type and distribution were similar among these species.

  19. Discriminant analysis for repeated measures data: a review

    LisaLix

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Discriminant analysis (DA encompasses procedures for classifying observations into groups (i.e., predictive discriminative analysis and describing the relative importance of variables for distinguishing amongst groups (i.e., descriptive discriminative analysis. In recent years, a number of developments have occurred in DA procedures for the analysis of data from repeated measures designs. Specifically, DA procedures have been developed for repeated measures data characterized by missing observations and/or unbalanced measurement occasions, as well as high-dimensional data in which measurements are collected repeatedly on two or more variables. This paper reviews the literature on DA procedures for univariate and multivariate repeated measures data, focusing on covariance pattern and linear mixed-effects models. A numeric example illustrates their implementation using SAS software.

  20. Lack of Stem Cells May Be Key to Repeat Miscarriages

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157663.html Lack of Stem Cells May Be Key to Repeat Miscarriages Potential clues ... March 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of stem cells in the lining of the uterus may cause ...

  1. Doses from radiation exposure

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  2. An absorbed dose microcalorimeter

    A graphite microcalorimeter is described for use as a primary standard of ionising radiation absorbed dose; its place in the hierarchy of Australian ionising radiation standards is discussed. A disc shaped absorber is supported on pins within three nested graphite jackets and an insulated vacuum vessel. Calibration heating is by thermistor, the feasibility of this was verified by computer modelling. Adiabatic and heat-flow modes of operation are described, and calculations of heat transfer between the various graphite parts are summarised. Carbon and water phantoms were built for the evaluation of correction factors for the microcalorimeter, and for the calibration of radiotherapy dosemeters. The microcalorimeter will be used as a working standard for the calibration of dosemeters in terms of absorbed dose for the x-ray, gamma-ray and electron radiotherapy beams commonly used in Australia today

  3. The cost of occupational dose

    Two methods of cost benefit analysis for use in occupational doses are described. The first assumes that the cost of health detriment is simply proportional to the collective dose equivalent. The second evaluates risk changes which explicitly consider the size of population at risk and the significance of the risk increment to individuals; thus the cost of detriment per collective dose equivalent increases with increasing dose per caput. The results from the two methods are different and optimisation depends crucially on the specific relationships between all the variables. A fixed conversion factor will ignore individual dose levels, and in attempting to reduce both protection and detriment costs will tend to increase average individual doses. A variable conversion factor which increases with increasing average individual doses will, in contrast, explicitly account for the distribution of individual doses in the assessment of detriment costs, will discriminate against high individual doses, and will tend to select options on a more case by case basis. (UK)

  4. A De Novo Genome Assembly Algorithm for Repeats and Nonrepeats

    Shuaibin Lian; Qingyan Li; Zhiming Dai; Qian Xiang; Xianhua Dai

    2014-01-01

    Background. Next generation sequencing platforms can generate shorter reads, deeper coverage, and higher throughput than those of the Sanger sequencing. These short reads may be assembled de novo before some specific genome analyses. Up to now, the performances of assembling repeats of these current assemblers are very poor. Results. To improve this problem, we proposed a new genome assembly algorithm, named SWA, which has four properties: (1) assembling repeats and nonrepeats; (2) adopting a...

  5. Learning, Teaching, and Turn Taking in the Repeated Assignment Game

    Cason, Timothy N.; Sau-Him Paul Lau; Vai-Lam Mui

    2011-01-01

    History-dependent strategies are often used to support cooperation in repeated game models. Using the indefinitely repeated common-pool resource assignment game and a perfect stranger experimental design, this paper reports novel evidence that players who have successfully used an efficiency-enhancing turn taking strategy will teach other players in subsequent supergames to adopt this strategy. We find that subjects engage in turn taking frequently in both the Low Conflict and the High Confli...

  6. Memory-based quantum repeater in quantum information communication

    Wu Xiang-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies the quantum repeater in quantum information communication. We propose to introduce the photon buffer mechanism for storing photons, which uses fibre delay loops as photon memories and a programmable 1 × N switcher for distributing photon delay time. Meanwhile, we also consider entanglement purification and entanglement swapping restoration at an entanglement purification or entanglement swapping failure and introduce a protection link mechanism that allows the photonic quantum repeater of a broken connection to initiate a connection restoration process.

  7. The Dynamics of Repeat Migration: A Markov Chain Analysis

    Zimmermann, Klaus F.; Amelie F. Constant

    2003-01-01

    While the literature has established that there is substantial and highly selective return migration, the growing importance of repeat migration has been largely ignored. Using Markov chain analysis, this paper provides a modeling framework for repeated moves of migrants between the host and home countries. The Markov transition matrix between the states in two consecutive periods is parameterized and estimated using a logit specification and a large panel data with 14 waves. The analysis for...

  8. Allele-selective inhibition of trinucleotide repeat genes

    Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Expanded trinucleotide repeats cause Huntington’s disease (HD) and many other neurodegenerative disorders. There are no cures for these devastating illnesses and treatments are urgently needed. Each trinucleotide repeat disorder is the result of the mutation of just one gene, and agents that block expression of the mutant gene offer a promising option for treatment. Therapies that block expression of both mutant and wild-type alleles can have adverse effects, challenging researchers to develo...

  9. Repeatability and reproducibility of decisions by latent fingerprint examiners.

    Bradford T Ulery

    Full Text Available The interpretation of forensic fingerprint evidence relies on the expertise of latent print examiners. We tested latent print examiners on the extent to which they reached consistent decisions. This study assessed intra-examiner repeatability by retesting 72 examiners on comparisons of latent and exemplar fingerprints, after an interval of approximately seven months; each examiner was reassigned 25 image pairs for comparison, out of total pool of 744 image pairs. We compare these repeatability results with reproducibility (inter-examiner results derived from our previous study. Examiners repeated 89.1% of their individualization decisions, and 90.1% of their exclusion decisions; most of the changed decisions resulted in inconclusive decisions. Repeatability of comparison decisions (individualization, exclusion, inconclusive was 90.0% for mated pairs, and 85.9% for nonmated pairs. Repeatability and reproducibility were notably lower for comparisons assessed by the examiners as "difficult" than for "easy" or "moderate" comparisons, indicating that examiners' assessments of difficulty may be useful for quality assurance. No false positive errors were repeated (n = 4; 30% of false negative errors were repeated. One percent of latent value decisions were completely reversed (no value even for exclusion vs. of value for individualization. Most of the inter- and intra-examiner variability concerned whether the examiners considered the information available to be sufficient to reach a conclusion; this variability was concentrated on specific image pairs such that repeatability and reproducibility were very high on some comparisons and very low on others. Much of the variability appears to be due to making categorical decisions in borderline cases.

  10. Matching Probabilities: The Behavioral Law and Economics of Repeated Behavior

    Ehud Guttel; Alon Harel

    2004-01-01

    Individuals may repeatedly face a choice of whether to obey a legal rule. Conventional legal scholarship has long assumed that whether such a choice is made repeatedly or is a one-time event has little or no effect on individuals’ decisions. Following models of rational-choice theory, traditional legal analysis predicts that, in either case, individuals would behave in a way that maximizes their payoffs. A large body of experimental literature, however, suggests that individuals facing a recu...

  11. Failure Characteristic of Laser Cladding Samples on Repeated Impact

    SHI Shi-hong; ZHENG Qi-guang; FU Ge-yan; ZHANG Jin-ping

    2004-01-01

    Using self-made impact fatigue test instruments and related analytic devices,the mechanical components with laser cladding layer have been attempted.It is found that,on repeated impact force,several failure modes of the components include the surface cracks,surface plastic deformation,corrosive pitting and coat collapse,etc.The paper reported the test method and initial analysis conclusions about the unique failure characteristics of the mechanical components on repeated impact load.

  12. Repeatability of DTI-based skeletal muscle fiber tracking

    Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Wilson, Kevin J.; Ding, Zhaohua; Damon, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based muscle fiber tracking enables the measurement of muscle architectural parameters, such as pennation angle (θ) and fiber tract length (Lft), throughout the entire muscle. Little is known, however, about the repeatability of either the muscle architectural measures or the underlying diffusion measures. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the repeatability of DTI fiber tracking-based measurements and θ and Lft. Four DTI acquisitions were perf...

  13. Survey of extrachromosomal circular DNA derived from plant satellite repeats

    Macas Jiří

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Satellite repeats represent one of the most dynamic components of higher plant genomes, undergoing rapid evolutionary changes of their nucleotide sequences and abundance in a genome. However, the exact molecular mechanisms driving these changes and their eventual regulation are mostly unknown. It has been proposed that amplification and homogenization of satellite DNA could be facilitated by extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA molecules originated by recombination-based excision from satellite repeat arrays. While the models including eccDNA are attractive for their potential to explain rapid turnover of satellite DNA, the existence of satellite repeat-derived eccDNA has not yet been systematically studied in a wider range of plant genomes. Results We performed a survey of eccDNA corresponding to nine different families and three subfamilies of satellite repeats in ten species from various genera of higher plants (Arabidopsis, Oryza, Pisum, Secale, Triticum and Vicia. The repeats selected for this study differed in their monomer length, abundance, and chromosomal localization in individual species. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis followed by Southern blotting, eccDNA molecules corresponding to all examined satellites were detected. EccDNA occurred in the form of nicked circles ranging from hundreds to over eight thousand nucleotides in size. Within this range the circular molecules occurred preferentially in discrete size intervals corresponding to multiples of monomer or higher-order repeat lengths. Conclusion This work demonstrated that satellite repeat-derived eccDNA is common in plant genomes and thus it can be seriously considered as a potential intermediate in processes driving satellite repeat evolution. The observed size distribution of circular molecules suggests that they are most likely generated by molecular mechanisms based on homologous recombination requiring long stretches of sequence

  14. The landscape of DNA repeat elements in human heart failure

    Haider, Syed; Cordeddu, Lina; Robinson, Emma; Movassagh, Mehregan; Siggens, Lee; Vujic, Ana; Choy, Mun-Kit; Goddard, Martin; Lio', Pietro; Foo, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Background The epigenomes of healthy and diseased human hearts were recently examined by genome-wide DNA methylation profiling. Repetitive elements, heavily methylated in post-natal tissue, have variable methylation profiles in cancer but methylation of repetitive elements in the heart has never been examined. Results We analyzed repetitive elements from all repeat families in human myocardial samples, and found that satellite repeat elements were significantly hypomethylated in end-stage car...

  15. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats

    Hurles Matthew E

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Results Here, a statistical test to detect ge...

  16. Cortical Activation Changes during Repeated Laser Stimulation: A Magnetoencephalographic Study

    Stancak, Andrej; Alghamdi, Jamaan; Turo J. Nurmikko

    2011-01-01

    Repeated warm laser stimuli produce a progressive increase of the sensation of warmth and heat and eventually that of a burning pain. The pain resulting from repetitive warm stimuli is mediated by summated C fibre responses. To shed more light on the cortical changes associated with pain during repeated subnoxious warm stimution, we analysed magnetoencephalographic (MEG) evoked fields in eleven subjects during application of repetitive warm laser stimuli to the dorsum of the right hand. One s...

  17. Genomic studies of expanded trinucleotide repeats : Focus on neuropsychiatric disorders

    Lindblad, Kerstin

    1998-01-01

    In a number of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, a worsening of the disease phenotype from one generation to the next has been linked to expanded trinucleotide repeat sequences that increase in size upon transmission. The clinical phenomenon of an earlier age of onset or a more severe phenotype in later generations of a family has been termed anticipation. The focus of this thesis has been to study expanded repeat sequences at the genomic level and to identify new...

  18. Simple Estimation of Hidden Correlation in Repeated Measures

    Nguyen, Thuan; Jiang, Jiming

    2011-01-01

    In medical and social studies, it is often desirable to assess the correlation between characteristics of interest that are not directly observable. In such cases, repeated measures are often available, but the correlation between the repeated measures is not the same as that between the true characteristics that are confounded with the measurement errors. The latter is called the hidden correlation. Previously, the problem has been treated by assuming prior knowledge about the measurement er...

  19. Repeated adaptive divergence of microhabitat specialization in avian feather lice

    Johnson Kevin P; Shreve Scott M; Smith Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Repeated adaptive radiations are evident when phenotypic divergence occurs within lineages, but this divergence into different forms is convergent when compared across lineages. Classic examples of such repeated adaptive divergence occur in island (for example, Caribbean Anolis lizards) and lake systems (for example, African cichlids). Host-parasite systems in many respects are analogous to island systems, where host species represent isolated islands for parasites whose l...

  20. Are major repeater patients addicted to suicidal behavior?

    Blasco-Fontecilla, Hilario; Artieda-Urrutia, Paula; Berenguer-Elias, Nuria; Garcia-Vega, Juan Manuel; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Monica; Rodriguez-Lomas, Cesar; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Isabel; Iruela-Cuadrado, Luis; de Leon, José

    2014-01-01

    The literature provides support for the hypothesis that some major repeaters (individuals with >=5 lifetime suicide attempts) are addicted to suicidal behavior (SB). This study explores whether major repeaters are addicted to SB or not using 7 criteria: tolerance (Criterion 1), withdrawal (Criterion 2), loss of control (Criterion 3), problems in quitting/cutting down (Criterion 4), much time spent using (Criterion 5), substantial reduction in activities (Criterion 6), and adverse physiological/physical consequences (Criterion 7). Total dependence on SB was indicated by the presence of 3 or more of the 7 criteria in the last 12 months. This cross-sectional study at Puerta de Hierro University Hospital (Madrid, Spain) recruited 118 suicide attempters including 8 major repeaters (7%, 8/118), who were all females. The association between each SB addiction criterion, physiological dependence and total dependence with major repeater status was tested for significance and for effect size with odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals. As hypothesized, major repeaters met significantly higher frequency of criteria for total dependence on SB, OR=62.9 (6.4-615). A backward stepwise logistic regression model was used to provide an OR between major repeater status and total dependence status corrected by confounding variables. Age, panic disorder without agoraphobia, borderline personality disorder, history of psychiatric inpatient admission, and total dependence on SB were introduced as independent variables with major repeater status as the dependent variable. The model selected total dependence and age as the remaining significant variables in the last step. Accordingly, major repeaters appear to be addicted to SB. PMID:25580865

  1. Lymphatic Pump Treatment Repeatedly Enhances the Lymphatic and Immune Systems

    Schander, Artur; Padro, David; KING, Hollis H.; Downey, H. Fred; Hodge, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteopathic practitioners utilize manual therapies called lymphatic pump techniques (LPT) to treat edema and infectious diseases. While previous studies examined the effect of a single LPT treatment on the lymphatic system, the effect of repeated applications of LPT on lymphatic output and immunity has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to measure the effects of repeated LPT on lymphatic flow, lymph leukocyte numbers, and inflammatory mediator concentr...

  2. DSR-Based Selective Repeat ARQ Protocol in MANET

    张全新; 宋瀚涛

    2003-01-01

    The efficient route algorithms involved in mobile ad hoc network(MANET) are studied. An arrangement of a combination of the traditional dynamic source routing(DSR) protocol is put forward and the selective repeat ARQ protocol is put forward by analyzing and studying them in detail and providing the scheme. In networks, especially in wireless networks, the nodes are capable to process data much faster than transmission, the DSR-based selective repeat ARQ protocol has real meanings in MANET.

  3. Fully integrated, fully automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles

    Tan, Eugene; Rosemary S. Turingan; Hogan, Catherine; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Schumm, James W.; Richard F Selden

    2013-01-01

    Background The generation of short tandem repeat profiles, also referred to as ‘DNA typing,’ is not currently performed outside the laboratory because the process requires highly skilled technical operators and a controlled laboratory environment and infrastructure with several specialized instruments. The goal of this work was to develop a fully integrated system for the automated generation of short tandem repeat profiles from buccal swab samples, to improve forensic laboratory process flow...

  4. Quantum key distribution with two-segment quantum repeaters

    Quantum repeaters represent one possible way to achieve long-distance quantum key distribution. One way of improving the repeater rate and decreasing the memory coherence time is the usage of multiplexing. Motivated by the experimental fact that long-range connections are practically demanding, we extend the analysis of the quantum repeater multiplexing protocol to the case of short-range connections. We derive formulas for the repeater rate and we show that short-range connections lead to most of the benefits of a full-range multiplexing protocol. A less demanding QKD-protocol without quantum memories was recently introduced by Lo et al. We generalize this measurement-device-independent quantum key Distribution protocol to the scenario where the repeater Station contains also heralded quantum memories. We assume either single-photon sources or weak coherent pulse sources plus decay states. We show that it is possible to significantly outperform the original proposal, even in presence of decoherence of the quantum memory. We give formulas in terms of device imperfections i.e., the quantum bit error rate and the repeater rate.

  5. Ising Model Reprogramming of a Repeat Protein's Equilibrium Unfolding Pathway.

    Millership, C; Phillips, J J; Main, E R G

    2016-05-01

    Repeat proteins are formed from units of 20-40 aa that stack together into quasi one-dimensional non-globular structures. This modular repetitive construction means that, unlike globular proteins, a repeat protein's equilibrium folding and thus thermodynamic stability can be analysed using linear Ising models. Typically, homozipper Ising models have been used. These treat the repeat protein as a series of identical interacting subunits (the repeated motifs) that couple together to form the folded protein. However, they cannot describe subunits of differing stabilities. Here we show that a more sophisticated heteropolymer Ising model can be constructed and fitted to two new helix deletion series of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (CTPRs). This analysis, showing an asymmetric spread of stability between helices within CTPR ensembles, coupled with the Ising model's predictive qualities was then used to guide reprogramming of the unfolding pathway of a variant CTPR protein. The designed behaviour was engineered by introducing destabilising mutations that increased the thermodynamic asymmetry within a CTPR ensemble. The asymmetry caused the terminal α-helix to thermodynamically uncouple from the rest of the protein and preferentially unfold. This produced a specific, highly populated stable intermediate with a putative dimerisation interface. As such it is the first step in designing repeat proteins with function regulated by a conformational switch. PMID:26947150

  6. Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Chen, C M; Wang, C T; Wang, C J; Ho, C H; Kao, Y Y; Chen, C C

    1997-12-01

    Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences, NP3R and NP4R, have been isolated from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. The length of a repeating unit for NP3R and NP4R is 165 and 180 nucleotides respectively. The abundance of NP3R, NP4R and telomeric repeats is, respectively, 8.4 x 10(4), 6 x 10(3) and 1.5 x 10(6) copies per haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that NP3R is located at the ends and/or in interstitial regions of all 10 chromosomes and NP4R on the terminal regions of three chromosomes in the haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Sequence homology search revealed that not only are NP3R and NP4R homologous to HRS60 and GRS, respectively, two tandem repeats isolated from N. tabacum, but that NP3R and NP4R are also related to each other, suggesting that they originated from a common ancestral sequence. The role of these repeated sequences in chromosome healing is discussed based on the observation that two to three copies of a telomere-similar sequence were present in each repeating unit of NP3R and NP4R. PMID:9451957

  7. Quantum repeater based on cavity QED evolutions and coherent light

    Gonţa, Denis; van Loock, Peter

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of cavity QED, we propose a quantum repeater scheme that uses coherent light and chains of atoms coupled to optical cavities. In contrast to conventional repeater schemes, in our scheme there is no need for an explicit use of two-qubit quantum logical gates by exploiting solely the cavity QED evolution. In our previous work (Gonta and van Loock in Phys Rev A 88:052308, 2013), we already proposed a quantum repeater in which the entanglement between two neighboring repeater nodes was distributed using controlled displacements of input coherent light, while the produced low-fidelity entangled pairs were purified using ancillary (four-partite) entangled states. In the present work, the entanglement distribution is realized using a sequence of controlled phase shifts and displacements of input coherent light. Compared to previous coherent-state-based distribution schemes for two-qubit entanglement, our scheme here relies only upon a simple discrimination of two coherent states with opposite signs, which can be performed in a quantum mechanically optimal fashion via a beam splitter and two on-off detectors. For the entanglement purification, we employ a method that avoids the use of extra entangled ancilla states. Our repeater scheme exhibits reasonable fidelities and repeater rates providing an attractive platform for long-distance quantum communication.

  8. Quantum key distribution with two-segment quantum repeaters

    Kampermann, Hermann; Abruzzo, Silvestre; Bruss, Dagmar [Theoretische Physik III, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum repeaters represent one possible way to achieve long-distance quantum key distribution. One way of improving the repeater rate and decreasing the memory coherence time is the usage of multiplexing. Motivated by the experimental fact that long-range connections are practically demanding, we extend the analysis of the quantum repeater multiplexing protocol to the case of short-range connections. We derive formulas for the repeater rate and we show that short-range connections lead to most of the benefits of a full-range multiplexing protocol. A less demanding QKD-protocol without quantum memories was recently introduced by Lo et al. We generalize this measurement-device-independent quantum key Distribution protocol to the scenario where the repeater Station contains also heralded quantum memories. We assume either single-photon sources or weak coherent pulse sources plus decay states. We show that it is possible to significantly outperform the original proposal, even in presence of decoherence of the quantum memory. We give formulas in terms of device imperfections i.e., the quantum bit error rate and the repeater rate.

  9. Effects of low dose radiation on repair processes in human lymphocytes

    DNA excision repair was investigated in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low dose radiation of 222Rn. Autoradiographic studies of unscheduled DNA synthesis and measurement of 3H-thymidine incorporation by repair replication into double stranded and single-strand containing DNA fractions obtained by BND cellulose chromatography seem to indicate a stimulatory effect of repeated low dose radiation on repair enzymes. (author)

  10. Characteristics of air dose rate distribution in the environment around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant site

    This article presents the features of regional distributions and temporal changes in air dose rates and radionuclide deposition densities in Fukushima on the basis of analyses on large-scale environmental monitoring results using diverse methods. The continuity of decontamination effects is discussed according to repeated monitoring data after the decontamination model project. Further, some examples are shown on the projection of air dose rates together with the ecological half lives for different land uses. (author)

  11. Antidepressant treatments: effects in rodents on dose-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine- and dopamine-mediated behaviours and 5-HT2 receptor number in frontal cortex.

    Green, A. R.; Heal, D. J.; Johnson, P.; Laurence, B. E.; Nimgaonkar, V. L.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS) administration, repeated desmethylimipramine injection (5 mg kg-1, twice daily for 14 days) and acute administration of the beta-adrenoceptor, clenbuterol, on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)- and dopamine-mediated behaviours in mice have been examined. All three treatments enhanced the carbidopa/5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head-twitch response at all doses of 5-HTP examined, producing a parallel shift in the dose-response curve. A singl...

  12. Biochemical and histopathological changes in the kidney and adrenal gland of rats following repeated exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin

    Hassina Khaldoun Oularbi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT is a type II pyrethroid insecticide widely used in pest management. This study was undertaken to evaluate the toxic effects of LCT on the kidneys and adrenal glands of rats after subacute exposure. Twenty-eight 6-week-old male albino Rattus norvegicus rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, which received distilled water. The experimental groups 2, 3 and 4 received 20.4, 30.6 and 61.2 mg/kg body weight, respectively, of LCT, administered orally over 28 days. The effects of the insecticide on various biochemical parameters were evaluated at 14 and 28 days. Histopathological studies were carried out in the kidneys and adrenal glands at the end of the experiment. Lambda-cyhalothrin, as a pyrethroid insecticide, induced significant increases (P≤0.05 in plasma urea, creatinine, uric acid and glucose concentrations, and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities after 14 and 28 days. In the rat plasma samples after 28 days, residual concentrations of LCT 1R, cis,

  13. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective...

  14. Who Repeats Algebra I, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated? REL 2015-059

    Fong, Anthony B.; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2014-01-01

    This REL West study explores the prevalence of students repeating Algebra I, who is most likely to repeat the course, and the level of improvement for students who repeat. Using six years of data from a cohort of 3,400 first-time seventh grade students in a California school district, authors found that 44 percent of students repeated algebra I.…

  15. Dose considerations in total skin electron irradiation for mycosis fungoides

    Two hundred patients with generalized cutaneous mycosis fungoides were treated with total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) in the Lahey Clinic Radiotherapy Department-MIT High Voltage Research Laboratory between 1964 and 1973. None of the patients had any clinical evidence of extracutaneous disease at presentation. The 3-year absolute survival rate was 54% (107 patients). Analysis of these 107 long-term survivors evaluated the relation between incidence of generalized cutaneous recurrence and total treatment dose given during the initial course of TSEI. Results indicated that in patients with erythroderma, the need for a second course of TSEI was inversely related to the total dose given during the first course. However, the curve seemed to flatten at about 1,500 cGy (rad). In plaque disease, the percentage of patients who received repeated courses of TSEI seemed to be relatively constant independent of total dose given during the initial course (65% to 80%). In patients with tumor lesions, the incidence of generalized cutaneous recurrence was directly proportional to total dose. The optimal dose of TSEI for patients with mycosis fungoides may vary depending on types of skin lesions. Total dose during the initial course of TSEI should be kept relatively conservative, particularly in patients with generalized plaques where relapse rate is high allowing reserve of normal tissue tolerance for further TSEI when indicated

  16. Near-term and late biological effects of acute and low-dose-rate continuous gamma-ray exposure in dogs and monkeys

    Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and dogs (beagle) were given thirteen 100-rad gamma-ray doses at 28-day intervals. The comparative response (inury and recovery) of the hematopoietic system of the two species was observed at 7-day intervals during the exposure regime. At 84 days after the thirteenth gamma-ray dose, the 1300-rad conditioned and control dogs and monkeys were challenged continuously with gamma rays at 35 r/day until death to determine the amount of radiation-induced injry remaining in conditioned animals as a reduction in mean survival time. Dogs (50%) and monkeys (8%) died from injury incurred during conditioning exposures. Thus, the comparative response (in terms of lethality) of dogs and monkeys to dose protraction by acute dose fractionation was similar to what we would expect from a single acute dose. The mean survival times for nonconditioned dogs and monkeys during continuous exposure at 35 R/day were the same (approx. 1400 h). Thus, the hematopoietic response of the two species by this method of dose protraction was not significantly different. Mean survival times of conditioned dogs and monkeys during the continuous 35-R/day gamma-ray challenge exposure were greater (significant in dogs but not in monkeys) than for their control counterparts. Thus, long-term radiation-induced injury was not measurable by this method. Conditioning doses of more than 4 times the acute LD5030 in dogs and approximately 2 times that in monkeys served only to increase both mean survival time and variance in a gamma-ray stress environment with a dose rate of 35 Rat/day

  17. Low dose of methyltestosterone in ovariectomised rats improves baroreflex sensitivity without geno- and cytotoxicity.

    Terra, Denise G; de Lima, Ewelyne M; do Nascimento, Andrews M; Brasil, Girlandia A; Filete, Placielle F; Kalil, Ieda C; Lenz, Dominik; Endringer, Denise C; Bissoli, Nazaré S; de Andrade, Tadeu U

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the isolated use of a low dose of methyltestosterone (MT) on cardiovascular reflexes and hormonal levels and its geno- and cytotoxic safety in ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 6), respectively: SHAM (received vehicle methylcellulose 0.5%), SHAM + MT (received MT 0.05 mg/kg), OVX (received vehicle), and OVX + MT (received MT). Twenty-one days after ovariectomy, treatment was given orally daily for 28 days. The Bezold-Jarisch reflex (BJR) was analyzed by measuring the bradycardic and hypotensive responses elicited by phenylbiguanide (PBG) administration. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was evaluated by phenylephrine and sodium nitroprussite. Myocyte hypertrophy was determined by morphometric analysis of H&E stained slides. Biochemical data were analyzed, as well as micronucleus assay. MT improved BRS and increased testosterone values, but did not change estradiol in the OVX group. MT did not promote changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BJR, serum concentrations of troponin I, weight and histopathology of the heart. MT was able to restore the BRS in OVX rats. The geno- and cytotoxic safety of the MT was demonstrated by the absence of an increase in the micronucleus (PCEMN) or change in the ratio between normochromatic erythrocytes and polychromatic erythrocytes (NCE/PCE). PMID:27148800

  18. Enzymatic activity of granulations tissues under low doses of radiation. Biochemical analysis in rats

    This paper was designed to investigate in the rat subcutaneous sponge-induced granulation tissue under low doses of X-ray, the activity of alkaline phosphatase, 5'nucleotide phosphodiesterase and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) enzymes. One hundred and fourteen Wistar rats were divided into three groups, as follows: Group I as control, Group II that received single 7,14 R in split-dosis immediately after sponge-implantation at the third and fifth days postoperatively. Biopsies were taken after 7, 11, 14, 21 and 28 days and the activity of the three enzymes was determined. The results have shown that in Group II alkaline phosphatase had higher activity in the 14th day of tissue evolution when compared to Groups I and III . The 5'nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in Group I was similar in all days checked, although in Group II the enzyme showed higher activity in 7th day and lower in 21st. In Group III the activity was higher after 14 and 7 days and lower after 28 and 21 days. There was no observation of changing in adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity when the three groups were compared. (author)

  19. In-use stability of enrofloxacin solution for injection in multi-dose containers

    Šandor Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-use stability study in this paper was designed as far as possible to simulate the practical usage of multi-dose containers products in veterinary practice and to establish the influence of storage conditions on drug's quality. According to literature data, shelf-live of enrofloxacin solutions for injection tested in this study is 28 days after opening. In-use (open container stability testing of enrofloxacin injection solutions was studied during a period of 112 days, and the physical-chemical parameters and microbiological contamination were assessed. A spectrophotometric method was validated for the quantification of enrofloxacin. The validation method yielded good results and included the selectivity, linearity, intra-assay precision (1.26% RSD, inter-assay precision (1.52% RSD, limit of detection (0.18 μg/mL, limit of quantification (0.54 μg/mL and accuracy. The results of spectrophotometric analyses were presented as the mean drug concentration of enrofloxacin vs. time of sampling. The findings of physical, chemical and microbiological parameters were in accordance with the producers' specifications and no extreme changes during prescribed storage occurred. The study was extended from the drug's proposed shelf-life after opening for the next 84 days and in that period no significant changes were recorded.

  20. Elimination of 7-aminoflunitrazepam and flunitrazepam in urine after a single dose of Rohypnol.

    Negrusz, A; Moore, C M; Stockham, T L; Poiser, K R; Kern, J L; Palaparthy, R; Le, N L; Janicak, P G; Levy, N A

    2000-09-01

    The hypnotic benzodiazepine flunitrazepam (Rohypnol) has been identified as the drug of choice for the purposes of "drugging" unsuspecting victims and raping them while they are under the influence of this substance. The objective of this paper was to study elimination of flunitrazepam and 7-aminoflunitrazepam in urine collected from ten healthy volunteers who received a single 2 mg oral dose of Rohypnol, to determine how long after drug administration 7-aminoflunitrazepam can be detected. A highly sensitive NCI-GC-MS method for the simultaneous quantitation of flunitrazepam (LOQ 100 pg/mL) and 7-aminoflunitrazepam (LOQ 10 pg/mL) in urine was developed. All samples were screened for benzodiazepines using optimized micro-plate enzyme immunoassay. The highest concentrations of 7-aminoflunitrazepam (70-518 ng/mL) and flunitrazepam (0.7-2.8 ng/mL) in urine were observed 6 h after drug administration in nine subjects and after 24 h in one subject. In six subjects 7-aminoflunitrazepam was detected up to 14 days after flunitrazepam administration, in one subject up to 21 days and in three subjects up to 28 days. In urine samples collected from six volunteers, flunitrazepam was detected three days after Rohypnol intake, in three subjects 24 h, and in one subject 5 days later. Benzodiazepine micro-plate enzyme immunoassay kit allowed the detection of flunitrazepam and metabolities 5 to 21 days after drug administration. PMID:11005178