WorldWideScience

Sample records for 26-kilobase common region

  1. Regional Commonalities and Regional Identities: Forging a Normative Understanding of Southeast Asian Identity

    Gürol Baba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, most of the IR academia’s attention on Southeast Asian regionalism utilised constructivism and/or realism and has focused on ASEAN and its derivatives. This article aims to skew this angle by elaborating a possible relationship between Asian values and a normative understanding of Southeast Asian identity. The major reason for this article’s focus on a normative interpretation is that a practical application of Southeast Asian identity is not very achievable due to various ethnic, cultural, political, territorial, and historical diversities. While the region is diverse, there are also a number of commonalities among its states. Asian values, from a Confucian perspective, account for some of these commonalities. By using constructivists’ claims on both the links between norms and identity and the dynamic interaction between values and norms, this article argues that Asian values could contribute to the development of Amitav Acharya’s widely cited normative/ideational format of Southeast Asian identity. The article takes ASEAN identity as a case study and aims to show why a normative identity is more achievable than a practical identity among Southeast Asians, and how Asian values might contribute to the creation of this shared identity.

  2. Doing Business 2014 Regional Profile : Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation

    2013-01-01

    This regional profile presents the Doing Business indicators for economies in Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). It also shows the regional average, the best performance globally for each indicator and data for the following comparator regions: Europe and Central Asia, Economic Community of West African States, Middle East and North Africa, Organization for the Harmoni...

  3. Priority actions of the different Regional Prevention Plans: common features and innovations

    Francesca Russo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The National Prevention Plan (NPP 2010-2012, approved by the Agreement between the Government, the Regions and Autonomous Provinces of Trento and Bolzano on 29 April 2010, called for Regions to adopt, by 31/12/2010, the Regional Prevention Plan (RPP for implementing the interventions provided by the NPP 2010-2012.This article has considered and compared the different RPP’s. In an attempt to provide an outlook on the future medical prevention plans over the next few years in Italy, a comparison has been made between the RPP from 19 Regions and the Autonomous Province of Trento. This work has been focused on the actions identified in regional plans as a priority concerning the major common and innovative elements.The analysis of each RPP revealed a common plan to chronic degenerative diseases, because of the aging of the population in every Region of Italy. Other important common targets are: surveillance systems, vaccination programs and screening programs. Toscana and Liguria, more than other Regions, are engaged in the creation of networks involving various social actors. In some Regions there are projects aimed at eliminating social, economic or gender inequities, such as the project “women’s health” in the Region of Puglia. Toscana and Emilia-Romagna Plans pay attention to environment and pollution issues.Despite social, environmental and economic differences, the various Regions have common principles, concerning: life style, surveillance, vaccination and the screening for cancer.

  4. Common prefrontal regions activate during self-control of craving, emotion, and motor impulses in smokers

    Tabibnia, Golnaz; Creswell, J. David; Kraynak, Thomas; Westbrook, Cecilia; Julson, Erica; Tindle, Hilary A.

    2014-01-01

    It has been posited that self-regulation of behaviors, emotions, and temptations may all rely on a common resource. Recent reviews suggest this common resource may include the inferior frontal cortex (IFC). However, to our knowledge no single functional neuroimaging study has tested this hypothesis. We obtained fMRI scans as 25 abstinent treatment-seeking cigarette smokers completed motor, affective, and craving self-control tasks before smoking cessation treatment. We identified two regions ...

  5. Common factors in the withdrawal of European aircraft manufacturers from the regional aircraft market

    Heerkens, Hans; Bruijn, de Erik J.; Steenhuis, Harm-Jan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate whether there were common causes for the withdrawal from the regional aircraft market of three established manufacturers (BAE Systems, Fokker and Saab), while competitors thrived. We focus on the markets for 50- and 100-seat aircraft. One cause concerning the 50-seat market was the in

  6. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull;

    2006-01-01

    confirmed expression of 32 out of 36 candidates, whereas Northern blots confirmed four out of 12 candidates. Furthermore, many RT-PCR results indicate differential expression in different tissues. Hence, our findings suggest that there are corresponding regions between human and mouse, which contain......Human and mouse genome sequences contain roughly 100,000 regions that are unalignable in primary sequence and neighbor corresponding alignable regions between both organisms. These pairs are generally assumed to be nonconserved, although the level of structural conservation between these has never...... alignment, using FOLDALIGN, on a subset of these 100,000 corresponding regions and estimate that 1800 contain common RNA structures. Comparing our results with the recent mapping of transcribed fragments (transfrags) in human, we find that high-scoring candidates are twice as likely to be found in regions...

  7. Nature conservation and tourism development in the Dutch Wadden Sea region: a common future?

    Revier, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about the development of tourism in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region in combination with nature conservation. The main question is whether they have a common future. There are some future points stated: - Nature and landscape of the Wadden Sea are the main pull factors for the tourism development. - Future tourism development requires a clear strategy that is supported by various stakeholders - Raising awareness about the natural values results in more visitors and public support f...

  8. Irrigation water demand of common bean on field and regional scale under varying climatic conditions

    Michael Wagner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crop irrigation plays an important role in the world's food production and its role is expected to increase still further. For policy makers, the quantification of the irrigation water demand and the water availability on a regional scale is crucial. In the project ‘SAPHIR’, a new stochastic framework was developed to upscale crop yield and crop water demand from irrigation experiments with common bean to the regional scale using the one-dimensional mechanistic crop model Daisy. The crop model parameters – derived based on a comprehensive experimental data collection and a sound calibration of the crop model – were used to simulate potential bean yield, yield reduction due to drought stress, and crop water demand in mid and northern Saxony, Eastern Germany, using the dominant soil characteristics. The stochastic relationship between irrigated water and crop yield (stochastic crop water production function enabled the prediction of the crop productivity on a regional scale. Furthermore, the available water resources for irrigation on the catchment scale were compared to the predicted irrigation water requirements to estimate the degree of local water self sufficiency. The simulation results show that an irrigation of common bean has high yield effects especially in locations with low precipitation during the growing season or for soils with a low water storage capacity. Especially in the drier northern parts of Saxony with its lower soil water storage capability, a decrease in non-irrigated fresh matter bean yield up to 40 % is predicted for the future. Irrigation and the projected increasing temperature can enhance the bean yield in southern Saxony. However, the required amount of irrigation water in northern Saxony can only be delivered by down to 20 % and less from the local precipitation. The presented framework enables policy makers to compare water demand and available water which allows a precise estimation of relevant

  9. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach

    Laura eDominguez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture, supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: 1 The supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. 2 The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2 and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1 portions. 3 Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. 4 Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote, and the alar supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  10. Common vampire bat attacks on humans in a village of the Amazon region of Brazil

    Schneider Maria Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people in Amazonian communities have reported bat bites in the last decade. Bites by vampire bats can potentially transmit rabies to humans. The objective of this study was to analyze factors associated with bat biting in one of these communities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a village of gold miners in the Amazonian region of Brazil (160 inhabitants. Bats were captured near people's houses and sent to a lab. Of 129 people interviewed, 41% had been attacked by a bat at least once, with 92% of the bites located on the lower limbs. A logistic regression found that adults were bitten around four times more often than children (OR = 3.75, CI 95%: 1.46-9.62, p = 0.036. Males were bitten more frequently than females (OR = 2.08, CI 95%: 0.90-4.76, p = 0.067. Nine Desmodus rotundus and three frugivorous bats were captured and tested negative for rabies. The study suggests that, in an area of gold miners, common vampire bats are more likely to attack adults and males. The control strategy for human rabies developed in this region should therefore place special emphasis on adult males. There should also be more research on how the search for gold in the Amazonian region places people and the environment at risk.

  11. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach.

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture), supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions (SCs) in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: (1) The supraoptoparaventricular region (SPV) is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. (2) The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2) and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1) portions. (3) Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. (4) Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote), and the alar SPV is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed. PMID:25691860

  12. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Common Bacterial Pathogens Isolated from a New Regional Hospital in Southern Taiwan.

    Hung-Ming Chen

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance has become a major health problem in Taiwan.While some trends in antimicrobial resistance are universal, others appear tobe unique for specific regions.Methods: To determine the distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance of bacterialpathogens in a new hospital in southern Taiwan, surveillance data on majorbacterial pathogens isolated from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chia-Yifrom January 2002 through December 2002 were retrospectively analyzed.Results: The most common gram-positive isolate was Staphylococcus aureus.Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the two most commongram negative isolates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ranked the first amonggram-negative, glucose non-fermenting isolates, followed in the order of frequencyby Acinetobacter baumannii. Oxacillin resistance rate of S. aureuswas 58%, while vancomycin and teicoplanin remained effective against all ofthe isolates. The penicillin non-susceptibility rate of Streptococcus pneumoniaewas 52%, and it is notable that the rate of resistance to erythromycinwas 87%. Resistance to various antimicrobial agents for P. aeruginosa,Aeromonas hydrophila, and gram-negative enteric bacilli was very commonin our study. Infections caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii was notuncommon in this hospital but fortunately, imipenem resistant A. baumanniiwas rarely encountered. Antimicrobial resistance was common in nontyphoidSalmonella, S. choleraesuis and serogroup B isolates in particular.Conclusion: The high rates of antimicrobial resistance among these major bacterialpathogens in this new hospital are impressive and alarming. Judicious use ofantimicrobial agents can never be overemphasized. Continued surveillanceof the changes of resistance patterns over time is necessary.

  13. Regional Arbitration Institution for ECOWAS: Lessons from OHADA Common Court of Justice and Arbitration

    Onyema, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This article examines whether the establishment of a new regional arbitration institution similar to the OHADA CCJA within ECOWAS will solve the problem of states within the sub-region hosting few international arbitration references. It concludes that this will not solve this problem neither is another arbitration institution desirable within the sub-region. The article examines the harmonisation strategy adopted by OHADA; the CCJA as an arbitration institution; the remit of ECOWAS and the r...

  14. Attacks of common migraine or hortons headache may not be accompanied by changes in regional cerebral blood flow

    Vasospasm and cerebral ischemia, followed by cerebral and extracerebral vasodilation and hyperemia, are generally believed to form the common pathophysiology of the various subtypes of migraine. Mild forms of reactions are thought to result in common migraine (no neurological prodromes or accompaniments), and more severe reactions are thought to induce classical migraine. 8 induced common migraine attacks in 6 patients do not support this unitarian view, as no regional cerebral blood flow changes was found, but suggests a different pathophysiology in common migraine compaired to classical migraine. There are few features in Hortons headache to incriminate the cerebral vessels, and generally patients do not have symptoms attributable to cerebral involvement. In 6 out of 14 patients with known Hortons headache we succesfully induced an attack after alcohol alone or in combination with sublingual nitroglycerine. A slight hyperventilation occurred during the attack, correcting cerebral blood flow for these changes left mean CBF totally unchanged. No regional abnormalities occurred in any of the about 700 regions measured from during each investigation in neither the group with common migraine, nor in the patients with Hortons headache. (Author)

  15. Emission of isoprene from common Indian plant species and its implications for regional air quality.

    Singh, Rashmi; Singh, Abhai Pratap; Singh, M P; Kumar, Animesh; Varshney, C K

    2008-09-01

    Isoprene is most dominant volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by many plants. In this study 40 common Indian plant species were examined for isoprene emission using dynamic flow through enclosure chamber technique. Isoprene emission rates of plants species were found to vary from undetectable to 69.5 microg g(-1) h(-1) (Madhuca latifolia). Besides, an attempt has been made to evaluate suitability of 80 common Indian plant species for planting programmes. Out of 80 species, 29 species were moderate to high emitters (10 to < or =25 microg g(-1) h(-1)), 12 species were low emitter emitters (1 to < or =10 microg g(-1) h(-1)) and remaining 39 species were found to be negligible or non emitters (<1 microg g(-1) h(-1)) of isoprene. About 50% plant species selected for planting programmes in India were found to be moderate to high emitters of isoprene. PMID:17952698

  16. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture), supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the de...

  17. Control region mutations and the 'common deletion' are frequent in the mitochondrial DNA of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Tang Ze-Zong

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background North central China has some of the highest rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the world with cumulative mortality surpassing 20%. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA accumulates more mutations than nuclear DNA and because of its high abundance has been proposed as a early detection device for subjects with cancer at various sites. We wished to examine the prevalence of mtDNA mutation and polymorphism in subjects from this high risk area of China. Methods We used DNA samples isolated from tumors, adjacent normal esophageal tissue, and blood from 21 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases and DNA isolated from blood from 23 healthy persons. We completely sequenced the control region (D-Loop from each of these samples and used a PCR assay to assess the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion. Results Direct DNA sequencing revealed that 7/21 (33%, 95% CI = 17–55% tumor samples had mutations in the control region, with clustering evident in the hyper-variable segment 1 (HSV1 and the homopolymeric stretch surrounding position 309. The number of mutations per subject ranged from 1 to 16 and there were a number of instances of heteroplasmy. We detected the 4977 bp 'common deletion' in 92% of the tumor and adjacent normal esophageal tissue samples examined, whereas no evidence of the common deletion was found in corresponding peripheral blood samples. Conclusions Control region mutations were insufficiently common to warrant attempts to develop mtDNA mutation screening as a clinical test for ESCC. The common deletion was highly prevalent in the esophageal tissue of cancer cases but absent from peripheral blood. The potential utility of the common deletion in an early detection system will be pursued in further studies.

  18. System Synergy of Farming System and Common Property Resources in Mountain Regions: A Case Study of Himachal Pradesh

    Pathania, M.S.; Sharma, K. D.; Lal, Harbans

    2008-01-01

    The study conducted in the hilly region of Himachal Pradesh has revealed that the average size of operational holding in the region is small (0.69 ha) and therefore the common property resources (CPRs) assume significant importance for sustaining the livelihood of people. The ‘kuhls’ emanating water of CPRs are the main sources of irrigation. The consumption of different products from CPR lands has been found to increase with decrease in the size of landholdings, which underlines the need...

  19. Steering in loco-regional deep hyperthermia: evaluation of common practice with 3D-planning

    Full text: Radiotherapy plus hyperthermia is standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. In our unit the hyperthermia treatment of these patients is performed with a BSD 2000 3D deep hyperthermia system. In order to apply loco-regional deep hyperthermia at a maximum dose level, protocolized SAR steering is used to optimize tumor temperatures, avoid toxicity and minimize complaints due to local overheating. SAR steering is the term we use to address all changes in antenna settings that affect the distribution of dissipated power. The protocol used to guide SAR steering reflects an empirical strategy based on the experience gathered over the last decade. With the availability of sophisticated codes to predict patient specific EM fields, we are now able to prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of the applied amplitude and phase settings, and of the steering protocol. In this study, we evaluate the effect of prescribed steering actions in a patient model according to the treatment protocol. In particular, we assess the effectiveness of both phase and amplitude steering to control power dissipation at the tumor location and at the surface. From the simulations it is clear that the SAR focus within the pelvis falls apart in three different maxima. One located at the ventral side and associated with the os pubis, one located at the backside and associated with the lumbosacral vertebrae, and one in the middle associated with the tumor volume. Instead of continuously shifting the SAR focus, both phase- and amplitude steering in the AP direction merely changes the ratio of dissipated power in the three different areas. To elucidate the difference between phase and amplitude steering in the AP direction, we divide our patient model in three regions of interest. These regions are indicated as front (f), middle (m) and back (b). For these regions total integrated power absorption was calculated at a range of phase and amplitude settings. In figure 1a the ratio

  20. Bimodal zone of the soil textural triangle : common in tropical and subtropical regions

    Condappa, D. De; Galle, Sylvie; Dewandel, B.; Haverkamp, Randel

    2008-01-01

    The USDA soil textural triangle shows a zone where sods have a low silt fraction compared with the fractions of sand and day. These soils have a particle-size distribution function showing two local maxima in weight percentage for the particle-size ranges of sand and clay. The soils are referred to as bimodal soil, with an associated bimodal zone in the soil textural triangle. It was shown that processes of pedogenesis in tropical and subtropical regions favor the generation of bimodal soils....

  1. Survey of Common Practices among Oculofacial Surgeons in the Asia-Pacific Region: Management of Orbital Floor Blowout Fractures

    Koh, Victor; Chiam, Nathalie; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-01-01

    A web-based anonymous survey was performed to assess common practices of oculofacial surgeons in the management of traumatic orbital floor blowout fractures. A questionnaire which contained questions on several controversial topics in the management of orbital floor fractures was sent out via e-mail to 131 oculofacial surgeons in 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. A total response rate of 58.3% was achieved from May to December 2012. The preferred time for surgical intervention was with...

  2. New public commons and network of nuclear site regions for the post-Fukushima accident re-vitalization

    Due to the Fukushima NPP accidents on 11 March 2011, we have deadly lost the regional ties among local people, electricity consumers, and people involved in the nuclear research, development and businesses. Now we need the method to reconstruct the ties and further the activation of locals in accordance to the concept of 'New Public Commons'. And it is the most important key to recover the people's confidence for the nuclear business and promote the new siting and replacement of nuclear power stations. More than forty years have past since the earliest stage of invitation of nuclear power stations to regional areas in Japan. For this period, the efforts for the development of regional industries and the improvement of regional life obtained a level of results. However, now a new turn is required in the regional development, as the perception of wealthy has been gradually changed. The primary objective of this study is to make a network among regional areas where nuclear power stations and related facilities are located. It should further the understanding for nuclear energy, stimulate the 'emergence' through the cooperative works among regional areas. As a result, such efforts will enhance the Social Responsibility of conducts related to the nuclear energy. i.e., Nuclear SR (NSR). The basic frame of the NSR should be re-estimated in the reflection of 3.11 Fukushima NPP accidents. (author)

  3. Rural and Regional Development Policies in Europe: Social Farming in the Common Strategic Framework (Horizon 2020

    Antoni Francesc TULLA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Social Farming (SF is an emerging sector in the rural European context, but the European Economic and Social Committee (2013/C 44/07 emphasizes that SF should be planned and implemented under the new 2014-20 rural development policy because of the positive results obtained. The SF concept can be associated with agriculture as a multifunctional activity, giving agricultural practice new meanings and functions and incorporating social services, medical treatment and rehabilitation, and educational training and support. In addition, agriculture must be considered as a means of employment and social integration for groups as diverse as individuals who are unemployed or living with mental retardation, mental disorders, or addictions, among others. As a result, innovative SF activities are contributing to the social economy, rural and regional development, and support for a new agro-social paradigm. These are mainly activities linked with the endogenous resources of the territory that generate new enterprises, together with complementary activities that consolidate an economic network as the basis for regional development.

  4. Finding common task-related regions in fMRI data from multiple subjects by periodogram clustering and clustering ensemble.

    Ye, Jun; Li, Yehua; Lazar, Nicole A; Schaeffer, David J; McDowell, Jennifer E

    2016-07-10

    We propose an innovative and practically relevant clustering method to find common task-related brain regions among different subjects who respond to the same set of stimuli. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series data, we first cluster the voxels within each subject on a voxel by voxel basis. To extract signals out of noisy data, we estimate a new periodogram at each voxel using multi-tapering and low-rank spline smoothing and then use the periodogram as the main feature for clustering. We apply a divisive hierarchical clustering algorithm to the estimated periodograms within a single subject and identify the task-related region as the cluster of voxels that have periodograms with a peak frequency matching that of the stimulus sequence. Finally, we apply a machine learning technique called clustering ensemble to find common task-related regions across different subjects. The efficacy of the proposed approach is illustrated via a simulation study and a real fMRI data set. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26875570

  5. Feeding frequency and nutrient content of foods commonly consumed in the Iringa and Morogoro regions in Tanzania.

    Kinabo, J; Mnkeni, A P; Nyaruhucha, C N M; Msuya, J; Haug, Anna; Ishengoma, J

    2006-01-01

    Information on the nutrient content of foods commonly consumed (especially indigenous ones) in rural communities of Tanzania is limited. A study was conducted to determine the nutrient content of foods commonly consumed in the Iringa and Morogoro regions. A survey was carried out in six representative villages to identify the types of foods and to determine the frequency of their consumption. Representative samples of the raw foods were collected from local markets and brought to the laboratory for analyses. Determination of protein was done by the micro-Kjeldahl method, fat by Soxhlet extraction and moisture by an oven-drying method. The mineral content was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that there is a wide range of foods commonly consumed in the two regions, especially legumes and vegetables. The frequency of consumption depended mainly on the season, whereby during the dry season the frequency of consumption was two to three meals per day and in the rainy season was one to two meals per day. Foods rich in fats were nuts and oil seeds, while good sources of protein included legumes, nuts and oil seeds especially pumpkin seeds, which contained 34.36 g/100 g edible portion. Indigenous vegetables such as mnavu (Solunum nigrum), twangabilidiga, mlenda (Corchorusolitarus) and mkochwe were rich in iron and calcium, with values as high as 24.78 mg iron in twangalibidiga and 812.41 mg calcium/100 g edible portion in mkunungu. Magnesium was highest in mtosi (288.58 mg) and copper was highest in mkunungu (0.49 mg). Mkochwe contained the highest amount of manganese. This study shows that foods locally produced in these regions are rich in nutrients, especially micronutrients, and therefore if consumed in adequate amounts may help to prevent dietary-related disorders. PMID:16849110

  6. Extracting the regional common-mode component of GPS station position time series from dense continuous network

    Tian, Yunfeng; Shen, Zheng-Kang

    2016-02-01

    We develop a spatial filtering method to remove random noise and extract the spatially correlated transients (i.e., common-mode component (CMC)) that deviate from zero mean over the span of detrended position time series of a continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) network. The technique utilizes a weighting scheme that incorporates two factors—distances between neighboring sites and their correlations of long-term residual position time series. We use a grid search algorithm to find the optimal thresholds for deriving the CMC that minimizes the root-mean-square (RMS) of the filtered residual position time series. Comparing to the principal component analysis technique, our method achieves better (>13% on average) reduction of residual position scatters for the CGPS stations in western North America, eliminating regional transients of all spatial scales. It also has advantages in data manipulation: less intervention and applicable to a dense network of any spatial extent. Our method can also be used to detect CMC irrespective of its origins (i.e., tectonic or nontectonic), if such signals are of particular interests for further study. By varying the filtering distance range, the long-range CMC related to atmospheric disturbance can be filtered out, uncovering CMC associated with transient tectonic deformation. A correlation-based clustering algorithm is adopted to identify stations cluster that share the common regional transient characteristics.

  7. Survey of Common Practices among Oculofacial Surgeons in the Asia-Pacific Region: Management of Orbital Floor Blowout Fractures.

    Koh, Victor; Chiam, Nathalie; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-09-01

    A web-based anonymous survey was performed to assess common practices of oculofacial surgeons in the management of traumatic orbital floor blowout fractures. A questionnaire which contained questions on several controversial topics in the management of orbital floor fractures was sent out via e-mail to 131 oculofacial surgeons in 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. A total response rate of 58.3% was achieved from May to December 2012. The preferred time for surgical intervention was within 2 weeks for adult patients, porous polyethylene implant was the most popular choice, and most surgeons preferred the transconjunctival approach. Postoperatively, diplopia was the most commonly encountered complication and most oculofacial surgeons reviewed their patients regularly for up to 12 months. We report the results of the first survey of oculofacial surgeons within the Asia-Pacific region on the management of orbital floor blowout fractures. Compared with previous surveys (from year 2000 to 2004), the duration to surgical intervention was comparable but there was a contrasting change in preferred surgical approach and choice of orbital implant. PMID:25136408

  8. Highly conserved non-coding sequences and the 18q critical region for short stature: a common mechanism of disease?

    Flavio Rizzolio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD are heterogeneous disorders with several different etiologies and they are responsible for most cases of short stature. Mutations in different genes have been identified but still many patients did not present mutations in any of the known genes. Chromosomal rearrangements may also be involved in short stature and, among others, deletions of 18q23 defined a critical region for the disorder. No gene was yet identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now report a balanced translocation X;18 in a patient presenting a breakpoint in 18q23 that was surprisingly mapped about 500 Kb distal from the short stature critical region. It separated from the flanking SALL3 gene a region enriched in highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNE that appeared to be regulatory sequences, active as enhancers or silencers during embryonic development. CONCLUSION: We propose that, during pituitary development, the 18q rearrangement may alter expression of 18q genes or of X chromosome genes that are translocated next to the HCNEs. Alteration of expression of developmentally regulated genes by translocation of HCNEs may represent a common mechanism for disorders associated to isolated chromosomal rearrangements.

  9. Common premotor regions for the perception and production of prosody and correlations with empathy and prosodic ability.

    Lisa Aziz-Zadeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prosody, the melody and intonation of speech, involves the rhythm, rate, pitch and voice quality to relay linguistic and emotional information from one individual to another. A significant component of human social communication depends upon interpreting and responding to another person's prosodic tone as well as one's own ability to produce prosodic speech. However there has been little work on whether the perception and production of prosody share common neural processes, and if so, how these might correlate with individual differences in social ability. METHODS: The aim of the present study was to determine the degree to which perception and production of prosody rely on shared neural systems. Using fMRI, neural activity during perception and production of a meaningless phrase in different prosodic intonations was measured. Regions of overlap for production and perception of prosody were found in premotor regions, in particular the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG. Activity in these regions was further found to correlate with how high an individual scored on two different measures of affective empathy as well as a measure on prosodic production ability. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate, for the first time, that areas that are important for prosody production may also be utilized for prosody perception, as well as other aspects of social communication and social understanding, such as aspects of empathy and prosodic ability.

  10. [Analysis of genetic diversity of Russian regional populations based on common STR markers used in DNA identification].

    Pesik, V Yu; Fedunin, A A; Agdzhoyan, A T; Utevska, O M; Chukhraeva, M I; Evseeva, I V; Churnosov, M I; Lependina, I N; Bogunov, Yu V; Bogunova, A A; Ignashkin, M A; Yankovsky, N K; Balanovska, E V; Orekhov, V A; Balanovsky, O P

    2014-06-01

    We conducted the first genetic analysis of a wide a range of rural Russian populations in European Russia with a panel of common DNA markers commonly used in criminalistics genetic identification. We examined a total of 647 samples from indigenous ethnic Russian populations in Arkhangelsk, Belgorod, Voronezh, Kursk, Rostov, Ryazan, and Orel regions. We employed a multiplex genotyping kit, COrDIS Plus, to genotype Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci, which included the genetic marker panel officially recommended for DNA identification in the Russian Federation, the United States, and the European Union. In the course of our study, we created a database of allelic frequencies, examined the distribution of alleles and genotypes in seven rural Russian populations, and defined the genetic relationships between these populations. We found that, although multidimensional analysis indicated a difference between the Northern gene pool and the rest of the Russian European populations, a pairwise comparison using 19 STR markers among all populations did not reveal significant differences. This is in concordance with previous studies, which examined up to 12 STR markers of urban Russian populations. Therefore, the database of allelic frequencies created in this study can be applied for forensic examinations and DNA identification among the ethnic Russian population over European Russia. We also noted a decrease in the levels of heterozygosity in the northern Russian population compared to ethnic populations in southern and central Russia, which is consistent with trends identified previously using classical gene markers and analysis of mitochondrial DNA. PMID:25715463

  11. A maximum likelihood QTL analysis reveals common genome regions controlling resistance to Salmonella colonization and carrier-state

    Thanh-Son Tran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium of the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica are significant causes of human food poisoning. Fowl carrying these bacteria often show no clinical disease, with detection only established post-mortem. Increased resistance to the carrier state in commercial poultry could be a way to improve food safety by reducing the spread of these bacteria in poultry flocks. Previous studies identified QTLs for both resistance to carrier state and resistance to Salmonella colonization in the same White Leghorn inbred lines. Until now, none of the QTLs identified was common to the two types of resistance. All these analyses were performed using the F2 inbred or backcross option of the QTLExpress software based on linear regression. In the present study, QTL analysis was achieved using Maximum Likelihood with QTLMap software, in order to test the effect of the QTL analysis method on QTL detection. We analyzed the same phenotypic and genotypic data as those used in previous studies, which were collected on 378 animals genotyped with 480 genome-wide SNP markers. To enrich these data, we added eleven SNP markers located within QTLs controlling resistance to colonization and we looked for potential candidate genes co-localizing with QTLs. Results In our case the QTL analysis method had an important impact on QTL detection. We were able to identify new genomic regions controlling resistance to carrier-state, in particular by testing the existence of two segregating QTLs. But some of the previously identified QTLs were not confirmed. Interestingly, two QTLs were detected on chromosomes 2 and 3, close to the locations of the major QTLs controlling resistance to colonization and to candidate genes involved in the immune response identified in other, independent studies. Conclusions Due to the lack of stability of the QTLs detected, we suggest that interesting regions for further studies are those that were

  12. Common Property Regimes (Regole) in the Veneto Region (Italy): institutional linkages with Municipalities in the integrated forest landscape management

    Favero, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Forest and pasture Commons are a shared trait of Alpine rural areas, with a total coverage of 1,668,851 hectares, i.e. almost 10% of the total agricultural area of the country (Istat, 2012). Particularly in the Italian Eastern Alps, forest Common Properties have a long-lasting tradition. Mostly called `Regole´ (singular: `Regola´), these were relevant institutions in the past, superintending to all aspects of community life and acting as essential regulator of natural resources use. Sin...

  13. The region of XRCC1 which harbours the three most common nonsynonymous polymorphic variants, is essential for the scaffolding function of XRCC1

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Gilljam, Karin Margaretha;

    2012-01-01

    most common amino acid variants of XRCC1, Arg194Trp, Arg280His and Arg399Gln, are located within the region comprising the NLS and BRCT1 domains, and these variants may be associated with increased incidence of specific types of cancer. While we could not detect differences in the intra...

  14. The Minho-Lima sub-region as a common destination : tourist potential and agents’ commitment on it

    Cadima Ribeiro, Jose; Cruz Vareiro, Laurentina; Pardellas de Blas, Xulio

    2006-01-01

    Empirical evidence shows that tourism can give a real contribution to regional development and, in the case of certain remote and economic lagged territories, it is the sector best placed to achieve this goal. This role of touristic activity as to do, namely, with the possibility of taking profit from endogenous resources of these territories and in the particular case of Minho-Lima sub-region an important tourist potential exists seating in the variety and singularity of its resources - the ...

  15. The Minho-Lima Sub-Region As a Common Destination: Agents’ Commitment on It.

    Jose Cadima Ribeiro; Laurentina Cruz Vareiro; Xulio Pardellas de Blas

    2006-01-01

    Empirical evidence shows that tourism can give a real contribution to regional development and, in the case of certain remote and economic lagged territories, it is the sector best placed to achieve this goal. This role of touristic activity as to do, namely, with the possibility of taking profit from endogenous resources of these territories and in the particular case of Minho-Lima sub-region an important tourist potential exists seating in the variety and singularity of its resources - the ...

  16. Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A;

    2014-01-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs u...

  17. Human in vitro induced T regulatory cells and memory T cells share common demethylation of specific FOXP3 promoter region

    Bégin, Philippe; Schulze, Janika; Baron, Udo; Olek, Sven; Rebecca N Bauer; Passerini, Laura; Baccheta, Rosa; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The FOXP3 gene is the master regulator for T regulatory cells and is under tight DNA methylation control at the Treg specific demethylated region (TSDR) in its first intron. This said, methylation of its promoter region, the significance of which is unknown, has also been associated with various immune-related disease states such as asthma, food allergy, auto-immunity and cancer. Here, we used induced T regulatory cells (iTreg) as a target cell population to identify candidate hypo...

  18. Security policies of India, Brazil and South Africa: Regional security contexts as constraints for a common agenda

    Flemes, Daniel; Costa Vaz, Alcides

    2011-01-01

    In the course of the last decade, the IBSA states (India, Brazil, South Africa) have increased their weight in the shifting global order, particularly in economic affairs. Can the same be said about the IBSA states' position in the international security hierarchy? After locating the IBSA coalition in the shifting world order, we analyze its member states' willingness and capacity to coordinate their security policies and build a common global security agenda. In addition, we explore the stat...

  19. Progeny of Osmia lignaria from distinct regions differ in developmental phenology and survival under a common thermal regime.

    Pitts-Singer, Theresa L; Cane, James H; Trostle, Glen

    2014-08-01

    Many insects, including some bees, have extensive subcontinental distributions that can differ in climatic conditions. Within and beyond these distributions, humans intentionally transport beneficial insects, including bees, to non-natal geographic locations. Insects also are experiencing unprecedented climatic change in their resident localities. For solitary bees, we know very little about the adaptive plasticity and geographic variation in developmental physiology that accommodates the different climates experienced within distributional ranges. Osmia lignaria Say (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) is a widely distributed North American spring-emerging bee being developed as a managed pollinator for tree fruit crops, including almonds. We examined the development and survival of O. lignaria progeny that were descended from populations sourced from southern California, western Washington, and northern Utah, and then were reared together under an hourly and weekly temperature regime simulating those of a California almond-growing region. We found that developmental physiologies of Washington and Utah progeny were generally similar. However, California progeny developed slower, were more metabolically active, and survived better under California conditions than did populations native to regions at higher latitudes. Regardless of geographic origin, cocooned adults managed under prescribed thermal regimes emerged faster and lived longer after wintering. Progeny of parents from different regions exhibited some acclimatory plasticity in developmental phenologies to a novel climatic regime, but overall their responses reflected their geographic origins. This outcome is consistent with their developmental phenologies being largely heritable adaptations to regional climates. PMID:24879969

  20. Control region mutations and the 'common deletion' are frequent in the mitochondrial DNA of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    North central China has some of the highest rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the world with cumulative mortality surpassing 20%. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) accumulates more mutations than nuclear DNA and because of its high abundance has been proposed as a early detection device for subjects with cancer at various sites. We wished to examine the prevalence of mtDNA mutation and polymorphism in subjects from this high risk area of China. We used DNA samples isolated from tumors, adjacent normal esophageal tissue, and blood from 21 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases and DNA isolated from blood from 23 healthy persons. We completely sequenced the control region (D-Loop) from each of these samples and used a PCR assay to assess the presence of the 4977 bp common deletion. Direct DNA sequencing revealed that 7/21 (33%, 95% CI = 17–55%) tumor samples had mutations in the control region, with clustering evident in the hyper-variable segment 1 (HSV1) and the homopolymeric stretch surrounding position 309. The number of mutations per subject ranged from 1 to 16 and there were a number of instances of heteroplasmy. We detected the 4977 bp 'common deletion' in 92% of the tumor and adjacent normal esophageal tissue samples examined, whereas no evidence of the common deletion was found in corresponding peripheral blood samples. Control region mutations were insufficiently common to warrant attempts to develop mtDNA mutation screening as a clinical test for ESCC. The common deletion was highly prevalent in the esophageal tissue of cancer cases but absent from peripheral blood. The potential utility of the common deletion in an early detection system will be pursued in further studies

  1. Common SNP-Based Haplotype Analysis of the 4p16.3 Huntington Disease Gene Region

    Lee, Jong-Min; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Myers, Richard H.; Hayden, Michael R.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Nance, Martha; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Griguoli, Annamaria; Di Donato, Stefano; Gomez-Tortosa, Estrella; Ayuso, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Age at the onset of motor symptoms in Huntington disease (HD) is determined largely by the length of a CAG repeat expansion in HTT but is also influenced by other genetic factors. We tested whether common genetic variation near the mutation site is associated with differences in the distribution of expanded CAG alleles or age at the onset of motor symptoms. To define disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we compared 4p16.3 SNPs in HD subjects with population controls in a...

  2. New public commons and network of nuclear site regions for the post-Fukushima accident re-vitalization

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accidents on March 11 2011, the landscape of the community of nuclear energy R and D and usage has been changing in various aspects here in Japan. With such recognition, the networking of nuclear site regions as well as consumer cities is proposed for obtaining novel-sense societal confidence, on the basis of on-going practice of atom-sports such as international MaxiMarathon and domestoic Tour de Atom. (author)

  3. Stability and adaptability of carioca common bean genotypes in states of the central South Region of Brazil

    Helton Santos Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify ‘Carioca’ common bean genotypes with high yield adaptability andstability in central South Brazil, based on different analysis methods. The value of cultivation and use (VCU of 16 genotypeswas evaluated in 26 trials in a randomized complete block design with three replications, in the states of Santa Catarina, SãoPaulo and Paraná, in 2003 and 2004. Grain yield data were subjected to analysis of variance, of stability and adaptability,using the methodologies of Lin and Binns, Annichiarico, Eberhart and Russell, Cruz et al. and AMMI. Several of themethodologies indicated the genotypes BRS Estilo and CNFC 9518 for high yield, high adaptability and high stability. Theyield, stability and adaptability of cultivar Pérola, widely grown in the country, were lower than of the new elite genotypesobtained by the breeding programs.

  4. Evaluation of resistance of commonly used antibiotics on clinical case of Staphylococcus capitis from Assir region, Saudi Arabia

    Nazar M Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus capitis is a coagulase-negative species (CoNS of Staphylococcus. It causes antimicrobial resistance for nosocomial infections as well as for community-acquired infections. This case report involves a 51-year-old, married Saudi patient. He got admitted to the male medical ward of Aseer Central Hospital, with severe chest infection. Clinical examination, X-ray, and laboratory investigations were performed which involved bactech, culture media, antibiotic sensitivity test using disk diffusion [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC] and molecular [polymerase chain reaction (PCR] for detection of CoNS of Staphylococcus species and detection of the mecA gene. Laboratory data were recorded in special formats and analyzed by statistical computer program (SPSS. Results showed the resistance of isolated S. capitis to many commonly used antibiotics.

  5. Common proviral integration region on mouse chromosome 7 in lymphomas and myelogenous leukemias induced by Friend murine leukemia virus.

    Silver, J.; Kozak, C

    1986-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) induces a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms 2 to 12 months after inoculation into newborn mice. These neoplasms are clonal or oligoclonal and contain a small number of F-MuLV insertions in high-molecular-weight DNA. To investigate whether different tumors have proviral insertions in the same region, a provirus-cellular DNA junction fragment from an F-MuLV-induced myelogenous leukemia was cloned in lambda gtWES, and a portion of the flanking cellular DNA ...

  6. Association between common germline genetic variation in 94 candidate genes or regions and risks of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    Quaye, Lydia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J;

    2009-01-01

    date, we have genotyped 340 SNPs from 94 candidate genes or regions, in up to 1,491 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 3,145 unaffected controls from three different population based studies from the UK, Denmark and USA. RESULTS: After adjusting for population stratification by genomic...... population stratification) P-trend = 0.006). We did not find statistically significant associations when the combined data for all SNPs were analysed using an admixture maximum likelihood (AML) experiment-wise test for association (P-heterogeneity = 0.051; P-trend = 0.068). CONCLUSION: These data suggest...

  7. Prevalence and correlates of common mental disorders among mothers of young children in Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania.

    Jacqueline G Uriyo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although poor maternal mental health is a major public health problem, with detrimental effects on the individual, her children and society, information on its correlates in low-income countries is sparse. AIMS: This study investigates the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD among at-risk mothers, and explores its associations with sociodemographic factors. METHODS: This population-based survey of mothers of children aged 0-36 months used the 14-item Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ. Mothers whose response was "yes" to 8 or more items on the scale were defined as "at risk of CMD." RESULTS: Of the 1,922 mothers (15-48 years, 28.8% were at risk of CMD. Risk of CMD was associated with verbal abuse, physical abuse, a partner who did not help with the care of the child, being in a polygamous relationship, a partner with low levels of education, and a partner who smoked cigarettes. Cohabiting appeared to be protective. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results indicate the significance of the quality of relations with one's partner in shaping maternal mental health. The high proportion of mothers who are at risk of CMD emphasizes the importance of developing evidence-based mental health programmes as part of the care package aimed at improving maternal well-being in Tanzania and other similar settings.

  8. Capillary electrophoresis of an 11-plex mtDNA coding region SNP single base extension assay for discrimination of the most common Caucasian HV1/HV2 mitotype.

    Vallone, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    The typing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located throughout the human mitochondrial genome assists in resolving individuals with an identical HV1/HV2 haplotype. A set of 11 sites which were selected for distinguishing individuals of a common Western European Caucasian HV1/HV2 mitotype was incorporated into a single base extension (SBE) assay. The assay was optimized for multiplex detection of sequence polymorphisms at positions 3010, 4793, 10211, 5004, 7028, 7202, 16519, 12858, 4580, 477, and 14470 in the mitochondrial genome. PCR primers were designed to allow for multiplex amplification of unique regions in the mitochondrial genome followed by an 11-plex SBE reaction using the SNaPshot(®) reagent kit. Separation and detection can be accomplished with a capillary-based electrophoresis platform commonly found in most forensic laboratories. PMID:22139659

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 isolates from common beans in Black Sea coastal region, Turkey, based on ITS-5.8S rDNA

    KILIÇOĞLU, Melike ÇEBİ; ÖZKOÇ, İbrahim

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 114 Rhizoctonia solani isolates were obtained from diseased common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants from the Black Sea coastal region of Turkey. Genetic variation was determined among R. solani anastomosis group 4 (AG-4) subgroups (AG-4 HG-I and AG-4 HG-II). ITS-5.8 rDNA sequences of these isolates were aligned with other known R. solani sequences from GenBank, and distance and parsimony analysis were used to determine phylogenetic relationships. The R. solani AG-4 isolates ...

  10. Region 9 Common Headers (SDWIS)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  11. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  12. Factors Determining Allocation of Common Costs in the Financial Services Sector: A Study of Rural Banks in the Ashanti Region of Ghana

    Ben K. Agyei-Mensah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the necessary conditions for organisational controls to work is that the manager whose performance is being measured must be able to affect the results in a material way. The controllability principle in management accounting is one of the central tenets of responsibility accounting, (Merchant and Van der Stede, 2007.The study assessed whether in measuring the performance of these branches factors that are within the control of these branches are considered. In addition the study examined the impact of contingent factors on the application of the controllability principle.The study found out that branch managers do not have full autonomy and control over common resources costs which form part of their evaluation, even though management accounting theory suggest that.The study findings also revealed that profitability (i.e. operating profit margin, Return on shareholders' capital and liquidity (i.e. current ratio and working capital ratio have varied impact on the use of performance measures, and the allocation of common costs to branches in the rural banks in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.

  13. BAC-end microsatellites from intra and inter-genic regions of the common bean genome and their correlation with cytogenetic features.

    Matthew Wohlgemuth Blair

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites are very useful for genetic mapping. In this study novel SSRs were identified in BAC-end sequences (BES from non-contigged, non-overlapping bacterial artificial clones (BACs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. These so called "singleton" BACs were from the G19833 Andean gene pool physical map and the new BES-SSR markers were used for the saturation of the inter-gene pool, DOR364×G19833 genetic map. A total of 899 SSR loci were found among the singleton BES, but only 346 loci corresponded to the single di- or tri-nucleotide motifs that were likely to be polymorphic (ATT or AG motifs, principally and useful for primer design and individual marker mapping. When these novel SSR markers were evaluated in the DOR364×G19833 population parents, 136 markers revealed polymorphism and 106 were mapped. Genetic mapping resulted in a map length of 2291 cM with an average distance between markers of 5.2 cM. The new genetic map was compared to the most recent cytogenetic analysis of common bean chromosomes. We found that the new singleton BES-SSR were helpful in filling peri-centromeric spaces on the cytogenetic map. Short genetic distances between some new singleton-derived BES-SSR markers was common showing suppressed recombination in these regions compared to other parts of the genome. The correlation of singleton-derived SSR marker distribution with other cytogenetic features of the bean genome is discussed.

  14. Geographical Analysis for Detecting High-Risk Areas for Bovine/Human Rabies Transmitted by the Common Hematophagous Bat in the Amazon Region, Brazil.

    Fernanda A G de Andrade

    Full Text Available The common hematophagous bat, Desmodus rotundus, is one of the main wild reservoirs of rabies virus in several regions in Latin America. New production practices and changed land use have provided environmental features that have been very favorable for D. rotundus bat populations, making this species the main transmitter of rabies in the cycle that involves humans and herbivores. In the Amazon region, these features include a mosaic of environmental, social, and economic components, which together creates areas with different levels of risk for human and bovine infections, as presented in this work in the eastern Brazilian Amazon.We geo-referenced a total of 175 cases of rabies, of which 88% occurred in bovines and 12% in humans, respectively, and related these cases to a number of different geographical and biological variables. The spatial distribution was analyzed using the Kernel function, while the association with independent variables was assessed using a multi-criterion Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP technique.The spatiotemporal analysis of the occurrence of rabies in bovines and humans found reduction in the number of cases in the eastern state of Pará, where no more cases were recorded in humans, whereas high infection rates were recorded in bovines in the northeastern part of the state, and low rates in the southeast. The areas of highest risk for bovine rabies are found in the proximity of rivers and highways. In the case of human rabies, the highest concentration of high-risk areas was found where the highway network coincides with high densities of rural and indigenous populations.The high-risk areas for human and bovine rabies are patchily distributed, and related to extensive deforested areas, large herds of cattle, and the presence of highways. These findings provide an important database for the generation of epidemiological models that could support the development of effective prevention measures and controls.

  15. Geographical Analysis for Detecting High-Risk Areas for Bovine/Human Rabies Transmitted by the Common Hematophagous Bat in the Amazon Region, Brazil

    Begot, Alberto L.; Ramos, Ofir de S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The common hematophagous bat, Desmodus rotundus, is one of the main wild reservoirs of rabies virus in several regions in Latin America. New production practices and changed land use have provided environmental features that have been very favorable for D. rotundus bat populations, making this species the main transmitter of rabies in the cycle that involves humans and herbivores. In the Amazon region, these features include a mosaic of environmental, social, and economic components, which together creates areas with different levels of risk for human and bovine infections, as presented in this work in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. Methodology We geo-referenced a total of 175 cases of rabies, of which 88% occurred in bovines and 12% in humans, respectively, and related these cases to a number of different geographical and biological variables. The spatial distribution was analyzed using the Kernel function, while the association with independent variables was assessed using a multi-criterion Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique. Findings The spatiotemporal analysis of the occurrence of rabies in bovines and humans found reduction in the number of cases in the eastern state of Pará, where no more cases were recorded in humans, whereas high infection rates were recorded in bovines in the northeastern part of the state, and low rates in the southeast. The areas of highest risk for bovine rabies are found in the proximity of rivers and highways. In the case of human rabies, the highest concentration of high-risk areas was found where the highway network coincides with high densities of rural and indigenous populations. Conclusion The high-risk areas for human and bovine rabies are patchily distributed, and related to extensive deforested areas, large herds of cattle, and the presence of highways. These findings provide an important database for the generation of epidemiological models that could support the development of effective prevention

  16. The Late Pleistocene-Holocene community development in Central and SE-Europe in direct fossil record: scope of the approach, common patterns and inter-regional differences.

    Horacek, Ivan; Lozek, Vojen

    2010-05-01

    continuous sedimentary sequences from different regions of Czech Republic and Slovakia (850 community samples, 29,800 MNI) and neighbouring countries of Central Europe. Despite common general trends we demonstrated stricking local and regional specificities. Among other they include (a) continuous survival of several woodland elements (Clethrionomys glareolus, Sorex araneus, Micotus subterraneus, Microtus agrestis) throughout Weichselian (including LGM) in the Carpathians, (b) prolonged survival of the glacial elements Ochotona pusilla and Microtus gregalis in Pannonian basin and (c) Dicrostonyx gulielmi in the Carpathian foredeep, contrasting to (d) the early disappearance of them in S-Germany and Bohemia, and (e) similar difference were found also in other cenologic traits. While the glacial communities were nearly homogenous in their structure throughout whole the region, the Holocene development produced a considerable faunal provincialism, which was the most pronounced during Boreal. In contrast to central Europe, the available sequences from the SE-Europe and Asia Minor show only minute faunal changes during the Vistulian and Holocene, no essential rearrangements in community structure were observed (at least as the core species are concerned) and except for Lagurus no glacial immigrant did invade the region. At the same time a degree of local provincialism was continuously high and, in a regional scale, it continuously exceeded that of the Boreal central Europe.

  17. Common Cold

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  18. Evaluation of heavy metal pollution in water wells and soil using common leafy green plant indicators in the Al-Kharj region, Saudi Arabia.

    Al-Hammad, Bushra Ahmed; Abd El-Salam, Magda Magdy

    2016-06-01

    This study was performed to determine the levels of eight heavy metals in irrigation well water and soil and to assess the suitability of some leafy green plants that are commonly cultivated in the Al-Kharj region, Saudi Arabia, for human consumption using an atomic absorption spectrometer. The mean concentrations of metals ranged from 0.0001 to 0.436 mg/L in well water and from 0.248 to 164.52 mg/kg in soil. The heavy metal concentrations showed significant differences among the different leafy green plants studied. Parsley (4.98 mg/kg) exhibited higher levels of Pb than other leafy green plants, whereas mallow (0.097 mg/kg) revealed greater amounts of Cd than other plants. All of the leafy green plants retained essential metals (Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn) more than the toxic metals (Pb and Cd). The levels of some of the metals in the leafy green plants were found to meet the FAO/WHO-recommended limits. The monitoring of heavy metals in leafy green plants must be continued because these plants are the main source of food for humans in many parts of the world and are considered to be bio-indicators for environmental pollution. PMID:27147237

  19. Effects of two common polymorphisms in the 3' untranslated regions of estrogen receptor β on mRNA stability and translatability

    Gustafsson Jan-Åke

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study represents the first attempt to functionally characterize two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTRs of estrogen receptor β (ERβ, focusing on the differences between alleles with regard to mRNA stability and translatability. These two ERβ SNPs have been investigated for association with disease in a large number of reports. Results Here we examined allelic expression in breast tumor samples from heterozygous individuals. A significant difference in mRNA levels of the two alleles was observed for one of the SNPs. A cell model system was employed to further investigate potential molecular effects of the two SNPs. We used a modified plasmid, containing the ERβ promoter and ERβ 3'UTRs which include the different alleles of investigated SNPs. Quantitative Real-Time PCR was used to determine mRNA levels after inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D, and a luciferase assay was used to determine protein levels. The obtained results suggested that there was no difference in mRNA stability or translatability between the alleles of investigated SNPs. Conclusion Our results indicate that observed associations between ERβ 3'UTR SNPs and disease susceptibility are due to linkage disequilibrium with another gene variant, rather than the variant itself being the susceptibility factor.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common sea slater, Ligia oceanica (Crustacea, Isopoda bears a novel gene order and unusual control region features

    Podsiadlowski Lars

    2006-09-01

    present the last common ancestor of these isopods. Beyond that, the positions of three tRNA genes differ in the two isopod species. Strand bias in nucleotide frequency is reversed in both isopod species compared to other Malacostraca. This is probably due to a reversal of the replication origin, which is further supported by the fact that the hairpin structure typically found in the control region shows a reversed orientation in the isopod species, compared to other crustaceans.

  1. One-Class Support Vector Machines Identify the Language and Default Mode Regions As Common Patterns of Structural Alterations in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Retico, Alessandra; Gori, Ilaria; Giuliano, Alessia; Muratori, Filippo; Calderoni, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The identification of reliable brain endophenotypes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been hampered to date by the heterogeneity in the neuroanatomical abnormalities detected in this condition. To handle the complexity of neuroimaging data and to convert brain images in informative biomarkers of pathology, multivariate analysis techniques based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) have been widely used in several disease conditions. They are usually trained to distinguish patients from healthy control subjects by making a binary classification. Here, we propose the use of the One-Class Classification (OCC) or Data Description method that, in contrast to two-class classification, is based on a description of one class of objects only. This approach, by defining a multivariate normative rule on one class of subjects, allows recognizing examples from a different category as outliers. We applied the OCC to 314 regional features extracted from brain structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of young children with ASD (21 males and 20 females) and control subjects (20 males and 20 females), matched on age [range: 22-72 months of age; mean = 49 months] and non-verbal intelligence quotient (NVIQ) [range: 31-123; mean = 73]. We demonstrated that a common pattern of features characterize the ASD population. The OCC SVM trained on the group of ASD subjects showed the following performances in the ASD vs. controls separation: the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.74 for the male and 0.68 for the female population, respectively. Notably, the ASD vs. controls discrimination results were maximized when evaluated on the subsamples of subjects with NVIQ ≥ 70, leading to AUC = 0.81 for the male and AUC = 0.72 for the female populations, respectively. Language regions and regions from the default mode network-posterior cingulate cortex, pars opercularis and pars triangularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, and transverse temporal gyrus

  2. Identification of genes from a 500-kb region at 7q11.23 that is commonly deleted in Williams syndrome patients

    Osborne, L.R.; Rommens, J.; Tsui, Lap-Chee [Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem developmental disorder caused by the deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23. Hemizygosity of the elastin (ELN) gene can account for the vascular and connective tissue abnormalities observed in WS patients, but the genes that contribute to features such as infantile hypercalcemia, dysmorphic facies, and mental retardation remain to be identified. In addition, the size of the genomic interval commonly deleted in WS patients has not been established. In this study we report the characterization of a 500-kb region that was determined to be deleted in our collection of WS patients. A detailed physical map consisting of cosmid, P1 artificial chromosomes, and yeast artificial chromosomes was constructed and used for gene isolation experiments. Using the techniques of direct cDNA selection and genomic DNA sequencing, a three known genes (ELN, LIMK1, and RFC2), a novel gene (WSCR1) with homology to RNA-binding proteins, a gene with homology to restin, and four other putative transcription units were identified. LIMK1 is a protein kinase with two repeats of the LIM/double zinc finger motif, and it is highly expressed in brain. RFC2 is the 40-kDa ATP-binding sub-unit of replication factor C, which is known to play a role in the elongation of DNA catalyzed by DNA polymerase {delta} and {epsilon}. LIMK1 and WSCR1 may be particularly relevant when explaining cognitive defects observed in WS patients. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Retrospective Study to Determine Diagnostic Utility of 6 Commonly Used Lung Cancer Biomarkers Among Han and Uygur Population in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of People's Republic of China.

    Yang-Chun, Feng; Min, Feng; Di, Zhang; Yan-Chun, Huang

    2016-05-01

    serum tumor markers also proved the result of cluster analysis. No matter SCLC or NSCLC, the positives rate of all tumor markers were increasing as clinical stage advancing. Pro-GRP had higher positive rate than NSE in limited stage of SCLC. CA125 had the highest positive rate in I and II stage of NSCLC, and CYFRA21-1 had the highest positive rate in III and IV stage of NSCLC. CEA and CA125 were beneficial to diagnose adenocarcinoma, CYFRA21-1, and SCC identified squamous cell cancer better.Only SCC level was higher in Han population than Uygur population because of the differences of smoking constituent ratio between 2 populations. So, it could be unified to research the application value of the 6 indicators for the Han and Uygur population. Then, we suggested a primary diagnostic utility of 6 commonly by lung cancer biomarkers in both the Han and Uygur populations in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of People's Republic of China. PMID:27149479

  4. Common learning

    Cripps, M.; Ely, J.; Mailath, G.; Samuelson, L.

    2007-01-01

    Consider two agents who learn the value of an unknown parameter by observing a sequence of private signals. The signals are independent and identically distributed across time but not necessarily across agents. We show that when each agent's signal space is finite, the agents will commonly learn the value of the parameter, that is, that the true value of the parameter will become approximate common knowledge. The essential step in this argument is to express the expectation of one agent's sig...

  5. Solid miscibility of common-anion lithium and sodium halides. Experimental determination of the region of demixing in lithium bromide + sodium bromide

    Oonk, H.A.J.; Wijk, H.J. van; Doornhof, D.

    1984-01-01

    The region of demixing of solid lithium bromide + sodium bromide mixtures has been measured by X-ray diffraction. The critical temperature of mixing corresponding to a thermodynamic fit of the experimental data is 513 K. Estimates are given of the regions of demixing in solid lithium chloride + sodi

  6. Creative Commons

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  7. 13N-nitrate uptake sites and rhizobium-infectible region in a single root of common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris] and soybean

    The positron emitting tracer-imaging system (PETIS) was used to determine whether it was possible to obtain on image of 13N distribution in common bean in which a single root was fed with a liquid medium containing nitrate at different concentrations with different 13N specific activities. The distribution of the images of the 13N atoms in the root could be obtained over a wide range of nitrate concentrations and 13N specific activities in the medium. As for nitrate stress on leguminous root nodulation, the positional relationship between the nitrate uptake sites and root hair just elongating area, where rhizobia capably initiate their infection, was studied in common bean and soybean. PETIS gave direct evidence that single roots of both common bean and soybean showed one or two dense 13N-distribution areas after 2 min pulse-feeding of 13NO3(-). These areas remained stable over 30 min, and the first dense site, which was common in all the examined roots, extended over ca. 1 cm above the root apex. Microscopic observation revealed that this area covered both sites of rhizobium infection and of early nodule development in a common bean and soybean single root

  8. Common proteomic changes in the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and particular evidence for involvement of cornu ammonis regions 2 and 3.

    2011-05-01

    The hippocampus is strongly implicated in schizophrenia and, to a lesser degree, bipolar disorder. Proteomic investigations of the different regions of the hippocampus may help us to clarify the basis and the disease specificity of the changes.

  9. Evolution in biosynthetic pathways: two enzymes catalyzing consecutive steps in methionine biosynthesis originate from a common ancestor and possess a similar regulatory region.

    Belfaiza, J.; Parsot, C; Martel, A.; de la Tour, C B; Margarita, D; Cohen, G. N.; Saint-Girons, I

    1986-01-01

    The metC gene of Escherichia coli K-12 was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of the metC gene and its flanking regions was determined. The translation initiation codon was identified by sequencing the NH2-terminal part of beta-cystathionase, the MetC gene product. The metC gene (1185 nucleotides) encodes a protein having 395 amino acid residues. The 5' noncoding region was found to contain a "Met box" homologous to sequences suggestive of operator structures upstream from other methionine ge...

  10. The most common mutation causing medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype in the region of the gene

    Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N; Blakemore, A I; Schneidermann, A K; Winter, V; Andresen, B S; Curtis, D; Engel, P C; Pricille, D; Rhead, W

    1991-01-01

    RFLP haplotypes in the region containing the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene on chromosome 1 have been determined in patients with MCAD deficiency. The RFLPs were detected after digestion of patient DNA with the enzymes BanII. PstI and TaqI and with an MCAD cDNA-clone as a probe. Of...

  11. Evidence for PTPN22 R620W Polymorphism As the Sole Common Risk Variant for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the 1p13.2 Region

    Martin, J.E.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Balsa, A.; Pascual-Salcedo, D.; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L.; Fernandez-Gutierrez, B.; Raya, E.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Kvien, T.K.; Viken, M.K.; Lie, B.A.; Koeleman, B.P.; Martin, J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The PTPN22 rs2476601 genetic variant has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases. Some reports suggest that this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may not be the only causal variant in the region of PTPN22. Our aim was to identify new independent RA

  12. Evidence for PTPN22 R620W Polymorphism As the Sole Common Risk Variant for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the 1p13.2 Region

    Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Raya, Enrique; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; van Riel, Piet; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Kvien, Tore K.; Viken, Marte K.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Martin, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The PTPN22 rs2476601 genetic variant has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases. Some reports suggest that this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may not be the only causal variant in the region of PTPN22. Our aim was to identify new independent RA

  13. A molecular biological study on identification of common septicemia bacteria using 16s-23s rRNA gene spacer regions

    傅君芬; 虞和永; 尚世强; 洪文澜; 陆淼泉; 李建平

    2002-01-01

    In the search for a rapid and reliable method for identification of bacteria in blood and cerebrospinal fluid , we developed a unified set of primers and used them under polymerase chain reaction(PCR) to amplify the spacer regions between the 16s and 23s genes in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci . Spacer regions within these loci showed a significant level of length and sequence polymorphism across most of the species lines. A generic pair of priming sequences was selected from highly conserved sequences in the 16s and 23s genes occurring adjacent to these polymorphic regions. This single set of primers and reaction conditions were used for the amplification of the 16s-23s spacer regions for 61 strains of standard bacteria and corresponding clinical isolates belonging to 20 genera and 27 species, including Listeria, Staphylococcus and Salmonella species, et al. When the spacer amplification products were resolved by electrophoresis, the resulting patterns could be used to distinguish most of the bacteria species within the test group, and the amplification products of the clinical isolates clustered at the standard species level. Some species presenting similar pattern were further analyzed by HinfI or AluI digestion or DNA clone and sequences analysis in order to establish the specific 16s-23s rRNA gene spacer regions map. Analysis of 42 blood specimens from septicemic neonates and 6 CSF specimens from suspected purulent meningitis patients by bacterial culture and PCR-RFLP(Restriction Fregament Length Polymorphism) showed that 15 specimens of blood culture were positive(35.7%) in the 42 septicemic neonates; 27 specimens were positive(64.2%) by PCR, and that the positive rate by PCR was significantly higher than that by blood culture(P<0.01). Among the 6 CSF specimens, one specimen found positive by blood culture was also positive by PCR, two found negative by blood culture showed positive by PCR; all three were S.epidermidis according to the DNA map. One C

  14. A Common Polymorphism in the Promoter Region of the TNFSF4 Gene Is Associated with Lower Allele-Specific Expression and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    Massimiliano Ria; Jacob Lagercrantz; Ann Samnegård; Susanna Boquist; Anders Hamsten; Per Eriksson

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The TNFSF4/TNFRSF4 system, along with several other receptor-ligand pairs, is involved in the recruitment and activation of T-cells and is therefore tentatively implicated in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. We have previously shown that genetic variants in TNFSF4 are associated with myocardial infarction (MI) in women. This prompted functional studies of TNFSF4 expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on a screening of the TNFSF4 genomic region, a promoter polymorphism...

  15. From global to regional and back again: common climate stressors of marine ecosystems relevant for adaptation across five ocean warming hotspots

    Popova, E.; Yool, A.; Byfield, V.; Cochrane, K.; A. C. Coward; Salim, S. S.; Gasalla, M.A.; S. A. Henson; Hobday, A. J.; Pecl, G.; Sauer, W.; Roberts, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean warming “hotspots” are regions characterised by above-average temperature increases over recent years, for which there are significant consequences for both living marine resources and the societies that depend on them. As such, they represent early warning systems for understanding the impacts of marine climate change, and test-beds for developing adaptation options for coping with those impacts. Here, we examine five hotspots off the coasts of eastern Australia, South Africa, Madagasc...

  16. Regional Absorption of Common Agricultural Policy's Rural Development Funds Targeted for Semi-Subsistence Farms in Romania in the 2007-2013 Programming Period

    BORÓKA-JÚLIA BÍRÓ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land fragmentation and the need for consolidation are major problems of current Romanian agriculture. The transition from the status-quo of an agricultural structure dominated by subsistence and semi-subsistence farms in the view of restructuring, resulting in a more efficient sector - is a must. Present study proposes to evaluate the application of specific measures of the Romanian National Rural Development Programme (NRDP that sought to support semi-subsistence farms between 2007 and 2013. Three NRDP measures have been identified under which semi-subsistence farms were eligible: Measure 112 "Setting up of young farmers", Measure 121 "Modernization of agricultural holdings", and Measure 141 "Supporting semi-subsistence agricultural holdings". The above measures belong to the 1st Axis of the Common Agricultural Policy's second pillar, thus having a common general goal the improvement of the competitiveness of the agricultural sector, while aiming at restructuring and developing the physical potential and management of generation change - trying to keep the rural population in place. Available data on a seven-year time horizon was analyzed. The absorption level of measures 112, 121 and 141 - under which the Romanian semi-subsistence farms were eligible - on national and subnational scale was mapped.

  17. Loss of TLE1 and TLE4 from the del(9q) commonly deleted region in AML cooperates with AML1-ETO to affect myeloid cell proliferation and survival

    Dayyani, Farshid; Wang, Jianfeng; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J.; Ahn, Eun-Young; Tobey, Erica; Zhang, Dong-Er; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Peterson, Randall T.; Sweetser, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Deletions on chromosome 9q are seen in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases and are specifically associated with t(8;21) AML. We previously defined the commonly deleted region in del(9q) AML and characterized the genes in this interval. To determine the critical lost gene(s) that might cooperate with the AML1-ETO fusion gene produced by t(8;21), we developed a set of shRNAs directed against each gene in this region. Within this library, shRNAs to TLE1 and TLE4 were the only shRNAs c...

  18. Jan Åge Riseth; Sámi reindeer management under technological change 1960-1990: Implications for Common-Pool Resource Use Under Various Natural and Instututional Conditions. A comparative analysis of regional development paths....

    Rolf Egil Haugerud (ed.)

    2000-01-01

    On June 22, Cand. Agric. Jan Åge Riseth successfully defended his dissertation "Sami reindeer management under technological change 1960-1990: Implications for Common-Pool Resource Use Under Various Natural And Institutional Conditions. A comparative analysis of regional development paths in West Finnmark, North Trøndelag, and South Trøndelag/Hedmark, Norway." for the degree Dr. Scient, at the Agricultural University of Norway (AUN), Dept. of Economics and Social Sciences.

  19. Didelphis marsupialis (common opossum): a potential reservoir host for zoonotic leishmaniasis in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil).

    Schallig, Henk D F H; da Silva, Eduardo S; van der Meide, Wendy F; Schoone, Gerard J; Gontijo, Celia M F

    2007-01-01

    Identification of the zoonotic reservoir is important for leishmaniasis control program. A number of (wild) animal species may serve as reservoir hosts, including the opossum Didelphis marsupialis. A survey carried out in Didelphis specimens (n = 111) from the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, an important focus of human leishmaniasis in Brazil, is reported. All animals were serologically tested with indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and direct agglutination tests (DAT) based on L. (L.) donovani or L. (V.) braziliensis antigen. A sub-population (n = 20) was analyzed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of Leishmania-specific DNA. For species identification, PCR-positive samples were subjected to restriction enzyme fragment polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Depending on the sero-diagnostic test employed, the sero-prevalence varied between 8.1% (9/111 animals positive with DAT test based on L. braziliensis antigen) and 21.6% (24/111 animals positive with IFAT). Five out of 20 samples analyzed with PCR tested positive for the presence of Leishmania-specific DNA. RFLP analysis revealed that two samples contained L. braziliensis complex DNA, one contained L. donovani complex DNA, and two samples could not be typed with the methodology used. These data suggest a potential role for the opossum as a reservoir host for zoonotic leishmaniasis in the region. PMID:17767408

  20. The effects of walnut and pine leaves on bread wheat growth and frequence of common weed species in the East-Mediterranean region.

    Akkaya, Aydin; Dokuyucu, Tevrican; Kara, Rukiye; Dumlupinar, Ziya

    2006-07-01

    A field experiment was carried out to determine the effects of walnut (Juglans regia L.) and pine (Pinus sp.) leaves on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) growth and weed control, during 2001-02 and 2002-03 growing seasons in East Mediterranean region of Turkey. In this research, the treatments were: applications of ground walnut leaves (GWL) and ground pine leaves (GPL) at 19 g/m2 dose at Zadoks-11, applications of 200, 400 and 800 cc/m2 of walnut leaves extract (WLE2, WLE4 and WLE8 respectively), pine leaves extract (PLE2, PLE4 and PLE8 respectively), mixture extract of 200 cc walnut and 200 cc pine (ME), herbicide application (HA) at 8 g/m2 dose at Zadoks-21, and control (C) without any treatment. The results have indicated that the effects of treatments were significant for grain yield (GY), plant height (PH), flag leaf length (FLL), weed number per square meter (WN), but non significant for grain number per head (GN), grain weight per head (GW), 1000 grain weight (1000 GW), flag leaf width (FLW), head number per square meter (HN), vegetative period (VP), grain filling period (GFP) and days to maturity (DM). PMID:17402244

  1. From global to regional and back again: common climate stressors of marine ecosystems relevant for adaptation across five ocean warming hotspots.

    Popova, Ekaterina; Yool, Andrew; Byfield, Valborg; Cochrane, Kevern; Coward, Andrew C; Salim, Shyam S; Gasalla, Maria A; Henson, Stephanie A; Hobday, Alistair J; Pecl, Gretta T; Sauer, Warwick H; Roberts, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Ocean warming 'hotspots' are regions characterized by above-average temperature increases over recent years, for which there are significant consequences for both living marine resources and the societies that depend on them. As such, they represent early warning systems for understanding the impacts of marine climate change, and test-beds for developing adaptation options for coping with those impacts. Here, we examine five hotspots off the coasts of eastern Australia, South Africa, Madagascar, India and Brazil. These particular hotspots have underpinned a large international partnership that is working towards improving community adaptation by characterizing, assessing and projecting the likely future of coastal-marine food resources through the provision and sharing of knowledge. To inform this effort, we employ a high-resolution global ocean model forced by Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 and simulated to year 2099. In addition to the sea surface temperature, we analyse projected stratification, nutrient supply, primary production, anthropogenic CO2 -driven ocean acidification, deoxygenation and ocean circulation. Our simulation finds that the temperature-defined hotspots studied here will continue to experience warming but, with the exception of eastern Australia, may not remain the fastest warming ocean areas over the next century as the strongest warming is projected to occur in the subpolar and polar areas of the Northern Hemisphere. Additionally, we find that recent rapid change in SST is not necessarily an indicator that these areas are also hotspots of the other climatic stressors examined. However, a consistent facet of the hotspots studied here is that they are all strongly influenced by ocean circulation, which has already shown changes in the recent past and is projected to undergo further strong change into the future. In addition to the fast warming, change in local ocean circulation represents a distinct feature of present and future

  2. Exchange of natural enemies for biological control: is it a rocky road?-the road in the Euro-Mediterranean region and the South American common market.

    Coutinot, D; Briano, J; Parra, J R P; de Sá, L A N; Cônsoli, F L

    2013-02-01

    The access and benefit sharing (ABS) regulations from the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) for the use of natural resources became an important issue because the biodiversity of developing countries was heavily accessed and unilaterally exploited by pharmaceutical and seed companies. However, natural enemies used for biological control are living and unmodified genetic resources which cannot be patented and have been treated as resources such as drugs, seeds, or other commercial products. Consequently, the ABS requirements have limited not only the use of natural enemies but also the positive effects that scientifically supported biological control strategies have on the society, the environment, and the economy, reducing problems of pesticide residues, water and soil contamination, and non-target effects. During the last several years, the biological control scientific community has faced new and extremely complicated legislation dictated by a high and diverse number of governmental agencies at different levels, making the access to natural resources for biocontrol purposes a rocky road. Society at large should be aware of how the strict ABS regulations affect the use of natural enemies as biological resources to secure food production, food safety, and global environmental protection. We discuss in here the current difficulties derived from CBD for the exchange of natural enemies taking as example the Euro-Mediterranean region, Argentina, and Brazil to demonstrate how long and diverse are the steps to be followed to obtain the required permits for access and exportation/importation of natural enemies. We then argue that the public visibility of biocontrol strategies should be increased and their benefits highlighted in order to persuade legislators for the development of a less bureaucratic, more expedient, and more centralized regulatory frame, greatly favoring the practice and benefits of biological control. We finally propose a general framework in

  3. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region.

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-08-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries. PMID:25173283

  4. Novel spectro-electrochemical cell for in situ/operando observation of common composite electrode with liquid electrolyte by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region

    Nakanishi, Koji; Kato, Daisuke; Arai, Hajime; Tanida, Hajime; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Ohta, Toshiaki; Ogumi, Zempachi

    2014-08-01

    A novel spectro-electochemical cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the tender X-ray region (TX-XAS) was designed and fabricated to investigate the electrochemical behavior of common battery materials with liquid electrolytes under in situ/operando conditions. The cell has several unique features, such as high X-ray transmittance, high signal to noise ratio, and high vacuum tightness. These features enable us quick and reliable XAS measurements. Operando P K-edge XAS measurements of an olivine-type LiFePO4 composite positive electrode were carried out to clarify its phosphorus environment during the electrochemical charging process. Results of spectral analysis show that there is no significant change in the oxidation state of phosphorus and in the coordination of the phosphate anions in the charging process, but a closer look of the consecutive XAS spectra suggests the shrinkage of the PO4 cage during the charging process, and the structural changes in a biphasic manner. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the cell for in situ/operando TX-XAS observations of light elements in practical batteries.

  5. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine and Common Morbidities Print Email Migraine and Common Morbidities ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine and Common Morbidities For many patients, migraine is ...

  6. Common Privacy Myths

    ... home > privacy + phrs > common privacy myths Common Privacy Myths With the new federal laws protecting the privacy ... are the truths to some of the common myths: Health information cannot be faxed – FALSE Your information ...

  7. 铜仁地区特种野猪9种常用饲料的营养价值%Nutritive Value of Nine Common Feedstuffs for Special Wild Boars in Tongren Region

    闵啸; 张华琦; 杨正德; 曹东; 孟华

    2014-01-01

    The digestibility of main nutrients and energy of six healthy special wild boars with three-month old and 25.24 kg of average body weight from the similar genetic source fed by 9 common feedstuffs (corn,wheat,rice bran,wheat bran,fish meal,bean pulp,rapeseed dregs,sweet potato vine and endive) was determined to study the nutritive value of common feedstuffs for special wild boars in Tongren region. The apparent digestibility of crude protein,crude fat,carbohydrate,total P and energy for special wild boars is slightly higher than domestic pigs.The apparent digestibility of total energy and carbohydrate is significantly and negatively related to neutral detergent fiber (NDF)content in feedstuffs.The apparent digestibility of fish meal to crude protein is the highest,followed by bean pulp and the lowest apparent digestibility of crude protein is rice bran,sweet potato vine and endive respectively.%为探明铜仁地区特种野猪常用饲料的营养价值,选择遗传来源相似,平均体重为25.24 kg的3月龄健康去势特种野猪6头,采用全收粪法测定特种野猪对9种常用饲料(能量饲料:玉米、小麦、米糠、麦麸,蛋白质饲料:鱼粉、豆粕、菜籽粕,青粗饲料:红薯藤、菊苣)主要养分与能量的消化率,并评定其有效能含量。结果表明:特种野猪对9种常用饲料的粗蛋白质、粗脂肪、碳水化合物、总磷及能量的表观消化率与家猪相似,但均略高于家猪。其中,总能、碳水化合物的表观消化率与饲料中中性洗涤纤维含量呈显著负相关;粗蛋白质的表观消化率以鱼粉最高,其次为豆粕,以糠麸和青粗饲料相对为低。

  8. Common vampire bat attacks on humans in a village of the Amazon region of Brazil Agressões de morcegos hematófagos a pessoas em um povoado da região amazônica do Brasil

    Maria Cristina Schneider

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Many people in Amazonian communities have reported bat bites in the last decade. Bites by vampire bats can potentially transmit rabies to humans. The objective of this study was to analyze factors associated with bat biting in one of these communities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a village of gold miners in the Amazonian region of Brazil (160 inhabitants. Bats were captured near people's houses and sent to a lab. Of 129 people interviewed, 41% had been attacked by a bat at least once, with 92% of the bites located on the lower limbs. A logistic regression found that adults were bitten around four times more often than children (OR = 3.75, CI 95%: 1.46-9.62, p = 0.036. Males were bitten more frequently than females (OR = 2.08, CI 95%: 0.90-4.76, p = 0.067. Nine Desmodus rotundus and three frugivorous bats were captured and tested negative for rabies. The study suggests that, in an area of gold miners, common vampire bats are more likely to attack adults and males. The control strategy for human rabies developed in this region should therefore place special emphasis on adult males. There should also be more research on how the search for gold in the Amazonian region places people and the environment at risk.Agressões de morcegos a pessoas vêm sendo notificadas em várias comunidades amazônicas nesta última década. Isto constitui um risco potencial para a raiva humana transmitida por morcegos. O objetivo deste estudo foi de analisar fatores associados a estas agressões em uma destas comunidades. Foi realizado um estudo transversal em um povoado de garimpeiros na Região Amazônica brasileira (160 habitantes. Foi realizada a captura de morcegos junto às casas e foram enviadas amostras para o laboratório. Das 129 pessoas entrevistas, 41% foram agredidas por morcegos pelo menos uma vez, com 92% das mordidas localizadas nos dedos dos pés. Por meio de regressão logística, encontrou-se que adultos eram agredidos ao redor de

  9. Common Reactions After Trauma

    ... here Enter ZIP code here Common Reactions After Trauma Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, Family, & Friends Common Reactions After Trauma Available in Spanish: Reacciones Comunes Después de un ...

  10. The Science Commons Project

    Martin, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Science Commons serves the advancement of science by contributing to the removal of unnecessary legal and technical barriers to scientific collaboration and innovation. Built on the promise of Open Access to scholarly literature and data, Science Commons identifies and eases key barriers to the movement of information, tools and data through the scientific research cycle. The long term vision of Science Commons is to provide more than just useful contracts. We will combine our publishin...

  11. Creative Commons International

    Catharina Maracke

    2010-01-01

    When Creative Commons (CC) was founded in 2001, the core Creative Commons licenses were drafted according to United States Copyright Law. Since their first introduction in December 2002, Creative Commons licenses have been enthusiastically adopted by many creators, authors, and other content producers – not only in the United States, but in many other jurisdictions as well. Global interest in the CC licenses prompted a discussion about the need for national versions of the CC licenses. To bes...

  12. The Proline-Rich Region of Pneumococcal Surface Proteins A and C Contains Surface-Accessible Epitopes Common to All Pneumococci and Elicits Antibody-Mediated Protection against Sepsis▿ ‡

    Daniels, Calvin C; Coan, Patricia; King, Janice; Hale, Joanetha; Benton, Kimberly A.; Briles, David E.; Hollingshead, Susan K.

    2010-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and PspC of Streptococcus pneumoniae are surface virulence proteins that interfere with complement deposition and elicit protective immune responses. The C-terminal halves of PspA and PspC have some structural similarity and contain highly cross-reactive proline-rich (PR) regions. In many PR regions of PspA and PspC, there exists an almost invariant nonproline block (NPB) of about 33 amino acids. Neither the PR regions nor their NPB exhibit the alpha-heli...

  13. Tragedy of the Commons

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    individualistic and selfish attitude this would collaps, since each single citizen could benefit from putting more sheep on the common, which would eventually collapse by overgrazing. The metaphore is applied to our common planet, and our ability to built up institutions, economics and ethics, geared for sharing...

  14. Common Ground and Delegation

    Dobrajska, Magdalena; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lyngsie, Jacob

    preconditions of increasing delegation. We argue that key HR practices?namely, hiring, training and job-rotation?are associated with delegation of decision-making authority. These practices assist in the creation of shared knowledge conditions between managers and employees. In turn, such a ?common ground......-scale questionnaire survey with unique population-wide employer-employee data. We find evidence of a direct and positive influence of hiring decisions (proxied by common educational background), and the training and job rotation of employees on delegation. Moreover, we find a positive interaction between common...

  15. Isolated loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer is more common in young patients and following breast conserving therapy: Long-term results of European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer studies

    de Bock, Truuske; van der Hage, J.A.; Putter, H.; Bonnema, J.; Bartelink, H.; van de Velde, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for isolated loco-regional recurrence in patients treated for invasive stage I or H breast cancer. The study population comprised 3602 women who had undergone primary surgery for early stage breast cancer, who were enrolled in European Organis

  16. Common Conditions in Newborns

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Common Conditions in ...

  17. Common Foot Problems

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Common Foot Problems A A A Trauma, infection, skin disease, ... the sole of the front part of the foot and on the toes. Foot infections include warts; ...

  18. Common Hair Problems

    ... the top of the head. Women may develop female pattern baldness in which the hair becomes thin over the ... is most commonly seen in children. Hair Loss, Female Pattern Baldness (Female Pattern Alopecia) Female pattern baldness (alopecia) is ...

  19. Common Knowledge on Networks

    Liddell, Torrin M

    2015-01-01

    Common knowledge of intentions is crucial to basic social tasks ranging from cooperative hunting to oligopoly collusion, riots, revolutions, and the evolution of social norms and human culture. Yet little is known about how common knowledge leaves a trace on the dynamics of a social network. Here we show how an individual's network properties---primarily local clustering and betweenness centrality---provide strong signals of the ability to successfully participate in common knowledge tasks. These signals are distinct from those expected when practices are contagious, or when people use less-sophisticated heuristics that do not yield true coordination. This makes it possible to infer decision rules from observation. We also find that tasks that require common knowledge can yield significant inequalities in success, in contrast to the relative equality that results when practices spread by contagion alone.

  20. Five Common Glaucoma Tests

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Five Common Glaucoma Tests en Español email Send this article to ... year or two after age 35. A Comprehensive Glaucoma Exam To be safe and accurate, five factors ...

  1. UNDERSTANDING THE GLOBAL COMMONS

    Bromley, Daniel W.; Cochrane, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    We want to clarify the way in which we think about the global commons, particularly the problem of global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions and tropical deforestation. We develop a policy framework in which the policy goal is the sustainability of the earth's ability to absorb greenhouse gases. The framework considers the unequal incidence of benefits and costs of particular policies. We identify several resource management regimes and suggest that management under a common property ...

  2. Common Warehouse Metamodel

    Jersák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    The main issue of this work is Common Warehouse Metamodel (CWM) which is used both as the standard for metadata in data warehousing and business intelligence and as means of exchange of metadata between tools in DWH. As this issue of CWM and metadata management has not been published in Czech-language so far, the main aim of this work is to introduce Common Warehouse Metamodel, its utilization in BI and also to present advantages of metadata management implementation based on CWM.

  3. Timely Common Knowledge

    Yannai A. Gonczarowski; Moses, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Coordinating activities at different sites of a multi-agent system typically imposes epistemic constraints on the participants. Specifying explicit bounds on the relative times at which actions are performed induces combined temporal and epistemic constraints on when agents can perform their actions. This paper characterises the interactive epistemic state that arises when actions must meet particular temporal constraints. The new state, called timely common knowledge, generalizes common know...

  4. A peptide derived from the CD loop-D helix region of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and survival by binding to the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor and common cytokine receptor chain gp130

    Rathje, Mette; Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Janne; Gotfryd, Kamil; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neuronal differentiation and promotes the survival of various neuronal cell types by binding to a receptor complex formed by CNTF receptor a (CNTFRa), gp130, and the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor (LIFR). The CD loop-D helix region of CNTF has...... that these receptors are involved in the effects of cintrofin. The C-terminal part of the peptide, corresponding to the D helix region of CNTF, was shown to be essential for the neuritogenic action of the peptide. CNTF and LIF induced neurite outgrowth in CGNs plated on laminin-coated slides. On...... uncoated slides, CNTF and LIF had no neuritogenic effect but were able to inhibit cintrofin-induced neuronal differentiation, indicating that cintrofin and cytokines compete for the same receptors. In addition, cintrofin induced the phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK, indicating that it exerts cell...

  5. Towards common technical standards

    In 1989, PETRONAS launched its Total Quality Management (TQM) program. In the same year the decision was taken by the PETRONAS Management to introduce common technical standards group wide. These standards apply to the design, construction, operation and maintenance of all PETRONAS installations in the upstream, downstream and petrochemical sectors. The introduction of common company standards is seen as part of an overall technical management system, which is an integral part of Total Quality Management. The Engineering and Safety Unit in the PETRONAS Central Office in Kuala Lumpur has been charged with the task of putting in place a set of technical standards throughout PETRONAS and its operating units

  6. Optimisation and common sense

    This note builds on recent articles about the development of new ICRP recommendations by supporting the use of common sense in optimisation; use of an additional criterion relating to technology-based principles is suggested to support utility- and equity-based criteria. This is taken forward by use of authoritative good practice safety precautions and a need to consider safety in an integrated manner. It is noted that use of common sense in ALARP or ALARA decisions is liable to rely on access to information and training. (author)

  7. COMMON FISCAL POLICY

    Gabriel Mursa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that a common fiscal policy, designed to support the euro currency, has some significant drawbacks. The greatest danger is the possibility of leveling the tax burden in all countries. This leveling of the tax is to the disadvantage of countries in Eastern Europe, in principle, countries poorly endowed with capital, that use a lax fiscal policy (Romania, Bulgaria, etc. to attract foreign investment from rich countries of the European Union. In addition, common fiscal policy can lead to a higher degree of centralization of budgetary expenditures in the European Union.

  8. Improving radiotherapy quality and safety: a common objective of A.S.N. and the Ile de France Regional Hospital Agency. Thoughts on successful cooperation in Ile de France

    Radiotherapy recent development in cancer treatment needs strong procedures and quality assessment to improve safety both for patients and professionals. In Ile de France territory, a coordinated action between ASN inspectors and medical doctors specialized in public health (MISP), working as civil servants in health administration, was initiated at the end of 2007. An inspection guideline was implemented in a workshop between ASN and Regional Hospital Agency (ARH). The MISP as health administrator has to verify if care organisation responds to treatment cancer regulatory framework: as a doctor he is authorized to access to patient records to know which treatment was chosen. He has to assure if the therapeutic guidelines are respected. His comprehensive approach is essentially patient-oriented. The MISP inspection coordinated with ASN inspectors is a very pertinent pluri-disciplinary approach, undeniably necessary in such a medical technic. The effectiveness of the radiotherapy pluri-disciplinary team is funded on sharing procedures and experiences, respecting different knowledge and practices in daily work. This on site audit'. seems to be very fertile both for the radiotherapy team, the MISP and ASN inspectors. Continuous quality improvement in radiotherapy in the Ile de France region is a fertile issue between ANS and ARH teams. Confronting knowledge and procedures during the 'on site audit' in a transparent way will contribute improving radiotherapy for the 30.000 Francilian patients which receive this treatment each year. This challenge is our main concern to facilitate the patients access to the best standards treatments. (author)

  9. Sequential Common Agency

    Prat, A.; Rustichini, A.

    1998-01-01

    In a common agency game a set of principals promises monetary transfers to an agent which depend on the action he will take. The agent then chooses the action, and is paid the corresponding transfers. Principals announce their transfers simultaneously. This game has many equilibria; Bernheim and Whi

  10. Is Context Common Ground?

    Østergaard, Jens Sand

    2012-01-01

    This article will explore the relation between the how’s and why’s of humour, by gradually moving from the contextual compositionality of conversational implication to a broadened perspective on the open- ended nature of conversation and the purpose humour serves in developing ‘common ground’....

  11. Information Commons to Go

    Bayer, Marc Dewey

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, Buffalo State College's E. H. Butler Library has used the Information Commons (IC) model to assist its 8,500 students with library research and computer applications. Campus Technology Services (CTS) plays a very active role in its IC, with a centrally located Computer Help Desk and a newly created Application Support Desk right in the…

  12. Some Common Abbreviations

    ... Coronary artery disease A common type of heart disease CAT Computerized axial tomography A type of x-ray ... Gastrointestinal Another term for your digestive system GFR Glomerular ... that causes one type of liver disease HBV Hepatitis B virus A virus that causes ...

  13. Commonly missed orthopedic problems.

    Ballas, M T; Tytko, J; Mannarino, F

    1998-01-15

    When not diagnosed early and managed appropriately, common musculoskeletal injuries may result in long-term disabling conditions. Anterior cruciate ligament tears are some of the most common knee ligament injuries. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis may present with little or no hip pain, and subtle or absent physical and radiographic findings. Femoral neck stress fractures, if left untreated, may result in avascular necrosis, refractures and pseudoarthrosis. A delay in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures may cause early wrist arthrosis if nonunion results. Ulnar collateral ligament tears are a frequently overlooked injury in skiers. The diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture is missed as often as 25 percent of the time. Posterior tibial tendon tears may result in fixed bony planus if diagnosis is delayed, necessitating hindfoot fusion rather than simple soft tissue repair. Family physicians should be familiar with the initial assessment of these conditions and, when appropriate, refer patients promptly to an orthopedic surgeon. PMID:9456991

  14. Common tester platform concept.

    Hurst, Michael James

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

  15. The ribosome as a missing link in prebiotic evolution II: Ribosomes encode ribosomal proteins that bind to common regions of their own mRNAs and rRNAs.

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2016-05-21

    We have proposed that the ribosome may represent a missing link between prebiotic chemistries and the first cells. One of the predictions that follows from this hypothesis, which we test here, is that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) must have encoded the proteins necessary for ribosomal function. In other words, the rRNA also functioned pre-biotically as mRNA. Since these ribosome-binding proteins (rb-proteins) must bind to the rRNA, but the rRNA also functioned as mRNA, it follows that rb-proteins should bind to their own mRNA as well. This hypothesis can be contrasted to a "null" hypothesis in which rb-proteins evolved independently of the rRNA sequences and therefore there should be no necessary similarity between the rRNA to which rb-proteins bind and the mRNA that encodes the rb-protein. Five types of evidence reported here support the plausibility of the hypothesis that the mRNA encoding rb-proteins evolved from rRNA: (1) the ubiquity of rb-protein binding to their own mRNAs and autogenous control of their own translation; (2) the higher-than-expected incidence of Arginine-rich modules associated with RNA binding that occurs in rRNA-encoded proteins; (3) the fact that rRNA-binding regions of rb-proteins are homologous to their mRNA binding regions; (4) the higher than expected incidence of rb-protein sequences encoded in rRNA that are of a high degree of homology to their mRNA as compared with a random selection of other proteins; and (5) rRNA in modern prokaryotes and eukaryotes encodes functional proteins. None of these results can be explained by the null hypothesis that assumes independent evolution of rRNA and the mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Also noteworthy is that very few proteins bind their own mRNAs that are not associated with ribosome function. Further tests of the hypothesis are suggested: (1) experimental testing of whether rRNA-encoded proteins bind to rRNA at their coding sites; (2) whether tRNA synthetases, which are also known to bind to their

  16. Ethnoscience: examining common sense.

    Nuti, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis I trace ideas about naturalistic inquiry into commonsense understanding through Chomsky's work. I argue that the resulting picture significantly illuminates both the nature of `common sense' and existing interdisciplinary debates surrounding it. Specifically, I claim that progress in investigating the nature of humans' commonsense understanding of psychology (folk psychology) has been hampered by the same kind of methodological dualism which for so long haunted s...

  17. 'Historicising common sense'.

    Millstone, Noah

    2012-12-01

    This essay is an expanded set of comments on the social psychology papers written for the special issue on History and Social Psychology. It considers what social psychology, and particularly the theory of social representations, might offer historians working on similar problems, and what historical methods might offer social psychology. The social history of thinking has been a major theme in twentieth and twenty-first century historical writing, represented most recently by the genre of 'cultural history'. Cultural history and the theory of social representations have common ancestors in early twentieth-century social science. Nevertheless, the two lines of research have developed in different ways and are better seen as complementary than similar. The theory of social representations usefully foregrounds issues, like social division and change over time, that cultural history relegates to the background. But for historians, the theory of social representations seems oddly fixated on comparing the thought styles associated with positivist science and 'common sense'. Using historical analysis, this essay tries to dissect the core opposition 'science : common sense' and argues for a more flexible approach to comparing modes of thought. PMID:23135802

  18. Common sense codified

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    At CERN, people of more than a hundred different nationalities and hundreds of different professions work together towards a common goal. The new Code of Conduct is a tool that has been designed to help us keep our workplace pleasant and productive through common standards of behaviour. Its basic principle is mutual respect and common sense. This is only natural, but not trivial…  The Director-General announced it in his speech at the beginning of the year, and the Bulletin wrote about it immediately afterwards. "It" is the new Code of Conduct, the document that lists our Organization's values and describes the basic standards of behaviour that we should both adopt and expect from others. "The Code of Conduct is not going to establish new rights or new obligations," explains Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department (HR). But what it will do is provide a framework for our existing rights and obligations." The aim of a co...

  19. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  20. English for common entrance

    Kossuth, Kornel

    2013-01-01

    Succeed in the exam with this revision guide, designed specifically for the brand new Common Entrance English syllabus. It breaks down the content into manageable and straightforward chunks with easy-to-use, step-by-step instructions that should take away the fear of CE and guide you through all aspects of the exam. - Gives you step-by-step guidance on how to recognise various types of comprehension questions and answer them. - Shows you how to write creatively as well as for a purpose for the section B questions. - Reinforces and consolidates learning with tips, guidance and exercises through

  1. Governing the Conflicted Commons

    Sareen, Siddharth

    developmental challenges, Saranda division is one of India’s most resource-rich, conflict-affected regions with ongoing insurgency and counter-insurgency operations. The study shows how governmental development interventions treat development as securitisation through practices of technicisation, selective...... that are predominantly populated by the Ho, an indigenous people concentrated in West Singhbhum district. Key informants cover a large variety, including government officials especially from the forest and rural development line agencies, staff of local non-governmental organisations, regional researchers, village......What determines authority over and access to resources in state-building, resource-conflict contexts? That is the puzzle of our times for research focussing on local governance and natural resources. This thesis demonstrates both how struggles over access and authority are taking place and how...

  2. Common sense and nonproliferation

    Since the dawn of the nuclear age nearly four decades ago, the United States has been firmly commited to the objective of preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. That principle is embodied in the Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), support for which has been a basic tenet of US foreign policy and a basic security interest of the world at large ever since. The Reagan administration remains firmly committed to the goal of preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Such proliferation could trigger new and grave dangers for America's security and well-being and indeed for that of all the world's peoples. Desperate leaders in future high-stakes conflicts might not shrink from nuclear blackmail or even from the use of nuclear weapons if they were available. A conventional clash between nuclear-armed states in a conflict-prone region might escalate by accident or miscalculation to a local nuclear exchange. It cannot be discounted that such a nuclear clash might threaten to involve the superpowers themselves. With proliferation, also, terrorist groups could more easily acquire nuclear weapons to extort concessions. Preventing the spread of nuclear weapons, then, is not solely of interest to the superpowers: it is vital to all countries and regions. The security of the countries in those regions to which nuclear weapons might spread would be most immediately and seriously affected. By their adherence to the NPT, more than 100 countries have recognized this fact

  3. COMMON SENSE BIBLICAL HERMENEUTICS

    Michael B. Mangini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the noetics of moderate realism provide a firm foundation upon which to build a hermeneutic of common sense, in the first part of his paper the author adopts Thomas Howe’s argument that the noetical aspect of moderate realism is a necessary condition for correct, universally valid biblical interpretation, but he adds, “insofar as it gives us hope in discovering the true meaning of a given passage.” In the second part, the author relies on John Deely’s work to show how semiotics may help interpreters go beyond meaning and seek the significance of the persons, places, events, ideas, etc., of which the meaning of the text has presented as objects to be interpreted. It is in significance that the unity of Scripture is found. The chief aim is what every passage of the Bible signifies. Considered as a genus, Scripture is composed of many parts/species that are ordered to a chief aim. This is the structure of common sense hermeneutics; therefore in the third part the author restates Peter Redpath’s exposition of Aristotle and St. Thomas’s ontology of the one and the many and analogously applies it to the question of how an exegete can discern the proper significance and faithfully interpret the word of God.

  4. Evolution of a common controller

    Powell, D.; Barbour, D.; Gilbreath, G.

    2012-06-01

    Precedent has shown common controllers must strike a balance between the desire for an integrated user interface design by human factors engineers and support of project-specific data requirements. A common user-interface requires the project-specific data to conform to an internal representation, but project-specific customization is impeded by the implicit rules introduced by the internal data representation. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) developed the latest version of the Multi-robot Operator Control Unit (MOCU) to address interoperability, standardization, and customization issues by using a modular, extensible, and flexible architecture built upon a sharedworld model. MOCU version 3 provides an open and extensible operator-control interface that allows additional functionality to be seamlessly added with software modules while providing the means to fully integrate the information into a layered game-like user interface. MOCU's design allows it to completely decouple the human interface from the core management modules, while still enabling modules to render overlapping regions of the screen without interference or a priori knowledge of other display elements, thus allowing more flexibility in project-specific customization.

  5. Common hematological disorders in children.

    Bansal, Deepak; Totadri, Sidharth

    2014-01-01

    It is common for primary care physicians to be faced with children with hematological disorders in everyday practice. The article seeks to provide realistic information for the first-contact physician in handling common hematological diseases in children. Practical step-wise approach to understanding and investigating anemia and bleeding disorders is illustrated. Requirement of iron in normal children and management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and thalassemia is explained. The gold standard for IDA continues to be ferrous sulphate which has good bioavailability and is inexpensive. There is emerging concept of delayed clamping of umbilical cord at birth, particularly in regions with widespread IDA, to augment iron stores in infancy. Typical case scenarios of children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and hemophilia are provided to facilitate the understanding of management in day to day practice. The vital role of the medical practitioner in shared care of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia is emphasized. A risk based treatment algorithm for febrile neutropenia is provided. PMID:23934100

  6. Common Influence Join

    Yiu, Man Lung; Mamoulis, Nikos; Karras, Panagiotis

    We identify and formalize a novel join operator for two spatial pointsets P and Q. The common influence join (CIJ) returns the pairs of points (p,q),p isin P,q isin Q, such that there exists a location in space, being closer to p than to any other point in P and at the same time closer to q than to...... any other point in Q. In contrast to existing join operators between pointsets (i.e., e-distance joins and fc-closest pairs), CIJ is parameter- free, providing a natural join result that finds application in marketing and decision support. We propose algorithms for the efficient evaluation of CIJ, for...... pointsets indexed by hierarchical multi-dimensional indexes. We validate the effectiveness and the efficiency of these methods via experimentation with synthetic and real spatial datasets. The experimental results show that a non-blocking algorithm, which computes intersecting pairs of Voronoi cells on...

  7. Common Control System Vulnerability

    Trent Nelson

    2005-12-01

    The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an

  8. Reformulating the commons

    Ostrom Elinor

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The western hemisphere is richly endowed with a diversity of natural resource systems that are governed by complex local and national institutional arrangements that have not, until recently, been well understood. While many local communities that possess a high degree of autonomy to govern local resources have been highly successful over long periods of time, others fail to take action to prevent overuse and degradation of forests, inshore fisheries, and other natural resources. The conventional theory used to predict and explain how local users will relate to resources that they share makes a uniform prediction that users themselves will be unable to extricate themselves from the tragedy of the commons. Using this theoretical view of the world, there is no variance in the performance of self-organized groups. In theory, there are no self-organized groups. Empirical evidence tells us, however, that considerable variance in performance exists and many more local users self-organize and are more successful than it is consistent with the conventional theory . Parts of a new theory are presented here.

  9. APME launches common method

    A common approach for carrying out ecological balances for commodity thermoplastics is due to be launched by the Association of Plastics Manufacturers in Europe (APME; Brussels) and its affiliate, The European Centre for Plastics in the Environment (PWMI) this week. The methodology report is the latest stage of a program started in 1990 that aims to describe all operations up to the production of polymer powder or granules at the plant gate. Information gathered will be made freely available to companies considering the use of polymers. An industry task force, headed by PWMI executive director Vince Matthews, has gathered information on the plastics production processes from oil to granule, and an independent panel of specialists, chaired by Ian Boustead of the U.K.'s Open University, devised the methodology and analysis. The methodology report stresses the need to define the system being analyzed and discusses how complex chemical processes can be analyzed in terms of consumption of fuels, energy, and raw materials, as well as solid, liquid, and gaseous emissions

  10. The Andean Common Market: An Experiment in Regional Cooperation.

    Carlson, Reynold E.

    The Grupo Andino (GRAN) was formed in 1969 as an effort at economic integration by six Latin American countries (Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela). It was an outgrowth of its predecessor, the Latin American Free Trade Association (LAFTA), which had been formed in 1960 with eleven member countries. The Andean Group (GRAN) from…

  11. Communication Can Destroy Common Learning

    2008-01-01

    We show by example that communication can generate a failure of common knowledge acquisition. In the absence of communication, agents acquire approximate common knowledge of some parameter, but with communication they do not.

  12. Ten Common First Aid Mistakes

    ... for the Latest in Workplace Safety Ten Common First Aid Mistakes These days, there are countless resources to ... We’ve listed some of the most common first aid mistakes below, along with the correct response methods. ...

  13. Analyzing Commonality In A System

    Pacheco, Alfred; Pool, Kevin

    1988-01-01

    Cost decreased by use of fewer types of parts. System Commonality Analysis Tool (SCAT) computer program designed to aid managers and engineers in identifying common, potentially common, and unique components of system. Incorporates three major functions: program for creation and maintenance of data base, analysis of commonality, and such system utilities as host-operating-system commands and loading and unloading of data base. Produces reports tabulating maintenance, initial configurations, and expected total costs. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Entrepreneurship and regional development

    Müller, Sabine

    This literature review examines how entrepreneurship and regional development has been previously addressed theoretically and empirically. Regional Science and Entrepreneurship are two fields with their own distinct literature's. The question is therefore, how do these two fields talk about...... the respective other? What are the commonalities and differences? The purpose of this article is to create an analytical synthesis by combining the insights of the two literature's in order to gain a fuller understanding of the relation between entrepreneurship and regional development....

  15. Five Theses on the Common

    Gigi Roggero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available I present five theses on the common within the context of the transformations of capitalist social relations as well as their contemporary global crisis. My framework involves ‘‘cognitive capitalism,’’ new processes of class composition, and the production of living knowledge and subjectivity. The commons is often discussed today in reference to the privatizationand commodification of ‘‘common goods.’’ This suggests a naturalistic and conservative image of the common, unhooked from the relations of production. I distinguish between commons and the common: the first model is related to Karl Polanyi, the second to Karl Marx. As elaborated in the postoperaista debate, the common assumes an antagonistic double status: it is boththe plane of the autonomy of living labor and it is subjected to capitalist ‘‘capture.’’ Consequently, what is at stake is not the conservation of ‘‘commons,’’ but rather the production of the common and its organization into new institutions that would take us beyond the exhausted dialectic between public and private.

  16. Five Theses on the Common

    Gigi Roggero

    2011-01-01

    I present five theses on the common within the context of the transformations of capitalist social relations as well as their contemporary global crisis. My framework involves ‘‘cognitive capitalism,’’ new processes of class composition, and the production of living knowledge and subjectivity. The commons is often discussed today in reference to the privatizationand commodification of ‘‘common goods.’’ This suggests a naturalistic and conservative image of the common, unhooked from the relati...

  17. Malheur - Common Carp Movement Control

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Invasive common carp Cyprinus carpio were introduced into the Harney Basin in the 1920’s and were recognized as a problem in Malheur Lake in 1952. The common carp...

  18. From natural-resource commons to knowledge commons common traits and differences

    Coriat, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on the works of Ostrom, the paper seeks to establish the bases on which the "traditional" commons (TC) and the "knowledge" commons (KC) can be compared and differentiated. Three criteria are proposed: the nature of the goods or systems of resources, the property regimes and the modes of governance. On this basis, the two large families of commons (traditional/informational) are distinguished as follows: - Nature of the goods. While TC are composed of tangible and rival goods, KC are c...

  19. Common Shocks, Common Dynamics, and the International Business Cycle.

    Centoni, Marco; Cubadda, Gianluca; Hecq, Alain

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops an econometric framework to understand whether co-movements observed in the international business cycle are the consequences of common shocks or common transmission mechanisms. Then we propose a new statistical measure of the importance of domestic and foreign shocks over the national business cycle. We show how to decompose the business cycle effects of permanent-transitory shocks into those due to their domestic and foreign components. We apply our analys...

  20. Facts about the Common Cold

    ... Common Cold What Is a Cold? Colds are minor infections of the nose and throat caused by ... other products such as echinacea, eucalyptus, garlic, honey, lemon, menthol, zinc and vitamin C have received a ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  2. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    ... of the Pancreas test Common Disorders of the Pancreas There are a variety of disorders of the ... the NPF Shop at our eStore The National Pancreas Foundation 3 Bethesda Metro Center Suite 700 Bethesda, ...

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    ... PSA tests. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 10 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    ... advanced melanoma. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 12 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    ... certain people. Read More "6 Common Cancers" Articles Lung Cancer / Breast Cancer / Prostate Cancer / Colorectal Cancer / Skin Cancer / Gynecologic Cancers Spring 2007 Issue: Volume 2 Number 2 Page 11 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & ...

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  8. Communication, timing, and common learning

    Steiner, Jakub; Stewart, C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 1 (2011), s. 230-247. ISSN 0022-0531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : common knowledge * learning * communication Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.235, year: 2011

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  11. Misconceptions about Acne Still Common

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157613.html Misconceptions About Acne Still Common Skin condition isn't caused by ... of negative and mistaken beliefs about people with acne, a new study finds. Researchers showed photos of ...

  12. NIH Common Data Elements Repository

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Common Data Elements (CDE) Repository has been designed to provide access to structured human and machine-readable definitions of data elements that have...

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure that makes ...

  14. The last common bilaterian ancestor

    Erwin, Douglas H.; Davidson, Eric H.

    2002-01-01

    Many regulatory genes appear to be utilized in at least superficially similar ways in the development of particular body parts in Drosophila and in chordates. These similarities have been widely interpreted as functional homologies, producing the conventional view of the last common protostome-deuterostome ancestor (PDA) as a complex organism that possessed some of the same body parts as modern bilaterians. Here we discuss an alternative view, in which the last common PDA had a less complex b...

  15. Forest commons in boreal Sweden

    Holmgren, Eva

    2009-01-01

    This thesis examines the influences of Swedish forest commons on forest condition, management and the local economy. The approach is rationalistic, i.e. outcomes of forestry activities are assessed in relation to aims. According to the stated objectives, forest commons should serve as exemplars for improved forest management, focusing on increased and sustained timber production. They should provide sustainable economic support for farmers and the local economy, providing a sound basis for ta...

  16. Urban ambiances as common ground?

    Jean-Paul Thibaud

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to point out various arguments which question ambiance as a common ground of everyday urban experience. Such a project involves four major points. First, we have to move beyond the exclusive practical aspects of everyday life and bring the sensory to the forefront. Under such conditions, sensory cultures emerge where feeling and acting come together. Second, we must put common experience into perspectiveby initiating a dual dynamics of socialising the sensory and sens...

  17. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Gevers Dirk; Chang Sarah; Chang LeeAnn; Kirkup Benjamin C; Polz Martin F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II) were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes ...

  18. Freeing data through The Polar Information Commons

    de Bruin, T.; Chen, R. S.; Parsons, M. A.; Carlson, D. J.; Cass, K.; Finney, K.; Wilbanks, J.; Jochum, K.

    2010-12-01

    The polar regions are changing rapidly with dramatic global effect. Wise management of resources, improved decision support, and effective international cooperation on resource and geopolitical issues require deeper understanding and better prediction of these changes. Unfortunately, polar data and information remain scattered, scarce, and sporadic. Inspired by the Antarctic Treaty of 1959 that established the Antarctic as a global commons to be used only for peaceful purposes and scientific research, we assert that data and information about the polar regions are themselves “public goods” that should be shared ethically and with minimal constraint. ICSU’s Committee on Data (CODATA) therefore started the Polar Information Commons (PIC) as an open, virtual repository for vital scientific data and information. The PIC provides a shared, community-based cyber-infrastructure fostering innovation, improving scientific efficiency, and encouraging participation in polar research, education, planning, and management. The PIC builds on the legacy of the International Polar Year (IPY), providing a long-term framework for access to and preservation of both existing and future data and information about the polar regions. Rapid change demands rapid data access. The PIC system enables scientists to quickly expose their data to the world and share them through open protocols on the Internet. A PIC digital label will alert users and data centers to new polar data and ensure that usage rights are clear. The PIC utilizes the Science Commons Protocol for Implementing Open Access Data, which promotes open data access through the public domain coupled with community norms of practice to ensure use of data in a fair and equitable manner. A set of PIC norms has been developed in consultation with key polar data organizations and other stakeholders. We welcome inputs from the broad science community as we further develop and refine the PIC approach and move ahead with

  19. Induced artificial androgenesis in common tench, Tinca tinca (L., using common carp and common bream eggs

    Dariusz Kucharczyk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents artificial induction using tench eggs, Tinca tinca (L., of androgenetic origin. The oocytes taken from common bream, Abramis brama (L. and common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. were genetically inactivated using UV irradiation and then inseminated using tench spermatozoa. Androgenetic origin (haploid or diploid embryos was checked using a recessive colour (blond and morphological markers. The percentage of hatched embryos in all experimental groups was much lower than in the control groups. All haploid embryos showed morphological abnormalities, which were recorded as haploid syndrome (stunted body, poorly formed retina, etc.. The optimal dose of UV irradiation of common bream and common carp eggs was 3456 J m–2. At this dose, almost 100% of haploid embryos were produced at a hatching rate of over 6%. Lower UV-ray doses affected abnormal embryo development. The highest yield of tench androgenesis (about 2% was noted when eggs were exposed to thermal shock 30 min after egg activation.

  20. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from...

  1. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magn...

  2. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  3. The last common bilaterian ancestor

    Erwin, Douglas H.; Davidson, Eric H.

    2002-01-01

    Many regulatory genes appear to be utilized in at least superficially similar ways in the development of particular body parts in Drosophila and in chordates. These similarities have been widely interpreted as functional homologies, producing the conventional view of the last common protostome-deuterostome ancestor (PDA) as a complex organism that possessed some of the same body parts as modern bilaterians. Here we discuss an alternative view, in which the last common PDA had a less complex body plan than is frequently conceived. This reconstruction alters expectations for Neoproterozoic fossil remains that could illustrate the pathways of bilaterian evolution.

  4. Science for common entrance physics

    Pickering, WR

    2015-01-01

    Cover everything required for the 13+ Common Entrance Physics exam with clearly presented content, lively illustrations and challenging end-of-chapter questions. This challenging and stimulating Science course has been reviewed by the ISEB subject editor and covers the content of both Levels 1 and 2 of the 13+ Physics exam. Designed for pupils in Years 7 and 8, it is an indispensable resource that lays the foundations for Common Entrance success. - Explores every Level 1 and 2 topic with clear explanations and examples - Includes topic-based exercises and extension questions - Builds on p

  5. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    ... Croatia - Cuba - Cyprus - Czech Republic - Denmark - Dominican Republic - Ecuador - Egypt - Estonia - Finland - France - Georgia - Germany - Greece - Guatemala - ... Advisors Regional Representation Vision, Mission & Goals Annual Report History Find a Local Society Contact Us Partners What ...

  6. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    ... Custard made with milk, vanilla 120 g 111 Ice cream, vanilla 100 g 124 Pudding, vanilla 120 g ... Advisors Regional Representation Vision, Mission & Goals Annual Report History Find a Local Society Contact Us Partners What ...

  7. Common menstrual concerns of adolescents

    Sacks, Diane

    1998-01-01

    Symptoms associated with menstruation are among the most common concerns of adolescent women. However, the factual information that adolescent women need is not always available to them. Physicians can do much to correct the myths and misinformation that the teenager may have concerning her menstrual cycle. This paper addresses clinical office concerns about normal menstruation, dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea and dysfunctional uterine bleeding.

  8. Common parasite with uncommon associations

    Sonal Jain

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Filaariasis a quite common in some parts of the world including India. It has been reported as an incidental finding in cytology smears. Here we report three cases where microfilariae of Wuchereria Bancrofti were detected incidentally in bone marrow smears, in two cases in special stain slides. All these patients were being investigated for other hematological disorders.

  9. Common parasite with uncommon associations

    Jasmita Dass; Sonal Jain; Monica Sharma; Seema Tyagi

    2011-01-01

    Filaariasis a quite common in some parts of the world including India. It has been reported as an incidental finding in cytology smears. Here we report three cases where microfilariae of Wuchereria Bancrofti were detected incidentally in bone marrow smears, in two cases in special stain slides. All these patients were being investigated for other hematological disorders.

  10. Technology: Technology and Common Sense

    Van Horn, Royal

    2004-01-01

    The absence of common sense in the world of technology continues to amaze the author. Things that seem so logical to just aren nott for many people. The installation of Voice-over IP (VoIP, with IP standing for Internet Protocol) in many school districts is a good example. Schools have always had trouble with telephones. Many districts don't even…

  11. Objectification in Common Sense Thinking

    Markova, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    In epistemologies of both scientific and common sense thinking "objectification" characterizes the formation of knowledge and concepts, yet in each case its meaning is different. In the former, objectification in acquiring knowledge refers to the individual's rationalistic reification of an object or of another person and to disengagement or…

  12. Common Core: Fact vs. Fiction

    Greene, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Despite students' interest in informational text, it has played second fiddle in literacy instruction for years. Now, though, nonfiction is getting its turn in the spotlight. The Common Core State Standards require that students become thoughtful consumers of complex, informative texts--taking them beyond the realm of dry textbooks and…

  13. Common sleep disorders in children.

    Carter, Kevin A; Hathaway, Nathanael E; Lettieri, Christine F

    2014-03-01

    Up to 50% of children will experience a sleep problem. Early identification of sleep problems may prevent negative consequences, such as daytime sleepiness, irritability, behavioral problems, learning difficulties, motor vehicle crashes in teenagers, and poor academic performance. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs in 1% to 5% of children. Polysomnography is needed to diagnose the condition because it may not be detected through history and physical examination alone. Adenotonsillectomy is the primary treatment for most children with obstructive sleep apnea. Parasomnias are common in childhood; sleepwalking, sleep talking, confusional arousals, and sleep terrors tend to occur in the first half of the night, whereas nightmares are more common in the second half of the night. Only 4% of parasomnias will persist past adolescence; thus, the best management is parental reassurance and proper safety measures. Behavioral insomnia of childhood is common and is characterized by a learned inability to fall and/or stay asleep. Management begins with consistent implementation of good sleep hygiene practices, and, in some cases, use of extinction techniques may be appropriate. Delayed sleep phase disorder is most common in adolescence, presenting as difficulty falling asleep and awakening at socially acceptable times. Treatment involves good sleep hygiene and a consistent sleep-wake schedule, with nighttime melatonin and/or morning bright light therapy as needed. Diagnosing restless legs syndrome in children can be difficult; management focuses on trigger avoidance and treatment of iron deficiency, if present. PMID:24695508

  14. The Common Vision. Reviews: Books.

    Chattin-McNichols, John

    1998-01-01

    Reviews Marshak's book describing the work of educators Maria Montessori, Rudolf Steiner, Aurobindo Ghose, and Inayat Khan. Maintains that the book gives clear, concise information on each educator and presents a common vision for children and their education; also maintains that it gives theoretical and practical information and discusses…

  15. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  16. Common Issues in Professional Behavior

    Janosik, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Most conversations about ethics and professional behavior involve case studies and hypothetical situations. This study identifies and examines the most common concerns in professional behavior as reported by 303 student affairs practitioners in the field. Differences by gender, years of experience, organizational level, institutional type, and…

  17. Genes and (common pathways underlying drug addiction.

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a serious worldwide problem with strong genetic and environmental influences. Different technologies have revealed a variety of genes and pathways underlying addiction; however, each individual technology can be biased and incomplete. We integrated 2,343 items of evidence from peer-reviewed publications between 1976 and 2006 linking genes and chromosome regions to addiction by single-gene strategies, microrray, proteomics, or genetic studies. We identified 1,500 human addiction-related genes and developed KARG (http://karg.cbi.pku.edu.cn, the first molecular database for addiction-related genes with extensive annotations and a friendly Web interface. We then performed a meta-analysis of 396 genes that were supported by two or more independent items of evidence to identify 18 molecular pathways that were statistically significantly enriched, covering both upstream signaling events and downstream effects. Five molecular pathways significantly enriched for all four different types of addictive drugs were identified as common pathways which may underlie shared rewarding and addictive actions, including two new ones, GnRH signaling pathway and gap junction. We connected the common pathways into a hypothetical common molecular network for addiction. We observed that fast and slow positive feedback loops were interlinked through CAMKII, which may provide clues to explain some of the irreversible features of addiction.

  18. Common sense and the common morality in theory and practice.

    Daly, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The unfinished nature of Beauchamp and Childress's account of the common morality after 34 years and seven editions raises questions about what is lacking, specifically in the way they carry out their project, more generally in the presuppositions of the classical liberal tradition on which they rely. Their wide-ranging review of ethical theories has not provided a method by which to move beyond a hypothetical approach to justification or, on a practical level regarding values conflict, beyond a questionable appeal to consensus. My major purpose in this paper is to introduce the thought of Bernard Lonergan as offering a way toward such a methodological breakthrough. In the first section, I consider Beauchamp and Childress's defense of their theory of the common morality. In the second, I relate a persisting vacillation in their argument regarding the relative importance of reason and experience to a similar tension in classical liberal theory. In the third, I consider aspects of Lonergan's generalized empirical method as a way to address problems that surface in the first two sections of the paper: (1) the structural relation of reason and experience in human action; and (2) the importance of theory for practice in terms of what Lonergan calls "common sense" and "general bias." PMID:24526573

  19. Schwannoma of submandibular region

    Ahad, Abdul

    1997-01-01

    Tumours of the nerve sheath origin in the head and neck are not common. Schwannomas are rare. Only a few cases have been reported so far. We report a rare case of Schwannoma of Submandibular region arising from the lingual nerve.

  20. REDVET indexada desde Scientific Commons

    veterinaria.org

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ResumenScientific Commons es un cosechador de metadatos desarrollado por laUniversidad de St. Gallen (Suiza en los idiomas inglés y alemán, utiliza el protocolo OAI-PMH y aunque aún está en versión beta, paulatinamente va adquiriendo números totales de revistas científicas que, como es el caso de REDVET Revista Electrónica de Veterinaria, publican en OA. Así si entramos a http://en.scientificcommons.org/redvet#search_string=REDVETVeremos como a fecha de hoy hay 644 artículos publicados en REDVETindexados en Scientific Commons:

  1. Common basis for cellular motility

    Zot, Henry G.; Javier E Hasbun; Minh, Nguyen Van

    2015-01-01

    Motility is characteristic of life, but a common basis for movement has remained to be identified. Diverse systems in motion shift between two states depending on interactions that turnover at the rate of an applied cycle of force. Although one phase of the force cycle terminates the decay of the most recent state, continuation of the cycle of force regenerates the original decay process in a recursive cycle. By completing a cycle, kinetic energy is transformed into probability of sustaining ...

  2. Common Perspectives in Qualitative Research.

    Flannery, Marie

    2016-07-01

    The primary purpose of this column is to focus on several common core concepts that are foundational to qualitative research. Discussion of these concepts is at an introductory level and is designed to raise awareness and understanding of several conceptual foundations that undergird qualitative research. Because of the variety of qualitative approaches, not all concepts are relevant to every design and tradition. However, foundational aspects were selected for highlighting. PMID:27314194

  3. Overfishing of the Common Snook

    Allison Ashcroft

    2012-01-01

    The chief aim of this project is to determine if the populations of the common snook, Centropomus Undecimalis, in the Atlantic and Gulf coast are being affected by overfishing. This is established by evaluating the intrinsic rate of change for these populations and their carrying capacities. It turns out that the carrying capacity for the population of the Atlantic coast is approximately one million snook and its intrinsic rate is 0.00621, while the carrying capacity of the Gulf coast's popul...

  4. Developing the common communication format

    Hopkinson, Alan

    1986-01-01

    The Unesco Common Communication Format (CCF) is described in the context of other exchange formats. A definition is given of 'exchange format', and the CCF is compared against this definition. The history of its development is outlined and its major technical features are summarized. Examples are given of the ways in which it is being used and is likely to be used in the future, and a number of implementation manuals are mentioned which have been developed to assist in its use.

  5. A common agency within bureaucracy

    Olcay, Nadide Banu

    2016-01-01

    We explore the welfare implications of multiple principals in the top level of bureaucracy. An agent has to carry out two separate tasks, which can either be organized by two separate principals, or combined under one principal. The relationship between the top level (the principals) and the lower level (agent) of bureaucracy is a “principal-agent problem”. The presence of multiple principals generates a “common agency”. We show that the optimal bureaucratic structure depends o...

  6. Common Factors in Return Seasonalities

    Matti Keloharju; Juhani T. Linnainmaa; Peter Nyberg

    2014-01-01

    A strategy that selects stocks based on their historical same-calendar-month returns earns an average return of 13% per year. We document similar return seasonalities in anomalies, commodities, international stock market indices, and at the daily frequency. The seasonalities overwhelm unconditional differences in expected returns. The correlations between different seasonality strategies are modest, suggesting that they emanate from different common factors. Our results suggest that seasonali...

  7. Common Ground Between Three Cultures

    Gloria Dunnivan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Triwizard program with Israel brought together students from three different communities: an Israeli Arab school, an Israeli Jewish school, and an American public school with few Jews and even fewer Muslims. The two Israeli groups met in Israel to find common ground and overcome their differences through dialogue and understanding. They communicated with the American school via technology such as video-conferencing, Skype, and emails. The program culminated with a visit to the U.S. The goal of the program was to embark upon a process that would bring about intercultural awareness and acceptance at the subjective level, guiding all involved to develop empathy and an insider's view of the other's culture. It was an attempt to have a group of Israeli high school students and a group of Arab Israeli students who had a fearful, distrustful perception of each other find common ground and become friends. TriWizard was designed to have participants begin a dialogue about issues, beliefs, and emotions based on the premise that cross-cultural training strategies that are effective in changing knowledge are those that engage the emotions, and actively develop empathy and an insider's views of another culture focused on what they have in common. Participants learned that they could become friends despite their cultural differences.

  8. Scientific Research: Commodities or Commons?

    Vermeir, Koen

    2013-10-01

    Truth is for sale today, some critics claim. The increased commodification of science corrupts it, scientific fraud is rampant and the age-old trust in science is shattered. This cynical view, although gaining in prominence, does not explain very well the surprising motivation and integrity that is still central to the scientific life. Although scientific knowledge becomes more and more treated as a commodity or as a product that is for sale, a central part of academic scientific practice is still organized according to different principles. In this paper, I critically analyze alternative models for understanding the organization of knowledge, such as the idea of the scientific commons and the gift economy of science. After weighing the diverse positive and negative aspects of free market economies of science and gift economies of science, a commons structured as a gift economy seems best suited to preserve and take advantage of the specific character of scientific knowledge. Furthermore, commons and gift economies promote the rich social texture that is important for supporting central norms of science. Some of these basic norms might break down if the gift character of science is lost. To conclude, I consider the possibility and desirability of hybrid economies of academic science, which combine aspects of gift economies and free market economies. The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of these deeper structural challenges faced by science policy. Such theoretical reflections should eventually assist us in formulating new policy guidelines.

  9. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  10. REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT POLICY IN ROMANIA

    Sabau Bene Mihaela; Mihaela Triculescu; Marius Herbei

    2013-01-01

    Regional development is a global process of diversification and economic and social development at a regional collectivity level by mobilizing and using existing resources. Diversification and regional development requires a common strategy of the private sector, public or social, official to capitalize human, technical and financial resources of a regional collectivity. In the specialty literatur,e the concept of development is manifested by the use of terms such as: economic and social deve...

  11. The Landform Regions of Iowa

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — A landscape is a collection of land shapes or land forms. Landform regions are a grouping of individual landscape features that have a common geomophology. In Iowa,...

  12. Regions & Cohesion

    KOFF, Harlan; Maganda, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The journal of the Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC), a cross-regional, interdisciplinary, and multi-lingual network of socially conscious and prestigious research institutes in Europe, North America, South America, Africa, and Asia. Due to the dramatic changes in global affairs related to regional integration, studies can no longer be limited to the analysis of economic competitiveness and political power in global geopolitics. Regions and...

  13. COMMON FIXED POINT THEOREM IN

    SYED SHAHNAWAZ ALI; JAINENDRA JAIN; ANIL RAJPUT

    2013-01-01

    The study of theory of fuzzy sets was initiated by Zadeh in 1965. Since then many authors have extended and developed the theory of fuzzy sets in the fields of topology and analysis. The notion of fuzzy metric spaces has very important applications in quantum particle physics. As a result many authors have extended the Banach’sContraction Principle to fuzzy metric spaces. Fixed point and common fixed point properties for mappings defined on fuzzy metric spaces have been studied by many author...

  14. Common elbow injuries in sport.

    Field, L D; Savoie, F H

    1998-09-01

    Athletes of all ages and skill levels are increasingly participating in sports involving overhead arm motions, making elbow injuries more common. Among these injuries is lateral epicondylitis, which occurs in over 50% of athletes using overhead arm motions. Lateral epicondylitis is characterised by pain in the area where the common extensor muscles meet the lateral humeral epicondyle. The onset of this pathological condition begins with the excessive use of the wrist extensor musculature. Repetitive microtraumatic injury can lead to mucinoid degeneration of the extensor origin and subsequent failure of the tendon. Lateral epicondylitis can almost always be treated nonoperatively with activity modification and specific exercises. If the athlete fails to respond to nonoperative treatment after 6 months to 1 year, they are candidates for surgical intervention. Medial epicondylitis is characterised by pain and tenderness at the flexor-pronator tendinous origin with pathology commonly being located at the interface between the pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis origin. Golfers and tennis players often develop this condition because of the repetitive valgus stress placed on the medial elbow soft tissues. Careful evaluation is important to differentiate medial epicondylitis from other causes of medial elbow pain. As with lateral epicondylitis, patients with medial epicondylitis not responding to an extensive nonoperative programme are candidates for surgical intervention. A less common cause of medial elbow pain is medial ulnar collateral ligament injury. Repetitive valgus stress placed on the joint can lead to microtraumatic injury and valgus instability. When the medial ulnar collateral ligament is disrupted, abnormal stress is placed on the articular surfaces that can lead to degenerative changes with osteophyte formation. As with other elbow injuries, a strict rehabilitation regimen is first employed; ligament reconstruction is only recommended if the injury

  15. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    P Azarfam; M Aminbakhsh; M. Asgharzadeh; AA Hossainpour; MA Hossainpour-Faizi; N Pouladi

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Ur...

  16. REDVET indexada desde Scientific Commons

    veterinaria.org

    2009-01-01

    ResumenScientific Commons es un cosechador de metadatos desarrollado por laUniversidad de St. Gallen (Suiza) en los idiomas inglés y alemán, utiliza el protocolo OAI-PMH y aunque aún está en versión beta, paulatinamente va adquiriendo números totales de revistas científicas que, como es el caso de REDVET Revista Electrónica de Veterinaria, publican en OA. Así si entramos a http://en.scientificcommons.org/redvet#search_string=REDVETVeremos como a fecha de hoy hay 644 artículos publicados en RE...

  17. Common-rail injection systems; Common-Rail Einspritzsysteme

    Lehle, W.; Hammer, J.; Naber, D.; Kampmann, S.; Duernholz, M.; Dohle, U. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The diesel engine has established by the end users as the economic solution with high driving enjoyment in all passenger car classes. The success could and can only be reached by the fulfillment of the emission standards, the highest comfort efforts and a long-lived use to justifiable system costs. The modular system portfolio of Bosch enables the engine manufacturers to fulfill the compensation between the high requirements and prices corresponding to real market conditions. In the following the essential challenges and chances of the Diesel drive, characteristics and solutions of the Common rail system, in hard-and software, and solutions for the diagnosis life cycle of the vehicle are shown. (orig.)

  18. 喀斯特山区9种常见树木叶片在防火期的阻火性分析%Fire Resistance of Leaves During Fire Prevention Period of Nine Common Tree Species in Karst Mountain Regions

    梁琴; 陶建平; 邓锋; 王微; 方文; 何平

    2015-01-01

    Objective]Guizhou province of China is one of the most typical karst regions in the world,at the same time,its fire disturbance is highly representative in the national forest fires. With the fragile karst environment plus severe forest fire disturbance,the fire prevention is particularly important and urgent in the Karst mountain regions of Guizhou province. Among the many fire prevention measures,the biological firebreak with its versatile,and long-term advantage, has attracted much attention of scholars and managers. The primary task of biological firebreak is to select the appropriate pyrophyte ( the plants with good fire resistance) . However,there is few study focus on the pyrophyte selection for karst mountain regions. On the other hand,with regard to pyrophyte selection,there is no uniform evaluation method up to now. It’s necessary to select appropriate fire-resistant tree species which are also suitable for growing in karst mountain regions,[Method]we investigated 9 common tree species from karst mountain regions of northwest Guizhou. Based on the measurements of four leaf traits ( benzene -alcohol extract content,ash content,ignition time and heat value) during fire prevention period,we used the Principal Component Analysis ( PCA) ,combined with the Weighted-Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution ( W-TOPSIS) ,to analyze the fire resistance.[Result]The Viburnum foetidum var. ceanothoides’s and Castanea seguinii’s benzene-alcohol extractive content were 2. 12 and 1. 97 times higher than Murica nana’s; The ash content of M. nana’s and V. foetidum var. ceanothoides’were the highest,and Castanea seguinii’s,Vaccinium pseudorobustum ’s and Ligustrum quihoui ’s were the lowest; The ignition time of L. quihoui, Castanea seguinii and Cotoneaster glaucophyllus var. glaucophyllus were the longest, and Puracantha fortuneana, Cunninghamia lanceolata and Rhododendron simsii were the shortest;The highest heat value were

  19. ASPECTS OF THE FUTURE COMMON AGRICULTURAL POLICY

    Paolo GAJO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to present the main CAP reforms imposed by the actual situation of agriculture development in the EU. The Common Agriculture Policy is focused on decoupling, modulation and cross-compliance. The single payment scheme will assure aids only for farms where production complies with environment, food safety, animal and plant health, animal welfare, and agricultural land maintenance in good condition. The new legislation provides the introduction of "green payments" related to the adoption of agricultural practices beneficial for the climate and the environment. The demographic growth imposes more production and a better distribution of food in the world. The EU has to be prepared to produce more because of the mass emigration to the rich countries from the region where food demand can not be covered.

  20. Management of common sleep disorders.

    Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J

    2013-08-15

    Sleep disorders are common and affect sleep quality and quantity, leading to increased morbidity. Patients with sleep disorders can be categorized as those who cannot sleep, those who will not sleep, those with excessive daytime sleepiness, and those with increased movements during sleep. Insomnia, defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep that results in daytime impairment, is diagnosed using history findings and treated with cognitive behavior therapy, with or without sleep hypnotics. Restless legs syndrome is characterized by an urge to move the legs that worsens with rest, is relieved by movement, and often occurs in the evening or at night. Restless legs syndrome is treated based on the frequency of symptoms. Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. It is diagnosed using a sleep log or actigraphy, followed by overnight polysomnography and a multiple sleep latency test. Narcolepsy is treated with stimulants, such as modafinil; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors; or gamma hydroxybutyric acid (sodium oxybate). Patients with snoring and witnessed apneas may have obstructive sleep apnea, which is diagnosed using overnight polysomnography. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most common and effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is characterized by increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep, resulting in the patient acting out dreams with possible harmful consequences. It is diagnosed based on history and polysomnography findings, and treated with environmental safety measures and melatonin or clonazepam. PMID:23944726

  1. Urban ambiances as common ground?

    Jean-Paul Thibaud

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to point out various arguments which question ambiance as a common ground of everyday urban experience. Such a project involves four major points. First, we have to move beyond the exclusive practical aspects of everyday life and bring the sensory to the forefront. Under such conditions, sensory cultures emerge where feeling and acting come together. Second, we must put common experience into perspectiveby initiating a dual dynamics of socialising the sensory and sensitising social life. Ambiances involve a complex web comprised of an ‘existential’ dimension (empathy with the ambient world, a ‘contextual’ dimension (degree of presence in the situation, and an ‘interactional’ dimension (forms of sociability expressed in the tonality. Third, we have to initiate a political ecology of ambiances in order to better understand how ambiances deal with fundamental design and planning issues. Far from being neutral, the notion of ambiance appears to be bound up with the socio-aesthetic strategies underpinning changes to the sensory urban environment of the future. Fourth, we have to question what in situ experience is all about. Three major research pointers enable to address this issue: the embodiment of situated experiences, the porous nature of sensory spaces, and the sensory efficiency of the build environment. Ambiances sensitize urban design as well as social lifeforms.

  2. ALMA Common Software - UTFSM Group

    Araya, M.; Avarias, J.; Mora, M.; Tobar, R.

    The ACS-UTFSM Group was created as a distributed systems research team on astronomical and non-astronomical applications on the year 2004. The choice of the ALMA Common Software framework (ACS) as the development platform came from the experience gained during summerjobs at ESO observatories. After three years of informal contributions to ACS development, the team presented a technology exchange initiative to the ALMA-CONICYT Fund 2006, which was granted in 2007. Through the past years, the UTFSM helped the ACS team with "nice-to-have" applications and testing. Currently the ACS-UTFSM is involved in several contributions to ACS, and the development of a flexible telescope control system (gTCS) framework which aims to encapsulate common requirements and will provide a uniform software. In preparation for this challenging objective, several small projects are currently being developed. The other interesting edge of the team work is the technology transfer initiatives. Several inter-universities collaborations are flourishing (PUC, UCN, UV) after the first ACS Workshop held at the UTFSM this year. Today three former team members are working at NRAO's ALMA Test Facility in Socorro, New Mexico. Two other students will have a summer job next year to work in ALMA related development.

  3. Common Mathematical Model of Fatigue Characteristics

    Z. Maléř

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new common mathematical model which is able to describe fatigue characteristics in the whole necessary range by one equation only:log N = A(R + B(R ∙ log Sawhere A(R = AR2 + BR + C and B(R = DR2 + AR + F.This model was verified by five sets of fatigue data taken from the literature and by our own three additional original fatigue sets. The fatigue data usually described the region of N 104 to 3 x 106 and stress ratio of R = -2 to 0.5. In all these cases the proposed model described fatigue results with small scatter. Studying this model, following knowledge was obtained:– the parameter ”stress ratio R” was a good physical characteristic– the proposed model provided a good description of the eight collections of fatigue test results by one equation only– the scatter of the results through the whole scope is only a little greater than that round the individual S/N curve– using this model while testing may reduce the number of test samples and shorten the test time– as the proposed model represents a common form of the S/N curve, it may be used for processing uniform objective fatigue life results, which may enable mutual comparison of fatigue characteristics.

  4. Complex reconfiguration - developing common tools

    Reconfiguring DOE sites, facilities, and laboratories to meet expected and evolving missions involves a number of disciplines and approaches formerly the preserve of private industry and defense contractors. This paper considers the process of identifying common tools for the various disciplines that can be exercised, assessed, and applied by team members to arrive at integrated solutions. The basic tools include: systems, hardware, software, and procedures that can characterize a site/facility's environment to meet organizational goals, safeguards and security, ES ampersand H, and waste requirements. Other tools such as computer-driven inventory and auditing programs can provide traceability of materials and product as they are processed and required added protection and control. This paper will also discuss the use of integrated teams in a number of high technology enterprises that could be adopted by DOE in high profile programs from environmental remediation to weapons dismantling and arms control

  5. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. PMID:25728477

  6. Whose commons are mobilities spaces?

    Freudendal-Pedersen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    regarding the right to city space. Drawing from qualitative research conducted in Copenhagen as part of an “Urban Cycle Mobilities” project, this article demonstrates that people who cycle in Copenhagen constitute a community of cyclists, and asks whether such a cycling community creates the condition for......The question of how to get more people to cycle has spread to many cities around the world. Copenhagen is often identified as having achieved considerable success in this regard, but there is a danger that the positive cycling narrative that prevails in Copenhagen may block critical discussion...... vision of the common good that gives cyclists greater and more protected access to the city’s mobility spaces...

  7. Sillamaee - a common Baltic concern

    The problems of uranium mining and milling are related to the huge amount of waste containing radioactive as well as chemical pollutants. Tailings can be satisfactorly protected so that the environmental impact is minor in the short term. The methods to reduce the risks are many. The actual releases today in the Sillamaee region of the Baltic Sea from the tailings pond are relatively small and should not give rise to concern. However, the situation is unstable, which is why efforts to find remediation methods are justified

  8. Promoting regional mobility

    Jensen, Anne

    . Development of pricing policies is contested at Community level and has taken place in a clash between different policy rationalities. Significantly though, the effects of the pricing policies are closely related to regional mobility systems, e.g. through financing large trans-border infrastructure projects...... and establishing common technical charging systems thus changing the conditions for regional mobility. This paper explores how policies of infrastructure pricing shape new ways of governing mobility which influences trans-border, regional policy-making. The key findings are that there is a tendency to...... include ideas of mobility as a narrative in community transport policy which further that through Community pricing policies, the conditions for mobility is enhanced in a Community perspective. However, when this is connected to infrastructure pricing, the effect is largest at a regional scale. Further...

  9. Mainstreaming regionalism

    Closa, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The consolidation of regionalism as a broad field of research attracting scholars across disciplines demands an inquiry on its scientific foundations. This inquiry should consider the object of research, the methods and the theories used. First, regionalism scholars lack a consensually agreed definition of their subject. Second, research focusses mainly in case studies, led by area specialists and comparative research is a rather occasional methodological occurrence. Finally, regionalism has ...

  10. Common Questions About Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    Kalra, Monica G; Higgins, Kim E; Perez, Evan D

    2016-07-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection causes 15% to 30% of sore throats in children and 5% to 15% in adults, and is more common in the late winter and early spring. The strongest independent predictors of GABHS pharyngitis are patient age of five to 15 years, absence of cough, tender anterior cervical adenopathy, tonsillar exudates, and fever. To diagnose GABHS pharyngitis, a rapid antigen detection test should be ordered in patients with a modified Centor or FeverPAIN score of 2 or 3. First-line treatment for GABHS pharyngitis includes a 10-day course of penicillin or amoxicillin. Patients allergic to penicillin can be treated with firstgeneration cephalosporins, clindamycin, or macrolide antibiotics. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are more effective than acetaminophen and placebo for treatment of fever and pain associated with GABHS pharyngitis; medicated throat lozenges used every two hours are also effective. Corticosteroids provide only a small reduction in the duration of symptoms and should not be used routinely. PMID:27386721

  11. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  12. Common errors in disease mapping

    Ricardo Ocaña-Riola

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Many morbid-mortality atlases and small-area studies have been carried out over the last decade. However, the methods used to draw up such research, the interpretation of results and the conclusions published are often inaccurate. Often, the proliferation of this practice has led to inefficient decision-making, implementation of inappropriate health policies and negative impact on the advancement of scientific knowledge. This paper reviews the most frequent errors in the design, analysis and interpretation of small-area epidemiological studies and proposes a diagnostic evaluation test that should enable the scientific quality of published papers to be ascertained. Nine common mistakes in disease mapping methods are discussed. From this framework, and following the theory of diagnostic evaluation, a standardised test to evaluate the scientific quality of a small-area epidemiology study has been developed. Optimal quality is achieved with the maximum score (16 points, average with a score between 8 and 15 points, and low with a score of 7 or below. A systematic evaluation of scientific papers, together with an enhanced quality in future research, will contribute towards increased efficacy in epidemiological surveillance and in health planning based on the spatio-temporal analysis of ecological information.

  13. Common questions about wound care.

    Worster, Brooke; Zawora, Michelle Q; Hsieh, Christine

    2015-01-15

    Lacerations, abrasions, burns, and puncture wounds are common in the outpatient setting. Because wounds can quickly become infected, the most important aspect of treating a minor wound is irrigation and cleaning. There is no evidence that antiseptic irrigation is superior to sterile saline or tap water. Occlusion of the wound is key to preventing contamination. Suturing, if required, can be completed up to 24 hours after the trauma occurs, depending on the wound site. Tissue adhesives are equally effective for low-tension wounds with linear edges that can be evenly approximated. Although patients are often instructed to keep their wounds covered and dry after suturing, they can get wet within the first 24 to 48 hours without increasing the risk of infection. There is no evidence that prophylactic antibiotics improve outcomes for most simple wounds. Tetanus toxoid should be administered as soon as possible to patients who have not received a booster in the past 10 years. Superficial mild wound infections can be treated with topical agents, whereas deeper mild and moderate infections should be treated with oral antibiotics. Most severe infections, and moderate infections in high-risk patients, require initial parenteral antibiotics. Severe burns and wounds that cover large areas of the body or involve the face, joints, bone, tendons, or nerves should generally be referred to wound care specialists. PMID:25591209

  14. Regional Anesthesia in Trauma Medicine

    Loreto Lollo; Wu, Janice J.; Andreas Grabinsky

    2011-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is an established method to provide analgesia for patients in the operating room and during the postoperative phase. While regional anesthesia offers unique advantages, as shown by the recent military experience, it is not commonly utilized in the prehospital or emergency department setting. Most often, regional anesthesia techniques for traumatized patients are first utilized in the operating room for procedural anesthesia or for postoperative pain control. While infiltra...

  15. Cooperation in regional nuclear training

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear training currently being undertaken in the countries of the co-authors, and considers the degree to which training problems are amenable to common solutions such as cooperative regional training programs. Different types of cooperation are discussed including the development of regional and international training centers, cooperative bilateral and multilateral training, and the proposed US International Nuclear Safety Training Academy. The paper provides suggestions of ways for enhancing regional cooperation

  16. Regional report Western Europe

    The present and future situation in the twelve Common Market and the sixth European Free Trade Area countries plus Yugoslavia are synthesized for the next 30 years in the energy field. Scenario is not based on an extrapolation of present experiences, but on savoir-faire evolution in function of new technologies, of new social needs and of an increase of local and regional environment protection. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  17. Common Questions About Chronic Prostatitis.

    Holt, James D; Garrett, W Allan; McCurry, Tyler K; Teichman, Joel M H

    2016-02-15

    Chronic prostatitis is relatively common, with a lifetime prevalence of 1.8% to 8.2%. Risk factors include conditions that facilitate introduction of bacteria into the urethra and prostate (which also predispose the patient to urinary tract infections) and conditions that can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic prostatitis must be differentiated from other causes of chronic pelvic pain, such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction; prostate and bladder cancers; benign prostatic hyperplasia; urolithiasis; and other causes of dysuria, urinary frequency, and nocturia. The National Institutes of Health divides prostatitis into four syndromes: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. CBP and CNP/CPPS both lead to pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. CBP presents as recurrent urinary tract infections with the same organism identified on repeated cultures; it responds to a prolonged course of an antibiotic that adequately penetrates the prostate, if the urine culture suggests sensitivity. If four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy is effective but symptoms recur, another course may be prescribed, perhaps in combination with alpha blockers or nonopioid analgesics. CNP/CPPS, accounting for more than 90% of chronic prostatitis cases, presents as prostatic pain lasting at least three months without consistent culture results. Weak evidence supports the use of alpha blockers, pain medications, and a four- to six-week course of antibiotics for the treatment of CNP/CPPS. Patients may also be referred to a psychologist experienced in managing chronic pain. Experts on this condition recommend a combination of treatments tailored to the patient's phenotypic presentation. Urology referral should be considered when appropriate treatment is ineffective. Additional treatments include pelvic

  18. Designing the Microbial Research Commons

    Uhlir, Paul F

    2011-10-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an ever-increasing range and volume of digital data. All elements of the pillars of science--whether observation, experiment, or theory and modeling--are being transformed by the continuous cycle of generation, dissemination, and use of factual information. This is even more so in terms of the re-using and re-purposing of digital scientific data beyond the original intent of the data collectors, often with dramatic results. We all know about the potential benefits and impacts of digital data, but we are also aware of the barriers, the challenges in maximizing the access, and use of such data. There is thus a need to think about how a data infrastructure can enhance capabilities for finding, using, and integrating information to accelerate discovery and innovation. How can we best implement an accessible, interoperable digital environment so that the data can be repeatedly used by a wide variety of users in different settings and with different applications? With this objective: to use the microbial communities and microbial data, literature, and the research materials themselves as a test case, the Board on Research Data and Information held an International Symposium on Designing the Microbial Research Commons at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 8-9 October 2009. The symposium addressed topics such as models to lower the transaction costs and support access to and use of microbiological materials and digital resources from the perspective of publicly funded research, public-private interactions, and developing country concerns. The overall goal of the symposium was to stimulate more research and implementation of improved legal and institutional models for publicly funded research in microbiology.

  19. Common Cause Failures and Ultra Reliability

    Jones, Harry W.

    2012-01-01

    A common cause failure occurs when several failures have the same origin. Common cause failures are either common event failures, where the cause is a single external event, or common mode failures, where two systems fail in the same way for the same reason. Common mode failures can occur at different times because of a design defect or a repeated external event. Common event failures reduce the reliability of on-line redundant systems but not of systems using off-line spare parts. Common mode failures reduce the dependability of systems using off-line spare parts and on-line redundancy.

  20. Proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    The modern cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has evolved from wild common beans distributed in Central America, Mexico and the Andean region of South America. It has been reported that wild common bean accessions have higher levels of protein content than the domesticated dry bean cultiva...

  1. Science for common entrance physics : answers

    Pickering, W R

    2015-01-01

    This book contains answers to all exercises featured in the accompanying textbook Science for Common Entrance: Physics , which covers every Level 1 and 2 topic in the ISEB 13+ Physics Common Entrance exam syllabus. - Clean, clear layout for easy marking. - Includes examples of high-scoring answers with diagrams and workings. - Suitable for ISEB 13+ Mathematics Common Entrance exams taken from Autumn 2017 onwards. Also available to purchase from the Galore Park website www.galorepark.co.uk :. - Science for Common Entrance: Physics. - Science for Common Entrance: Biology. - Science for Common En

  2. Non-three-colorable common graphs exist

    Hatami, Hamed; Kral, Daniel; Norine, Serguei; Razborov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A graph H is called common if the total number of copies of H in every graph and its complement asymptotically minimizes for random graphs. A former conjecture of Burr and Rosta, extending a conjecture of Erdos asserted that every graph is common. Thomason disproved both conjectures by showing that the complete graph of order four is not common. It is now known that in fact the common graphs are very rare. Answering a question of Sidorenko and of Jagger, Stovicek and Thomason from 1996 we show that the 5-wheel is common. This provides the first example of a common graph that is not three-colorable.

  3. METHODOLOGY OF REGIONAL ECONOMY OPTIMIZING

    K. Ainabek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development of the national economy directly depends on the optimality of its composite parts. This can be addressed through the appropriate balance of the sectors and the regions, the inner parts of their structure based on a common criterion of the evaluation of cost variables characterizing the parameters of the functioning of the regional actors. This paper shows theoretical principles and economic-mathematical model of optimization of the regional economy and the relations between the center and the regions based on the author’s approach.

  4. Southern Watersheds Common Reedgrass Monitoring Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Southern Watersheds Common Reedgrass Project is an interagency effort to increase public awareness of the common reedgrass problem, demonstrate effective...

  5. Climate Change Facts: Answers to Common Questions

    ... Basics Climate Change Facts: Answers to Common Questions Climate Change Facts: Answers to Common Questions This page ... All Responses Is there a scientific consensus on climate change? The major scientific agencies of the United ...

  6. Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice

    ... near you Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice Patient ... that traditionally accompany gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Voice Misuse and Overuse Speaking is a physical task ...

  7. On the commons of developed industrialized countries

    Erling Berge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The editorial discusses the status and prospects of the commons of developed industrialized countries, based on the literature. For the traditional commons, one key variable for long-term development prospects of the commons is found in the way ownership to the commons is structured. A second key variable is the way increasing knowledge, including scientific environmental knowledge, has affected our perception of what a resource is within a commons and its value. The way these two variables characterizing commons: “structure of ownership” and “knowledge of valuable resources” are related is illustrated in a process referred to as “the withering away” with potential for widely diverging outcomes. Also new emerging urban commons are commented on and a more indepth study of both traditional and new urban commons is called for.

  8. Regional systems of innovation: an evolutionary perspective

    Cooke, P.; M G Uranga; G Etxebarria

    1998-01-01

    The authors develop the concept of regional systems of innovation and relate it to preexisting research on national systems of innovation. They argue that work conducted in the 'new regional science' field is complementary to systems of innovation approaches. They seek to link new regional work to evolutionary economics, and argue for the development of evolutionary regional science. Common elements of interest to evolutionary innovation research and new regional science are important in unde...

  9. Governing the global commons with local institutions

    Todd Bodnar; Marcel Salathé

    2012-01-01

    Most problems faced by modern human society have two characteristics in common - they are tragedy-of-the-commons type of problems, and they are global problems. Tragedy-of-the-commons type of problems are those where a commonly shared resource is overexploited by free riders at the expense of everyone sharing the resource. The exploitation of global resources such as clean air and water, political stability and peace, etc. underlies many of the most pressing human problems. Punishment of free...

  10. 49 CFR 1185.5 - Common control.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Common control. 1185.5 Section 1185.5... OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE INTERLOCKING OFFICERS § 1185.5 Common control. It shall not be... carriers if such carriers are operated under common control or management either: (a) Pursuant to...

  11. Academic Engagement in the Library Commons

    Bennett, Charlie; Bodnar, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written about library commons in recent years. For the most part, that literature has dealt with designing information and learning commons that support student learning by giving them the tools and resources they need for their academic work. However, few authors have discussed how a library commons might facilitate collaboration…

  12. Emergence Prediction of Common Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris)

    Common groundsel is an important weed of strawberry and other horticultural crops. There are few herbicides registered for common groundsel control in such crops, and understanding and predicting the timing and extent of common groundsel emergence may facilitate its management. We developed simple e...

  13. Finding common ground in implementation: towards a theory of gradual commonality.

    Ter Haar, Marian; Aarts, Noelle; Verhoeven, Piet

    2016-03-01

    This article reports on an empirical study that aimed to design a practice-based theory about collaboration on the local implementation of a nationally developed health-promoting intervention. The study's objective is to better understand the dynamic process of complex collaboration. The research is based on a Delphi study among some 100 individuals in local and regional networks, in which various professionals work together to implement the BeweegKuur, which translates as 'course of exercise'. The BeweegKuur is a combined lifestyle intervention aimed at promoting sufficient physical exercise and a healthy diet among people in the Netherlands who are overweight and at risk of diabetes. The Delphi study in three rounds systematically and interactively constructs a common perspective on implementation, reflecting stakeholders' ideas about the collaboration and providing an insight into how these ideas are influenced by the context of the implementation. The statistical and qualitative analyses of the responses to the feedback in the Delphi study form the basis for this practice-based theory on complex collaboration, called the theory of gradual commonality. During interaction, consensus gradually emerges about co-creation as a collaboration strategy. Co-creation leaves room for various ways of achieving the ambitions of the BeweegKuur. This article discusses the importance of this practice-based theory and the value of the Delphi research strategy for promoting health. PMID:25209917

  14. North American Regional Report

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    North America is an energy community fortunate to be endowed with a rich and varied resource base. It consumes about a third of the world's energy and produces about one quarter of world energy supply. North America depends on a mix of complementary energy sources that should remain competitive but not in conflict. The current supply mix varies between Canada, the United States and Mexico, but fossil fuels are dominant across the region, leaving the three member countries vulnerable to a myriad of risks associated with traditional supply sources. Energy trade between all three countries is also a major contributor to the region's economy. Thus, the impetus for collaboration across the region has grown out of the common goals of energy security and economic prosperity. The goal of the WEC regional group was to discuss avenues for advancing North American cooperation and coordination on a range of energy issues. An additional objective was to develop policy recommendations that will facilitate effective development and use of the region's energy resources. Results and recommendtaions are summarized from three forums that focused on the pertinent issues of energy trade, energy efficiency and energy diversification. The inaugural forum (Energy Trade) was held in Washington, D.C. in the fall of 2005. The following summer, the second forum (Energy Efficiency) took place in Mexico City. The third forum (Energy Diversification) was hosted in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

  15. ERICA: prevalence of common mental disorders in Brazilian adolescents

    Lopes, Claudia S; Abreu, Gabriela de Azevedo; dos Santos, Debora França; Menezes, Paulo Rossi; de Carvalho, Kenia Mara Baiocchi; Cunha, Cristiane de Freitas; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite; Bloch, Katia Vergetti; Szklo, Moyses

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence of common mental disorders in Brazilian adolescent students, according to geographical macro-regions, school type, sex, and age. METHODS We evaluated 74,589 adolescents who participated in the Cardiovascular Risk Study in Adolescents (ERICA), a cross-sectional, national, school-based study conducted in 2013-2014 in cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants. A self-administered questionnaire and an electronic data collector were employed. The presence of common mental disorders was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). We estimated prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of common mental disorders by sex, age, and school type, in Brazil and in the macro-regions, considering the sample design. RESULTS The prevalence of common mental disorders was of 30.0% (95%CI 29.2-30.8), being higher among girls (38.4%; 95%CI 37.1-39.7) when compared to boys (21.6%; 95%CI 20.5-22.8), and among adolescents who were from 15 to 17 years old (33.6%; 95%CI 32.2-35.0) compared to those aged between 12 and 14 years (26.7%; 95%CI 25.8-27.6). The prevalence of common mental disorders increased with age for both sexes, always higher in girls (ranging from 28.1% at 12 years to 44.1% at 17 years) than in boys (ranging from 18.5% at 12 years to 27.7% at 17 years). We did not observe any significant difference by macro-region or school type. Stratified analyses showed higher prevalence of common mental disorders among girls aged from 15 to 17 years of private schools in the North region (53.1; 95%CI 46.8-59.4). CONCLUSIONS The high prevalence of common mental disorders among adolescents and the fact that the symptoms are often vague mean these disorders are not so easily identified by school administrators or even by health services. The results of this study can help the proposition of more specific prevention and control measures, focused on highest risk subgroups. PMID:26910549

  16. INTEGRATION PROCESSES IN CENTRAL ASIA. PROSPECTS FOR A COMMON MARKET

    Rakhmatullina, Gulnur

    2005-01-01

    Globalization processes have a growing effect on the development of individual countries and the world economy, with the Central Asian states, among others, being drawn into their orbit. The advantages of globalization are realized precisely at the integration and regional levels. That is why it is so important today to implement the initiative launched by President Islam Karimov of Uzbekistan for creating a Central Asian Common Market (CACM). The idea is that this market should include Kazak...

  17. Climate change and the decline of a once common bird

    McClure, Christopher J. W.; Rolek, Brian W; McDonald, Kenneth; Hill, Geoffrey E.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to negatively impact wildlife through a variety of mechanisms including retraction of range. We used data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and regional and global climate indices to examine the effects of climate change on the breeding distribution of the Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus), a formerly common species that is rapidly declining. We found that the range of the Rusty Blackbird retracted northward by 143 km since the 1960s and that the prob...

  18. Estimating bioenergy potentials of common African agricultural residues

    Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe; Kádár, Zsófia; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2013-01-01

    Asking a bioenergy researcher about the composition of wheat straw, he would know it by heart. But if enquiring about typicalAfrican biomasses – it would be another case. Until now, biomasses common to African countries have not received the samescientific attention as biomasses from Europe, North America or Brazil. For that reason, it is difficult to estimate bioenergypotentials in the African region.As a part of an on‐going research collaboration investigating production of 2g biofuels in G...

  19. Sociotopy in the temporoparietal cortex: common versus distinct processes

    Bahnemann, Markus; Dziobek, Isabel; Prehn, Kristin; Wolf, Ingo; Heekeren, Hauke R.

    2009-01-01

    A major controversy in the social cognitive neurosciences evolved around the question whether activity in the posterior superior temporal sulcus and adjacent temporoparietal junction (pSTS/TPJ-region) evoked by various tasks represents a common process or distinct processes. To investigate this question, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participants performed Biological Motion (BM), Theory-of-Mind (ToM) and Moral Judgment (MJ) tasks. Importantly, for each task we...

  20. A Simulation Model for Component Commonality

    ZHU Xiao-chi; ZHANG Zi-gang

    2002-01-01

    Component commonality has been cited as a powerful approach for manufacturers to cope with increased component proliferation and to control inventory costs. To fully realize its potential benefits, one needs a clear understanding of its impacts on the system. In this paper, the feasibility of using a simulation model to provide a systematic perspective for manufacturing firms to implement a commonality strategy is demonstrated. Alternative commonality strategies including the stage of employing commonality and the allocation policies are simulated. Several interesting results on effects of commonality, allocation policies,and optimal solutions are obtained. We then summarize qualitative insights and managerial implications into the component commonality design and implementation, and inventory management in a general multi-stage assembly system.

  1. Statistical region merging.

    Nock, Richard; Nielsen, Frank

    2004-11-01

    This paper explores a statistical basis for a process often described in computer vision: image segmentation by region merging following a particular order in the choice of regions. We exhibit a particular blend of algorithmics and statistics whose segmentation error is, as we show, limited from both the qualitative and quantitative standpoints. This approach can be efficiently approximated in linear time/space, leading to a fast segmentation algorithm tailored to processing images described using most common numerical pixel attribute spaces. The conceptual simplicity of the approach makes it simple to modify and cope with hard noise corruption, handle occlusion, authorize the control of the segmentation scale, and process unconventional data such as spherical images. Experiments on gray-level and color images, obtained with a short readily available C-code, display the quality of the segmentations obtained. PMID:15521493

  2. Accounting and marketing: searching a common denominator

    David S. Murphy

    2012-01-01

    Accounting and marketing are very different disciplines. The analysis of customer profitability is one concept that can unite accounting and marketing as a common denominator. In this article I search for common ground between accounting and marketing in the analysis of customer profitability to determine if a common denominator really exists between the two. This analysis focuses on accounting profitability, customer lifetime value, and customer equity. The article ends with a summary of wha...

  3. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought

    Beebe, Stephen E.; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Blair, Matthew W.; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of droug...

  4. Commons, Piracy and the Crisis of Property

    Fredriksson, Martin; Arvanitakis, James

    2016-01-01

    This article takes the politicisation of copyright and file sharing as a starting point to discuss the concept of the commons and the construction of property. Empirically, the article draws on a series of interviews with Pirate Party members in Sweden, Australia, Germany, the UK and USA; placed in the theoretical framework of the commons. We argue that piracy, as an act and an ideology, interrogates common understandings of property as something self-evident, natural and uncontestable. Such ...

  5. Component Commonality with Service Level Requirements

    Yigal Gerchak; Michael J. Magazine; A. Bruce Gamble

    1988-01-01

    This paper extends recent results of Baker et al. (Baker, K. R., M. J. Magazine, H. L. W. Nuttle. 1986. The effect of commonality on safety stocks in a simple inventory model. Management Sci. 32 982--988.) in understanding the impact of component commonality on stocking levels under service level constraints. A model is formulated for an arbitrary number of products with general joint demand distribution. The results obtained are not all intuitive. While utilizing commonality is beneficial, n...

  6. Context modeling using a common sensedatabase

    LINDSTEDT, GUSTAF; RUNELÖV, MARTIN

    2013-01-01

    Common sense databases are collections of human common sense knowledge. With these databases available, a lot of possibilities arise regarding understanding human language and putting it into a context. This essay aims to discuss how a common sense database could be used to enable a more human-like grasp of context in conversational agents. To try out the possibilities of context modeling using these databases we built a prototype that uses the knowledge base ConceptNet. Our tests showed that...

  7. Mathematics for common entrance three (extension) answers

    Alexander, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This book contains answers to all exercises featured in the accompanying textbook Mathematics for Common Entrance Three (Extension) , which provides essential preparation for Level 3 of the ISEB 13+ Mathematics exam, as well as for CASE and other scholarship exams. - Clean, clear layout for easy marking. - Includes examples of high-scoring answers with diagrams and workings. Also available to purchase from the Galore Park website www.galorepark.co.uk :. - Mathematics for Common Entrance Three (Extension). - Mathematics for Common Entrance One. - Mathematics for Common Entrance One Answers. - M

  8. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated proposes the Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) program to facilitate the development of a Software Defined Radio...

  9. Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coherent Logix, Incorporated (CLX) proposes the development of a Software Defined Common Processing System (SDCPS) that leverages the inherent advantages of an...

  10. More efficient policy of energy and regional electricity supply by the directive 96/92/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 december 1996 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity; Effizientere Energiepolitik und regionale Elektrizitaetsversorgung durch die EU-Elektrizitaetsrichtlinie 1996. Politikfeldanalyse der europaeischen, deutschen und bayerischen Energiepolitik und Elektrizitaetswirtschaft im Zusammenhang mit der Entstehung und Umsetzung der EU-Richtlinie 96 sowie der Veraenderung der Effizienz in der traditionellen Elektrizitaetsversorgung unter supranationalem EU-Einfluss

    Furtner, Franz

    2006-07-01

    The German energy policy and its main addressees, the regional electricity companies (EVU), are going through a critical phase at the beginning of the 21st century. The increasing complexity and inconsistency of energy issues have, in Germany and in other countries, led to decisions which again have produced extensive, but not yet foreseeable developments, as, for example, the liberalisation of the electricity and gas market within the European Union. The first objective of this paper is an empirical analysis of the regional electricity supply industry in Germany and particularly in Bavaria in so far as it is relevant for energy politics, as well as an introduction to the German energy policy up to approximately the time when the Directive 96/92/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 19 December 1996 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity, was passed. Moreover, findings for the definition of energy efficiency in electricity supply and of the policy analysis are outlined. The second objective of this paper is the analysis and evaluation of the European Union energy policy, in particular of the Directive 96/92/EC, its formation and how it has been put into action by the German and Bavarian electricity supply industry. Energy efficiency of the electricity supply serves as a yardstick, the research method employed is the policy analysis. The main part of this paper, by comparing objectives to effects and by evaluating interviews with energy experts, examines the questions if, in what ways and to what extent the Directive 96/92/EC has led to an increase of energy efficiency in the narrow as well as in the boarder sense, within the EU, Germany and Bavaria. Additionally, three hypotheses are tested: firstly the significance of energy efficiency (in the narrow sense), secondly the alignment of European energy supply, and thirdly the importance of supranational control through EU politics. The results are presented in tabular form, and the