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Sample records for 26-week randomised parallel-group

  1. Mandibular advancement appliance for obstructive sleep apnoea: results of a randomised placebo controlled trial using parallel group design

    Petri, N.; Svanholt, P.; Solow, B.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a mandibular advancement appliance (MAA) for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Ninety-three patients with OSA and a mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 34.7 were centrally randomised into three, parallel groups: (a) MAA; (b) mandibular non......-advancement appliance (MNA); and (c) no intervention. The appliances were custom made, in one piece. The MAAs had a mean protrusion of the mandible of 74% (range 64-85%). Outcome measures, assessed after continuous use for 4 weeks, were AHI (polysomnography), daytime sleepiness (Epworth) and quality of life (SF-36...

  2. CONSORT 2010 Explanation and Elaboration: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials (Chinese version)

    Moher, David; Hopewell, Sally; Schulz, Kenneth F;

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal. Without transparent reporting, readers cannot judge the reliability and validity of trial findings nor extract information for systematic reviews. Recent methodological analyses indicate th...

  3. CONSORT 2010 Explanation and Elaboration: Updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials

    Moher, David; Hopewell, Sally; Schulz, Kenneth F;

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal. Without transparent reporting, readers cannot judge the reliability and validity of trial findings nor extract information for systematic reviews. Recent methodological analyses indicate th...

  4. CONSORT 2010 Explanation and Elaboration: updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials (Chinese version)

    Moher, David; Hopewell, Sally; Schulz, Kenneth F;

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal. Without transparent reporting, readers cannot judge the reliability and validity of trial findings nor extract information for systematic reviews. Recent methodological analyses indicate that...... to write or appraise trial reports. A CONSORT explanation and elaboration article was published in 2001 alongside the 2001 version of the CONSORT statement. After an expert meeting in January 2007, the CONSORT statement has been further revised and is published as the CONSORT 2010 Statement. This...... dissemination of the CONSORT statement-has also been extensively revised. It presents the meaning and rationale for each new and updated checklist item providing examples of good reporting and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies. Several examples of flow diagrams are included. The CONSORT...

  5. CONSORT 2010 Explanation and Elaboration: Updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials

    Moher, David; Hopewell, Sally; Schulz, Kenneth F;

    2010-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence shows the quality of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal. Without transparent reporting, readers cannot judge the reliability and validity of trial findings nor extract information for systematic reviews. Recent methodological analyses indicate that...... to write or appraise trial reports. A CONSORT explanation and elaboration article was published in 2001 alongside the 2001 version of the CONSORT statement. After an expert meeting in January 2007, the CONSORT statement has been further revised and is published as the CONSORT 2010 Statement. This...... dissemination of the CONSORT statement-has also been extensively revised. It presents the meaning and rationale for each new and updated checklist item providing examples of good reporting and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies. Several examples of flow diagrams are included. The CONSORT...

  6. A comparison of two treatments for childhood apraxia of speech: methods and treatment protocol for a parallel group randomised control trial

    Murray Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood Apraxia of Speech is an impairment of speech motor planning that manifests as difficulty producing the sounds (articulation and melody (prosody of speech. These difficulties may persist through life and are detrimental to academic, social, and vocational development. A number of published single subject and case series studies of speech treatments are available. There are currently no randomised control trials or other well designed group trials available to guide clinical practice. Methods/Design A parallel group, fixed size randomised control trial will be conducted in Sydney, Australia to determine the efficacy of two treatments for Childhood Apraxia of Speech: 1 Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the 2 Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme – Third edition. Eligible children will be English speaking, aged 4–12 years with a diagnosis of suspected CAS, normal or adjusted hearing and vision, and no comprehension difficulties or other developmental diagnoses. At least 20 children will be randomised to receive one of the two treatments in parallel. Treatments will be delivered by trained and supervised speech pathology clinicians using operationalised manuals. Treatment will be administered in 1-hour sessions, 4 times per week for 3 weeks. The primary outcomes are speech sound and prosodic accuracy on a customised 292 item probe and the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology inconsistency subtest administered prior to treatment and 1 week, 1 month and 4 months post-treatment. All post assessments will be completed by blinded assessors. Our hypotheses are: 1 treatment effects at 1 week post will be similar for both treatments, 2 maintenance of treatment effects at 1 and 4 months post will be greater for Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment than Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme treatment, and 3 generalisation of treatment effects to untrained related speech behaviours will be greater for Rapid

  7. The effect of umeclidinium added to inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist in patients with symptomatic COPD: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study.

    Sousa, Ana R; Riley, John H; Church, Alison; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Punekar, Yogesh S; Fahy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of triple therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA), added to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA), have been demonstrated. Limited data assessing the efficacy of the LAMA umeclidinium (UMEC) added to ICS/LABA are available. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of UMEC added to ICS/LABAs in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD. This is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study. Patients were symptomatic (modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale score ⩾2), despite receiving ICS/LABA (fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FP/SAL, branded) 500/50 mcg, budesonide/formoterol (BD/FOR, branded) 200/6 mcg or 400/12 mcg, or other ICS/LABAs) ⩾30 days before the run-in (7±2 days). Patients were randomised 1:1 to once-daily UMEC 62.5 mcg or placebo (PBO), added to twice-daily open-label ICS/LABA for 12 weeks. Primary end point was trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at Day 85; secondary end point was weighted mean (WM) 0-6 h FEV1 at Day 84; other end points included COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score and Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) score. Adverse events (AEs) were investigated. In the UMEC+ICS/LABA and PBO+ICS/LABA groups, 119 and 117 patients were randomised, respectively. Patients received FP/SAL (40%), BD/FOR (43%) and other ICS/LABAs (17%). UMEC+ICS/LABA resulted in significant improvements in trough FEV1 (Day 85) and in WM 0-6 h FEV1 (Day 84) versus PBO+ICS/LABA (difference: 123 and 148 ml, respectively, both P<0.001). Change from baseline for UMEC+ICS/LABA versus PBO+ICS/LABA was significantly different for CAT score at Day 84 (-1.31, P<0.05), but not for TDI score (0.40, P=0.152). AE incidence was similar with UMEC+ICS/LABA (38%) and PBO+ICS/LABA (42%). UMEC+ICS/LABA improved lung function and CAT score in patients with symptomatic COPD versus PBO+ICS/LABA (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257372). PMID:27334739

  8. Efficacy and safety of the partial PPARγ agonist balaglitazone compared with pioglitazone and placebo: A phase III, randomised, parallel-group study in patients with type 2 diabetes on stable insulin therapy

    Henriksen, Kim; Byrjalsen, Inger; Qvist, Per;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of patients with full PPARγ agonists is associated with weight gain, heart failure, peripheral oedema and bone loss. However, the safety of partial PPARγ agonists has not been established in a clinical trial. The BALLET trial aimed to establish the glucose-lowering effects and safety...... parameters of the partial PPARγ agonist balaglitazone in diabetic patients on stable insulin therapy. 409 subjects from 3 countries with type 2 diabetes on stable insulin therapy were randomised to 26 weeks of double-blind treatment with once daily doses of 10 or 20mg balaglitazone, 45 mg pioglitazone, or...... matching placebo (n≥99 in each group). The primary endpoint was the efficacy of balaglitazone 10mg and 20mg versus placebo on the absolute change in HbA(1c) . Secondary endpoints included levels of fasting serum glucose (FSG), and changes in body composition and bone mineral density as measured by DXA...

  9. A comparison of two treatments for childhood apraxia of speech: methods and treatment protocol for a parallel group randomised control trial

    Murray Elizabeth; McCabe Patricia; Ballard Kirrie J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood Apraxia of Speech is an impairment of speech motor planning that manifests as difficulty producing the sounds (articulation) and melody (prosody) of speech. These difficulties may persist through life and are detrimental to academic, social, and vocational development. A number of published single subject and case series studies of speech treatments are available. There are currently no randomised control trials or other well designed group trials available to gu...

  10. Evaluation of wet-cupping therapy for persistent non-specific low back pain: a randomised, waiting-list controlled, open-label, parallel-group pilot trial

    Kim Kun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent non-specific low back pain (PNSLBP is one of the most frequently experienced types of back pain around the world. Wet-cupping is a common intervention for various pain conditions, especially in Korea. In this context, we conducted a pilot study to determine the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatment for PNSLBP. Methods We recruited 32 participants (21 in the wet-cupping group and 11 in the waiting-list group who had been having PNSLBP for at least 3 months. The participants were recruited at the clinical research centre of the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Korea. Eligible participants were randomly allocated to wet-cupping and waiting-list groups. Following the practice of traditional Korean medicine, the treatment group was provided with wet-cupping treatment at two acupuncture points among the BL23, BL24 and BL25 6 times within 2 weeks. Usual care, including providing brochures for exercise, general advice for PNSLBP and acetaminophen, was allowed in both groups. Separate assessors participated in the outcome assessment. We used the 0 to100 numerical rating scale (NRS for pain, the McGill Pain Questionnaire for pain intensity (PPI and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ, and we assessed acetaminophen use and safety issues. Results The results showed that the NRS score for pain decreased (-16.0 [95% CI: -24.4 to -7.7] in the wet-cupping group and -9.1 [-18.1 to -0.1] in the waiting-list group, but there was no statistical difference between the groups (p = 0.52. However, the PPI scores showed significant differences between the two groups (-1.2 [-1.6 to -0.8] for the wet-cupping group and -0.2 [-0.8 to 0.4] for the waiting-list group, p Conclusion This pilot study may provide preliminary data on the effectiveness and safety of wet-cupping treatments for PNSLBP. Future full-scale randomised controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention

  11. Linagliptin and pioglitazone combination therapy versus monotherapy with linagliptin or pioglitazone: A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multinational clinical trial.

    Nauck, Michael Albrecht; di Domenico, Maximiliano; Patel, Sanjay; Kobe, Maureen; Toorawa, Robert; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2016-07-01

    Linagliptin plus pioglitazone single-pill combinations were evaluated. Patients (n = 936) with insufficient glycaemic control, despite lifestyle interventions, were randomised for 30 weeks to either monotherapy with linagliptin 5 mg; pioglitazone 15, 30 or 45 mg; or single-pill combination with linagliptin 5 mg plus pioglitazone 15, 30 or 45 mg. An extension (⩽54 weeks) planned to evaluate linagliptin plus pioglitazone 30 or 45 mg single-pill combinations was not completed due to a protocol amendment. Adjusted mean (95% confidence interval) differences in HbA1c change from baseline at week 30 for linagliptin plus pioglitazone 15, 30 and 45 mg were -0.17% (-0.41, 0.07), -0.37% (-0.60, -0.14) and -0.41% (-0.64, -0.18) versus pioglitazone monotherapies, respectively, and -0.44% (-0.67, -0.20), -0.68% (-0.91, -0.44) and -0.89% (-1.12, -0.66) versus linagliptin monotherapy, respectively. Single-pill combinations were generally well tolerated. Hypoglycaemia frequency was ⩽1.5% per group. Linagliptin plus pioglitazone combinations were efficacious, with safety profiles comparable to the individual monotherapies. PMID:27190087

  12. A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study to demonstrate equivalence in efficacy and safety of CT-P13 compared with innovator infliximab when coadministered with methotrexate in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: the PLANETRA study

    Yoo, Dae Hyun; Hrycaj, Pawel; Miranda, Pedro; Ramiterre, Edgar; Piotrowski, Mariusz; Shevchuk, Sergii; Kovalenko, Volodymyr; Prodanovic, Nenad; Abello-Banfi, Mauricio; Gutierrez-Ureña, Sergio; Morales-Olazabal, Luis; Tee, Michael; Jimenez, Renato; Zamani, Omid; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, HoUng; Park, Won; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety of innovator infliximab (INX) and CT-P13, an INX biosimilar, in active rheumatoid arthritis patients with inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Methods Phase III randomised, double-blind, multicentre, multinational, parallel-group study. Patients with active disease despite MTX (12.5–25 mg/week) were randomised to receive 3 mg/kg of CT-P13 (n=302) or INX (n=304) with MTX and folic acid. The primary endpoint was the American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response at week 30. Therapeutic equivalence of clinical response according to ACR20 criteria was concluded if the 95% CI for the treatment difference was within ±15%. Secondary endpoints included ACR response criteria, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria, change in Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Simplified Disease Activity Index, Clinical Disease Activity Index, as well as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters, safety and immunogenicity. Results At week 30, ACR20 responses were 60.9% for CT-P13 and 58.6% for INX (95% CI −6% to 10%) in the intention-to-treat population. The proportions in CT-P13 and INX groups achieving good or moderate EULAR responses (C reactive protein (CRP)) at week 30 were 85.8% and 87.1%, respectively. Low disease activity or remission according to DAS28–CRP, ACR–EULAR remission rates, ACR50/ACR70 responses and all other PK and PD endpoints were highly similar at week 30. Incidence of drug-related adverse events (35.2% vs 35.9%) and detection of antidrug antibodies (48.4% vs 48.2%) were highly similar for CT-P13 and INX, respectively. Conclusions CT-P13 demonstrated equivalent efficacy to INX at week 30, with a comparable PK profile and immunogenicity. CT-P13 was well tolerated, with a safety profile comparable with that of INX. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01217086 PMID:23687260

  13. A randomised, double-blind, multicentre, parallel-group, prospective study comparing the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of CT-P13 and innovator infliximab in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: the PLANETAS study

    Park, Won; Hrycaj, Pawel; Jeka, Slawomir; Kovalenko, Volodymyr; Lysenko, Grygorii; Miranda, Pedro; Mikazane, Helena; Gutierrez-Ureña, Sergio; Lim, MieJin; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, HoUng; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Braun, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and efficacy of innovator infliximab (INX) and CT-P13, a biosimilar to INX, in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Phase 1 randomised, double-blind, multicentre, multinational, parallel-group study. Patients were randomised to receive 5 mg/kg of CT-P13 (n=125) or INX (n=125). Primary endpoints were area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) at steady state and observed maximum steady state serum concentration (Cmax,ss) between weeks 22 and 30. Additional PK, efficacy endpoints, including 20% and 40% improvement response according to Assessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Working Group criteria (ASAS20 and ASAS40), and safety outcomes were also assessed. Results Geometric mean AUC was 32 765.8 μgh/ml for CT-P13 and 31 359.3 μgh/ml for INX. Geometric mean Cmax,ss was 147.0  μg/ml for CT-P13 and 144.8 μg/ml for INX. The ratio of geometric means was 104.5% (90% CI 94% to 116%) for AUC and 101.5% (90% CI 95% to 109%) for Cmax,ss. ASAS20 and ASAS40 responses at week 30 were 70.5% and 51.8% for CT-P13 and 72.4% and 47.4% for INX, respectively. In the CT-P13 and INX groups more than one adverse event occurred in 64.8% and 63.9% of patients, infusion reactions occurred in 3.9% and 4.9%, active tuberculosis occurred in 1.6% and 0.8%, and 27.4% and 22.5% of patients tested positive for anti-drug antibodies, respectively. Conclusions The PK profiles of CT-P13 and INX were equivalent in patients with active AS. CT-P13 was well tolerated, with an efficacy and safety profile comparable to that of INX up to week 30. PMID:23687259

  14. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all P<0·05). Effects on defecation frequency were similar for the two doses tested, suggesting that a ceiling effect was reached with the one billion dose. Overall, 4 weeks' supplementation with the probiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385). PMID:26382580

  15. Comparison in myelography between iodixanol 270 and 320 mgI/ml and iotrolan 300 mgI/ml: a multicentre, randomised, parallel-group, double-blind, phase III trial

    The objective of the trial was to compare the safety and efficacy of the non-ionic, dimeric, isotonic contrast medium iodixanol (Visipaque 270 and 320 mgI/ml) with those of iotrolan (Isovist 300 mgI/ml) in myelography. After lumbar or cervical puncture, 315 patients were examined in a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, comparative myelography study. Image quality, changes in vital signs, immediate and delayed adverse events were registered. There was a tendency for better images with iodixanol 320 than with iodixanol 270 and iotrolan 300, but the overall quality was good or excellent with all products. The frequency of patients reporting adverse events and headache varied much across centres, but there was no statistically significant difference between the contrast media. The incidence of events was higher after lumbar puncture than after cervical puncture, in women rather than in men, and after puncture with a 22-gauge (G) bevel-tipped needle compared with a 24 G Sprotte needle. The frequency of headache did not correlate with the absence of pathology. The higher iodine concentration in iodixanol 320 could be an advantage for film quality. When compared with iotrolan 300, iodixanol 320 and 270 give similar incidences of adverse events, including headache. (orig.)

  16. An ex vivo, assessor blind, randomised, parallel group, comparative efficacy trial of the ovicidal activity of three pediculicides after a single application - melaleuca oil and lavender oil, eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil, and a "suffocation" pediculicide

    Altman Phillip M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two components to the clinical efficacy of pediculicides: (i efficacy against the crawling-stages (lousicidal efficacy; and (ii efficacy against the eggs (ovicidal efficacy. Lousicidal efficacy and ovicidal efficacy are confounded in clinical trials. Here we report on a trial that was specially designed to rank the clinical ovicidal efficacy of pediculicides. Eggs were collected, pre-treatment and post-treatment, from subjects with different types of hair, different coloured hair and hair of different length. Method Subjects with at least 20 live eggs of Pediculus capitis (head lice were randomised to one of three treatment-groups: a melaleuca oil (commonly called tea tree oil and lavender oil pediculicide (TTO/LO; a eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil pediculicide (EO/LTTO; or a "suffocation" pediculicide. Pre-treatment: 10 to 22 live eggs were taken from the head by cutting the single hair with the live egg attached, before the treatment (total of 1,062 eggs. Treatment: The subjects then received a single treatment of one of the three pediculicides, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Post-treatment: 10 to 41 treated live eggs were taken from the head by cutting the single hair with the egg attached (total of 1,183 eggs. Eggs were incubated for 14 days. The proportion of eggs that had hatched after 14 days in the pre-treatment group was compared with the proportion of eggs that hatched in the post-treatment group. The primary outcome measure was % ovicidal efficacy for each of the three pediculicides. Results 722 subjects were examined for the presence of eggs of head lice. 92 of these subjects were recruited and randomly assigned to: the "suffocation" pediculicide (n = 31; the melaleuca oil and lavender oil pediculicide (n = 31; and the eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil pediculicide (n = 30 subjects. The group treated with eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil had an ovicidal efficacy of 3.3% (SD

  17. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    Saghaei Mahmood

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over different aspects of randomization in parallel group trials, including output type and format, structure and ordering of generated unique identifiers and enabling users to specify group names for more than two groups. Results The program has different settings for: simple and blocked randomizations; length, format and ordering of generated unique identifiers; type and format of program output; and saving sessions for future use. A formatted random list generated by this program can be used directly (without further formatting by the coordinator of the research team to prepare and encode different drugs or instruments necessary for the parallel group trial. Conclusions Random Allocation Software enables users to control different attributes of the random allocation sequence and produce qualified lists for parallel group trials.

  18. Excision of an intrapericardial immature teratoma in a 26-week premature neonate

    Robert B. Hawkins; Rosenberger, Laura H.; Swanson, Julia C.; James J. Gangemi; McGahren, Eugene D

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 26-week premature newborn with an immature intrapericardial teratoma. The patient was transferred from an outside hospital for management of a large mediastinal mass causing respiratory insufficiency. The newborn was supported with the help of a large interdisciplinary team until day of life 22 when he underwent surgical excision. On follow up the infant is doing very well and is one of the youngest survivors to date.

  19. Liraglutide vs insulin glargine and placebo in combination with metformin and sulfonylurea therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus (LEAD-5 met+SU): a randomised controlled trial

    Russell-Jones, D; Vaag, A; Schmitz, O;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of liraglutide in type 2 diabetes mellitus vs placebo and insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin), all in combination with metformin and glimepiride. METHODS: This randomised (using a telephone or web......-based randomisation system), parallel-group, controlled 26 week trial of 581 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on prior monotherapy (HbA(1c) 7.5-10%) and combination therapy (7.0-10%) was conducted in 107 centres in 17 countries. The primary endpoint was HbA(1c). Patients were randomised (2:1:2) to liraglutide 1......Hg; -4.5 mmHg difference, 95% CI 6.8, -2.2; p = 0.0001) but not vs placebo (p = 0.0791). Rates of hypoglycaemic episodes (major, minor and symptoms only, respectively) were 0.06, 1.2 and 1.0 events/patient/year, respectively, in the liraglutide group (vs 0, 1.3, 1.8 and 0, 1.0, 0.5 with glargine and...

  20. Reporting of sample size calculation in randomised controlled trials: review

    Charles, Pierre; Giraudeau, Bruno; Dechartres, Agnes; Baron, Gabriel; Ravaud, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess quality of reporting of sample size calculation, ascertain accuracy of calculations, and determine the relevance of assumptions made when calculating sample size in randomised controlled trials. Design Review. Data sources We searched MEDLINE for all primary reports of two arm parallel group randomised controlled trials of superiority with a single primary outcome published in six high impact factor general medical journals between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. All...

  1. Discrepancies in sample size calculations and data analyses reported in randomised trials: comparison of publications with protocols

    Chan, A.W.; Hrobjartsson, A.; Jorgensen, K.J.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate how often sample size calculations and methods of statistical analysis are pre-specified or changed in randomised trials. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. Data source Protocols and journal publications of published randomised parallel group trials initially approved in 1...

  2. Clinical score and rapid antigen detection test to guide antibiotic use for sore throats: randomised controlled trial of PRISM (primary care streptococcal management)

    P. Little; Hobbs, F D R; Moore, M.; Mant, D; Williamson, I.; McNulty, C; Cheng, Y.E.; Leydon, G; McManus, R; Kelly, J; Barnett, J; Glasziou, P.; Mullee, M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of clinical scores that predict streptococcal infection or rapid streptococcal antigen detection tests compared with delayed antibiotic prescribing. DESIGN: Open adaptive pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Primary care in United Kingdom. PATIENTS: Patients aged ?3 with acute sore throat. INTERVENTION: An internet programme randomised patients to targeted antibiotic use according to: delayed antibiotics (the compara...

  3. Findings from a pilot Randomised trial of an Asthma Internet Self-management Intervention (RAISIN)

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Sauderson, K.; McConnachie, A.; Agur, K.; Chaudhuri, R.; M. Thomas; Thomson, N; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a Phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a web-site (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and Setting: Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants: Adults (age ? 16rs) with physician diagnosed, symptomatic asthma (a...

  4. Findings from a pilot randomised trial of an asthma internet self-management intervention (RAISIN)

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Saunderson, K.; McConnachie, A.; Agur, K.; Chaudhuri, R.; M. Thomas; Thomson, N. C.; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a website (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and setting Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants Adults (age≥16 years) with physician diagnosed, sympt...

  5. Iodixanol Has a Favourable Fibrinolytic Profile Compared to Iohexol in Cardiac Patients Undergoing Elective Angiography: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Parallel Group Study.

    Andrew T Treweeke

    Full Text Available There is no consensus and a limited evidence base for choice of contrast agents (CA in angiography. This study evaluated the impact of iohexol and iodixanol CA on fibrinolytic factors (tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA] and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1], as well as platelet-monocyte conjugates in cardiac patients undergoing elective angiography in a double-blind, randomised parallel group study.Patients (men, 50-70 years old; n = 12 were randomised to receive either iohexol (Omnipaque; n = 6 or iodixanol (Visipaque; n = 6 during elective angiography at Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, UK. Arterial and venous blood samples were drawn prior to CA delivery and following angiography. Assessment of platelet-monocyte conjugation, t-PA and PAI-1 antigen and activity was conducted in samples pre- and post-angiography.Plasma t-PA antigen was depressed equally in the study groups after angiography, but there was a greater reduction in PAI-1 antigen in the group receiving iodixanol. These findings corresponded to a substantial reduction in t-PA activity in patients receiving iohexol, with no change in those receiving iodixanol (P = 0.023 between the CA groups. Both CAs caused a reduction in platelet-monocyte conjugation, with no difference between the groups. No adverse events were reported during the trial.Avoiding reduced plasma t-PA activity might be an important consideration in choosing iodixanol over iohexol in patients at risk of thrombosis following angiography. The trial is registered on the ISRCTN register (ISRCTN51509735 and funded by the Coronary Thrombosis Trust and National Health Service (Highland R&D Endowments. The funders had no influence over study design or reporting.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN51509735.

  6. Randomized, controlled, parallel-group prospective study to investigate the clinical effectiveness of early insulin treatment in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    Lloyd Janet

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults [LADA] is a type 1 diabetes that is slowly developing. This means many people are treated as having type 2 diabetes at diagnosis as they are adults who are not immediately insulin dependent. LADA can be distinguished from type 2 diabetes by antibody tests. Patients who are antibody positive have an autoimmune reaction which is similar to that of type 1 diabetes and is not found in type 2 diabetes. We would like to examine the best way of treating LADA in the early phase of the conditions, with tablets (similar to type 2 diabetes or with insulin (similar to type 1 diabetes. Methods/design This is an open parallel group prospective randomised trial. Participants need to have a GAD antibody test results of 101 WHO units or more and a diagnosis of diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis. Participants will need to have been diagnosed within 12 months and not treated with insulin at study entry. They will be randomised to receive either insulin (NovoMix 30 or tablets (diet treated followed by metformin followed by glitazone (with or without metformin followed by insulin. Primary outcome assessment will be for change in HbA1c and change in fasting C-peptide over 24 months. Secondary outcome measures will include Quality of life, GAD antibody levels, adverse events, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, and markers of the metabolic syndrome. Discussion This study seeks the best treatment for early LADA in terms of maintaining glycaemic control and maintaining natural insulin production. Trial registration ISRCTN63815121

  7. Melatonin for chronic whiplash syndrome with delayed melatonin onset randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    Wieringen, S. van; Jansen, T.; Smits, M.G.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of melatonin in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and delayed melatonin onset. Design: Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. One-week baseline was followed by a 4-week treatment period with either melatonin or placebo. In the ba

  8. Reduction of Intimal Hyperplasia with Re-188-labeled Stents in a Rabbit Model at 7 and 26 Weeks: An Experimental Study

    The aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of 188Re-labeled stents to reduce neointimal formation in a rabbit atherosclerosis model and to test the long-term effects at 7 and 26 weeks. Fifty-nine male New Zealand White rabbits were fed a 0.5% cholesterol diet for 4 weeks before balloon angioplasty and insertion of Palmaz stents in the infrarenal aorta. The animals were sacrificed 7 and 26 weeks after stent implantation. Control stents were compared with 188Re stents: (dose 1) 11.3 ± 1.8 MBq; (dose 2) 37.3 ± 4.2 MBq, and (dose 3) 80.1 ± 7.8 MBq. Each activity group consisted of a short-term (7 weeks) and a long-term group (26 weeks), resulting in a total of eight study groups. No thrombotic occlusion was observed. The neointimal formation in the control group was 2.11 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-6.52] mm2 at 7 weeks and 2.10 (0.62-7.11) at 26 weeks. In the treatment groups, neointima reduction was detectable at 7 weeks [dose 1: 0.33 (0.09-1.22) mm2; dose 2: 0.17 (0.05-0.57) mm2; dose 3: 0.03 (0.01-0.13) mm2]. After 26 weeks, a catch-up of neointimal formation in the radioactive groups was most obvious in the low-dose group [dose 1: 0.80 (0.28-2.29) mm2; dose 2: 0.18([0.06-0.52) mm2; dose 3: 0.50 (0.17-1.42) mm2]. Compared to the long-term control group, neointimal reduction was still >60%. No induction of neointimal formation was observed at the edges of the stents. Radiation resulted in delayed re-endothelialization. 188Re stents were capable to reduce intimal hyperplasia and did not cause thrombosis. The edge effect, which was the major limitation of 32P stents, was not observed in 188Re stents

  9. Reduction of intimal hyperplasia with Re-188-labeled stents in a rabbit model at 7 and 26 weeks: an experimental study.

    Tepe, Gunnar; Dietrich, Tobias; Grafen, Franziska; Brehme, Ute; Muschick, Peter; Dinkelborg, Ludger M; Greschniok, Annette; Claussen, Claus D; Duda, Stephan H

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of (188)Re-labeled stents to reduce neointimal formation in a rabbit atherosclerosis model and to test the long-term effects at 7 and 26 weeks. Fifty-nine male New Zealand White rabbits were fed a 0.5% cholesterol diet for 4 weeks before balloon angioplasty and insertion of Palmaz stents in the infrarenal aorta. The animals were sacrificed 7 and 26 weeks after stent implantation. Control stents were compared with (188)Re stents: (dose 1) 11.3 +/- 1.8 MBq; (dose 2) 37.3 +/- 4.2 MBq, and (dose 3) 80.1 +/- 7.8 MBq. Each activity group consisted of a short-term (7 weeks) and a long-term group (26 weeks), resulting in a total of eight study groups. No thrombotic occlusion was observed. The neointimal formation in the control group was 2.11 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68--6.52] mm(2) at 7 weeks and 2.10 (0.62--7.11) at 26 weeks. In the treatment groups, neointima reduction was detectable at 7 weeks [dose 1: 0.33 (0.09--1.22) mm(2); dose 2: 0.17 (0.05--0.57) mm(2); dose 3: 0.03 (0.01--0.13) mm(2)]. After 26 weeks, a catch-up of neointimal formation in the radioactive groups was most obvious in the low-dose group [dose 1: 0.80 (0.28--2.29) mm(2); dose 2: 0.18([0.06--0.52) mm(2); dose 3: 0.50 (0.17--1.42) mm(2)]. Compared to the long-term control group, neointimal reduction was still >60%. No induction of neointimal formation was observed at the edges of the stents. Radiation resulted in delayed re-endothelialization. (188)Re stents were capable to reduce intimal hyperplasia and did not cause thrombosis. The edge effect, which was the major limitation of (32)P stents, was not observed in (188)Re stents. PMID:16059762

  10. Clomifene citrate or unstimulated intrauterine insemination compared with expectant management for unexplained infertility: pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    Bhattacharya, S; Harrild, K; Mollison, J; Wordsworth, S; Tay, C; Harrold, A; McQueen, D; Lyall, H; L. Johnston; Burrage, J; Grossett, S; Walton, H; Lynch, J; Johnstone, A.; Kini, S

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of clomifene citrate and unstimulated intrauterine insemination with expectant management for the treatment of unexplained infertility. Design Three arm parallel group, pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Setting Four teaching hospitals and a district general hospital in Scotland. Participants Couples with infertility for over two years, confirmed ovulation, patent fallopian tubes, and motile sperm. Intervention Expectant management, oral clomifene ci...

  11. 26-week repeated oral dose toxicity study of UP446, a combination of defined extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu, in beagle dogs.

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The needs for relatively safe botanical alternatives to relieve symptoms associated to arthritis have continued to grow in parallel with the ageing population. UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been used as over the counter joint care dietary supplements and a prescription medical food. Significant safety data have been documented in rodents and human for this composition. Here we evaluated the potential adverse effects of orally administered UP446 in beagle dogs following a 26-week repeated oral dose toxicity study. UP446 at doses of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg/day were administered orally to beagle dogs for 26 weeks. A 4-week recovery group from the high dose (1000 mg/kg) and vehicle treated groups were included. No morbidity or mortality was observed for the duration of the study. No significant differences between groups in body weights, food consumption, ophthalmological examinations, electrocardiograms, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weights, gross pathology and histopathology were documented. Emesis, loose feces and diarrhea were noted in both genders at the 1000 mg/kg treatment groups. These clinical signs were considered to be reversible as they were not evident in the recovery period. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of UP446 was considered to be 500 mg/kg/day both in male and female beagle dogs. PMID:27125835

  12. ‘Third wave’ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Jakobsen Janus Christian; Gluud Christian; Kongerslev Mickey; Larsen Kirsten Aaskov; Sørensen Per; Winkel Per; Lange Theis; Søgaard Ulf; Simonsen Erik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diag...

  13. Moxibustion as an adjuvant for benign prostatic hyperplasia with lower urinary tract symptoms: a protocol for a parallel-group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    Lee, Hye-Yoon; Nam, Jong-Kil; Lee, Sang-Don; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Young-Ju; Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Hye-lim; Park, Seong-Ha; Kwon, Jung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to explore the feasibility of using moxibustion as a supplementary intervention and to assess the sample size for verifying the effectiveness and safety of integrative treatment involving moxibustion compared with conventional treatment for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanying moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods and analysis A total of 60 patients diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia by a urologist based on prostate s...

  14. A multicentre, double-blind, randomised, controlled, parallel-group study of the effectiveness of a pharmacist-acquired medication history in an emergency department

    Becerra-Camargo, Jesus; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando; Garcia-Jimenez, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Background Admission to an emergency department (ED) is a key vulnerable moment when patients are at increased risk of medication discrepancies and medication histories are an effective way of ensuring that fewer errors are made. This study measured whether a pharmacist-acquired medication history in an ED focusing on a patient’s current home medication regimen, and available to be used by a doctor when consulting in the ED, would reduce the number of patients having at least 1 medication dis...

  15. Abacavir, zidovudine, or stavudine as paediatric tablets for African HIV-infected children (CHAPAS-3): an open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial

    V Mulenga; Musiime, V.; Kekitiinwa, A.; Cook, AD; G Abongomera; Kenny, J.; Chabala, C; Mirembe, G.; Asiimwe, A; Owen-Powell, E.; Burger, D.; McIlleron, H.; N. Klein; Chintu, C; Thomason, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background WHO 2013 guidelines recommend universal treatment for HIV-infected children younger than 5 years. No paediatric trials have compared nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Africa, where most HIV-infected children live. We aimed to compare stavudine, zidovudine, or abacavir as dual or triple fixed-dose-combination paediatric tablets with lamivudine and nevirapine or efavirenz. Methods In this open-label, parallel-gro...

  16. Twice weekly fluticasone propionate added to emollient maintenance treatment to reduce risk of relapse in atopic dermatitis: randomised, double blind, parallel group study

    Berth-Jones, John; Damstra, Robert J; Golsch, Stefan; Livden, John K; Van Hooteghem, Oliver; Allegra, Fulvio; Parker, Christine A

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate, cream and ointment, applied twice weekly in addition to maintenance treatment with emollients, in reducing the risk of relapse of chronic recurrent atopic dermatitis.

  17. Budesonide/formoterol as effective as prednisolone plus formoterol in acute exacerbations of COPD A double-blind, randomised, non-inferiority, parallel-group, multicentre study

    Andersson Eva; Vogelmeier Claus; Selroos Olof; Ställberg Björn; Ekström Tommy; Larsson Kjell

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Oral corticosteroids and inhaled bronchodilators with or without antibiotics represent standard treatment of COPD exacerbations of moderate severity. Frequent courses of oral steroids may be a safety issue. We wanted to evaluate in an out-patient setting whether a 2-week course of inhaled budesonide/formoterol would be equally effective for treatment of acute COPD exacerbations as standard therapy in patients judged by the investigator not to require hospitalisation. Metho...

  18. Specialist treatment versus self-help for bulimia nervosa: a randomised controlled trial in general practice.

    Durand, Mary Alison; King, Michael

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about general practice management of patients with eating disorders. AIM: To compare the effectiveness of a general practice-based, self-help approach to the treatment of bulimia nervosa with that of specialist outpatient treatment. DESIGN OF STUDY: A prospective, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: General practices and specialist eating disorder clinics in London. METHOD: Patients were recruited from general practitioner (GP) referrals to specia...

  19. Evaluation of sit-stand workstations in an office setting: a randomised controlled trial

    E. F. Graves, Lee; C. Murphy, Rebecca; Shepherd, Sam O.; Cabot, Josephine; Hopkins, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Excessive sitting time is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity independent of physical activity. This aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a sit-stand workstation on sitting time, and vascular, metabolic and musculoskeletal outcomes in office workers, and to investigate workstation acceptability and feasibility. Methods A two-arm, parallel-group, individually randomised controlled trial was conducted in one organisation. Participants were asym...

  20. Erythropoietin in traumatic brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Nichol, Alistair

    2015-02-08

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Laboratory and clinical studies demonstrate a possible beneficial effect of erythropoietin in improving outcomes in the traumatic brain injury cohort. However, there are concerns regarding the association of erythropoietin and thrombosis in the critically ill. A large-scale, multi-centre, blinded, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, randomised trial is currently underway to address this hypothesis.

  1. Therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: single blind randomised controlled trial

    Enander, Jesper; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Lichtenstein, Linn; Alstroem, Katarina; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljotsson, Brjann; Rueck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) compared with online supportive therapy. Design A 12 week single blind parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Academic medical centre. Participants 94 self referred adult outpatients with a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder and a modified Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (BDD-YBOCS) score of ≥20. Concurrent psychotrop...

  2. Renal effects of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin in patients with diabetes who have progressive renal disease (PLANET I) : a randomised clinical trial

    de Zeeuw, Dick; Anzalone, Deborah A.; Cain, Valerie A.; Cressman, Michael D.; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Monyak, John T.; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Sowers, James R.; Vidt, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of lipid-lowering treatments in renoprotection for patients with diabetes is debated. We studied the renal effects of two statins in patients with diabetes who had proteinuria. Methods PLANET I was a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trial done in 147 research centres in A

  3. Spontaneous Uterine Rupture in a Twine Pregnancy at 25-26 Weeks Gestation in a Woman with Previous History of Laparoscopy Myomectomy

    N. Soofizadeh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Uterine rupture in pregnancy is rare and often catastrophic with high incidence of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of uterine rupture is separation of previous cesarean hysterotomy scar. Other common predisposing factors to uterine rupture are previous traumatizing operations or manipulations such as curettage, perforation, myomectomy and excessive or inappropriate uterine stimulation with oxytocin.Case Report: In this case, spontaneous rupture of uterine at 25-26 weeks gestation (twin pregnancy in a 36 year old woman has been reported(G5P2A2L1. She was hospitalized so that preeclampsia can be rule out for her. She underwent laparoscopic removal of myoma and 3 months later IVF was done for her because of secondary infertility. During hospitalization, suddenly she had mild vaginal bleeding and decreased fetal movement. Emergency sonography reported that the two fetuses died and severe oligohydramnius and myomatosis uterine with the biggest size was 90mm.Conclusion: Try of labor was done for her but she didn't respond to induction and the patient was qualified for cesarean section. During the operation, the rupture of the uterine wall was seen in the site of the previous myomectomy and the two dead fetuses were observed in the abdomen without myoma in the uterin. The myoma that was reported by the sonologist was hematoma and omentoma. Uterine wall was repaired.

  4. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    Sackley, Catherine M.; Walker, Marion F; Burton, Chris R; Watkins, Caroline L; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E.; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of an established programme of occupational therapy in maintaining functional activity and reducing further health risks from inactivity in care home residents living with stroke sequelae. Design Pragmatic, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 228 care homes (>10 beds each), both with and without the provision of nursing care, local to 11 trial administrative centres across the United Kingdom. Participants 1042 ca...

  5. CYCLE pilot: a protocol for a pilot randomised study of early cycle ergometry versus routine physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients

    Kho, Michelle E.; Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France; Herridge, Margaret S.; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Pellizzari, Joseph R; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Mourtzakis, Marina; Karachi, Timothy; Cook, Deborah J; ,

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early exercise with in-bed cycling as part of an intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programme has the potential to improve physical and functional outcomes following critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling adults in a multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial (RCT) of early in-bed cycling versus routine physiotherapy to inform a larger RCT. Methods and analysis 60-patient parallel group pilot RCT in 7 Canadian medical-sur...

  6. Randomised controlled trial of homoeopathy versus placebo in perennial allergic rhinitis with overview of four trial series

    Taylor, M. A.; Reilly, D.; Llewellyn-Jones, R.H.; McSharry, C; Aitchison, T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that homoeopathy is a placebo by examining its effect in patients with allergic rhinitis and so contest the evidence from three previous trials in this series. Design: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group, multicentre study. SETTING: Four general practices and a hospital ear, nose, and throat outpatient department. PARTICIPANTS: 51 patients with perennial allergic rhinitis. Intervention: Random assignment to an oral 30c h...

  7. Primary care referral to a commercial provider for weight loss treatment versus standard care: a randomised controlled trial

    Jebb, Susan A.; Ahern, Amy L; Olson, Ashley D.; Aston, Louise M.; Holzapfel, Christina; Stoll, Julia; Amann-Gassner, Ulrike; Simpson, Annie E; Fuller, Nicholas R.; Pearson, Suzanne; Lau, Namson S; Mander, Adrian P; Hauner, Hans; Ian D. Caterson

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity needs effective approaches for weight loss in primary care and community settings. We compared weight loss with standard treatment in primary care with that achieved after referral by the primary care team to a commercial provider in the community. Methods In this parallel group, non-blinded, randomised controlled trial, 772 overweight and obese adults were recruited by primary care practices in Australia, Germany, and the...

  8. Long-term effect of inhaled budesonide in mild and moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomised controlled trial

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Sørensen, T; Lange, Peter;

    1999-01-01

    . METHODS: We used a parallel-group, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled design in a singlecentre study, nested in a continuing epidemiological survey (the Copenhagen City Heart Study). Inclusion criteria were as follows: no asthma; a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and vital...... COPD patients recruited from the general population by screening. We question the role of long-term inhaled corticosteroids in the treatment of mild to moderate COPD....

  9. Effect of formoterol on clinical parameters and lung functions in patients with bronchial asthma: a randomised controlled trial

    Akpinarli, A.; Tuncer, A; Saraclar, Y.; Sekerel, B.; Kalayci, O.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the role of formoterol in the treatment of children with bronchial asthma who are symptomatic despite regular use of inhaled corticosteroids.
METHODS—A randomised, double blind, parallel group, placebo controlled study to investigate the effects of inhaled formoterol (12 µg twice a day) in 32 children with moderate to severe bronchial asthma. The study consisted of two week run in periods and six week treatment periods, during both of which the patients ...

  10. Is low dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy as effective for inflammation and remodeling in asthma? A randomized, parallel group study

    Baraket Melissa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most of the clinical benefits of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS therapy may occur at low doses, results of dose-ranging studies are inconsistent. Although symptom/lung function response to low and high dose ICS medication is comparable, it is uncertain whether low dose ICSs are as effective as high dose in the treatment of inflammation and remodeling. Methods 22 mild or moderate asthmatic adult subjects (corticosteroid free for > 2 months participated in a randomized, parallel group study to compare effects of fluticasone propionate (FP 200 mcg/day and 1000 mcg/day. Alveolar macrophage (AM-derived cytokines and basement membrane thickness (BMT were measured at baseline and after 7 weeks treatment while symptoms, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR to mannitol at baseline and 6 weeks. Results FP improved spirometry, eNO, symptoms and AHR with no difference between low and high dose FP. Both high and low dose FP reduced GM-CSF, TNF-alpha and IL-1ra, with no change in BMT and with no differences between low and high dose FP. Conclusions 200 μg/day of FP was as effective as 1000 μg/day in improving asthma control, airway inflammation, lung function and AHR in adults in the short term. Future studies should examine potential differential effects between low and high dose combination therapy (ICS/long acting beta agonist on inflammation and airway remodeling over longer treatment periods.

  11. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Logan Pip A; Leighton Mat P; Walker Marion F; Armstrong Sarah; Gladman John R F; Sach Tracey H; Smith Shirley; Newell Ossie; Avery Tony; Williams Hywel; Scott James; O’Neil Kathleen; McCluskey Annie; Leach Simon; Barer David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Up to 42% of all stroke patients do not get out of the house as much as they would like. This can impede a person’s quality of life. This study is testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a new outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention by comparing it to usual care. Methods/design This is a multi-centre parallel group individually randomised, controlled trial. At least 506 participants will be recruited through 15 primary and secondary care settings ...

  12. No relevant cardiac, pharmacokinetic or safety interactions between roflumilast and inhaled formoterol in healthy subjects: an open-label, randomised, actively controlled study

    de Mey, Christian; Nassr, Nassr; Lahu, Gezim

    2011-01-01

    Background Roflumilast is an oral, selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor with anti-inflammatory effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The addition of roflumilast to long-acting bronchodilators improves lung function in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. The present study investigated drug-drug interaction effects between inhaled formoterol and oral roflumilast. Methods This was a single-centre (investigational clinic), open, randomised, multiple-dose, parallel-group s...

  13. Randomised controlled trial of short bursts of a potent topical corticosteroid versus prolonged use of a mild preparation for children with mild or moderate atopic eczema

    Thomas, K.S.; Armstrong, S J; Avery, A J; Li Wan Po, A; O'Neill, C; Young, S.; Williams, H C

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a three day burst of a potent corticosteroid is more effective than a mild preparation used for seven days in children with mild or moderate atopic eczema. Design Randomised, double blind, parallel group study of 18 weeks' duration. Setting 13 general practices and a teaching hospital in the Nottingham area. Participants 174 children with mild or moderate atopic eczema recruited from general practices and 33 from a hospital outpatie...

  14. Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial

    Jones, Jannah; Wyse, Rebecca; Finch, Meghan; Lecathelinais, Christophe; Wiggers, John; Marshall, Josephine; Falkiner, Maryann; Pond, Nicole; Yoong, Sze Lin; Hollis, Jenna; Fielding, Alison; Dodds, Pennie; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Freund, Megan; McElduff, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention to increase the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices by centre-based childcare services. The study also sought to determine if the intervention was effective in improving child dietary intake and increasing child physical activity levels while attending childcare. Methods A parallel group, randomised controlled trial was conducted in a sample of 128 childcare ...

  15. Randomised clinical trial

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A B; Smith, G;

    2016-01-01

    of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. METHODS: This was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using...

  16. Efficacy and safety of tonabersat, a gap-junction modulator, in the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized study

    Hauge, A W; Olesen, J; Dahlöf, C G H;

    2009-01-01

    The ability of tonabersat to relieve the symptoms of migraine attacks with or without aura was evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, parallel-group study. Patients received 20 or 40 mg of tonabersat, or 50 mg of sumatriptan (positive control), or placebo at the...... onset of a moderate or severe attack. Headache intensity, relief and recurrence were recorded for 24 h after dosing. On the basis of primary or secondary efficacy measures, tonabersat did not provide a clinically or statistically significant advantage over placebo. Tonabersat generally was well...

  17. A randomized, open, parallel group, multicenter trial to investigate analgesic efficacy and safety of a new transdermal fentanyl patch compared to standard opioid treatment in cancer pain

    Kress, Hans G; Von der Laage, Dorothea; Hoerauf, Klaus H;

    2008-01-01

    pharmacokinetically bioequivalent to the marketed fentanyl patch. To determine noninferiority in efficacy in cancer patients and to compare safety, a clinical trial comparing the new fentanyl patch with standard oral or transdermal opioid treatment was planned. The design was an open, parallel group, multicenter...... trial, in which 220 patients were randomized to receive either the fentanyl patch or standard opioid treatment for 30 days. The primary efficacy variable, pain intensity (PI) on a 0-10-point numerical rating scale, was recorded once daily. The primary endpoint was the relative area under the curve of PI...

  18. A randomized, open, parallel group, multicenter trial to investigate analgesic efficacy and safety of a new transdermal fentanyl patch compared to standard opioid treatment in cancer pain

    Kress, H.G.; Laage, D. Von der; Hoerauf, K.H.;

    2008-01-01

    pharmacokinetically bioequivalent to the marked fentanyl patch. To determine noninferiority in efficacy in cancer patients and to compare safety, a clinical trial comparing the new fentanyl patch with standard oral or transdermal opioid treatment was planned. The design was an open, parallel group, multicenter trial......, in which 220 patients were randomized to receive either the fentanyl patch or standard opioid treatment for 30 days. The primary efficacy variable, pain intensity (PI) on a 0-10-point numerical rating scale, was recorded once daily. The primary endpoint was the relative area under the curve of PI...

  19. Effect of an education and activation programme on functional limitations and patient-perceived recovery in acute and sub-acute shoulder complaints – a randomised clinical trial

    Goossens Marielle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The education and activation programme (EAP aims at coping with psychosocial determinants to prevent the development of chronic shoulder complaints (SCs. The effect of the EAP on functional limitations and patient-perceived recovery after 6 and 26 weeks is evaluated in a randomised clinical trial. Methods Patients with SCs present at rest or elicited by movement and lasting no longer than 3 months were allocated at random to either EAP as an addition to usual care (UC, or to UC only. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 6 and 26 weeks and were analysed by means of multilevel analysis for the group effect. EAP was administered by GPs or by an ambulant therapist (CDB. Patients in the UC group were given UC by their own GP. Results Multilevel analysis failed to show a significant effect of the EAP on either functional limitations or patient-perceived recovery. Analysis showed coincidentally a relation between catastrophising at baseline and functional limitations. Conclusion The EAP has no significant effect on the outcome of SCs after 6 and 26 weeks. The relation between catastrophising at baseline and functional limitations suggests that an intervention focusing specifically on catastrophising may be more successful in reducing functional limitations in the long term. Further research is however needed to evaluate the effect of catastrophising at baseline on the course of SCs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN71777817

  20. Once-daily rupatadine improves the symptoms of chronic idiopathic urticaria: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Dubertret, Louis; Zalupca, Lavinia; Cristodoulo, Tania; Benea, Vasile; Medina, Iris; Fantin, Sara; Lahfa, Morad; Pérez, Iñaki; Izquierdo, Iñaki; Arnaiz, Eva

    2007-01-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, international, dose-ranging study investigated the effect of treatment with rupatadine 5, 10 and 20 mg once daily for 4 weeks on symptoms and interference with daily activities and sleep in 12-65 years-old patients with moderate-to-severe chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). Rupatadine 10 and 20 mg significantly reduced pruritus severity by 62.05% and 71.87% respectively, from baseline, over a period of 4 weeks compared to reduction with placebo by 46.59% (p CIU. Rupatadine decreased pruritus severity, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PMID:17478385

  1. The Breathing for Life Trial: a randomised controlled trial of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO)-based management of asthma during pregnancy and its impact on perinatal outcomes and infant and childhood respiratory health

    Vanessa E. Murphy; Jensen, Megan E.; Mattes, Joerg; Hensley, Michael J.; Giles, Warwick B; Peek, Michael J.; Bisits, Andrew; Callaway, Leonie K.; McCaffery, Kirsten; Barrett, Helen L.; Colditz, Paul B.; Seeho, Sean K.; Attia, John; Searles, Andrew; Doran, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are common during pregnancy and associated with an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. Adjusting asthma treatment based on airway inflammation rather than symptoms reduces the exacerbation rate by 50 %. The Breathing for Life Trial (BLT) will test whether this approach also improves perinatal outcomes. Methods/design BLT is a multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial of asthma management guided by fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO, ...

  2. Prevention of multiple pregnancies in couples with unexplained or mild male subfertility : Randomised controlled trial of in vitro fertilisation with single embryo transfer or in vitro fertilisation in modified natural cycle compared with intrauterine insemination with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation

    Bensdorp, A J; Tjon-Kon-Fat, R. I.; Bossuyt, P.M.M.; Koks, C A M; Oosterhuis, G. J E; van Hoek, A.; Hompes, P.G.A.; Broekmans, F.J.M.; Verhoeve, H R; De Bruin, J. P.; van Golde, R.; Repping, S.; Cohlen, B.J.; Lambers, M D A; van Bommel, P F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of in vitro fertilisation with single embryo transfer or in vitro fertilisation in a modified natural cycle with that of intrauterine insemination with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in terms of a healthy child. Design: Multicentre, open label, three arm, parallel group, randomised controlled non-inferiority trial. Setting: 17 centres in the Netherlands. Participants: Couples seeking fertility treatment after at least 12 months of unprotected inte...

  3. Hemostatic efficacy of TachoSil in liver resection compared with argon beam coagulator treatment: An open, randomized, prospective, multicenter, parallel-group trial

    Fischer, Lars; Seiler, Christoph M.; Broelsch, Christoph E.; Hemptinne, Bernard de; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Mischinger, Hans -Jörg; Gassel, Heinz-Jochen; Rokkjær, Mogens; Schauer, Rolf; Larsen, Peter N.; Tetens, Vilhelm; Büchler, Markus W.

    2011-01-01

    points were drainage duration, volume, and content. Adverse events were collected to evaluate the safety of treatments. The trial was registered internationally (Eudract number 2008-006407-23). Results: Among 119 patients (60 TachoSil and 59 ABC) randomized in 10 tertiary care centers in Europe, the mean......Background: The aim of this trial was to confirm previous results demonstrating the efficacy and safety of a fixed combination tissue sealant versus argon beam coagulation (ABC) treatment in liver resection. Methods: This trial was designed as an international, multicenter, randomized, controlled...... surgical trial with 2 parallel groups. Patients were eligible for intra-operative randomization after elective resection of ≥1 liver segment and primary hemostasis. The primary end point was the time to hemostasis after starting the randomized intervention to obtain secondaty hemostasis. Secondary end...

  4. Hemostatic efficacy of TachoSil in liver resection compared with argon beam coagulator treatment: an open, randomized, prospective, multicenter, parallel-group trial

    Fischer, Lars; Seiler, Christoph M; Broelsch, Christoph E; de Hemptinne, Bernard; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Mischinger, Hans-Jörg; Gassel, Heinz-Jochen; Rokkjaer, Mogens; Schauer, Rolf; Larsen, Peter N; Tetens, Vilhelm; Büchler, Markus W

    2011-01-01

    points were drainage duration, volume, and content. Adverse events were collected to evaluate the safety of treatments. The trial was registered internationally (Eudract number 2008-006407-23). RESULTS: Among 119 patients (60 TachoSil and 59 ABC) randomized in 10 tertiary care centers in Europe, the mean......BACKGROUND: The aim of this trial was to confirm previous results demonstrating the efficacy and safety of a fixed combination tissue sealant versus argon beam coagulation (ABC) treatment in liver resection. METHODS: This trial was designed as an international, multicenter, randomized, controlled...... surgical trial with 2 parallel groups. Patients were eligible for intra-operative randomization after elective resection of = 1 liver segment and primary hemostasis. The primary end point was the time to hemostasis after starting the randomized intervention to obtain secondary hemostasis. Secondary end...

  5. A randomised, open-label study of umeclidinium versus glycopyrronium in patients with COPD

    Tara Rheault

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the efficacy and safety of once-daily umeclidinium 62.5 µg with once-daily glycopyrronium 50 µg in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This was a 12-week, multicentre, randomised, open-label, parallel-group study (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02236611. Patients were randomised 1:1 to umeclidinium 62.5 µg or glycopyrronium 50 µg administered via Ellipta or Breezhaler dry powder inhaler, respectively. The primary endpoint was trough forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 at day 85 in the per-protocol population. Other endpoints included: weighted mean FEV1 over 0–24 h and patient-reported outcomes (transition dyspnoea index score and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score. Adverse events were also assessed. A total of 1037 patients were randomised to treatment. Umeclidinium was non-inferior (margin: −50 mL to glycopyrronium (trough FEV1 at day 85 treatment difference: 24 mL, 95% confidence intervals: −5–54. Improvements in other endpoints were similar between treatments. Adverse event incidences were similar for umeclidinium (37% and glycopyrronium (36%. Once-daily umeclidinium was non-inferior to once-daily glycopyrronium in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in trough FEV1 at day 85. Patient-reported outcomes and safety profiles were similar for both treatments.

  6. Methylprednisolone in combination with interferon beta-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MECOMBIN study): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial

    Ravnborg, Mads; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Andersson, Magnus;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is commonly used to treat patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis; however, the treatment is only partially effective in reducing relapses and progression of disability. Corticosteroids are used to treat relapses in patients with multiple sclerosis. We...... interferon beta-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MECOMBIN) study. Patients were recruited between October, 2002, and March, 2005 from 50 neurology departments in eight countries. We included treatment-naive patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who had an expanded disability...... status scale (EDSS) score of 4 or less. Patients all started to receive interferon beta-1a and after 3 months were randomly assigned to add-on methylprednisolone or placebo 500 mg/day orally for 3 consecutive days per month for 3-4 years. Placebo tablets were identical to methylprednisolone tablets...

  7. A cluster-randomised, parallel group, controlled intervention study of genetic prostate cancer risk assessment and use of PSA tests in general practice--the ProCaRis study

    Kirkegaard, Pia; Vedsted, Peter; Edwards, Adrian;

    2013-01-01

    PSA-testen er det bedste og mest anvendte værktøj til at opspore prostatacancer. Testen er dog behæftet med fejlkilder, som kan føre til overflødig udredning, diagnosticering og behandling. Ved udredning tages biopsier med risiko for behandlingskrævende infektion. Behandlingen for prostatacancer ...

  8. Effectiveness and micro-costing of the KiVa school-based bullying prevention programme in Wales: study protocol for a pragmatic definitive parallel group cluster randomised controlled trial

    Clarkson, Suzy; Axford, Nick; Berry, Vashti; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Bjornstad, Gretchen; Wrigley, Zoe; Charles, Joanna; Hoare, Zoe; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Matthews, Justin; Hutchings, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Background Bullying refers to verbal, physical or psychological aggression repeated over time that is intended to cause harm or distress to the victims who are unable to defend themselves. It is a key public health priority owing to its widespread prevalence in schools and harmful short- and long-term effects on victims’ well-being. There is a need to strengthen the evidence base by testing innovative approaches to preventing bullying. KiVa is a school-based bullying prevention programme with...

  9. Paramedic Initiated Lisinopril For Acute Stroke Treatment (PIL-FAST: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    McColl Elaine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High blood pressure during acute stroke is associated with poorer stroke outcome. Previous trials have failed to show benefit from lowering blood pressure but treatment may have been commenced too late to be effective. The earliest that acute stroke treatments could be initiated is during contact with the emergency medical services (paramedics. However, experience of pre-hospital clinical trials is limited and logistical challenges are likely to be greater than for trials performed in other settings. We report the protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of paramedic initiated blood pressure lowering treatment for hypertension in acute stroke. Methods Trial Design: Double blind parallel group external pilot randomised controlled trial. Setting: Participant recruitment and initial treatment by North East Ambulance Service research trained paramedics responding to the emergency call. Continued treatment in three study hospitals. Participants: Target is recruitment of 60 adults with acute arm weakness due to suspected stroke (within 3 hours of symptom onset and hypertension (systolic BP>160 mmHg. Intervention: Lisinopril 5-10 mg (intervention group, matched placebo (control group, daily for 7 days. Randomisation: Study medication contained within identical pre-randomised "trial packs" carried by research trained paramedics. Outcomes: Study feasibility (recruitment rate, compliance with data collection and clinical data to inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial (blood pressure monitoring, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel ADL Index, Modified Rankin Scale, renal function. Discussion This pilot study is assessing the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of paramedic initiated lisinopril for hypertension early after the onset of acute stroke. The results will inform the design of a definitive RCT to evaluate the effects of very early blood pressure lowering in acute stroke

  10. A comparative study of the clinical efficacy and safety of agomelatine with escitalopram in major depressive disorder patients: A randomized, parallel-group, phase IV study

    Chetan S Urade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the efficacy of agomelatine with escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, improve sleep in MDD patients and study the adverse effects of agomelatine. Materials and Methods: Randomized, parallel-group, open-label study. The primary efficacy outcome was change from baseline to last post-baseline value in Hamilton depression rating scale and Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire scale. Both parametric and nonparametric tests were applied for analysis. Results: Within-group and between-groups comparison of the mean HAMD17 scores showed statistically significant changes (P < 0.0001. Escitalopram showed early onset of response and remission compared to agomelatine at 10th week (P < 0.0001 and 14th week (P < 0.0001, respectively. In agomelatine, within-group and between-groups change of the mean LSEQ score was statistically significant at subsequent follow-up visits (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Escitalopram is superior to agomelatine in efficacy, considering the early response, early remission, and better relief from symptoms of MDD in adults. Agomelatine may be preferred in MDD patients having insomnia as a predominant symptom. Liver function monitoring should be done in patients on long-term agomelatine therapy.

  11. Minocycline versus co-trimoxazole in chancroid : A double-blind randomised study

    Oberoi C

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This double-blind randomised parallel-group study comparing the efficacy and side effects of minocycline with that of cotrimoxazole in chancroid, had 56 analysable cases, 28 in each group. All admissible cases were assessed clinically on a scale of 0 to 3 for number and size of ulcers, pain, discharge, surrounding erythema and bubo. Each drug individually showed significant improvement in all clinical parameters. Minocycline showed significantly better improvement than cotrimoxazole in all parameters. Minocycline had 43% cure rate, and no failures, against 36% cure and 25% failure for cotrimoxazole. Both the drug were well tolerated. We conclude that minocycline is a superior alternative to cotrimoxazole in the therapy of chancroid.

  12. Efficacy and safety of 4 weeks' treatment with combined fluticasone furoate/vilanterol in a single inhaler given once daily in COPD: a placebo-controlled randomised trial

    Lotvall, J.; Bakke, Per S; Bjermer, Leif; Steinshamn, Sigurd Loe; Scott-Wilson, C.; Crim, Courtney; Sanford, L; Haumann, B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fluticasone furoate/vilanterol (FF/VI) is a novel once-daily (OD) inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2 agonist combination in development for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Trial design. A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study. Methods. Participants were patients with moderate-to-severe COPD treated with placebo or FF/VI 400/25 μg OD for 4 weeks. Study objectives were to assess the safety and efficacy of...

  13. Using ecological momentary assessment in testing the effectiveness of an alcohol intervention: a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial.

    Carmen V Voogt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption of college students has a fluctuating nature, which might impact the measurement of intervention effects. By using 25 follow-up time-points, this study tested whether intervention effects are robust or might vary over time. METHODS: Data were used from a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial applying ecological momentary assessment (EMA with 30 data time-points in total. Students between 18 and 24 years old who reported heavy drinking in the past six months and who were ready to change their alcohol consumption were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 456: web-based brief alcohol intervention and control condition (n = 451: no intervention. Outcome measures were weekly alcohol consumption, frequency of binge drinking, and heavy drinking status. RESULTS: According to the intention-to-treat principle, regression analyses revealed that intervention effects on alcohol consumption varied when exploring multiple follow-up time-points. Intervention effects were found for a weekly alcohol consumption at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 weeks follow-up, b frequency of binge drinking at 1, 2, 7, and 12 weeks follow-up, and c heavy drinking status at 1, 2, 7, and 16 weeks follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: This research showed that the commonly used one and six month follow-up time-points are relatively arbitrary and not using EMA might bring forth erroneous conclusions on the effectiveness of interventions. Therefore, future trials in alcohol prevention research and beyond are encouraged to apply EMA when assessing outcome measures and intervention effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register NTR2665.

  14. Randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid in topical treatment of eczema

    Gandy JJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Justin J Gandy, Jacques R Snyman, Constance EJ van RensburgDepartment of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South AfricaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid (CHD-FA in the treatment of eczema in patients two years and older.Methods: In this single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study, 36 volunteers with predetermined eczema were randomly assigned to receive either the study drug or placebo twice daily for four weeks.Results: All safety parameters remained within normal limits, with no significant differences in either group. Significant differences were observed for both severity and erythema in the placebo and CHD-FA treated groups, and a significant difference was observed for scaling in the placebo-treated group. With regard to the investigator assessment of global response to treatment, a significant improvement was observed in the CHD-FA group when compared with the placebo group. A statistically significant decrease in visual analog scale score was observed in both groups, when comparing the baseline with the final results.Conclusion: CHD-FA was well tolerated, with no difference in reported side effects other than a short-lived burning sensation on application. CHD-FA significantly improved some aspects of eczema. Investigator assessment of global response to treatment with CHD-FA was significantly better than that with emollient therapy alone. The results of this small exploratory study suggest that CHD-FA warrants further investigation in the treatment of eczema.Keywords: fulvic acid, eczema, anti-inflammatory, efficacy, safety

  15. Adding liraglutide to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: onset of treatment effects over time

    Gallwitz, B; Vaag, A; Falahati, A; Madsbad, S

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the onset of treatment effects over time observed for liraglutide in combination with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). METHODS: This analysis included patients from three phase 3, 26-week, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group trials. Prior to randomisation, patients underwent...... a run-in and titration period with metformin (Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes-2, LEAD-2), glimepiride (LEAD-1) or metformin plus rosiglitazone (LEAD-4). Patients were then randomised to receive liraglutide (0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 mg once-daily), active comparator and/or placebo. For this analysis...

  16. The effectiveness of pulsed electrical stimulation (E-PES in the management of osteoarthritis of the knee: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Gupta Ritu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the knee is one of the main causes of musculoskeletal disability in the western world. Current available management options provide symptomatic relief (exercise and self-management, medication and surgery but do not, in general, address the disease process itself. Moreover, adverse effects and complications with some of these interventions (medication and surgery and the presence of co-morbidities commonly restrict their use. There is clearly a need to investigate treatments that are more widely applicable for symptom management and which may also directly address the disease process itself. In two randomised controlled trials of four and 12 weeks duration, pulsed electrical stimulation was shown to be effective in managing the symptoms of OA of the knee. Laboratory and animal studies demonstrate the capacity of externally applied electric and electromagnetic fields to positively affect chondrocyte proliferation and extracellular matrix protein production. This latter evidence provides strong theoretical support for the use of electrical stimulation to maintain and repair cartilage in the clinical setting and highlights its potential as a disease-modifying modality. Methods/Design A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, repeated measures trial to examine the effectiveness of pulsed electrical stimulation in providing symptomatic relief for people with OA of the knee over 26 weeks. Seventy people will be recruited and information regarding age, gender, body mass index and medication use will be recorded. The population will be stratified for age, gender and baseline pain levels. Outcome measures will include pain (100 mm VAS and WOMAC 3.1, function (WOMAC 3.1, stiffness (WOMAC 3.1, patient global assessment (100 mm VAS and quality of life (SF-36. These outcomes will be measured at baseline, four, 16 and 26 weeks. Activity levels will be measured at baseline and 16 weeks using accelerometers and

  17. Cardiac safety of indacaterol in healthy subjects: a randomized, multidose, placebo- and positive-controlled, parallel-group thorough QT study

    Woessner Ralph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indacaterol is a novel once-daily ultra long-acting β2-agonist for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is known that β2-agonists, like other adrenergic compounds, can prolong the QT-interval. This thorough QT/QTc study (as per ICH E14 guideline evaluated the effect of indacaterol on the QT interval in healthy subjects. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo- and positive-controlled (open-label moxifloxacin study, non-smoking healthy subjects (18-55 years, body mass index: 18.5-32.0 kg/m2 were randomized (4:4:2:4:1 to 14-day treatment with once-daily indacaterol (150 μg, 300 μg, or 600 μg, placebo, or placebo/moxifloxacin (double-blind 14-day treatment with placebo and a single open-label dose of 400 mg moxifloxacin on Day 14. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline on Day 14 in QTcF (QT interval corrected for heart rate using Fridericia's formula. Results In total, 404 subjects were randomized to receive indacaterol (150 [n = 108], 300 [n = 108], 600 μg [n = 54], placebo (n = 107, or placebo/moxifloxacin (n = 27; 388 subjects completed the study. Maximal time-matched mean (90% confidence intervals treatment differences from placebo in QTcF change from baseline on Day 14 were 2.66 (0.55, 4.77, 2.98 (1.02, 4.93 and 3.34 (0.86, 5.82 ms for indacaterol 150 μg, 300 μg and 600 μg, respectively. Study sensitivity was confirmed with moxifloxacin demonstrating a significant maximal time-matched QTcF prolongation of 13.90 (10.58, 17.22 ms compared to placebo. All indacaterol doses were well tolerated. Conclusion Indacaterol, at doses up to 600 μg once daily (2-4 times the therapeutic dose does not have any clinically relevant effect on the QT interval. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01263808

  18. Oral fibrinogen-depleting agent lumbrokinase for secondary ischemic stroke prevention: results from a multicenter, randomized, parallel-group and controlled clinical trial

    CAO Yong-jun; ZHANG Xia; WANG Wan-hua; ZHAI Wan-qing; QIAN Ju-fen; WANG Jian-sheng; CHEN Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated fibrinogen (Fg) level is a known risk factor for ischemic stroke.There are few clinical trials on oral fibrinogen-depleting therapies for secondary ischemic stroke prevention.We aimed to assess the effects of one-year therapy with oral lumbrokinase enteric-coated capsules on secondary ischemic stroke prevention.Methods This is a multicenter,randomized,parallel group and controlled study that began treatment in hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke and continued for 12 months.Patients were randomized to either the control group that received the standard stroke treatment or the fibrinogen-depleting group that received the standard stroke treatment plus enteric-coated lumbrokinase capsules.The NIH Stroke Scale scores (NIHSSs) and plasma Fg level were recorded.The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and status of plaques were examined through carotid ultrasound examination.Primary outcomes included all-cause mortality,any event of recurrent ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA),hemorrhagic stroke,myocardial infarction and angina,and other noncerebral ischemia or hemorrhage.Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Long-rank test were used to compare total vascular end point incidence between the two groups.Comparison of median values between two groups was done by the Student t test,one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA),or non-parametric rank sum test.Results A total of 310 patients were enrolled,192 patients in the treatment group and 118 patients in the control group.Compared to the control group,the treatment group showed favorable outcomes in the Fg level,carotid IMT,the detection rate of vulnerable plaques,the volume of carotid plaques,NIHSS scores,and incidence of total vascular (6.78% and 2.08%,respectively) and cerebral vascular events (5.93% and 1.04%,respectively) (P <0.05).In the treatment group,the volume of carotid plaques was significantly related to the carotid IMT,the plaque diameter,width and number (P

  19. Post-discharge management following hip fracture - get you back to B4: A parallel group, randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Brown Roy A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall-related hip fractures result in significant personal and societal consequences; importantly, up to half of older adults with hip fracture never regain their previous level of mobility. Strategies of follow-up care for older adults after fracture have improved investigation for osteoporosis; but managing bone health alone is not enough. Prevention of fractures requires management of both bone health and falls risk factors (including the contributing role of cognition, balance and continence to improve outcomes. Methods/Design This is a parallel group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a post-fracture clinic compared with usual care on mobility for older adults following their hospitalization for hip fracture. Participants randomized to the intervention will attend a fracture follow-up clinic where a geriatrician and physiotherapist will assess and manage their mobility and other health issues. Depending on needs identified at the clinical assessment, participants may receive individualized and group-based outpatient physiotherapy, and a home exercise program. Our primary objective is to assess the effectiveness of a novel post-discharge fracture management strategy on the mobility of older adults after hip fracture. We will enrol 130 older adults (65 years+ who have sustained a hip fracture in the previous three months, and were admitted to hospital from home and are expected to be discharged home. We will exclude older adults who prior to the fracture were: unable to walk 10 meters; diagnosed with dementia and/or significant comorbidities that would preclude their participation in the clinical service. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to the Intervention or Usual Care groups by remote allocation. Treatment allocation will be concealed; investigators, measurement team and primary data analysts will be blinded to group allocation. Our primary outcome is mobility

  20. The Efficacy and Safety of Wenxin Keli in Patients with Frequent Premature Ventricular Contractions: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Parallel-group, Multicenter Trial

    Wei Hua; Run-Lin Gao; Bu-Chang Zhao; Jing Wang; Xu-Hua Chen; Chi Cai; Shu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) are common in the general population,and frequent PVCs may result in the poor quality of life or even the damage of cardiac function.We examined the efficacy and safety of a traditional Chinese medicine Wenxin Keli for the treatment of frequent PVCs among a relatively large Chinese cohort.Methods:We performed a randomized,double-blind,placebo-controlled,parallel-group,multicenter trial.A total of 1200 eligible participants were randomly assigned in a ratio of 1:1 to receive Wenxin Keli or the placebo for 4 weeks.The primary and secondary endpoint was the change of PVC numbers and PVC-related symptoms after a 4-week treatment compared with baseline,respectively.In addition,vital signs,laboratory values,and electrocardiographic parameters were assessed in a safety analysis.Results:At the initial evaluation,no significant differences in the baseline characteristics were observed between the Wenxin Keli group and the placebo group.A smaller number of PVCs was observed after the 4-week treatment than at baseline,in both the Wenxin Keli group (5686 ± 5940 vs.15,138 ± 7597 beats/d,P < 0.001) and the placebo group (10,592 ± 8009 vs.14,529 ± 5929 beats/d,P < 0.001);moreover,the Wenxin Keli group demonstrated a significantly greater reduction in the frequency of PVCs than the placebo group (P < 0.001).In a full analysis set,patients in the Wenxin Keli group exhibited significantly higher total effective responses in the reduction of PVCs compared to those in the placebo group (83.8% vs.43.5%,P < 0.001).The per-protocol analysis yielded similar results (83.0% vs.39.3%,P < 0.001).Treatment with Wenxin Keli also demonstrated superior performance compared to the placebo with respect to PVC-related symptoms.No severe adverse effects attributable to Wenxin Keli were reported.Conclusions:Wenxin Keli treatment effectively reduced the overall number of PVCs and alleviated PVC-related symptoms in patients

  1. Tweeting links to Cochrane Schizophrenia Group reviews: a randomised controlled trial

    Adams, C E; Bodart, A Y M; Sampson, S; Zhao, S; Montgomery, A A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of using health social media on web activity. Design Individually randomised controlled parallel group superiority trial. Setting Twitter and Weibo. Participants 170 Cochrane Schizophrenia Group full reviews with an abstract and plain language summary web page. Interventions Three randomly ordered slightly different 140 character or less messages, each containing a short URL to the freely accessible summary page sent on specific times on one single day. This was compared with no messaging. Outcome The primary outcome was web page visits at 1 week. Secondary outcomes were other metrics of web activity at 1 week. Results 85 reviews were randomised to each of the intervention and control arms. Google Analytics allowed 100% follow-up within 1 week of completion. Intervention and control reviews received a total of 1162 and 449 visits, respectively (IRR 2.7, 95% CI 2.2 to 3.3). Fewer intervention reviews had single page only visits (16% vs 31%, OR 0.41, 0.19 to 0.88) and users spent more time viewing intervention reviews (geometric mean 76 vs 31 s, ratio 2.5, 1.3 to 4.6). Other secondary metrics of web activity all showed strong evidence in favour of the intervention. Conclusions Tweeting in this limited area of healthcare increases ‘product placement’ of evidence with the potential for that to influence care. Trial registration number ISRCTN84658943. PMID:26956164

  2. The serious mental illness health improvement profile [HIP]: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Swift Louise

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serious mental illness Health Improvement Profile [HIP] is a brief pragmatic tool, which enables mental health nurses to work together with patients to screen physical health and take evidence-based action when variables are identified to be at risk. Piloting has demonstrated clinical utility and acceptability. Methods/Design A single blind parallel group cluster randomised controlled trial with secondary economic analysis and process observation. Unit of randomisation: mental health nurses [MHNs] working in adult community mental health teams across two NHS Trusts. Subjects: Patients over 18 years with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder on the caseload of participating MHNs. Primary objective: To determine the effects of the HIP programme on patients' physical wellbeing assessed by the physical component score of the Medical Outcome Study (MOS 36 Item Short Form Health Survey version 2 [SF-36v2]. Secondary objectives: To determine the effects of the HIP programme on: cost effectiveness, mental wellbeing, cardiovascular risk, physical health care attitudes and knowledge of MHNs and to determine the acceptability of the HIP Programme in the NHS. Consented nurses (and patients will be randomised to receive the HIP Programme or treatment as usual. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and 12 months with a process observation after 12 months to include evaluation of patients' and professionals' experience and observation of any effect on care plans and primary-secondary care interface communication. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis. Discussion The results of the trial and process observation will provide information about the effectiveness of the HIP Programme in supporting MHNs to address physical comorbidity in serious mental illness. Given the current unacceptable prevalence of physical comorbidity and mortality in the serious mental illness population, it is

  3. Long-term efficacy and safety of incobotulinumtoxinA and conventional treatment of poststroke arm spasticity: a prospective, non-interventional, open-label, parallel-group study

    Dressler, Dirk; Rychlik, Reinhard; Kreimendahl, Fabian; Schnur, Nicole; Lambert-Baumann, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of incobotulinumtoxinA with conventional antispastic therapy for poststroke arm spasticity in routine clinical practice over a 1-year period. Design Prospective, non-interventional, open-label, parallel-group study. Setting 47 centres in Germany. Participants Patients with poststroke arm spasticity; 108 receiving incobotulinumtoxinA, 110 conventional therapy. Intervention Conventional antispastic treatment including oral antispastic medications, ph...

  4. A DOUBLE BLIND, RANDOMIZED, PARALLEL GROUP, PROSPECTIVE, CLINICAL STUDY FOR EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF LOW DOSE DOXEPIN IN COMPARISION WITH ZOPICLONE IN ADULT AND ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY INSOMNIA

    Pali; Deepti

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia is underappreciated public health issue. In recent years, insomnia treatment has advanced beyond the routine use of benzodiazepines. AIMS: To compare the efficacy and safety of low dose Doxepin with Zopiclone in patients with primary insomnia. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A double blind, randomized parallel group, prospective study of low dose Doxepin (n=20) and Zopiclone (n=15) in patients with primary insomnia. METHODS & MATERIAL: Patients fulfilling the sel...

  5. Ultrasound in management of rheumatoid arthritis: ARCTIC randomised controlled strategy trial

    Aga, Anna-Birgitte; Olsen, Inge Christoffer; Lillegraven, Siri; Hammer, Hilde B; Uhlig, Till; Fremstad, Hallvard; Madland, Tor Magne; Lexberg, Åse Stavland; Haukeland, Hilde; Rødevand, Erik; Høili, Christian; Stray, Hilde; Noraas, Anne; Hansen, Inger Johanne Widding; Bakland, Gunnstein; Nordberg, Lena Bugge; van der Heijde, Désirée; Kvien, Tore K

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a treatment strategy based on structured ultrasound assessment would lead to improved outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis, compared with a conventional strategy. Design Multicentre, open label, two arm, parallel group, randomised controlled strategy trial. Setting Ten rheumatology departments and one specialist centre in Norway, from September 2010 to September 2015. Participants 238 patients were recruited between September 2010 and April 2013, of which 230 (141 (61%) female) received the allocated intervention and were analysed for the primary outcome. The main inclusion criteria were age 18-75 years, fulfilment of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug naivety with indication for disease modifying drug therapy, and time from first patient reported swollen joint less than two years. Patients with abnormal kidney or liver function or major comorbidities were excluded. Interventions 122 patients were randomised to an ultrasound tight control strategy targeting clinical and imaging remission, and 116 patients were randomised to a conventional tight control strategy targeting clinical remission. Patients in both arms were treated according to the same disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug escalation strategy, with 13 visits over two years. Main outcome measures The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a combination between 16 and 24 months of clinical remission, no swollen joints, and non-progression of radiographic joint damage. Secondary outcomes included measures of disease activity, radiographic progression, functioning, quality of life, and adverse events. All participants who attended at least one follow-up visit were included in the full analysis set. Results 26 (22%) of the 118 analysed patients in the ultrasound tight control arm and 21 (19%) of the 112 analysed patients in the

  6. Strategies to improve retention in randomised trials

    Brueton, V. C.; Tierney, J.; Stenning, S; Harding, S; Meredith, S.; Nazareth, I; Rait, G

    2013-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up from randomised trials can introduce bias and reduce study power, affecting the generalisability, validity and reliability of results. Many strategies are used to reduce loss to follow-up and improve retention but few have been formally evaluated. Objectives To quantify the effect of strategies to improve retention on the proportion of participants retained in randomised trials and to investigate if the effect varied by trial strategy and trial setting. Search met...

  7. Randomised trial of biofeedback training for encopresis.

    Plas, R. N.; Benninga, M.A.; Redekop, W. K.; Taminiau, J A; Büller, H A

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate biofeedback training in children with encopresis and the effect on psychosocial function. DESIGN: Prospective controlled randomised study. PATIENT INTERVENTIONS: A multimodal treatment of six weeks. Children were randomised into two groups. Each group received dietary and toilet advice, enemas, oral laxatives, and anorectal manometry. One group also received five biofeedback training sessions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Successful treatment was defined as less than two episodes ...

  8. ‘Third wave’ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Jakobsen Janus Christian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either ‘third wave‘ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck’s Depression Inventory, and The World Health Organisation-Five Well-being Index 1999. Discussion Interventions for depression have until now shown relatively small effects. Our trial results will provide knowledge about the effects of two modern psychotherapeutic interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials: NCT01070134

  9. Randomised social-skills training and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder - The SOSTRA trial protocol

    Thomsen Per

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are hyperactive and impulsive, cannot maintain attention, and have difficulties with social interactions. Medical treatment may alleviate symptoms of ADHD, but seldom solves difficulties with social interactions. Social-skills training may benefit ADHD children in their social interactions. We want to examine the effects of social-skills training on difficulties related to the children's ADHD symptoms and social interactions. Methods/Design The design is randomised two-armed, parallel group, assessor-blinded trial. Children aged 8-12 years with a diagnosis of ADHD are randomised to social-skills training and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone. A sample size calculation estimated that at least 52 children must be included to show a 4-point difference in the primary outcome on the Conners 3rd Edition subscale for 'hyperactivity-impulsivity' between the intervention group and the control group. The outcomes will be assessed 3 and 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure is ADHD symptoms. The secondary outcome is social skills. Tertiary outcomes include the relationship between social skills and symptoms of ADHD, the ability to form attachment, and parents' ADHD symptoms. Discussion We hope that the results from this trial will show that the social-skills training together with medication may have a greater general effect on ADHD symptoms and social and emotional competencies than medication alone. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT00937469

  10. Pancreatitis, very early compared with normal start of enteral feeding (PYTHON trial: design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial

    Schaapherder Alexander F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In predicted severe acute pancreatitis, infections have a negative effect on clinical outcome. A start of enteral nutrition (EN within 24 hours of onset may reduce the number of infections as compared to the current practice of starting an oral diet and EN if necessary at 3-4 days after admission. Methods/Design The PYTHON trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group, superiority multicenter trial. Patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (Imrie-score ≥ 3 or APACHE-II score ≥ 8 or CRP > 150 mg/L will be randomised to EN within 24 hours or an oral diet and EN if necessary, after 72 hours after hospital admission. During a 3-year period, 208 patients will be enrolled from 20 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite of mortality or infections (bacteraemia, infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis, pneumonia during hospital stay or within 6 months following randomisation. Secondary endpoints include other major morbidity (e.g. new onset organ failure, need for intervention, intolerance of enteral feeding and total costs from a societal perspective. Discussion The PYTHON trial is designed to show that a very early ( Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN18170985

  11. Generation of allocation sequences in randomised trials: chance, not choice.

    Schulz, Kenneth F; Grimes, David A

    2002-02-01

    The randomised controlled trial sets the gold standard of clinical research. However, randomisation persists as perhaps the least-understood aspect of a trial. Moreover, anything short of proper randomisation courts selection and confounding biases. Researchers should spurn all systematic, non-random methods of allocation. Trial participants should be assigned to comparison groups based on a random process. Simple (unrestricted) randomisation, analogous to repeated fair coin-tossing, is the most basic of sequence generation approaches. Furthermore, no other approach, irrespective of its complexity and sophistication, surpasses simple randomisation for prevention of bias. Investigators should, therefore, use this method more often than they do, and readers should expect and accept disparities in group sizes. Several other complicated restricted randomisation procedures limit the likelihood of undesirable sample size imbalances in the intervention groups. The most frequently used restricted sequence generation procedure is blocked randomisation. If this method is used, investigators should randomly vary the block sizes and use larger block sizes, particularly in an unblinded trial. Other restricted procedures, such as urn randomisation, combine beneficial attributes of simple and restricted randomisation by preserving most of the unpredictability while achieving some balance. The effectiveness of stratified randomisation depends on use of a restricted randomisation approach to balance the allocation sequences for each stratum. Generation of a proper randomisation sequence takes little time and effort but affords big rewards in scientific accuracy and credibility. Investigators should devote appropriate resources to the generation of properly randomised trials and reporting their methods clearly. PMID:11853818

  12. Hypnosis Antenatal Training for Childbirth (HATCh: a randomised controlled trial [NCT00282204

    Baghurst Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although medical interventions play an important role in preserving lives and maternal comfort they have become increasingly routine in normal childbirth. This may increase the risk of associated complications and a less satisfactory birth experience. Antenatal hypnosis is associated with a reduced need for pharmacological interventions during childbirth. This trial seeks to determine the efficacy or otherwise of antenatal group hypnosis preparation for childbirth in late pregnancy. Methods/design A single centre, randomised controlled trial using a 3 arm parallel group design in the largest tertiary maternity unit in South Australia. Group 1 participants receive antenatal hypnosis training in preparation for childbirth administered by a qualified hypnotherapist with the use of an audio compact disc on hypnosis for re-enforcement; Group 2 consists of antenatal hypnosis training in preparation for childbirth using an audio compact disc on hypnosis administered by a nurse with no training in hypnotherapy; Group 3 participants continue with their usual preparation for childbirth with no additional intervention. Women > 34 and Discussion If effective, hypnosis would be a simple, inexpensive way to improve the childbirth experience, reduce complications associated with pharmacological interventions, yield cost savings in maternity care, and this trial will provide evidence to guide clinical practice.

  13. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. METHODS A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. RESULTS The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. PMID:27211885

  14. Design paper: The CapOpus trial: a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of specialized addiction treatment versus treatment as usual for young patients with cannabis abuse and psychosis

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Fohlmann, Allan; Larsen, Anne-Mette;

    2008-01-01

    ) treatment as usual. The specialized addiction treatment is manualized and consists of both individual and group-based motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy, and incorporates both the family and the case manager of the patient.The primary outcome measure will be changes in amount of...... major objective for the CapOpus trial is to evaluate the additional effect on cannabis abuse of a specialized addiction treatment program adding group treatment and motivational interviewing to treatment as usual. DESIGN: The trial is designed as a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical...... trial. Patients are primarily recruited through early-psychosis detection teams, community mental health centers, and assertive community treatment teams. Patients are randomized to one of two treatment arms, both lasting six months: 1) specialized addiction treatment plus treatment as usual or 2...

  15. Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT): protocol for a randomised controlled trial of PACT versus usual physiotherapy care for adults with chronic low back pain

    Godfrey, Emma; Galea Holmes, Melissa; Wileman, Vari; McCracken, Lance; Moss-Morris, Rona; Pallet, John; Sanders, Duncan; Barcellona, Massimo; Critchley, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common condition and source of significant suffering, disability and healthcare costs. Current physiotherapy treatment is moderately effective. Combining theory-based psychological methods with physiotherapy could improve outcomes for people with CLBP. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT) on functioning in patients with CLBP. Methods and analysis The PACT trial is a two-armed, parallel-group, multicentre RCT to assess the efficacy of PACT in comparison with usual physiotherapy care (UC). 240 patients referred to physiotherapy with CLBP will be recruited from three National Health Service (NHS) hospitals trusts. Inclusion criteria are: age ≥18 years, CLBP ≥12-week duration, scoring ≥3 points on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and adequate understanding of spoken and written English to participate. Patients will be randomised to PACT or UC (120 per arm stratified by centre) by an independent randomisation service and followed up at 3 and 12 months post randomisation. The sample size of 240 will provide adequate power to detect a standardised mean difference of 0.40 in the primary outcome (RMDQ; 5% significance, 80% power) assuming attrition of 20%. Analysis will be by intention to treat conducted by the trial statistician, blind to treatment group, following a prespecified analysis plan. Estimates of treatment effect at the follow-up assessments will use an intention-to-treat framework, implemented using a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination This trial has full ethical approval (14/SC/0277). It will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The results will enable clinicians, patients and health service managers to make informed decisions regarding the efficacy of PACT for patients with CLBP. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  16. The effect of escitalopram versus placebo on perceived stress and salivary cortisol in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with depression-A randomised trial

    Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj; Gether, Ulrik;

    2012-01-01

    The effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) on healthy individuals remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that escitalopram decreases perceived stress and salivary cortisol. The trial has a randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design. After informed consent 80...... healthy first-degree relatives to patients with depression were randomly allocated to receive daily tablets of escitalopram 10mg or placebo for 4 weeks. The area under the curve (AUC) for awakening and all day salivary cortisol was analysed in samples taken immediately after awakening and at 15-min...... significant decreases were found in awakening salivary cortisol (P=0.04) and in all day salivary cortisol (P=0.02) in the escitalopram group compared with the placebo group. There were no statistically significant differences in perceived stress between the intervention groups. These findings from a...

  17. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation aimed at improving outdoor mobility for people after stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Logan Pip A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 42% of all stroke patients do not get out of the house as much as they would like. This can impede a person’s quality of life. This study is testing the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of a new outdoor mobility rehabilitation intervention by comparing it to usual care. Methods/design This is a multi-centre parallel group individually randomised, controlled trial. At least 506 participants will be recruited through 15 primary and secondary care settings and will be eligible if they are over 18 years of age, have had a stroke and wish to get out of the house more often. Participants are being randomly allocated to either the intervention group or the control group. Intervention group participants receive up to 12 rehabilitation outdoor mobility sessions over up to four months. The main component of the intervention is repeated practice of outdoor mobility with a therapist. Control group participants are receiving the usual intervention for outdoor mobility limitations: verbal advice and provision of leaflets provided over one session. Outcome measures are being collected using postal questionnaires, travel calendars and by independent assessors. The primary outcome measure is the Social Function domain of the SF36v2 quality of life assessment six months after recruitment. The secondary outcome measures include: functional ability, mobility, the number of journeys (monthly travel diaries, satisfaction with outdoor mobility, mood, health-related quality of life, resource use of health and social care. Carer mood information is also being collected. The mean Social Function score of the SF-36v2 will be compared between treatment arms using a multiple membership form of mixed effects multiple regression analysis adjusting for centre (as a fixed effect, age and baseline Social Function score as covariates and therapist as a multiple membership random effect. Regression coefficients and 95% confidence

  18. Targeting young drinkers online: the effectiveness of a web-based brief alcohol intervention in reducing heavy drinking among college students: study protocol of a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial

    Lemmers Lex ACJ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of heavy drinking among college students and its associated health related consequences highlights an urgent need for alcohol prevention programs targeting 18 to 24 year olds. Nevertheless, current alcohol prevention programs in the Netherlands pay surprisingly little attention to the drinking patterns of this specific age group. The study described in this protocol will test the effectiveness of a web-based brief alcohol intervention that is aimed at reducing alcohol use among heavy drinking college students aged 18 to 24 years old. Methods/Design The effectiveness of the What Do You Drink web-based brief alcohol intervention will be tested among 908 heavy drinking college students in a two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial. Participants will be allocated at random to either the experimental (N = 454: web-based brief alcohol intervention or control condition (N = 454: no intervention. The primary outcome measure will be the percentage of participants who drink within the normative limits of the Dutch National Health Council for low-risk drinking. These limits specify that, for heavy alcohol use, the mean consumption cannot exceed 14 or 21 glasses of standard alcohol units per week for females and males, respectively, while for binge drinking, the consumption cannot exceed five or more glasses of standard alcohol units on one drinking occasion at least once per week within one month and six months after the intervention. Reductions in mean weekly alcohol consumption and frequency of binge drinking are also primary outcome measures. Weekly Ecological Momentary Assessment will measure alcohol-related cognitions, that is, attitudes, self-efficacy, subjective norms and alcohol expectancies, which will be included as the secondary outcome measures. Discussion This study protocol describes the two-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial developed to evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based brief

  19. A DOUBLE BLIND, RANDOMIZED, PARALLEL GROUP, PROSPECTIVE, CLINICAL STUDY FOR EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF LOW DOSE DOXEPIN IN COMPARISION WITH ZOPICLONE IN ADULT AND ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY INSOMNIA

    Pali

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia is underappreciated public health issue. In recent years, insomnia treatment has advanced beyond the routine use of benzodiazepines. AIMS: To compare the efficacy and safety of low dose Doxepin with Zopiclone in patients with primary insomnia. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A double blind, randomized parallel group, prospective study of low dose Doxepin (n=20 and Zopiclone (n=15 in patients with primary insomnia. METHODS & MATERIAL: Patients fulfilling the selection criteria were enrolled. Enrolled patients were randomized to 2 groups- of low dose Doxepin(3mg and Zopiclone (3.75mg. Patients were provided with sleep diaries to record sleep parameters, change in alertness and mood, sleepiness scale score and other adverse events were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student ‘t’ test. RESULTS: Both the groups show significant reduction the time of wakening after sleep onset, with improvement in both total sleep time & sleep efficiency. Both the drugs were well tolerated and percentage change in mood and alertness was comparable. CONCLUSION: Low dose Doxepin was found to be as effective and safe as Zopiclone in patients of primary insomnia

  20. Design paper: The CapOpus trial: A randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial of specialized addiction treatment versus treatment as usual for young patients with cannabis abuse and psychosis

    Gluud Christian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies indicate a link between cannabis-use and psychosis as well as more severe psychosis in those with existing psychotic disorders. There is currently insufficient evidence to decide the optimal way to treat cannabis abuse among patients with psychosis. Objectives The major objective for the CapOpus trial is to evaluate the additional effect on cannabis abuse of a specialized addiction treatment program adding group treatment and motivational interviewing to treatment as usual. Design The trial is designed as a randomized, parallel-group, observer-blinded clinical trial. Patients are primarily recruited through early-psychosis detection teams, community mental health centers, and assertive community treatment teams. Patients are randomized to one of two treatment arms, both lasting six months: 1 specialized addiction treatment plus treatment as usual or 2 treatment as usual. The specialized addiction treatment is manualized and consists of both individual and group-based motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy, and incorporates both the family and the case manager of the patient. The primary outcome measure will be changes in amount of cannabis consumption over time. Other outcome measures will be psychosis symptoms, cognitive functioning, quality of life, social functioning, and cost-benefit analyses. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00484302.

  1. Quetiapine augmentation of SRIs in treatment refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study [ISRCTN83050762

    van Ameringen Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective in the treatment of OCD, many patients fail to respond to these agents. Growing evidence from open-label and placebo-controlled trials suggests a role for augmentation of SRIs with atypical antipsychotics in OCD. Quetiapine is generally well tolerated and previous open-label data has produced mixed results in OCD and additional controlled data is needed. Methods We undertook a double-blind, randomised, parallel-group, flexible-dose, placebo-controlled study of quetiapine augmentation in subjects who had responded inadequately to open-label treatment with an SRI for 12 weeks. Following informed consent and screening, forty-two subjects were randomised to either placebo or quetiapine for six weeks. Results There was significant improvement from baseline to endpoint on the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale in both the quetiapine and placebo groups (quetiapine, n = 20, p Conclusions In this study, quetiapine augmentation was no more effective than placebo augmentation of SRIs. A number of limitations in study design make comparisons with previous studies in this area difficult and probably contributed to our negative findings. Future work in this important clinical area should address these limitations.

  2. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial: study protocol, rationale and feasibility of a randomised multicentre trial

    Vester-Andersen Morten

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients. Methods and design The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure is all-cause 30-day mortality. We aim to enrol 400 patients in seven Danish hospitals. The sample size allows us to detect or refute a 34% relative risk reduction of mortality with 80% power. Discussion This trial evaluates the benefits and possible harm of intermediate care. The results may potentially influence the survival of many high-risk surgical patients. As a pioneer trial in the area, it will provide important data on the feasibility of future large-scale randomised clinical trials evaluating different levels of postoperative care. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01209663

  3. The third Symptom Management Research Trial in Oncology (SMaRT Oncology-3: a randomised trial to determine the efficacy of adding a complex intervention for major depressive disorder (Depression Care for People with Lung Cancer to usual care, compared to usual care alone in patients with lung cancer

    Sharpe Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression Care for People with Lung Cancer is a complex intervention delivered by specially trained cancer nurses, under the supervision of a psychiatrist. It is given as a supplement to the usual care for depression, which patients receive from their general practitioner and cancer service. The third Symptom Management Research Trial in Oncology (SMaRT Oncology-3 Trial will test its efficacy when compared to usual care alone. Design A two arm parallel group multi-centre randomised controlled trial. 200 patients will be recruited through established systematic Symptom Monitoring Services, which screen patients for depression. Patients will have: a diagnosis of lung cancer; an estimated life expectancy of three months or more and a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder. Patients will be randomised to usual care or usual care plus Depression Care for People with Lung Cancer. Randomisation will be carried out by telephoning a secure computerised central randomisation system or by using a secure web interface. The primary outcome measure is average depression severity. This will be assessed using scores on the 20-item Symptom Hopkins Checklist (SCL-20D, collected every four weeks over 32 weeks. Secondary outcomes include severity of anxiety, pain and fatigue; self-rated improvement of depression; quality of life and satisfaction with depression care. Trial Registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN75905964

  4. Randomised controlled trials: important but overrated?

    Boylan, J F

    2012-02-01

    Practising physicians individualise treatments, hoping to achieve optimal outcomes by tackling relevant patient variables. The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is universally accepted as the best means of comparison. Yet doctors sometimes wonder if particular patients might benefit more from treatments that fared worse in the RCT comparisons. Such clinicians may even feel ostracised by their peers for stepping outside treatments based on RCTs and guidelines. Are RCTs the only acceptable evaluations of how patient care can be assessed and delivered? In this controversy we explore the interpretation of RCT data for practising clinicians facing individualised patient choices. First, critical care anaesthetists John Boylan and Brian Kavanagh emphasise the dangers of bias and show how Bayesian approaches utilise prior probabilities to improve posterior (combined) probability estimates. Secondly, Jane Armitage, of the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford, argues why RCTs remain essential and explores how the quality of randomisation can be improved through systematic reviews and by avoiding selective reporting.

  5. A randomised comparison of cognitive behavioural therapy

    De Roos, Carlijn; Greenwald, Ricky; Hollander-Gijsman, Margien den; Noorthoorn, Eric; van Buuren, Stef; Jongh, Ad De

    2011-01-01

    Background: Building on previous research with disaster-exposed children and adolescents, a randomised clinical trial was performed in the treatment of trauma-related symptoms. In the current study two active treatments were compared among children in a broad age range and from a wide diversity of ethnic populations. Objective: The primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR). Design...

  6. CYCLE pilot: a protocol for a pilot randomised study of early cycle ergometry versus routine physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients

    Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France; Herridge, Margaret S; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Pellizzari, Joseph R; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Mourtzakis, Marina; Karachi, Timothy; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early exercise with in-bed cycling as part of an intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programme has the potential to improve physical and functional outcomes following critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling adults in a multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial (RCT) of early in-bed cycling versus routine physiotherapy to inform a larger RCT. Methods and analysis 60-patient parallel group pilot RCT in 7 Canadian medical-surgical ICUs. We will include all previously ambulatory adult patients within the first 0–4 days of mechanical ventilation, without exclusion criteria. After informed consent, patients will be randomised using a web-based, centralised electronic system, to 30 min of in-bed leg cycling in addition to routine physiotherapy, 5 days per week, for the duration of their ICU stay (28 days maximum) or routine physiotherapy alone. We will measure patients' muscle strength (Medical Research Council Sum Score, quadriceps force) and function (Physical Function in ICU Test (scored), 30 s sit-to-stand, 2 min walk test) at ICU awakening, ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Our 4 feasibility outcomes are: (1) patient accrual of 1–2 patients per month per centre, (2) protocol violation rate 80% at the 3 time points and (4) blinded outcomes ascertainment >80% at hospital discharge. Hospital outcome assessors are blinded to group assignment, whereas participants, ICU physiotherapists, ICU caregivers, research coordinators and ICU outcome assessors are not blinded to group assignment. We will analyse feasibility outcomes with descriptive statistics. Ethics and dissemination Each participating centre will obtain local ethics approval, and results of the study will be published to inform the design and conduct of a future multicentre RCT of in-bed cycling to improve physical outcomes in ICU survivors. Trial registration number NCT02377830; Pre-results. PMID:27059469

  7. DiPALS: Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - a randomised controlled trial.

    McDermott, Christopher J; Bradburn, Mike J; Maguire, Chin; Cooper, Cindy L; Baird, Wendy O; Baxter, Susan K; Cohen, Judith; Cantrill, Hannah; Dixon, Simon; Ackroyd, Roger; Baudouin, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Berrisford, Richard; Bianchi, Stephen; Bourke, Stephen C; Darlison, Roy; Ealing, John; Elliott, Mark; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Galloway, Simon; Hamdalla, Hisham; Hanemann, C Oliver; Hughes, Philip; Imam, Ibrahim; Karat, Dayalan; Leek, Roger; Maynard, Nick; Orrell, Richard W; Sarela, Abeezar; Stradling, John; Talbot, Kevin; Taylor, Lyn; Turner, Martin; Simonds, Anita K; Williams, Tim; Wedzicha, Wisia; Young, Carolyn; Shaw, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting in death, usually from respiratory failure, within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a treatment that when given to patients in respiratory failure leads to improved survival and quality of life. Diaphragm pacing (DP), using the NeuRx/4(®) diaphragm pacing system (DPS)™ (Synapse Biomedical, Oberlin, OH, USA), is a new technique that may offer additional or alternative benefits to patients with ALS who are in respiratory failure. OBJECTIVE The Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (DiPALS) trial evaluated the effect of DP on survival over the study duration in patients with ALS with respiratory failure. DESIGN The DiPALS trial was a multicentre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic analyses and a qualitative longitudinal substudy. PARTICIPANTS Eligible participants had a diagnosis of ALS (ALS laboratory-supported probable, clinically probable or clinically definite according to the World Federation of Neurology revised El Escorial criteria), had been stabilised on riluzole for 30 days, were aged ≥ 18 years and were in respiratory failure. We planned to recruit 108 patients from seven UK-based specialist ALS or respiratory centres. Allocation was performed using 1 : 1 non-deterministic minimisation. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomised to either standard care (NIV alone) or standard care (NIV) plus DP using the NeuRX/4 DPS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause. Secondary outcomes were patient quality of life [assessed by European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, three levels (EQ-5D-3L), Short Form questionnaire-36 items and Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index questionnaire]; carer quality of life (EQ-5D-3L and Caregiver Burden Inventory); cost-utility analysis and health

  8. Effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    Sacanell Judit

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We investigated the effects on hemodynamics and gas exchange of a lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS. Methods The design was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study in our Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain. We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men and 2 women; mean age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score: 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40. Patients were randomized into 2 groups: Group A (n = 8 received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B.Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% ω-3; Group B (n = 8 received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT. Lipid emulsions were administered during 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. Measurements of the main hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters were made at baseline (immediately before administration of the lipid emulsions, every hour during the lipid infusion, at the end of administration, and six hours after the end of administration lipid infusion. Results No statistically significant changes were observed in the different hemodynamic values analyzed. Likewise, the gas exchange parameters did not show statistically significant differences during the study. No adverse effect attributable to the lipid emulsions was seen in the patients analyzed. Conclusion The lipid emulsion enriched with omega-3 fatty acids was safe and well tolerated in short-term administration to patients with ARDS. It did not cause any significant changes in hemodynamic and gas exchange parameters. Trial registration ISRCTN63673813

  9. Ketoprofen versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen in the management of fever: results of two randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies in children.

    Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja

    2010-01-01

    Fever is a common symptom in children and one of the major concerns of parents of younger and preschool-age children. To compare the efficacy and safety of ketoprofen with that of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen in the treatment of febrile conditions in children. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies with two parallel groups in each study were conducted in primary-care outpatient clinics. Children aged 6 months to 6 years presenting with a febrile condition and an oral body temperature of > or =38.8 degrees C or rectal temperature of > or =39 degrees C were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomized to receive either ketoprofen syrup 0.5 mg/kg, ibuprofen suspension 5 mg/kg or paracetamol suspension 15 mg/kg every 6 hours by the oral route. The primary outcome measure was the change in temperature at 3 hours (H3), compared with baseline (H0). All three treatments provided similar mean maximum decreases of 1.4-1.5 degrees C in body temperature at H3 compared with H0. Use of ketoprofen was not associated with any increased risk of adverse events compared with the two reference compounds. Ketoprofen 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be equivalent to the standard antipyretic doses of the reference products ibuprofen 5 mg/kg and paracetamol 15 mg/kg. Ketoprofen at the 0.5 mg/kg dose should be an effective and safe option for symptomatic management of fever in children. PMID:20380479

  10. Cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation: a prospective randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN51857546

    Brand Ronald

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Open discectomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with long-lasting sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. Minimally invasive approaches such as microendoscopic discectomy have gained attention in recent years. Reduced tissue trauma allows early ambulation, short hospital stay and quick resumption of daily activities. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18–70 years presenting with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation lasting more than 6–8 weeks are included. Patients with disc herniation larger than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, or disc herniation less than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter with concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eliglible for participation. Randomisation into microendoscopic discectomy or conventional unilateral transflaval discectomy will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The length of skin incision is equal in both groups. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient, measured by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica, at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. We will also evaluate several other outcome parameters, including perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine kinase, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, open discectomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc

  11. The DAMASK trial protocol: a pragmatic randomised trial to evaluate whether GPs should have direct access to MRI for patients with suspected internal derangement of the knee

    Orchard Jo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though new technologies like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI may be accurate, they often diffuse into practice before thorough assessment of their value in diagnosis and management, and of their effects on patient outcome and costs. MRI of the knee is a common investigation despite concern that it is not always appropriate. There is wide variation in general practitioners (GPs access to, and use of MRI, and in the associated costs. The objective of this study was to resolve uncertainty whether GPs should refer patients with suspected internal derangement of the knee for MRI or to an orthopaedic specialist in secondary care. Methods/Design The design consisted of a pragmatic multi-centre randomised trial with two parallel groups and concomitant economic evaluation. Patients presenting in general practice with suspected internal derangement of the knee and for whom their GP was considering referral to an orthopaedic specialist in secondary care were eligible for inclusion. Within practices, GPs or practice nurses randomised eligible and consenting participants to the local radiology department for an MRI examination, or for consultation with an orthopaedic specialist. To ensure that the waiting time from GP consultation to orthopaedic appointment was similar for both trial arms, GPs made a provisional referral to orthopaedics when requesting the MRI examination. Thus we evaluated the more appropriate sequence of events independent of variations in waiting times. Follow up of participants was by postal questionnaires at six, twelve and 24 months after randomisation. This was to ensure that the evaluation covered all events up to and including arthroscopy. Discussion The DAMASK trial should make a major contribution to the development of evidence-based partnerships between primary and secondary care professionals and inform the debate when MRI should enter the diagnostic pathway.

  12. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials on the effects of potassium supplements on serum potassium and creatinine

    Cappuccio, Francesco P; Buchanan, Laura A; Ji, Chen; Siani, Alfonso; Miller, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High potassium intake could prevent stroke, but supplementation is considered hazardous. We assessed the effect of oral potassium supplementation on serum or plasma potassium levels and renal function. Setting We updated a systematic review of the effects of potassium supplementation in randomised clinical trials carried out worldwide, published in 2013, extending it to July 2015. We followed the PRISMA guidelines. Participants Any individual taking part in a potassium supplementation randomised clinical trial. Studies included met the following criteria: randomised clinical trials, potassium supplement given and circulating potassium levels reported. Intervention Oral potassium supplementation. Primary outcome measures Serum or plasma potassium and serum or plasma creatinine. Results A total of 20 trials (21 independent groups) were included (1216 participants from 12 different countries). All but 2 were controlled (placebo n=16, control n=2). Of these trials, 15 were crossover, 4 had a parallel group and 1 was sequential. The duration of supplementation varied from 2 to 24 weeks and the amount of potassium given from 22 to 140 mmol/day. In the pooled analysis, potassium supplementation caused a small but significant increase in circulating potassium levels (weighted mean difference (WMD) 0.14 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.19, p<1×10−5), not associated with dose or duration of treatment. The average increase in urinary potassium excretion was 45.75 mmol/24 hours, 95% CI 38.81 to 53.69, p<1×10−5. Potassium supplementation did not cause any change in circulating creatinine levels (WMD 0.30 µmol/L, 95% CI −1.19 to 1.78, p=0.70). Conclusions In short-term studies of relatively healthy persons, a moderate oral potassium supplement resulted in a small increase in circulating potassium levels and no change in renal function. PMID:27566636

  13. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida; Tendal, Britta; Hilden, Jørgen; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe; Brorson, Stig

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  14. Randomised Controlled Trials in Education Research: A Case Study of an Individually Randomised Pragmatic Trial

    Torgerson, Carole J.

    2009-01-01

    The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is an evaluative method used by social scientists in order to establish whether or not an intervention is effective. This contribution discusses the fundamental aspects of good RCT design. These are illustrated through the use of a recently completed RCT which evaluated an information and communication…

  15. The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial

    Freitag Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group-based social skills training (SST has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD. To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manualised SOSTA–FRA program will result in improved social responsiveness (measured by the parent rated social responsiveness scale, SRS compared to treatment as usual (TAU. It is further expected, that parent and self reported anxiety and depressive symptoms will decline and pro-social behaviour will increase in the treatment group. A neurophysiological study in the Frankfurt HFASD subgroup will be performed pre- and post treatment to assess changes in neural function induced by SST versus TAU. Methods/design The SOSTA – net trial is designed as a prospective, randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with two parallel groups. The primary outcome is change in SRS score directly after the intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Several secondary outcome measures are also obtained. The target sample consists of 220 individuals with ASD, included at the six study centres. Discussion This study is currently one of the largest trials on SST in children and adolescents with HFASD worldwide. Compared to recent randomised controlled studies, our study shows several advantages with regard to in- and exclusion criteria, study methods, and the therapeutic approach chosen, which can be easily implemented in non-university-based clinical settings. Trial registration ISRCTN94863788 – SOSTA – net: Group-based social skills training in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder.

  16. Antibiotics for bronchiectasis exacerbations in children: rationale and study protocol for a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    Chang Anne B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite bronchiectasis being increasingly recognised as an important cause of chronic respiratory morbidity in both indigenous and non-indigenous settings globally, high quality evidence to inform management is scarce. It is assumed that antibiotics are efficacious for all bronchiectasis exacerbations, but not all practitioners agree. Inadequately treated exacerbations may risk lung function deterioration. Our study tests the hypothesis that both oral azithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid are superior to placebo at improving resolution rates of respiratory exacerbations by day 14 in children with bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis. Methods We are conducting a bronchiectasis exacerbation study (BEST, which is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial, in five centres (Brisbane, Perth, Darwin, Melbourne, Auckland. In the component of BEST presented here, 189 children fulfilling inclusion criteria are randomised (allocation-concealed to receive amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (22.5 mg/kg twice daily with placebo-azithromycin; azithromycin (5 mg/kg daily with placebo-amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; or placebo-azithromycin with placebo-amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for 14 days. Clinical data and a paediatric cough-specific quality of life score are obtained at baseline, at the start and resolution of exacerbations, and at day 14. In most children, blood and deep nasal swabs are also collected at the same time points. The primary outcome is the proportion of children whose exacerbations have resolved at day 14. The main secondary outcome is the paediatric cough-specific quality of life score. Other outcomes are time to next exacerbation; requirement for hospitalisation; duration of exacerbation; and spirometry data. Descriptive viral and bacteriological data from nasal samples and blood markers will also be reported. Discussion Effective, evidence-based management

  17. Effects of an omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion on eicosanoid synthesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study

    Chacon Pilar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lipid emulsions has been associated with changes in lung function and gas exchange which may be mediated by biologically active metabolites derived from arachidonic acid. The type and quantity of the lipid emulsions used could modulate this response, which is mediated by the eicosanoids. This study investigates the use of omega-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsions in ARDS patients and their effects on eicosanoid values. Methods Prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study carried out at the Intensive Medicine Department of Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona-Spain. We studied 16 consecutive patients with ARDS and intolerance to enteral nutrition (14 men; age: 58 ± 13 years; APACHE II score 17.8 ± 2.3; Lung Injury Score: 3.1 ± 0.5; baseline PaO2/FiO2 ratio: 149 ± 40. Patients were randomized into two groups: Group A (n = 8 received the study emulsion Lipoplus® 20%, B. Braun Medical (50% MCT, 40% LCT, 10% fish oil (FO; Group B (n = 8 received the control emulsion Intralipid® Fresenius Kabi (100% LCT. Lipid emulsions were administered for 12 h at a dose of 0.12 g/kg/h. We measured LTB4, TXB2, and 6-keto prostaglandin F1α values at baseline [immediately before the administration of the lipid emulsions (T-0], at the end of the administration (T-12 and 24 hours after the beginning of the infusion (T 24 in arterial and mixed venous blood samples. Results In group A (FO LTB4, TXB2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1α levels fell during omega-3 administration (T12. After discontinuation (T24, levels of inflammatory markers (both systemic and pulmonary behaved erratically. In group B (LCT all systemic and pulmonary mediators increased during lipid administration and returned to baseline levels after discontinuation, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. There was a clear interaction between the treatment in group A (fish oil and changes in LTB4 over time. Conclusions Infusion of

  18. A randomized, parallel-group study to evaluate the efficacy of umeclidinium/vilanterol 62.5/25 μg on health-related quality of life in patients with COPD

    Siler, Thomas M; Donald, Alison C; O’Dell, Dianne; Church, Alison; Fahy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of the inhaled muscarinic antagonist umeclidinium (UMEC) with the long-acting β2-agonist vilanterol (VI) has been shown to provide significant improvements in lung function compared with UMEC, VI, or placebo (PBO) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study was specifically designed to support these findings by assessing health-related quality of life and symptomatic outcomes in a similar population. Methods This was a 12-week multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study. Eligible patients were randomized 1:1 to receive once-daily UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg (via ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler) or PBO for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) total score at day 84. Secondary efficacy endpoints included rescue albuterol use (puffs/day) over weeks 1–12 and trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 84. Adverse events were also assessed. Results A total of 496 patients were included in the intent-to-treat population in the UMEC/VI (n=248) and PBO (n=248) treatment groups. UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg provided a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in SGRQ total score at day 84 versus PBO (difference between treatments in SGRQ total score change from baseline: −4.03 [95% confidence interval {CI}: −6.28, −1.79]; P<0.001). UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg resulted in a statistically significant reduction in rescue albuterol use versus PBO (−0.7 puffs/day [95% CI: −1.1, −0.4]; P<0.001). UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg provided a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 84 versus PBO (122 mL [95% CI: 71, 172]; P<0.001). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatments (32% and 30% of patients in the UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg and PBO groups, respectively). Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that treatment with UMEC/VI 62.5/25 μg provides clinically important

  19. Achieving lipid goals with rosuvastatin compared with simvastatin in high risk patients in real clinical practice: a randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center study: the DISCOVERY-Beta study

    Toivo Laks

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Toivo Laks1, Ester Keba2, Mariann Leiner3, Eero Merilind4, Mall Petersen5, Sirje Reinmets6, Sille Väli7, Terje Sööt8, Karin Otter81Clinic of Internal Medicine, North-Estonia Regional Hospital, Tallinn, Estonia; 2Clinic of Internal Medicine, Viljandi County Hospital, Viljandi, Estonia; 3Mustamäe Family Doctors Centre, Tallinn, Estonia; 4Nõmme Family Doctors Centre, Tallinn, Estonia; 5Saku Health Centre, Saku, Estonia; 6Kristiine Family Doctors, Tallinn, Estonia; 7Family Doctor Sille Väli, Kuressaare, Estonia; 8AstraZeneca, Tallinn, EstoniaAbstract: The aim of this multi-center, open-label, randomized, parallel-group trial was to compare the efficacy of rosuvastatin with that of simvastatin in achieving the 1998 European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS lipid treatment goals. 504 patients (≥18 years with primary hypercholesterolemia and a 10-year cardiovascular (CV risk >20% or history of coronary heart disease (CHD or other established atherosclerotic disease were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive rosuvastatin 10 mg or simvastatin 20 mg once daily for 12 weeks. A significantly higher proportion of patients achieved 1998 EAS low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C goal after 12 weeks of treatment with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared to simvastatin 20 mg (64 vs 51.5%, p < 0.01. Similarly, significantly more patients achieved the 1998 EAS total cholesterol (TC goal and the 2003 EAS LDL-C and TC goals (p < 0.001 with rosuvastatin 10 mg compared with simvastatin 20 mg. The incidence of adverse events and the proportion of patients who discontinued study treatment were similar between treatment groups. In conclusion, in the DISCOVERY-Beta Study in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia greater proportion of patients in the rosuvastatin 10 mg group achieved the EAS LDL-C treatment goal compared with the simvastatin 20 mg group. Drug tolerability was similar across both treatment groups.Keywords: hypercholesterolemia, low-density lipoprotein

  20. Effect of electroacupuncture on opioid consumption in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Xue Charlie CL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common and has been increasingly managed by opioid medications, of which the long-term efficacy is unknown. Furthermore, there is evidence that long-term use of opioids is associated with reduced pain control, declining physical function and quality of life, and could hinder the goals of integrated pain management. Electroacupuncture (EA has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative opioid consumption. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture could assist patients with chronic pain to reduce their requirements for opioids. The proposed research aims to assess if EA is an effective adjunct therapy to standard pain and medication management in reducing opioids use by patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, sham-acupuncture controlled, three-arm clinical trial, 316 patients regularly taking opioids for pain control and meeting the defined selection criteria will be recruited from pain management centres and clinics of primary care providers in Victoria, Australia. After a four-week run-in period, the participants are randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups to receive EA, sham EA or no-EA with a ratio of 2:1:1. All participants receive routine pain medication management delivered and supervised by the trial medical doctors. Twelve sessions of semi-structured EA or sham EA treatment are delivered over 10 weeks. Upon completion of the acupuncture treatment period, there is a 12-week follow-up. In total, participants are involved in the trial for 26 weeks. Outcome measures of opioid and non-opioid medication consumption, pain scores and opioid-related adverse events are documented throughout the study. Quality of life, depression, function, and attitude to pain medications are also assessed. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will determine whether EA is of significant clinical value in assisting the management of

  1. A Phase IIIb, Multicentre, Randomised, Parallel-Group, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of OROS Hydromorphone in Subjects with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Pain Induced by Osteoarthritis of the Hip or the Knee

    Jozef Vojtaššák

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Opioid analgesics are included in treatment guidelines for the symptomatic management of osteoarthritis (OA. Starting with a low dose of opioid and slowly titrating to a higher dose may help avoid intolerable side effects. Methods. Subjects aged ≥40 years, with moderate to severe pain induced by OA of the hip or knee not adequately controlled by previous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs or paracetamol treatment, were enrolled. Subjects received OROS hydromorphone 4 mg or placebo once-daily. The dose was titrated every 3-4 days in case of unsatisfactory pain control during the 4-week titration phase. A 12 week maintenance phase followed. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in “pain on average” measured on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI scale from baseline to the end of the maintenance phase. Results. 139 subjects received OROS hydromorphone and 149 subjects received placebo. All efficacy endpoints showed similar improvements from baseline to end of study in the 2 groups. The safety results were consistent with the safety profile of OROS hydromorphone. Conclusion.The study did not meet the primary endpoint; although many subjects' pain was not adequately controlled at inclusion, their pain may have improved with continued paracetamol or NSAID treatment.

  2. An ex vivo, assessor blind, randomised, parallel group, comparative efficacy trial of the ovicidal activity of three pediculicides after a single application - melaleuca oil and lavender oil, eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil, and a "suffocation" pediculicide

    Altman Phillip M; Barker Stephen C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There are two components to the clinical efficacy of pediculicides: (i) efficacy against the crawling-stages (lousicidal efficacy); and (ii) efficacy against the eggs (ovicidal efficacy). Lousicidal efficacy and ovicidal efficacy are confounded in clinical trials. Here we report on a trial that was specially designed to rank the clinical ovicidal efficacy of pediculicides. Eggs were collected, pre-treatment and post-treatment, from subjects with different types of hair, di...

  3. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of THC/CBD oromucosal spray in combination with the existing treatment regimen, in the relief of central neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Langford, R M; Mares, J; Novotna, A; Vachova, M; Novakova, I; Notcutt, W; Ratcliffe, S

    2013-04-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) occurs in many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The provision of adequate pain relief to these patients can very difficult. Here we report the first phase III placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of the endocannabinoid system modulator delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray (USAN name, nabiximols; Sativex, GW Pharmaceuticals, Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK), to alleviate CNP. Patients who had failed to gain adequate analgesia from existing medication were treated with THC/CBD spray or placebo as an add-on treatment, in a double-blind manner, for 14 weeks to investigate the efficacy of the medication in MS-induced neuropathic pain. This parallel-group phase of the study was then followed by an 18-week randomized-withdrawal study (14-week open-label treatment period plus a double-blind 4-week randomized-withdrawal phase) to investigate time to treatment failure and show maintenance of efficacy. A total of 339 patients were randomized to phase A (167 received THC/CBD spray and 172 received placebo). Of those who completed phase A, 58 entered the randomized-withdrawal phase. The primary endpoint of responder analysis at the 30 % level at week 14 of phase A of the study was not met, with 50 % of patients on THC/CBD spray classed as responders at the 30 % level compared to 45 % of patients on placebo (p = 0.234). However, an interim analysis at week 10 showed a statistically significant treatment difference in favor of THC/CBD spray at this time point (p = 0.046). During the randomized-withdrawal phase, the primary endpoint of time to treatment failure was statistically significant in favor of THC/CBD spray, with 57 % of patients receiving placebo failing treatment versus 24 % of patients from the THC/CBD spray group (p = 0.04). The mean change from baseline in Pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) (p = 0.028) and sleep quality NRS (p = 0.015) scores, both secondary endpoints in phase B, were also statistically

  4. A randomized, parallel-group study to evaluate the efficacy of umeclidinium/vilanterol 62.5/25 µg on health-related quality of life in patients with COPD

    Siler TM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas M Siler,1 Alison C Donald,2 Dianne O’Dell,2,3 Alison Church,2 William A Fahy4 1Midwest Chest Consultants, PC, St Charles, MO, 2GSK, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 3Pearl Therapeutics, Inc., Durham, NC, USA; 4GSK, Respiratory Medicines Development Centre, Stockley Park, Middlesex, UK Background: The combination of the inhaled muscarinic antagonist umeclidinium (UMEC with the long-acting β2-agonist vilanterol (VI has been shown to provide significant improvements in lung function compared with UMEC, VI, or placebo (PBO in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This study was specifically designed to support these findings by assessing health-related quality of life and symptomatic outcomes in a similar population. Methods: This was a 12-week multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study. Eligible patients were randomized 1:1 to receive once-daily UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg (via ELLIPTA® dry powder inhaler or PBO for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ total score at day 84. Secondary efficacy endpoints included rescue albuterol use (puffs/day over weeks 1–12 and trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 84. Adverse events were also assessed. Results: A total of 496 patients were included in the intent-to-treat population in the UMEC/VI (n=248 and PBO (n=248 treatment groups. UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg provided a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in SGRQ total score at day 84 versus PBO (difference between treatments in SGRQ total score change from baseline: -4.03 [95% confidence interval {CI}: -6.28, -1.79]; P<0.001. UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg resulted in a statistically significant reduction in rescue albuterol use versus PBO (-0.7 puffs/day [95% CI: -1.1, -0.4]; P<0.001. UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg provided a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second on day 84 versus PBO (122 mL [95

  5. Protocol for SAMS (Support and Advice for Medication Study: A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to support patients with type 2 diabetes with adherence to medication

    Sutton Stephen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although some interventions have been shown to improve adherence to medication for diabetes, results are not consistent. We have developed a theory-based intervention which we will evaluate in a well characterised population to test efficacy and guide future intervention development and trial design. Methods and Design The SAMS (Supported Adherence to Medication Study trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial among 200 patients with type 2 diabetes and an HbA1c of 7.5% or above. It is designed to evaluate the efficacy of a two-component motivational intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and volitional action planning to support medication adherence compared with standard care. The intervention is delivered by practice nurses. Nurses were trained using a workshop approach with role play and supervised using assessment of tape-recorded consultations. The trial has a two parallel groups design with an unbalanced three-to-two individual randomisation eight weeks after recruitment with twelve week follow-up. The primary outcome is medication adherence measured using an electronic medication monitor over 12 weeks and expressed as the difference between intervention and control in mean percentage of days on which the correct number of medication doses is taken. Subgroup analyses will explore impact of number of medications taken, age, HbA1c, and self-reported adherence at baseline on outcomes. The study also measures the effect of dispensing medication to trial participants packaged in the electronic medication-monitoring device compared with conventional medication packaging. This will be achieved through one-to-one randomisation at recruitment to these conditions with assessment of the difference between groups in self-report of medication adherence and change in mean HbA1c from baseline to eight weeks. Anonymised demographic data are collected on non-respondents. Central randomisation

  6. Effect of communicating genetic and phenotypic risk for type 2 diabetes in combination with lifestyle advice on objectively measured physical activity: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Godino Job G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with increased risk of morbidity and premature mortality. Among those at high risk, incidence can be halved through healthy changes in behaviour. Information about genetic and phenotypic risk of T2D is now widely available. Whether such information motivates behaviour change is unknown. We aim to assess the effects of communicating genetic and phenotypic risk of T2D on risk-reducing health behaviours, anxiety, and other cognitive and emotional theory-based antecedents of behaviour change. Methods In a parallel group, open randomised controlled trial, approximately 580 adults born between 1950 and 1975 will be recruited from the on-going population-based, observational Fenland Study (Cambridgeshire, UK. Eligible participants will have undergone clinical, anthropometric, and psychosocial measurements, been genotyped for 23 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with T2D, and worn a combined heart rate monitor and accelerometer (Actiheart® continuously for six days and nights to assess physical activity. Participants are randomised to receive either standard lifestyle advice alone (control group, or in combination with a genetic or a phenotypic risk estimate for T2D (intervention groups. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. Secondary outcomes include self-reported diet, self-reported weight, intention to be physically active and to engage in a healthy diet, anxiety, diabetes-related worry, self-rated health, and other cognitive and emotional outcomes. Follow-up occurs eight weeks post-intervention. Values at follow-up, adjusted for baseline, will be compared between randomised groups. Discussion This study will provide much needed evidence on the effects of providing information about the genetic and phenotypic risk of T2D. Importantly, it will be among the first to examine the impact of genetic risk information using a randomised controlled trial design, a

  7. Immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination: randomised controlled trial

    I.M. Custers; P.A. Flierman; P. Maas; T. Cox; T.J.H.M. van Dessel; M.H. Gerards; M.H. Mochtar; C.A.H. Janssen; F. van der Veen; B.W.J. Mol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of 15 minutes of immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting One academic teaching hospital and six non-academic teaching hospitals. Participants Women having intrauterine inseminati

  8. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S. H.; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S.; Wright, J; S. Brown; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Denta...

  9. HIV prevention in Mexican schools: prospective randomised evaluation of intervention

    Walker, D.; Gutierrez, JP; TORRES, P.; Bertozzi, SM

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess effects on condom use and other sexual behaviour of an HIV prevention programme at school that promotes the use of condoms with and without emergency contraception. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: 40 public high schools in the state of Morelos, Mexico. PARTICIPANTS: 10 954 first year high school students. INTERVENTION: Schools were randomised to one of three arms: an HIV prevention course that promoted condom use, the same course with emergency contr...

  10. Tyranny of the randomised clinical trial.

    Rosenbek, John C

    2016-06-01

    Researchers and clinicians often disagree about what it means to provide the best possible care. This paper's purpose is to propose ways of resolving the disagreements. The first is to have both groups re-examine the three equal components of evidence-based practice, a re-examination that begins with rejection of the randomised clinical trial's tyranny. The second is for researchers to design rehabilitation research based on a biopsychosocial rather than a biomedical model. The third is for both groups to redefine translational research so that it means both translation from the laboratory to the clinic and from the clinic to the laboratory. The fourth is to advocate for a science of dissemination that is as robust as rehabilitation's present science of discovery. Most examples are drawn from the literature on acquired neurologic speech and language disorders. PMID:27124262

  11. The Hawthorne Effect: a randomised, controlled trial

    van Haselen Robbert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Hawthorne Effect' may be an important factor affecting the generalisability of clinical research to routine practice, but has been little studied. Hawthorne Effects have been reported in previous clinical trials in dementia but to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to quantify them. Our aim was to compare minimal follow-up to intensive follow-up in participants in a placebo controlled trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia. Methods Participants in a dementia trial were randomised to intensive follow-up (with comprehensive assessment visits at baseline and two, four and six months post randomisation or minimal follow-up (with an abbreviated assessment at baseline and a full assessment at six months. Our primary outcomes were cognitive functioning (ADAS-Cog and participant and carer-rated quality of life (QOL-AD. Results We recruited 176 participants, mainly through general practices. The main analysis was based on Intention to treat (ITT, with available data. In the ANCOVA model with baseline score as a co-variate, follow-up group had a significant effect on outcome at six months on the ADAS-Cog score (n = 140; mean difference = -2.018; 95%CI -3.914, -0.121; p = 0.037 favouring the intensive follow-up group, and on participant-rated quality of life score (n = 142; mean difference = -1.382; 95%CI -2.642, -0.122; p = 0.032 favouring minimal follow-up group. There was no significant difference on carer quality of life. Conclusion We found that more intensive follow-up of individuals in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia resulted in a better outcome than minimal follow-up, as measured by their cognitive functioning. Trial registration Current controlled trials: ISRCTN45577048

  12. Rationale and design of an independent randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of aripiprazole or haloperidol in combination with clozapine for treatment-resistant schizophrenia

    Piantato Ennio

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One third to two thirds of people with schizophrenia have persistent psychotic symptoms despite clozapine treatment. Under real-world circumstances, the need to provide effective therapeutic interventions to patients who do not have an optimal response to clozapine has been cited as the most common reason for simultaneously prescribing a second antipsychotic drug in combination treatment strategies. In a clinical area where the pressing need of providing therapeutic answers has progressively increased the occurrence of antipsychotic polypharmacy, despite the lack of robust evidence of its efficacy, we sought to implement a pre-planned protocol where two alternative therapeutic answers are systematically provided and evaluated within the context of a pragmatic, multicentre, independent randomised study. Methods/Design The principal clinical question to be answered by the present project is the relative efficacy and tolerability of combination treatment with clozapine plus aripiprazole compared with combination treatment with clozapine plus haloperidol in patients with an incomplete response to treatment with clozapine over an appropriate period of time. This project is a prospective, multicentre, randomized, parallel-group, superiority trial that follow patients over a period of 12 months. Withdrawal from allocated treatment within 3 months is the primary outcome. Discussion The implementation of the protocol presented here shows that it is possible to create a network of community psychiatric services that accept the idea of using their everyday clinical practice to produce randomised knowledge. The employed pragmatic attitude allowed to randomly allocate more than 100 individuals, which means that this study is the largest antipsychotic combination trial conducted so far in Western countries. We expect that the current project, by generating evidence on whether it is clinically useful to combine clozapine with aripiprazole

  13. The SINS trial: A randomised controlled trial of excisional surgery versus imiquimod 5% cream for nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma

    Armstrong Sarah J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basal cell carcinoma is the commonest human cancer. Despite increasing incidence it remains poorly researched. While not life threatening it can cause significant cosmetic disfigurement. Imiquimod, a cream which enhances the body's immune response, may help deal with the number of cases that occur in low-risk sites, especially when good cosmetic results and home use without surgery are needed. This study aims 1. To compare excisional surgery with imiquimod cream for nodular or superficial basal cell carcinoma in low risk sites, with respect to 3 year clinical clearance, cost-effectiveness and cosmetic results. 2. To ascertain if certain phenotypic features and gene polymorphisms predict tumour responsiveness to treatment. Methods/Design Five hundred participants with low risk nodular or superficial basal cell carcinoma will be recruited from hospitals to this multi-centre, randomised, parallel group, controlled phase III trial. Treatment in the imiquimod group is for 6 weeks for superficial basal cell carcinoma and 12 weeks for nodular basal cell carcinoma. Both treatment groups are followed up in clinic for 3 years. Primary outcome variable: the proportion of participants with clinical evidence of success (no recurrence at 3 years. The primary outcome will be compared between the two treatment groups. Secondary outcomes include: i clinical success at 1, 2 and 5 years, ii time to first recurrence, iii cosmetic appearance of lesion site after treatment, iv level of pain, and v cost-effectiveness. Safety and tolerability data will also be reported. Discussion This study protocol describes a pragmatic randomised controlled trial which it is hoped will address the above uncertainties. Three-year results will be available towards the end of 2010. Trial registration Meta-register: NCT00066872, Eudract No. 2004-004506-24, ISRCTN48755084.

  14. Influence of reported study design characteristics on intervention effect estimates from randomised controlled trials

    Savović, J; Jones, He; Altman, Dg;

    2012-01-01

    The design of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should incorporate characteristics (such as concealment of randomised allocation and blinding of participants and personnel) that avoid biases resulting from lack of comparability of the intervention and control groups. Empirical evidence suggests...

  15. Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media: the 'Get Randomised' campaign.

    Mackenzie, Isla S; Wei, Li; Rutherford, Daniel; Findlay, Evelyn A; Saywood, Wendy; Campbell, Marion K; Macdonald, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT * Recruitment is key to the success of clinical trials. * Many clinical trials fail to achieve adequate recruitment. * Public understanding and engagement in clinical research could be improved. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS * 'Get Randomised' is the first campaign of its kind in the UK. * It is possible to improve public awareness of clinical research using the media. * Further work is needed to determine whether improved public awareness leads to increased participation in clinical research in the future. AIM To increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland. METHODS A generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later. RESULTS There was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign

  16. Sources of Bias in Outcome Assessment in Randomised Controlled Trials: A Case Study

    Ainsworth, Hannah; Hewitt, Catherine E.; Higgins, Steve; Wiggins, Andy; Torgerson, David J.; Torgerson, Carole J.

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) can be at risk of bias. Using data from a RCT, we considered the impact of post-randomisation bias. We compared the trial primary outcome, which was administered blindly, with the secondary outcome, which was not administered blindly. From 44 schools, 522 children were randomised to receive a one-to-one maths…

  17. Effect of Systematic Follow-Up by General Practitioners after Deliberate Self-Poisoning: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Tine K Grimholt

    Full Text Available To assess whether systematic follow-up by general practitioners (GPs of cases of deliberate self-poisoning (DSP by their patients decreases psychiatric symptoms and suicidal behaviour compared with current practice.Randomised clinical trial with two parallel groups.General practices in Oslo and the eastern part of Akershus County.Patients aged 18-75 years admitted to hospital for DSP. We excluded patients diagnosed with psychoses, without a known GP, those not able to complete a questionnaire, and patients admitted to psychiatric in-patient care or other institutions where their GP could not follow them immediately after discharge.The GPs received a written guideline, contacted the patients and scheduled a consultation within one week after discharge, and then provided regular consultations for six months. We randomised the patients to either intervention (n = 78 or treatment as usual (n = 98.Primary outcome measure was the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI. Secondary outcomes were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, self-reported further self-harm and treatment for DSP in a general hospital or an emergency medical agency (EMA. We assessed patients on entry to the trial and at three and six months. We collected data from interviews, self-report questionnaires, and hospital and EMA medical records.There were no significant differences between the groups in SSI, BDI, or BHS mean scores or change from baseline to three or six months. During follow-up, self-reported DSP was 39.5% in the intervention group vs. 15.8% in controls (P = 0.009. Readmissions to general hospitals were similar (13% in both groups (P = 0.963, while DSP episodes treated at EMAs were 17% in the intervention group and 7% in the control group (P = 0.103.Structured follow-up by GPs after an episode of DSP had no significant effect on suicide ideation, depression or hopelessness. There was no significant difference in repeated episodes of DSP in

  18. Primary care randomised controlled trial of a tailored interactive website for the self-management of respiratory infections (Internet Doctor)

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Andreou, Panayiota; McDermott, Lisa; Joseph, Judith; Mullee, Mark; Moore, Mike; Broomfield, Sue; Thomas, Tammy; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess an internet-delivered intervention providing advice to manage respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Design Open pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary care in UK. Participants Adults (aged ≥18) registered with general practitioners, recruited by postal invitation. Intervention Patients were randomised with computer-generated random numbers to access the intervention website (intervention) or not (control). The intervention tailored advice about the diagnosis, natural history, symptom management (particularly paracetamol/ibuprofen use) and when to seek further help. Outcomes Primary: National Health Service (NHS) contacts for those reporting RTIs from monthly online questionnaires for 20 weeks. Secondary: hospitalisations; symptom duration/severity. Results 3044 participants were recruited. 852 in the intervention group and 920 in the control group reported 1 or more RTIs, among whom there was a modest increase in NHS direct contacts in the intervention group (intervention 37/1574 (2.4%) versus control 20/1661 (1.2%); multivariate risk ratio (RR) 2.25 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.07, p=0.048)). Conversely, reduced contact with doctors occurred (239/1574 (15.2%) vs 304/1664 (18.3%); RR 0.71, 0.52 to 0.98, p=0.037). Reduction in contacts occurred despite slightly longer illness duration (11.3 days vs 10.7 days, respectively; multivariate estimate 0.60 days longer (−0.15 to 1.36, p=0.118) and more days of illness rated moderately bad or worse illness (0.52 days; 0.06 to 0.97, p=0.026). The estimate of slower symptom resolution in the intervention group was attenuated when controlling for whether individuals had used web pages which advocated ibuprofen use (length of illness 0.22 days, −0.51 to 0.95, p=0.551; moderately bad or worse symptoms 0.36 days, −0.08 to 0.80, p=0.105). There was no evidence of increased hospitalisations (risk ratio 0.25; 0.05 to 1.12; p=0.069). Conclusions An internet

  19. Cognition, behaviour and academic skills after cognitive rehabilitation in Ugandan children surviving severe malaria: a randomised trial

    John Chandy C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with severe malaria in African children is associated with not only a high mortality but also a high risk of cognitive deficits. There is evidence that interventions done a few years after the illness are effective but nothing is known about those done immediately after the illness. We designed a study in which children who had suffered from severe malaria three months earlier were enrolled into a cognitive intervention program and assessed for the immediate benefit in cognitive, academic and behavioral outcomes. Methods This parallel group randomised study was carried out in Kampala City, Uganda between February 2008 and October 2010. Sixty-one Ugandan children aged 5 to 12 years with severe malaria were assessed for cognition (using the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, second edition and the Test of Variables of Attention, academic skills (Wide Range Achievement Test, third edition and psychopathologic behaviour (Child Behaviour Checklist three months after an episode of severe malaria. Twenty-eight were randomised to sixteen sessions of computerised cognitive rehabilitation training lasting eight weeks and 33 to a non-treatment group. Post-intervention assessments were done a month after conclusion of the intervention. Analysis of covariance was used to detect any differences between the two groups after post-intervention assessment, adjusting for age, sex, weight for age z score, quality of the home environment, time between admission and post-intervention testing and pre-intervention score. The primary outcome was improvement in attention scores for the intervention group. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN53183087. Results Significant intervention effects were observed in the intervention group for learning mean score (SE, [93.89 (4.00 vs 106.38 (4.32, P = 0.04] but for working memory the intervention group performed poorly [27.42 (0.66 vs 25.34 (0.73, P = 0.04]. No

  20. A randomised comparison of cognitive behavioural therapy

    Carlijn de Roos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : Building on previous research with disaster-exposed children and adolescents, a randomised clinical trial was performed in the treatment of trauma-related symptoms. In the current study two active treatments were compared among children in a broad age range and from a wide diversity of ethnic populations. Objective : The primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR. Design : Children (n=52, aged 4–18 were randomly allocated to either CBT (n=26 or EMDR (n=26 in a disaster mental health after-care setting after an explosion of a fireworks factory. All children received up to four individual treatment sessions over a 4–8 week period along with up to four sessions of parent guidance. Blind assessment took place pre- and post-treatment and at 3 months follow-up on a variety of parent-rated and self-report measures of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology, depression, anxiety, and behaviour problems. Analyses of variance (general linear model repeated measures were conducted on the intention-to-treat sample and the completers. Results : Both treatment approaches produced significant reductions on all measures and results were maintained at follow-up. Treatment gains of EMDR were reached in fewer sessions. Conclusion : Standardised CBT and EMDR interventions can significantly improve functioning of disaster-exposed children.For the abstract in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online

  1. Salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate versus fluticasone propionate plus montelukast: a randomised controlled trial investigating the effects on airway inflammation in asthma

    Woodcock Ashley

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have compared treatment strategies in patients with asthma poorly controlled on low dose inhaled corticosteroids, and little is known about the effects of different treatments on airway inflammation. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, we compared the effects of salmeterol plus fluticasone propionate (FP (Seretide™; SFC and FP plus montelukast (FP/M on sputum inflammatory markers, airway responsiveness, lung function, and symptoms in adult asthmatics. Methods Sixty-six subjects were randomised to SFC or FP/M for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was changes in neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, lymphocyte, and epithelial cell levels in induced sputum. Additional outcomes included the change in other sputum markers of airway inflammation, airway responsiveness, symptom control, and lung function. Results Both treatments had no significant effect on induced sputum inflammatory cells, although there was a trend for a reduction in sputum eosinophils. Both treatments significantly improved airway responsiveness, whereas SFC generally led to greater improvements in symptom control and lung function than FP/M. FP/M led to significantly greater reductions in sputum cysteinyl leukotrienes than SFC (treatment ratio 1.80; 95% CI 1.09, 2.94. Conclusion Both treatments led to similar control of eosinophilic airway inflammation, although PEF and symptom control were better with SFC. Study number SAM40030 (SOLTA

  2. Supplementation of xylitol-containing chewing gum with probiotics: a double blind, randomised pilot study focusing on saliva flow and saliva properties.

    Gueimonde, Laura; Vesterlund, Satu; García-Pola, María J; Gueimonde, Miguel; Söderling, Eva; Salminen, Seppo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of daily chewing, for 12 weeks, of 2 different probiotic gums compared with placebo on saliva flow rate, saliva IgA levels and saliva pH. The intervention study included 54 adult volunteers with hyposalivation in a double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled design with three parallel groups. Volunteers were randomly assigned to 3 different groups: subjects in group A (n = 19) were given placebo chewing gum, group B (n = 17) received Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 (ATCC 27536) and group C (n = 18) received Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG (ATCC 53103), Bifidobacterium longum 46 (DSM 14583) and Bifidobacterium longum 2C (DSM 14579) gums, during 3 months. Two volunteers from group B left the study for personal reasons leaving 19, 15 and 18 volunteers, respectively, for analyses. Clinical examinations, personal interviews, sialometries and saliva sampling were conducted at baseline and after 1, 2, 3 and 4 months. No statistically significant differences were found between probiotic and placebo groups for any of the parameters analysed. No side effects of probiotic or placebo chewing gums were observed. Chewing gum, with and without probiotics, had a positive impact on salivary flow rate and saliva pH and IgA levels. PMID:26913493

  3. Hand sanitiser provision for reducing illness absences in primary school children: a cluster randomised trial.

    Patricia Priest

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential for transmission of infectious diseases offered by the school environment are likely to be an important contributor to the rates of infectious disease experienced by children. This study aimed to test whether the addition of hand sanitiser in primary school classrooms compared with usual hand hygiene would reduce illness absences in primary school children in New Zealand. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This parallel-group cluster randomised trial took place in 68 primary schools, where schools were allocated using restricted randomisation (1:1 ratio to the intervention or control group. All children (aged 5 to 11 y in attendance at participating schools received an in-class hand hygiene education session. Schools in the intervention group were provided with alcohol-based hand sanitiser dispensers in classrooms for the winter school terms (27 April to 25 September 2009. Control schools received only the hand hygiene education session. The primary outcome was the number of absence episodes due to any illness among 2,443 follow-up children whose caregivers were telephoned after each absence from school. Secondary outcomes measured among follow-up children were the number of absence episodes due to specific illness (respiratory or gastrointestinal, length of illness and illness absence episodes, and number of episodes where at least one other member of the household became ill subsequently (child or adult. We also examined whether provision of sanitiser was associated with experience of a skin reaction. The number of absences for any reason and the length of the absence episode were measured in all primary school children enrolled at the schools. Children, school administrative staff, and the school liaison research assistants were not blind to group allocation. Outcome assessors of follow-up children were blind to group allocation. Of the 1,301 and 1,142 follow-up children in the hand sanitiser and control groups, respectively, the

  4. An Investigation of the Shortcomings of the CONSORT 2010 Statement for the Reporting of Group Sequential Randomised Controlled Trials: A Methodological Systematic Review.

    Abigail Stevely

    Full Text Available It can be argued that adaptive designs are underused in clinical research. We have explored concerns related to inadequate reporting of such trials, which may influence their uptake. Through a careful examination of the literature, we evaluated the standards of reporting of group sequential (GS randomised controlled trials, one form of a confirmatory adaptive design.We undertook a systematic review, by searching Ovid MEDLINE from the 1st January 2001 to 23rd September 2014, supplemented with trials from an audit study. We included parallel group, confirmatory, GS trials that were prospectively designed using a Frequentist approach. Eligible trials were examined for compliance in their reporting against the CONSORT 2010 checklist. In addition, as part of our evaluation, we developed a supplementary checklist to explicitly capture group sequential specific reporting aspects, and investigated how these are currently being reported.Of the 284 screened trials, 68(24% were eligible. Most trials were published in "high impact" peer-reviewed journals. Examination of trials established that 46(68% were stopped early, predominantly either for futility or efficacy. Suboptimal reporting compliance was found in general items relating to: access to full trials protocols; methods to generate randomisation list(s; details of randomisation concealment, and its implementation. Benchmarking against the supplementary checklist, GS aspects were largely inadequately reported. Only 3(7% trials which stopped early reported use of statistical bias correction. Moreover, 52(76% trials failed to disclose methods used to minimise the risk of operational bias, due to the knowledge or leakage of interim results. Occurrence of changes to trial methods and outcomes could not be determined in most trials, due to inaccessible protocols and amendments.There are issues with the reporting of GS trials, particularly those specific to the conduct of interim analyses. Suboptimal

  5. UVB phototherapy in an outpatient setting or at home: a pragmatic randomised single-blind trial designed to settle the discussion. The PLUTO study

    van Weelden Huib

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home ultraviolet B (UVB treatment is a much-debated treatment, especially with regard to effectiveness, safety and side effects. However, it is increasingly being prescribed, especially in the Netherlands. Despite ongoing discussions, no randomised research has been performed, and only two studies actually compare two groups of patients. Thus, firm evidence to support or discourage the use of home UVB phototherapy has not yet been obtained. This is the goal of the present study, the PLUTO study (Dutch acronym for "national trial on home UVB phototherapy for psoriasis". Methods We designed a pragmatic randomised single-blind multi-centre trial. This trial is designed to evaluate the impact of home UVB treatment versus UVB phototherapy in a hospital outpatient clinic as to effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In total 196 patients with psoriasis who were clinically eligible for UVB phototherapy were included. Normally 85% of the patients treated with UVB show a relevant clinical response. With a power of 80% and a 0.05 significance level it will be possible to detect a reduction in effectiveness of 15%. Effectiveness will be determined by calculating differences in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI and the Self Administered PASI (SAPASI scores. Quality of life is measured using several validated generic questionnaires and a disease-specific questionnaire. Other outcome measures include costs, side effects, dosimetry, concomitant use of medication and patient satisfaction. Patients are followed throughout the therapy and for 12 months thereafter. The study is no longer recruiting patients, and is expected to report in 2006. Discussion In the field of home UVB phototherapy this trial is the first randomised parallel group study. As such, this trial addresses the weaknesses encountered in previous studies. The pragmatic design ensures that the results can be well generalised to the target population

  6. Participant experiences from chronic administration of a multivitamin versus placebo on subjective health and wellbeing: a double-blind qualitative analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    Sarris Jerome

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Methods Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16, three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent analysis from three researchers was employed to ensure methodological rigour. Participant’s experiences were categorised as “positive” or “negative” and a Chi Square analysis was then applied to each of the experiential themes, to compare experiences between the multivitamin and placebo groups, (subdividing the groups by gender. Usual experiences were categorised and discussed separately. Results Of the 182 participants enrolled, 116 completed the study and qualitative data were available from 114 participants. Thematic analysis revealed significant effects in favour of the multivitamin over placebo for participants experiencing increased energy levels (p=.022 and enhanced mood (p=.027. The beneficial effect on energy levels was particularly evident among female participants. A trend was found for participants reporting better sleep in the multivitamin over placebo. The multivitamin and placebo groups did not significantly differ in perceived positive or negative effects in areas relating to other aspects of mental function or physical health. No significant negative effects were revealed, although there was a non-significant trend for more people in the multivitamin

  7. The SHED-IT community trial study protocol: a randomised controlled trial of weight loss programs for overweight and obese men

    Young Myles D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a major cause of preventable death in Australia with prevalence increasing at an alarming rate. Of particular concern is that approximately 68% of men are overweight/obese, yet are notoriously difficult to engage in weight loss programs, despite being more susceptible than women to adverse weight-related outcomes. There is a need to develop and evaluate obesity treatment programs that target and appeal to men. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of two relatively low intensity weight loss programs developed specifically for men. Methods and Design The study design is an assessor blinded, parallel-group randomised controlled trial that recruited 159 overweight and obese men in Newcastle, Australia. Inclusion criteria included: BMI 25-40 (kg/m2; no participation in other weight loss programs during the study; pass a health-screening questionnaire and pre-exercise risk assessment; available for assessment sessions; access to a computer with e-mail and Internet facilities; and own a mobile phone. Men were recruited to the SHED-IT (Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Internet Technology study via the media and emails sent to male dominated workplaces. Men were stratified by BMI category (overweight, obese class I, obese class II and randomised to one of three groups: (1 SHED-IT Resources - provision of materials (DVD, handbooks, pedometer, tape measure with embedded behaviour change strategies to support weight loss; (2 SHED-IT Online - same materials as SHED-IT Resources plus access to and instruction on how to use the study website; (3 Wait-list Control. The intervention programs are three months long with outcome measures taken by assessors blinded to group allocation at baseline, and 3- and 6-months post baseline. Outcome measures include: weight (primary outcome, % body fat, waist circumference, blood pressure, resting heart rate, objectively measured physical activity, self-reported dietary

  8. Community involvement in dengue vector control: cluster randomised trial

    Vanlerberghe, V; Toledo, M. E.; Rodríguez, M.; Gomez, D.; Baly, A; Benitez, J. R.; Van der Stuyft, P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of an integrated community based environmental management strategy to control Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, compared with a routine strategy. DESIGN: Cluster randomised trial. SETTING: Guantanamo, Cuba. PARTICIPANTS: 32 circumscriptions (around 2000 inhabitants each). INTERVENTIONS: The circumscriptions were randomly allocated to control clusters (n=16) comprising routine Aedes control programme (entomological surveillance, source reduction, selec...

  9. Community involvement in dengue vector control: cluster randomised trial

    Vanlerberghe, V; Toledo, M. E.; Rodriguez, M.; Gómez, D.; Baly, D; Baly, A; Benítez, J. R.; Van der Stuyft, P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effectiveness of an integrated community based environmental management strategy to control Aedes aegypti, the vector of dengue, compared with a routine strategy. Design Cluster randomised trial. Setting Guantanamo, Cuba. Participants 32 circumscriptions (around 2000 inhabitants each). Interventions: The circumscriptions were randomly allocated to control clusters (n=16) comprising routine Aedes control programme (entomological surveillance, sourc...

  10. Yoga in schizophrenia : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    Vancampfort, D.; Vansteelandt, K.; Scheewe, T.; Probst, M.; Knapen, J.; De Herdt, A.; De Hert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Vancampfort D, Vansteelandt K, Scheewe T, Probst M, Knapen J, De Herdt A, De Hert M. Yoga in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary treatment on general psychopa

  11. Cluster randomised trials in the medical literature: two bibliometric surveys

    Bland J Martin

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several reviews of published cluster randomised trials have reported that about half did not take clustering into account in the analysis, which was thus incorrect and potentially misleading. In this paper I ask whether cluster randomised trials are increasing in both number and quality of reporting. Methods Computer search for papers on cluster randomised trials since 1980, hand search of trial reports published in selected volumes of the British Medical Journal over 20 years. Results There has been a large increase in the numbers of methodological papers and of trial reports using the term 'cluster random' in recent years, with about equal numbers of each type of paper. The British Medical Journal contained more such reports than any other journal. In this journal there was a corresponding increase over time in the number of trials where subjects were randomised in clusters. In 2003 all reports showed awareness of the need to allow for clustering in the analysis. In 1993 and before clustering was ignored in most such trials. Conclusion Cluster trials are becoming more frequent and reporting is of higher quality. Perhaps statistician pressure works.

  12. Outcomes in a Randomised Controlled Trial of Mathematics Tutoring

    Topping, K. J.; Miller, D.; Murray, P.; Henderson, S.; Fortuna, C.; Conlin, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Large-scale randomised controlled trials (RCT) are relatively rare in education. The present study was an attempt to scale up previous small peer tutoring projects, while investing only modestly in continuing professional development for teachers. Purpose: A two-year RCT of peer tutoring in mathematics was undertaken in one local…

  13. Immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination: randomised controlled trial

    Custers, Inge M; Flierman, Paul A; Maas, Pettie; Cox, Tessa; Van Dessel, Thierry J H M; Gerards, Mariette H; Mochtar, Monique H; Janssen, Catharina A H; van der Veen, Fulco; Ben Willem J. Mol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of 15 minutes of immobilisation versus immediate mobilisation after intrauterine insemination. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting One academic teaching hospital and six non-academic teaching hospitals. Participants Women having intrauterine insemination for unexplained, cervical factor, or male subfertility. Interventions 15 minutes of immobilisation or immediate mobilisation after insemination. Main outcome measure Ongoing pregnancy per couple...

  14. The use of spatial and randomisation-based methods for analysis of trials with treatments randomised into rows and columns

    Kristensen, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The effect of restricted randomisations on the validity and efficiency of using spatial model as well as more common analysis of variance methods for analysing field trials was examined by simulating yields in agricultural fields with known spatial variation and analysing those using eight...

  15. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  16. Study design and methods of the BoTULS trial: a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical effect and cost effectiveness of treating upper limb spasticity due to stroke with botulinum toxin type A

    Graham Laura

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following a stroke, 55–75% of patients experience upper limb problems in the longer term. Upper limb spasticity may cause pain, deformity and reduced function, affecting mood and independence. Botulinum toxin is used increasingly to treat focal spasticity, but its impact on upper limb function after stroke is unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of botulinum toxin type A plus an upper limb therapy programme in the treatment of post stroke upper limb spasticity. Methods Trial design : A multi-centre open label parallel group randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation. Participants : Adults with upper limb spasticity at the shoulder, elbow, wrist or hand and reduced upper limb function due to stroke more than 1 month previously. Interventions : Botulinum toxin type A plus upper limb therapy (intervention group or upper limb therapy alone (control group. Outcomes : Outcome assessments are undertaken at 1, 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome is upper limb function one month after study entry measured by the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT. Secondary outcomes include: spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale; grip strength; dexterity (Nine Hole Peg Test; disability (Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index; quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale, Euroqol EQ-5D and attainment of patient-selected goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Health and social services resource use, adverse events, use of other antispasticity treatments and patient views on the treatment will be compared. Participants are clinically reassessed at 3, 6 and 9 months to determine the need for repeat botulinum toxin type A and/or therapy. Randomisation : A web based central independent randomisation service. Blinding : Outcome assessments are undertaken by an assessor who is blinded to the randomisation group. Sample size : 332 participants provide 80% power to detect a 15% difference in treatment

  17. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon;

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises....... The treatment guideline is presented to assist neonatologists in making decisions in relation to cerebral oximetry readings in preterm infants within the SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial. The evidence grades were relatively low and the guideline cannot be recommended outside a research setting...... of the literature and assessment of the quality of evidence and the grade of recommendation for each of the interventions. Results and Conclusions: A clinical intervention algorithm based on the main determinants of cerebral perfusion-oxygenation changes during the first hours after birth was generated...

  18. Reported challenges in nurse-led randomised controlled trials

    Wang Vedelø, Tina; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    ) nonadherence to research protocols and (iii) economic and organisational obstacles. These three challenges and barriers were inter-related and all were affected by time and timing. Conclusion: Randomised controlled trials are complex, expensive, time-consuming and highly demanding for researchers and the...... clinical nursing staff. Two lessons learned from this integrative review can be highlighted. First, we recommend researchers openly to share their experiences of barriers and challenges. They should describe factors that may have inhibited the desired outcome. Second, efforts to improve the collaboration...... between nurse researchers and clinicians, including education, training and support may increase the success rate and quality of nurse-led studies using the randomised controlled trial....

  19. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    Saghaei Mahmood

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over...

  20. Thermoregulatory effects of swaddling in Mongolia: a randomised controlled study

    Tsogt, Bazarragchaa; Manaseki-Holland, Semira; Pollock, Jon; Blair, Peter S.; Fleming, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate thermal balance of infants in a Mongolian winter, and compare the effects of traditional swaddling with an infant sleeping-bag in apartments or traditional tents (Gers). Design A substudy within a randomised controlled trial. Setting Community in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Subjects A stratified randomly selected sample of 40 swaddled and 40 non-swaddled infants recruited within 48 h of birth. Intervention Sleeping-bags and baby outfits of total thermal resistance equivale...

  1. Psychological rehabilitation after myocardial infarction: multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Jones, D. A.; West, R R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation in unselected myocardial infarction patients in six centres, baseline data being collected on admission and by structured interview (of patients and spouses) shortly after discharge and outcome being assessed by structured interview at six months and clinical examination at 12 months. SETTING: Six district general hospitals. SUBJECTS: All 2328 eligible patients admitted ove...

  2. Promoting childbirth companions in South Africa: a randomised pilot study

    Smith Helen; Nikodem V Cheryl; Hofmeyr G Justus; Brown Heather; Garner Paul

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Most women delivering in South African State Maternity Hospitals do not have a childbirth companion; in addition, the quality of care could be better, and at times women are treated inhumanely. We piloted a multi-faceted intervention to encourage uptake of childbirth companions in state hospitals, and hypothesised that lay carers would improve the behaviour of health professionals. Methods We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote child...

  3. Ear Acupressure for Smoking Cessation: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Zhang, Anthony L.; Yuan Ming Di; Christopher Worsnop; Brian H. May; Cliff Da Costa; Xue, Charlie C.L.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and safety of ear acupressure (EAP) as a stand-alone intervention for smoking cessation and the feasibility of this study design. Adult smokers were randomised to receive EAP specific for smoking cessation (SSEAP) or a nonspecific EAP (NSEAP) intervention which is not typically used for smoking cessation. Participants received 8 weekly treatments and were requested to press the five pellets taped to one ear at least three times daily. Participants were fol...

  4. Randomised controlled trial of intrapartum fetal heart rate monitoring.

    Mahomed, K.; Nyoni, R.; Mulambo, T.; Kasule, J.; Jacobus, E.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare effectiveness of different methods of monitoring intrapartum fetal heart rate. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Referral maternity hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe. SUBJECTS--1255 women who were 37 weeks or more pregnant with singleton cephalic presentation and normal fetal heart rate before entry into study. INTERVENTIONS--Intermittent monitoring of fetal heart rate by electronic monitoring, Doppler ultrasound, use of Pinard stethoscope by a research ...

  5. Colostomy or ileostomy after colorectal anastomosis?: a randomised trial.

    Khoury, G A; Lewis, M.C.; Meleagros, L; Lewis, A A

    1987-01-01

    Sixty one patients were entered in a randomised trial to compare transverse loop colostomy with loop ileostomy after a colorectal anastomosis thought to be at risk of dehiscence. Radiologically proven breakdown of the colorectal anastomosis occurred in 13% of these selected patients and most frequently in the colostomy group. Ileostomies functioned earlier than colostomies (P less than 0.001) but there was no other significant difference in outcome between the groups. In 52 patients intestina...

  6. Compliance therapy in psychotic patients: randomised controlled trial.

    Kemp, R; Hayward, P.; Applewhaite, G.; Everitt, B; David, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether compliance therapy, a cognitive-behavioural intervention, could improve compliance with treatment and hence social adjustment in acutely psychotic inpatients, and if so, whether the effect persisted six months later. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial of compliance therapy and non-specific counselling, each comprising 4-6 sessions lasting 10-60 minutes. SETTING--Acute psychiatric admissions ward serving an inner London catchment area. SUBJECTS--47 patients wit...

  7. Improper analysis of trials randomised using stratified blocks or minimisation

    Kahan, B. C.; Morris, T. P.

    2012-01-01

    Many clinical trials restrict randomisation using stratified blocks or minimisation to balance prognostic factors across treatment groups. It is widely acknowledged in the statistical literature that the subsequent analysis should reflect the design of the study, and any stratification or minimisation variables should be adjusted for in the analysis. However, a review of recent general medical literature showed only 14 of 41 eligible studies reported adjusting their primary analysis for strat...

  8. Randomised controlled trial of aminophylline for severe acute asthma

    Yung, M; South, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine whether children with severe acute asthma treated with large doses of inhaled salbutamol, inhaled ipratropium, and intravenous steroids are conferred any further benefits by the addition of aminophylline given intravenously.
STUDY DESIGN—Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of 163 children admitted to hospital with asthma who were unresponsive to nebulised salbutamol.
RESULTS—The placebo and treatment groups of children were similar at b...

  9. Randomised controlled trial of azathioprine withdrawal in ulcerative colitis.

    Hawthorne, A. B.; Logan, R. F.; Hawkey, C. J.; Foster, P. N.; Axon, A T; Swarbrick, E T; Scott, B B; Lennard-Jones, J E

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether azathioprine can prevent relapse in ulcerative colitis. DESIGN--One year placebo controlled double blind trial of withdrawal or continuation of azathioprine. SETTING--Outpatient clinics of five hospitals. SUBJECTS--79 patients with ulcerative colitis who had been taking azathioprine for six months or more. Patients in full remission for two months or more (67), and patients with chronic low grade or corticosteroid dependent disease (12) were randomised separate...

  10. Cost-effectiveness of decompression according to Gill versus instrumented spondylodesis in the treatment of sciatica due to low grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: A prospective randomised controlled trial [NTR1300

    Brand Ronald

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nerve root decompression with instrumented spondylodesis is the most frequently performed surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with symptomatic low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Nerve root decompression without instrumented fusion, i.e. Gill's procedure, is an alternative and less invasive approach. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of decompression according to Gill versus instrumented spondylodesis. Methods/design All patients (age between 18 and 70 years with sciatica or neurogenic claudication lasting more than 3 months due to spondylolytic spondylolisthesis grade I or II, are eligible for inclusion. Patients will be randomly allocated to nerve root decompression according to Gill, either unilateral or bilateral, or pedicle screw fixation with interbody fusion. The main primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured with the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica at 12 weeks and 2 years. Other primary outcome measures are perceived recovery and intensity of leg pain and low back pain. The secondary outcome measures include, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine phosphokinase, quality of life, medical consumption, costs, absenteeism, work perception, depression and anxiety, and treatment preference. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurse will not be blinded during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, nerve root decompression with instrumented fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, although scientific proof justifying instrumented spondylodesis over simple decompression is lacking. This trial is designed to elucidate the controversy in best

  11. Multiple imputation methods for bivariate outcomes in cluster randomised trials.

    DiazOrdaz, K; Kenward, M G; Gomes, M; Grieve, R

    2016-09-10

    Missing observations are common in cluster randomised trials. The problem is exacerbated when modelling bivariate outcomes jointly, as the proportion of complete cases is often considerably smaller than the proportion having either of the outcomes fully observed. Approaches taken to handling such missing data include the following: complete case analysis, single-level multiple imputation that ignores the clustering, multiple imputation with a fixed effect for each cluster and multilevel multiple imputation. We contrasted the alternative approaches to handling missing data in a cost-effectiveness analysis that uses data from a cluster randomised trial to evaluate an exercise intervention for care home residents. We then conducted a simulation study to assess the performance of these approaches on bivariate continuous outcomes, in terms of confidence interval coverage and empirical bias in the estimated treatment effects. Missing-at-random clustered data scenarios were simulated following a full-factorial design. Across all the missing data mechanisms considered, the multiple imputation methods provided estimators with negligible bias, while complete case analysis resulted in biased treatment effect estimates in scenarios where the randomised treatment arm was associated with missingness. Confidence interval coverage was generally in excess of nominal levels (up to 99.8%) following fixed-effects multiple imputation and too low following single-level multiple imputation. Multilevel multiple imputation led to coverage levels of approximately 95% throughout. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26990655

  12. Reduction of adverse effects from intravenous acetylcysteine treatment for paracetamol poisoning: a randomised controlled trial:a randomised controlled trial

    Bateman, D Nicholas; Dear, James W; Thanacoody, H K Ruben; Thomas, Simon H L; Eddleston, Michael; Sandilands, Euan A; Coyle, Judy; Cooper, Jamie G.; Rodriguez, Aryelly; Butcher, Isabella; Lewis, Steff C.; Vliegenthart, A D Bastiaan; Veiraiah, Aravindan; Webb, David J.; Gray, Alasdair

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paracetamol poisoning is common worldwide. It is treated with intravenous acetylcysteine, but the standard regimen is complex and associated with frequent adverse effects related to concentration, which can cause treatment interruption. We aimed to ascertain whether adverse effects could be reduced with either a shorter modified acetylcysteine schedule, antiemetic pretreatment, or both. METHODS: We undertook a double-blind, randomised factorial study at three UK hospitals, between...

  13. Are adaptive randomised trials or non-randomised studies the best way to address the Ebola outbreak in west Africa?

    Lanini, Simone; Zumla, Alimuddin; Ioannidis, John P A; Di Caro, Antonino; Krishna, Sanjeev; Gostin, Lawrence; Girardi, Enrico; Pletschette, Michel; Strada, Gino; Baritussio, Aldo; Portella, Gina; Apolone, Giovanni; Cavuto, Silvio; Satolli, Roberto; Kremsner, Peter; Vairo, Francesco; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The Ebola outbreak that has devastated parts of west Africa represents an unprecedented challenge for research and ethics. Estimates from the past three decades emphasise that the present effort to contain the epidemic in the three most affected countries (Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone) has been insufficient, with more than 24,900 cases and about 10,300 deaths, as of March 25, 2015. Faced with such an exceptional event and the urgent response it demands, the use of randomised controlled trials (RCT) for Ebola-related research might be both unethical and infeasible and that potential interventions should be assessed in non-randomised studies on the basis of compassionate use. However, non-randomised studies might not yield valid conclusions, leading to large residual uncertainty about how to interpret the results, and can also waste scarce intervention-related resources, making them profoundly unethical. Scientifically sound and rigorous study designs, such as adaptive RCTs, could provide the best way to reduce the time needed to develop new interventions and to obtain valid results on their efficacy and safety while preserving the application of ethical precepts. We present an overview of clinical studies registered at present at the four main international trial registries and provide a simulation on how adaptive RCTs can behave in this context, when mortality varies simultaneously in either the control or the experimental group. PMID:25881871

  14. The effect of a comprehensive lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular risk factors in pharmacologically treated patients with stable cardiovascular disease compared to usual care: a randomised controlled trial

    IJzelenberg Wilhelmina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The additional benefit of lifestyle interventions in patients receiving cardioprotective drug treatment to improve cardiovascular risk profile is not fully established. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a target-driven multidisciplinary structured lifestyle intervention programme of 6 months duration aimed at maximum reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD compared with usual care. Methods A single centre, two arm, parallel group randomised controlled trial was performed. Patients with stable established CVD and at least one lifestyle-related risk factor were recruited from the vascular and cardiology outpatient departments of the university hospital. Blocked randomisation was used to allocate patients to the intervention (n = 71 or control group (n = 75 using an on-site computer system combined with allocations in computer-generated tables of random numbers kept in a locked computer file. The intervention group received the comprehensive lifestyle intervention offered in a specialised outpatient clinic in addition to usual care. The control group continued to receive usual care. Outcome measures were the lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors: smoking, physical activity, physical fitness, diet, blood pressure, plasma total/HDL/LDL cholesterol concentrations, BMI, waist circumference, and changes in medication. Results The intervention led to increased physical activity/fitness levels and an improved cardiovascular risk factor profile (reduced BMI and waist circumference. In this setting, cardiovascular risk management for blood pressure and lipid levels by prophylactic treatment for CVD in usual care was already close to optimal as reflected in baseline levels. There was no significant improvement in any other risk factor. Conclusions Even in CVD patients receiving good clinical care and using cardioprotective drug treatment, a comprehensive

  15. Securing All intraVenous devices Effectively in hospitalised patients—the SAVE trial: study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Rickard, Claire M; Marsh, Nicole; Webster, Joan; Playford, E Geoffrey; McGrail, Matthew R; Larsen, Emily; Keogh, Samantha; McMillan, David; Whitty, Jennifer A; Choudhury, Md Abu; Dunster, Kimble R; Reynolds, Heather; Marshall, Andrea; Crilly, Julia; Young, Jeanine; Thom, Ogilvie; Gowardman, John; Corley, Amanda; Fraser, John F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Over 70% of all hospital admissions have a peripheral intravenous device (PIV) inserted; however, the failure rate of PIVs is unacceptably high, with up to 69% of these devices failing before treatment is complete. Failure can be due to dislodgement, phlebitis, occlusion/infiltration and/or infection. This results in interrupted medical therapy; painful phlebitis and reinsertions; increased hospital length of stay, morbidity and mortality from infections; and wasted medical/nursing time. Appropriate PIV dressing and securement may prevent many cases of PIV failure, but little comparative data exist regarding the efficacy of various PIV dressing and securement methods. This trial will investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of 4 methods of PIV dressing and securement in preventing PIV failure. Methods and analysis A multicentre, parallel group, superiority randomised controlled trial with 4 arms, 3 experimental groups (tissue adhesive, bordered polyurethane dressing, sutureless securement device) and 1 control (standard polyurethane dressing) is planned. There will be a 3-year recruitment of 1708 adult patients, with allocation concealment until randomisation by a centralised web-based service. The primary outcome is PIV failure which includes any of: dislodgement, occlusion/infiltration, phlebitis and infection. Secondary outcomes include: types of PIV failure, PIV dwell time, costs, device colonisation, skin colonisation, patient and staff satisfaction. Relative incidence rates of device failure per 100 devices and per 1000 device days with 95% CIs will summarise the impact of each dressing, and test differences between groups. Kaplan-Meier survival curves (with log-rank Mantel-Cox test) will compare device failure over time. p Values of <0.05 will be considered significant. Secondary end points will be compared between groups using parametric or non-parametric techniques appropriate to level of measurement. Ethics and dissemination Ethical

  16. Internet-based treatment for older adults with depression and co-morbid cardiovascular disease: protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial

    Christensen Helen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression, cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors and cognitive impairment are important causes of disability and poor health outcomes. In combination they lead to an even worse prognosis. Internet or web-based interventions have been shown to deliver efficacious psychological intervention programs for depression on a large scale, yet no published studies have evaluated their impact among patients with co-existing physical conditions. The aims of this randomised controlled trial are to determine the effects of an evidence-based internet intervention program for depression on depressive mood symptoms, cognitive function and treatment adherence in patients at risk of CVD. Methods/Design This study is an internet-based, double-blind, parallel group randomised controlled trial. The trial will compare the effectiveness of online cognitive behavioural therapy with an online attention control placebo. The trial will consist of a 12-week intervention phase with a 40-week follow-up. It will be conducted in urban and rural New South Wales, Australia and will recruit a community-based sample of adults aged 45 to 75 years. Recruitment, intervention, cognitive testing and follow-up data collection will all be internet-based and automated. The primary outcome is a change in severity of depressive symptoms from baseline to three-months. Secondary outcomes are changes in cognitive function and adherence to treatment for CVD from baseline to three, six and 12-months. Discussion Prior studies of depression amongst patients with CVD have targeted those with previous vascular events and major depression. The potential for intervening earlier in these disease states appears to have significant potential and has yet to be tested. Scalable psychological programs using web-based interventions could deliver care to large numbers in a cost effective way if efficacy were proved. This study will determine the effects of a web-based intervention on

  17. Effects and feasibility of a standardised orientation and mobility training in using an identification cane for older adults with low vision: design of a randomised controlled trial

    van der Velde J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orientation and mobility training (O&M-training in using an identification cane, also called symbol cane, is provided to people with low vision to facilitate independent participation in the community. In The Netherlands this training is mainly practice-based because a standardised and validly evaluated O&M-training in using the identification cane is lacking. Recently a standardised O&M-training in using the identification cane was developed. This training consists of two face-to-face sessions and one telephone session during which, in addition to usual care, the client's needs regarding mobility are prioritised, and cognitive restructuring techniques, action planning and contracting are applied to facilitate the use of the cane. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate this standardised O&M-training in using the identification cane in older adults with low vision. Methods/design A parallel group randomised controlled trial was designed to compare the standardised O&M-training with usual care, i.e. the O&M-training commonly provided by the mobility trainer. Community-dwelling older people who ask for support at a rehabilitation centre for people with visual impairment and who are likely to receive an O&M-training in using the identification cane are included in the trial (N = 190. The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are ADL self care and visual functioning with respect to distance activities and mobility. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, feelings of anxiety, symptoms of depression, fear of falling, and falls history. Data for the effect evaluation are collected by means of telephone interviews at baseline, and at 5 and 17 weeks after the start of the O&M-training. In addition to an effect evaluation, a process evaluation to study the feasibility of the O&M-training is carried out. Discussion The screening procedure for eligible participants started in November

  18. Is an Intervention Using Computer Software Effective in Literacy Learning? A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Brooks, G.; Miles, J. N. V.; Torgerson, C. J.; Torgerson, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Computer software is widely used to support literacy learning. There are few randomised trials to support its effectiveness. Therefore, there is an urgent need to rigorously evaluate computer software that supports literacy learning. Methods: We undertook a pragmatic randomised controlled trial among pupils aged 11-12 within a single…

  19. Feasibility study of an integrated stroke self-management programme : a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Jones, Fiona; Gage, Heather; Drummond, Avril; Bhalla, Ajay; Grant, Robert; Lennon, Sheila; McKevitt, Christopher; Riazi, Afsane; Liston, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the feasibility of conducting a controlled trial into the effectiveness of a self-management programme integrated into stroke rehabilitation. DESIGN: A feasibility cluster-randomised design was utilised with stroke rehabilitation teams as units of randomisation. SETTING: Community-based stroke rehabilitation teams in London. PARTICIPANTS: 78 patients with a diagnosis of stroke requiring community based rehabilitation. INTERVENTION: The interv...

  20. Inconsistent reporting of surrogate outcomes in randomised clinical trials: cohort study

    La Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Brok, Jesper; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To assess if authors of randomised clinical trials convey the fact that they have used surrogate outcomes and discussed their validity.......To assess if authors of randomised clinical trials convey the fact that they have used surrogate outcomes and discussed their validity....

  1. Orange juice consumption and its effect on blood lipid profile and indices of the metabolic syndrome; a randomised, controlled trial in an at-risk population.

    Simpson, E J; Mendis, B; Macdonald, I A

    2016-04-20

    Data from epidemiological and in vitro studies suggest that orange juice (OJ) may have a positive impact on lipid metabolism. However, there have been reports in the media claiming detrimental consequences of 100% juice consumption, including weight-gain and adverse effects on insulin sensitivity and blood lipid profile. The effect of daily OJ consumption was assessed using a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blinded, parallel group design. Thirty-six overweight, but otherwise healthy men (40-60 years; 27-35 kg m(-2)) with elevated fasting serum cholesterol (5-7 mmol l(-1)), were recruited from the general UK population. None were using nutritional strategies or medication to lower their cholesterol, nor were regular consumers of citrus products. Assessment of BMI, HOMA-IR, and circulating lipid (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, non-esterified fatty acids, triacylglycerol, apolipoprotein-A1 and apolipoprotein-B) concentrations, was made when fasted before (V1) and after a 12-week intervention (V2), during which participants consumed 250 ml per d of OJ or an energy and sugars-matched orange-flavoured drink (control). The two groups were matched at V1 with respect to all parameters described above. Although triacylglycerol concentration was similar between the groups at both visits, a trend for the change in this variable to differ between groups was observed (P = 0.060), with those in control exhibiting a significant increase in triacylglycerol at V2, compared with V1. In OJ, those with the highest initial triacylglycerol concentration showed the greatest reduction at V2 (R(2) = 0.579; P < 0.001), whereas there was no correlation between these variables in controls (R(2) = 0.023; P = 0.548). Twelve weeks consumption of 250 ml per d of OJ did not adversely affect insulin sensitivity, circulating lipids or body weight. PMID:26965492

  2. Neuroprotective effect of therapeutic hypothermia versus standard care alone after convulsive status epilepticus: protocol of the multicentre randomised controlled trial HYBERNATUS.

    Legriel, Stephane; Pico, Fernando; Tran-Dinh, Yves-Roger; Lemiale, Virginie; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) is a major medical emergency associated with a 50 % morbidity rate. CSE guidelines have recommended prompt management for many years, but there is no evidence to date that they have significantly improved practices or outcomes. Developing neuroprotective strategies for use after CSE holds promise for diminishing morbidity and mortality rates. Hypothermia has been shown to afford neuroprotection in various health conditions. We therefore designed a trial to determine whether 90-day outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with CSE requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU) are improved by early therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) for 24 h with propofol sedation. We are conducting a multicentre, open-label, parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial (HYBERNATUS) of potential neuroprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia and routine propofol sedation started within 8 h after CSE onset in ICU patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Included patients are allocated to receive therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) plus standard care or standard care alone. We plan to enrol 270 patients in 11 ICUs. An interim analysis is scheduled after the inclusion of 135 patients. The main study objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia (32-34 °C) for 24 h in diminishing 90-day morbidity and mortality (defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score <5). The HYBERNATUS trial is expected to a decreased proportion of patients with a Glasgow Outcome Scale score lower than 5 after CSE requiring ICU admission and mechanical ventilation. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01359332 (registered on 23 May 2011). PMID:27325409

  3. A multicentre randomised controlled trial evaluating lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in older people admitted to hospital: the PLACIDE study protocol

    Allen Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhoea complicates 5–39% of courses of antibiotic treatment. Major risk factors are increased age and admission to hospital. Of particular importance is C. difficile associated diarrhoea which occurs in about 4% of antibiotic courses and may result in severe illness, death and high healthcare costs. The emergence of the more virulent 027 strain of C. difficile has further heightened concerns. Probiotics may prevent antibiotic associated diarrhoea by several mechanisms including colonization resistance through maintaining a healthy gut flora. Methods This study aims to test the hypothesis that administration of a probiotic comprising two strains of lactobacilli and two strains of bifidobacteria alongside antibiotic treatment prevents antibiotic associated diarrhoea. We have designed a prospective, parallel group trial where people aged 65 years or more admitted to hospital and receiving one or more antibiotics are randomly allocated to receive either one capsule of the probiotic or a matching placebo daily for 21 days. The primary outcomes are the frequency of antibiotic associated and C. difficile diarrhoea during 8–12 weeks follow-up. To directly inform routine clinical practice, we will recruit a sufficient number of patients to demonstrate a 50% reduction in the frequency of C. difficile diarrhoea with a power of 80%. To maximize the generalizability of our findings and in view of the well-established safety record of probiotics, we will recruit a broad range of medical and surgical in-patients from two different health regions within the UK. Discussion Antibiotic associated diarrhoea constitutes a significant health burden. In particular, current measures to prevent and control C. difficile diarrhoea are expensive and disrupt clinical care. This trial may have considerable significance for the prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea in hospitals. Trial registration International

  4. The effect of recombinant erythropoietin on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with affective disorders: a randomised controlled study.

    Maj Vinberg

    Full Text Available The study aims to investigate the effect of repeated infusions of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in patients with affective disorders. In total, 83 patients were recruited: 40 currently depressed patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HDRS-17 score >17 (study 1 and 43 patients with bipolar disorder (BD in partial remission (HDRS-17 and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS ≤ 14 (study 2. In both studies, patients were randomised to receive eight weekly EPO (Eprex; 40,000 IU or saline (0.9% NaCl infusions in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel--group design. Plasma BDNF levels were measured at baseline and at weeks 5, 9 and at follow up, week 14. In contrast with our hypothesis, EPO down regulated plasma BDNF levels in patients with TRD (mean reduction at week 9 (95% CI: EPO 10.94 ng/l (4.51-21.41 ng/l; mean increase at week 9: Saline 0.52 ng/l, p=0.04 (-5.88-4.48 ng/l p=0.04, partial ŋ2=0.12. No significant effects were found on BDNF levels in partially remitted patients with BD (p=0.35. The present effects of EPO on BDNF levels in patients with TRD point to a role of neurotrophic factors in the potential effects of EPO seen in TRD and BD. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these effects and the interaction between EPO and peripheral levels on BDNF need to be further elucidated in human studies including a broad range of biomarkers.ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00916552.

  5. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus supportive therapy for persistent positive symptoms in psychotic disorders: The POSITIVE Study, a multicenter, prospective, single-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial

    Sartory Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT has a moderate effect on symptom reduction and on general well being of patients suffering from psychosis. However, questions regarding the specific efficacy of CBT, the treatment safety, the cost-effectiveness, and the moderators and mediators of treatment effects are still a major issue. The major objective of this trial is to investigate whether CBT is specifically efficacious in reducing positive symptoms when compared with non-specific supportive therapy (ST which does not implement CBT-techniques but provides comparable therapeutic attention. Methods/Design The POSITIVE study is a multicenter, prospective, single-blind, parallel group, randomised clinical trial, comparing CBT and ST with respect to the efficacy in reducing positive symptoms in psychotic disorders. CBT as well as ST consist of 20 sessions altogether, 165 participants receiving CBT and 165 participants receiving ST. Major methodological aspects of the study are systematic recruitment, explicit inclusion criteria, reliability checks of assessments with control for rater shift, analysis by intention to treat, data management using remote data entry, measures of quality assurance (e.g. on-site monitoring with source data verification, regular query process, advanced statistical analysis, manualized treatment, checks of adherence and competence of therapists. Research relating the psychotherapy process with outcome, neurobiological research addressing basic questions of delusion formation using fMRI and neuropsychological assessment and treatment research investigating adaptations of CBT for adolescents is combined in this network. Problems of transfer into routine clinical care will be identified and addressed by a project focusing on cost efficiency. Discussion This clinical trial is part of efforts to intensify psychotherapy research in the field of psychosis in Germany, to contribute to the

  6. The feasibility of creating a checklist for the assessment of the methodological quality both of randomised and non-randomised studies of health care interventions

    Downs, S. H.; Black, N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the feasibility of creating a valid and reliable checklist with the following features: appropriate for assessing both randomised and non-randomised studies; provision of both an overall score for study quality and a profile of scores not only for the quality of reporting, internal validity (bias and confounding) and power, but also for external validity. DESIGN: A pilot version was first developed, based on epidemiological principles, reviews, and existing checklists...

  7. Protocol for the MoleMate™ UK Trial: a randomised controlled trial of the MoleMate system in the management of pigmented skin lesions in primary care [ISRCTN 79932379

    Wilson Edward CF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suspicious pigmented lesions are a common presenting problem in general practice consultations; while the majority are benign a small minority are melanomas. Differentiating melanomas from other pigmented lesions in primary care is challenging: currently, 95% of all lesions referred to a UK specialist are benign. The MoleMate system is a new diagnostic aid, incorporating a hand-held SIAscopy scanner with a primary care diagnostic algorithm. This trial tests the hypothesis that adding the MoleMate system to current best primary care practice will increase the proportion of appropriate referrals of suspicious pigmented lesions to secondary care compared with current best practice alone. Methods/design The MoleMate UK Trial is a primary care based multi-centre randomised controlled trial, with randomisation at patient level using a validated block randomisation method for two age groups (45 years and under; 46 years and over. We aim to recruit adult patients seen in general practice with a pigmented skin lesion that cannot immediately be diagnosed as benign and the patient reassured. The trial has a 'two parallel groups' design, comparing 'best practice' with 'best practice' plus the MoleMate system in the intervention group. The primary outcome is the positive predictive value (PPV of referral defined as the proportion of referred lesions seen by secondary care experts that are considered 'clinically significant' (i.e. biopsied or monitored. Secondary outcomes include: the sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value (NPV of the decision not to refer; clinical outcomes (melanoma thickness, 5 year melanoma incidence and mortality; clinician outcomes (Index of Suspicion, confidence, learning effects; patient outcomes (satisfaction, general and cancer-specific worry, and cost-utility. Discussion The MoleMate UK Trial tests a new technology designed to improve the management of suspicious pigmented lesions in primary care

  8. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    Imms Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental or bimanual occupational therapy group (control. Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following

  9. An educational approach based on a non-injury model compared with individual symptom-based physical training in chronic LBP. A pragmatic, randomised trial with a one-year follow-up

    Korsholm Lars

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the treatment of chronic back pain, cognitive methods are attracting increased attention due to evidence of effectiveness similar to that of traditional therapies. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of performing a cognitive intervention based on a non-injury model with that of a symptom-based physical training method on the outcomes of low back pain (LBP, activity limitation, LBP attitudes (fear-avoidance beliefs and back beliefs, physical activity levels, sick leave, and quality of life, in chronic LBP patients. Methods The study was a pragmatic, single-blind, randomised, parallel-group trial. Patients with chronic/recurrent LBP were randomised to one of the following treatments: 1. Educational programme : the emphasis was on creating confidence that the back is strong, that loads normally do not cause any damage despite occasional temporary pain, that reducing the focus on the pain might facilitate more natural and less painful movements, and that it is beneficial to stay physically active. 2. Individual symptom-based physical training programme : directional-preference exercises for those centralising their pain with repetitive movements; 'stabilising exercises' for those deemed 'unstable' based on specific tests; or intensive dynamic exercises for the remaining patients. Follow-up questionnaires (examiner-blinded were completed at 2, 6 and 12 months. The main statistical test was an ANCOVA adjusted for baseline values. Results A total of 207 patients participated with the median age of 39 years (IQR 33-47; 52% were female, 105 were randomised to the educational programme and 102 to the physical training programme. The two groups were comparable at baseline. For the primary outcome measures, there was a non-significant trend towards activity limitation being reduced mostly in the educational programme group, although of doubtful clinical relevance. Regarding secondary outcomes, improvement in

  10. Does a 10-valent pneumococcal-Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine prevent respiratory exacerbations in children with recurrent protracted bacterial bronchitis, chronic suppurative lung disease and bronchiectasis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurrent protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB), chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis are characterised by a chronic wet cough and are important causes of childhood respiratory morbidity globally. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most commonly associated pathogens. As respiratory exacerbations impair quality of life and may be associated with disease progression, we will determine if the novel 10-valent pneumococcal-Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) reduces exacerbations in these children. Methods A multi-centre, parallel group, double-blind, randomised controlled trial in tertiary paediatric centres from three Australian cities is planned. Two hundred six children aged 18 months to 14 years with recurrent PBB, CSLD or bronchiectasis will be randomised to receive either two doses of PHiD-CV or control meningococcal (ACYW135) conjugate vaccine 2 months apart and followed for 12 months after the second vaccine dose. Randomisation will be stratified by site, age (, nasopharyngeal and saliva swabs, and serum will be collected at baseline and at 2, 3, 8 and 14 months post-enrolment. Local and systemic reactions will be recorded on daily diaries for 7 and 30 days, respectively, following each vaccine dose and serious adverse events monitored throughout the trial. Fortnightly, parental contact will help record respiratory exacerbations. The primary outcome is the incidence of respiratory exacerbations in the 12 months following the second vaccine dose. Secondary outcomes include: nasopharyngeal carriage of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae vaccine and vaccine- related serotypes; systemic and mucosal immune responses to H. influenzae proteins and S. pneumoniae vaccine and vaccine-related serotypes; impact upon lung function in children aged ≥6 years; and vaccine safety. Discussion As H. influenzae is the most common bacterial pathogen associated with these chronic respiratory diseases in

  11. Protocol for a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial of lithium carbonate in patients with amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (LiCALS [Eudract number: 2008-006891-31

    Kelly Joanna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterised by loss of motor neurons leading to severe weakness and death from respiratory failure within 3-5 years. Riluzole prolongs survival in ALS. A published report has suggested a dramatic effect of lithium carbonate on survival. 44 patients were studied, with 16 randomly selected to take LiCO3 and riluzole and 28 allocated to take riluzole alone. In the group treated with lithium, no patients had died (i.e., 100% survival at the end of the study (15 months from entry, compared to 71% surviving in the riluzole-only group. Although the trial can be criticised on several grounds, there is a substantial rationale from other laboratory studies that lithium is worth investigating therapeutically in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Methods/Design LiCALS is a multi-centre double-blind randomised parallel group controlled trial of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of lithium carbonate (LiCO3 at doses to achieve stable 'therapeutic' plasma levels (0.4-0.8 mmol/L, plus standard treatment, versus matched placebo plus standard treatment, in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The study will be based in the UK, in partnership with the MND Association and DeNDRoN (the Dementias and Neurodegnerative Diseases Clinical Research Network. 220 patients will be recruited. All patients will be on the standard treatment for ALS of riluzole 100 mg daily. The primary outcome measure will be death from any cause at 18 months defined from the date of randomisation. Secondary outcome measures will be changes in three functional rating scales, the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised, The EuroQOL (EQ-5D, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Eligible patients will have El Escorial Possible, Laboratory-supported Probable, Probable or Definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with disease duration between 6 months and 36 months (inclusive, vital

  12. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Palmer Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785. The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format.

  13. Randomised clinical trials with clinician-preferred treatment.

    Korn, E L; Baumrind, S

    1991-01-19

    The standard design for randomised clinical trials may be inappropriate when the clinician believes that one of the treatments being tested is superior for the patient, or when the clinician has a preference for one of the treatments. For such instances the suggestion is that the patient is randomly allocated to treatment only when there is clinical disagreement about treatment of choice for that patient, and then the patient is assigned to a clinician who had thought that the regimen allocated is the one most appropriate for that patient. PMID:1670796

  14. Mendelian Randomisation Study of Childhood BMI and Early Menarche

    Hannah S. Mumby; Elks, Cathy E; Shengxu Li; Sharp, Stephen J.; Kay-Tee Khaw; Luben, Robert N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Ken K Ong

    2011-01-01

    To infer the causal association between childhood BMI and age at menarche, we performed a mendelian randomisation analysis using twelve established “BMI-increasing” genetic variants as an instrumental variable (IV) for higher BMI. In 8,156 women of European descent from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort, height was measured at age 39–77 years; age at menarche was self-recalled, as was body weight at age 20 years, and BMI at 20 was calculated as a proxy for childhood BMI. DNA was genotyped for twelve BM...

  15. Bach flower remedies: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    Ernst, Edzard

    2010-01-01

    Bach flower remedies continue to be popular and its proponents make a range of medicinal claims for them. The aim of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the evidence for these claims. Five electronic databases were searched without restrictions on time or language. All randomised clinical trials of flower remedies were included. Seven such studies were located. All but one were placebo-controlled. All placebo-controlled trials failed to demonstrate efficacy. It is concluded that the most reliable clinical trials do not show any differences between flower remedies and placebos. PMID:20734279

  16. Randomised controlled trial of nicotine chewing-gum.

    Jarvis, M. J.; Raw, M.; Russell, M A; Feyerabend, C

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of 2 mg nicotine chewing-gum as an aid to stopping smoking was compared with a placebo containing 1 mg nicotine, but unbuffered, in a double-blind randomised trial. Of 58 subjects given the active gum, 27 (47%) were not smoking at one-year follow-up compared with 12 (21%) of the 58 subjects treated with placebo (p less than 0.025). By the most stringent criterion of outcome, 18 (31%) subjects in the active treatment group and eight (14%) in the placebo group had not smoked a...

  17. Randomised controlled trial of colloid infusions in hypotensive preterm infants.

    Emery, E F; Greenough, A; Gamsu, H R

    1992-01-01

    Colloid infusions are often given to treat hypotension in preterm infants. The aim of this work was to assess whether it was the amount of protein or the volume of the colloid infused which accounted for the observed increase in blood pressure. Sixty preterm infants were randomised (20 in each group) to receive 5 ml/kg 20% albumin, 15 ml/kg fresh frozen plasma, or 15 ml/kg 4.5% albumin. All infusions were given at a rate of 5 ml/kg/hour in addition to maintenance fluids. The infants were rand...

  18. Alcohol intake and cardiovascular risk factors: A Mendelian randomisation study.

    Cho, Yoonsu; Shin, So-Youn; Won, Sungho; Relton, Caroline L; Davey Smith, George; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Mendelian randomisation studies from Asia suggest detrimental influences of alcohol on cardiovascular risk factors, but such associations are observed mainly in men. The absence of associations of genetic variants (e.g. rs671 in ALDH2) with such risk factors in women - who drank little in these populations - provides evidence that the observations are not due to genetic pleiotropy. Here, we present a Mendelian randomisation study in a South Korean population (3,365 men and 3,787 women) that 1) provides robust evidence that alcohol consumption adversely affects several cardiovascular disease risk factors, including blood pressure, waist to hip ratio, fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels. Alcohol also increases HDL cholesterol and lowers LDL cholesterol. Our study also 2) replicates sex differences in associations which suggests pleiotropy does not underlie the associations, 3) provides further evidence that association is not due to pleiotropy by showing null effects in male non-drinkers, and 4) illustrates a way to measure population-level association where alcohol intake is stratified by sex. In conclusion, population-level instrumental variable estimation (utilizing interaction of rs671 in ALDH2 and sex as an instrument) strengthens causal inference regarding the largely adverse influence of alcohol intake on cardiovascular health in an Asian population. PMID:26687910

  19. Advance care planning - a multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial

    Rietjens, Judith A C; Korfage, Ida J; Dunleavy, Lesley;

    2016-01-01

    , and improve their quality of life. METHODS/DESIGN: We will study the effects of the ACP program Respecting Choices on the quality of life of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer. In a phase III multicenter cluster randomised controlled trial, 22 hospitals in 6 countries will be randomised...... of their disease trajectory, is an important next step in an era of increased focus on patient centered healthcare and shared decision-making. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number: ISRCTN63110516 . Date of registration: 10/3/2014....

  20. Executive Functioning and Learning Skills of Adolescent Children Born at Fewer than 26 Weeks of Gestation.

    A Farooqi

    Full Text Available To assess the cognitive and behavioral aspects of executive functioning (EF and learning skills in extremely preterm (EPT children compared with term control children aged 10 to 15 years.A total of 132 of 134 (98% of all eligible survivors EPT children born at the 2 Swedish regional tertiary care centers from 1992 to 1998 (mean age = 12 years, mean birth weight = 718 g, and mean gestational age = 24.4 weeks and 103 matched term controls were assessed. General intelligence was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III-R, and cognitive aspects of EF were analyzed using EF-sensitive subscales of the WISC-III-R and Tower test of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function Scale (D-KEFS. Behaviors related to EF and learning skills were assessed using the Five to Fifteen questionnaire, which is a validated parent and teacher instrument. Academic performance in school was assessed by teachers' responses on Achenbach's Teachers Report Form. Analyses performed included multivariate analyses of covariance (ANCOVA and MANCOVA and logistic regression analyses.The EPT children displayed significant deficits in cognitive aspects of EF compared with the controls, exhibiting decreases on the order of 0.9 SD to 1.2 SD for tasks of verbal conceptual reasoning, verbal and non-verbal working memory, processing speed and planning ability (P 70 and without major NSI revealed no interactions, but significant main effects were observed for the behavioral composite executive function score, group status (EPT vs control and FSIQ, for which all effect sizes were medium to large. The corresponding findings of MANCOVA of the parent-reported learning skills were very similar. According to the teachers' ratings, the EPT children were less well adjusted to the school environment.EPT children born in the 1990s who received active perinatal care are at an increased risk of executive dysfunction, even after excluding children with significant neurodevelopmental disabilities. Even mild to moderate executive dysfunctions has a significant impact on learning skills. These findings suggest the need for timely interventions that address specific cognitive vulnerabilities and executive dysfunctions.

  1. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  2. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial evaluating three implementation interventions

    Rycroft-Malone Jo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation research is concerned with bridging the gap between evidence and practice through the study of methods to promote the uptake of research into routine practice. Good quality evidence has been summarised into guideline recommendations to show that peri-operative fasting times could be considerably shorter than patients currently experience. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of three strategies for the implementation of recommendations about peri-operative fasting. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomised trial underpinned by the PARIHS framework was conducted during 2006 to 2009 with a national sample of UK hospitals using time series with mixed methods process evaluation and cost analysis. Hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions: standard dissemination (SD of a guideline package, SD plus a web-based resource championed by an opinion leader, and SD plus plan-do-study-act (PDSA. The primary outcome was duration of fluid fast prior to induction of anaesthesia. Secondary outcomes included duration of food fast, patients’ experiences, and stakeholders’ experiences of implementation, including influences. ANOVA was used to test differences over time and interventions. Results Nineteen acute NHS hospitals participated. Across timepoints, 3,505 duration of fasting observations were recorded. No significant effect of the interventions was observed for either fluid or food fasting times. The effect size was 0.33 for the web-based intervention compared to SD alone for the change in fluid fasting and was 0.12 for PDSA compared to SD alone. The process evaluation showed different types of impact, including changes to practices, policies, and attitudes. A rich picture of the implementation challenges emerged, including inter-professional tensions and a lack of clarity for decision-making authority and responsibility. Conclusions This was a large, complex study and one of the first

  3. Deprescribing in Frail Older People: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Kathleen Potter

    Full Text Available Deprescribing has been proposed as a way to reduce polypharmacy in frail older people. We aimed to reduce the number of medicines consumed by people living in residential aged care facilities (RACF. Secondary objectives were to explore the effect of deprescribing on survival, falls, fractures, hospital admissions, cognitive, physical, and bowel function, quality of life, and sleep.Ninety-five people aged over 65 years living in four RACF in rural mid-west Western Australia were randomised in an open study. The intervention group (n = 47 received a deprescribing intervention, the planned cessation of non-beneficial medicines. The control group (n = 48 received usual care. Participants were monitored for twelve months from randomisation. Primary outcome was change in the mean number of unique regular medicines. All outcomes were assessed at baseline, six, and twelve months.Study participants had a mean age of 84.3 ± 6.9 years and 52% were female. Intervention group participants consumed 9.6 ± 5.0 and control group participants consumed 9.5 ± 3.6 unique regular medicines at baseline. Of the 348 medicines targeted for deprescribing (7.4 ± 3.8 per person, 78% of regular medicines, 207 medicines (4.4 ± 3.4 per person, 59% of targeted medicines were successfully discontinued. The mean change in number of regular medicines at 12 months was -1.9 ± 4.1 in intervention group participants and +0.1 ± 3.5 in control group participants (estimated difference 2.0 ± 0.9, 95%CI 0.08, 3.8, p = 0.04. Twelve intervention participants and 19 control participants died within 12 months of randomisation (26% versus 40% mortality, p = 0.16, HR 0.60, 95%CI 0.30 to 1.22 There were no significant differences between groups in other secondary outcomes. The main limitations of this study were the open design and small participant numbers.Deprescribing reduced the number of regular medicines consumed by frail older people living in residential care with no significant

  4. A randomised trial of lung sealant versus medical therapy for advanced emphysema

    Come, Carolyn E.; Kramer, Mordechai R.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Abu-Hijleh, Muhanned; Berkowitz, David; Bezzi, Michela; Bhatt, Surya P; Boyd, Michael B.; Cases, Enrique; Chen, Alexander C.; Christopher B. Cooper; Flandes, Javier; Gildea, Thomas; Gotfried, Mark; Hogarth, D. Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled pilot studies demonstrated promising results of endoscopic lung volume reduction using emphysematous lung sealant (ELS) in patients with advanced, upper lobe predominant emphysema. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ELS in a randomised controlled setting.

  5. Second malignancy risk associated with treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma: meta-analysis of the randomised trials

    Franklin, J; Pluetschow, A; Paus, M;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite several investigations, second malignancy risks (SMR) following radiotherapy alone (RT), chemotherapy alone (CT) and combined chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) remain controversial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We sought individual patient data from randomised trial...

  6. Prevention of acute knee injuries in adolescent female football players: cluster randomised controlled trial

    Walden, Markus; Atroshi, Isam; Magnusson, Henrik; Wagner, Philippe; Hagglund, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of neuromuscular training in reducing the rate of acute knee injury in adolescent female football players. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign Stratified cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting 230 Swedish football clubs (121 in the intervention group, 109 in the control group) were followed for one season (2009, seven months). less thanbrgreate...

  7. Effects of food with two oral rehydration therapies: a randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Alam, N H; Ahmed, T.; M. Khatun; Molla, A M

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of food on the efficacy of oral rehydration solution (ORS), a randomised, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 182 adults with cholera. After initial rehydration with an intravenous polyelectrolyte solution for four hours, the patients were randomised to receive one of four rehydration therapies: glucose based ORS and no food for the first 24 hours (group A), glucose based ORS plus food from the beginning of treatment (group B), rice based ORS with no food for the...

  8. Preventing Weight Gain in Women in Rural Communities: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    Lombard, Catherine; Harrison, Cheryce; Kozica, Samantha; Zoungas, Sophia; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Teede, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in both developed and developing countries. Even modest weight gain increases the risk for chronic illness, yet evidence-based interventions to prevent weight gain are rare. This trial will determine if a simple low-intensity intervention can prevent weight gain in women compared to general health information. Methods and Findings We conducted a 1-yr pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial in 41 Australian towns (clusters) randomised ...

  9. Home based exercise programme for knee pain and knee osteoarthritis: randomised controlled trial

    Thomas, KS; Muir, KR; DOHERTY, M.; Jones, AC; O'Reilly, SC; Bassey, EJ

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a home based exercise programme can improve outcomes in patients with knee pain. Design Pragmatic, factorial randomised controlled trial of two years' duration. Setting Two general practices in Nottingham. Participants 786 men and women aged >45 years with self reported knee pain. Interventions Participants were randomised to four groups to receive exercise therapy, monthly telephone contact, exercise therapy plus telephone contact...

  10. Carbon cost of pragmatic randomised controlled trials: retrospective analysis of sample of trials

    Lyle, Katy; Dent, Louise; Bailey, Sally; Kerridge, Lynn; Roberts, Ian; Milne, Ruairidh

    2009-01-01

    Objective To calculate the global warming potential, in carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent emissions, from a sample of pragmatic randomised controlled trials. Design Retrospective analysis. Data source Internal data held by NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre. Studies included All eligible pragmatic randomised controlled trials funded by the NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme during 2002 and 2003. Main outcome measure CO2 equivalents for trial activities calculated w...

  11. Lay support for pregnant women with social risk: a randomised controlled trial

    Kenyon, Sara; Jolly, Kate; Hemming, Karla; Hope, Lucy; Blissett, Jackie; Dann, Sophie-Anna; Lilford, Richard; MacArthur, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought evidence of effectiveness of lay support to improve maternal and child outcomes in disadvantaged families. Design Prospective, pragmatic, individually randomised controlled trial. Setting 3 Maternity Trusts in West Midlands, UK. Participants Following routine midwife systematic assessment of social risk factors, 1324 nulliparous women were assigned, using telephone randomisation, to standard maternity care, or addition of referral to a Pregnancy Outreach Worker (POW) serv...

  12. Evaluation of benefit to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines: cluster randomised trial.

    Beurs, D.P. de; Groot, M.H. de; Keijser, J. de; Duijn, E. van; Winter, R.F.P. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims: To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method: In total 45 psychiatric departments were randomised (Dutch trial register: NTR3092). In the intervention condition, all staff in the departments were trained with an e-learning supported train-the-trainer programme. After the intervention...

  13. Stepped care and cognitive–behavioural therapy for bulimia nervosa: randomised trial

    Mitchell, James E; Agras, Stewart; Crow, Scott; Halmi, Katherine; Fairburn, Christopher G.; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background This study compared the best available treatment for bulimia nervosa, cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) augmented by fluoxetine if indicated, with a stepped-care treatment approach in order to enhance treatment effectiveness. Aims To establish the relative effectiveness of these two approaches. Method This was a randomised trial conducted at four clinical centres (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00733525). A total of 293 participants with bulimia nervosa were randomise...

  14. A 2-year randomised placebo-controlled trial of doxycycline for lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Chang, William Y.C.; Cane, Jennifer L; Kumaran, Maruti; Lewis, Sarah; Tattersfield, Anne E.; Johnson, Simon R

    2014-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterised by lung cysts and airflow obstruction. Matrix metalloproteinases have been implicated in lung destruction in LAM. We performed a randomised, double-blind trial, comparing the matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor doxycycline with placebo on the progression of LAM. 23 females with LAM were randomised to doxycycline 100 mg daily for 3 months followed by 200 mg daily for 21 months, or matched placebo. Lung function, exercise capacity, quality of...

  15. Homoeopathy for delayed onset muscle soreness: a randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.

    Vickers, A J; Fisher, P.; Smith, C.; Wyllie, S E; Lewith, G T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To pilot a model for determining whether a homoeopathic medicine is superior to placebo for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). DESIGN: Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Physiotherapy department of a homoeopathic hospital. SUBJECTS: Sixty eight healthy volunteers (average age 30; 41% men) undertook a 10 minute period of bench stepping carrying a small weight and were randomised to a homoeopathic medicine or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean muscle soreness ...

  16. Developing, delivering and documenting rehabilitation in a multi-centre randomised controlled surgical trial

    Handoll, H. H. G.; Goodchild, L; Brealey, S. D.; Hanchard, N. C. A.; Jefferson, L.; Keding, A; Rangan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A rigorous approach to developing, delivering and documenting rehabilitation within randomised controlled trials of surgical interventions is required to underpin the generation of reliable and usable evidence. This article describes the key processes used to ensure provision of good quality and comparable rehabilitation to all participants of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with conservative treatment of proximal humeral fractures in adults. Methods Th...

  17. A randomised controlled trial of azithromycin therapy in bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) post lung transplantation

    Corris, Paul A; Ryan, Victoria A; Small, Therese; Lordan, James; Fisher, Andrew J.; Meachery, Gerard; Johnson, Gail; Ward, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a placebo-controlled trial of azithromycin therapy in bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) post lung transplantation. Methods We compared azithromycin (250 mg alternate days, 12 weeks) with placebo. Primary outcome was FEV1 change at 12 weeks. Results 48 patients were randomised; (25 azithromycin, 23 placebo). It was established, post randomisation that two did not have BOS. 46 patients were analysed as intention to treat (ITT) with 33 ‘Completers’. ITT analysis inc...

  18. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers

    O’Cathain, A.; Hoddinott, P.; Lewin, S; Thomas, K J; Young, B; Adamson, J.; Jansen, J.F.M.; Mills, N; Moore, G.; Donovan, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full trial. We present guidance that researchers, research funders and reviewers may wish to consider when assessing or undertaking qualitative research within feasibility studies for randomised controll...

  19. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    Stokes Emma; Cusack Tara; Galvin Rose

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patient...

  20. Randomised comparison of silicone versus Teflon cannulas for peripheral intravenous nutrition.

    Reynolds, J V; Walsh, K; Ruigrok, J; Hyland, J M

    1995-01-01

    The use of peripheral intravenous nutrition using standard Teflon cannulas is limited by a high incidence of thrombophlebitis, with resultant frequent line changes and compromised nutritional therapy. Fine-bore silicone catheters may reduce the incidence of thrombophlebitis; we prospectively compared the silicone catheter with a Teflon cannula in a randomised trial. Seventy-nine surgical patients were randomised to receive peripheral nutrition (10 g nitrogen; 1770 kcal; 650 mOsm/l) either via...

  1. Low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy to prevent macrosomia (ROLO study): randomised control trial

    Walsh, Jennifer M.; Ciara A. McGowan; Mahony, Rhona; Foley, Michael E.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine if a low glycaemic index diet in pregnancy could reduce the incidence of macrosomia in an at risk group. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Maternity hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Participants 800 women without diabetes, all in their second pregnancy between January 2007 to January 2011, having previously delivered an infant weighing greater than 4 kg. Intervention Women were randomised to receive no dietary intervention or start on a low glycaemic index diet fr...

  2. What can qualitative research do for randomised controlled trials? A systematic mapping review

    O Cathain, A.; Thomas, KJ; Drabble, SJ; Rudolph, A; Hewison, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop an empirically based framework of the aspects of randomised controlled trials addressed by qualitative research. Design Systematic mapping review of qualitative research undertaken with randomised controlled trials and published in peer-reviewed journals. Data sources MEDLINE, PreMEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Health Technology Assessment, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Social Sciences Citation Index and ASSIA. Eligibility criteria Articles reporting qua...

  3. The gastrointestinal toxicity of aspirin: an overview of randomised controlled trials.

    Roderick, P. J.; Wilkes, H C; Meade, T W

    1993-01-01

    The proven benefit of aspirin in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and its possible value in primary prevention must be weighted against its potential hazards. This paper is an overview of the gastrointestinal toxicity of aspirin, its most serious complication after intracerebral haemorrhage. Information on toxicity has been drawn only from randomised trials, thus avoiding the potential biases of observational studies. All randomised placebo controlled trials listed in the An...

  4. Careful science? Bodywork and care practices in randomised clinical trials

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Bønnelycke, Julie; Eriksen, Hanne Hellerup

    2013-01-01

    the focus to reflect everyday practices would foster better targeted public health campaigns. This article is based on our participation in FINE, a multidisciplinary Danish research project. The core methodology of FINE was a randomised controlled trial in which 61 moderately overweight men were put...... into different exercise groups. In this article we analyse the scientific work of the trial as representing entangled processes of bodywork, where data are extracted and objectified bodies are manipulated and care practices address the emotional, social and mundane aspects of the participants' everyday...... lives. Care practices are an inherent part of producing scientific facts but they are removed from the recognised results of scientific practice and thus from common public health recommendations. However, knowledge about the strategic use of care practices in lifestyle interventions is important for...

  5. Choosing a control intervention for a randomised clinical trial

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical trials are performed to resolve uncertainty concerning comparator interventions. Appropriate acknowledgment of uncertainty enables the concurrent achievement of two goals : the acquisition of valuable scientific knowledge and an optimum treatment choice for the patient-participant. The ethical recruitment of patients requires the presence of clinical equipoise. This involves the appropriate choice of a control intervention, particularly when unapproved drugs or innovative interventions are being evaluated. Discussion We argue that the choice of a control intervention should be supported by a systematic review of the relevant literature and, where necessary, solicitation of the informed beliefs of clinical experts through formal surveys and publication of the proposed trial's protocol. Summary When clinical equipoise is present, physicians may confidently propose trial enrollment to their eligible patients as an act of therapeutic beneficence.

  6. Statistical issues in randomised controlled trials: a narrative synthesis

    Bolaji; Emmanuel; Egbewale

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials(RCTs) are gold standard in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in medical investigations, only if well designed and implemented. Till date, distorted views and misapplications of statistical procedures involved in RCTs are still in practice. Hence, clarification of concepts and acceptable practices related to certain statistical issues involved in the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials is needed. This narrative synthesis aimed at providing succinct but clear information on the concepts and practices of selected statistical issues in RCTs to inform correct applications. The use of tests of significance is no longer acceptable as means to compare baseline similarity between treatment groups and in determining which covariate(s) should be included in the model for adjustment. Distribution of baseline attributes simply presented in tabular form is however, rather preferred. Regarding covariate selection, such approach that makes use of information on the degree of correlation between the covariate(s) and the outcome variable is more in tandem with statistical principle(s) than that based on tests of significance. Stratification and minimisation are not alternatives to covariate adjusted analysis; in fact they establish the need for one. Intention-totreat is the preferred approach for the evaluation of primary outcome measures and researchers have responsibility to report whether or not the procedure was followed. A major use of results from subgroup analysis is to generate hypothesis for future clinical trials. Since RCTs are gold standard in the comparison of medical interventions, researchers cannot afford the practices of distorted allocation or statistical procedures in this all important experimental design method.

  7. Can a self-management programme delivered by a community pharmacist improve asthma control? A randomised trial

    Barbanel, D; Eldridge, S; Griffiths, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: No randomised studies have addressed whether self-management for asthma can be successfully delivered by community pharmacists. Most randomised trials of asthma self-management have recruited participants from secondary care; there is uncertainty regarding its effectiveness in primary care. A randomised controlled study was undertaken to determine whether a community pharmacist could improve asthma control using self-management advice for individuals recruited during attendance at...

  8. Psychoeducation with problem-solving (PEPS) therapy for adults with personality disorder: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a manualised intervention to improve social functioning.

    McMurran, Mary; Crawford, Mike J; Reilly, Joe; Delport, Juan; McCrone, Paul; Whitham, Diane; Tan, Wei; Duggan, Conor; Montgomery, Alan A; Williams, Hywel C; Adams, Clive E; Jin, Huajie; Lewis, Matthew; Day, Florence

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND If effective, less intensive treatments for people with personality disorder have the potential to serve more people. OBJECTIVES To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychoeducation with problem-solving (PEPS) therapy plus usual treatment against usual treatment alone in improving social problem-solving with adults with personality disorder. DESIGN Multisite two-arm, parallel-group, pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial. SETTING Community mental health services in three NHS trusts in England and Wales. PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling adults with any personality disorder recruited from community mental health services. INTERVENTIONS Up to four individual sessions of psychoeducation, a collaborative dialogue about personality disorder, followed by 12 group sessions of problem-solving therapy to help participants learn a process for solving interpersonal problems. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was measured by the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ). Secondary outcomes were service use (general practitioner records), mood (measured via the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and client-specified three main problems rated by severity. We studied the mechanism of change using the Social Problem-Solving Inventory. Costs were identified using the Client Service Receipt Inventory and quality of life was identified by the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions questionnaire. Research assistants blinded to treatment allocation collected follow-up information. RESULTS There were 739 people referred for the trial and 444 were eligible. More adverse events in the PEPS arm led to a halt to recruitment after 306 people were randomised (90% of planned sample size); 154 participants received PEPS and 152 received usual treatment. The mean age was 38 years and 67% were women. Follow-up at 72 weeks after randomisation was completed for 62% of participants in the usual-treatment arm and 73% in the PEPS arm. Intention

  9. Alcohol assessment and feedback by email for university students: main findings from randomised controlled trial.

    McCambridge, J; Bendtsen, M; Karlsson, N.; White, IR; Nilsen, P; Bendtsen, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brief interventions can be efficacious in changing alcohol consumption and increasingly take advantage of the internet to reach high-risk populations such as students. AIMS: To evaluate the effectiveness of a brief online intervention, controlling for the possible effects of the research process. METHOD: A three-arm parallel groups design was used to explore the magnitude of the feedback and assessment component effects. The three groups were: alcohol assessment and feedback (grou...

  10. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Anorexia Nervosa

    McClelland, Jessica Kate; Kekic, Maria; Bozhilova, Natali; Nestler, Steffen; Dew, Tracy; Van Den Eynde, Frederique Frans; David, Anthony Sion; Rubia, Katya; Campbell, Iain Cameron; Schmidt, Ulrike Hermine

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundAnorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC).MethodsIn this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC) in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was a...

  11. Long-term retention on treatment with lumiracoxib 100 mg once or twice daily compared with celecoxib 200 mg once daily: A randomised controlled trial in patients with osteoarthritis

    Notter Marianne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy, safety and tolerability of lumiracoxib, a novel selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, has been demonstrated in previous studies of patients with osteoarthritis (OA. As it is important to establish the long-term safety and efficacy of treatments for a chronic disease such as OA, the present study compared the effects of lumiracoxib at doses of 100 mg once daily (o.d. and 100 mg twice daily (b.i.d. with those of celecoxib 200 mg o.d. on retention on treatment over 1 year. Methods In this 52-week, multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study, male and female patients (aged at least 40 years with symptomatic primary OA of the hip, knee, hand or spine were randomised (1:2:1 to lumiracoxib 100 mg o.d. (n = 755, lumiracoxib 100 mg b.i.d. (n = 1,519 or celecoxib 200 mg o.d. (n = 758. The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate non-inferiority of lumiracoxib at either dose compared with celecoxib 200 mg o.d. with respect to the 1-year retention on treatment rate. Secondary outcome variables included OA pain in the target joint, patient's and physician's global assessments of disease activity, Short Arthritis assessment Scale (SAS total score, rescue medication use, and safety and tolerability. Results Retention rates at 1 year were similar for the lumiracoxib 100 mg o.d., lumiracoxib 100 mg b.i.d. and celecoxib 200 mg o.d. groups (46.9% vs 47.5% vs 45.3%, respectively. It was demonstrated that retention on treatment with lumiracoxib at either dose was non-inferior to celecoxib 200 mg o.d. Similarly, Kaplan-Meier curves for the probability of premature discontinuation from the study for any reason were similar across the treatment groups. All three treatments generally yielded comparable results for the secondary efficacy variables and all treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion Long-term treatment with lumiracoxib 100 mg o.d., the recommended dose for OA, was as effective and well

  12. Protocol for the PINCER trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of a pharmacist-led IT-based intervention with simple feedback in reducing rates of clinically important errors in medicines management in general practices

    Murray Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in primary care. The aims of this study are to determine the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of a pharmacist-led information-technology-based complex intervention compared with simple feedback in reducing proportions of patients at risk from potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management in general (family practice. Methods Research subject group: "At-risk" patients registered with computerised general practices in two geographical regions in England. Design: Parallel group pragmatic cluster randomised trial. Interventions: Practices will be randomised to either: (i Computer-generated feedback; or (ii Pharmacist-led intervention comprising of computer-generated feedback, educational outreach and dedicated support. Primary outcome measures: The proportion of patients in each practice at six and 12 months post intervention: - with a computer-recorded history of peptic ulcer being prescribed non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs - with a computer-recorded diagnosis of asthma being prescribed beta-blockers - aged 75 years and older receiving long-term prescriptions for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or loop diuretics without a recorded assessment of renal function and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. Secondary outcome measures; These relate to a number of other examples of potentially hazardous prescribing and medicines management. Economic analysis: An economic evaluation will be done of the cost per error avoided, from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS, comparing the pharmacist-led intervention with simple feedback. Qualitative analysis: A qualitative study will be conducted to explore the views and experiences of health care professionals and NHS managers concerning the interventions, and investigate possible reasons why the interventions prove effective, or conversely prove

  13. The effects of Hartcoach, a life style intervention provided by telephone on the reduction of coronary risk factors: a randomised trial

    Leemrijse Chantal J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide. Secondary prevention is essential, but participation rates for cardiac rehabilitation are low. Furthermore, current programmes do not accomplish that patients with CVD change their lifestyle in a way that their individual risk factors for recurrent events decrease, therefore more effective interventions are needed. In this study, the effectiveness of the Hartcoach-programme, a telephonic secondary prevention program focussing on self management, is studied. Methods/design A multicenter, randomised parallel-group study is being conducted. Participants are 400 patients with acute myocardial infarction (STEMI, NSTEMI, and patients with chronic or unstable angina pectoris (IAP. Patients are recruited through the participating hospitals and randomly assigned to the experimental group (Hartcoach-programme plus usual care or the control group (usual care. The Hartcoach-programme consists of a period of six months during which the coach contacts the patient every four to six weeks by telephone. Coaches train patients to take responsibility for the achievement and maintenance of the defined target levels for their particular individual modifiable risk factors. Target levels and treatment goals are agreed by the nurse and patient together. Data collection is blinded and occurs at baseline and after 26 weeks (post-intervention. Primary outcome is change in cardiovascular risk factors (cholesterol, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, physical activity and diet. Secondary outcomes include chances in glucose, HbA1c, medication adherence, self-management and quality of life. Discussion This study evaluates the effects of the Hartcoach-programme on the reduction of individual risk factors of patients with CVDs. Patients who are not invited to follow a hospital based rehabilitation programme or patients who are unable to adhere to such a programme, may be

  14. Trial Protocol: Using genotype to tailor prescribing of nicotine replacement therapy: a randomised controlled trial assessing impact of communication upon adherence

    Prevost A Toby

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behavioural impact of pharmacogenomics is untested; informing smokers of genetic test results for responsiveness to smoking cessation medication may increase adherence to this medication. The objective of this trial is to estimate the impact upon adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT of informing smokers that their oral dose of NRT has been tailored to a DNA analysis. Hypotheses to be tested are as follows: IAdherence to NRT is greater among smokers informed that their oral dose of NRT is tailored to an analysis of DNA (genotype, compared to one tailored to nicotine dependence questionnaire score (phenotype. II Amongst smokers who fail to quit at six months, motivation to make another quit attempt is lower when informed that their oral dose of NRT was tailored to genotype rather than phenotype. Methods/Design An open label, parallel groups randomised trial in which 630 adult smokers (smoking 10 or more cigarettes daily using National Health Service (NHS stop smoking services in primary care are randomly allocated to one of two groups: i. NRT oral dose tailored by DNA analysis (OPRM1 gene (genotype, or ii. NRT oral dose tailored by nicotine dependence questionnaire score (phenotype The primary outcome is proportion of prescribed NRT consumed in the first 28 days following an initial quit attempt, with the secondary outcome being motivation to make another quit attempt, amongst smokers not abstinent at six months. Other outcomes include adherence to NRT in the first seven days and biochemically validated smoking abstinence at six months. The primary outcome will be collected on 630 smokers allowing sufficient power to detect a 7.5% difference in mean proportion of NRT consumed using a two-tailed test at the 5% level of significance between groups. The proportion of all NRT consumed in the first four weeks of quitting will be compared between arms using an independent samples t-test and by estimating the 95

  15. The effects of different levels of calcium supplementation on the bone mineral status of postpartum lactating Chinese women: a 12-month randomised, double-blinded, controlled trial.

    Zhang, Zhe-Qing; Chen, Yu-Ming; Wang, Ruo-Qin; Huang, Zhen-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Su, Yi-Xiang

    2016-01-14

    Increasing dietary Ca intake may prevent the excessive mobilisation of bone mineral in nursing mothers. We aimed to investigate whether higher Ca intake could positively modulate the bone mineral changes in Chinese postpartum lactating women. The study was a 12-month randomised, double-blinded, parallel group trial conducted over 12 months. A total of 150 postpartum women were randomly selected to receive either 40 g of milk powder containing 300 mg of Ca and 5 μg of vitamin D (Low-Ca group) or same milk powder additionally fortified with 300 mg of Ca (Mid-Ca group) or 600 mg of Ca (High-Ca group). Bone mineral density (BMD) for the whole body, the lumbar spine, the total left hip and its sub-regions was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A total of 102 subjects completed the whole trial. The duration of total lactating time was 7·9 (SD 2·8) months on average. The intention-to-treat analysis yielded the following mean percentage changes in BMD for the whole body, the lumbar spine and the total left hip, respectively: -0·93 (SD 1·97), 2·11 (SD 4·90) and -1·60 (SD 2·65)% for the Low-Ca group; -0·56 (SD 1·89), 2·21 (SD 3·77) and -1·43 (SD 2·30)% for the Mid-Ca group; and -0·44 (SD 1·67), 2·32 (SD 4·66) and -0·95 (SD 4·08)% for the High-Ca group. The differences between the groups were not statistically significant (P: 0·5-0·9). The results of the complete case analysis were similar. In sum, we found no significant differences in the bone mineral changes from baseline to 12 months in postpartum lactating women consuming milk powder fortified with different levels of Ca. PMID:26522081

  16. A randomised double blind placebo controlled clinical trial of a standardised extract of fresh Crataegus berries (Crataegisan) in the treatment of patients with congestive heart failure NYHA II.

    Degenring, F H; Suter, A; Weber, M; Saller, R

    2003-01-01

    A placebo controlled, randomised, parallel group, multicentre trial conducted in accordance with the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) shows the efficacy and safety of a standardised extract of fresh berries of Crataegus oxyacantha L. and monogyna Jacq. (Crataegisan) in patients with cardiac failure NYHA class II. A total of 143 patients (72 men, 71 women, mean age of 64.8 (8.0 years) were recruited and treated with 3 times 30 drops of the extract (n = 69) or placebo (n = 74) for 8 weeks. The primary variable for the evaluation of efficacy was the change in exercise tolerance determined with bicycle exercise testing, secondary variables included the blood pressure-heart rate product (BHP). Subjective cardiac symptoms at rest and at higher levels of exertion were assessed by the patient on a categorical rating scale. An overall assessment of efficacy at the final visit was provided by the patient and the investigator. In the ITT population there was a significant increase in exercise tolerance in both groups between visit 1 and visit 3. The difference between the treatment groups was 8.3 watts in favour of the standardised extract of fresh Crataegus berries (p = 0.045). The result is confirmed in the PP population (p = 0.047). Changes in BHP at 50 watts and at comparable maximum load were in favour of Crataegus extract but the results are not statistically significant. The subjective assessment of cardiac symptoms at rest and at higher levels of exertion did not change significantly and the patient and investigator overall assessment of efficacy were similar for the two groups. The medication was well tolerated and had a high level of patient acceptability. The significant improvement, due to the fact that dyspnoea and fatigue do not occur until a significantly higher wattage has been reached in the bicycle exercise testing allows the conclusion that the recruited NYHA II patients may expect an improvement in their heart failure condition under long term

  17. SWIM (sickle with ibuprofen and morphine) randomised controlled trial fails to recruit: lessons learnt

    Cho, Gavin; Anie, Kofi A; Buckton, Jacky; Kiilu, Patricia; Layton, Mark; Alexander, Lydia; Hemmaway, Claire; Sutton, Dorothy; Amos, Claire; Doré, Caroline J; Kahan, Brennan; Meredith, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sickle With Ibuprofen and Morphine (SWIM) trial was designed to assess whether co-administration of ibuprofen (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) resulted in a reduction of opioid consumption delivered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for acute pain in sickle cell disease. Design A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Setting UK multicentre trial in acute hospital setting. Participants Adults with sickle cell disease of any gender and phenotype aged 16 years and over. Interventions Oral ibuprofen at a dose of 800 mg three times daily or placebo in addition to opioids (morphine or diamorphine) administered via PCA pump for up to 4 days. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was opioid consumption over 4 days following randomisation. Results The SWIM trial closed early because it failed to randomise to its target of 316 patients within a reasonable time. Conclusions The key issues identified include the unanticipated length of time between informed consent and randomisation, difficulties in randomisation of patients in busy emergency departments, availability of trained staff at weekends and out of hours, fewer centres than expected using PCA routinely for sickle cell pain treatment, lack of research staff and support for participation, and the trial design. There are implications for future UK trials in sickle cell disease. Trial registration number ISRCTN97241637, NCT00880373; Pre-results. PMID:27288381

  18. Randomised controlled trial of the effect of long-term selenium supplementation on plasma cholesterol in an elderly Danish population

    Cold, Frederik; Winther, Kristian H; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto;

    2015-01-01

    PRECISE (PREvention of Cancer by Intervention with Selenium) pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01819649) was a 5-year randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with four groups (allocation ratio 1:1:1:1). Men and women aged 60-74 years (n 491) were randomised to 100 (n 124), 200 (n 122) or...

  19. Cervical occlusion in women with cervical insufficiency: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial with cerclage, with and without cervical occlusion

    Secher, Niels Jørgen; MaCormack, CD; Weber, Tom;

    2007-01-01

    , without the membranes being exposed to the vagina. 6. Tertiary cerclage: Short cervix, membranes exposed to the vagina. Observational study: Eligible women who refuse to be randomised will participate in an observational study. 7. Repeat/requested cervical occlusion. METHODS: The women will be randomised...

  20. Grafting after sinus lift with anorganic bovine bone alone compared with 50:50 anorganic bovine bone and autologous bone: results of a pilot randomised trial at one year.

    Meloni, S M; Jovanovic, S A; Lolli, F M; Cassisa, C; De Riu, G; Pisano, M; Lumbau, A; Lugliè, P F; Tullio, A

    2015-05-01

    Our aim was to compare the outcome of implants inserted in maxillary sinuses augmented with anorganic bovine bone grafts compared with those augmented with mixed 50:50 bovine and autologous bone grafts. Twenty sinuses with 1-4mm of residual crestal height below the maxillary sinuses were randomised into two groups according to a parallel group design (n=10 in each). Sinuses were grafted using a lateral approach. In one group the grafts were 50:50 anorganic bovine bone and autologous bone and in the other anorganic bovine bone alone. After 7 months, 32 implants had been inserted. Outcome measures were survival of implants, complications, marginal changes in the height of the bone, and soft tissue variables (pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing). Probabilities of less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. No patient failed to complete the trial and no implant had failed at 1 year. There were some minor complications. After 12 months, the mean (SD) marginal bone loss (mm) was 1.06 (0.61) in the 50:50 group and 1.19 (0.53) in the anorganic bovine group. The mean (SD) values for pocket probing depth (mm) and bleeding on probing (score) were 2.49 (0.38) and 1.59 (0.82) in the 50:50 group and 2.31 (0.64) and 1.36 (0.87) in the anorganic bovine group (neither difference was significant). The present data are consistent with the hypothesis that the outcome of implants inserted in sinuses grafted with either material is comparable. PMID:25796408

  1. Consumption of Buglossoides arvensis seed oil is safe and increases tissue long-chain n-3 fatty acid content more than flax seed oil - results of a phase I randomised clinical trial.

    Lefort, Natalie; LeBlanc, Rémi; Giroux, Marie-Andrée; Surette, Marc E

    2016-01-01

    Enrichment of tissues with ≥20-carbon n-3 PUFA like EPA is associated with positive cardiovascular outcomes. Stearidonic acid (SDA; 18 : 4n-3) and α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18 : 3n-3) are plant-derived dietary n-3 PUFA; however, direct comparisons of their impact on tissue n-3 PUFA content are lacking. Ahiflower(®) oil extracted from Buglossoides arvensis seeds is the richest known non-genetically modified source of dietary SDA. To investigate the safety and efficacy of dietary Ahiflower oil, a parallel-group, randomised, double-blind, comparator-controlled phase I clinical trial was performed. Diets of healthy subjects (n 40) were supplemented for 28 d with 9·1 g/d of Ahiflower (46 % ALA, 20 % SDA) or flax seed oil (59 % ALA). Blood and urine chemistries, blood lipid profiles, hepatic and renal function tests and haematology were measured as safety parameters. The fatty acid composition of fasting plasma, erythrocytes, polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells were measured at baseline and after 14 and 28 d of supplementation. No clinically significant changes in safety parameters were measured in either group. Tissue ALA and EPA content increased in both groups compared with baseline, but EPA accrual in plasma and in all cell types was greater in the Ahiflower group (time × treatment interactions, P ≤ 0·01). Plasma and mononuclear cell eicosatetraenoic acid (20 : 4n-3) and docosapentaenoic acid (22 : 5n-3) content also increased significantly in the Ahiflower group compared with the flax group. In conclusion, the consumption of Ahiflower oil is safe and is more effective for the enrichment of tissues with 20- and 22-carbon n-3 PUFA than flax seed oil. PMID:26793308

  2. Should desperate volunteers be included in randomised controlled trials?

    Allmark, P; Mason, S

    2006-09-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) sometimes recruit participants who are desperate to receive the experimental treatment. This paper defends the practice against three arguments that suggest it is unethical first, desperate volunteers are not in equipoise. Second clinicians, entering patients onto trials are disavowing their therapeutic obligation to deliver the best treatment; they are following trial protocols rather than delivering individualised care. Research is not treatment; its ethical justification is different. Consent is crucial. Third, desperate volunteers do not give proper consent: effectively, they are coerced. This paper responds by advocating a notion of equipoise based on expert knowledge and widely shared values. Where such collective, expert equipoise exists there is a prima facie case for an RCT. Next the paper argues that trial entry does not involve clinicians disavowing their therapeutic obligation; individualised care based on insufficient evidence is not in patients best interest. Finally, it argues that where equipoise exists it is acceptable to limit access to experimental agents; desperate volunteers are not coerced because their desperation does not translate into a right to receive what they desire. PMID:16943339

  3. Autotitrating versus standard noninvasive ventilation: a randomised crossover trial.

    Jaye, J; Chatwin, M; Dayer, M; Morrell, M J; Simonds, A K

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of automatic titration of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional NIV in stable neuromuscular and chest wall disorder patients established on long-term ventilatory support. In total, 20 neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients with nocturnal hypoventilation treated with long-term NIV completed a randomised crossover trial comparing two noninvasive pressure support ventilators: a standard bilevel ventilator (VPAP III) and a novel autotitrating bilevel ventilator (AutoVPAP). Baseline physiological measurements, overnight polysomnography and Holter monitoring were repeated at the end of each 1-month treatment period. Nocturnal oxygenation was comparable between the autotitrating device and standard ventilator, as were sleep efficiency, arousals and heart rate variability. However, there was a small significant increase in mean overnight transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (median (interquartile range) 7.2 (6.7-7.7) versus 6.7 (6.1-7.0) kPa) and a decrease in percentage stage 1 sleep (mean+/-sd 16+/-9 versus 19+/-10%) on autotitrating NIV compared with conventional NIV. Autotitrating noninvasive ventilation using AutoVPAP produced comparable control of nocturnal oxygenation to standard nonivasive ventilation, without compromising sleep quality in stable neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients requiring long-term ventilatory support for nocturnal hypoventilation. PMID:19251798

  4. Effectiveness of a nurse-led intensive home-visitation programme for first-time teenage mothers (Building Blocks): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    Robling, Michael; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Bell, Kerry; Butler, Christopher C; Cannings-John, Rebecca; Channon, Sue; Martin, Belen Corbacho; Gregory, John W; Hood, Kerry; Kemp, Alison; Kenkre, Joyce; Montgomery, Alan A; Moody, Gwenllian; Owen-Jones, Eleri; Pickett, Kate; Richardson, Gerry; Roberts, Zoë E S; Ronaldson, Sarah; Sanders, Julia; Stamuli, Eugena; Torgerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Many countries now offer support to teenage mothers to help them to achieve long-term socioeconomic stability and to give a successful start to their children. The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a licensed intensive home-visiting intervention developed in the USA and introduced into practice in England that involves up to 64 structured home visits from early pregnancy until the child's second birthday by specially recruited and trained family nurses. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of giving the programme to teenage first-time mothers on infant and maternal outcomes up to 24 months after birth. Methods We did a pragmatic, non-blinded, randomised controlled, parallel-group trial in community midwifery settings at 18 partnerships between local authorities and primary and secondary care organisations in England. Eligible participants were nulliparous and aged 19 years or younger, and were recruited at less than 25 weeks' gestation. Field-based researchers randomly allocated mothers (1:1) via remote randomisation (telephone and web) to FNP plus usual care (publicly funded health and social care) or to usual care alone. Allocation was stratified by site and minimised by gestation (<16 weeks vs ≥16 weeks), smoking status (yes vs no), and preferred language of data collection (English vs non-English). Mothers and assessors (local researchers at baseline and 24 months' follow-up) were not masked to group allocation, but telephone interviewers were blinded. Primary endpoints were biomarker-calibrated self-reported tobacco use by the mother at late pregnancy, birthweight of the baby, the proportion of women with a second pregnancy within 24 months post-partum, and emergency attendances and hospital admissions for the child within 24 months post-partum. Analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN23019866. Findings Between June 16, 2009, and July 28, 2010, we screened 3251 women. After enrolment, 823

  5. Comparisons against baseline within randomised groups are often used and can be highly misleading

    Bland J Martin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In randomised trials, rather than comparing randomised groups directly some researchers carry out a significance test comparing a baseline with a final measurement separately in each group. Methods We give several examples where this has been done. We use simulation to demonstrate that the procedure is invalid and also show this algebraically. Results This approach is biased and invalid, producing conclusions which are, potentially, highly misleading. The actual alpha level of this procedure can be as high as 0.50 for two groups and 0.75 for three. Conclusions Randomised groups should be compared directly by two-sample methods and separate tests against baseline are highly misleading.

  6. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement (ADVANCE-2): a randomised double-blind trial

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Raskob, Gary E; Gallus, Alexander;

    2010-01-01

    , patients, statisticians, adjudicators, and steering committee were masked to allocation. Apixaban was started 12-24 h after wound closure and enoxaparin 12 h before surgery; both drugs were continued for 10-14 days, when bilateral ascending venography was scheduled. Primary outcome was the composite of...... receive oral apixaban 2.5 mg twice daily (n=1528) or subcutaneous enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (1529). The randomisation schedule was generated by the Bristol-Myers Squibb randomisation centre and stratified by study site and by unilateral or bilateral surgery with a block size of four. Investigators...

  7. Is vitamin C supplementation beneficial? Lessons learned from randomised controlled trials

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Poulsen, Henrik E

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the promised 'antioxidant miracle' of the 1980s, several randomised controlled trials have shown no effect of antioxidant supplements on hard endpoints such as morbidity and mortality. The former over-optimistic attitude has clearly called for a more realistic assessment of the...... saturation through their normal diet, there could be a large subpopulation with a potential health problem that remains uninvestigated. The present review discusses the relevance of the available literature on vitamin C supplementation and proposes guidelines for future randomised intervention trials....

  8. Randomised clinical trial of Levonantradol and Chlorpromazine in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced vomiting

    Lucraft, H.H.; Palmer, M.K. (Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK))

    1982-11-01

    Levonantradol is a cannabis derivative. Cannabinoid anti-emetics are being assessed in cancer chemotherapy but have been little used in radiotherapy to date. A pilot study and randomised trial compared the anti-emetic effect of a standard drug (Chlorpromazine 25 mg) with Levonantradol at two doses (0.5 and 0.75 mg) in patients receiving palliative single fraction radiotherapy to sites likely to cause nausea and vomiting. Most patients were out-patients. Both drugs were well tolerated. The frequency of vomiting was similar in all three groups in both the pilot study and randomised trial.

  9. Randomised clinical trial of Levonantradol and Chlorpromazine in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced vomiting

    Levonantradol is a cannabis derivative. Cannabinoid anti-emetics are being assessed in cancer chemotherapy but have been little used in radiotherapy to date. A pilot study and randomised trial compared the anti-emetic effect of a standard drug (Chlorpromazine 25 mg) with Levonantradol at two doses (0.5 and 0.75 mg) in patients receiving palliative single fraction radiotherapy to sites likely to cause nausea and vomiting. Most patients were out-patients. Both drugs were well tolerated. The frequency of vomiting was similar in all three groups in both the pilot study and randomised trial. (author)

  10. Randomised comparison of coronary stenting with and without balloon predilatation in selected patients

    Le Breton, H; Boschat, J; Commeau, P; Brunel, P.; Gilard, M; Breut, C; Bar, O.; Geslin, P; Tirouvanziam, A; Maillard, L.; Moquet, B; Barragan, P.; Dupouy, P.; Grollier, G; Berland, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The SWIBAP (stent without balloon predilatation) prospective randomised trial was designed to compare direct coronary stenting with stenting preceded by lesion predilatation with an angioplasty balloon.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the feasibility and safety of direct stenting in non-complex coronary lesions in a prospective study.
PATIENTS AND DESIGN—All patients  3.0 mm, who granted their informed consent, were randomised into the trial. In group I, the stent was placed without balloon...

  11. Experiences from a randomised, controlled trial on cycling to school: does cycling increase cardiorespiratory fitness?

    Børrestad, Line Anita Bjørkelund; Østergaard, Lars; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bere, Elling

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of a 12-week randomised controlled cycling-to-school trial on cardiorespiratory fitness. Methods: A total of 53 10- to 13-year-old children from one public school were included. The children were randomised into either a cycling group or a control group. The cycling group was encouraged to cycle to and from school each day during a period of 12 weeks. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and anthropometrical data (weight and ...

  12. Neonatal ECMO Study of Temperature (NEST - a randomised controlled trial

    Juszczak Edmund

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing evidence indicates that once mature neonates with severe cardio-respiratory failure become eligible for Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO their chances of intact survival are doubled if they actually receive ECMO. However, significant numbers survive with disability. NEST is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial designed to test whether, in neonates requiring ECMO, cooling to 34°C for the first 48 to 72 hours of their ECMO course leads to improved later health status. Infants allocated to the control group will receive ECMO at 37°C throughout their course, which is currently standard practice around the world. Health status of both groups will be assessed formally at 2 years corrected age. Methods/Design All infants recruited to the study will be cared for in one of the four United Kingdom (UK ECMO centres. Babies who are thought to be eligible will be assessed by the treating clinician who will confirm eligibility, ensure that consent has been obtained and then randomise the baby using a web based system, based at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU Clinical Trials Unit. Trial registration. Babies allocated ECMO without cooling will receive ECMO at 37°C ± 0.2°C. Babies allocated ECMO with cooling will be managed at 34°C ± 0.2°C for up to 72 hours from the start of their ECMO run. The minimum duration of cooling will be 48 hours. Rewarming (to 37°C will occur at a rate of no more than 0.5°C per hour. All other aspects of ECMO management will be identical. Primary outcome: Cognitive score from the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition (Bayley-III at age of 2 years (24 - 27 months. Discussion For the primary analysis, children will be analysed in the groups to which they are assigned, comparing the outcome of all babies allocated to "ECMO with cooling" with all those allocated to "ECMO" alone, regardless of deviation from the protocol or treatment received. For

  13. Promoting childbirth companions in South Africa: a randomised pilot study

    Smith Helen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most women delivering in South African State Maternity Hospitals do not have a childbirth companion; in addition, the quality of care could be better, and at times women are treated inhumanely. We piloted a multi-faceted intervention to encourage uptake of childbirth companions in state hospitals, and hypothesised that lay carers would improve the behaviour of health professionals. Methods We conducted a pilot randomised controlled trial of an intervention to promote childbirth companions in hospital deliveries. We promoted evidence-based information for maternity staff at 10 hospitals through access to the World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library (RHL, computer hardware and training to all ten hospitals. We surveyed 200 women at each site, measuring companionship, and indicators of good obstetric practice and humanity of care. Five hospitals were then randomly allocated to receive an educational intervention to promote childbirth companions, and we surveyed all hospitals again at eight months through a repeat survey of postnatal women. Changes in median values between intervention and control hospitals were examined. Results At baseline, the majority of hospitals did not allow a companion, or access to food or fluids. A third of women were given an episiotomy. Some women were shouted at (17.7%, N = 2085, and a few reported being slapped or struck (4.3%, N = 2080. Despite an initial positive response from staff to the childbirth companion intervention, we detected no difference between intervention and control hospitals in relation to whether a companion was allowed by nursing staff, good obstetric practice or humanity of care. Conclusion The quality and humanity of care in these state hospitals needs to improve. Introducing childbirth companions was more difficult than we anticipated, particularly in under-resourced health care systems with frequent staff changes. We were unable to determine whether the presence

  14. Semiparametric methods for multistate survival models in randomised trials.

    Hudson, Harold M; Lô, Serigne N; Simes, R John; Tonkin, Andrew M; Heritier, Stephane

    2014-05-10

    Transform methods have proved effective for networks describing a progression of events. In semi-Markov networks, we calculated the transform of time to a terminating event from corresponding transforms of intermediate steps. Saddlepoint inversion then provided survival and hazard functions, which integrated, and fully utilised, the network data. However, the presence of censored data introduces significant difficulties for these methods. Many participants in controlled trials commonly remain event-free at study completion, a consequence of the limited period of follow-up specified in the trial design. Transforms are not estimable using nonparametric methods in states with survival truncated by end-of-study censoring. We propose the use of parametric models specifying residual survival to next event. As a simple approach to extrapolation with competing alternative states, we imposed a proportional incidence (constant relative hazard) assumption beyond the range of study data. No proportional hazards assumptions are necessary for inferences concerning time to endpoint; indeed, estimation of survival and hazard functions can proceed in a single study arm. We demonstrate feasibility and efficiency of transform inversion in a large randomised controlled trial of cholesterol-lowering therapy, the Long-Term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischaemic Disease study. Transform inversion integrates information available in components of multistate models: estimates of transition probabilities and empirical survival distributions. As a by-product, it provides some ability to forecast survival and hazard functions forward, beyond the time horizon of available follow-up. Functionals of survival and hazard functions provide inference, which proves sharper than that of log-rank and related methods for survival comparisons ignoring intermediate events. PMID:24338893

  15. Acupuncture for dry eye: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Kim Ae-Ran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dry eye is usually managed by conventional medical interventions such as artificial tears, anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical treatment. However, since dry eye is one of the most frequent ophthalmologic disorders, safer and more effective methods for its treatment are necessary, especially for vulnerable patients. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with dry eye. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for this condition. Methods/Design A randomised, patient-assessor blinded, sham (non-acupuncture point, shallow acupuncture controlled study was established. Participants allocated to verum acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will be treated three times weekly for three weeks for a total of nine sessions per participant. Seventeen points (GV23; bilateral BL2, GB4, TE23, Ex1 (Taiyang, ST1 and GB20; and left SP3, LU9, LU10 and HT8 for men, right for women have been selected for the verum acupuncture; for the sham acupuncture, points have been selected that do not coincide with a classical acupuncture point and that are located close to the verum points, except in the case of the rim of the eye. Ocular surface disease index, tear film breakup time, the Schirmer I test, medication quantification scale and general assessment of improvement will be used as outcome variables for evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture. Safety will also be assessed at every visit. Primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed four weeks after screening. All statistical analyses will be performed using analysis of covariance. Discussion The results of this trial will be used as a basis for clarifying the efficacy of acupuncture for dry eye. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00969280.

  16. TREC-SAVE: a randomised trial comparing mechanical restraints with use of seclusion for aggressive or violent seriously mentally ill people: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Ferreira Marco AV; Coutinho Evandro SF; Huf Gisele; Ferreira Silvana; Mello Flavia; Adams Clive E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Thousands of people whose aggression is thought due to serious mental illness are secluded or restrained every day. Without fair testing these techniques will continue to be used outside of a rigorous evidence base. With such coercive treatment this leaves all concerned vulnerable to abuse and criticism. This paper presents the protocol for a randomised trial comparing seclusion with restraints for people with serious mental illnesses. Methods/Design Setting-General psychi...

  17. Morning vaccination enhances antibody response over afternoon vaccination: A cluster-randomised trial

    Long, Joanna E.; Drayson, Mark T; Taylor, Angela E.; Toellner, Kai M.; Lord, Janet M.; Phillips, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Early small studies provide mixed evidence for effects of time of vaccination on antibody response. • This is the first large scale randomised trial of different times of vaccination. • Morning vaccination enhances the antibody response to the influenza vaccine. • This simple manipulation is cost neutral and may improve protection from influenza in older adults.

  18. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY) A PILOT MULTICENTRE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Ghert, M.; Bhandari, M.; Deheshi, B.; Guyatt, G.; Holt, G.; O'Shea, T.; Randall, R. L.; Thabane, L.; Wunder, J.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Turcotte, R.; Madden, K.; Scott, T.; Sprague, S.; Simunovic, N.; Swinton, M.; Racano, A.; Heels-Ansdell, D.; Buckingham, L.; Rose, P.; Brigman, B.; Pullenayegum, E.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; Mckay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Biljan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; St Yves, H.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, K.; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Chai, Y.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Bil-Jan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; Yves, H. St.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, Kristine; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Tran, N.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Geller, D.; Hoang, B.; Tingling, J.; Solorzano, C.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Puloski, S.; Monument, M.; Carcary, K.; Cameron, C.; Aboulafia, A.; Loo-Mis, M.; Bosley, J.; Bonvegna, R.; Kassa, M.; Damron, T.; Craig, T.; Reale, M.; Goodman, H. J.; Culbertson, M. Deza; Caruso, P.; Garling, E.; Schwab, J.; Fiore, A.; Phukan, R.; Park, C.; Joshi, L.; Aboulafia, A.; Wallace, M.; Flack, J.; Vaughan, K.; Avergas, A.; Brady, M.; Brown, S.; Schadie, N.; Battersby, R.; Weiss, K.; Goodman, M.; Heyl, A.; Yeschke, C. A.; Sumic, P.; Dudgeon, M.; Prosser, R.; Korenoski, C.; DiCaprio, M.; Palmer, B.; Cioppa, E.; Schaeffer, T. M.; Paul, P.; Toreson, J.; Cummings, J.; Schwartz, L.; Zahner, B.; Morris, C.; Laljani, V.; Mesko, N.; Joyce, M.; Lietman, S.; Wustrack, R.; O'Donnell, R.; Stevenson, C.; Carmody, E.; Tyler, W.; McIntyre, A.; Spiguel, A.; Scarborough, M.; Gibbs, C. P.; Steshyn, J.; Nunn, B.; Rosenthal, H.; Haynes, K.; Leddy, L.; Walton, Z.; Doung, Y-C.; Hayden, J.; Velez, R.; Aguirre, M.; Perez, M.; Barrera, S.; Garca Lopez, A.; Grimer, R.; Dunn, K.; Virdee, H.; Rankin, K.; Beckingsale, T.; Gerrand, C.; Campbell, I.; Allen, M.; Khan, S. Alam; Bakshi, S.; Rastogi, S.; Poudel, R.; Kumar, V. Sampath; Rai, A.; Baptista, A. M.; de Camargo, O. P.; Marais, L.; Rodseth, R.; Ferreira, N.; Rajah, C.; Gumede, S.; Gortzak, Y.; Sternheim, A.; Bickels, J.; Kolander, Y.; Lev, S.; Hettwer, W.; Petersen, M. M.; Grum-Schwensen, T.; Jutte, P.; Ploegmakers, J. J. W.; Stevens, M.; Mahendra, A.; Gupta, S.; Bergovec, M.; Leithner, A.; Funovics, P.; Dijkstra, P. D. S.; Van De Sande, M.; Hoogenstraaten, A.; Leijerzapf, N.; Steadman, P.; Steadman, P.; Boffano, M.; Piana, R.; Marone, S.; Albertini, U.; Boux, E.; Maiello, A.; Repsa, L.; Zile, S.; Aston, W.; Pollock, R.; Cool, P.; Gibbons, M.; Whit-Well, D.; Cosker, T.; Hemingway, J.; Porter, D.; Patton, S.; Navia, J.; Betancur, A. F.; Laitenen, M.; Pakarinen, K.; Nieminen, J.; Yla-Mononen, S.; Rautiainen, S.; Fiorenza, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies of patients with bone sarcomas have been challenged by insufficient numbers at individual centres to draw valid conclusions. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether a five-da

  19. Review of Randomised Controlled Trials of Internet Interventions for Mental Disorders and Related Conditions

    Griffiths, Kathleen M.; Christensen, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Self-help Internet interventions have the potential to enable consumers to play a central role in managing their own health. This paper contains a systematic review of 15 randomised controlled trials of the effectiveness of self-help Internet interventions for mental disorders and related conditions. Conditions addressed by the interventions…

  20. Comparison of Bobath based and movement science based treatment for stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    van Vliet, P M; Lincoln, N.; Foxall, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Bobath based (BB) and movement science based (MSB) physiotherapy interventions are widely used for patients after stroke. There is little evidence to suggest which is most effective. This single-blind randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of these treatments on movement abilities and functional independence.

  1. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial

    B. Kuijper; J.T.J. Tans; A. Beelen; F. Nollet; M. de Visser

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. Participants 205 patients with symptoms and

  2. Cervical collar or physiotherapy versus wait and see policy for recent onset cervical radiculopathy: randomised trial.

    B. Kuijper (Barbara); J.T. Tans; A. Beelen (Anita); F. Nollet (Frans); M. de Visser (Marianne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with collar or physiotherapy compared with a wait and see policy in recent onset cervical radiculopathy. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Neurology outpatient clinics in three Dutch hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: 205 patients w

  3. Comments on: The effects of sitagliptin on gastric emptying in healthy humans - a randomised, controlled study

    Ekaterina A Pigarova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Comments on: Stevens JE, Horowitz M, Deacon CF, Nauck M, Rayner CK, Jones KL. The effects of sitagliptin on gastric emptying in healthy humans - a randomised, controlled study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Jun 28. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2012.05198.x

  4. Skills Training to Avoid Inadvertent Plagiarism: Results from a Randomised Control Study

    Newton, Fiona J.; Wright, Jill D.; Newton, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern within academic institutions. The current study utilised a randomised control trial of 137 new entry tertiary students to assess the efficacy of a scalable short training session on paraphrasing, patch writing and plagiarism. The results indicate that the training significantly enhanced students' overall…

  5. Randomised comparison of procedures for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials of treatment for cancer.

    Simes, R J; Tattersall, M H; Coates, A S; Raghavan, D; Solomon, H J; Smartt, H

    1986-10-25

    Methods of obtaining informed consent have evolved differently in Western countries without substantive information on the impact of these different practices on the patients. A randomised study was performed to compare two commonly adopted methods of seeking consent to randomised treatment: an individual approach at the discretion of each doctor and a uniform policy of total disclosure of all relevant information. The impact of both consent procedures on the patient's understanding and anxiety levels and on the doctor-patient relationship was assessed by means of a questionnaire given soon after the consent interview. Fifty seven patients were assigned at random to two groups: to 29 patients an individual approach to seeking consent was adopted and to 28 patients all relevant information was given. Seven patients refused consent to randomised treatment, with slightly more refusals by patients in the total disclosure group (5 v 2, p = 0.25). The main effects of total disclosure of all information compared with an individual approach to seeking consent were: a better understanding of treatment and side effects and of research aspects of the treatments; less willingness to agree to randomised treatment; and increased anxiety. No significant differences were found in patients' perceptions of the doctor-patient relationship. A repeat questionnaire given three to four weeks later no longer showed significant differences between the two groups. PMID:3094776

  6. Community based occupational therapy for patients with dementia and their care givers: randomised controlled trial.

    Graff, M.J.L.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Thijssen, M.; Dekker, J.; Hoefnagels, W.H.L.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of community based occupational therapy on daily functioning of patients with dementia and the sense of competence of their care givers. DESIGN: Single blind randomised controlled trial. Assessors were blinded for treatment allocation. SETTING: Memory clinic

  7. Evaluation of benefit to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines: cluster randomised trial.

    Beurs, D.P. de; Groot, M.H. de; Keijser, J. de; Duijn, E. van; Winter, R.F.P. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims: To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method: In total 45 psychiatric departments were

  8. Effect of virtual reality training on laparoscopic surgery: randomised controlled trial

    Larsen, Christian R; Soerensen, Jette L; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Dalsgaard, Torur; Schouenborg, Lars; Ottosen, Christian; Torben V. Schroeder; Ottesen, Bent S

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of virtual reality training on an actual laparoscopic operation. Design Prospective randomised controlled and blinded trial. Setting Seven gynaecological departments in the Zeeland region of Denmark. Participants 24 first and second year registrars specialising in gynaecology and obstetrics. Interventions Proficiency based virtual reality simulator training in laparoscopic salpingectomy and standard clinical education (controls). Main outcome measure The main ou...

  9. Spread spectrum in three-phase inverter by an optimised dual randomised PWM technique

    Boudjerda, Nasserdine; Boudouda, Aimad; Melit, Mohammed; Nekhoul, Bachir; El Khamlichi Drissi, Khalil; Kerroum, Kamal

    2014-03-01

    Randomised pulse width modulation (RPWM) technique has become a viable alternative to deterministic pulse width modulation (DPWM). By spreading the power spectrum in a continuous noise, this new technique better complies with electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements for conducted electromagnetic interferences (EMI) and allows reducing the emitted acoustic noise in variable speed drives (VSDs). The most popular RPWM schemes are randomised pulse position modulation (RPPM) and randomised carrier frequency modulation (RCFM). The combination (RCFM-RPPM) or dual RPWM (DRPWM) has also been proposed. In this article, we propose an optimised DRPWM (ODRPWM) for the three-phase inverter. First, the modulating principle is proposed, and then, a mathematical model of power spectral density (PSD) of the output voltage is developed and validated for the three schemes, namely RPPM, RCFM and RCFM-RPPM. PSD analysis shows that the proposed scheme is more effective on spreading PSD. Moreover, this analysis reveals optimal parameters of randomisation for a maximum spread of the PSD. The optimisation problem is then modelled and solved using two powerful non-linear methods.

  10. Relationship between obesity and the risk of clinically significant depression: Mendelian randomisation study.

    Hung, Chi-Fa

    2014-07-01

    Obesity has been shown to be associated with depression and it has been suggested that higher body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of depression and other common mental disorders. However, the causal relationship remains unclear and Mendelian randomisation, a form of instrumental variable analysis, has recently been employed to attempt to resolve this issue.

  11. Randomised controlled trial of topical kanuka honey for the treatment of rosacea

    Braithwaite, Irene; Hunt, Anna; Riley, Judith; Fingleton, James; Kocks, Janwillem; Corin, Andrew; Helm, Colin; Sheahan, Davitt; Tofield, Christopher; Montgomery, Barney; Holliday, Mark; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of topical 90% medical-grade kanuka honey and 10% glycerine (Honevo) as a treatment for rosacea. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with blinded assessment of primary outcome variable. SETTING: Outpatient primary healthcare population from 5 New Zealand sites.

  12. A prospective randomised controlled clinical trial comparing somatostatin and vasopressin in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage.

    S. A. Jenkins; Baxter, J. N.; Corbett, W; Devitt, P.; Ware, J; Shields, R

    1985-01-01

    Twenty two patients were entered into a randomised controlled clinical trial comparing the efficacy of somatostatin and vasopressin in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage. Somatostatin was significantly more successful in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage than vasopressin (p = 0.003). Furthermore, no complications were observed during treatment with somatostatin.

  13. Comparative effectiveness of long-acting antipsychotics: issues and challenges from a pragmatic randomised study.

    Ostuzzi, G; Barbui, C

    2016-02-01

    Although long-acting antipsychotics are widely used in individuals with psychotic disorders, it is unclear which long-acting preparation should be considered as first-line treatment in clinical practice. In this commentary, the main strengths and weaknesses of a recently published pragmatic randomised study comparing long-acting paliperidone palmitate v. long-acting haloperidol decanoate are briefly analysed. PMID:26515607

  14. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a Mendelian randomisation approach

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Dahl, Morten; Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G.

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design. Methods The authors measured high...

  15. Exercise therapy for Stress-related mental disorder, a randomised controlled trial in primary care

    Quartero, A. Otto; Burger, Huib; Donker, Marieke; de Wit, Niek J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: to investigate whether a structured physical exercise programme (PEP) improves the recovery of general health in patients suffering from Stress-related Mental Disorder (SMD). Method: Study design: randomised open trial in general practice. Patients from two regions in the Netherlands wer

  16. Acupressure at acupoint P6 for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a randomised clinical trial

    Majholm, Birgitte; Møller, Ann M

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting causes discomfort in many patients despite both antiemetic prophylactics and improved anaesthetic techniques. Stimulation of acupoint P6 is described as an alternative method for prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting.In a randomised, double-blinded stu...

  17. Functional effects of losartan in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-a randomised clinical trial

    Axelsson, Anna; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of disease-modifying treatments in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The aim of this randomised, placebo-controlled study was to assess if losartan could improve or ameliorate deterioration of cardiac function and exercise capacity. METHODS: Echocardiography, exercise...

  18. Low quality of reporting adverse drug reactions in paediatric randomised controlled trials

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Roon, Eric N

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Randomised controlled trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to learn about frequency and character of adverse drug reactions. To improve the quality of reporting adverse effects, the Consort group published recommendations. The authors studied the application of these recommendations in RCTs

  19. Effect of unsupervised home based proprioceptive training on recurrences of ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Mechelen, van W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of an unsupervised proprioceptive training programme on recurrences of ankle sprain after usual care in athletes who had sustained an acute sports related injury to the lateral ankle ligament. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial, with one year follow-up. SETT

  20. Ventilation strategies and outcome in randomised trials of high frequency ventilation

    Thome, U; Carlo, W; Pohlandt, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Randomised controlled trials comparing elective use of high frequency ventilation (HFV) with conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in preterm infants have yielded conflicting results. We hypothesised that the variability of results may be explained by differences in study design, ventilation strategies, delay in initiation of HFV, and use of permissive hypercapnia.

  1. The matching quality of experimental and control interventions in blinded pharmacological randomised clinical trials

    Bello, Segun; Wei, Maoling; Hilden, Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blinding is a pivotal method to avoid bias in randomised clinical trials. In blinded drug trials, experimental and control interventions are often designed to be matched, i.e. to appear indistinguishable. It is unknown how often matching procedures are inadequate, so we decided to sys...

  2. Outcomes of a multicentre randomised clinical trial of etanercept to treat ankylosing spondylitis.

    Calin, A.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Emery, P; Hakala, M; Kalden, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Mola, EM; Salvarani, C; Sanmarti, R; Sany, J; Sibilia, J; Sieper, J.; Linden, S. ven der; Veys, E; Appel, AM; Fatenejad, S

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of etanercept to treat adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). METHODS: Adult patients with AS at 14 European sites were randomly assigned to 25 mg injections of etanercept or placebo twice w

  3. Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conductive Education for stroke survivors has shown promise but randomised evidence is unavailable. This study assessed the feasibility of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate efficacy. Methods. Adult stroke survivors were recruited through local community notices. Those completing the baseline assessment were randomised using an online program and group allocation was independent. Intervention group participants received 10 weekly 1.5-hour sessions of Conductive Education at the National Institute of Conductive Education in Birmingham, UK. The control group participants attended two group meetings. The study evaluated the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, retention of participants, and appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Independent assessments included the Barthel Index, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. Eighty-two patients were enrolled; 77 completed the baseline assessment (46 men, mean age 62.1 yrs. and were randomised. 70 commenced the intervention (n=37 or an equivalent waiting period (n=33. 32/37 completed the 10-week training and 32/33 the waiting period. There were no missing items from completed questionnaires and no adverse events. Discussion. Recruitment, intervention, and assessment methods worked well. Transport issues for intervention and assessment appointments require review. Conclusion. A definitive trial is feasible. This trial is registered with ISRCTN84064492.

  4. Reading and Language Intervention for Children at Risk of Dyslexia: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Duff, Fiona J.; Hulme, Charles; Grainger, Katy; Hardwick, Samantha J.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Snowling, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intervention studies for children at risk of dyslexia have typically been delivered preschool, and show short-term effects on letter knowledge and phoneme awareness, with little transfer to literacy. Methods: This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effectiveness of a reading and language intervention for 6-year-old children…

  5. Randomised Items in Computer-Based Tests: Russian Roulette in Assessment?

    Marks, Anthony M.; Cronje, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based assessments are becoming more commonplace, perhaps as a necessity for faculty to cope with large class sizes. These tests often occur in large computer testing venues in which test security may be compromised. In an attempt to limit the likelihood of cheating in such venues, randomised presentation of items is automatically…

  6. Moderate alcohol consumption increases insulin sensitivity and ADIPOQ expression in postmenopausal women: A randomised, crossover trial

    Joosten, M.M.; Beulens, J.W.J.; Kersten, S.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: To determine whether 6 weeks of daily, moderate alcohol consumption increases expression of the gene encoding adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and plasma levels of the protein, and improves insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Methods: In a randomised, open-label, crossover trial conduc

  7. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease: a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara; Finan, Chris; Wong, Andrew; Amuzu, Antoinette; Ong, Ken; Gaunt, Tom R; Warren, Helen; Davies, Teri-Louise; Drenos, Fotios; Cooper, Jackie; Ebrahim, Shah; Lawlor, Debbie A; Talmud, Philippa J; Humphries, Steve E; Power, Christine; Hypponen, Elina; Richards, Marcus; Hardy, Rebecca; Kuh, Diana; Wareham, Nicholas; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Day, Ian N; Whincup, Peter; Morris, Richard; Strachan, Mark W J; Price, Jacqueline; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Plagnol, Vincent; Whittaker, John C; Smith, George Davey; Dudbridge, Frank; Casas, Juan P; Holmes, Michael V; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease. We then used a conventional Mendelian randomisation approach to investigate the causal relevance using a genetic instrument based on 31 urate-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To account for potential pleiotropic associations of certain SNPs with risk factors other than urate, we additionally did both a multivariable Mendelian randomisation analysis, in which the genetic associations of SNPs with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were included as covariates, and an Egger Mendelian randomisation (MR-Egger) analysis to estimate a causal effect accounting for unmeasured pleiotropy. Findings In the meta-analysis of 17 prospective observational studies (166 486 individuals; 9784 coronary heart disease events) a 1 SD higher urate concentration was associated with an odds ratio (OR) for coronary heart disease of 1·07 (95% CI 1·04–1·10). The corresponding OR estimates from the conventional, multivariable adjusted, and Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis (58 studies; 198 598 individuals; 65 877 events) were 1·18 (95% CI 1·08–1·29), 1·10 (1·00–1·22), and 1·05 (0·92–1·20), respectively, per 1 SD increment in plasma urate. Interpretation Conventional and multivariate Mendelian randomisation analysis implicates a causal role for urate in the development of coronary heart disease, but these estimates might be inflated by hidden pleiotropy. Egger Mendelian randomisation analysis, which accounts for

  8. DIRECT trial. Diverticulitis recurrences or continuing symptoms: Operative versus conservative Treatment. A MULTICENTER RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL

    van de Wall Bryan JM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persisting abdominal complaints are common after an episode of diverticulitis treated conservatively. Furthermore, some patients develop frequent recurrences. These two groups of patients suffer greatly from their disease, as shown by impaired health related quality of life and increased costs due to multiple specialist consultations, pain medication and productivity losses. Both conservative and operative management of patients with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or frequently recurring diverticulitis are applied. However, direct comparison by a randomised controlled trial is necessary to determine which is superior in relieving symptoms, optimising health related quality of life, minimising costs and preventing diverticulitis recurrences against acceptable morbidity and mortality associated with surgery or the occurrence of a complicated recurrence after conservative management. We, therefore, constructed a randomised clinical trial comparing these two treatment strategies. Methods/design The DIRECT trial is a multicenter randomised clinical trial. Patients (18-75 years presenting themselves with persisting abdominal complaints after an episode of diverticulitis and/or three or more recurrences within 2 years will be included and randomised. Patients randomised for conservative treatment are treated according to the current daily practice (antibiotics, analgetics and/or expectant management. Patients randomised for elective resection will undergo an elective resection of the affected colon segment. Preferably, a laparoscopic approach is used. The primary outcome is health related quality of life measured by the Gastro-intestinal Quality of Life Index, Short-Form 36, EQ-5D and a visual analogue scale for pain quantification. Secondary endpoints are morbidity, mortality and total costs. The total follow-up will be three years. Discussion Considering the high incidence and the

  9. Timing of birth for women with a twin pregnancy at term: a randomised controlled trial

    Haslam Ross R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a well recognized risk of complications for both women and infants of a twin pregnancy, increasing beyond 37 weeks gestation. Preterm birth prior to 37 weeks gestation is a recognized complication of a twin pregnancy, however, up to 50% of twins will be born after this time. The aims of this randomised trial are to assess whether elective birth at 37 weeks gestation compared with standard care in women with a twin pregnancy affects the risk of perinatal death, and serious infant complications. Methods/Design Design: Multicentred randomised trial. Inclusion Criteria: women with a twin pregnancy at 366 weeks or more without contraindication to continuation of pregnancy. Trial Entry & Randomisation: Following written informed consent, eligible women will be randomised from 36+6 weeks gestation. The randomisation schedule uses balanced variable blocks, with stratification for centre of birth and planned mode of birth. Women will be randomised to either elective birth or standard care. Treatment Schedules: Women allocated to the elective birth group will be planned for elective birth from 37 weeks gestation. Where the plan is for vaginal birth, this will involve induction of labour. Where the plan is for caesarean birth, this will involve elective caesarean section. For women allocated to standard care, birth will be planned for 38 weeks gestation or later. Where the plan is for vaginal birth, this will involve either awaiting the spontaneous onset of labour, or induction of labour if required. Where the plan is for caesarean birth, this will involve elective caesarean section (after 38 and as close to 39 weeks as possible. Primary Study Outcome: A composite of perinatal mortality or serious neonatal morbidity. Sample Size: 460 women with a twin pregnancy to show a reduction in the composite outcome from 16.3% to 6.7% with adjustment for the clustering of twin infants within mothers (p = 0.05, 80% power. Discussion This

  10. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  11. Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Gomersall Sjaan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activitystat hypothesis proposes that when physical activity or energy expenditure is increased or decreased in one domain, there will be a compensatory change in another domain to maintain an overall, stable level of physical activity or energy expenditure. To date, there has been no experimental study primarily designed to test the activitystat hypothesis in adults. The aim of this trial is to determine the effect of two different imposed exercise loads on total daily energy expenditure and physical activity levels. Methods This study will be a randomised, multi-arm, parallel controlled trial. Insufficiently active adults (as determined by the Active Australia survey aged 18–60 years old will be recruited for this study (n=146. Participants must also satisfy the Sports Medicine Australia Pre-Exercise Screening System and must weigh less than 150 kg. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups using a computer-generated allocation sequence. Participants in the Moderate exercise group will receive an additional 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks, and those in the Extensive exercise group will receive an additional 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks. Exercise targets will be accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions monitored by heart rate telemetry. Control participants will not be given any instructions regarding lifestyle. The primary outcome measures are activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water and physical activity (accelerometry. Secondary measures will include resting metabolic rate via indirect calorimetry, use of time, maximal oxygen consumption and several anthropometric and physiological measures. Outcome measures will be conducted at baseline (zero weeks, mid- and end-intervention (three and six weeks with three (12 weeks and six month (24 week follow-up. All assessors will be

  12. Can lay-led walking programmes increase physical activity in middle aged adults? A randomised controlled trial

    Lamb, S.; Bartlett, H; Ashley, A; W. Bird

    2002-01-01

    Design: Randomised controlled trial with one year follow up. Physical activity was measured by questionnaire. Other measures included attitudes to exercise, body mass index, cholesterol, aerobic capacity, and blood pressure.

  13. Two randomised phase II trials of subcutaneous interleukin-2 and histamine dihydrochloride in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Donskov, F; Middleton, M; Fode, K;

    2005-01-01

    Histamine inhibits formation and release of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, and thereby protects natural killer and T cells against oxidative damage. Thus, the addition of histamine may potentially improve the efficacy of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Two randomised phase II trials of IL-2 with...... randomised phase III trial is warranted to clarify the potential role of adding histamine to IL-2 in mRCC....

  14. Pain Levels after Local Anaesthetic with or without Hyaluronidase in Carpal Tunnel Release: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    Yeo, G.; Gupta, A; Ding, G.; Skerman, H.; Khatun, M.; Melsom, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Hyaluronidase is an enzyme that temporarily liquefies the interstitial barrier, allowing easy dispersal of local anaesthetic through cleavage of tissue planes. This prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study investigates the utility of adding hyaluronidase to local anaesthetic in the setting of carpal tunnel release. Methods. 70 consecutive carpal tunnel release patients were recruited and randomised into a control group only receiving local anaesthetic and a hyaluronidase gro...

  15. A prospective randomised trial of four-layer versus short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    Scriven, J. M.; Taylor, L. E.; Wood, A. J.; Bell, P R; Naylor, A. R.; London, N. J.

    1998-01-01

    This trial was undertaken to examine the safety and efficacy of four-layer compared with short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers within the confines of a prospective, randomised, ethically approved trial. Fifty-three patients were recruited from a dedicated venous ulcer assessment clinic and their individual ulcerated limbs were randomised to receive either a four-layer bandage (FLB)(n = 32) or a short stretch bandage (SSB)(n = 32). The endpoint was a complet...

  16. Effectiveness of an audience response system on orthodontic knowledge retention of undergraduate dental students – a randomised control trial

    Robson, Nicholas; Popat, Hashmat; Richmond, Stephen; Farnell, Damian J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective:: To determine the effect of an audience response system (ARS) on knowledge retention of dental students and to gauge student perceptions of using the ARS. Design:: Randomised control study. Setting:: School of Dentistry, Cardiff University. Participants:: Seventy four second-year dental students were stratified by gender and randomised anonymously to one of two groups. Methods:: One group received a lecture on orthodontic terminology and diagnosis in a traditional didactic format a...

  17. Prostate cancer - evidence of exercise and nutrition trial (PrEvENT):Study protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial

    Hackshaw-McGeagh, Lucy; Lane, J. Athene; Persad, Raj; Gillatt, David; Holly, Jeff M P; Koupparis, Anthony; Rowe, Edward; Johnston, Lyndsey; Cloete, Jenny; Shiridzinomwa, Constance; Abrams, Paul; Penfold, Chris M; Bahl, Amit; Oxley, Jon; Perks, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A growing body of observational evidence suggests that nutritional and physical activity interventions are associated with beneficial outcomes for men with prostate cancer, including brisk walking, lycopene intake, increased fruit and vegetable intake and reduced dairy consumption. However, randomised controlled trial data are limited. The 'Prostate Cancer: Evidence of Exercise and Nutrition Trial' investigates the feasibility of recruiting and randomising men diagnosed with local...

  18. Inadequate reporting of research ethics review and informed consent in cluster randomised trials: review of random sample of published trials

    Taljaard, Monica; McRae, Andrew D; Weijer, Charles; Bennett, Carol; Dixon, Stephanie; Taleban, Julia; Skea, Zoe; Eccles, Martin P.; Brehaut, Jamie C; Donner, Allan; Saginur, Raphael; Boruch, Robert F; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the extent to which authors of cluster randomised trials adhered to two basic requirements of the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ uniform requirements for manuscripts (namely, reporting of research ethics review and informed consent), to determine whether the adequacy of reporting has improved over time, and to identify characteristics of cluster randomised trials associated with reportin...

  19. Effect on peer review of telling reviewers that their signed reviews might be posted on the web: randomised controlled trial

    van Rooyen, Susan; Delamothe, Tony; Evans, Stephen J W

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To see whether telling peer reviewers that their signed reviews of original research papers might be posted on the BMJ’s website would affect the quality of their reviews. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting A large international general medical journal based in the United Kingdom. Participants 541 authors, 471 peer reviewers, and 12 editors. Intervention Consecutive eligible papers were randomised either to have the reviewer’s signed report made available on the BMJ’s webs...

  20. Theory of planned behaviour variables and objective walking behaviour do not show seasonal variation in a randomised controlled trial

    Williams, Stefanie L; French, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies have shown that objectively measured walking behaviour is subject to seasonal variation, with people walking more in summer compared to winter. Seasonality therefore may have the potential to bias the results of randomised controlled trials if there are not adequate statistical or design controls. Despite this there are no studies that assess the impact of seasonality on walking behaviour in a randomised controlled trial, to quantify the extent of such bias. Fu...

  1. Effectiveness of quinine versus artemether-lumefantrine for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Ugandan children: randomised trial

    Achan, J.; Tibenderana, J. K.; Kyabayinze, D.; Mangen, F. W.; Kamya, M. R.; Dorsey, G.; D'Alessandro, U; Rosenthal, P. J.; Talisuna, A O

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of oral quinine with that of artemether-lumefantrine in treating uncomplicated malaria in children. DESIGN: Randomised, open label effectiveness study. SETTING: Outpatient clinic of Uganda's national referral hospital in Kampala. PARTICIPANTS: 175 children aged 6 to 59 months with uncomplicated malaria. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were randomised to receive oral quinine or artemether-lumefantrine administered by care givers at home. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE...

  2. New non-randomised model to assess the prevalence of discriminating behaviour: a pilot study on mephedrone

    Schaffer Jay; Deshmukh Nawed; Shah Syeda; Taft Helen; Cross Paul; Nepusz Tamás; Petróczi Andrea; Shane Maryann; Adesanwo Christiana; Barker James; Naughton Declan P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background An advantage of randomised response and non-randomised models investigating sensitive issues arises from the characteristic that individual answers about discriminating behaviour cannot be linked to the individuals. This study proposed a new fuzzy response model coined 'Single Sample Count' (SSC) to estimate prevalence of discriminating or embarrassing behaviour in epidemiologic studies. Methods The SSC was tested and compared to the established Forced Response (FR) model ...

  3. A pragmatic multi-centred randomised controlled trial of yoga for chronic low back pain: Trial protocol

    Cox, Helen; Tilbrook, Helen; Aplin, John; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Hewitt, Catherine; Jayakody, Shalmini; Semlyen, Anna; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David; Trewhela, Alison; Watt, Ian; Worthy, Gill

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is...

  4. The demise of the randomised controlled trial: bibliometric study of the German-language health care literature, 1948 to 2004

    Antes Gerd; Schwarzer Guido; Galandi Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In order to reduce systematic errors (such as language bias) and increase the precision of the summary treatment effect estimate, a comprehensive identification of randomised controlled trials (RCT), irrespective of publication language, is crucial in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We identified trials in the German general health care literature. Methods Eight German language general health care journals were searched for randomised controlled trials and analysed w...

  5. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    De Berardis, Giorgia; Sacco, Michele; Strippoli, Giovanni F.M.; Pellegrini, Fabio; Graziano, Giusi; Tognoni, Gianni; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the benefits and harms of low dose aspirin in people with diabetes and no cardiovascular disease. Design Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline (1966-November 2008), the Cochrane central register of controlled trials (Cochrane Library 2008;issue 4), and reference lists of retrieved articles. Review methods Randomised trials of aspirin compared with placebo or no aspirin in people with diabetes and no pre-existing cardiovascular disease were e...

  6. Pharmacist-led management of chronic pain in primary care:results from a randomised controlled exploratory trial

    Bruhn, Hanne; Christine M. Bond; Elliott, Alison M; Hannaford, Philip C; Amanda J Lee; McNamee, Paul; Smith, Blair H; Watson, Margaret C; Holland, Richard; Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effectiveness of pharmacist medication review, with or without pharmacist prescribing, with standard care, for patients with chronic pain. Design An exploratory randomised controlled trial. Setting Six general practices with prescribing pharmacists in Grampian (3) and East Anglia (3). Participants Patients on repeat prescribed pain medication (4815) were screened by general practitioners (GPs), and mailed invitations (1397). 196 were randomised and 180 (92%) complete...

  7. Insecticide-treated nets for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Carol Gamble

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protection from malaria with insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs during pregnancy is widely advocated, but evidence of benefit has been inconsistent. We undertook a systematic review of randomised trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Three cluster-randomised and two individually randomised trials met the inclusion criteria; four from Africa (n = 6,418 and one from Thailand (n = 223. In Africa, ITNs compared to no nets increased mean birth weight by 55 g (95% confidence interval [CI] 21-88, reduced low birth weight by 23% (relative risk [RR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.98, and reduced miscarriages/stillbirths by 33% (RR 0.67, 0.47-0.97 in the first few pregnancies. Placental parasitaemia was reduced by 23% in all gravidae (RR 0.77, 0.66-0.90. The effects were apparent in the cluster-randomised trials and the one individually randomised trial in Africa. The trial in Thailand, which randomised individuals to ITNs or untreated nets, showed reductions in anaemia and fetal loss in all gravidae, but not reductions in clinical malaria or low birth weight. CONCLUSIONS: ITNs used throughout pregnancy or from mid-pregnancy onwards have a beneficial impact on pregnancy outcome in malaria-endemic Africa in the first few pregnancies. The potential impact of ITNs in pregnant women and their newborns in malaria regions outside Africa requires further research.

  8. Randomised controlled trials may underestimate drug effects: balanced placebo trial design.

    Karen Lund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is an inherent assumption in randomised controlled trials that the drug effect can be estimated by subtracting the response during placebo from the response during active drug treatment. OBJECTIVE: To test the assumption of additivity. The primary hypothesis was that the total treatment effect is smaller than the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect. The secondary hypothesis was that non-additivity was most pronounced in participants with large placebo effects. METHODS: We used a within-subject randomised blinded balanced placebo design and included 48 healthy volunteers (50% males, mean (SD age 23.4 (6.2 years. Experimental pain was induced by injections of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle. Participants received four injections with hypertonic saline along with lidocaine or matching placebo in randomised order: A: received hypertonic saline/told hypertonic saline; B: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline; C: received hypertonic saline+placebo/told hypertonic saline+pain killer; D: received hypertonic saline+lidocaine/told hypertonic saline+pain killer. The primary outcome measure was the area under the curve (AUC, mm(2 of pain intensity during injections. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the sum of the drug effect and the placebo effect (mean AUC 6279 mm(2 (95% CI, 4936-7622 and the total treatment effect (mean AUC 5455 mm(2 (95% CI, 4585-6324 (P = 0.049. This difference was larger for participants with large versus small placebo effects (P = 0.015, and the difference correlated significantly with the size of the placebo effect (r = 0.65, P = 0.006. CONCLUSION: Although this study examined placebo effects and not the whole placebo response as in randomised controlled trials, it does suggest that the additivity assumption may be incorrect, and that the estimated drug effects in randomised controlled trials may be underestimated, particularly in studies

  9. Group mindfulness-based intervention for distressing voices: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Chadwick, Paul; Strauss, Clara; Jones, Anna-Marie; Kingdon, David; Ellett, Lyn; Dannahy, Laura; Hayward, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Group Person-Based Cognitive Therapy (PBCT) integrates cognitive therapy and mindfulness to target distinct sources of distress in psychosis. The present study presents data from the first randomised controlled trial investigating group PBCT in people distressed by hearing voices. One-hundred and eight participants were randomised to receive either group PBCT and Treatment As Usual (TAU) or TAU only. While there was no significant effect on the primary outcome, a measure of general psychological distress, results showed significant between-group post-intervention benefits in voice-related distress, perceived controllability of voices and recovery. Participants in the PBCT group reported significantly lower post-treatment levels of depression, with this effect maintained at six-month follow-up. Findings suggest PBCT delivered over 12weeks effectively impacts key dimensions of the voice hearing experience, supports meaningful behaviour change, and has lasting effects on mood. PMID:27146475

  10. The post hoc use of randomised controlled trials to explore drug associated cancer outcomes

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; Zoungas, Sophia; Chalmers, John;

    2013-01-01

    on public health before proper regulatory action can be taken. This paper aims to discuss challenges of exploring drug-associated cancer outcomes by post-hoc analyses of Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) designed for other purposes. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES TO CONSIDER: We set out to perform a post......INTRODUCTION: Drug-induced cancer risk is of increasing interest. Both observational studies and data from clinical trials have linked several widely used treatments to cancer. When a signal for a potential drug-cancer association is generated, substantiation is required to assess the impact...... challenges must be addressed to enhance the likelihood of reliable conclusions. Advantages of post-hoc analyses of RCTs include quality of data collected and sometimes randomisation to exposure of interest. Limitations include confounding and sample size, which is fixed to suit the purposes of the trial...

  11. Discontinuation of oxytocin in the active phase of labour. A randomised controlled trial

    Bor, Isil Pinar; Boie, Sidsel; Ledertoug, Susanne; Stornes, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether discontinuation of oxytocin infusion increases the duration of the active phase of labour and reduces maternal and neonatal complications. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Regional Hospital of Randers......, Denmark. POPULATION: Women with singleton pregnancy in the vertex position undergoing labour induction or augmentation. METHODS: Two hundred women were randomised when cervical dilation was ≤4 cm to either continue or discontinue oxytocin infusion when cervical dilation reached 5 cm. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES......). The incidence of fetal heart rate abnormalities (51 versus 20%) and uterine hyperstimulation (12 versus 2%) was significantly greater in the continued than the discontinued oxytocin group. The incidence of tachysystole, caesarean deliveries, postpartum haemorrhage, third degree perineal tears and...

  12. Virtual outreach: a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of joint teleconferenced medical consultations

    Wallace, P.; Barber, J; Clayton, W.; Currell, R.; Fleming, K.; Garner, P.; Haines, A.; Harrison, R; Jacklin, P.; Jarrett, C.; Jayasuriya, R.; Lewis, L; Parker, S; Roberts, J.; Thompson, S

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypotheses that virtual outreach would reduce offers of hospital follow-up appointments and reduce numbers of medical interventions and investigations, reduce numbers of contacts with the health care system, have a positive impact on patient satisfaction and enablement, and lead to improvements in patient health status. To perform an economic evaluation of virtual outreach.Design: A randomised controlled trial comparing joint teleconsultations between GPs, specialists ...

  13. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease:a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A.; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease...

  14. General Practitioner Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme Study (GAPS): protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Avent, Minyon L.; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Gilks, Charles; Del Mar, Chris; Halton, Kate; Sidjabat, Hanna; Hall, Lisa; Dobson, Annette; Paterson, David L.; van Driel, Mieke L.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a strong link between antibiotic consumption and the rate of antibiotic resistance. In Australia, the vast majority of antibiotics are prescribed by general practitioners, and the most common indication is for acute respiratory infections. The aim of this study is to assess if implementing a package of integrated, multifaceted interventions reduces antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections in general practice. Methods/design This is a cluster randomised trial...

  15. Tiotropium in patients with moderate COPD naive to maintenance therapy: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    Troosters, Thierry; Sciurba, Frank C.; Decramer, Marc; Siafakas, Nikos M.; Klioze, Solomon S.; Sutradhar, Santosh C.; Weisman, Idelle M; Yunis, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: The benefits of pharmacotherapy with tiotropium HandiHaler 18 μg for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been previously demonstrated. However, few data exist regarding the treatment of moderate disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage II). Aims: To determine whether tiotropium improves lung function/patient-reported outcomes in patients with GOLD stage II COPD naive to maintenance therapy. Methods: A randomised 24-we...

  16. Randomised controlled trial comparing oral and intravenous rehydration therapy in children with diarrhoea.

    Mackenzie, A; Barnes, G.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the effectiveness of oral rehydration in children with moderate dehydration caused by gastroenteritis, and to compare the complications of oral and intravenous treatment. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Emergency department and infectious diseases ward in a large urban teaching hospital. PATIENTS--111 children aged 3-36 months who had been previously healthy, had had diarrhoea for seven days or less, had clinical signs of dehydration, and were not in shoc...

  17. Lessons from a randomised experiment with mixed-mode designs for a household panel survey

    Lynn, Peter; Uhrig, S.C. Noah; Burton, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a randomised experiment with mixed-mode survey designs in the context of a household panel survey. The experiment was designed to allow comparisons between two alternative mixed-mode designs (telephone interviewing plus face-to-face interviewing) and a unimode design (face-to-face interviewing only) in terms of response rates, sample composition, costs and other key outcomes, as well as to permit assessment of the feasibility of implementing the mixed-mode designs.

  18. Ukrain – a new cancer cure? A systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    Schmidt K.; Ernst E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Ukrain is an anticancer drug based on the extract of the plant Chelidonium majus L. Numerous pre-clinical and clinical investigations seem to suggest that Ukrain is pharmacologically active and clinically effective. We wanted therefore to critically evaluate the clinical trial data in the form of a systematic review. Methods Seven electronic databases were searched for all relevant randomised clinical trials. Data were extracted and validated by both authors, tabulated and...

  19. Side effects of phenobarbital and carbamazepine in childhood epilepsy: randomised controlled trial

    Banu, S. H.; Jahan, M.; Koli, U. K.; Ferdousi, S.; Khan, N. Z.; Neville, B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the behavioural side effects associated with two commonly used antiepilepsy drugs--phenobarbital and carbamazepine--in children in Bangladesh. Design: Prospective randomised controlled single centre trial. Setting: Specialist children's hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Participants: 108 children aged 2-15 with generalised tonic-clonic (n=51) or partial and secondary generalised seizures (n=57). Main outcome measures: Seizure control and behavioural side effects. Results: 9...

  20. Prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery: a randomised clinical trial.

    Hall, J. C.; Tarala, R. A.; Tapper, J.; Hall, J L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the prevention of respiratory complications after abdominal surgery by a comparison of a global policy of incentive spirometry with a regimen consisting of deep breathing exercises for low risk patients and incentive spirometry plus physiotherapy for high risk patients. DESIGN--Stratified randomised trial. SETTING--General surgical service of an urban teaching hospital. PATIENTS--456 patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Patients less than 60 years of age with an Ameri...

  1. Reporting quality of randomised controlled trials published in prosthodontic and implantology journals

    Kloukos, D.; Papageorgiou, S. N.; Doulis, I.; Petridis, H.; Pandis, N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reporting quality of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in prosthodontic and implantology journals. Thirty issues of nine journals in prosthodontics and implant dentistry were searched for RCTs, covering the years 2005-2012: The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, The International Journal of Prosthodontics, The International Journal of Periodontics & Restorative Dentistry, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Cl...

  2. The effect of the synthetic retinoid etretinate on sputum cytology: results from a randomised trial.

    Arnold, A.M.; Browman, G.P.; Levine, M. N.; D'Souza, T.; Johnstone, B.; Skingley, P.; Turner-Smith, L.; Cayco, R.; Booker, L.; Newhouse, M

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory studies, and one previous uncontrolled trial, have suggested that retinoids may reverse bronchial atypia, a putatively premalignant condition. Sputum sampling is a simple, non-invasive method of assessing atypia. Smokers with at least a 15 pack-year history were screened for sputum atypia. One hundred and fifty subjects' were randomised to receive the synthetic retinoid etretinate 25 mg orally or identical placebo daily for 6 months. Compliance was measured by performing pill count...

  3. Practical aspects of conducting a pragmatic randomised trial in primary care: patient recruitment and outcome assessment.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conducting a pragmatic randomised trial in primary care is often accompanied by practical problems. Such problems are seldom reported and may constitute useful lessons for researchers planning future trials. AIM: To address the difficulties involved in patient recruitment and to present measures to minimise bias during outcome assessment. METHOD: A recently conducted trial comparing the effects of corticosteroid injections and physiotherapy for painful stiff shoulder was used to i...

  4. Clozapine versus placebo in Huntington's disease: a double blind randomised comparative study

    Vugt, J.P.P. van; Siesling, S.; Vergeer, M; van der Velde, E A; R. Roos

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To establish the effect of the atypical neuroleptic clozapine on chorea, voluntary motor performance, and functional disability in patients with Huntington's disease.
METHODS—Thirty three patients with Huntington's disease participated in a double blind randomised trial. A maximum of 150 mg/day clozapine or placebo equivalent was given for a period of 31 days. Assessments were performed in the week before and at the last day of the trial. Chorea was scored usin...

  5. Randomised controlled pilot trial of mindfulness training for stress reduction during pregnancy

    Guardino, CM; Dunkel Schetter, C; Bower, JE; Lu, MC; Smalley, SL

    2014-01-01

    This randomised controlled pilot trial tested a six-week mindfulness-based intervention in a sample of pregnant women experiencing high levels of perceived stress and pregnancy anxiety. Forty-seven women enrolled between 10 and 25 weeks gestation were randomly assigned to either a series of weekly Mindful Awareness Practices classes (n = 24) with home practice or to a reading control condition (n = 23). Hierarchical linear models of between-group differences in change over time demonstrated t...

  6. Parent-focused treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa: a study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Hughes, Elizabeth K; Le Grange, Daniel; Court, Andrew; Yeo, Michele SM; Campbell, Stephanie; Allan, Erica; Crosby, Ross D.; Loeb, Katharine L.; Sawyer, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Background Family-based treatment is an efficacious outpatient intervention for medically stable adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Previous research suggests family-based treatment may be more effective for some families when parents and adolescents attend separate therapy sessions compared to conjoint sessions. Our service developed a novel separated model of family-based treatment, parent-focused treatment, and is undertaking a randomised controlled trial to compare parent-focused treatmen...

  7. Effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring in pregnant women with diabetes: randomised clinical trial

    Murphy, Helen R.; Rayman, Gerry; Lewis, Karen; Kelly, Susan; Johal, Balroop; Duffield, Katherine; Fowler, Duncan; Campbell, Peter J.; Temple, Rosemary C

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of continuous glucose monitoring during pregnancy on maternal glycaemic control, infant birth weight, and risk of macrosomia in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Design Prospective, open label randomised controlled trial. Setting Two secondary care multidisciplinary obstetric clinics for diabetes in the United Kingdom. Participants 71 women with type 1 diabetes (n=46) or type 2 diabetes (n=25) allocated to antenatal care plus continuous glucose mon...

  8. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of sildenafil (Viagra) in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction.

    Burls, A.; Gold, L; Clark, W.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sildenafil (Viagra), a new oral drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, was licensed for use across Europe in 1998. AIM: To examine the effectiveness and safety of sildenafil as an oral treatment for erectile dysfunction. DESIGN OF STUDY: Systematic review and meta-analysis. SETTING: All published or unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing sildenafil with a placebo or alternative therapies. METHOD: Published studies were sought by computerised searches of electr...

  9. Effectiveness of dementia follow-up care by memory clinics or general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of post-diagnosis dementia treatment and coordination of care by memory clinics compared with general practitioners. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine memory clinics and 159 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Participants 175 patients with a new diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers. Interventions Usual care provided by memory clinic or general practitioner. Main out...

  10. The gait and balance of patients with diabetes can be improved: a randomised controlled trial

    Allet, L.; Armand, S.; de Bie, R.A.; Golay, A.; Monnin, D.; Aminian, K.; Staal, J.B.; de Bruin, E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Gait characteristics and balance are altered in diabetic patients. Little is known about possible treatment strategies. This study evaluates the effect of a specific training programme on gait and balance of diabetic patients. Methods This was a randomised controlled trial (n = 71) with an intervention (n = 35) and control group (n = 36). The intervention consisted of physiotherapeutic group training including gait and balance exercises with function-orientated strengthening (...

  11. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for people with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled study

    Wade, D T; Gage, Heather; Owen, C.; Trend, P; Grossmith, C.; Kaye, J

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a programme of multidisciplinary rehabilitation and group support achieves sustained benefit for people with Parkinson’s disease or their carers. Methods: The study was a randomised controlled crossover trial comparing patients and carers who had received rehabilitation four months before assessment with those who had not. Patients were recruited from a neurology clinic, attended a day hospital from home weekly for six weeks using private car...

  12. Randomised comparison of ondansetron and metoclopramide plus dexamethasone for chemotherapy induced emesis.

    Dick, G S; Meller, S T; Pinkerton, C R

    1995-01-01

    The serotonin (5HT3) antagonist ondansetron was compared in a randomised study with metoclopramide and dexamethasone for the prevention of chemotherapy induced emesis. Thirty children aged 1-15 years with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia received 'intensification modules' according to the MRC United Kingdom acute lymphoblastic leukaemia regimen UKALL XI. This contains the moderately emetogenic drugs daunorubicin, etoposide, and cytarabine. Fifteen children received an intravenous loading dose of...

  13. Randomised controlled trial of the MEND programme: a family-based community intervention for childhood obesity

    Sacher, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Childhood obesity is a serious global public health issue. The number of children affected has increased dramatically in recent years, and despite extensive research in this field, no effective generalisable prevention or treatment interventions have been achieved as yet. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) was to evaluate the efficacy of the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition, Do it (MEND) programme, a multicomponent communitybased childhood obesity intervention. Met...

  14. Randomised controlled trial of effects of coordinating care for terminally ill cancer patients.

    Addington-Hall, J M; MacDonald, L D; Anderson, H R; Chamberlain, J.; Freeling, P.; Bland, J. M.; Raftery, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To measure effects on terminally ill cancer patients and their families of coordinating the services available within the NHS and from local authorities and the voluntary sector. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Inner London health district. PATIENTS--Cancer patients were routinely notified from 1987 to 1990. 554 patients expected to survive less than one year entered the trial and were randomly allocated to a coordination or a control group. INTERVENTION--All patient...

  15. Buprenorphine versus dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    Adams Clive E; Tompkins Charlotte NE; Sheard Laura; Wright Nat MJ; Allgar Victoria L; Oldham Nicola S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Many drug users present to primary care requesting detoxification from illicit opiates. There are a number of detoxification agents but no recommended drug of choice. The purpose of this study is to compare buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for detoxification from illicit opiates in primary care. Methods Open label randomised controlled trial in NHS Primary Care (General Practices), Leeds, UK. Sixty consenting adults using illicit opiates received either daily sublingual b...

  16. Dipyridamole is superior to dobutamine for thallium stress imaging: a randomised crossover study.

    Kumar, E. B.; Steel, S A; Howey, S; Caplin, J L; Aber, C P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the value of dobutamine over dipyridamole as a pharmacological stressing agent in myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201. DESIGN--Stress and redistribution tomographic images were taken in a group of patients in a randomised crossover study of both agents. The scans were scored to give a value for the stress and redistribution images and a reversibility score (redistribution--stress). All patients had coronary angiography that was also scored. Differences between ...

  17. Weight-loss intervention using implementation intentions and mental imagery: a randomised control trial study protocol

    Hattar, Anne; Hagger, Martin S.; Pal, Sebely

    2015-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are major health problems worldwide. This protocol describes the HEALTHI (Healthy Eating and Active LifesTyle Health Intervention) Program, a 12-week randomised-controlled weight-loss intervention that adopts two theory-based intervention techniques, mental imagery and implementation intentions, a behaviour-change technique based on planning that have been shown to be effective in promoting health-behaviour change in previous research. The effectiveness of go...

  18. Written emotional disclosure for women with ovarian cancer and their partners: randomised controlled trial

    Arden-Close, Emily; Gidron, Yori; Bayne, Louise; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2013-01-01

    Objective: written emotional disclosure for 15–20?min a day over 3 to 4?days improves physical and psychological health and may benefit cancer patients. However, no studies have tested the effectiveness of guided writing in cancer patients and their partners. A randomised controlled trial tested whether writing about the patient's diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer using the Guided Disclosure Protocol (GDP) is effective in reducing perceived stress and improving quality of life (QoL) i...

  19. Randomised trial of safety and efficacy of immediate postoperative enteral feeding in patients undergoing gastrointestinal resection.

    Carr, C S; Ling, K. D.; Boulos, P.; Singer, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether immediate post-operative enteral feeding in patients who have undergone gastrointestinal resection is safe and effective. DESIGN: Randomised trial of immediate post-operative enteral feeding through a nasojejunal tube v conventional postoperative intravenous fluids until the reintroduction of normal diet. SETTING: Teaching hospitals in London. SUBJECTS: 30 patients under the care of the participating consultant surgeon who were undergoing elective laparotomies wi...

  20. MObile Technology for Improved Family Planning Services (MOTIF): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Smith, C.; Vannak, U; Sokhey, L; Ngo, TD; Gold, J; Khut, K; Edwards, P.; Rathavy, T; Free, C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Providing women with contraceptive methods following abortion is important to reduce repeat abortion rates, yet evidence for effective post-abortion family planning interventions are limited. This protocol outlines the evaluation of a mobile phone-based intervention using voice messages to support post-abortion family planning in Cambodia. METHODS/DESIGN A single blind randomised controlled trial of 500 participants. Clients aged 18 or over, attending for abortion at four Mari...

  1. Participation bias in a randomised trial of screening for lung cancer

    Hestbech, Mie Sara; Siersma, Volkert; Dirksen, Asger;

    2011-01-01

    following socio-demographic aspects: social group, living alone, gender, age and geographical area. DLCST participants reported less negative psychosocial aspects than the comparable population sample. CONCLUSION: The present study has shown substantial socio-demographic and psychosocial participation bias......INTRODUCTION: Participation bias might affect the results and the representability of randomised controlled trials. We investigated the degree of socio-demographic and psychosocial participation bias in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST). METHODS: In DLCST the questionnaire COS...

  2. Acupuncture for treating alopecia areata: a protocol of systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    Lee, Hye Won; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Ju Ah; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acupuncture is frequently used in dermatology for treating a number of skin disorders. There is no critically appraised evidence of the potential benefits and harm of acupuncture for alopecia areata (AA). This review aims to systematically evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for the management of AA in randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Methods and analysis 13 databases will be searched from their inception. These include PubMed, AMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, 6 Korean medi...

  3. Moxibustion for treating knee osteoarthritis: study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Lee, Seunghoon; Kim, Kun Hyung; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Joo-Hee; Kang, Jung Won; Kang, Kyung-Won; Jung, So-Young; Kim, Ae-Ran; Park, Hyo-Ju; Shin, Mi-Suk; Hong, Kwon-Eui; Song, Ho-Sueb; Choi, Jin-Bong; Kim, Hyung-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment of knee osteoarthritis, which is a major cause of disability among the elderly, is typically selected from multidisciplinary options, including complementary and alternative medicine. Moxibustion has been used in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis in Korea to reduce pain and improve physical activity. However, there is no sufficient evidence of its effectiveness, and it cannot therefore be widely recommended for treating knee osteoarthritis. We designed a randomised...

  4. Effect of unsupervised home based proprioceptive training on recurrences of ankle sprain: randomised controlled trial

    Hupperets, Maarten D W; Verhagen, Evert A L M; van Mechelen, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an unsupervised proprioceptive training programme on recurrences of ankle sprain after usual care in athletes who had sustained an acute sports related injury to the lateral ankle ligament. Design Randomised controlled trial, with one year follow-up. Setting Primary care. Participants 522 athletes, aged 12-70, who had sustained a lateral ankle sprain up to two months before inclusion; 256 (120 female and 136 male) in the intervention group; 266 (128 ...

  5. Supervised exercises for adults with acute lateral ankle sprain: a randomised controlled trial

    Rijn, Rogier; Os, Anton; Kleinrensink, Gert Jan; Bernsen, Roos; Verhaar, JAN; Koes, Bart; Bierma-zeinstra, Sita

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: During the recovery period after acute ankle sprain, it is unclear whether conventional treatment should be supported by supervised exercise. AIM: To evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises compared with conventional treatment alone in patients with an acute ankle sprain. DESIGN: Randomised controlled clinical trial. SETTING: A total of 32 Dutch general practices and the hospital emergency department....

  6. Cognitive–behavioural therapy v. structured care for medically unexplained symptoms: randomised controlled trial

    Sumathipala, A.; Siribaddana, S.; Abeysingha, M. R. N.; Silva, P.; Dewey, M; Prince, M.; Mann, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background A pilot trial in Sri Lanka among patients with medically unexplained symptoms revealed that cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) administered by a psychiatrist was efficacious. Aims To evaluate CBT provided by primary care physicians in a comparison with structured care. Method A randomised control trial (n=75 in each arm) offered six 30 min sessions of structured care or therapy. The outcomes of the two interventions were compared at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months. Resu...

  7. Economic evaluation alongside pragmatic randomised trials: developing a standard operating procedure for clinical trials units

    Russell Ian T; Linck Pat; Hounsome Barry; Edwards Rhiannon T

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background There is wide recognition that pragmatic randomised trials are the best vehicle for economic evaluation. This is because trials provide the best chance of ensuring internal validity, not least through the rigorous prospective collection of patient-specific data. Furthermore the marginal cost of collecting economic data alongside clinical data is typically modest. UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) does not require a standard operating procedure (SOP) for economic e...

  8. Cost effectiveness of a community based exercise programme in over 65 year olds: cluster randomised trial

    Munro, J F; Nicholl, J. P.; Brazier, J E; Davey, R.; Cochrane, T.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of a community based exercise programme as a population wide public health intervention for older adults. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomised community intervention trial. Setting: 12 general practices in Sheffield; four randomly selected as intervention populations, and eight as control populations. PARTICIPANTS: All those aged 65 and over in the least active four fifths of the population responding to a baseline survey. Ther...

  9. Effects of group prenatal care on psychosocial risk in pregnancy: Results from a randomised controlled trial

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Magriples, Urania; Westdahl, Claire; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Kershaw, Trace S.

    2011-01-01

    Few interventions have succeeded in reducing psychosocial risk among pregnant women. The objective of this study was to determine whether an integrated group prenatal care intervention already shown to improve perinatal and sexual risk outcomes can also improve psychosocial outcomes compared to standard individual care. This randomised controlled trial included pregnant women ages 14–25 from two public hospitals (N = 1047) who were randomly assigned to standard individual care, group prenatal...

  10. Limited benefits of ambulance telemetry in delivering early thrombolysis: a randomised controlled trial

    Woollard, M; Pitt, K.; Hayward, A.; Taylor, N.

    2005-01-01

    Methods: This prospective randomised controlled trial recruited patients using the 999 ambulance service in a rural area of the UK with signs or symptoms of coronary heart disease. Subjects were assigned to receive either standard paramedic treatment or transmission of 12 lead ECG, blood pressure, pulse oximetry, and relevant medical history to a general hospital coronary care unit. Cardiology senior house officers then determined each patient's suitability for pre-hospital thrombolysis time,...

  11. Neuromuscular training and the risk of leg injuries in female floorball players: cluster randomised controlled study

    Pasanen, Kati; Parkkari, Jari; Pasanen, Matti; Hiilloskorpi, Hannele; Mäkinen, Tanja; Järvinen, Markku; Kannus, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a neuromuscular training programme is effective in preventing non-contact leg injuries in female floorball players. Design Cluster randomised controlled study. Setting 28 top level female floorball teams in Finland. Participants 457 players (mean age 24 years)—256 (14 teams) in the intervention group and 201 (14 teams) in the control group—followedup for one league season (six months). Intervention A neuromuscular training programme to enhance players’ motor s...

  12. Randomised controlled trial of topical kanuka honey for the treatment of acne

    Semprini, Alex; Braithwaite, Irene; Corin, Andrew; Sheahan, Davitt; Tofield, Christopher; Helm, Colin; Montgomery, Barney; Fingleton, James; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of Honevo, a topical 90% medical-grade kanuka honey, and 10% glycerine (honey product) as a treatment for facial acne. Design Randomised controlled trial with single blind assessment of primary outcome variable. Setting Outpatient primary care from 3 New Zealand localities. Participants Of 136 participants aged between 16 and 40 years with a diagnosis of acne and baseline Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) for acne score of ≥2.68, participants were ra...

  13. Neckties and Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Healthy Males: A Pilot Randomised Crossover Trial

    Mark Rafferty; Quinn, Terence J.; Jesse Dawson; Matthew Walters

    2010-01-01

    Background. A necktie may elevate intracranial pressure through compression of venous return. We hypothesised that a tight necktie would deleteriously alter cerebrovascular reactivity. Materials and Methods. A necktie was simulated using bespoke apparatus comprising pneumatic inner-tube with aneroid pressure-gauge. Using a randomised crossover design, cerebrovascular reactivity was measured with the “pseudo-tie” worn inflated or deflated for 5 minutes (simulating tight/loose necktie resp.)....

  14. Limits of teacher delivered sex education: interim behavioural outcomes from randomised trial

    Wight, Daniel; Raab, Gillian M.; Henderson, Marion; Abraham, Charles; Buston, Katie; Hart, Graham; Scott, Sue

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a theoretically based sex education programme for adolescents (SHARE) delivered by teachers reduced unsafe sexual intercourse compared with current practice. DESIGN: Cluster randomised trial with follow up two years after baseline (six months after intervention). A process evaluation investigated the delivery of sex education and broader features of each school. SETTING: Twenty five secondary schools in east Scotland. PARTICIPANTS: 8430 pupils aged 13-15 years;...

  15. Larval therapy for leg ulcers (VenUS II): randomised controlled trial

    Dumville, Jo C; Worthy, Gill; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dowson, Christopher; Iglesias, Cynthia; Mitchell, Joanne L; Nelson, E Andrea; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of larval therapy with a standard debridement technique (hydrogel) for sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers. Design Pragmatic, three armed randomised controlled trial. Setting Community nurse led services, hospital wards, and hospital outpatient leg ulcer clinics in urban and rural settings, United Kingdom. Participants 267 patients with at least one venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcer with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue, and...

  16. Defining Feasibility and Pilot Studies in Preparation for Randomised Controlled Trials: Development of a Conceptual Framework

    Eldridge, Sandra M.; Lancaster, Gillian A.; Michael J. Campbell; Thabane, Lehana; Hopewell, Sally; Coleman, Claire L.; Bond, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a framework for defining pilot and feasibility studies focusing on studies conducted in preparation for a randomised controlled trial. To develop the framework, we undertook a Delphi survey; ran an open meeting at a trial methodology conference; conducted a review of definitions outside the health research context; consulted experts at an international consensus meeting; and reviewed 27 empirical pilot or feasibility studies. We initially adopted mutually exclusive definitions of ...

  17. Atorvastatin as a stable treatment in bronchiectasis: a randomised controlled trial

    Mandal, Pallavi; Chalmers, James D; Graham, Catriona; Harley, Catherine; Sidhu, Manjit K; Doherty, Catherine; Govan, John W; Sethi, Tariq; Davidson, Donald J; Rossi, Adriano G.; Hill, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is characterised by chronic cough, sputum production, and recurrent chest infections. Pathogenesis is poorly understood, but excess neutrophilic airway inflammation is seen. Accumulating evidence suggests that statins have pleiotropic effects; therefore, these drugs could be a potential anti-inflammatory treatment for patients with bronchiectasis. We did a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial to establish if atorvastatin could reduce cough in patients with bronchiectasi...

  18. The use of glucosamine for chronic low back pain: a systematic review of randomised control trials

    Sodha, Reena; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan; Alam, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether the use of oral glucosamine influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) thought to be related to spinal osteoarthritis (OA). Design Systematic review of randomised control trials. Searches were performed up to March 2011 on Medline, AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane and EMBASE with subsequent reference screening of retrieved studies. In addition, the grey literature was searched via opensigle. Included studies were required to i...

  19. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for children with anxiety disorders: A randomised controlled trial

    Vigerland, Sarah; Ljotsson, Brjann; Thulin, Ulrika; Ost, Lars-Goran; Andersson, Gerhard; Serlachius, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for anxiety disorders in children, but few affected seek or receive treatment. Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) could be a way to increase the availability of empirically supported treatments. Aims: A randomised controlled trial was conducted to evaluate ICBT for children with anxiety disorders. Method: Families (N = 93) with a child aged 8-12 years with a principal diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder...

  20. Effectiveness of training health professionals to provide smoking cessation interventions: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Silagy, C; Lancaster, T.; Gray, S.; Fowler, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effectiveness of interventions that train healthcare professionals in methods for improving the quality of care delivered to patients who smoke. DESIGN--Systematic literature review. SETTING--Primary care medical and dental practices in the United States and Canada. Patients were recruited opportunistically. SUBJECTS--878 healthcare professionals and 11,228 patients who smoked and were identified in eight randomised controlled trials. In each of these trials healthcar...

  1. Randomised clinical trials on acupuncture in the Korean literature: bibliometric analysis and methodological quality

    Kim, Sina; Sagong, Hye Seon; Kong, Jae Cheol; Choi, Jun-Yong; Lee, Myeong Soo; Wieland, L Susan; Manheimer, Eric; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture systematic reviewers have increasingly searched Chinese databases and journals to identify eligible randomised clinical trials (RCTs). However, reviewers have infrequently searched for eligible RCTs in Korean databases and journals. This study aimed to identify difficult to locate acupuncture RCTs in Korean databases and journals and to assess the characteristics and quality of the identified RCTs. Methods Eleven electronic databases and seven journals were searched up t...

  2. Randomised trial of endoscopic endoprosthesis versus operative bypass in malignant obstructive jaundice

    Andersen, J R; Sørensen, S M; Kruse, A;

    1989-01-01

    In patients with obstructive jaundice caused by malignant stricture of the extrahepatic bile duct we compared survival time, complication rates, hospitalisation requirements, and quality of life after palliation by endoscopic endoprosthesis or bypass surgery. During diagnostic endoscopic...... survival between treatment groups or randomisation groups. No differences were found when other variables were compared. We conclude, that palliation of obstructive jaundice in malignant bile duct obstruction with endoscopically introduced endoprosthesis is as effective as operative bypass....

  3. Dry needling and exercise for chronic whiplash - a randomised controlled trial

    Souvlis Tina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic whiplash is a common and costly problem. Sensory hypersensitivity is a feature of chronic whiplash that is associated with poor responsiveness to physical treatments such as exercise. Modalities such as dry-needling have shown some capacity to modulate sensory hypersensitivity, suggesting that when combined with advice and exercise, such an approach may be more effective in the management of chronic whiplash. The primary aim of this project is to investigate the effectiveness of dry-needling, advice and exercise for chronic whiplash. Method/Design A double-blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. 120 participants with chronic whiplash, grade II will be randomised to receive either 1 dry-needling, advice and exercise or 2 sham dry-needling, advice and exercise. All participants will receive an educational booklet on whiplash. Participants who are randomised to Group 1 will receive 6 treatments of combined dry-needling and exercise delivered in the first 3 weeks of the 6 week program, and 4 treatments of exercise only in the last 3 weeks of the program. Participants randomised to Group 2 will receive an identical protocol, except that a sham dry-needling technique will be used instead of dry-needling. The primary outcome measures are the Neck Disability Index (NDI and participants' perceived recovery. Outcomes will be measured at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks after randomization by an assessor who is blind to the group allocation of the participants. In parallel, an economic analysis will be conducted. Discussion This trial will utilise high quality trial methodologies in accordance with CONSORT guidelines. The successful completion of this trial will provide evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a combined treatment approach for the management of chronic whiplash. Trial registration ACTRN12609000470291

  4. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; Berg, Hans J. van den; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A.H.M.; Logtenberg, Sabine L M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an intermediate to high obstetric risk with an intention to deliver vaginally. To exclude a clinically relevant difference in satisfaction with pain relief of more than 10%, we needed to include 1136 women....

  5. Efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy versus anxiety management for body dysmorphic disorder: a randomised controlled trial

    Veale, D; Anson, M; Miles, S; Pieta, M.; Costa, A.; Ellison, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The evidence base for the efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for treating body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is weak. Aims: To determine whether CBT is more effective than anxiety management (AM) in an outpatient setting. Method: This was a single-blind stratified parallelgroup randomised controlled trial. The primary endpoint was at 12 weeks, and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for BDD (BDD-YBOCS) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures for BDD includ...

  6. Somatostatin in the treatment of acute pancreatitis: A prospective randomised controlled trial

    Choi, T. K.; Mok, F; Zhan, W H; Fan, S. T.; Lai, E C; Wong, J

    1989-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of somatostatin in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. Seventy one patients were randomised to control (h = 36), or to the somatostatin group (h = 35) who received somatostatin 100 micrograms/h after a 250 microgram bolus for the first two days. The following were compared in the two groups on admission and two days later: laboratory tests of prognostic significance, severity of pancreatitis, and also morbidity and mortality. Of th...

  7. Assessing the efficacy of mobile phone interventions using randomised controlled trials: issues and their solutions.

    Emma Beard

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing interest in the use of mobile phone interventions to promote behaviour change and their efficacy has been assessed extensively using exploratory methods (e.g., pilot studies and proof of concept). However, in an era of evidence-based practice, calls have been made for digital interventions to be evaluated with the same rigour as other forms of behaviour change interventions i.e. with randomised controlled trials. Aims: This presentation aims to overview a numb...

  8. Routine follow up of breast cancer in primary care: randomised trial.

    Grunfeld, E.; Mant, D.; Yudkin, P; Adewuyi-Dalton, R; Cole, D; Stewart, J; Fitzpatrick, R.; Vessey, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect on time to diagnosis of recurrence and on quality of life of transferring primary responsibility for follow up of women with breast cancer in remission from hospital to general practice. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with 18 month follow up in which women received routine follow up either in hospital or in general practice. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: 296 women with breast cancer in remission receiving regular follow up care at district general hospitals in Eng...

  9. Effectiveness of provider incentives for anaemia reduction in rural China: a cluster randomised trial

    Miller, Grant; Luo, Renfu; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Shi, Yaojiang; Foo, Patricia; Zhao, Qiran; Martorell, Reynaldo; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the impact of provider performance pay for anaemia reduction in rural China. Design A cluster randomised trial of information, subsidies, and incentives for school principals to reduce anaemia among their students. Enumerators and study participants were not informed of study arm assignment. Setting 72 randomly selected rural primary schools across northwest China. Participants 3553 fourth and fifth grade students aged 9-11 years. All fourth and fifth grade students in samp...

  10. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Forster Anne; Young John; Barber Sally; Clegg Andrew; Iliffe Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to a...

  11. Outcomes of a multicentre randomised clinical trial of etanercept to treat ankylosing spondylitis.

    Calin, A; Dijkmans, B A C; Emery, P; Hakala, M.; Kalden, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Mola, EM; Salvarani, C.; Sanmarti, R.; Sany, J; Sibilia, J; Sieper, J; Linden, S. ven der; Veys, E; Appel, AM

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of etanercept to treat adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). METHODS: Adult patients with AS at 14 European sites were randomly assigned to 25 mg injections of etanercept or placebo twice weekly for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was an improvement of at least 20% in patient reported symptoms, based on the multicomponent Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) response...

  12. Patch: platelet transfusion in cerebral haemorrhage: study protocol for a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from intracerebral haemorrhage have a poor prognosis, especially if they are using antiplatelet therapy. Currently, no effective acute treatment option for intracerebral haemorrhage exists. Limiting the early growth of intracerebral haemorrhage volume which continues the first hours after admission seems a promising strategy. Because intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet therapy have been shown to be particularly at risk of early haematoma growth, platelet transfusion may have a beneficial effect. Methods/Design The primary objective is to investigate whether platelet transfusion improves outcome in intracerebral haemorrhage patients who are on antiplatelet treatment. The PATCH study is a prospective, randomised, multi-centre study with open treatment and blind endpoint evaluation. Patients will be randomised to receive platelet transfusion within six hours or standard care. The primary endpoint is functional health after three months. The main secondary endpoints are safety of platelet transfusion and the occurrence of haematoma growth. To detect an absolute poor outcome reduction of 20%, a total of 190 patients will be included. Discussion To our knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial of platelet transfusion for an acute haemorrhagic disease. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR1303

  13. Psychodynamic guided self-help for adult depression through the internet: a randomised controlled trial.

    Robert Johansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT is an effective treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD, but not all clients with MDD can receive psychotherapy. Using the Internet to provide psychodynamic treatments is one way of improving access to psychological treatments for MDD. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of an Internet-based psychodynamic guided self-help treatment for MDD. METHODS: Ninety-two participants who were diagnosed with MDD according to the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were randomised to treatment or an active control. The treatment consisted of nine treatment modules based on psychodynamic principles with online therapist contact. The active control condition was a structured support intervention and contained psychoeducation and scheduled weekly contacts online. Both interventions lasted for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II. RESULTS: Mixed-effects model analyses of all randomised participants showed that participants receiving Internet-based PDT made large and superior improvements compared with the active control group on the BDI-II (between-group Cohen's d = 1.11. Treatment effects were maintained at a 10-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Internet-based psychodynamic guided self-help is an efficacious treatment for MDD that has the potential to increase accessibility and availability of PDT for MDD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01324050.

  14. Assessing the Causality between Blood Pressure and Retinal Vascular Caliber through Mendelian Randomisation

    Li, Ling-Jun; Liao, Jiemin; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui; Ikram, M. Kamran; Shyong, Tai E.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine the association between blood pressure (BP) and retinal vascular caliber changes that were free from confounders and reverse causation by using Mendelian randomisation. A total of 6528 participants from a multi-ethnic cohort (Chinese, Malays, and Indians) in Singapore were included in this study. Retinal arteriolar and venular caliber was measured by a semi-automated computer program. Genotyping was done using Illumina 610-quad chips. Meta-analysis of association between BP, and retinal arteriolar and venular caliber across three ethnic groups was performed both in conventional linear regression and Mendelian randomisation framework with a genetic risk score of BP as an instrumental variable. In multiple linear regression models, each 10 mm Hg increase in systolic BP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial BP (MAP) was associated with significant decreases in retinal arteriolar caliber of a 1.4, 3.0, and 2.6 μm, and significant decreases in retinal venular caliber of a 0.6, 0.7, and 0.9 μm, respectively. In a Mendelian randomisation model, only associations between DBP and MAP and retinal arteriolar narrowing remained yet its significance was greatly reduced. Our data showed weak evidence of a causal relationship between elevated BP and retinal arteriolar narrowing.

  15. How big should the pilot study for my cluster randomised trial be?

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Costelloe, Ceire E; Kahan, Brennan C; Lancaster, Gillian A; Kerry, Sally M

    2016-06-01

    There is currently a lot of interest in pilot studies conducted in preparation for randomised controlled trials. This paper focuses on sample size requirements for external pilot studies for cluster randomised trials. We consider how large an external pilot study needs to be to assess key parameters for input to the main trial sample size calculation when the primary outcome is continuous, and to estimate rates, for example recruitment rates, with reasonable precision. We used simulation to provide the distribution of the expected number of clusters for the main trial under different assumptions about the natural cluster size, intra-cluster correlation, eventual cluster size in the main trial, and various decisions made at the piloting stage. We chose intra-cluster correlation values and pilot study size to reflect those commonly reported in the literature. Our results show that estimates of sample size required for the main trial are likely to be biased downwards and very imprecise unless the pilot study includes large numbers of clusters and individual participants. We conclude that pilot studies will usually be too small to estimate parameters required for estimating a sample size for a main cluster randomised trial (e.g. the intra-cluster correlation coefficient) with sufficient precision and too small to provide reliable estimates of rates for process measures such as recruitment or follow-up rates. PMID:26071431

  16. Social Stories in mainstream schools for children with autism spectrum disorder: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

    Marshall, David; Wright, Barry; Allgar, Victoria; Adamson, Joy; Williams, Christine; Ainsworth, Hannah; Cook, Liz; Varley, Danielle; Hackney, Lisa; Dempster, Paul; Ali, Shehzad; Trepel, Dominic; Collingridge Moore, Danielle; Littlewood, Elizabeth; McMillan, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of recruitment, retention, outcome measures and intervention training/delivery among teachers, parents and children. To calculate a sample size estimation for full trial. Design A single-centre, unblinded, cluster feasibility randomised controlled trial examining Social Stories delivered within a school environment compared with an attentional control. Setting 37 primary schools in York, UK. Participants 50 participants were recruited and a cluster randomisation approach by school was examined. Participants were randomised into the treatment group (n=23) or a waiting list control group (n=27). Outcome measures Acceptability and feasibility of the trial, intervention and of measurements required to assess outcomes in a definitive trial. Results An assessment of the questionnaire completion rates indicated teachers would be most appropriate to complete the primary outcome measure. 2 outcome measures: the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS)-2 and a goal-based measure showed both the highest levels of completion rates (above 80%) at the primary follow-up point (6 weeks postintervention) and captured relevant social and behaviour outcomes. Power calculations were based on these 2 outcome measures leading to a total proposed sample size of 180 participant groups. Conclusions Results suggest that a future trial would be feasible to conduct and could inform the policy and practice of using Social Stories in mainstream schools. Trial registration number ISRCTN96286707; Results. PMID:27515756

  17. The Women's international study of long-duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM: a randomised controlled trial

    Meade Tom W

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the time of feasibility work and final design of the trial there was no randomised control trial evidence for the long-term risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy. Observational studies had suggested that long term use of estrogen was likely to be associated, amongst other things, with reduced risks of osteoporosis and ischaemic heart disease and increased risks of breast and endometrial cancer. Concomitant use of progestogens had been shown to protect against endometrial cancer, but there were few data showing how progestogen might affect estrogen actions on other conditions. Disease specific risks from observational studies suggested that, overall, long-term HRT was likely to be beneficial. Several studies showed that mortality from all causes was lower in HRT users than in non-users. Some secondary cardiovascular prevention trials were ongoing but evidence was also required for a range of outcomes in healthy women. The WISDOM trial was designed to compare combined estrogen and progestogen versus placebo, and estrogen alone versus combined estrogen and progestogen. During the development of WISDOM the Women's Health Initiative trial was designed, funded and started in the US. Design Randomised, placebo, controlled, trial. Methods The trial was set in general practices in the UK (384, Australia (94, and New Zealand (24. In these practices 284175 women aged 50–69 years were registered with 226282 potentially eligible. We sought to randomise 22300 postmenopausal women aged 50 – 69 and treat for ten years. The interventions were: conjugated equine estrogens, 0.625 mg orally daily; conjugated equine estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5/5.0 mg orally daily; matched placebo. Primary outcome measures were: major cardiovascular disease, osteoporotic fractures, breast cancer and dementia. Secondary outcomes were: other cancers, all cause death, venous thromboembolism and cerebro-vascular disease. Results

  18. Early surgery versus initial conservative treatment in patients with spontaneous supratentorial lobar intracerebral haematomas (STICH II): a randomised trial

    Mendelow, A David; Gregson, Barbara A; Rowan, Elise N; Murray, Gordon D.; Gholkar, Anil; Mitchell, Patrick M.; ,

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The balance of risk and benefit from early neurosurgical intervention for conscious patients with superficial lobar intracerebral haemorrhage of 10–100 mL and no intraventricular haemorrhage admitted within 48 h of ictus is unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that early surgery compared with initial conservative treatment could improve outcome in these patients. Methods In this international, parallel-group trial undertaken in 78 centres in 27 countries, we compared...

  19. Early surgery versus initial conservative treatment in patients with spontaneous supratentorial lobar intracerebral haematomas (STICH II):a randomised trial

    Mendelow, A David; Gregson, Barbara A; Rowan, Elise N; Murray, Gordon D.; Gholkar, Anil; Mitchell, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The balance of risk and benefit from early neurosurgical intervention for conscious patients with superficial lobar intracerebral haemorrhage of 10-100 mL and no intraventricular haemorrhage admitted within 48 h of ictus is unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that early surgery compared with initial conservative treatment could improve outcome in these patients. METHODS: In this international, parallel-group trial undertaken in 78 centres in 27 countries, we compared early...

  20. Relationship Between Cervicovagind Ferritin Levels in 22-26 Weeks of Pregnant Women with Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

    .* F. Naghshvar, M.D

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose: Low serum ferritin levels correlate with low iron stores, whereas high levels are associated with an acute-phase reaction. Our objective was to determine whether elevated levels of ferritin in the genital tract can be a potential marker to identify patients at risk for spontaneous preterm delivery.Materials and Methods: We performed a nested case-control study involving 28 women who had spontaneous preterm delivery. 28 term control subjects mathched for parity, age, education, previous history of PTL and vaginal bleeding selected from 275 women enrolled in the preterm prediction study of the prenatal care unit at Imam hospital. Cervical ferritin was measured using radoimmunoassay.Results: Cervical ferritin levels were significantly higher in women who subsequently had spontaneous early preterm delivery (mean SD: 54.5 5 ng/ml VS 36.39 1.59 in control, P=0.001.Conclusion: Elevated cervical ferritin levels in 22=24 weeks of gestation in asymptomatic women are associated with subsequent spontaneous preterm birth. Cervical ferritin, alone or in combination with other potential markers, maybe a useful tool to help identify high risk women who would potentially benefit from such prospective intervention.Until the identification of such clinical interventions in a clinical trial, the use of cervical ferritin for the prediction of preterm delivery remains experimental.

  1. Comparative effectiveness and adverse effects of interferon alpha-2b plus ribavirin therapy in hepatitis 'C' for 26 weeks

    Hepatitis C is major emerging challenge for pathologists and treating physicians all over the world. Already 10 million Pakistani population has become anti-HCV positive. It is not only affecting hepatobiliary system but with passage of time research is revealing that Hepatitis C is going to involve almost every organ of the body. With timely diagnosis and treatment, millions of patients can be saved from morbidity and mortality. The nation has to sacrifice initial economic allocations to avoid later millions of mortalities and greater economic losses on affected patients and to support their families. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of combine therapy of Hepatitis C in local population of Pakistan. This case series study was done at CMH Okara, Kohat, Abbottabad, and PAF Hospital, Shorkot from August 2000 to August 2009. All 1,000 patients from 10 to 60 years of age, confirmed anti-HCV Positive by ELISA and PCR Positive for HCV RNA, were subjected to Interferon alpha-2b and Ribavirin therapy for similar period of time. Response and adverse affects were observed by clinical examination, blood complete picture including platelet count and ALT fortnightly. PCR for HCV RNA and ultrasound abdomen (hepatobiliary system) was done quarterly during treatment and 6 monthly for 2 years after treatment to review the sustained response and relapse. Over all cure rate after 2 years was 855 (85.5%) excluding the 50 (5%) of initial resistant to one year treatment and 95 (9.5%) re-treated relapse cases. One hundred and forty-five (14.5%) patients were found to be resistant to treatment. Hepatitis C must be treated timely after proper diagnosis. Interferon and Ribavirin combination have shown high 'cure' rate in Hepatitis C. In spite of high cure rate of 85.5% with timely and proper treatment, low socio-economic status is a major problem for poor individuals to get treatment. Preventive aspect must be strictly followed and implemented. (author)

  2. Limiting weight gain in overweight and obese women during pregnancy to improve health outcomes: the LIMIT randomised controlled trial

    Crowther Caroline A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a significant global health problem, with the proportion of women entering pregnancy with a body mass index greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 approaching 50%. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with a well-recognised increased risk of adverse health outcomes both for the woman and her infant, however there is more limited information available regarding effective interventions to improve health outcomes. The aims of this randomised controlled trial are to assess whether the implementation of a package of dietary and lifestyle advice to overweight and obese women during pregnancy to limit gestational weight gain is effective in improving maternal, fetal and infant health outcomes. Methods/Design Design: Multicentred randomised, controlled trial. Inclusion Criteria: Women with a singleton, live gestation between 10+0-20+0 weeks who are obese or overweight (defined as body mass index greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2, at the first antenatal visit. Trial Entry & Randomisation: Eligible, consenting women will be randomised between 10+0 and 20+0 weeks gestation using a central telephone randomisation service, and randomisation schedule prepared by non-clinical research staff with balanced variable blocks. Stratification will be according to maternal BMI at trial entry, parity, and centre where planned to give birth. Treatment Schedules: Women randomised to the Dietary and Lifestyle Advice Group will receive a series of inputs from research assistants and research dietician to limit gestational weight gain, and will include a combination of dietary, exercise and behavioural strategies. Women randomised to the Standard Care Group will continue to receive their pregnancy care according to local hospital guidelines, which does not currently include routine provision of dietary, lifestyle and behavioural advice. Outcome assessors will be blinded to the allocated treatment group. Primary Study Outcome: infant large for

  3. The Post-Discharge Network Coordination Programme (PDNC-P: A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of an intervention aimed at reducing rehospitalisations and improving mental health

    Michael Pascal Hengartner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a post-discharge intervention for psychiatric inpatients aimed at preventing hospital readmissions and at improving patients’ mental health and psychosocial functioning. Methods: RCT using parallel group block randomisation including 151 patients with ≤3 hospitalisations within the last three years, a GAF score ≤60, and aged 18–64 years, assessed at two psychiatric hospitals from the canton of Zurich, Switzerland, between September 2011 and February 2014. Primary outcomes were rate and duration of rehospitalisation; secondary outcomes were mental health and functioning. Outcome measures were assessed before discharge from the index hospitalisation (t0, 3 months after discharge when the intervention terminated (t1, and 12 months after discharge (t2. Participants received either a brief case management post-discharge intervention or treatment as usual.Results: In the short-term (i.e., t0-t1 no significant effect emerged in any outcome. In the long-term (i.e., t0-t2 the two groups did not differ significantly with respect to the rate and duration of rehospitalisation. Also, the intervention did not reduce psychiatric symptoms, did not improve social support and did not improve quality of life. However, it did slightly increase assessor-rated general (d=0.30 and social functioning (d=0.42, although self-reports revealed a deteriorative effect on symptom remission (d=-0.44.Conclusions: This psychosocial post-discharge intervention showed no efficacy in the primary outcome of rehospitalisation. With respect to secondary outcomes, in the long-term it might lead to slightly increased social functioning but revealed no significant effect on psychopathology, social support and quality of life. In contrast, with respect to self-reported symptom remission, it was revealed to have a negative effect. In this high-resource catchment area with comprehensive community psychiatric and social services the intervention

  4. The DiGEM trial protocol – a randomised controlled trial to determine the effect on glycaemic control of different strategies of blood glucose self-monitoring in people with type 2 diabetes [ISRCTN47464659

    Goyder Elizabeth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We do not yet know how to use blood glucose self-monitoring (BGSM most effectively in the self-management of type 2 diabetes treated with oral medication. Training in monitoring may be most effective in improving glycaemic control and well being when results are linked to behavioural change. Methods/design DiGEM is a three arm randomised parallel group trial set in UK general practices. A total of 450 patients with type 2 diabetes managed with lifestyle or oral glucose lowering medication are included. The trial compares effectiveness of three strategies for monitoring glycaemic control over 12 months (1 a control group with three monthly HbA1c measurements; interpreted with nurse-practitioner; (2 A self-testing of blood glucose group; interpreted with nurse- practitioner to inform adjustment of medication in addition to 1; (3 A self-monitoring of blood glucose group with personal use of results to interpret results in relation to lifestyle changes in addition to 1 and 2. The trial has an 80% power at a 5% level of significance to detect a difference in change in the primary outcome, HbA1c of 0.5% between groups, allowing for an attrition rate of 10%. Secondary outcome measures include health service costs, well-being, and the intervention effect in sub-groups defined by duration of diabetes, current management, health status at baseline and co-morbidity. A mediation analysis will explore the extent to which changes in beliefs about self-management of diabetes between experimental groups leads to changes in outcomes in accordance with the Common Sense Model of illness. The study is open and has recruited more than half the target sample. The trial is expected to report in 2007. Discussion The DiGEM intervention and trial design address weaknesses of previous research by use of a sample size with power to detect a clinically significant change in HbA1c, recruitment from a well-characterised primary care population, definition

  5. Protocol for “Seal or Varnish?” (SoV trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the relative cost and effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants and fluoride varnish in preventing dental decay

    Chestnutt Ivor Gordon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries remains a significant public health problem, prevalence being linked to social and economic deprivation. Occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars are the most susceptible site in the developing permanent dentition. Cochrane reviews have shown pit and fissure sealants (PFS and fluoride varnish (FV to be effective over no intervention in preventing caries. However, the comparative cost and effectiveness of these treatments is uncertain. The primary aim of the trial described in this protocol is to compare the clinical effectiveness of PFS and FV in preventing dental caries in first permanent molars in 6-7 year-olds. Secondary aims include: establishing the costs and the relative cost-effectiveness of PFS and FV delivered in a community/school setting; examining the impact of PFS and FV on children and their parents/carers in terms of quality of life/treatment acceptability measures; and examining the implementation of treatment in a community setting. Methods/design The trial design comprises a randomised, assessor-blinded, two-arm, parallel group trial in 6–7 year old schoolchildren. Clinical procedures and assessments will be performed at 66 primary schools, in deprived areas in South Wales. Treatments will be delivered via a mobile dental clinic. In total, 920 children will be recruited (460 per trial arm. At baseline and annually for 36 months dental caries will be recorded using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS by trained and calibrated dentists. PFS and FV will be applied by trained dental hygienists. The FV will be applied at baseline, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months. The PFS will be applied at baseline and re-examined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months, and will be re-applied if the existing sealant has become detached/is insufficient. The economic analysis will estimate the costs of providing the PFS versus FV. The process evaluation will assess implementation and

  6. Percutaneous vertebroplasty compared to conservative treatment in patients with painful acute or subacute osteoporotic vertebral fractures.Three months follow up in a clinical randomised study

    Rousing, Rikke

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Study design. Clinical randomised study.    Objective. The aim of this study is to compare PVP to conservative treatment of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures in a clinical randomised study with respect to pain, physical and mental outcome, and to asses the risk of adjacent f...

  7. Cognitive-behavioural therapy-based intervention to reduce fear of falling in older people: therapy development and randomised controlled trial - the Strategies for Increasing Independence, Confidence and Energy (STRIDE) study.

    Parry, Steve W; Bamford, Claire; Deary, Vincent; Finch, Tracy L; Gray, Jo; MacDonald, Claire; McMeekin, Peter; Sabin, Neil J; Steen, I Nick; Whitney, Sue L; McColl, Elaine M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Falls cause fear, anxiety and loss of confidence, resulting in activity avoidance, social isolation and increasing frailty. The umbrella term for these problems is 'fear of falling', seen in up to 85% of older adults who fall. Evidence of effectiveness of physical and psychological interventions is limited, with no previous studies examining the role of an individually delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) approach. OBJECTIVES Primary objective To develop and then determine the effectiveness of a new CBT intervention (CBTi) delivered by health-care assistants (HCAs) plus usual care compared with usual care alone in reducing fear of falling. Secondary objectives To measure the impact of the intervention on falls, injuries, functional abilities, anxiety/depression, quality of life, social participation and loneliness; investigate the acceptability of the intervention for patients, family members and professionals and factors that promote or inhibit its implementation; and measure the costs and benefits of the intervention. DESIGN Phase I CBTi development. Phase II Parallel-group patient randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the new CBTi plus usual care compared with usual care alone. SETTING Multidisciplinary falls services. PARTICIPANTS Consecutive community-dwelling older adults, both sexes, aged ≥ 60 years, with excessive or undue fear of falling per Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) score of > 23. INTERVENTIONS Phase I Development of the CBTi. The CBTi was developed following patient interviews and taught to HCAs to maximise the potential for uptake and generalisability to a UK NHS setting. Phase II RCT. The CBTi was delivered by HCAs weekly for 8 weeks, with a 6-month booster session plus usual care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES These were assessed at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. Primary outcome measure Fear of falling measured by change in FES-I scores at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures

  8. Open versus laparoscopic left lateral hepatic sectionectomy within an enhanced recovery ERAS® programme (ORANGE II – Trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    van Dam Ronald M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of lLaparoscopic liver resection in terms of time to functional recovery, length of hospital stay (LOS, long-term abdominal wall hernias, costs and quality of life (QOL has never been studied in a randomised controlled trial. Therefore, this is the subject of the international multicentre randomised controlled ORANGE II trial. Methods Patients eligible for left lateral sectionectomy (LLS of the liver will be recruited and randomised at the outpatient clinic. All randomised patients will undergo surgery in the setting of an ERAS programme. The experimental design produces two randomised arms (open and laparoscopic LLS and a prospective registry. The prospective registry will be based on patients that cannot be randomised because of the explicit treatment preference of the patient or surgeon, or because of ineligibility (not meeting the in- and exclusion criteria for randomisation in this trial. Therefore, all non-randomised patients undergoing LLS will be approached to participate in the prospective registry, thereby allowing acquisition of an uninterrupted prospective series of patients. The primary endpoint of the ORANGE II trial is time to functional recovery. Secondary endpoints are postoperative LOS, percentage readmission, (liver-specific morbidity, QOL, body image and cosmetic result, hospital and societal costs over 1 year, and long-term incidence of incisional hernias. It will be assumed that in patients undergoing laparoscopic LLS, length of hospital stay can be reduced by two days. A sample size of 55 patients in each randomisation arm has been calculated to detect a 2-day reduction in LOS (90% power and α = 0.05 (two-tailed. The ORANGE II trial is a multicenter randomised controlled trial that will provide evidence on the merits of laparoscopic surgery in patients undergoing LLS within an enhanced recovery ERAS programme. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00874224.

  9. Randomised placebo controlled multicentre trial to assess short term clarithromycin for patients with stable coronary heart disease: CLARICOR trial

    Jespersen, Christian M; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Damgaard, Morten;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the macrolide clarithromycin affects mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Centrally randomised multicentre trial. All parties at all stages were blinded. Analyses were by intention to treat. SETTING: Five Copenha...... patients with stable coronary heart disease may cause significantly higher cardiovascular mortality. The long term safety of clarithromycin in patients with stable ischaemic heart disease should be examined. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00121550.......OBJECTIVE: To determine if the macrolide clarithromycin affects mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Centrally randomised multicentre trial. All parties at all stages were blinded. Analyses were by intention to treat. SETTING: Five...... Copenhagen University cardiology departments and a coordinating centre. PARTICIPANTS: 13,702 patients aged 18 to 85 years who had a discharge diagnosis of myocardial infarction or angina pectoris in 1993-9 and alive in August 1999 were invited by letter; 4373 were randomised. INTERVENTIONS: Two weeks...

  10. The OPERA trial: protocol for a randomised trial of an exercise intervention for older people in residential and nursing accommodation

    Taylor Stephanie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is common in residents of Residential and Nursing homes (RNHs. It is usually undetected and often undertreated. Depression is associated with poor outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise has potential to improve depression, and has been shown in existing trials to improve outcomes among younger and older people. Existing evidence comes from trials that are short, underpowered and not from RNH settings. The aim of the OPERA trial is to establish whether exercise is effective in reducing the prevalence of depression among older RNH residents. Method OPERA is a cluster randomised controlled trial. RNHs are randomised to one of two groups with interventions lasting 12 months Intervention group: a depression awareness and physical activity training session for care home staff, plus a whole home physical activation programme including twice weekly physiotherapist-led exercise groups. The intervention lasts for one year from randomisation, or Control group: a depression awareness training session for care home staff. Participants are people aged 65 or over who are free of severe cognitive impairment and willing to participate in the study. Our primary outcome is the prevalence of depressive symptoms, a GDS-15 score of five or more, in all participants at the end of the one year intervention period. Our secondary depression outcomes include remission of depressive symptoms and change in GDS-15 scores in those with depressive symptoms prior to randomisation. Other secondary outcomes include, fear of falling, mobility, fractures, pain, cognition, costs and health related quality of life. We aimed to randomise 77 RNHs. Discussion Home recruitment was completed in May 2010; 78 homes have been randomised. Follow up will finish in May 2011 and results will be available late 2011. Trial Registration [ISRCTN: ISRCTN43769277

  11. Study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: combined multimarker screening and randomised patient treatment with ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE)

    O'Gorman, Neil; Wright, David; Rolnik, Daniel L; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Poon, Liona C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pre-eclampsia (PE) affects 2–3% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin in women at risk for PE may substantially reduce the prevalence of the disease. Effective screening for PE requiring delivery before 37 weeks (preterm PE) can be provided by a combination of maternal factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and placental growth factor at 11–13 weeks' gestation, with a detection rate of 75% at a false-positive rate of 10%. We present a protocol (V.6, date 25 January 2016) for the ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE) trial, which is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial (RCT) that uses an effective PE screening programme to determine whether low-dose aspirin given to women from 11 to 13 weeks' gestation will reduce the incidence of preterm PE. Methods and analysis All eligible women attending for their first trimester scan will be invited to participate in the screening study for preterm PE. Those found to be at high risk of developing preterm PE will be invited to participate in the RCT. Further scans will be conducted for assessment of fetal growth and biomarkers. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes will be collected and analysed. The first enrolment for the pilot study was in April 2014. As of April 2016, 26 670 women have been screened and 1760 recruited to the RCT. The study is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry. Trial registration number ISRCTN13633058. PMID:27354081

  12. No effect on performance tests from a neuromuscular warm-up programme in youth female football: a randomised controlled trial

    Lindblom, Hanna; Waldén, Markus; Hägglund, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present randomised controlled trial was to study the effect of a neuromuscular warm-up programme on performance tests in youth female football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFour youth female football teams with players aged 12-16 years were randomised into an intervention group and control group. The intervention was a 15-min neuromuscular warm-up programme carried out twice a week during the 11-week study period. Baseline and follow-up measurements of p...

  13. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of group psychoeducation versus group support in the maintenance of bipolar disorder

    Roberts Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-didactically delivered curriculum based group psychoeducation has been shown to be more effective than both group support in a specialist mood disorder centre in Spain (with effects lasting up to five years, and treatment as usual in Australia. It is unclear whether the specific content and form of group psychoeducation is effective or the chance to meet and work collaboratively with other peers. The main objective of this trial is to determine whether curriculum based group psychoeducation is more clinically and cost effective than unstructured peer group support. Methods/design Single blind two centre cluster randomised controlled trial of 21 sessions group psychoeducation versus 21 sessions group peer support in adults with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder, not in current episode but relapsed in the previous two years. Individual randomisation is to either group at each site. The groups are carefully matched for the number and type of therapists, length and frequency of the interventions and overall aim of the groups but differ in content and style of delivery. The primary outcome is time to next bipolar episode with measures of the therapeutic process, barriers and drivers to the effective delivery of the interventions and economic analysis. Follow up is for 96 weeks after randomisation. Discussion The trial has features of both an efficacy and an effectiveness trial design. For generalisability in England it is set in routine public mental health practice with a high degree of expert patient involvement. Trial Registration ISRCTN62761948 Funding National Institute for Health Research, England.

  14. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME therapy following stroke

    Stokes Emma

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744

  15. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; Stokes, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s) assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744) PMID:18570643

  16. Educational outreach to general practitioners reduces children's asthma symptoms: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Sladden Michael

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood asthma is common in Cape Town, a province of South Africa, but is underdiagnosed by general practitioners. Medications are often prescribed inappropriately, and care is episodic. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of educational outreach to general practitioners on asthma symptoms of children in their practice. Methods This is a cluster randomised trial with general practices as the unit of intervention, randomisation, and analysis. The setting is Mitchells Plain (population 300,000, a dormitory town near Cape Town. Solo general practitioners, without nurse support, operate from storefront practices. Caregiver-reported symptom data were collected for 318 eligible children (2 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma, who were attending general practitioners in Mitchells Plain. One year post-intervention follow-up data were collected for 271 (85% of these children in all 43 practices. Practices randomised to intervention (21 received two 30-minute educational outreach visits by a trained pharmacist who left materials describing key interventions to improve asthma care. Intervention and control practices received the national childhood asthma guideline. Asthma severity was measured in a parent-completed survey administered through schools using a symptom frequency and severity scale. We compared intervention and control group children on the change in score from pre-to one-year post-intervention. Results Symptom scores declined an additional 0.84 points in the intervention vs. control group (on a nine-point scale. p = 0.03. For every 12 children with asthma exposed to a doctor allocated to the intervention, one extra child will have substantially reduced symptoms. Conclusion Educational outreach was accepted by general practitioners and was effective. It could be applied to other health care quality problems in this setting.

  17. Treatment of acute diverticulitis laparoscopic lavage vs. resection (DILALA: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Rosenberg Jacob

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perforated diverticulitis is a condition associated with substantial morbidity. Recently published reports suggest that laparoscopic lavage has fewer complications and shorter hospital stay. So far no randomised study has published any results. Methods DILALA is a Scandinavian, randomised trial, comparing laparoscopic lavage (LL to the traditional Hartmann's Procedure (HP. Primary endpoint is the number of re-operations within 12 months. Secondary endpoints consist of mortality, quality of life (QoL, re-admission, health economy assessment and permanent stoma. Patients are included when surgery is required. A laparoscopy is performed and if Hinchey grade III is diagnosed the patient is included and randomised 1:1, to either LL or HP. Patients undergoing LL receive > 3L of saline intraperitoneally, placement of pelvic drain and continued antibiotics. Follow-up is scheduled 6-12 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. A QoL-form is filled out on discharge, 6- and 12 months. Inclusion is set to 80 patients (40+40. Discussion HP is associated with a high rate of complication. Not only does the primary operation entail complications, but also subsequent surgery is associated with a high morbidity. Thus the combined risk of treatment for the patient is high. The aim of the DILALA trial is to evaluate if laparoscopic lavage is a safe, minimally invasive method for patients with perforated diverticulitis Hinchey grade III, resulting in fewer re-operations, decreased morbidity, mortality, costs and increased quality of life. Trial registration British registry (ISRCTN for clinical trials ISRCTN82208287http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN82208287

  18. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Forster Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness of a 12 week exercise intervention (the HOPE programme designed to improve the mobility and functional abilities of frail older people living at home, compared with usual care. The primary outcome is the timed-up-and-go test (TUGT, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes include the Barthel Index of activities of daily living (ADL, EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D quality of life measure and the geriatric depression scale (GDS, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. We will record baseline frailty using the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS, record falls and document muscle/joint pain. We will test the feasibility of collection of data to identify therapy resources required for delivery of the intervention. Discussion The HOPE trial will explore and evaluate a home-based exercise intervention for frail older people. Although previous RCTs have used operationalised, non-validated methods of measuring frailty, the HOPE trial is, to our knowledge, the first RCT of an exercise intervention for frail older people that includes a validated method of frailty assessment at baseline. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57066881

  19. Epoetin alfa in platinum-treated ovarian cancer patients: results of a multinational, multicentre, randomised trial

    Wilkinson, P. M.; Antonopoulos, M; Lahousen, M; Lind, M.; Kosmidis, P

    2006-01-01

    This multicentre, open-label, controlled clinical trial assessed the effects of epoetin alfa treatment on haematologic and quality of life (QOL) parameters in 182 anaemic (Hb⩽12 g dl−1) ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum chemotherapy. Patients were randomised 2 : 1 to receive epoetin alfa 10 000–20 000 IU three times weekly plus best standard treatment (BST) or BST only. Main study end points were changes from baseline in haemoglobin (Hb) level, transfusion requirements, and QOL. For ...

  20. Low-dose prednisone chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised clinical trial (CAPRA-2)

    Buttgereit, Frank; Mehta, Daksha; Kirwan, John; Szechinski, Jacek; Boers, Maarten; Alten, Rieke E; Supronik, Jerzy; Szombati, Istvan; Romer, Ulrike; Witte, Stephan; Saag, Kenneth G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of low-dose prednisone chronotherapy using a new modified-release (MR) formulation for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients with active RA (n=350) were randomised 2:1 to receive MR prednisone 5 mg or placebo once daily in the evening in addition to their existing RA disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment. The primary end point was the percentage of patie...

  1. Randomised Clinical Efficacy Trial of Topiramate and Nitrazepam in Treatment of Infantile Spasms

    Razieh FALLAH; SALOR, Fahimah; Sedighah Akhavan Karbasi; Hadi Motaghipisheh

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Fallah R, Salor F, Akhavan Karbasi S, Motaghipisheh H. Randomised Clinical Efficacy Trial of Topiramate and Nitrazepam in Treatment of Infantile Spasms. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):12-19.ObjectiveInfantile spasms (IS) are among the most catastrophic epileptic syndromes of infancy. The purpose of this study was to compare efficacy and safety of topiramate (TPM) and nitrazepam (NZP) as first-line drugs in the treatment ofIS.Materials & MethodsIn a parall...

  2. Randomised comparison of early versus late induction of labour in post-term pregnancy.

    Augensen, K; Bergsjø, P; Eikeland, T; Askvik, K; Carlsen, J.

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective randomised study of mothers referred for prolonged pregnancy (around the 42nd week) 214 (group 1) were submitted to attempted induction of labour and 195 (group 2) assigned to continue for a further week without intervention. Strict selection criteria were used for the certainty of term. Mothers in group 2 were given regular non-stress tests to ensure fetal wellbeing, as were those in group 1 in whom induction failed. In group 1, 48 (23%) out of 210 first attempted inductions...

  3. Children, parents, and pets exercising together (CPET randomised controlled trial: study rationale, design, and methods

    Yam Philippa S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objectively measured physical activity is low in British children, and declines as childhood progresses. Observational studies suggest that dog-walking might be a useful approach to physical activity promotion in children and adults, but there are no published public health interventions based on dog-walking with children. The Children, Parents, and Pets Exercising Together Study aims to develop and evaluate a theory driven, generalisable, family-based, dog walking intervention for 9-11 year olds. Methods/design The Children, Parents, and Pets Exercising Together Study is an exploratory, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial as defined in the UK MRC Framework on the development and evaluation of complex interventions in public health. The trial will follow CONSORT guidance. Approximately 40 dog-owning families will be allocated randomly in a ratio of 1.5:1 to receive a simple behavioural intervention lasting for 10 weeks or to a 'waiting list' control group. The primary outcome is change in objectively measured child physical activity using Actigraph accelerometry. Secondary outcomes in the child, included in part to shape a future more definitive randomised controlled trial, are: total time spent sedentary and patterning of sedentary behaviour (Actigraph accelerometry; body composition and bone health from dual energy x-ray absorptiometry; body weight, height and BMI; and finally, health-related quality of life using the PedsQL. Secondary outcomes in parents and dogs are: changes in body weight; changes in Actigraph accelerometry measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour. Process evaluation will consist of assessment of simultaneous child, parent, and dog accelerometry data and brief interviews with participating families. Discussion The Children, Parents, and Pets Exercising Together trial should be the first randomised controlled study to establish and evaluate an intervention aimed at dog-based physical

  4. Effect of regular exercise on prevention of excessive weight gain in pregnancy: a randomised controlled trial

    Haakstad, Lene Annette Hagen; Bø, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether a 12-week supervised exercise-programme with an additional 30 min of moderate self-imposed physical activity on the non-supervised weekdays prevents excessive weight gain in pregnancy, as well as postpartum weight retention. Methods: One hundred and five sedentary, nulliparous pregnant women with a mean age of 30.7 ± 4.0 years and a pre-pregnancy body mass index of 23.8 ± 4.3 kg/m2 were randomised to either an exercise group (EG, n = 52) or a control group (C...

  5. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials:Probiotics for functional constipation

    Anna; Chmielewska; Hania; Szajewska

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To systematically evaluate and update evidence on the efficacy and safety of probiotic supplementation for the treatment of constipation. METHODS:The MEDLINE,EMBASE,CINAHL,and Cochrane Library databases were searched in May 2009 for randomised controlled trials(RCTs)performed in paediatric or adult populations related to the study aim. RESULTS:We included five RCTs with a total of 377 subjects(194 in the experimental group and 183 in the control group).The participants were adults (three RCTs,n=266)and ...

  6. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-01-01

    , using state of the art methodology, in order to test the clinical impact of using the SARI for preoperative airway assessment compared with a clinical judgement based on usual practice for airway assessment. Finally, to test if implementation of the SARI would reduce the proportion of unanticipated...... techniques in SARI departments reached statistical significance, p = 0.29 and p = 0.06 respectively. The papers constituting this thesis demonstrate that at high proportion of airway management difficulties are unanticipated. In a cluster randomised trial it was not possible to reduce the proportion of...

  7. Post-Operative Benefits of Animal-Assisted Therapy in Pediatric Surgery: A Randomised Study

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Palestrini, Clara; De Giorgis, Valentina; Raschetti, Roberto; Tumminelli, Massimiliano; Mencherini, Simonetta; Papotti, Francesca; Klersy, Catherine; Albertini, Riccardo; Ostuni, Selene; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period. Patients and Methods Forty children (3–17 years) were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underw...

  8. Randomised, controlled study of intratumoral recombinant gamma-interferon treatment in newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Färkkilä, M; Jääskeläinen, J.; Kallio, M. (Miki); Blomstedt, G.; Raininko, R; Virkkunen, P.; Paetau, A.; Sarelin, H.; Mäntylä, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of intratumoral recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) as adjuvant to open cytoreduction and external irradiation of 60 Gy on survival in adults with a newly diagnosed high-grade cerebral glioma was studied. The patients were randomised during surgery into the rIFN-gamma group (n = 14) or the control group (n = 17), and the latter received a subcutaneous reservoir of rIFN-gamma injections. Intratumoral rIFN-gamma was given three times a week for 4 weeks until radiotherapy, escal...

  9. GENetic and clinical Predictors Of treatment response in Depression: the GenPod randomised trial protocol

    O'Donovan Michael

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most effective pharmacological treatments for depression inhibit the transporters that reuptake serotonin (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors – SSRIs and noradrenaline (Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors – NaRIs into the presynaptic terminal. There is evidence to suggest that noradrenaline and serotonin enhancing drugs work through separate mechanisms to produce their clinical antidepressant action. Although most of the current evidence suggests there is little difference in overall efficacy between SSRIs and NaRIs, there are patients who respond to one class of compounds and not another. This suggests that treatment response could be predicted by genetic and/or clinical characteristics. Firstly, this study aims to investigate the influence of a polymorphism (SLC6A4 in the 5HT transporter in altering response to SSRI medication. Secondly, the study will investigate whether those with more severe depression have a better response to NaRIs than SSRIs. Methods/design The GenPod trial is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. GPs referred patients aged between 18–74 years presenting with a new episode of depression, who did not have any medical contraindications to antidepressant medication and who had no history of psychosis or alcohol/substance abuse. Patients were interviewed to ascertain their suitability for the study. Eligible participants (with a primary diagnosis of depression according to ICD10 criteria and a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score > 14 were randomised to receive one of two antidepressant treatments, either the SSRI Citalopram or the NaRI Reboxetine, stratified according to severity. The final number randomised to the trial was 601. Follow-up assessments took place at 2, 6 and 12 weeks following randomisation. Primary outcome was measured at 6 weeks by the BDI. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis and will use multiple regression models to compare treatments

  10. Randomised in situ trial on the effect of milk and CPP-ACP on dental erosion

    Wiegand, Annette; Attin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This randomised in situ study aimed to analyse the effect of milk (with or without 5ppm F) and CPP-ACP pastes (with or without 900ppm F) on dental erosion. METHODS The study was a seven phase (5 days each) crossover design involving 15 participants wearing intraoral appliances with enamel and dentine specimens. Specimens were extraorally eroded (erosive soft drink, 6×90s/day) and brushed (2×30s/day, 2N) using a non-fluoridated toothpaste (negative control). The test products wer...

  11. Psychotherapy with traumatised refugees – the design of a randomised clinical trial

    Vindbjerg, Erik; Carlsson, Jessica Mariana; Klimpke, Christoph Axel

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence as to which kind of psychotherapy is the most effective in the treatment of traumatised refugees. At the Competence Center for  Transcultural Psychiatry, a series of clinical trials have been conducted since 2008. The first results are pending publication. The aim...... of this paper is to discuss some of the challenges in adapting Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to the treatment of traumatised refugees, as well as describe a randomised clinical trial designed to test two such adaptations. In the described trial one group receives CBT with a focus on cognitive...

  12. Randomised, double blind trial of two loading dose regimens of diamorphine in ventilated newborn infants.

    Barker, D. P.; Simpson, J.; Pawula, M.; Barrett, D A; Shaw, P N; N. Rutter

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the safety and efficacy of two loading doses of diamorphine in 27 ventilated newborn infants in a randomised double blind trial. METHODS--Fifty or 200 mcg/kg were infused intravenously over 30 minutes, followed by a 15 mcg/kg/hour continuous infusion. Serial measurements were made of physiology, behaviour, and stress hormones. RESULTS--Both loading doses produced small but significant falls in blood pressure. The 200 mcg/kg dose produced greater respiratory depression, and tw...

  13. Xylitol chewing gum in prevention of acute otitis media: double blind randomised trial.

    Uhari, M.; Kontiokari, T; Koskela, M.; Niemelä, M. (Mika)

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether xylitol, which reduces the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae, might have clinical importance in the prevention of acute otitis media. DESIGN: A double blind randomised trial with xylitol administered in chewing gum. SETTING: Eleven day care nurseries in the city of Oulu. Most of the children had had problems with recurrent acute otitis media. SUBJECTS: 306 day care children: 149 children in the sucrose group (76 boys; mean (SD) age 4.9 (1.5) years) and 157 in th...

  14. The significance of clinical experience on learning outcome from resuscitation training-a randomised controlled study

    Jensen, Morten Lind; Lippert, Freddy; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus;

    2009-01-01

    retention of learning. Materials and methods: This was a prospective single blinded randomised controlled study of the learning outcome from a standard ALS course on a volunteer sample of the entire cohort of newly graduated doctors from Copenhagen University. The outcome measurement was ALS...... immediately following graduation. Results: Invitation to participate was accepted by 154/240 (64%) graduates and 117/154 (76%) completed the study. There was no difference between the intervention and control groups with regard to the imme- diate learning outcome. The intervention group had significantly...... small but statistically significant impact on the retention of learning, but not on the immediate learning outcome....

  15. A randomised controlled trial among cleaners--effects on strength, balance and kinesiophobia

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Ektor-Andersen, John; Sjøgaard, Gisela;

    2011-01-01

    was to evaluate the effects of a 3-month workplace trial with interventions to improve physical or cognitive behavioural resources among cleaners. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted among 294 female cleaners from 9 workplaces. The participants were allocated to three groups: Physical...... coordination training (PCT, n = 95), Cognitive behavioural theory-based training (CBTr, n = 99) and Reference group (REF, n = 100). Interventions were conducted during work hours for an average of 1 hour/week. Muscle strength was measured by maximal voluntary contractions in trunk/extension, and shoulder...

  16. Photoageing Intervention ( PAINT: A proposal for a randomised controlled trial in Australian Primary Care

    Oksana Burford

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The adverse health impacts of tobacco smoking are adrain on national resources. This study will test anintervention to promote smoking cessation among youngadults aged 18-30years. The intervention will be deliveredwithin two settings in Australian health care; communitypharmacies and general practice. The new study builds onthe pilot data, reported here, which inform the feasibility,recruitment strategy, outcome measure, effect size andattrition rate. The new study is a randomised controlledtrial with 200 clients recruited from general practice andcommunity pharmacies in Western Australia.

  17. Telehealth for patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease: pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    Salisbury, Chris; O’Cathain, Alicia; Thomas, Clare; Edwards, Louisa; Gaunt, Daisy; Dixon, Padraig; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Nicholl, Jon; Large, Shirley; Yardley, Lucy; Fahey, Tom; Foster, Alexis; Garner, Katy; Horspool, Kimberley; Man, Mei-See

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether non-clinical staff can effectively manage people at high risk of cardiovascular disease using digital health technologies. Design Pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Setting 42 general practices in three areas of England. Participants Between 3 December 2012 and 23 July 2013 we recruited 641 adults aged 40 to 74 years with a 10 year cardiovascular disease risk of 20% or more, no previous cardiovascular event, at least one modifiable risk factor (sy...

  18. PEER D5.3 USAGE STUDY Randomised controlled trial results

    Rowlands, Ian; Clark, David; Nicholas, David

    2012-01-01

    This report reviews the findings of an experiment to measure the effect of exposing early article versions in repositories on downloads of the version of record at various publishers' web sites. The research design used was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) involving 18,062 articles from 135 journals and 254,721 publisher downloads. 7,183 preprints were randomly allocated to a control group and temporarily withdrawn from four PEER repositories for a period of three months. Articles were all...

  19. Visibility aids for pedestrians and cyclists: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Kwan, Irene; Mapstone, James

    2004-05-01

    This study aims to quantify the effect of visibility aids on the occurrence of pedestrian and cyclist-motor vehicle collisions and injuries, and drivers' responses in detection and recognition. Trial reports were systematically reviewed according to predefined eligibility criteria, including randomised controlled trials or controlled before-and-after trials comparing visibility aids and no visibility aids, and of different visibility aids on pedestrian and cyclist safety, and drivers' responses in detection and recognition. This included trials in which the order of interventions was randomised, or balanced using a Latin square design. Two reviewers independently assessed validity of trials and abstracted data. The main outcome measures were pedestrian and cyclist-motor vehicle collisions and injuries, and drivers'/observers' responses in the detection and recognition time, distance and frequency. No trials which assessed the effect of visibility aids on pedestrian and cyclist-motor vehicle collisions and injuries were identified. Twelve trials examined the effectiveness of daytime visibility aids and 25 trials on night time visibility aids, including 882 participants. Drivers' and observers' detection and recognition improved with visibility aids. For daytime, fluorescent materials in yellow, red and orange colours enhanced detection and recognition. "Biomotion" markings enhanced recognition. Substantial heterogeneity between the trials limits the possibility for meta-analysis. Visibility aids have the potential to improve detection and recognition and would merit further development to gain public acceptance. However, the impact of visibility aids on pedestrian and cyclist safety is unknown and needs to be determined. PMID:15003574

  20. Intelligence and persisting with medication for two years: Analysis in a randomised controlled trial.

    Deary, Ian J; Gale, Catharine R; Stewart, Marlene C W; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Murray, Gordon D; Batty, G David; Price, Jacqueline F

    2009-11-01

    The study examined whether verbal intelligence is associated with persisting to take medication for up to two years. The design is a prospective follow-up of compliance with taking medication in high-risk individuals participating in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial set in Central Scotland. Participants were 1993 people aged between 50 and 77 years with an ankle brachial index intelligence was associated with a greater likelihood of continuing to take medication up to two years after randomisation. For a standard deviation increase in Mill Hill Vocabulary Scale score, risk of stopping medication in the first two years of the study was 0.75 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.87, p intelligence is associated with continuing, medium-to-long term engagement with health self-care, even in the face of uncertainty about whether active treatment is being received, whether the treatment is known to be effective in general, and whether it will be helpful to the individual taking it. Such persisting with potentially helpful health behaviours in the face of uncertainty might partly explain why people with higher intelligence live longer and suffer less morbidity from chronic diseases. PMID:19907664

  1. Study Protocol: Screening and Treatment of Alcohol-Related Trauma (START – a randomised controlled trial

    Jayaraj Rama

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of mandibular fractures in the Northern Territory of Australia is very high, especially among Indigenous people. Alcohol intoxication is implicated in the majority of facial injuries, and substance use is therefore an important target for secondary prevention. The current study tests the efficacy of a brief therapy, Motivational Care Planning, in improving wellbeing and substance misuse in youth and adults hospitalised with alcohol-related facial trauma. Methods and design The study is a randomised controlled trial with 6 months of follow-up, to examine the effectiveness of a brief and culturally adapted intervention in improving outcomes for trauma patients with at-risk drinking admitted to the Royal Darwin Hospital maxillofacial surgery unit. Potential participants are identified using AUDIT-C questionnaire. Eligible participants are randomised to either Motivational Care Planning (MCP or Treatment as Usual (TAU. The outcome measures will include quantity and frequency of alcohol and other substance use by Timeline Followback. The recruitment target is 154 participants, which with 20% dropout, is hoped to provide 124 people receiving treatment and follow-up. Discussion This project introduces screening and brief interventions for high-risk drinkers admitted to the hospital with facial trauma. It introduces a practical approach to integrating brief interventions in the hospital setting, and has potential to demonstrate significant benefits for at-risk drinkers with facial trauma. Trial Registration The trial has been registered in Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR and Trial Registration: ACTRN12611000135910.

  2. Anteroposterior glide versus rotating platform low contact stress (LCS knee arthroplasty: a randomised controlled trial

    Wynn-Jones Charles

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fifty thousand knee replacements are performed annually in the UK at an estimated cost of £150 million. Post-operative improvement depends on a number of factors including implant design and patient associated factors. To our knowledge there are no published study's comparing the results of AP glide and rotating platform designs of LCS knee arthroplasty. Therefore we feel that a study is required to investigate and compare the effects of two types of LCS total knee arthroplasty on joint proprioception and range of motion. Methods/Design Patients will be randomised to receive either a LCS AP glide or Rotating platform prosthesis. Clinical scores (Oxford knee score, American knee society score, EuroQol, range of motion and proprioception will be assessed prior to and at 3,6, 12 and 24 months after the operation. Proprioception will be assessed in terms of absolute error angle (mean difference between the target angle and the response angle. Knee angles will be measured in degrees using an electromagnetic tracking device, Polhemus 3Space Fastrak that detects positions of sensors placed on the test limb. Student's t-test will be used to compare the mean of two groups. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the best prosthesis to use for patients undergoing total knee replacement. This pragmatic randomised trial will test the null hypothesis that anteroposterior glide LCS knee arthroplasty does not result in better post operative knee motion and proprioception as compared to rotating platform LCS knee. Trial Registration ISRCTN52943804

  3. Internet-based search of randomised trials relevant to mental health originating in the Arab world

    Adams Clive E

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is becoming a widely used source of accessing medical research through various on-line databases. This instant access to information is of benefit to busy clinicians and service users around the world. The population of the Arab World is comparable to that of the United States, yet it is widely believed to have a greatly contrasting output of randomised controlled trials related to mental health. This study was designed to investigate the existence of such research in the Arab World and also to investigate the availability of this research on-line. Methods Survey of findings from three internet-based potential sources of randomised trials originating from the Arab world and relevant to mental health care. Results A manual search of an Arabic online current contents service identified 3 studies, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO searches identified only 1 study, and a manual search of a specifically indexed, study-based mental health database, PsiTri, revealed 27 trials. Conclusion There genuinely seem to be few trials from the Arab world and accessing these on-line was problematic. Replication of some studies that guide psychiatric/psychological practice in the Arab world would seem prudent.

  4. Preventing hypothermia in elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery patients: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Duff Jed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery frequently experience periods of inadvertent hypothermia. This common perioperative problem has been linked to adverse patient outcomes such as myocardial ischaemia, surgical site infection and coagulopathy. International perioperative guidelines recommend patient warming, using a forced air warming device, and the use of warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions for the prevention of hypothermia in at-risk patient groups. This trial will investigate the effect of these interventions on patients’ temperature, thermal comfort, and total recovery time. Method/Design The trial will employ a randomised 2 x 2 factorial design. Eligible patients will be stratified by anaesthetist and block randomised into one of four groups: Group one will receive preoperative warming with a forced air warming device; group two will receive warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions; group three will receive both preoperative warming and warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions; and group four will receive neither intervention. Participants in all four groups will receive active intraoperative warming with a forced air warming device. The primary outcome measures are postoperative temperature, thermal comfort, and total recovery time. Primary outcomes will undergo a two-way analysis of variance controlling for covariants such as operating room ambient temperature and volume of intraoperative irrigation solution. Discussion This trial is designed to confirm the effectiveness of these interventions at maintaining perioperative normothermia and to evaluate if this translates into improved patient outcomes. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12610000591055

  5. Physical Activity Counselling during Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with COPD: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Chris Burtin

    Full Text Available Pulmonary rehabilitation programs only modestly enhance daily physical activity levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This randomised controlled trial investigates the additional effect of an individual activity counselling program during pulmonary rehabilitation on physical activity levels in patients with moderate to very severe COPD.Eighty patients (66 ± 7 years, 81% male, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 45 ± 16% of predicted referred for a six-month multidisciplinary pulmonary rehabilitation program were randomised. The intervention group was offered an additional eight-session activity counselling program. The primary outcomes were daily walking time and time spent in at least moderate intense activities.Baseline daily walking time was similar in the intervention and control group (median 33 [interquartile range 16-47] vs 29 [17-44] whereas daily time spent in at least moderate intensity was somewhat higher in the intervention group (17[4-50] vs 12[2-26] min. No significant intervention*time interaction effects were observed in daily physical activity levels. In the whole group, daily walking time and time spent in at least moderate intense activities did not significantly change over time.The present study identified no additional effect of eight individual activity counselling sessions during pulmonary rehabilitation to enhance physical activity levels in patients with COPD.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00948623.

  6. A randomised trial of nutrient supplements to minimise psychological stress after a natural disaster.

    Kaplan, Bonnie J; Rucklidge, Julia J; Romijn, Amy R; Dolph, Michael

    2015-08-30

    After devastating flooding in southern Alberta in June 2013, we attempted to replicate a New Zealand randomised trial that showed that micronutrient (minerals, vitamins) consumption after the earthquakes of 2010-11 resulted in improved mental health. Residents of southern Alberta were invited to participate in a study on the potential benefit of nutrient supplements following a natural disaster. Fifty-six adults aged 23-66 were randomised to receive a single nutrient (vitamin D, n=17), a few-nutrients formula (B-Complex, n=21), or a broad-spectrum mineral/vitamin formula (BSMV, n=18). Self-reported changes in depression, anxiety and stress were monitored for six weeks. Although all groups showed substantial decreases on all measures, those consuming the B-Complex and the BSMV formulas showed significantly greater improvement in stress and anxiety compared with those consuming the single nutrient, with large effect sizes (Cohen's d range 0.76-1.08). There were no group differences between those consuming the B-Complex and BSMV. The use of nutrient formulas with multiple minerals and/or vitamins to minimise stress associated with natural disasters is now supported by three studies. Further research should be carried out to evaluate the potential population benefit that might accrue if such formulas were distributed as a post-disaster public health measure. PMID:26154816

  7. Brachytherapy and percutaneous stenting in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma: A prospective randomised study

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiation therapy including intraluminal brachyterapy with iridium-192 on survival of patients with malignant biliary strictures (cholangiocarcinoma, histologically improved) treated with metallic stent in a prospective randomised study. Method and materials: In the prospective randomised study, 21 patients with cholangiocarcinoma were treated with implantation of percutaneous stents followed with intraluminal Ir-192 brachytherapy (mean dose 30 Gy) and external radiotherapy (mean dose 50 Gy) and 21 patients were treated only with stents insertion. We did not find any statistically significant differences in age and tumor localization between these two groups of patients. Results: All the patients died. In the group of patients treated with brachytherapy and with stent implantation, the mean survival time was 387.9 days. In the group of patients treated only with stent insertion the mean survival was 298 days. In effort to eliminate possible effect of external radiotherapy we treated the control group of eight patients with cholangiocarcinoma by stent insertion and brachyterapy only. Conclusion: Our results show that combined radiation therapy could extend the survival in the patients with cholangiocarcinoma obstruction

  8. Randomised double-blind comparative study of dexmedetomidine and tramadol for post-spinal anaesthesia shivering

    Geeta Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dexmedetomidine (α2 adrenergic agonist has been used for prevention of post anaesthesia shivering. Its use for the treatment of post-spinal anaesthesia shivering has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy, haemodynamic and adverse effects of dexmedetomidine with those of tramadol, when used for control of post-spinal anaesthesia shivering. Methods: A prospective, randomised, and double-blind study was conducted in 50 American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grade I and II patients of either gender, aged between 18 and 65 years, scheduled for various surgical procedures under spinal anaesthesia. The patients were randomised in two groups of 25 patients each to receive either dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg or tramadol 0.5 mg/kg as a slow intravenous bolus. Grade of shivering, onset of shivering, time for cessation of shivering, recurrence, response rate, and adverse effects were observed at scheduled intervals. Unpaired t-test was used for analysing the data. Results: Time taken for cessation of shivering was significantly less with dexmedetomidine when compared to tramadol. Nausea and vomiting was observed only in tramadol group (28% and; 20% respectively. There was not much difference in the sedation profile of both the drugs. Conclusion: We conclude that although both drugs are effective, the time taken for cessation of shivering is less with dexmedetomidine when compared to tramadol. Moreover, dexmedetomidine has negligible adverse effects, whereas tramadol is associated with significant nausea and vomiting.

  9. Cognitive therapy for internalised stigma in people experiencing psychosis: A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Morrison, Anthony P; Burke, Eilish; Murphy, Elizabeth; Pyle, Melissa; Bowe, Samantha; Varese, Filippo; Dunn, Graham; Chapman, Nicola; Hutton, Paul; Welford, Mary; Wood, Lisa J

    2016-06-30

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of Cognitive Therapy (CT) as an intervention for internalised stigma in people with psychosis. We conducted a single-blind randomised controlled pilot trial comparing CT plus treatment as usual (TAU) with TAU only. Participants were assessed at end of treatment (4 months) and follow-up (7 months). Twenty-nine participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were randomised. CT incorporated up to 12 sessions over 4 months (mean sessions=9.3). Primary outcome was the Internalised Stigma of Mental Illness Scale - Revised (ISMI-R) total score, which provides a continuous measure of internalised stigma associated with mental health problems. Secondary outcomes included self-rated recovery, internalised shame, emotional problems, hopelessness and self-esteem. Recruitment rates and retention for this trial were good. Changes in outcomes were analysed following the intention-to-treat principle, using ANCOVAs adjusted for baseline symptoms. There was no effect on our primary outcome, with a sizable reduction observed in both groups, but several secondary outcomes were significantly improved in the group assigned to CT, in comparison with TAU, including internalised shame, hopelessness and self-rated recovery. Stigma-focused CT appears feasible and acceptable in people with psychosis who have high levels of internalised stigma. A larger, definitive trial is required. PMID:27092862

  10. A prospective randomised controlled trial comparing three alternative bearing surfaces in primary total hip replacement.

    Nikolaou, V S; Edwards, M R; Bogoch, E; Schemitsch, E H; Waddell, J P

    2012-04-01

    The ideal bearing surface for young patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) remains controversial. We report the five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical and radiological outcomes of 102 THRs in 91 patients who were < 65 years of age. These patients were randomised to receive a cobalt-chrome on ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, cobalt-chrome on highly cross-linked polyethylene, or a ceramic-on-ceramic bearing. In all, 97 hip replacements in 87 patients were available for review at five years. Two hips had been revised, one for infection and one for peri-prosthetic fracture. At the final follow-up there were no significant differences between the groups for the mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (pain, p = 0.543; function, p = 0.10; stiffness, p = 0.99), Short Form-12 (physical component, p = 0.878; mental component, p = 0.818) or Harris hip scores (p = 0.22). Radiological outcomes revealed no significant wear in the ceramic group. Comparison of standard and highly cross-linked polyethylene, however, revealed an almost threefold difference in the mean annual linear wear rates (0.151 mm/year versus 0.059 mm/year, respectively) (p < 0.001). PMID:22434459

  11. Replicability of sight word training and phonics training in poor readers: a randomised controlled trial

    G McArthur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of effective treatments for children with reading impairment, paired with growing concern about the lack of scientific replication in psychological science, the aim of this study was to replicate a quasi-randomised trial of sight word and phonics training using a randomised controlled trial (RCT design. One group of poor readers (N = 41 did 8 weeks of phonics training (i.e., phonological decoding and then 8 weeks of sight word training (i.e., whole-word recognition. A second group did the reverse order of training. Sight word and phonics training each had a large and significant valid treatment effect on trained irregular words and word reading fluency. In addition, combined sight word and phonics training had a moderate and significant valid treatment effect on nonword reading accuracy and fluency. These findings demonstrate the reliability of both phonics and sight word training in treating poor readers in an era where the importance of scientific reliability is under close scrutiny.

  12. Effectiveness of group body psychotherapy for negative symptoms of schizophrenia: multicentre randomised controlled trial†

    Priebe, S.; Savill, M.; Wykes, T.; Bentall, R. P.; Reininghaus, U.; Lauber, C.; Bremner, S.; Eldridge, S.; Röhricht, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Negative symptoms of schizophrenia have a severe impact on functional outcomes and treatment options are limited. Arts therapies are currently recommended but more evidence is required. Aims To assess body psychotherapy as a treatment for negative symptoms compared with an active control (trial registration: ISRCTN84216587). Method Schizophrenia out-patients were randomised into a 20-session body psychotherapy or Pilates group. The primary outcome was negative symptoms at end of treatment. Secondary outcomes included psychopathology, functional, social and treatment satisfaction outcomes at treatment end and 6-months later. Results In total, 275 participants were randomised. The adjusted difference in negative symptoms was 0.03 (95% CI −1.11 to 1.17), indicating no benefit from body psychotherapy. Small improvements in expressive deficits and movement disorder symptoms were detected in favour of body psychotherapy. No other outcomes were significantly different. Conclusions Body psychotherapy does not have a clinically relevant beneficial effect in the treatment of patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:27151073

  13. Improving health-related fitness in adolescents: the CrossFit Teens™ randomised controlled trial.

    Eather, Narelle; Morgan, Philip James; Lubans, David Revalds

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of the CrossFit Teens™ resistance training programme for improving health-related fitness and resistance training skill competency in adolescents. This assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in the Hunter Region, Australia, from July to September 2013. Ninety-six (96) students (age = 15.4 (.5) years, 51.5% female) were randomised into intervention (n = 51) or control (n = 45) conditions for 8-weeks (60 min twice per week). Waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), BMI-Z score (primary outcomes), cardiorespiratory fitness (shuttle run test), muscular fitness (standing jump, push-up, handgrip, curl-up test), flexibility (sit and reach) and resistance training skill competency were measured at baseline and immediate post-intervention. Feasibility measures of recruitment, retention, adherence and satisfaction were assessed. Significant group-by-time intervention effects were found for waist circumference [-3.1 cm, P CrossFit Teens™ is a feasible and efficacious programme for improving health-related fitness in adolescents. PMID:25972203

  14. Direct mail improves knowledge of basic life support guidelines in general practice: a randomised study

    Secher Niels

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of new guidelines into clinical practice is often incomplete. Direct mail is a simple way of providing information to physicians and may improve implementation of new guidelines on basic life support (BLS. The aim of this study was to describe knowledge of the most recent European Resuscitation Council (ERC Guidelines for BLS among general practitioners (GPs and investigate whether direct mail improves theoretical knowledge of these guidelines. Methods All general practice clinics (n=351 in Central Denmark Region were randomised to receive either direct mail (intervention or no direct mail (control. The direct mail consisted of the official ERC BLS/AED poster and a cover letter outlining changes in compression depth and frequency in the new guidelines. In general practice clinics randomised to intervention, every GP received a direct mail addressed personally to him/her. Two weeks later, a multiple-choice questionnaire on demographics and BLS guidelines were mailed to GPs in both groups. Results In total, 830 GPs were included in this study (direct mail, n=408; control, n=422. The response rate was 58%. The majority (91% of GPs receiving direct mail were familiar with BLS Guidelines 2010 compared to 72% in the control group (P Conclusion Direct mail improved knowledge of changes in BLS guidelines and thus facilitated the implementation of this knowledge into clinical practice. Resuscitation councils and medical societies may consider using direct mail as a simple strategy to facilitate implementation of changes in clinical guidelines.

  15. Increasing walking in patients with intermittent claudication: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    O'Carroll Ronan E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with intermittent claudication are at increased risk of death from heart attack and stroke compared to matched controls. Surgery for intermittent claudication is for symptom management and does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Increasing physical activity can reduce claudication symptoms and may improve cardiovascular health. This paper presents the pilot study protocol for a randomised controlled trial to test whether a brief psychological intervention leads to increased physical activity, improvement in quality of life, and a reduction in the demand for surgery, for patients with intermittent claudication. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 patients newly diagnosed with intermittent claudication, who will be randomised into two groups. The control group will receive usual care, and the treatment group will receive usual care and a brief 2-session psychological intervention to modify illness and walking beliefs and develop a walking action plan. The primary outcome will be walking, measured by pedometer. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life and uptake of surgery for symptom management. Participants will be followed up after (a 4 months, (b 1 year and (c 2 years. Discussion This study will assess the acceptability and efficacy of a brief psychological intervention to increase walking in patients with intermittent claudication, both in terms of the initiation, and maintenance of behaviour change. This is a pilot study, and the results will inform the design of a larger multi-centre trial. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN28051878

  16. Economic evaluation alongside pragmatic randomised trials: developing a standard operating procedure for clinical trials units

    Russell Ian T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is wide recognition that pragmatic randomised trials are the best vehicle for economic evaluation. This is because trials provide the best chance of ensuring internal validity, not least through the rigorous prospective collection of patient-specific data. Furthermore the marginal cost of collecting economic data alongside clinical data is typically modest. UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC does not require a standard operating procedure (SOP for economic evaluation as a prerequisite for trial unit registration. We judge that such a SOP facilitates the integration of health economics into trials. Methods A collaboration between health economists and trialists at Bangor University led to the development of a SOP for economic evaluation alongside pragmatic trials, in addition to the twenty SOPs required by UKCRC for registration, which include randomisation, data management and statistical analysis. Results Our recent telephone survey suggests that no other UKCRC-registered trials unit currently has an economic SOP. Conclusion We argue that UKCRC should require, from all Trials Units undertaking economic evaluation and seeking registration or re-registration, a SOP for economic evaluation as one of their portfolio of supporting SOPs.

  17. Activated protein C inhibits neutrophil migration in allergic asthma: a randomised trial.

    de Boer, J Daan; Berger, Marieke; Majoor, Christof J; Kager, Liesbeth M; Meijers, Joost C M; Terpstra, Sanne; Nieuwland, Rienk; Boing, Anita N; Lutter, René; Wouters, Diana; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Zeerleder, Sacha S; Bel, Elisabeth H; van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Zee, Jaring S; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-12-01

    Asthma patients show evidence of a procoagulant state in their airways, accompanied by an impaired function of the anticoagulant protein C system. We aimed to study the effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in allergic asthma patients.We conducted a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept study in house dust mite (HDM) allergic asthma patients. Patients were randomised to receive intravenous rhAPC (24 µg·kg(-1)·h(-1); n=12) or placebo (n=12) for 11 h. 4 h after the start of infusion, a first bronchoscopy was performed to challenge one lung segment with saline (control) and a contralateral segment with a combination of HDM extract and lipopolysaccharide (HDM+LPS), thereby mimicking environmental house dust exposure. A second bronchoscopy was conducted 8 h after intrabronchial challenge to obtain bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF).rhAPC did not influence HDM+LPS induced procoagulant changes in the lung. In contrast, rhAPC reduced BALF leukocyte counts by 43% relative to placebo, caused by an inhibitory effect on neutrophil influx (64% reduction), while leaving eosinophil influx unaltered. rhAPC also reduced neutrophil degranulation products in the airways.Intravenous rhAPC attenuates HDM+LPS-induced neutrophil migration and protein release in allergic asthma patients by an effect that does not rely on coagulation inhibition. PMID:26381519

  18. Live lecture versus video podcast in undergraduate medical education: A randomised controlled trial

    Fukuta Junaid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information technology is finding an increasing role in the training of medical students. We compared information recall and student experience and preference after live lectures and video podcasts in undergraduate medical education. Methods We performed a crossover randomised controlled trial. 100 students were randomised to live lecture or video podcast for one clinical topic. Live lectures were given by the same instructor as the narrator of the video podcasts. The video podcasts comprised Powerpoint™ slides narrated using the same script as the lecture. They were then switched to the other group for a second clinical topic. Knowledge was assessed using multiple choice questions and qualitative information was collected using a questionnaire. Results No significant difference was found on multiple choice questioning immediately after the session. The subjects enjoyed the convenience of the video podcast and the ability to stop, review and repeat it, but found it less engaging as a teaching method. They expressed a clear preference for the live lecture format. Conclusions We suggest that video podcasts are not ready to replace traditional teaching methods, but may have an important role in reinforcing learning and aiding revision.

  19. Reducing Postpartum Weight Retention and Improving Breastfeeding Outcomes in Overweight Women: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Julia Martin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity is prevalent among women of reproductive age (42% BMI > 25 kg/m2 and parity is associated with risk of weight gain. Weight gain greater than that recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM is also associated with lower rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration in women. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial is to examine the feasibility of recruiting and maintaining a cohort of pregnant women with the view of reducing postpartum weight retention and improving breastfeeding outcomes. Women (BMI of 25–35 kg/m2 (n = 36 were recruited from the John Hunter Hospital antenatal clinic in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were stratified by BMI and randomised to one of three groups with follow-up to six months postpartum. Women received a dietary intervention with or without breastfeeding support from a lactation consultant, or were assigned to a wait-list control group where the dietary intervention was issued at three months postpartum. Feasibility and acceptability was assessed by participation rates and questionnaire. Analysis of variance and covariance was conducted to determine any differences between groups. Sixty-nine per cent of the participants were still enrolled at six months postpartum. This pilot demonstrated some difficulties in recruiting women from antenatal clinics and retaining them in the trial. Although underpowered; the results on weight; biomarkers and breastfeeding outcomes indicated improved metabolic health.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging or arthrography for shoulder problems: a randomised study

    Objective: Diagnostic technologies are often assessed merely by their accuracy, rather than by their impact on diagnosis and patient management. To this end the authors have undertaken a study to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthrography of the shoulder for patients referred from a rheumatology clinic. Methods and patients: Patients referred from a rheumatology clinic with symptoms warranting imaging of the shoulder were randomised to either MRI or arthrography. Data on the clinician's diagnostic confidence and management were recorded before and after imaging using questionnaires. Patients were followed-up at least 10 months after imaging to see how management plans evolved, and what proportion of patients required further imaging. Results: Fifty three shoulders underwent imaging over a year and entered into the study; 29 randomised to MRI and 24 to arthrography. Both MRI and arthrography had a similar beneficial diagnostic impact in terms of clinical diagnoses (refuted and retained) and new diagnoses established. MRI and arthrography had a similar therapeutic impact, although MRI was associated with a significant shift towards surgical intervention. Conclusion: MRI and arthrography a have similar diagnostic and therapeutic impact

  1. Incorrect statistical method in parallel-groups RCT led to unsubstantiated conclusions.

    Allison, David B; Antoine, Lisa H; George, Brandon J

    2016-01-01

    The article by Aiso et al. titled "Compared with the intake of commercial vegetable juice, the intake of fresh fruit and komatsuna (Brassica rapa L. var perviridis) juice mixture reduces serum cholesterol in middle-aged men: a randomized controlled pilot study" does not meet the expected standards of Lipids in Health and Disease. Although the article concludes that there are some significant benefits to their komatsuna juice mixture, these claims are not supported by the statistical analyses used. An incorrect procedure was used to compare the differences in two treatment groups over time, and a large number of outcomes were tested without correction; both issues are known to produce high rates of false positives, making the conclusions of the study unjustified. The study also fails to follow published journal standards regarding clinical trial registration and reporting. PMID:27083538

  2. Supervised Home Training of Dialogue Skills in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Parallel Group Study

    Nobis-Bosch, Ruth; Springer, Luise; Radermacher, Irmgard; Huber, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to prove the efficacy of supervised self-training for individuals with aphasia. Linguistic and communicative performance in structured dialogues represented the main study parameters. Method: In a cross-over design for randomized matched pairs, 18 individuals with chronic aphasia were examined during 12 weeks of…

  3. Inappropriate statistical method in a parallel-group randomized controlled trial results in unsubstantiated conclusions.

    Dimova, Rositsa B; Allison, David B

    2016-01-01

    The conclusions of Cassani et al. in the January 2015 issue of Nutrition Journal (doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-14-5 ) cannot be substantiated by the analysis reported nor by the data themselves. The authors ascribed the observed decrease in inflammatory markers to the components of flaxseed and based their conclusions on within-group comparisons made between the final and the baseline measurements separately in each arm of the randomized controlled trial. However, this is an improper approach and the conclusions of the paper are invalid. A correct analysis of the data shows no such effects. PMID:27265269

  4. Effect of guideline based computerised decision support on decision making of multidisciplinary teams: cluster randomised trial in cardiac rehabilitation

    Goud, R.; de Keizer, N F; ter Riet, G; Wyatt, J C; Hasman, A.; Hellemans, I.M.; Peek, N.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent to which computerised decision support can improve concordance of multidisciplinary teams with therapeutic decisions recommended by guidelines. DESIGN: Multicentre cluster randomised trial. PARTICIPANTS: Multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation teams in Dutch centres and their cardiac rehabilitation patients. INTERVENTIONS: Teams received an electronic patient record system with or without additional guideline based decision support. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: C...

  5. Do sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation influence sleep bruxism? Report of a randomised controlled trial

    M. Valiente López; M.K.A. van Selms; J. van der Zaag; H.L. Hamburger; F. Lobbezoo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of sleep hygiene measures combined with relaxation techniques in the management of sleep bruxism (SB) in a double-blind, parallel, controlled, randomised clinical trial design. Sixteen participants (mean ± s.d. age = 39·9 ± 10·8 years) were randomly as

  6. "Every Child Counts": Testing Policy Effectiveness Using a Randomised Controlled Trial, Designed, Conducted and Reported to CONSORT Standards

    Torgerson, Carole; Wiggins, Andy; Torgerson, David; Ainsworth, Hannah; Hewitt, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    We report a randomised controlled trial evaluation of an intensive one-to-one numeracy programme--"Numbers Count"--which formed part of the previous government's numeracy policy intervention--"Every Child Counts." We rigorously designed and conducted the trial to CONSORT guidelines. We used a pragmatic waiting list design to…

  7. Can exercise improve self esteem in children and young people? A systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    Ekeland, E; Heian, F; Hagen, K.; Coren, E

    2005-01-01

    Twenty three randomised controlled trials were analysed. A synthesis of several small, low quality trials indicates that exercise may have short term beneficial effects on self esteem in children and adolescents. However, high quality research on defined populations with adequate follow up is needed.

  8. Penicillin for acute sore throat : randomised double blind trial of seven days versus three days treatment or placebo in adults

    Zwart, S; Sachs, APE; Ruijs, GJHM; Gubbels, JW; Hoes, AW; de Melker, RA

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess whether treatment with penicillin for three days and the traditional treatment for seven days were equally as effective at accelerating resolution of symptoms in patients with sore throat compared with placebo. Design Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. Setting 43 f

  9. HPV type in plantar warts influences natural course and treatment response: Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Koning, M.N. de; Feltkamp, M.C.; Bavinck, J.N.; Quint, W.G.V.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryotherapy is effective for common warts, but for plantar warts available treatments often fail. OBJECTIVES: Within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we examined whether subgroups of common and plantar warts have a favourable natural course or response to treatment based on wart-

  10. Stretching before sleep reduces the frequency and severity of nocturnal leg cramps in older adults : a randomised trial

    Hallegraeff, Joannes M.; van der Schans, Cees P.; de Ruiter, Renee; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.

    2012-01-01

    Question: In adults who experience nocturnal leg cramps, does stretching of the calf and hamstring muscles each day just before sleep reduce the frequency and severity of the cramps? Design: A randomised trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Eighty adults age

  11. Stretching before sleep reduces the frequency and severity of nocturnal leg cramps in older adults: a randomised trial

    Hallegraeff, J.M.; Schans, C.P. van der; Ruiter, R. de; Greef, M.H. de

    2012-01-01

    QUESTION: In adults who experience nocturnal leg cramps, does stretching of the calf and hamstring muscles each day just before sleep reduce the frequency and severity of the cramps? DESIGN: A randomised trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Eighty adults age

  12. CT screening for lung cancer brings forward early disease. The Randomised Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST)

    Saghir, Zaigham; Dirksen, Asger; Ashraf, Haseem;

    2012-01-01

    were randomised to five annual low-dose CT screenings or no screening. Two experienced chest radiologists read all CT scans and registered the location, size and morphology of nodules. Nodules between 5 and 15 mm without benign characteristics were rescanned after 3 months. Growing nodules (>25% volume...

  13. Value of internal limiting membrane peeling in surgery for idiopathic macular hole stage 2 and 3: a randomised clinical trial

    Christensen, U C; Krøyer, K; Sander, B;

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling on anatomical and functional success rates in stage 2 and 3 idiopathic macular hole surgery (MHS). METHODS: Randomised clinical trial of stage 2 and 3 idiopathic macular hole without visible epiretinal fibrosis and with less...

  14. PTFE bypass to below-knee arteries: distal vein collar or not? A prospective randomised multicentre study

    Lundgren, Fredrik; Bergqvist, David; Norgren, Lars; Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2010-01-01

    Patency and limb salvage after synthetic bypass to the arteries below-knee are inferior to that which can be achieved with autologous vein. Use of a vein collar at the distal anastomosis has been suggested to improve patency and limb salvage, a problem that is analysed in this randomised clinical...

  15. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease : mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Shah, Tina; Engert, James C.; Clarke, Robert; Davey-Smith, George; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Anand, Sonia; Pepys, Mark B.; Smeeth, Liam; Whittaker, John; Casas, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Simon G.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Danesh, John; Eiriksdottir, G.; Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Gudnason, V.; Folsom, A. R.; Andrews, G.; Ballantyne, C. M.; Samani, N. J.; Hall, A. S.; Braund, P. S.; Balmforth, A. J.; Whincup, P. H.; Morris, R.; Lawlor, D. A.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Timpson, N.; Ebrahim, S.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Timpson, N.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Zacho, J.; Brown, M.; Sandhu, M.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Lange, L.; Reiner, A.; Cushman, M.; Tracy, R.; Wu, C.; Ge, J.; Zou, Y.; Sun, A.; Hung, J.; McQuillan, B.; Thompson, P.; Beilby, J.; Warrington, N.; Palmer, L. J.; Wanner, C.; Drechsler, C.; Hoffmann, M. M.; Fowkes, F. G. R.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Tzoulaki, I.; Kumari, M.; Miller, M.; Marmot, M.; Onland-Moret, C.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; Boer, J. M.; Wijmenga, C.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Sandhu, M.; Khaw, K-T; Vasan, R. S.; Schnabel, R. B.; Yamamoto, J. F.; Benjamin, E. J.; Schunkert, H.; Erdmann, J.; Koenig, I. R.; Hengstenberg, C.; Chiodini, B.; Franzosi, M. G.; Pietri, S.; Gori, F.; Rudock, M.; Liu, Y.; Lohman, K.; Harris, T. B.; Humphries, S. E.; Hamsten, A.; Norman, P. E.; Hankey, G. J.; Jamrozik, K.; Palmer, L. J.; Rimm, E. B.; Pai, J. K.; Psaty, B. M.; Heckbert, S. R.; Bis, J. C.; Yusuf, S.; Anand, S.; Engert, J. C.; Xie, C.; Collins, R.; Clarke, R.; Bennett, D.; Kooner, J.; Chambers, J.; Elliott, P.; Maerz, W.; Kleber, M. E.; Boehm, B. O.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Melander, O.; Berglund, G.; Koenig, W.; Thorand, B.; Baumert, J.; Peters, A.; Rimm, E. B.; Manson, J.; Pai, J. K.; Humphries, S. E.; Cooper, J. A.; Talmud, P. J.; Ladenvall, P.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J-H; Hallmans, G.; Reilly, M. P.; Qu, L.; Li, M.; Rader, D. J.; Watkins, H.; Clarke, R.; Hopewell, J.; Saleheen, D.; Danesh, J.; Frossard, P.; Sattar, N.; Robertson, M.; Shepherd, J.; Schaefer, E.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J. C. M.; Kardys, I.; Dehghan, A.; de Faire, U.; Bennet, A.; Gigante, B.; Leander, K.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Timpson, N.; Peters, B.; Maitland-van der Zee, A. H.; de Boer, A.; Klungel, O.; Reiner, A.; Manson, J.; Greenland, P.; Dai, J.; Liu, S.; Brunner, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Marmot, M.; Sattar, N.; O'Reilly, D.; Ford, I.; Packard, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of individual participant data from 47 epidemiological studies in 15 countries. Participants 194 418 particip

  16. Duration of pregnancy in relation to fish oil supplementation and habitual fish intake: a randomised clinical trial with fish oil

    Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi; Østerdal, M L; Salvig, J D;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of fish oil supplementation on duration of pregnancy, conditional on the woman's habitual fish intake. DESIGN: Multicentre 1:1 randomised clinical trial of effect of fish oil in a high-risk population of pregnant women in whom habitual fish intake was assessed at ...

  17. Ear Acupuncture versus  local anaestethic for pain relief during perineal repair - a randomised controlled trial

    Kindberg, Sara

    2007-01-01

    ACUPUNCTURE OR LOCAL ANAESTETICS FOR PAIN RELIEF DURING PERINEAL REPAIR AFTER VAGINAL DELIVERY: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL.   By:  Sara Kindberg. Midwife and PhD student, Sønderborg Hospital, Denmark. Objective: To evaluate acupuncture as a new method of pain relief for postpartum perineal...

  18. Translation of Randomised Controlled Trial Findings into Clinical Practice : Comparison of Olanzapine and Valproate in the EMBLEM Study

    Novick, D.; Gonzalez-Pinto, A.; Haro, J. M.; Bertsch, J.; Reed, C.; Perrin, E.; Tohen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. Methods: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation of Medicat

  19. A Randomised Controlled Trial Using Mobile Advertising to Promote Safer Sex and Sun Safety to Young People

    Gold, J.; Aitken, C. K.; Dixon, H. G.; Lim, M. S. C.; Gouillou, M.; Spelman, T.; Wakefield, M.; Hellard, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile phone text messages (SMS) are a promising method of health promotion, but a simple and low cost way to obtain phone numbers is required to reach a wide population. We conducted a randomised controlled trial with simultaneous brief interventions to (i) evaluate effectiveness of messages related to safer sex and sun safety and (ii) pilot the…

  20. Walking or vitamin B for cognition in older adults with mild cognitive impairment? A randomised controlled trial

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Mechelen, W. van; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of aerobic exercise or vitamin B supplementation on cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Design: Randomised placebo-controlled trial. Setting: General community. Participants: Community-dwelling adults aged 70-80 with MCI. Interve

  1. Tele-guidance of chronic heart failure patients enhances knowledge about the disease. A multi-centre, randomised controlled study

    Balk, A.H.; Davidse, W.; Dommelen, P. van; Klaassen, E.; Caliskan, K.; Burgh, P. van der; Leenders, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: New strategies are required to optimize care in increasing numbers of chronic heart failure patients. The aim of this randomised trial was to evaluate a remote guidance system. Methods: Intervention group patients received a home TV-channel providing educational materials. Tele-guidance

  2. Prospective multi-centre randomised trial comparing induction of labour with a double-balloon catheter versus dinoprostone

    Løkkegaard, E; Lundstrøm, M; Kjær, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    randomised to double-balloon or vaginal dinoprostone (3 mg) groups. There was a significantly higher failure rate for labour induction in the balloon group (relative risk: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.49). Median induction time was 27.3 h in the balloon group and 29.8 h in the dinoprostone...

  3. A comparison of anterior and posterior chamber lenses after cataract extraction in rural Africa: a within patient randomised trial

    Waddell, K M; Reeves, B C; Johnson, G J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with a posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) is the preferred method of cataract surgery in developed countries. However, intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE) with an anterior chamber lens (AC IOL) may be appropriate in rural Africa. A randomised controlled trial was carried out to compare these surgical strategies.

  4. Mixing nulliparous and multiparous women in randomised controlled trials of preeclampsia prevention is debatable: evidence from a systematic review.

    Emmanuel Simon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nulliparity is a major risk factor of preeclampsia investigated in numerous trials of its prevention. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess whether these trials considered nulliparity in subject selection or analysis of results. SEARCH STRATEGY: 01 April 2013 search of MEDLINE via PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. 01 April 2013 search of trials registered in Clinicaltrials.gov. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials and metaanalyses of preeclampsia prevention with no restriction to period of publication or language. Metaanalyses were selected to fully identify relevant trials. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: One reader appraised each selected article/registered protocol using a pretested, standardized data abstraction form developed in a pilot test. For each article, he recorded whether both nulliparous and multiparous were included and, in case of mixed populations, whether randomisation was stratified, and whether subgroup analyses had been reported. For registered protocols, he only assessed whether it was planned to include mixed populations. MAIN RESULTS: 88 randomised controlled trials were identified, representing 83,396 included women. In 58 of the 88 articles identified (65.9%, preeclampsia was the primary outcome. In 31 of these (53.4%, the investigation combined nulliparous and multiparous women; only two reports in 31 (6.5% stated that randomisation was stratified on parity and only four (12.9% described a subgroup analysis by parity. Of the 30 registered trials, 20 (66.6% planned to include both nulliparous and multiparous women. CONCLUSION: Parity is largely ignored in randomised controlled trials of preeclampsia prevention, which raises difficulties in interpreting the results.

  5. Exercise augmentation compared to usual care for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Randomised Controlled Trial (The REAP study: Randomised Exercise Augmentation for PTSD

    van der Ploeg Hidde P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physical wellbeing of people with mental health conditions can often be overlooked in order to treat the primary mental health condition as a priority. Exercise however, can potentially improve both the primary psychiatric condition as well as physical measures that indicate risk of other conditions such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Evidence supports the role of exercise as an important component of treatment for depression and anxiety, yet no randomised controlled trials (RCT's have been conducted to evaluate the use of exercise in the treatment of people with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. This RCT will investigate the effects of structured, progressive exercise on PTSD symptoms, functional ability, body composition, physical activity levels, sleep patterns and medication usage. Methods and design Eighty participants with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV diagnosis of PTSD will be recruited. Participants will have no contraindications to exercise and will be cognitively able to provide consent to participate in the study. The primary outcome measures will be PTSD symptoms, measured through the PTSD Checklist Civilian (PCL-C scale. Secondary outcome measures will assess depression and anxiety, mobility and strength, body composition, physical activity levels, sleep patterns and medication usage. All outcomes will be assessed by a health or exercise professional masked to group allocation at baseline and 12 weeks after randomisation. The intervention will be a 12 week individualised program, primarily involving resistance exercises with the use of exercise bands. A walking component will also be incorporated. Participants will complete one supervised session per week, and will be asked to perform at least two other non-supervised exercise sessions per week. Both intervention and control groups will receive all usual non-exercise interventions including psychotherapy

  6. Mebendazole Compared with Secnidazole in the Treatment of Adult Giardiasis: A Randomised, No-Inferiority, Open Clinical Trial

    Karen Tornés; Maytee Robaina; Sergio Cimerman; Martha Galloso; Ilmaems Olivero; Roberto Cañete; Yohana Salazar; Idalia Ayala; Maydel Alfonso; Escobedo, Angel A.; Pedro Almirall

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of mebendazole and secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in adult patients, a single-centre, parallel group, open-label, randomized non-inferiority trial was carried out. One-hundred and 26 participants who had symptomatic Giardia mono-infection took part in the study. Direct wet mount and/or Ritchie concentration techniques and physical examinations were conducted at the time of enrolment and at the follow-up visit. The primary outcome measure was para...

  7. Foot orthoses and physiotherapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: A randomised clinical trial

    Darnell Ross

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal overuse condition that has a significant impact on participation in daily and physical activities. A recent systematic review highlighted the lack of high quality evidence from randomised controlled trials for the conservative management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although foot orthoses are a commonly used intervention for patellofemoral pain syndrome, only two pilot studies with short term follow up have been conducted into their clinical efficacy. Methods/design A randomised single-blinded clinical trial will be conducted to investigate the clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of foot orthoses in the management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. One hundred and seventy-six participants aged 18–40 with anterior or retropatellar knee pain of non-traumatic origin and at least six weeks duration will be recruited from the greater Brisbane area in Queensland, Australia through print, radio and television advertising. Suitable participants will be randomly allocated to receive either foot orthoses, flat insoles, physiotherapy or a combined intervention of foot orthoses and physiotherapy, and will attend six visits with a physiotherapist over a 6 week period. Outcome will be measured at 6, 12 and 52 weeks using primary outcome measures of usual and worst pain visual analogue scale, patient perceived treatment effect, perceived global effect, the Functional Index Questionnaire, and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Secondary outcome measures will include the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, Physical Activity Level in the Previous Week, pressure pain threshold and physical measures of step and squat tests. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be based on treatment effectiveness against resource usage recorded in treatment logs and

  8. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol

    Lawlor Debbie A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. Methods/design The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. Discussion The results of

  9. Can improving working memory prevent academic difficulties? a school based randomised controlled trial

    Anderson Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low academic achievement is common and is associated with adverse outcomes such as grade repetition, behavioural disorders and unemployment. The ability to accurately identify these children and intervene before they experience academic failure would be a major advance over the current 'wait to fail' model. Recent research suggests that a possible modifiable factor for low academic achievement is working memory, the ability to temporarily store and manipulate information in a 'mental workspace'. Children with working memory difficulties are at high risk of academic failure. It has recently been demonstrated that working memory can be improved with adaptive training tasks that encourage improvements in working memory capacity. Our trial will determine whether the intervention is efficacious as a selective prevention strategy for young children at risk of academic difficulties and is cost-effective. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 440 children with low working memory after a school-based screening of 2880 children in Grade one. We will approach caregivers of all children from 48 participating primary schools in metropolitan Melbourne for consent. Children with low working memory will be randomised to usual care or the intervention. The intervention will consist of 25 computerised working memory training sessions, which take approximately 35 minutes each to complete. Follow-up of children will be conducted at 6, 12 and 24 months post-randomisation through child face-to-face assessment, parent and teacher surveys and data from government authorities. The primary outcome is academic achievement at 12 and 24 months, and other outcomes include child behaviour, attention, health-related quality of life, working memory, and health and educational service utilisation. Discussion A successful start to formal learning in school sets the stage for future academic, psychological and economic well-being. If

  10. Preventing Weight Gain in Women in Rural Communities: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Catherine Lombard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in both developed and developing countries. Even modest weight gain increases the risk for chronic illness, yet evidence-based interventions to prevent weight gain are rare. This trial will determine if a simple low-intensity intervention can prevent weight gain in women compared to general health information.We conducted a 1-yr pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial in 41 Australian towns (clusters randomised using a computer-generated randomisation list for intervention (n = 21 or control (n = 20. Women aged 18 to 50 yr were recruited from the general population to receive a 1-yr self-management lifestyle intervention (HeLP-her consisting of one group session, monthly SMS text messages, one phone coaching session, and a program manual, or to a control group receiving one general women's health education session. From October 2012 to April 2014 we studied 649 women, mean age 39.6 yr (+/- SD 6.7 and BMI of 28.8 kg/m(2 (+/- SD 6.9 with the primary outcome weight change between groups at 1 yr. The mean change in the control was +0.44 kg (95% CI -0.09 to 0.97 and in the intervention group -0.48 kg (95% CI -0.99 to 0.03 with an unadjusted between group difference of -0.92 kg (95% CI -1.67 to -0.16 or -0.87 kg (95% CI -1.62 to -0.13 adjusted for baseline values and clustering. Secondary outcomes included improved diet quality and greater self-management behaviours. The intervention appeared to be equally efficacious across all age, BMI, income, and education subgroups. Loss to follow-up included 23.8% in the intervention group and 21.8% in the control group and was within the anticipated range. Limitations include lack of sensitive tools to measure the small changes to energy intake and physical activity. Those who gained weight may have been less inclined to return for 1 yr weight measures.A low intensity lifestyle program can prevent the persistent weight gain observed in women. Key features included

  11. The effects of crisis plans for patients with psychotic and bipolar disorders: a randomised controlled trial

    Roosenschoon BJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crises and (involuntary admissions have a strong impact on patients and their caregivers. In some countries, including the Netherlands, the number of crises and (involuntary admissions have increased in the last years. There is also a lack of effective interventions to prevent their occurrence. Previous research has shown that a form of psychiatric advance statement – joint crisis plan – may prevent involuntary admissions, but another study showed no significant results for another form. The question remains which form of psychiatric advance statement may help to prevent crisis situations. This study examines the effects of two other psychiatric advance statements. The first is created by the patient with help from a patient's advocate (Patient Advocate Crisis Plan: PACP and the second with the help of a clinician only (Clinician facilitated Crisis Plan: CCP. We investigate whether patients with a PACP or CCP show fewer emergency visits and (involuntary admissions as compared to patients without a psychiatric advance statement. Furthermore, this study seeks to identify possible mechanisms responsible for the effects of a PACP or a CCP. Methods/Design This study is a randomised controlled trial with two intervention groups and one control condition. Both interventions consist of a crisis plan, facilitated through the patient's advocate or the clinician respectively. Outpatients with psychotic or bipolar disorders, who experienced at least one psychiatric crisis during the previous two years, are randomly allocated to one of the three groups. Primary outcomes are the number of emergency (after hour visits, (involuntary admissions and the length of stay in hospital. Secondary outcomes include psychosocial functioning and treatment satisfaction. The possible mediator variables of the effects of the crisis plans are investigated by assessing the patient's involvement in the creation of the crisis plan, working alliance

  12. Home versus outpatient ultraviolet B phototherapy for mild to severe psoriasis : pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (PLUTO study)

    Koek, Mayke B. G.; Buskens, Erik; van Weelden, Huib; Steegmans, Paul H. A.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A. F. M.; Sigurdsson, Vigfus

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ultraviolet B phototherapy at home is equally safe and equally effective as ultraviolet B phototherapy in an outpatient setting for patients with psoriasis. Design Pragmatic multicentre single blind randomised clinical trial (PLUTO study). Setting Dermatology departmen

  13. Exercises versus arthroscopic decompression in patients with subacromial impingement: a randomised, controlled study in 90 cases with a one year follow up

    Haahr, J. P.; Ostergaard, S.; Dalsgaard, J.; Norup, K.; Frost, P.; Lausen, S.; Holm, E. A.; Andersen, JH

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of graded physiotherapeutic training of the rotator cuff versus arthroscopic subacromial decompression in patients with subacromial impingement. METHODS: Randomised controlled trial with 12 months' follow up in a hospital setting. Ninety consecutive patients aged...

  14. Randomised trial of cervical cerclage, with and without occlusion, for the prevention of preterm birth in women suspected for cervical insufficiency

    Brix, Nis; Secher, N J; McCormack, C D;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of cerclage, with and without cervical occlusion. DESIGN: Multicentre, stratified, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Hospital-based multicentre study with 18 tertiary centres from nine countries. POPULATION: Women with a history of cervical insufficiency...

  15. 'Be active, eat right', evaluation of an overweight prevention protocol among 5-year-old children: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Veldhuis Lydian; Struijk Mirjam K; Kroeze Willemieke; Oenema Anke; Renders Carry M; Bulk-Bunschoten Anneke MW; HiraSing Remy A; Raat Hein

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has at least doubled in the past 25 years with a major impact on health. In 2005 a prevention protocol was developed applicable within Youth Health Care. This study aims to assess the effects of this protocol on prevalence of overweight and health behaviour among children. Methods and design A cluster randomised controlled trial is conducted among 5-year-old children included by 44 Youth Health Care teams randomised with...

  16. Water is a safe and effective alternative to sterile normal saline for wound irrigation prior to suturing: a prospective, double-blind, randomised, controlled clinical trial

    Weiss, Eric Alan; Oldham, George; Lin, Michelle; Foster, Tammy; Quinn, James Victor

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is a significant difference in the infection rates of wounds irrigated with sterile normal saline (SS) versus tap water (TW), before primary wound closure. Design Single centre, prospective, randomised, double-blind controlled trial. Wound irrigation solution type was computer randomised and allocation was done on a sequential basis. Setting Stanford University Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine. Participants Patients older than 1 year of age, who ...

  17. The GRAIDS Trial: a cluster randomised controlled trial of computer decision support for the management of familial cancer risk in primary care

    Emery, J.; Morris, H.; R. Goodchild; Fanshawe, T.; Prevost, A.T.; Bobrow, M.; Kinmonth, A L

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of an assessment strategy using the computer decision support system (the GRAIDS software), on the management of familial cancer risk in British general practice in comparison with best current practice. The design included cluster randomised controlled trial, and involved forty-five general practice teams in East Anglia, UK. Randomised to GRAIDS (Genetic Risk Assessment on the Internet with Decision Support) support (intervention n=23) or comparison (...

  18. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E.; Robert J. Snyder

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly app...

  19. Evaluation of the impact of a school gardening intervention on children’s fruit and vegetable intake: a randomised controlled trial

    Christian, Meaghan S; Evans, Charlotte EL; Nykjaer, Camilla; Hancock, Neil; Cade, Janet E

    2014-01-01

    Background Current academic literature suggests that school gardening programmes can provide an interactive environment with the potential to change children’s fruit and vegetable intake. This is the first cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) designed to evaluate whether a school gardening programme can have an effect on children’s fruit and vegetable intake. Methods The trial included children from 23 schools; these schools were randomised into two groups, one to receive the Royal Horti...

  20. Does physiotherapy reduce the incidence of postoperative complications in patients following pulmonary resection via thoracotomy? a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    McPherson Kathryn M; Stiller Kathy; Nicol Kristine; Reeve Julie C; Denehy Linda

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Postoperative pulmonary and shoulder complications are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. While physiotherapy aims to prevent or minimise these complications, currently there are no randomised controlled trials to support or refute effectiveness of physiotherapy in this setting. Methods/Design This single blind randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 184 patients following lung resection via open thoracotomy. All subjects will receive a ...

  1. A cluster-randomised, controlled trial to assess the impact of a workplace osteoporosis prevention intervention on the dietary and physical activity behaviours of working women: study protocol

    Tan, Ai May; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Sarmugam, Rani; Howard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease and its risk can be reduced through adequate calcium consumption and physical activity. This protocol paper describes a workplace-based intervention targeting behaviour change in premenopausal women working in sedentary occupations. Method/Design A cluster-randomised design was used, comparing the efficacy of a tailored intervention to standard care. Workplaces were the clusters and units of randomisation and intervention. Sample size calculat...

  2. Effectiveness of telemonitoring integrated into existing clinical services on hospital admission for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: researcher blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    Pinnock, Hilary; Hanley, Janet; McCloughan, Lucy; Todd, Allison; Krishan, Ashma; Lewis, Stephanie; Stoddart, Andrew; van der Pol, Marjon; MacNee, William; Sheikh, Aziz; Pagliari, Claudia; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the effectiveness of telemonitoring integrated into existing clinical services such that intervention and control groups have access to the same clinical care. Design: Researcher blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Setting: UK primary care (Lothian, Scotland). Participants: Adults with at least one admission for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the year before randomisation. We excluded people who had other significant lung disease, who were unab...

  3. Effectiveness of telemonitoring integrated into existing clinical services on hospital admission for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: researcher blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    Pinnock, Hilary; Hanley, Janet; McCloughan, Lucy; Todd, Allison; Krishan, Ashma; Lewis, Stephanie; Stoddart, Andrew; van der Pol, Marjon; MacNee, William; Sheikh, Aziz; Pagliari, Claudia; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of telemonitoring integrated into existing clinical services such that intervention and control groups have access to the same clinical care. Design Researcher blind, multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Setting UK primary care (Lothian, Scotland). Participants Adults with at least one admission for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the year before randomisation. We excluded people who had other significant lung disease, who were unable t...

  4. A pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of fluid loading and level of dependency in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery: trial protocol

    Norrie John; Vale Luke; Stott Stephen A; Campbell Marion K; Cuthbertson Brian H; Kinsella John; Cook Jonathan; Brittenden Julie; Grant Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients undergoing major elective or urgent surgery are at high risk of death or significant morbidity. Measures to reduce this morbidity and mortality include pre-operative optimisation and use of higher levels of dependency care after surgery. We propose a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of level of dependency and pre-operative fluid therapy in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised cont...

  5. Improved dietary intake among overweight and obese children followed from 8 to 12 years of age in a randomised controlled trial

    Waling, Maria; Larsson, Christel

    2012-01-01

    More knowledge about improving dietary intake in secondary preventive actions against childhood overweight and obesity is needed. The objective was to evaluate the impact of a 2-year intervention on energy, macronutrient and food intake of overweight and obese children participating in a randomised controlled trial. Children (8-12 years old) living in Sweden were recruited to participate for 2 years between 2006 and 2009. The children were randomised into either an intervention group (n 58), ...

  6. Extra-pleural pneumonectomy versus no extra-pleural pneumonectomy for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma: clinical outcomes of the Mesothelioma and Radical Surgery (MARS) randomised feasibility study

    Treasure, T; Lang-Lazdunski, L.; Waller, D; Bliss, J M; Tan, C.; Entwisle, J; Snee, M.; O Brien, M.; Thomas, G.; Senan, S; O'Byrne, K; Kilburn, L S; Spicer, J; Landau, D; Edwards, J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The effects of extra-pleural pneumonectomy (EPP) on survival and quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma have, to our knowledge, not been assessed in a randomised trial. We aimed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients who were randomly assigned to EPP or no EPP in the context of trimodal therapy in the Mesothelioma and Radical Surgery (MARS) feasibility study. Methods MARS was a multicentre randomised controlled trial in 12 UK hospitals. Patient...

  7. The impact of school fruit tuck shops and school food policies on children's fruit consumption: a cluster randomised trial of schools in deprived areas

    Moore, L; Tapper, K.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the impact of school fruit tuck shops on children’s consumption of fruit and sweet and savoury snacks. Design: Cluster randomised effectiveness trial with school as the unit of randomisation. Setting: 43 primary schools in deprived areas in south Wales and south-west England with a range of school food policies. Intervention: Schools operated fruit tuck shops throughout one academic year. Control schools did not do so. Measures: Repeated cross-sections of chi...

  8. Using the theory of planned behaviour as a process evaluation tool in randomised trials of knowledge translation strategies: A case study from UK primary care

    Grimshaw Jeremy M; Croal Bernard L; Thomas Ruth E; Ramsay Craig R; Eccles Martin P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Randomised trials of knowledge translation strategies for professional behaviour change can provide robust estimates of effectiveness, but offer little insight into the causal mechanisms by which any change is produced. To illustrate the applicability of causal methods within randomised trials, we undertook a theory-based process evaluation study within an implementation trial to explore whether the cognitions of primary care doctors' predicted their test requesting behavi...

  9. A multi-centre randomised controlled study of pre-IVF outpatient hysteroscopy in women with recurrent IVF implantation failure: Trial of Outpatient Hysteroscopy - [TROPHY] in IVF

    Khalaf Yacoub; Sunkara Sesh; Campo Rudi; El-Toukhy Tarek; Coomarasamy Arri

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The success rate of IVF treatment is low. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis found that the outcome of IVF treatment could be improved in patients who have experienced recurrent implantation failure if an outpatient hysteroscopy (OH) is performed before starting the new treatment cycle. However, the trials were of variable quality, leading to a call for a large and high-quality randomised trial. This protocol describes a multi-centre randomised controlled trial t...

  10. Characteristics and outcomes of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer who declined to participate in randomised clinical chemotherapy trials

    Tanai, C; Nokihara, H; Yamamoto, S.; Kunitoh, H; Yamamoto, N.; Sekine, I.; Ohe, Y; Tamura, T.

    2009-01-01

    There are inadequate data on the outcomes of patients who declined to participate in randomised clinical trials as compared with those of participants. We retrospectively reviewed the patient characteristics and treatment outcomes of both participants and non-participants in the two randomised trials for chemotherapy-naive advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Trial 1 compared four platinum-based combination regimens. Trial 2 compared two sequences of carboplatin plus paclitaxel and gefitinib ...

  11. Effect of oxandrolone and timing of pubertal induction on final height in Turner’s syndrome: randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial

    Gault, E.J.; Perry, R J; Cole, T J; Casey, S.; Paterson, W.F.; Hindmarsh, P. C.; Betts, P; Dunger, D B; Donaldson, M D C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of oxandrolone and the timing of pubertal induction on final height in girls with Turner’s syndrome receiving a standard dose of growth hormone. Design Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting 36 paediatric endocrinology departments in UK hospitals. Participants Girls with Turner’s syndrome aged 7-13 years at recruitment, receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy (10 mg/m2/week). Interventions Participants were randomised to oxandrolone (0...

  12. The impact of oxandolone and timing of pubertal induction on final height in Turner sydrome: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Gault, E.J.; Perry, R J; Cole, T J; Casey, S.; Paterson, W.M.; Hindmarsh, P.J.; Betts, P; Dunger, D B; Donaldson, M D C

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of oxandrolone and the timing of pubertal induction on final height in girls with Turner’s syndrome receiving a standard dose of growth hormone. Design: Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Setting:36 paediatric endocrinology departments in UK hospitals. Participants: Girls with Turner’s syndrome aged 7-13 years at recruitment, receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy (10 mg/m2/week). Interventions Participants were randomise...

  13. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    da Luz Maurício Antônio; Costa Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Fuhro Fernanda Ferreira; Manzoni Ana Carolina Taccolini; de Oliveira Naiane Teixeira Bastos; Cabral Cristina Maria Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a bli...

  14. A Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing the Effect of E-learning, with a Taught Workshop, on the Knowledge and Search Skills of Health Professionals

    Nicola Pearce‐Smith

    2006-01-01

    Objective The aim of the trial was to establish whether there is a significant difference in terms of knowledge and skills, between self-directed learning using a web-based resource, compared with a classroom based interactive workshop, for teaching health professionals how to search. The outcomes measured were knowledge of databases and study designs, and search skills. Methods The study design was a randomised controlled trial (RCT). 17 health professionals were randomised into one ...

  15. Integration of balance and strength training into daily life activity to reduce rate of falls in older people (the LiFE study): randomised parallel trial

    Clemson, Lindy; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A; Bundy, Anita; Cumming, Robert G; Manollaras, Kate; O’Loughlin, Patricia; Black, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a lifestyle integrated approach to balance and strength training is effective in reducing the rate of falls in older, high risk people living at home. Design Three arm, randomised parallel trial; assessments at baseline and after six and 12 months. Randomisation done by computer generated random blocks, stratified by sex and fall history and concealed by an independent secure website. Setting Residents in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Participants Participant...

  16. Randomised, phase II trial comparing oral capecitabine (Xeloda®) with paclitaxel in patients with metastatic/advanced breast cancer pretreated with anthracyclines

    Talbot, D C; Moiseyenko, V; Van Belle, S; O'Reilly, S. M.; Alba Conejo, E; Ackland, S; Eisenberg, P; Melnychuk, D.; Pienkowski, T; Burger, H-U; Laws, S.; Osterwalder, B

    2002-01-01

    Capecitabine, an oral fluoropyrimidine carbamate, was designed to generate 5-fluorouracil preferentially at the tumour site. This randomised, phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine or paclitaxel in patients with anthracycline-pretreated metastatic breast cancer. Outpatients with locally advanced and/or metastatic breast cancer whose disease was unresponsive or resistant to anthracycline therapy were randomised to 3-week cycles of intermittent oral capecitabine (1255 ...

  17. Effects of a free school breakfast programme on children's attendance, academic achievement and short-term hunger: results from a stepped-wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial

    Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Gorton, Delvina; Turley, Maria; Jiang, Yannan; Michie, Jo; Maddison, Ralph; Hattie, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Free school breakfast programmes (SBPs) exist in a number of high-income countries, but their effects on educational outcomes have rarely been evaluated in randomised controlled trials. Methods A 1-year stepped-wedge, cluster randomised controlled trial was undertaken in 14 New Zealand schools in low socioeconomic resource areas. Participants were 424 children, mean age 9±2 years, 53% female. The intervention was a free daily SBP. The primary outcome was children's school attendanc...

  18. 'Be active, eat right', evaluation of an overweight prevention protocol among 5-year-old children: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Veldhuis, Lydian; Struijk, Mirjam; Kroeze, Willemieke; Oenema, Anke; Renders, Carry; Bulk-Bunschoten, Anneke; Hirasing, Remy; Raat, Hein

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has at least doubled in the past 25 years with a major impact on health. In 2005 a prevention protocol was developed applicable within Youth Health Care. This study aims to assess the effects of this protocol on prevalence of overweight and health behaviour among children. METHODS AND DESIGN: A cluster randomised controlled trial is conducted among 5-year-old children included by 44 Youth Health Care teams randomised...

  19. Brushes and picks used on nails during the surgical scrub to reduce bacteria: a randomised trial.

    Tanner, J; Khan, D; Walsh, S; Chernova, J; Lamont, S; Laurent, T

    2009-03-01

    Though brushes are no longer used on the hands and forearms during the surgical scrub, they are still widely used on the nails. The aim of this study was to determine whether nail picks and nail brushes are effective in providing additional decontamination during a surgical hand scrub. A total of 164 operating department staff were randomised to undertake one of the following three surgical hand-scrub protocols: chlorhexidine only; chlorhexidine and a nail pick; or chlorhexidine and a nail brush. Bacterial hand sampling was conducted before and 1h after scrubbing using a modified version of the glove juice method. No statistically significant differences in bacterial numbers were found between any two of the three intervention groups. Nail brushes and nail picks used during surgical hand scrubs do not decrease bacterial numbers and are unnecessary. PMID:19162371

  20. Casein improves brachial and central aortic diastolic blood pressure in overweight adolescents: a randomised, controlled trial

    Arnberg, Karina; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F.;

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, blood pressure (BP) and blood lipids may be improved by milk in adults and the effects may be mediated via proteins. However, limited is known about the effects of milk proteins on central aortic BP and no studies have examined the effects in children. Therefore, the present...... stiffness or blood lipid concentrations. A high intake of casein improves DBP in overweight adolescents. Thus, casein may be beneficial for younger overweight subjects in terms of reducing the longterm risk of CVD. In contrast, whey protein seems to increase BP compared with drinking water; however, water...... trial examined the effect of milk and milk proteins on brachial and central aortic BP, blood lipids, inflammation and arterial stiffness in overweight adolescents. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in 193 overweight adolescents aged 12–15 years. They were randomly assigned to drink 1 litre of...