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Sample records for 25-kpa altitude exposures

  1. Pupillary Light Reaction during High Altitude Exposure

    Schultheiss, Maximilian; Schommer, Kai; Schatz, Andreas; Wilhelm, Barbara; Peters, Tobias; Fischer, M. Dominik; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Gekeler, Florian; Willmann, Gabriel, 1977-

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to quantify the pupillary light reaction during high altitude exposure using the state of the art Compact Integrated Pupillograph (CIP) and to investigate a potential correlation of altered pupil reaction with severity of acute mountain sickness (AMS). This work is related to the Tübingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Methods Parameters of pupil dynamics (initial diameter, amplitude, relative amplitude, latency, constriction velocity) were quantified in 14...

  2. Ambulation Increases Decompression Sickness in Altitude Exposure

    Conkin, Johnny; Pollock, N. W.; Natoli, M. J.; Wessel, J. H., III; Gernhardt, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION - Exercise accelerates inert gas elimination during oxygen breathing prior to decompression (prebreathe), but may also promote bubble formation and increase the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The timing, pattern and intensity of exercise are likely critical to the net effect. The NASA Prebreathe Reduction Program (PRP) combined oxygen prebreathe and exercise preceding a 4.3 psi exposure in non-ambulatory subjects (a microgravity analog) to produce two protocols now used by astronauts preparing for extravehicular activity (CEVIS and ISLE). Additional work is required to investigate whether exercise normal to 1 G environments increases the risk of DCS over microgravity simulation. METHODS - The CEVIS protocol was replicated with one exception. Our subjects completed controlled ambulation (walking in place with fixed cadence and step height) during both preflight and at 4.3 psi instead of remaining non-ambulatory throughout. Decompression stress was graded with aural Doppler (Spencer 0-IV scale). Two-dimensional echocardiographic imaging was used to look for left heart gas emboli (the presence of which prompted test termination). Venous blood was collected at three points to correlate Doppler measures of decompression stress with microparticle (cell fragment) accumulation. Fisher Exact Tests compared test and control groups. Trial suspension would occur when DCS risk >15% or grade IV venous gas emboli (VGE) risk >20% (at 70% confidence). RESULTS - Eleven person-trials were completed (9 male, 2 female) when DCS prompted suspension. DCS was greater than in CEVIS trials (3/11 [27%] vs. 0/45 [0%], respectively, p=0.03). Statistical significance was not reached for peak grade IV VGE (2/11 [18%] vs. 3/45 [7%], p=0.149) or cumulative grade IV VGE observations per subject-trial (8/128 [6%] vs. 26/630 [4%], p=0.151). Microparticle data were collected for 5/11 trials (3 with DCS outcomes), with widely varying patterns that could not be resolved statistically

  3. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Conflict Control in the Conflict-Resolving Stage

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Baoxi; Guo, Shichun; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    The neurocognitive basis of the effect of long-term high altitude exposure on conflict control is unclear. Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in a flanker task to investigate the influence of high altitude on conflict control in the high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but were born at low altitude) and the low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although altitude effect was not significant at the behavioral level, ERPs showed cognitive conf...

  4. Modelling of radiation exposure at high altitudes during solar storms

    A transport code analysis using Monte Carlo N-Particle extended code, MCNPX, has been used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate radiation exposure during solar storms at high altitudes. Neutron monitor count rate data from stations around the world were used to benchmark the model calculations during a ground-level event (GLE). A comparison was made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during GLE 60. A computer code has been developed to implement the model for routine analysis. (authors)

  5. Long-Term Exposure to High Altitude Affects Response Inhibition in the Conflict-monitoring Stage

    Ma, Hailin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jianhui; Luo, Ping; Han, Buxin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of high-altitude exposure on response inhibition, event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were measured in Go/NoGo task. The participants included an ‘immigrant’ high-altitude group (who had lived at high altitude for three years but born at low altitude) and a low-altitude group (living in low altitude only). Although the behavioural data showed no significant differences between the two groups, a delayed latency of NoGo-N2 was found in the high-altitude...

  6. [Should hypertensive patients adapt their antihypertensive drugs during high altitude exposure?].

    Wuerzner, G; Allemann, Y

    2015-09-01

    High altitude exposure during leisure time is becoming more and more frequent. Due to the high prevalence of hypertension in the general population, high altitude exposure in hypertensive patients may not be uncommon. The increase in blood pressure with altitude has been confirmed by ambulatory blood pressure measurement in normotensive as well as in hypertensive patients. Compared to a placebo, most hypertensive drugs keep their blood pressure lowering effect up to a certain altitude. It is recommended that hypertensive patients measure their blood pressure during high altitude, exposure and plan a possible adaptation of treatment with their physician before their sojourn. PMID:26540993

  7. Continuous positive airway pressure increases haemoglobin O2 saturation after acute but not prolonged altitude exposure.

    p. Agostoni, Caldara G, Bussotti M, Revera M, Valentini M, Gregorini F, Faini A, Lombardi C, Bilo G, Giuliano A, Veglia F, Savia G, P.A. Modesti, Mancia G, Parati G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: It is unknown whether subclinical high-altitude pulmonary oedema reduces spontaneously after prolonged altitude exposure. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) removes extravascular lung fluids and improves haemoglobin oxygen saturation in acute cardiogenic oedema. We evaluated the presence of pulmonary extravascular fluid increase by assessing CPAP effects on haemoglobin oxygen saturation under acute and prolonged altitude exposure. We applied 7 cm H2O CPAP for 30 min to he...

  8. Acclimatisation in trekkers with and without recent exposure to high altitude.

    MacNutt, Meaghan J; Laursen, Paul B; Kedia, Shiksha; Neupane, Maniraj; Parajuli, Parash; Pokharel, Jhapindra; Sheel, A William

    2012-09-01

    In mountaineers, recent altitude exposure has been shown to improve climbing performance and clinical outcomes during re-exposure to high altitude. However, the timing of previous altitude exposure has not been clearly reported and previous findings might be driven by individuals who were still acclimatised at the time of re-exposure. Our goal was to determine whether recent altitude exposure would confer an advantage even in individuals who had de-acclimatised for ≥ 1 week before being re-exposure. Low-altitude natives kept a daily trekking log throughout 7- to 8-day trek from Lukla (2,840 m) to Gokyo Ri (5,360 m). Trekkers with recent altitude exposure (re-acclimatisers, RA; n = 20) walked 20% faster (p < 0.01), reported lower acute mountain sickness scores (9 ± 8 vs. 15 ± 13; p = 0.02), and used less medication to treat headache (p < 0.05) compared to trekkers with no recent altitude exposure (initial acclimatisers, IA; n = 30). On Gokyo Ri, S(p)O(2) was significantly higher in RA than IA trekkers (85 ± 6 vs. 78 ± 6; p = 0.01). These data indicate improved functional outcomes and physiological compensation for hypoxia in RA. However, even after de-acclimatisation for 7-30 days, it is possible that RA trekkers began the trek in a more acclimatised state than IA trekkers. RA trekkers might represent a self-selected group that has previously tolerated altitude well and has therefore opted to return. Some findings might also reflect improved psychological altitude tolerance in RA. A direct comparison of the functional and physiological responses to hypoxia throughout an initial and re-acclimatisation to high altitude is needed. PMID:22252248

  9. Ozone Exposure System Designed and Used to High-Altitude Airship Materials

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    High-altitude airships can receive high doses of ozone over short mission durations. For example, in 1 year at an altitude of 70,000 ft, the ozone fluence (number arriving per unit area) can be as high as 1.2 1024 molecules/sq cm. Ozone exposure at these levels can embrittle materials or change the performance of solar cells. It is important to expose components and materials to the expected ozone dosage to determine if the ozone exposure could cause any mission-critical failures.

  10. Mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle following high-altitude exposure

    Jacobs, Robert A; Boushel, Robert; Wright-Paradis, Cynthia; Calbet, Jose A L; Robach, Paul; Gnaiger, Erich; Lundby, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding mitochondrial modifications in human skeletal muscle following acclimatization to high altitude are conflicting, and these inconsistencies may be due to the prevalence of representing mitochondrial function through static and isolated measurements of specific mitochondrial...... characteristics. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate mitochondrial function in response to high-altitude acclimatization through measurements of respiratory control in the vastus lateralis muscle. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from 10 lowland natives prior to and again after a total of 9......-11 days of exposure to 4559 m. High-resolution respirometry was performed on the muscle samples to compare respiratory chain function and respiratory capacities. Respirometric analysis revealed that mitochondrial function was largely unaffected, because high-altitude exposure did not affect the capacity...

  11. Changes of pathological and physiological indicators affecting drug metabolism in rats after acute exposure to high altitude

    Li, Wenbin; Wang, Rong; Xie, Hua; ZHANG, JUANHONG; Jia, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    High altitude environments cause the human body to undergo a series of pathological, physiological and biochemical changes, which have a certain effect on drug pharmacokinetics. The objective of the present study was to observe changes in factors affecting pharmacokinetics in rats following acute exposure to high altitude and return to low altitude. A total of 21 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups. The rats in group A were maintained at low altitude in Shanghai, 55 m abov...

  12. Hemoglobin mass and intravascular volume kinetics during and after exposure to 3,454-m altitude

    Siebenmann, C; Cathomen, A; Hug, M; Keiser, S; Lundby, A K; Hilty, M P; Goetze, J P; Rasmussen, P; Lundby, C

    2015-01-01

    High altitude (HA) exposure facilitates a rapid contraction of plasma volume (PV) and a slower occurring expansion of hemoglobin mass (Hbmass). The kinetics of the Hbmass expansion has never been examined by multiple repeated measurements, and this was our primary study aim. The second aim was to...

  13. Altitude Exposure at 1800 m Increases Haemoglobin Mass in Distance Runners

    Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Iona Halliday, Chris R. Abbiss, Philo U. Saunders, Christopher J. Gore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of low natural altitudes (< 2000 m on erythropoietic adaptation is currently unclear, with current recommendations indicating that such low altitudes may be insufficient to stimulate significant increases in haemoglobin mass (Hbmass. As such, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of 3 weeks of live high, train high exposure (LHTH at low natural altitude (i.e. 1800 m on Hbmass, red blood cell count and iron profile. A total of 16 elite or well-trained runners were assigned into either a LHTH (n = 8 or CONTROL (n = 8 group. Venous blood samples were drawn prior to, at 2 weeks and at 3 weeks following exposure. Hbmass was measured in duplicate prior to exposure and at 2 weeks and at 3 weeks following exposure via carbon monoxide rebreathing. The percentage change in Hbmass from baseline was significantly greater in LHTH, when compared with the CONTROL group at 2 (3.1% vs 0.4%; p = 0.01; and 3 weeks (3.0% vs -1.1%; p < 0.02, respectively following exposure. Haematocrit was greater in LHTH than CONTROL at 2 (p = 0.01 and 3 weeks (p = 0.04 following exposure. No significant interaction effect was observed for haemoglobin concentration (p = 0.06, serum ferritin (p = 0.43, transferrin (p = 0.52 or reticulocyte percentage (p = 0.16. The results of this study indicate that three week of natural classic (i.e. LHTH low altitude exposure (1800 m results in a significant increase in Hbmass of elite distance runners, which is likely due to the continuous exposure to hypoxia.

  14. Threshold altitude for bubble decay and stabilization in rat adipose tissue at hypobaric exposures

    Randsoe, Thomas; Larsen, Ole Hyldegaard

    2013-01-01

    Bubble formation during altitude exposures, causing altitude decompression sickness (aDCS), has been referred to in theoretical models as venous gas embolisms (VGE). This has also been demonstrated by intravascular gas formation. Previous reports indicate that the formation of VGE and aDCS incide......Bubble formation during altitude exposures, causing altitude decompression sickness (aDCS), has been referred to in theoretical models as venous gas embolisms (VGE). This has also been demonstrated by intravascular gas formation. Previous reports indicate that the formation of VGE and a......DCS incidence increase abruptly for exposures exceeding 40-44 kPa ambient pressures. Further, extravascular micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue grow transiently, then shrink and disappear while breathing oxygen (F1O2 = 1.0) at 71 kPa. At 25 kPa similar air bubbles will grow and stabilize during...... oxygen breathing without disappearing. We hypothesize that an ambient pressure threshold for either extravascular bubble stabilization or disappearance may be identified between 71 and 25 kPa. Whether extravascular bubbles will stabilize above a certain threshold has not been demonstrated before....

  15. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure.

    Andrew D Govus

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass and iron parameters after 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure.Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females exposed to moderate altitude (1,350-3,000 m were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII and blood iron parameters [ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT].Altitude exposure (mean ± s: 21 ± 3 days increased Hbmass by 1.1% [-0.4, 2.6], 3.3% [1.7, 4.8], and 4.0% [2.0, 6.1] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who ingested nil, 105 mg and 210 mg respectively, of oral iron supplement daily. Serum ferritin levels decreased by -33.2% [-46.9, -15.9] and 13.8% [-32.2, 9.7] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who supplemented with nil and 105 mg of oral iron supplement daily, but increased by 36.8% [1.3, 84.8] in athletes supplemented with 210 mg of oral iron daily. Finally, athletes who ingested either 105 mg or 210 mg of oral iron supplement daily had a greater TII compared with non-supplemented athletes (0 versus 105 mg: effect size (d = -1.88 [-2.56, -1.17]; 0 versus 210 mg: effect size (d = -2.87 [-3.88, -1.66].Oral iron supplementation during 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure may enhance Hbmass production and assist the maintenance of iron balance in some athletes with low pre-altitude iron stores.

  16. Risk factors for high-altitude headache upon acute high-altitude exposure at 3700 m in young Chinese men: a cohort study

    Bian, Shi-Zhu; Zhang, Ji-Hang; Xu-bin GAO; Li, Ming; Yu, Jie; Liu, Xi; Dong, Jun-Qing; Chen, Guo-Zhu; Huang, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background This prospective and observational study aimed to identify demographic, physiological and psychological risk factors associated with high-altitude headache (HAH) upon acute high-altitude exposure. Methods Eight hundred fifty subjects ascended by plane to 3700 m above Chengdu (500 m) over a period of two hours. Structured Case Report Form (CRF) questionnaires were used to record demographic information, physiological examinations, psychological scale, and symptoms including headache...

  17. Sperm forward motility is negatively affected by short-term exposure to altitude hypoxia.

    Verratti, V; Di Giulio, C; D'Angeli, A; Tafuri, A; Francavilla, S; Pelliccione, F

    2016-09-01

    Human exposure to altitude is a model to study the role of oxygen in different areas of physiology and pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a short exposure to hypoxia (5 days) combined with exercise, at altitude ranging from 900 m above sea level to 5895 m above sea level (Kilimanjaro Expedition) can modify seminal and reproductive hormonal parameter levels in human beings. During the ascent, blood oxygen saturation at 3.848 m above sea level was found to be decreased when compared to sea level (P hypoxia on spermatozoa during the epididymal transit where they mature acquiring their motility. PMID:26762696

  18. Quantification of Optic Disc Edema during Exposure to High Altitude Shows No Correlation to Acute Mountain Sickness

    Willmann, Gabriel, 1977-; Fischer, M. Dominik; Schatz, Andreas; Schommer, Kai; Messias, Andre; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Gekeler, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Background The study aimed to quantify changes of the optic nerve head (ONH) during exposure to high altitude and to assess a correlation with acute mountain sickness (AMS). This work is related to the Tuebingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Methodology/Principal Findings A confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO, Heidelberg Retina Tomograph, HRT3®) was used to quantify changes at the ONH in 18 healthy participants before, during and after rapid ascent to high altitude (4559 ...

  19. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    Belén Feriche

    Full Text Available When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17 in conditions of normoxia (N1 and hypobaric hypoxia (HH and G2 (n = 11 in conditions of normoxia (N2 and normobaric hypoxia (NH. Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax was recorded as the highest P(mean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max (∼ 3% and maximal strength (1 RM (∼ 6% in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05. We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean and P(peak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01 and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001. No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  20. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05). We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean) and P(peak) in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01) and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  1. Hemodynamic characteristics of high-altitude headache following acute high altitude exposure at 3700 m in young Chinese men

    Bian, Shi-Zhu; JIN, JUN; Li, Qian-Ning; Yu, Jie; Tang, Cai-Fa; Rao, Rong-Sheng; Yu, Shi-Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Qin, Jun; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to identify the systemic and cerebral hemodynamic characteristics and their roles in high-altitude headache (HAH) among young Chinese men following acute exposure. Methods The subjects (n = 385) were recruited in June and July of 2012. They completed case report form questionnaires, as well as heart rate (HR), blood pressure, echocardiogram and transcranial Doppler examinations at 3700 m following a two-hour plane flight. A subgroup of 129 participants was examined...

  2. Deviations from uniform power-law scaling due to exposure to high altitude

    Posiewnik, A.

    2002-12-01

    A major challenge in biological physics is the analysis of time series that are typically highly nonstationary. Viswanathan et al. (Phys. Rev. E 55 (1) (1997) 845-899) using techniques based on the Fano factor and the Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis showed that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems in normal conditions are more stable than those of pathological systems-there is underlying loss of uniform power-law scaling in disease. Here we test, using the same techniques as Viswanathan et al. (1997), the hypothesis that deviations from uniform power-law scaling, similar to those seen in heart failure and deep apnea syndrome occur also for healthy subjects under pathological conditions (hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude, over 6000 m).

  3. Changes of body fluid and hematology in toad and their rehabilitation following intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude

    Biswas, H. M.; Boral, M. C.

    1986-06-01

    Three groups of adult male toads were exposed intermittently in a decompression chamber for a daily period of 4 and 8 hours at a time for 6 consecutive days to an “altitude” of 12,000; 18,000 and 24,000 feet (3658; 5486; 7315 m) respectively. Most of the exposed animals were sacrificed immediately after the last exposure, but only a few animals experiencing 8 hours of exposure were sacrificed after a further 16 hours of exposure at normal atmospheric pressure. Eight hours of daily exposure for 6 days causes a decrease of body fluids and an increase of hematological parameters in all the altitude exposed animals compared with to the changes noted in the animals having 4 hours of daily exposure for 6 days at the same altitude levels. The animals that were exposed to pressures equivalent to altitudes of 12,000 and 18,000 feet daily for 8 hours were found to return nearly to their normal body fluids and hematological balance after 16 hours of exposure to normal atmospheric pressure, whereas the animals exposed for a similar period at an equivalent 24,000 feet failed to get back their normal balance of body fluids and hematology after 16 hours of exposure at normal atmospheric pressure. The present experiment shows that the body weight loss and changes of body fluid and hematological parameters in the toad after exposure to simulated high altitude are due not only to dehydration, but suggest that hypoxia may also have a role.

  4. Tissue weights and adaptation response of the toad after 96 hours of exposure to simulated high altitude — A body fluid and hematological study

    Biswas, H. M.; Boral, M. C.

    1985-12-01

    Adult male toads were exposed to simulated high altitude of 24,000 feet for 96 hrs of continuous exposure in a decompression chamber. The animals were sacrificed immediately after the exposure period. Significant increase of the weight of the ventricle and spleen is observed in altitude exposed animals. Red blood cell, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit ratio and red cell mass are significantly increased in high altitude exposed animals in comparison to control. MCV (mean corpuscular volume) and MCH (mean corpuscular hemoglobin) are decreased in altitude exposed group. Plasma volume, blood volume, extracellular fluid volume, intracellular fluid volume and total body water are decreased significantly after altitude exposure for 96 hrs. These physiological changes are thought to be due to dehydration of this animal at simulated high altitude and it is highly affected after 96 hrs of exposure as evidenced by the significant reduction of total body water and intracellular fluid volume.

  5. COMPARISON OF LIVE HIGH: TRAIN LOW ALTITUDE AND INTERMITTENT HYPOXIC EXPOSURE

    Clare E. Humberstone-Gough

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Live High:Train Low (LHTL altitude training is a popular ergogenic aid amongst athletes. An alternative hypoxia protocol, acute (60-90 min daily Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE, has shown potential for improving athletic performance. The aim of this study was to compare directly the effects of LHTL and IHE on the running and blood characteristics of elite triathletes. Changes in total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, velocity at VO2max (vVO2max, time to exhaustion (TTE, running economy, maximal blood lactate concentration ([La] and 3 mM [La] running speed were compared following 17 days of LHTL (240 h of hypoxia, IHE (10.2 h of hypoxia or Placebo treatment in 24 Australian National Team triathletes (7 female, 17 male. There was a clear 3.2 ± 4.8% (mean ± 90% confidence limits increase in Hbmass following LHTL compared with Placebo, whereas the corresponding change of -1.4 ± 4.5% in IHE was unclear. Following LHTL, running economy was 2.8 ± 4.4% improved compared to IHE and 3mM [La] running speed was 4.4 ± 4.5% improved compared to Placebo. After IHE, there were no beneficial changes in running economy or 3mM [La] running speed compared to Placebo. There were no clear changes in VO2max, vVO2max and TTE following either method of hypoxia. The clear difference in Hbmass response between LHTL and IHE indicated that the dose of hypoxia in IHE was insufficient to induce accelerated erythropoiesis. Improved running economy and 3mM [La] running speed following LHTL suggested that this method of hypoxic exposure may enhance performance at submaximal running speeds. Overall, there was no evidence to support the use of IHE in elite triathletes

  6. Relationship between daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke and blood pressure in high-altitude Peru

    Peña, Melissa Burroughs; Romero, Karina M.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Davila-Roman, Victor G.; Gilman, Robert H.; Wise, Robert A; Miranda, J. Jaime; Checkley, William

    2015-01-01

    Household air pollution from biomass fuel use affects three billion people worldwide; however, few studies have examined the relationship between biomass fuel use and blood pressure. We sought to determine if daily biomass fuel use was associated with elevated blood pressure in high altitude Peru and if this relationship was affected by lung function. We analyzed baseline information from a population-based cohort study of adults aged ≥35 years in Puno, Peru. Daily biomass fuel use was self-reported. We used multivariable regression models to examine the relationship between daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke and blood pressure outcomes. Interactions with sex and quartiles of forced vital capacity (FVC) were conducted to evaluate for effect modification. Data from 1004 individuals (mean age 55.3 years, 51.7% female) were included. We found an association between biomass fuel use with both prehypertension (adjusted relative risk ratio 5.0, 95% CI 2.6 to 9.9) and hypertension (adjusted relative risk ratio 3.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.0). Biomass fuel users had a higher SBP (7.01 mmHg, 95% CI 4.4 to 9.6) and a higher DBP (5.9 mmHg, 95% CI 4.2 to 7.6) when compared to nonusers. We did not find interaction effects between daily biomass fuel use and sex or percent predicted FVC for either SBP or DBP. Biomass fuel use was associated with an increased risk of hypertension and higher blood pressure in Peru. Reducing exposure to household air pollution from biomass fuel use represents an opportunity for cardiovascular prevention. PMID:25753976

  7. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  8. Studies on some biochemical aspects in the toad after 48 hours of exposure to simulated high altitude

    Biswas, H. M.; Boral, M. C.

    1983-06-01

    Blood glucose, tissue carbohydrate, total plasma and tissue protein and plasma electrolyte concentrations were estimated in male toads, exposed to simulated high altitude of 12,000, 18,000 and 24,000 feet respectively for 48 hours of continuous exposure in a decompression chamber. Blood glucose and muscle carbohydrate were decreased significantly in animals exposed to 18,000 and 24,000 feet altitude, without having any change in the liver carbohydrate. Muscle carbohydrate was also decreased in 12,000 feet altitude exposed animals. Plasma protein content was increased significantly in 18,000 and 24,000 feet altitude exposed animals, whereas no such change was noted in tissue protein content. A slight increase of plasma sodium concentration was found in animals exposed to 24,000 feet, and a decrease of potassium concentration was also noted in 18,000 and 24,000 feet exposed animals. Magnesium concentration of the plasma was increased in 18,000 and 24,000 feet exposed animals. This animal had also shown an eosinopenia, lymphopenia and neutrophilia when exposed at 24,000 feet high altitude.

  9. Caffeine improves performance in double poling during acute exposure to 2,000-m altitude.

    Stadheim, H K; Nossum, E M; Olsen, R; Spencer, M; Jensen, J

    2015-12-15

    There is limited research on the physiological effects of caffeine (CAF) ingestion on exercise performance during acute hypoxia. The aim of the present study was therefore to test the effect of placebo (PLA) and CAF (4.5 mg/kg) on double poling (DP) performance during acute hypoxia. Thirteen male subelite cross-country skiers (V̇o2max 72.6 ± 5.68 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were included. Performance was assessed as 1) an 8-km cross-country DP time-trial (C-PT), and 2) time until task failure at a set workload equal to ∼90% of DP V̇o2max. Testing was carried out in a hypobaric chamber, at 800 mbar (Pio2: ∼125 mmHg) corresponding to ∼2,000 m above sea level in a randomized double-blinded, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. CAF improved time to task failure from 6.10 ± 1.40 to 7.22 ± 1.30 min (P exercise subjects reported lower pain in arms and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) following CAF ingestion. Throughout C-PTs similar RPE and pain was shown between treatments. However, higher heart rate was observed during the CAF 8 km (187 ± 7 vs. 185 ± 7; P < 0.05) and 90% C-PT (185 ± 7 vs. 181 ± 9) associated with increased ventilation, blood lactate, glucose, adrenaline, decreased pH, and bicarbonate. The present study demonstrates for the first time that CAF ingestion improves DP time to task failure although not consistently time trial performance during acute exposure to altitude. Mechanisms underpinning improvements seem related to reduced pain RPE and increased heart rate during CAF C-PTs. PMID:26494444

  10. High Altitude Hearts: Genetic Basis of Cardiac Responses to Long-term Hypoxia Exposures in Drosophila

    Zarndt, Rachel Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a feature of many hypoxia-induced diseases, and affects millions of people worldwide suffering conditions including pulmonary disease, inflammation, and high altitude. Interestingly, highlanders with beneficial genetic adaptations to high altitude have remarkably low incidence of cardiomyopathies. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy is the hallmark feature of disease in other, poorly adapted highland populations. Detailed mechanisms of these cardiac responses remain...

  11. Hemopoiesis in the pig-tailed monkey Macaca nemestrina during chronic altitude exposure.

    Buderer, M. C.; Pace, N.

    1972-01-01

    Study of monkeys for 180 days at 3800 m altitude to examine their hemopoietic response. Plasma volume was found to be reduced while red cell volume increased steadily for four to five months. Reduction in mean corpuscular hemoglobin content was observed from day 30 to day 120 at altitude. Total plasma protein concentration was unchanged at altitude, but marked reduction in the albumin/globulin ratio occurred. Total circulating plasma protein and albumin were reduced in amount, whereas nonalbumin protein was unchanged. These results imply loss of albumin coupled with a corresponding loss of water from the blood and maintenance of normal plasma osmotic pressure. The body/venous hematocrit ratio was found to be reduced at altitude, possibly as a consequence of the expanded capillary volume of the body. The hemopoietic responses of the pig-tailed monkey at altitude require at least several months for completion, and closely resemble those seen in man; thus, the monkey can serve well for long-term studies of high-altitude acclimatization.

  12. Physiological responses of mules on prolonged exposure to high altitude (3 650 m)

    Riar, S. S.; Shankar Bhat, K.; Sen Gupta, J.

    1982-06-01

    Eight healthy male animals were inducted and kept for 2 1/2 years at 3 650 m altitude and subjected to normal work schedules. Physiological measurements viz. heart rate, blood pressure, minute ventilation, oxygen consumption, respiration rate, hemoglobin, packed cell haematocrit volume and eosinophil count were made on these animals at periodic intervals. On acute induction to an altitude of 3 650 m these animals demonstrated a sudden increase in tidal volume, a decrease in Rf and no change in VE, suggesting a decreased dead space/tidal volume ratio at altitude. However, all these changes stabilised within 3 weeks but on prolongation of stay, the physical state of these animals was adversely affected. The respiratory adjustments occurring on return to sea level appear to be a response to thermal stress. The initial increase in heart rate and blood pressure stabilised by the 2nd week.

  13. High altitude subhyaloid hemorrhage

    Abdul Hanifudin; Lik Thai Lim; Elliott Yann Ah-Kee; Tarek El-Khashab

    2015-01-01

    Subhyaloid hemorrhages can occur as a result of exposure to high altitude. We hereby report a clinical picture of subhyaloid hemorrhage associated with high altitude. The case demonstrates optical coherence tomography findings that aid diagnosis of subhyaloid hemorrhage.

  14. High altitude radiation exposure in the SR-71: a preliminary report. Professional study

    DeHart, R.M.

    1974-04-01

    A study to measure radiation received by SR-71 crews at high altitudes began at Beale AFB, California in 1971. Data gathered during the first eighteen months are presented. Radiation was measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter provided by the USAF Radiological Health Laboratory (AFLC).

  15. Left Ventricular Function during Acute High-Altitude Exposure in a Large Group of Healthy Young Chinese Men

    Rao, Mingyue; Li, Jiabei; Qin, Jun; Zhang, Jihang; Gao, Xubin; Yu, Shiyong; Yu, Jie; Chen, Guozhu; Xu, Baida; Li, Huijie; Rao, Rongsheng; Huang, Lan; JIN, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to observe left ventricular function during acute high-altitude exposure in a large group of healthy young males. Methods A prospective trial was conducted in Szechwan and Tibet from June to August, 2012. By Doppler echocardiography, left ventricular function was examined in 139 healthy young Chinese men at sea level; within 24 hours after arrival in Lhasa, Tibet, at 3700 m; and on day 7 following an ascent to Yangbajing at 4400 m after 7 days of acclim...

  16. Hydration and tissue solid content of the lean body on prolonged exposure to altitude

    Bharadwaj, H.; Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Zachariah, T.; Kishnani, S.; Pramanik, S. N.; Gupta, A.; Rai, R. M.

    1989-03-01

    Using densitometric, hydrometric and anthropometric techniques, body fat, tissue solids, water and mineral content were quantitatively measured on two groups each of 26 young and healthy Indian soldiers of mixed ethnic composition. The experimental group was exposed to 3500 m altitude for 2 years and the experiments were carried out after 48 h and 3 weeks rehabilitation in Delhi (300 m). The control group was never exposed to high altidues. Inspite of the experimental group being fed with superior rations at high altitude, this group showed significantly hyperhydrated lean body with reduced tissue solids in comparison to the control group which was fed with identical rations in Delhi. The calculated mean density of the fat free body had declined to 0.092×103 kg/m3. The 3 week stay at low altitude had little influence on body composition. Hyperhydration, with reduced tissue solids, would cause reduction in the density of fat free body, and would thus interfere with the estimates of total body fat based on densitometric procedures alone. In the hyperhydrated state, Siri's formula overestimated fat by 22.8% of the true value.

  17. ANTI-HYPOXIA AND ANTI-OXIDATION EFFECTS OF AMINOPHYLLINE ON HUMAN WITH ACUTE HIGH-ALTITUDE EXPOSURE

    Bo Yang; Guang-yi Wang; Bin Chen; Rong-bin Qin; Si Lang Zha Xi; Lian Chen

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the anti-hypoxia and anti-oxidation effects of aminophylline on human with acute high-altitude exposure.Methods Totally 100 young male army members newly recruited from Sichuan province (400 meters above sea level) were enrolled. They were randomly divided into two groups; 50 in aminophylline group (A group) and 50 in control group (C group). A group and C group orally took aminophylline and placebo respectively for 10 days, 7 days before entering Lhasa (3 658 meters above sea level) by air and 3 days after it Several parameters were measured at three time points: before drug taken, 7 days after drug taken, and 3 days after ascending high altitude. These parameters included serum levels of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), hydrogen dioxide (H2O2), lactic acid (LA), as well as arterial oxygen saturation (SO2) , arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2), and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2). Statistical analysis was conducted to compare the difference between two groups with Stata 7.0 software system.Results There were no statistical differences between groups in hypoxia and oxidation indicators before and after drug taken in plain area. Three days after ascending high altitude, the serum levels of SOD, CAT, H2O2, LA, PaCO2 increased in both groups, yet to a much larger degree in C group than A group (P < 0.01); and NO, SO2, PaO2 decreased more markedly in C group (P < 0.05 for NO, P < 0.0001 for SO2 and PaO2).Conclusion Aminophylline has significant anti-hypoxia and anti-oxidation effects at high altitude.

  18. Sleep quality changes in insomniacs and non-insomniacs after acute altitude exposure and its relationship with acute mountain sickness

    Tang XG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Xu-gang Tang,1 Ji-hang Zhang,1 Xu-bin Gao,1 Qian-ning Li,2 Jia-bei Li,1 Jie Yu1 Jun Qin,1 Lan Huang11Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, 2Department of Neurology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: We aimed to observe the changes in subjective sleep quality among insomniacs and non-insomniacs after acute ascending to 3,700 m and its possible relationship with acute mountain sickness (AMS. Methods: A total of 600 adult men were recruited. Subjects’ subjective sleep quality was evaluated by the Athens Insomnia Scale. AMS was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Arterial oxygen saturation was measured. Results: Despite insomnia resolution in only a few subjects, the prevalence of insomnia among insomniacs remained stable at 90% after rapid ascent to 3,700 m. However, among non-insomniacs, the prevalence of insomnia sharply increased to 32.13% in the first day of altitude exposure and progressively reduced to 4.26% by the 60th day of altitude stay. Moreover, the prevalences of insomnia symptoms decreased more markedly from day 1 to day 60 at 3,700 m among non-insomniacs than among insomniacs. At 3,700 m, the prevalence of AMS among insomniacs was 79.01%, 60.49%, and 32.10% on the first, third, and seventh days, respectively, which was significantly higher than that among non-insomniacs. Multivariate regression revealed that elevated Athens Insomnia Scale scores are an independent risk factor for AMS (adjusted odds ratio 1.388, 95% confidence interval: 1.314–1.464, P<0.001, whereas high arterial oxygen saturation and long duration of altitude exposure are protective factors against AMS. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the effect of high-altitude exposure on subjective sleep quality is more marked, but disappears more quickly, among non-insomniacs than among insomniacs, whereas AMS is especially common among insomniacs. Moreover, poor subjective sleep

  19. Fulminant high altitude blindness.

    Mashkovskiy, Evgeny; Szawarski, Piotr; Ryzhkov, Pavel; Goslar, Tomaz; Mrak, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged altitude exposure even with acclimatization continues to present a physiological challenge to all organ systems including the central nervous system. We describe a case of a 41-year-old Caucasian female climber who suffered severe visual loss that was due to possible optic nerve pathology occurring during a high altitude expedition in the Himalayas. This case is atypical of classic high altitude cerebral oedema and highlights yet another danger of prolonged sojourn at extreme altitudes. PMID:27601532

  20. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes: a study on the effect of antioxidant mixtures during intermittent exposures to high altitude

    Vani, R.; Shiva Shankar Reddy, C. S.; Asha Devi, S.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our study was to compare and assess the effectiveness of antioxidant mixtures on the erythrocytes (RBC) of adult male albino rats (Wister) subjected to simulated intermittent high altitudes—5,100 m (AL1) and 6,700 m (AL2)—to induce oxidative stress (OS). To achieve our objective, we pre-supplemented four sets of animals with different antioxidant mixtures [vitamin E (vit.E; 50 IU/kg BW), vitamin C (vit.C; 400 mg/kg) and l-carnitine (400 mg/kg)] in different combinations [M1 (vit.E+vit.C), M2 (vit.C+carnitine), M3 (vit.E+carnitine) and M4 (vit.C+vit.E+carnitine)] for 30 days prior to as well during exposure to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH). Membrane instability, in terms of osmotic fragility and hemolysis, decreased in RBCs of supplemented animals. There was a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase in the RBCs of supplemented animals. We confirmed OS imposed by IHH with assays relating to lipid [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and lipofuscin (LF)] and protein (carbonyl, PrC) oxidation, and found a positive correlation between PrC and hemolysis, with a decrease in both upon supplementation with M3 and M4 mixtures. Fluorescence microscopic observation showed a maximum decrease in the LF content in rats administered M4 and M1 compared to those on M2 and M3 mixtures at both altitudes. We suggest that multiple antioxidant fortifications are effective in overcoming increased OS experienced by RBCs at high altitudes.

  1. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing...... at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen...... prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently...

  2. Ice-based altitude distribution of natural radiation annual exposure rate in the Antarctica zone over the latitude range 69 degrees S-77 degrees S using a pair-filter thermoluminescence method.

    Nakajima, T; Kamiyama, T; Fujii, Y; Motoyama, H; Esumi, S

    1995-12-01

    Both ice-based altitude distributions of natural ionizing radiation exposure and the quasi-effective energy of natural radiation over Antartica over the latitude range 69 degrees S - 77 degrees S during approx. 500 days were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results shows that dependence on altitude above sea level of the exposure rate increases by almost three-fold with each increase of 2000 m of altitude, thus deviating from the general rule stating that the exposure rate should double with each 2000 m. Although the exposure rate shows a dependence on altitude, altitude dependence of the quasi-effective energy of natural radiation over Antartica is not observed. In the present study it is observed that natural radiation occurring over the ice base of Antartica consists mainly of cosmic rays. PMID:8563705

  3. Ice-based altitude distribution of natural radiation annual exposure rate in the Antarctica zone over the latitude range 69 deg S-77 deg S using a pair-filter thermoluminescence method

    Both ice-based altitude distributions of natural ionizing radiation exposure and the quasi-effective energy of natural radiation over Antarctica over the latitude range 69oS-77oS during approx. 500 days were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results shows that dependence on altitude above sea level of the exposure rate increases by almost three-fold with each increase of 2000 m of altitude, thus deviating from the general rule stating that the exposure rate should double with each 2000 m. Although the exposure rate shows a dependence on altitude, altitude dependence of the quasi-effective energy of natural radiation over Antarctica is not observed. In the present study it is observed that natural radiation occurring over the ice base of Antarctica consists mainly of cosmic rays. (Author)

  4. Effect of oxygen and heliox breathing on air bubbles in adipose tissue during 25-kPa altitude exposures

    Randsoe, T.; Kvist, T.M.; Hyldegaard, O.

    2008-01-01

    .7) after which they started shrinking or remained stable throughout the observation period. Bubble growth time was significantly longer during oxygen breathing compared with heliox breathing and preoxygenated animals. Significantly more bubbles disappeared in preoxygenated animals compared with oxygen and......At altitude, bubbles are known to form and grow in blood and tissues causing altitude decompression sickness. Previous reports indicate that treatment of decompression sickness by means of oxygen breathing at altitude may cause unwanted bubble growth. In this report we visually followed the in vivo...... changes of micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue of anesthetized rats at 101.3 kPa (sea level) after which they were decompressed from 101.3 kPa to and held at 25 kPa (10,350 m), during breathing of oxygen or a heliox(34:66) mixture (34% helium and 66% oxygen). Furthermore, bubbles were studied...

  5. Exposure to intermittent high altitude induces different changes in adenylyl cyclase activity in hearts of young and adult Wistar rats

    Hynie, S.; Šída, P.; Klenerová, V.; Asemu, Girma; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2003), s. 53-67. ISSN 1079-9893 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A069; GA MZd NF6627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : heart * high altitude * adenylylcyclase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.093, year: 2003

  6. Sensitivity of HRV parameters including pNNxx proven by short-term exposure to 2700 m altitude

    Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) is increasingly applied in research and intervention. However, the sensitivity of the variety of HRV parameters for changes in cardiovascular reactivity remains unclear. This study investigated effect sizes of HRV parameters in an experimental field study, exposing persons to 2700 m altitude. Parameters analyzed were mean heart rate (HR), atrioventricular conduction time, SDNNi, rMSSD, pNN50, pNNxx (xx = pNN05, pNN10, pNN20, pNN25, pNN30, pNN40), LF, HF, LFnu, LF/HF ratio, and Total Power, as well as ratings of arousal and mood. Forty-five persons were taken to the Dachstein mountain by cable car. HRV parameters of 40 min epochs and ratings at 170 m and 2700 m were compared. At altitude, HR increased and HRV decreased in all parameters. Although moods were not changed, test persons experienced higher arousal at altitude. Besides for HR, analysis revealed the highest effect size for SDNNi, followed by pNN20 and pNN25 and was much lower for HF. As pNNxx parameters were highly correlated with HF, they are discussed to reflect vagal activity. Moreover, pNNxx parameters are clearly defined, whereas HF is susceptible to variations in computation; thus pNNxx parameters seem preferable due to higher effect sizes and better comparability

  7. Treatment of micro air bubbles in rat adipose tissue at 25 kPa altitude exposures with perfluorocarbon emulsions and nitric oxide

    Randsøe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, O

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFC) and nitric oxide (NO) releasing agents have on experimental basis demonstrated therapeutic properties in treating and preventing the formation of venous gas embolism as well as increased survival rate during decompression sickness from diving. The eff......INTRODUCTION: Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFC) and nitric oxide (NO) releasing agents have on experimental basis demonstrated therapeutic properties in treating and preventing the formation of venous gas embolism as well as increased survival rate during decompression sickness from diving....... The effect is ascribed to an increased solubility and transport capacity of respiratory gases in the PFC emulsion and possibly enhanced nitrogen washout through NO-increased blood flow rate and/or the removal of endothelial micro bubble nuclei precursors. Previous reports have shown that metabolic gases (i.......e., oxygen in particular) and water vapor contribute to bubble growth and stabilization during altitude exposures. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the administration of PFC and NO donors upon hypobaric pressure exposures either (1) enhance the bubble disappearance rate through faster desaturation...

  8. Coronary heart disease at altitude.

    Alexander, J K

    1994-01-01

    In the past, it has been assumed that some basic physiologic responses to altitude, exposure in coronary patients are comparable to those in normal young subjects. In fact there are similar changes in sympathetic activation, heart rate, and blood pressure early after ascent, with decrements in plasma volume, cardiac output, and stroke volume as acclimatization proceeds. These responses are described, and experience with coronary patients is reviewed. During the 1st 2 to 3 days at altitude, co...

  9. Hormonal Changes Under Altitude Stress

    H.D Brahmachari

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available The separate effects of exposure for six hours to cold (8 degree Celsius, hypoxia (4267 m. and simulated altitude (8 degree Celsius at 4267 m.have been studied on ten human subjects in a decompression chamber, with respect to the changes in blood cortisol, ADH and urinary catecholamines. Changes in blood cortisol, PBI, ADH urinary excretion of 17-keto steroids and urine volume have been recorded on another ten subjects on acute exposure to high altitude (3505 m.. Changes in the same parameters alongwith urinary testosterone level, have been recorded on another 20 subjects on prolonged exposure for two years to high altitude (3505 m.. The results have been discussed.

  10. Effects of Prebiotics on the Expression of the Integral Membrane Protein Occludin and Cytokines in Rats after Acute High Altitude Exposure

    Fang-Xin Zhang; Zhi-Yun Deng; Ju-Zi Dong; Yun Duan; Shang-Xin Deng; Jia-Yu Chen; Qiang Ma; Ti-Dong Shan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the effects of prebiotics on the expression of occludin and cytokines in the intestinal mucosal barrier of stressed rats in a high altitude environment. Forty-eight rats were acutely stressed in a high altitude hypoxia environment (3848 m). Rats in the hypoxia control group (n = 24) and prebiotics group (n = 24) were stressed for 2, 4 and 6 days before harvesting the intestinal mucosa. The expression of the occludin protei...

  11. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia...

  12. Adaptation to High Altitude

    H. S. Nayar

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is inconsequential for physiologically fit persons below an effective altitude of 2640 metres. At higher altitudes, the adaptation is brought about by four main factors, viz., hyperventilation, increased diffusion of oxygen across alveolar membrane, erythrocythemia and maintenance of body hydration. Carbon dioxide sensitivity is markedly elevated at high altitude, both in sojourners and acclimatized low-landers. The greater pulmonary diffusing capacity observed in high altitude natives is well documented. RBC count, haemoglobin and haematocrit increase whereas arterial oxyhaemoglobin saturation percentage decreases at high altitude. Diuretics (Furosemide have no role in adaptation to high altitude and adequate body hydration must be maintained.The ultimate adaptive mechanisms occur at tissue level which facilitate the diffusion of oxygen from blood to tissue and its utilization. The work capacity decreases at high altitude and a relationship between load carried and speed of marching has been determined at various altitudes. Although altitude has an adverse effect on process of cold acclimatization, yet it is possible to induce cold acclimatization by exposing subjects to a temperature of 0° to -5°C for a period of three hours daily for three weeks. The caloric requirements increase at high altitudes and are 4,286 K Cal and 4,380 K Cal at 13000 feet (3950 m and 17000 feet (5170 m, respectively.

  13. Delayed appearance of high altitude retinal hemorrhages.

    Daniel Barthelmes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal hemorrhages have been described as a component of high altitude retinopathy (HAR in association with altitude illness. In this prospective high altitude study, we aimed to gain new insights into the pathophysiology of HAR and explored whether HAR could be a valid early indicator of altitude illness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 28 mountaineers were randomly assigned to two ascent profiles during a research expedition to Mt. Muztagh Ata (7546 m/24,751 ft. Digital fundus photographs were taken prior to expedition at 490 m (1,607 ft, during expedition at 4497 m (14,750 ft = base camp, 5533 m (18,148 ft, 6265 m (20,549 ft, 6865 m (22,517 ft and 4.5 months thereafter at 490 m. Number, size and time of occurrence of hemorrhages were recorded. Oxygen saturation (SpO₂ and hematocrit were also assessed. 79% of all climbers exhibited retinal hemorrhages during the expedition. Number and area of retinal bleeding increased moderately to medium altitudes (6265 m. Most retinal hemorrhages were detected after return to base camp from a high altitude. No post-expeditional ophthalmic sequelae were detected. Significant negative (SpO₂ Beta: -0.4, p<0.001 and positive (hematocrit Beta: 0.2, p = 0.002, time at altitude Beta: 0.33, p = 0.003 correlations with hemorrhages were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: When closely examined, a very large amount of climbers exhibit retinal hemorrhages during exposure to high altitudes. The incidence of retinal hemorrhages may be greater than previously appreciated as a definite time lag was observed between highest altitude reached and development of retinal bleeding. Retinal hemorrhages should not be considered warning signs of impending severe altitude illness due to their delayed appearance.

  14. Work at high altitude and oxidative stress: antioxidant nutrients.

    Askew, E W

    2002-11-15

    A significant portion of the world's geography lies above 10,000 feet elevation, an arbitrary designation that separates moderate and high altitude. Although the number of indigenous people living at these elevations is relatively small, many people travel to high altitude for work or recreation, exposing themselves to chronic or intermittent hypoxia and the associated risk of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and less frequently, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). The symptoms of AMS (headache, nausea, anorexia, fatigue, lassitude) occur in those who travel too high, too fast. Some investigators have linked the development of these symptoms with the condition of altered blood-brain barrier permeability, possibly related to hypoxia induced free radical formation. The burden of oxidative stress increases during the time spent at altitude and may even persist for some time upon return to sea level. The physiological and medical consequences of increased oxidative stress engendered by altitude is unclear; indeed, hypoxia is believed to be the trigger for the cascade of signaling events that ultimately leads to adaptation to altitude. These signaling events include the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may elicit important adaptive responses. If produced in excess, however, these ROS may contribute to impaired muscle function and reduced capillary perfusion at altitude or may even play a role in precipitating more serious neurological and pulmonary crisis. Oxidative stress can be observed at altitude without strenuous physical exertion; however, environmental factors other than hypoxia, such as exercise, UV light exposure and cold exposure, can also contribute to the burden. Providing antioxidant nutrients via the diet or supplements to the diet can reduce oxidative stress secondary to altitude exposure. In summary, the significant unanswered question concerning altitude exposure and antioxidant supplementation is

  15. HIGH-ALTITUDE ILLNESS

    Dwitya Elvira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHigh-altitude illness (HAI merupakan sekumpulan gejala paru dan otak yang terjadi pada orang yang baru pertama kali mendaki ke ketinggian. HAI terdiri dari acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE dan high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. Tujuan tinjauan pustaka ini adalah agar dokter dan wisatawan memahami risiko, tanda, gejala, dan pengobatan high-altitude illness. Perhatian banyak diberikan terhadap penyakit ini seiring dengan meningkatnya popularitas olahraga ekstrim (mendaki gunung tinggi, ski dan snowboarding dan adanya kemudahan serta ketersediaan perjalanan sehingga jutaan orang dapat terpapar bahaya HAI. Di Pherice, Nepal (ketinggian 4343 m, 43% pendaki mengalami gejala AMS. Pada studi yang dilakukan pada tempat wisata di resort ski Colorado, Honigman menggambarkan kejadian AMS 22% pada ketinggian 1850 m sampai 2750 m, sementara Dean menunjukkan 42% memiliki gejala pada ketinggian 3000 m. Aklimatisasi merupakan salah satu tindakan pencegahan yang dapat dilakukan sebelum pendakian, selain beberapa pengobatan seperti asetazolamid, dexamethasone, phosopodiestrase inhibitor, dan ginko biloba.Kata kunci: high-altitude illness, acute mountain sickness, edema cerebral, pulmonary edema AbstractHigh-altitude illness (HAI is symptoms of lung and brain that occurs in people who first climb to altitude. HAI includes acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. The objective of this review was to understand the risks, signs, symptoms, and treatment of high-altitude illness. The attention was given to this disease due to the rising popularity of extreme sports (high mountain climbing, skiing and snowboarding and the ease and availability of the current travelling, almost each year, millions of people could be exposed to the danger of HAI. In Pherice, Nepal (altitude 4343 m, 43% of climbers have symptoms of AMS. Furthermore, in a study conducted at sites in

  16. Cosmic rays and dosimetry at aviation altitudes

    Recent concerns regarding the effects of the cosmic radiation field at aircraft altitudes on aircrew have resulted in a renewed interest in detailed measurements of the neutral and charged particle components in the atmosphere. CR-39 nuclear track detectors have been employed on a number of subsonic and supersonic aircraft to measure charge spectra and LET spectra at aircraft altitudes. These detectors are ideal for long term exposures required for these studies and their passive nature makes them suitable for an environment where interference with flight instrumentation could be a problem. We report here on measurements and analysis of short range tracks which were produced by high LET particles generated mainly by neutron interactions at aviation altitudes. In order to test the overall validity of the technique measurements were also carried out at the CERN-CEC field which simulates the radiation field at aviation altitudes and good agreement was found with dose values obtained using mainly heavy ion calibration

  17. Blood Coagulation Changes at High Altitude

    I. S. Chohan

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available The current concepts of blood coagulation changes in the pathogenesis of acute mountain sickness (AMS, high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO, high altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH and chronic mountain sickness(CMS which afflict the inductees and residents at high altitude have been reviewed. Hypercoagulable state which is more marked during the first few days of exposure is countered by enhanced fibrinolytic activity and accelerated cell mediated immunity. Magnesium levels are increased in normal residents at high altitudes and may be responsible for enhancing fibrinolytic activity and accelerating immune responses. Magnesium levels are significantly reduced in HAPO patients. Judicious use of furosemide in lower dosage is still the mainstay of treatment of HAPO and AMS.

  18. High altitude pulmonary edema in mountain climbers.

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Guzek, Aneta; Juszczak, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    Every year thousands of ski, trekking or climbing fans travel to the mountains where they stay at the altitude of more than 2500-3000m above sea level or climb mountain peaks, often exceeding 7000-8000m. High mountain climbers are at a serious risk from the effects of adverse environmental conditions prevailing at higher elevations. They may experience health problems resulting from hypotension, hypoxia or exposure to low temperatures; the severity of those conditions is largely dependent on elevation, time of exposure as well as the rate of ascent and descent. A disease which poses a direct threat to the lives of mountain climbers is high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). It is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema which typically occurs in rapidly climbing unacclimatized lowlanders usually within 2-4 days of ascent above 2500-3000m. It is the most common cause of death resulting from the exposure to high altitude. The risk of HAPE rises with increased altitude and faster ascent. HAPE incidence ranges from an estimated 0.01% to 15.5%. Climbers with a previous history of HAPE, who ascent rapidly above 4500m have a 60% chance of illness recurrence. The aim of this article was to present the relevant details concerning epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms, prevention, and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema among climbers in the mountain environment. PMID:25291181

  19. [Mountaineering and altitude sickness].

    Maggiorini, M

    2001-06-01

    Almost every second trekker or climber develops two to three symptoms of the high altitude illness after a rapid ascent (> 300 m/day) to an altitude above 4000 m. We distinguish two forms of high altitude illness, a cerebral form called acute mountain sickness and a pulmonary form called high altitude pulmonary edema. Essentially, acute mountain sickness is self-limiting and benign. Its symptoms are mild to moderate headache, loss of appetite, nausea, dizziness and insomnia. Nausea rarely progresses to vomiting, but if it does, this may anticipate a progression of the disease into the severe form of acute mountain sickness, called high altitude cerebral edema. Symptoms and signs of high altitude cerebral edema are severe headache, which is not relieved by acetaminophen, loss of movement coordination, ataxia and mental deterioration ending in coma. The mechanisms leading to acute mountain sickness are not very well understood; the loss of cerebral autoregulation and a vasogenic type of cerebral edema are being discussed. High altitude pulmonary edema presents in roughly twenty percent of the cases with mild symptoms of acute mountain sickness or even without any symptoms at all. Symptoms associated with high altitude pulmonary edema are incapacitating fatigue, chest tightness, dyspnoe at the minimal effort that advances to dyspnoe at rest and orthopnoe, and a dry non-productive cough that progresses to cough with pink frothy sputum due to hemoptysis. The hallmark of high altitude pulmonary edema is an exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Successful prophylaxis and treatment of high altitude pulmonary edema using nifedipine, a pulmonary vasodilator, indicates that pulmonary hypertension is crucial for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema. The primary treatment of high altitude illness consists in improving hypoxemia and acclimatization. For prophylaxis a slow ascent at a rate of 300 m/day is recommended, if symptoms persist, acetazolamide at a

  20. Plasticity of the muscle proteome to exercise at altitude

    Flueck, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The ascent of humans to the summits of the highest peaks on Earth initiated a spurt of explorations into the physiological consequences of physical activity at altitude. The past three decades have demonstrated that the resetting of respiratory and cardiovascular control with chronic exposure to altitudes above 4000 m is accompanied by important structural-functional adjustments of skeletal muscle. The fully altitude-adapted phenotype preserves energy charge at reduced aerobic capacity throug...

  1. An oxygen enrichment device for lowlanders ascending to high altitude

    Shen, Guanghao; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Yan, Yili; LIU, JUAN; Guo, Wei; Jing, Da; Lei, Tao; Tian, Yue; Xie, Kangning; Luo, Erping; Zhang, Jianbao

    2013-01-01

    Background When ascending to the high altitude, people living in low altitude areas will suffer from acute mountain sickness. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that whether an oxygen concentration membrane can be made and used to construct a new portable oxygen enrichment device for individuals in acute exposure to the high altitude. Methods The membrane was fabricated using vinylsiloxane rubber, polyphenylene oxide hydrogen silicone polymers, chloroplatinic acid and isopropyl a...

  2. Common High Altitudes Illnesses a Primer for Healthcare Provider

    Mohsenin, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude imposes significant strain on cardiopulmonary system and the brain. As a consequence, sojourners to high altitude frequently experience sleep disturbances, often reporting restless and sleepless nights. At altitudes above 3,000 meters (9,800 ft) almost all healthy subjects develop periodic breathing especially during NREM sleep. Sleep architecture gradually improves with increased NREM and REM sleep despite persistence of periodic breathing. The primary reason for pe...

  3. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... you are going up or coming down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are changing ...

  4. High Altitude and Heart

    Murat Yalcin; Ejder Kardesoglu; Zafer Isilak

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, situations associated with high altitude such as mountaineering, aviation increasingly draw the attention of people. Gas pressure decreases and hypoxia is encountered when climbing higher. Physiological and pathological responses of human body to different heights are different. Therefore, physiological and pathological changes that may occur together with height and to know the clinical outcomes of these are important . Acute mountain sickness caused by high altitude and high altit...

  5. Endurance training at altitude.

    Saunders, Philo U; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1968 Olympic Games when the effects of altitude on endurance performance became evident, moderate altitude training ( approximately 2000 to 3000 m) has become popular to improve competition performance both at altitude and sea level. When endurance athletes are exposed acutely to moderate altitude, a number of physiological responses occur that can comprise performance at altitude; these include increased ventilation, increased heart rate, decreased stroke volume, reduced plasma volume, and lower maximal aerobic power ((.)Vo(2max)) by approximately 15% to 20%. Over a period of several weeks, one primary acclimatization response is an increase in the volume of red blood cells and consequently of (.)Vo(2max). Altitudes > approximately 2000 m for >3 weeks and adequate iron stores are required to elicit these responses. However, the primacy of more red blood cells for superior sea-level performance is not clear-cut since the best endurance athletes in the world, from Ethiopia (approximately 2000 to 3000 m), have only marginally elevated hemoglobin concentrations. The substantial reduction in (.)Vo(2max) of athletes at moderate altitude implies that their training should include adequate short-duration (approximately 1 to 2 min), high-intensity efforts with long recoveries to avoid a reduction in race-specific fitness. At the elite level, athlete performance is not dependent solely on (.)Vo(2max), and the "smallest worthwhile change" in performance for improving race results is as little as 0.5%. Consequently, contemporary statistical approaches that utilize the concept of the smallest worthwhile change are likely to be more appropriate than conventional statistical methods when attempting to understand the potential benefits and mechanisms of altitude training. PMID:19519223

  6. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by one’s altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intrac...

  7. Child health and living at high altitude.

    Niermeyer, S; Andrade Mollinedo, P; Huicho, L

    2009-10-01

    The health of children born and living at high altitude is shaped not only by the low-oxygen environment, but also by population ancestry and sociocultural determinants. High altitude and the corresponding reduction in oxygen delivery during pregnancy result in lower birth weight with higher elevation. Children living at high elevations are at special risk for hypoxaemia during infancy and during acute lower respiratory infection, symptomatic high-altitude pulmonary hypertension, persistence of fetal vascular connections, and re-entry high-altitude pulmonary oedema. However, child health varies from one population group to another due to genetic adaptation as well as factors such as nutrition, intercurrent infection, exposure to pollutants and toxins, socioeconomic status, and access to medical care. Awareness of the risks uniquely associated with living at high altitude and monitoring of key health indicators can help protect the health of children at high altitude. These considerations should be incorporated into the scaling-up of effective interventions for improving global child health and survival. PMID:19066173

  8. High Altitude and Heart

    Murat Yalcin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, situations associated with high altitude such as mountaineering, aviation increasingly draw the attention of people. Gas pressure decreases and hypoxia is encountered when climbing higher. Physiological and pathological responses of human body to different heights are different. Therefore, physiological and pathological changes that may occur together with height and to know the clinical outcomes of these are important . Acute mountain sickness caused by high altitude and high altitude cerebral edema are preventable diseases with appropriate precautions. Atmospheric oxygen decreasing with height, initiates many adaptive mechanisms. These adaptation mechanisms and acclimatization vary widely among individuals because of reasons such as environmental factors, exercise and cold. High altitude causes different changes in the cardiovascular system with various mechanisms. Although normal individuals easily adapt to these changes, this situation can lead to undesirable results in people with heart disease. For this reason, it should be known the effective evaluation of the people with known heart disease before traveling to high altitude and the complications due to the changes with height and the recommendations can be made to these patients. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 211-222

  9. High-altitude medicine

    Paralikar Swapnil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sojourns to high altitude have become common for recreation and adventure purposes. In most individuals, gradual ascent to a high altitude leads to a series of adaptive changes in the body, termed as acclimatization. These include changes in the respiratory, cardiovascular, hematologic systems and cellular adaptations that enhance oxygen delivery to the tissues and augment oxygen uptake. Thus there is an increase in pulmonary ventilation, increase in diffusing capacity in the lung, an increase in the cardiac output and increase in the red blood cell count due to an increase in erythropoietin secretion by the kidney, all of which enhance oxygen delivery to the cells. Cellular changes like increase in the number of mitochondria and augmentation of cytochrome oxidase systems take months or years to develop. Too rapid an ascent or inability to acclimatize leads to high-altitude illnesses. These include acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. Acute mountain sickness is self limiting if recognized early. Both HACE and HAPE are life threatening and need to be treated aggressively. The key to treatment of these illnesses is early recognition; administration of supplemental oxygen; and descent if required. Drugs like acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine may be administered as recommended.

  10. Exercise and Training at Altitudes: Physiological Effects and Protocols

    Olga Cecilia Vargas Pinilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in altitude leads to a proportional fall in the barometric pressure, and a decrease in atmospheric oxygen pressure, producing hypobaric hypoxia that affects, in different degrees, all body organs, systems and functions. The chronically reduced partial pressure of oxygen causes that individuals adapt and adjust to physiological stress. These adaptations are modulated by many factors, including the degree of hypoxia related to altitude, time of exposure, exercise intensity and individual conditions. It has been established that exposure to high altitude is an environmental stressor that elicits a response that contributes to many adjustments and adaptations that influence exercise capacity and endurance performance. These adaptations include in crease in hemoglobin concentration, ventilation, capillary density and tissue myoglobin concentration. However, a negative effect in strength and power is related to a decrease in muscle fiber size and body mass due to the decrease in the training intensity. Many researches aim at establishing how training or living at high altitudes affects performance in athletes. Training methods, such as living in high altitudes training low, and training high-living in low altitudes have been used to research the changes in the physical condition in athletes and how the physiological adaptations to hypoxia can enhanceperformance at sea level. This review analyzes the literature related to altitude training focused on how physiological adaptations to hypoxic environments influence performance, and which protocols are most frequently used to train in high altitudes.

  11. Animal Metabolism and Nutritional Requirements Under Physiological Stress Effect of High Altitude

    K. K. Srivastava

    1966-11-01

    Full Text Available Various biochemical and physiological aspects of high altitude exposure and an integrated picture of metabolism of the organism during stress has been reviewed in this paper. This has been further utilised to point out specific nutrient requirement, if any, for survival of the organism during stress and to develop increased resistance towards high altitude exposure. Carbohydrates appear to be the best calorific food material under conditions prevailing at high altitude.

  12. Acute and Chronic Altitude-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction in Children and Adolescents.

    Rimoldi S.F.; Rexhaj E.; Duplain H.; Urben S.; Billieux J.; Allemann Y.; Romero C.; Ayaviri A.; Salinas C.; Villena M.; Scherrer U.; Sartori C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether exposure to high altitude induces cognitive dysfunction in young healthy European children and adolescents during acute, short-term exposure to an altitude of 3450 m and in an age-matched European population permanently living at this altitude. STUDY DESIGN: We tested executive function (inhibition, shifting, and working memory), memory (verbal, short-term visuospatial, and verbal episodic memory), and speed processing ability in: (1) 48 healthy nonacclimatized Eu...

  13. Cerebrovascular stroke at high altitude

    Objective: To asses the high altitude as a risk factor for cerebrovascular stroke in people residing at a height greater than 15,000 feet above sea level. Results: Ten patients suffered from stroke at high altitude while just one case had stroke in indexed age group at lower heights (p-value<0.05). Relative risk was 10 times greater at high altitude. Conclusion: High altitude is a risk factor for stroke in persons residing at altitudes of over 15, 000 ft. (author)

  14. The cerebral effects of ascent to high altitudes.

    Wilson, Mark H; Newman, Stanton; Imray, Chris H

    2009-02-01

    Cellular hypoxia is the common final pathway of brain injury that occurs not just after asphyxia, but also when cerebral perfusion is impaired directly (eg, embolic stroke) or indirectly (eg, raised intracranial pressure after head injury). We Review recent advances in the understanding of neurological clinical syndromes that occur on exposure to high altitudes, including high altitude headache (HAH), acute mountain sickness (AMS), and high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE), and the genetics, molecular mechanisms, and physiology that underpin them. We also present the vasogenic and cytotoxic bases for HACE and explore venous hypertension as a possible contributory factor. Although the factors that control susceptibility to HACE are poorly understood, the effects of exposure to altitude (and thus hypobaric hypoxia) might provide a reproducible model for the study of cerebral cellular hypoxia in healthy individuals. The effects of hypobaric hypoxia might also provide new insights into the understanding of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:19161909

  15. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training

    Małgorzata Michalczyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like “live high, train high” (LH-TH, “live high, train low” (LH-TL or “intermittent hypoxic training” (IHT. Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented.

  16. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training.

    Michalczyk, Małgorzata; Czuba, Miłosz; Zydek, Grzegorz; Zając, Adam; Langfort, Józef

    2016-01-01

    The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like "live high, train high" (LH-TH), "live high, train low" (LH-TL) or "intermittent hypoxic training" (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented. PMID:27322318

  17. Pulmonary artery pressure limits exercise capacity at high altitude.

    Naeije, Robert; Huez, Sandrine; Lamotte, Michel; Retailleau, Kathleen; Neupane, S; Abramowicz, Daniel; Faoro, Vitalie

    2010-01-01

    Altitude exposure is associated with decreased exercise capacity and increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Echocardiographic measurements of pulmonary haemodynamics and a cardiopulmonary exercise test were performed in 13 healthy subjects at sea level, in normoxia and during acute hypoxic breathing (1 h, 12% oxygen in nitrogen), and in 22 healthy subjects after acclimatisation to an altitude of 5,050 m. The measurements were obtained after randomisation, double-blinded to the intake ...

  18. Iron Supplementation and Altitude: Decision Making Using a Regression Tree

    Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Andrew D. Govus, Peter Peeling, Chris R. Abbiss, Christopher J. Gore

    2016-01-01

    Altitude exposure increases the body’s need for iron (Gassmann and Muckenthaler, 2015), primarily to support accelerated erythropoiesis, yet clear supplementation guidelines do not exist. Athletes are typically recommended to ingest a daily oral iron supplement to facilitate altitude adaptations, and to help maintain iron balance. However, there is some debate as to whether athletes with otherwise healthy iron stores should be supplemented, due in part to concerns of iron overload. Excess iro...

  19. Effects of high altitude and exercise on marksmanship.

    Tharion, W J; Hoyt, R W; Marlowe, B E; Cymerman, A

    1992-02-01

    The effects of exercise and high altitude (3,700 m to 4,300 m) on marksmanship accuracy and sighting time were quantified in 16 experienced marksmen. Subjects dry-fired a disabled rifle equipped with a laser-based system from a free-standing position. The 2.3-cm circular target was at a distance of 5 m. Marksmanship was assessed under the following conditions: 1) at rest at sea level; 2) immediately after a 21-km run/walk ascent from 1,800 m to 4,300 m elevation; 3) at rest during days 1 to 3 at altitude; 4) at rest during days 14 to 16 at altitude; and 5) immediately after a second ascent after 17 d at altitude. Exercise reduced marksmanship accuracy (p less than 0.05) but did not affect sighting time. Acute altitude exposure reduced marksmanship accuracy, and decreased sighting time (p less than 0.05). However, after residence at altitude, accuracy and sighting time at rest returned to sea level values. Exercise and acute altitude exposure had similar but independent detrimental effects on marksmanship. PMID:1546938

  20. Can patients with coronary heart disease go to high altitude?

    Dehnert, Christoph; Bärtsch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Tourism to high altitude is very popular and includes elderly people with both manifest and subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD). Thus, risk assessment regarding high altitude exposure of patients with CHD is of increasing interest, and individual recommendations are expected despite the lack of sufficient scientific evidence. The major factor increasing cardiac stress is hypoxia. At rest and for a given external workload, myocardial oxygen demand is increased at altitude, particularly in nonacclimatized individuals, and there is some evidence that blood-flow reserve is reduced in atherosclerotic coronary arteries even in the absence of severe stenosis. Despite a possible imbalance between oxygen demand and oxygen delivery, studies on selected patients have shown that exposure and exercise at altitudes of 3000 to 3500 m is generally safe for patients with stable CHD and sufficient work capacity. During the first days at altitude, patients with stable angina may develop symptoms of myocardial ischemia at slightly lower heart rate x  blood-pressure products. Adverse cardiac events, however, such as unstable angina coronary syndromes, do not occur more frequently compared with sea level except for those who are unaccustomed to exercise. Therefore, training should start before going to altitude, and the altitude-related decrease in exercise capacity should be considered. Travel to 3500 m should be avoided unless patients have stable disease, preserved left ventricular function without residual capacity, and above-normal exercise capacity. CHD patients should avoid travel to elevations above 4500 m owing to severe hypoxia at these altitudes. The risk assessment of CHD patients at altitude should always consider a possible absence of medical support and that cardiovascular events may turn into disaster. PMID:20919884

  1. High Altitude Emissions

    Bulzan, Dan

    2007-01-01

    An overview of emissions related research being conducted as part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Supersonics Project is presented. The overview includes project objectives, milestones, and descriptions of major research areas. The overview also includes information on the emissions research being conducted under NASA Research Announcements. Technical challenges include: 1) Environmental impact of supersonic cruise emissions is greater due to higher flight altitudes which makes emissions reduction increasingly important. 2) Accurate prediction tools to enable combustor designs that reduce emissions at supersonic cruise are needed as well as intelligent systems to minimize emissions. 3) Combustor operating conditions at supersonic cruise are different than at subsonic cruise since inlet fuel and air temperatures are considerably increased.

  2. Nutritional Strategies for the Preservation of Fat Free Mass at High Altitude

    Stacie L. Wing-Gaia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to extreme altitude presents many physiological challenges. In addition to impaired physical and cognitive function, energy imbalance invariably occurs resulting in weight loss and body composition changes. Weight loss, and in particular, loss of fat free mass, combined with the inherent risks associated with extreme environments presents potential performance, safety, and health risks for those working, recreating, or conducting military operations at extreme altitude. In this review, contributors to muscle wasting at altitude are highlighted with special emphasis on protein turnover. The article will conclude with nutritional strategies that may potentially attenuate loss of fat free mass during high altitude exposure.

  3. Dose-response of altitude training: how much altitude is enough?

    Levine, Benjamin D; Stray-Gundersen, James

    2006-01-01

    Altitude training continues to be a key adjunctive aid for the training of competitive athletes throughout the world. Over the past decade, evidence has accumulated from many groups of investigators that the "living high--training low" approach to altitude training provides the most robust and reliable performance enhancements. The success of this strategy depends on two key features: 1) living high enough, for enough hours per day, for a long enough period of time, to initiate and sustain an erythropoietic effect of high altitude; and 2) training low enough to allow maximal quality of high intensity workouts, requiring high rates of sustained oxidative flux. Because of the relatively limited access to environments where such a strategy can be practically applied, numerous devices have been developed to "bring the mountain to the athlete," which has raised the key issue of the appropriate "dose" of altitude required to stimulate an acclimatization response and performance enhancement. These include devices using molecular sieve technology to provide a normobaric hypoxic living or sleeping environment, approaches using very high altitudes (5,500m) for shorter periods of time during the day, and "intermittent hypoxic training" involving breathing very hypoxic gas mixtures for alternating 5 minutes periods over the course of 60-90 minutes. Unfortunately, objective testing of the strategies employing short term (less than 4 hours) normobaric or hypobaric hypoxia has failed to demonstrate an advantage of these techniques. Moreover individual variability of the response to even the best of living high--training low strategies has been great, and the mechanisms behind this variability remain obscure. Future research efforts will need to focus on defining the optimal dosing strategy for these devices, and determining the underlying mechanisms of the individual variability so as to enable the individualized "prescription" of altitude exposure to optimize the performance of

  4. Regression of altitude-produced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Sizemore, D. A.; Mcintyre, T. W.; Van Liere, E. J.; Wilson , M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The rate of regression of cardiac hypertrophy with time has been determined in adult male albino rats. The hypertrophy was induced by intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude. The percentage hypertrophy was much greater (46%) in the right ventricle than in the left (16%). The regression could be adequately fitted to a single exponential function with a half-time of 6.73 plus or minus 0.71 days (90% CI). There was no significant difference in the rates of regression for the two ventricles.

  5. Re-exposure to the hypobaric hypoxic brain injury of high altitude: plasma S100B levels and the possible effect of acclimatisation on blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    Winter, C D; Whyte, T; Cardinal, J; Kenny, R; Ballard, E

    2016-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxic brain injury results in elevated peripheral S100B levels which may relate to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. A period of acclimatisation or dexamethasone prevents altitude-related illnesses and this may involve attenuation of BBB compromise. We hypothesised that both treatments would diminish the S100B response (a measure of BBB dysfunction) on re-ascent to the hypobaric hypoxia of high altitude, in comparison to an identical ascent completed 48 h earlier by the same group. Twelve healthy volunteers, six of which were prescribed dexamethasone, ascended Mt Fuji (summit 3700 m) and serial plasma S100B levels measured. The S100B values reduced from a baseline 0.183 µg/l (95 % CI 0.083-0.283) to 0.145 µg/l (95 % CI 0.088-0.202) at high altitude for the dexamethasone group (n = 6) and from 0.147 µg/l (95 % CI 0.022-0.272) to 0.133 µg/l (95 % CI 0.085-0.182) for the non-treated group (n = 6) [not statistically significant (p = 0.43 and p = 0.82) for the treated and non-treated groups respectively]. [These results contrasted with the statistically significant increase during the first ascent, S100B increasing from 0.108 µg/l (95 % CI 0.092-0.125) to 0.216 µg/l (95 % CI 0.165-0.267) at high altitude]. In conclusion, an increase in plasma S100B was not observed in the second ascent and this may relate to the effect of acclimatisation (or hypoxic pre-conditioning) on the BBB. An exercise stimulated elevation of plasma S100B levels was also not observed during the second ascent. The small sample size and wide confidence intervals, however, precludes any statistically significant conclusions and a larger study would be required to confirm these findings. PMID:26924650

  6. Energy metabolism and the high-altitude environment.

    Murray, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    At high altitude the barometric pressure falls, challenging oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, whilst hypoxia is not the only physiological stress encountered at high altitude, low arterial P(O2) is a sustained feature, even after allowing adequate time for acclimatization. Cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism is altered in subjects at, or returning from, high altitude. In the heart, energetic reserve falls, as indicated by lower phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but in the hypoxic rat heart fatty acid oxidation and respiratory capacity are decreased, whilst pyruvate oxidation is also lower after sustained hypoxic exposure. In skeletal muscle, there is not a consensus. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m) a loss of muscle mitochondrial density is seen, but this was not observed in a simulated ascent of Everest in hypobaric chambers. At more moderate high altitude, decreased respiratory capacity may occur without changes in mitochondrial volume density, and fat oxidation may be downregulated, although this is not seen in all studies. The underlying mechanisms, including the possible role of hypoxia-signalling pathways, remain to be resolved, particularly in light of confounding factors in the high-altitude environment. In high-altitude-adapted Tibetan natives, however, there is evidence of natural selection centred around the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway, and metabolic features in this population (e.g. low cardiac phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratios, increased cardiac glucose uptake and lower muscle mitochondrial densities) share similarities with those in acclimatized lowlanders, supporting a possible role for the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway in the metabolic response of cardiac and skeletal muscle energy metabolism to high altitude. PMID:26315373

  7. The sleep of elite athletes at sea level and high altitude: a comparison of sea-level natives and high-altitude natives (ISA3600)

    ROACH, Gregory D.; Schmidt, Walter F; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J; Sargent, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Background Altitude exposure causes acute sleep disruption in non-athletes, but little is known about its effects in elite athletes. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of altitude on two groups of elite athletes, that is, sea-level natives and high-altitude natives. Methods Sea-level natives were members of the Australian under-17 soccer team (n=14). High-altitude natives were members of a Bolivian under-20 club team (n=12). Teams participated in an 18-day (19 nights) training c...

  8. Physiological adaptation of the cardiovascular system to high altitude.

    Naeije, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Altitude exposure is associated with major changes in cardiovascular function. The initial cardiovascular response to altitude is characterized by an increase in cardiac output with tachycardia, no change in stroke volume, whereas blood pressure may temporarily be slightly increased. After a few days of acclimatization, cardiac output returns to normal, but heart rate remains increased, so that stroke volume is decreased. Pulmonary artery pressure increases without change in pulmonary artery wedge pressure. This pattern is essentially unchanged with prolonged or lifelong altitude sojourns. Ventricular function is maintained, with initially increased, then preserved or slightly depressed indices of systolic function, and an altered diastolic filling pattern. Filling pressures of the heart remain unchanged. Exercise in acute as well as in chronic high-altitude exposure is associated with a brisk increase in pulmonary artery pressure. The relationships between workload, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake are preserved in all circumstances, but there is a decrease in maximal oxygen consumption, which is accompanied by a decrease in maximal cardiac output. The decrease in maximal cardiac output is minimal in acute hypoxia but becomes more pronounced with acclimatization. This is not explained by hypovolemia, acid-bases status, increased viscosity on polycythemia, autonomic nervous system changes, or depressed systolic function. Maximal oxygen uptake at high altitudes has been modeled to be determined by the matching of convective and diffusional oxygen transport systems at a lower maximal cardiac output. However, there has been recent suggestion that 10% to 25% of the loss in aerobic exercise capacity at high altitudes can be restored by specific pulmonary vasodilating interventions. Whether this is explained by an improved maximum flow output by an unloaded right ventricle remains to be confirmed. Altitude exposure carries no identified risk of myocardial ischemia in

  9. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    Matthys Heinrich

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax, sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient. Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST, which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists including mechanical aids to

  10. Autonomic Cardiovascular Responses in Acclimatized Lowlanders on Prolonged Stay at High Altitude: A Longitudinal Follow Up Study

    Dhar, Priyanka; Sharma, Vijay K.; Hota, Kalpana B.; Das, Saroj K; Hota, Sunil K.; Srivastava, Ravi B.; Singh, Shashi B

    2014-01-01

    Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude is reported to cause sympathetic dominance that may contribute to the pathophysiology of high altitude illnesses. The effect of prolonged stay at high altitude on autonomic functions, however, remains to be explored. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the effect of high altitude on autonomic neural control of cardiovascular responses by monitoring heart rate variability (HRV) during chronic hypobaric hypoxia. Baseline electrocar...

  11. Countermeasures on Mobile Health Service Detachment in the Field Training at Acute High Altitude Exposure%机动卫勤分队急进高海拔地区驻训的对策

    贺巍; 范兴爱; 朱琳

    2014-01-01

    本文根据某军队医院机动卫勤分队参加高海拔地区野外驻训的实践,总结分析在高海拔地区驻训容易出现的高原反应、人员的不良情绪、劳动效率下降等方面的问题及产生原因,并提出加强学习、充分准备、教育疏导、科学组训等对策,增强卫勤保障能力。%Combining with own practice in high altitude field training of mobile health service detachment , the authors summarized the main problems and reasons of high altitude sickness , unhealthy emotions of the staff , labor efficiency decline, etc.Moreover, some countermeasures were put forward as follows so as to improve the medical support capability of mobile health service detachment , reinforce learning, adequate preparation, education channel, scientific organization, etc.

  12. Physiological responses to exercise at altitude : an update.

    Mazzeo, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Studies performed over the past decade have yielded new information related to the physiological and metabolic adjustments made in response to both short- and long-term high-altitude exposure. These investigations have examined the potential mechanisms responsible for the alterations observed in such key variables as heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, muscle blood flow, substrate utilization and mitochondrial function, both at rest and during exercise of varying intensities. Additionally, the occurrence and mechanisms related to the 'lactate paradox' continues to intrigue investigators. It is apparent that exposure to high altitude is an environmental stressor that elicits a robust sympathoadrenal response that contributes to many of the critical adjustments and adaptations mentioned above. Furthermore, as some of these important physiological adaptations are known to enhance performance, it has become popular to incorporate an aspect of altitude living/training into the training regimens of endurance athletes (e.g. 'live high-train low'). Finally, it is important to note that many factors influence the extent to which individuals adjust and adapt to the stress imposed by exposure to high altitude. Included among these are (i) the degree of hypoxia; (ii) the duration of exposure to hypoxic conditions; (iii) the exercise intensity (absolute vs relative workload); and (iv) the inter-individual variability in adapting to hypoxic environments ('responders' vs 'non-responders'). PMID:18081363

  13. Reactive hyperemia of rat brain following high altitude hypoxia

    Radioactive 85Sr microparticles were used to assess the cardiac output and blood flow through medulla oblongata, cerebellum, subcortical portions and cerebral cortex in adult laboratory rats 20 hours after 8-hour exposure to 7000 m high altitude hypoxia. The local blood supply increased in all parts of the brain, in particular in medulla oblongata and cerebellum. (author). 10 figs., 9 refs

  14. The sleep of elite athletes at sea level and high altitude: a comparison of sea-level natives and high-altitude natives (ISA3600)

    Roach, Gregory D; Schmidt, Walter F; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J; Sargent, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Background Altitude exposure causes acute sleep disruption in non-athletes, but little is known about its effects in elite athletes. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of altitude on two groups of elite athletes, that is, sea-level natives and high-altitude natives. Methods Sea-level natives were members of the Australian under-17 soccer team (n=14). High-altitude natives were members of a Bolivian under-20 club team (n=12). Teams participated in an 18-day (19 nights) training camp in Bolivia, with 6 nights at near sea level in Santa Cruz (430 m) and 13 nights at high altitude in La Paz (3600 m). Sleep was assessed on every day/night using activity monitors. Results The Australians’ sleep was shorter, and of poorer quality, on the first night at altitude compared with sea level. Sleep quality returned to normal by the end of the first week at altitude, but sleep quantity had still not stabilised at its normal level after 2 weeks. The quantity and quality of sleep obtained by the Bolivians was similar, or greater, on all nights at altitude compared with sea level. The Australians tended to obtain more sleep than the Bolivians at sea level and altitude, but the quality of the Bolivians’ sleep tended to be better than that of the Australians at altitude. Conclusions Exposure to high altitude causes acute and chronic disruption to the sleep of elite athletes who are sea-level natives, but it does not affect the sleep of elite athletes who are high-altitude natives. PMID:24282197

  15. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ISTAR Group ( IG) and team mate Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) propose a Venus altitude cycling balloon (Venus ACB), an innovative superpressure balloon...

  16. High-altitude pulmonary hypertension

    X-Q. Xu; Z-C. Jing

    2009-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH) is a specific disease affecting populations that live at high elevations. The prevalence of HAPH among those residing at high altitudes needs to be further defined. Whereas reduction in nitric oxide production may be one mechanism for the development of HAPH, the roles of endothelin-1 and prostaglandin I2 pathways in the pathogenesis of HAPH deserve further study. Although some studies have suggested that genetic factors contribute to the pathogenes...

  17. A Start Toward Micronucleus-Based Decompression Models; Altitude Decompression

    Van Liew, H. D.; Conkin, Johnny

    2007-01-01

    Do gaseous micronuclei trigger the formation of bubbles in decompression sickness (DCS)? Most previous instructions for DCS prevention have been oriented toward supersaturated gas in tissue. We are developing a mathematical model that is oriented toward the expected behavior of micronuclei. The issue is simplified in altitude decompressions because the aviator or astronaut is exposed only to decompression, whereas in diving there is a compression before the decompression. The model deals with four variables: duration of breathing of 100% oxygen before going to altitude (O2 prebreathing), altitude of the exposure, exposure duration, and rate of ascent. Assumptions: a) there is a population of micronuclei of various sizes having a range of characteristics, b) micronuclei are stable until they grow to a certain critical nucleation radius, c) it takes time for gas to diffuse in or out of micronuclei, and d) all other variables being equal, growth of micronuclei upon decompression is more rapid at high altitude because of the rarified gas in the micronuclei. To estimate parameters, we use a dataset of 4,756 men in altitude chambers exposed to various combinations of the model s variables. The model predicts occurrence of DCS symptoms quite well. It is notable that both the altitude chamber data and the model show little effect of O2 prebreathing until it lasts more than 60 minutes; this is in contrast to a conventional idea that the benefit of prebreathing is directly due to exponential washout of tissue nitrogen. The delay in response to O2 prebreathing can be interpreted as time required for outward diffusion of nitrogen; when the micronuclei become small enough, they are disabled, either by crushing or because they cannot expand to a critical nucleation size when the subject ascends to altitude.

  18. Change of plasma hormone levels at acute exposure to 4500 meters altitude and its significance%模拟急进4500米高原血浆去甲肾上腺素等激素水平变化及意义

    隆敏; 田开新; 喻杨; 于世勇; 覃军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore changes of plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (ADR), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels, and plasma renin activity (PRA) at acute exposure to 4500m altitude and their significances. Methods A set of hypobaric chamber was applied to simulate 4500 m altitude. Venous blood samples of 43 healthy young males were obtained before and at 22 hours after acute exposure to simulate 4500 m altitude. High-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical method was used to detect plasma NA and ADR concentrations, while plasma ANP concentration and PRA were detected by radioimmunoassay. Subjects whose scores were higher than 10 were allocated into acute mountain sickness (AMS) group, and those less than 10 into non-AMS Group. Results After acute exposure to high altitude, concentrations of plasma NA and PRA significantly decreased[NA: (3.7 ± 0.8) vs (2.9 ±0.5) μg/L; PRA: (2.9 ±1.8) vs (1.3 ±1.1) μg/(L·h); P<0.01], however plasma ADR, ANP concentrations significantly increased [ADR: (2.0 ± 0.6) vs (2.5 ± 0.5) μg/L, P < 0.01; ANP: (79 ± 31) vs (100 ± 42) μg/L, P < 0.05]. Plasma NA concentration was significantly higher in AMS group than in non-AMS group after exposure to 4500 m altitude[(3.1 ±0.4) vs (2.8 ±0.5) μg/L, P<0.05], although it was not different at plain. AMS score was positively correlated with plasma NA concentrations either at plain or at 4500 m altitude ( r = 0.435, 0.391, P < 0.05 ) . Conclusion Apparent nerve-endocrine changes occur at acute exposure to high altitude, and these changes may be related to AMS.%目的 探讨急进4500m高原血浆去甲肾上腺素(NA)、肾上腺素(ADR)、心钠素(ANP)浓度、肾素活性(PRA)变化及意义.方法采用低压氧舱模拟急进4500m高原,43名健康青年男性分别在进舱前和模拟高原22h后接受静脉采血.高效液相色谱-电化学法检测NA及ADR浓度,放射免疫方法检测ANP浓度及PRA.急性高原反应(AMS)评分大于10分受试者

  19. Diagnostic criteria of high-altitude de-adaptation for high-altitude migrants returning to the plains: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Qi-quan ZHOU

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the diagnostic method of high-altitude de-adaptation and constitute the diagnostic criteria of high-altitude de-adaptation for people returning to the plains from high-altitude. Methods  Epidemiological survey and clinical multicenter randomized controlled studies were used to determine/perform blood picture, routine urine analysis, routine stool examination, myocardial enzymes, liver and kidney functions, nerve function, sex hormone, microalbuminuria, ECG, echocardiography, pulmonary function tests, and so on, in 3011 subjects after they returned to the plains from high-altitude. The diagnostic criteria of high-altitude de-adaptation were formulated by a comparative analysis of the obtained data with those of healthy subjects living in the same area, altitude, and age. The regularity and characteristics of high-altitude de-adaptation syndrome were found and diagnostic criteria for high-altitude de-adaptation was established based on the results. Results  The investigative results showed that the incidence of high-altitude de-adaptation syndrome was found in 84.36% of population returning to the plains from high-altitude. About 60% of them were considered to have mild reactions, 30% medium, and only 10% were severe. The lower the altitude they returned to, the longer the duration of stay in highland, and the heavier the labor they engaged in high altitude, the higher the incidence rate of high-altitude de-adaptation syndrome was. Patients with high-altitude de-adaptation syndrome exhibited hematological abnormality and abnormal ventricular function, especially the right ventricular diastolic function after returning for 1 year to 5 years. Long-term hypoxia exposure often caused obvious change in cardiac morphology with left and right ventricular hypertrophy, particularly the right ventricle. In addition, low blood pressure and low pulse pressure were found at times. Microalbuminuria was found in some high-altitude de

  20. Timing the arrival at 2340m altitude for aerobic performance

    Schuler, B; Thomsen, JJ; Gassmann, M;

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and performance increase upon altitude acclimatization at moderate altitude. Eight elite cyclists were studied at sea level, and after 1 (Day 1), 7 (Day 7), 14 (Day 14) and 21 (Day 21) days of exposure to 2340 m. Capillary blood...... samples were taken on these days before performing two consecutive maximal exercise trials. Acclimatization reased hemoglobin concentration and arterial oxygen content. On Day 1, VO2max and time to exhaustion (at 80% of sea-level maximal power output) decreased by 12.8% (P<0.05) and 25.8% (P<0...

  1. Effect of high altitude hypoxia on changes of plasma CNP, ET and CGRP contents in healthy young males

    Objective: To explore the changes of plasma CNP, ET and (CGR contents in healthy young males with exposure to high altitude hypoxia. Methods: Plasma CNP, ET and CGRP contents were measured with RIA in 50 healthy young males at the altitude of 1000 m (as control), 2260 m (medium altitude) and 3780 m (high altitude for 1d, 5d and 15d) successively. Results: 1) Plasma CNP contents increased gradually as the altitude rose (at high altitude for 15d vs all other 4 settings, P<0.01). 2)Plasma ET contents were significantly lower at high altitude for 5d than those at medium altitude, P<0.01. However, prolonged stay at high altitude for 15d would significantly increase the plasma ET contents (vs all other 4 settings, P<0.01). 3)Plasma CGRP contents reached peak at medium altitude (vs medium altitude, P<0.01). 4)Plasma ET contents were positively correlated with CNP contents (r=0.470, P<0.01) but negatively correlated with CGRP contents (r = - 0.425, P<0.05). Conclusion: ET, CGRP and CNP participate in the physiologic regulation of pulmonary circulation under hypoxia. CGRP, a strong vaso dilator, modulates pulmonary vascular dilatation at the early stage of hypoxia. After prolonged exposure to high altitude hypoxia ET and CNP contents increase significantly. (authors)

  2. High-altitude pulmonary hypertension

    X-Q. Xu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH is a specific disease affecting populations that live at high elevations. The prevalence of HAPH among those residing at high altitudes needs to be further defined. Whereas reduction in nitric oxide production may be one mechanism for the development of HAPH, the roles of endothelin-1 and prostaglandin I2 pathways in the pathogenesis of HAPH deserve further study. Although some studies have suggested that genetic factors contribute to the pathogenesis of HAPH, data published to date are insufficient for the identification of a significant number of gene polymorphims in HAPH. The clinical presentation of HAPH is nonspecific. Exertional dyspnoea is the most common symptom and signs related to right heart failure are common in late stages of HAPH. Echocardiography is the most useful screening tool and right heart catheterisation is the gold standard for the diagnosis of HAPH. The ideal management for HAPH is migration to lower altitudes. Phosphodiesterase 5 is an attractive drug target for the treatment of HAPH. In addition, acetazolamide is a promising therapeutic agent for high-altitude pulmonary hypertension. To date, no evidence has confirmed whether endothelin-receptor antagonists have efficacy in the treatment of high-altitude pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  4. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    Sheng Li Hu

    Full Text Available Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD, stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200 detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m, and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m. P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Changes in physical performance parameters during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    Jensen, Kurt; Höög, Martina; Willis, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Olympic cross country skiing competitions in 2014 will be held in Sochi, Russia at an altitude of approximately 1500m. Although moderate, this altitude is known to reduce performance in highly trained endurance athletes. It is also known that individuals react differently during...... altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance changes during and after three weeks of training in moderate altitude in elite skiers. METHOD: Four male and three female skiers were tested on a roller skiing treadmill using the classic technique at sea level (NORM1), after 3 and 20...... days at 1500m altitude (ALT1 and ALT2), and 10 days after altitude at sea level (NORM2). The test protocol was a standardized progressive submaximal session of 4 min exercise with 1 min rest between each stage, followed by a 6-10 min progressive “all out” exercise with an increase in first speed and...

  6. Altitude precipitation gradient in Serbia

    Živković Nenad M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using average annual precipitations data for period 1961-90. from all rain gauges in Serbia, southern of Sava and Danube rivers, the map of altitude precipitations gradient is constructed. 59 regions homogeneous for relation X=f(H are obtained by regression analysis method (two-dimensional type, X precipitation height and H - altitude. Some new method are applied, some limitations are shown, some regularities are found in disposition of precipitation growth and it is indicated on practical application of this method in physico-geographical research.

  7. Iron Supplementation and Altitude: Decision Making Using a Regression Tree

    Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Andrew D. Govus, Peter Peeling, Chris R. Abbiss, Christopher J. Gore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Altitude exposure increases the body’s need for iron (Gassmann and Muckenthaler, 2015, primarily to support accelerated erythropoiesis, yet clear supplementation guidelines do not exist. Athletes are typically recommended to ingest a daily oral iron supplement to facilitate altitude adaptations, and to help maintain iron balance. However, there is some debate as to whether athletes with otherwise healthy iron stores should be supplemented, due in part to concerns of iron overload. Excess iron in vital organs is associated with an increased risk of a number of conditions including cancer, liver disease and heart failure. Therefore clear guidelines are warranted and athletes should be discouraged from ‘self-prescribing” supplementation without medical advice. In the absence of prospective-controlled studies, decision tree analysis can be used to describe a data set, with the resultant regression tree serving as guide for clinical decision making. Here, we present a regression tree in the context of iron supplementation during altitude exposure, to examine the association between pre-altitude ferritin (Ferritin-Pre and the haemoglobin mass (Hbmass response, based on daily iron supplement dose. De-identified ferritin and Hbmass data from 178 athletes engaged in altitude training were extracted from the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS database. Altitude exposure was predominantly achieved via normobaric Live high: Train low (n = 147 at a simulated altitude of 3000 m for 2 to 4 weeks. The remaining athletes engaged in natural altitude training at venues ranging from 1350 to 2800 m for 3-4 weeks. Thus, the “hypoxic dose” ranged from ~890 km.h to ~1400 km.h. Ethical approval was granted by the AIS Human Ethics Committee, and athletes provided written informed consent. An in depth description and traditional analysis of the complete data set is presented elsewhere (Govus et al., 2015. Iron supplementation was prescribed by a sports physician

  8. Sleep and Breathing at High Altitude.

    Wickramasinghe, Himanshu; Anholm, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep at high altitude is characterized by poor subjective quality, increased awakenings, frequent brief arousals, marked nocturnal hypoxemia, and periodic breathing. A change in sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and decreasing slow-wave and REM sleep have been demonstrated. Periodic breathing with central apnea is almost universally seen amongst sojourners to high altitude, although it is far less common in long-standing high altitude dwellers. Hypobaric hypoxia in concert with periodic breathing appears to be the principal cause of sleep disruption at altitude. Increased sleep fragmentation accounts for the poor sleep quality and may account for some of the worsened daytime performance at high altitude. Hypoxic sleep disruption contributes to the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude. PMID:11898114

  9. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    ... Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their Relationship to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache Alcohol and Migraine Anxiety and ...

  10. Cold Stress at High Altitudes

    N. C. Majumdar

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cold at high altitudes has been analysed from a purely physical standpoint. It has been shown that Siple's Wind-Chill Index is not reliable because (i it does not make use of the well established principles governing the physical processes of heat transfer by convection and radiation, and (ii it assumes that the mean radiant temperature of the surroundings is the same as the ambient dry bulb temperature. A Cold Stress Index has been proposed which is likely to be a more reliable guide for assessing the climatic hazards of high altitude environments. The Index can be quickly estimated with the help of two nomograms devised for the purpose.

  11. Altitude Control Feasibility for a Seaweed Harvester

    Gallieri, Marco; Ringwood, John

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the altitude control of a seaweed harvester is examined. The harvesting system consists of a vessel and a suspended harvester device, the altitude of which is controlled by a winch. The goal of the control action is to maintain the harvester at a constant altitude with respect to the seabed profile. A control strategy is proposed, including a vessel motion feed-forward action, using a motion reference unit (MRU), and an altitude feedback ...

  12. Altitude training and haemoglobin mass from the optimised carbon monoxide rebreathing method determined by a meta-analysis

    Gore, Christopher J; Sharpe, Ken; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Saunders, Philo U.; Humberstone, Clare E; Robertson, Eileen Y; Wachsmuth, Nadine B.; Clark, Sally A; McLean, Blake D.; Friedmann-Bette, Birgit; Neya, Mitsuo; Pottgiesser, Torben; Schumacher, Yorck O; Schmidt, Walter F

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterise the time course of changes in haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) in response to altitude exposure. Methods This meta-analysis uses raw data from 17 studies that used carbon monoxide rebreathing to determine Hbmass prealtitude, during altitude and postaltitude. Seven studies were classic altitude training, eight were live high train low (LHTL) and two mixed classic and LHTL. Separate linear-mixed models were fitted to the data from the 17 studies and the resultant estimates of...

  13. Effect of altitude on the protein metabolism of Bolivian children

    The malnutrition is prevalent and is a major problem among Bolivian children. It is caused by several interacting factors: (1) inadequate protein energy intake due to low socio-economic status; (ii) exposure to acute, repeated and chronic bacterial infections; (iii) exposure to multiple and chronic parasitic infections; (iv) high altitude of the capital, La Paz, 3600 m, with a numerous populations compared to the rest of the country. The research objectives in the first phase are: (i) determination of protein utilization with a non-invasive method using stable isotope tracer among children living at high and low altitude; (ii) determination of protein metabolism among eutrophic children without parasitic or acute bacterial infections at both altitudes; (iii) determination of protein requirement among these children. Two groups of 10 pubertal children, matched for age and sex, of same socio-economic status, eutrophic, without malnutrition, infections or intestinal parasites will be studied; the different status being arrived by anthropometric, nutritional intake, biochemical and pediatrical evaluation. For the metabolic study, stable isotopes L-[1-13C] leucine labelled casein will be used and 13CO2 excreted will be measured. All the basic nutritional assessment and VCO2 measurements will be performed in Bolivia, while the samples of expired gas will be stored in Vacutainers for further analysis by isotope radio mass spectrometer (IRMS), in Clermont-Ferrand, France. The plans for future work is based on the study of the effects of the different variables and their interactions. The following will be evaluated: (i) the socio-economic status; (ii) the bacterial infections: (iii) the parasitic infections; (iv) the altitude. As published by Obert, et al., the socio-economic variable is more connected with the nutritional status than with the altitude. 12 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Maximal exercise and muscle oxygen extraction in acclimatizing lowlanders and high altitude natives

    Lundby, Carsten; Sander, Mikael; van Hall, Gerrit;

    2006-01-01

    The tight relation between arterial oxygen content and maximum oxygen uptake (Vv(o2max)within a given person at sea level is diminished with altitude acclimatization. An explanation often suggested for this mismatch is impairment of the muscle O(2) extraction capacity with chronic hypoxia, and is...... the focus of the present study. We have studied six lowlanders during maximal exercise at sea level (SL) and with acute (AH) exposure to 4,100 m altitude, and again after 2 (W2) and 8 weeks (W8) of altitude sojourn, where also eight high altitude native (Nat) Aymaras were studied. Fractional arterial...... muscle O(2) extraction at maximal exercise was 90.0+/-1.0% in the Danish lowlanders at sea level, and remained close to this value in all situations. In contrast to this, fractional arterial O(2) extraction was 83.2+/-2.8% in the high altitude natives, and did not change with the induction of normoxia...

  15. Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

    Turhan San; Senol Polat; Cemal Cingi; Gorkem Eskiizmir; Fatih Oghan; Burak Cakir

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude (HA) environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ven...

  16. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment wa...

  17. High Altitude and Intracardiac Devices(Pacemaker and Intracardiac Defibrillator andCardiac Resynchronisation Therapy)

    Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Yıldız, Banu Şahin; Yıldız, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular system responds to high altitude short after exposure. Hypoxia induces increase in heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. This may have clinical implications in patients with underlying heart disease such as coronary artery disease, heart failure and rhythm disorders. Past studies have showed that patients may experience altitude-induced arrhythmias. However, there are conflicting data for patients with cardiac devices such as permanent pacemaker, intracardia...

  18. The role of oxygen-increased respirator in humans ascending to high altitude

    Shen Guanghao; Xie Kangning; Yan Yili; Jing Da; Tang Chi; Wu Xiaoming; Liu Juan; Sun Tao; Zhang Jianbao; Luo Erping

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is common for people who live in low altitude areas ascending to the high altitude. Many instruments have been developed to treat mild cases of AMS. However, long-lasting and portable anti-hypoxia equipment for individual is not yet available. Methods Oxygen-increased respirator (OIR) has been designed to reduce the risk of acute mountain sickness in acute exposure to low air pressure. It can increase the density of oxygen by increasing total ...

  19. Acetazolamide pre-treatment before ascending to high altitudes: when to start?

    Burtscher, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is the main responsible factor initiating the symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) in susceptible individuals. Measures that improve oxygenation and/or hasten acclimatization like pre-treatment with acetazolamide will prevent the development of AMS. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with acetazolamide the day before arrival at high altitude would elicit improved oxygenation compared to placebo not until the second day of high-altitude exposure. Fifteen study participants were ra...

  20. Non-high altitude methods for rapid screening of susceptibility to acute mountain sickness

    Song, Han; Ke, Tao; Luo, Wen-Jing; Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute mountain sickness (AMS) refers to the cerebral abnormalities typically triggered by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude. Although AMS is not often life threatening, it can seriously impact health quality and decrease productivity. Thus, detection of potential susceptibility to AMS has become important for people arriving at high-altitude plateaus for the first time, including laborers and military staff. The aim of this review was to examine techniques which effici...

  1. Heart rate and respiratory rhythm dynamics on ascent to high altitude.

    Lipsitz, L.A.; Hashimoto, F; Lubowsky, L. P.; Mietus, J.; Moody, G.B.; Appenzeller, O.; Goldberger, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alterations in autonomic control of heart rate at high altitude and to test the hypothesis that hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude induces non-linear, periodic heart rate oscillations, similar to those seen in heart failure and the sleep apnoea syndrome. SUBJECTS--11 healthy subjects aged 24-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram records obtained at baseline (1524 m) and at 4700 m. Simultaneous heart rate and respiratory d...

  2. Acetazolamide pre-treatment before ascending to high altitudes: when to start?

    Burtscher, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is the main responsible factor initiating the symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) in susceptible individuals. Measures that improve oxygenation and/or hasten acclimatization like pre-treatment with acetazolamide will prevent the development of AMS. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with acetazolamide the day before arrival at high altitude would elicit improved oxygenation compared to placebo not until the second day of high-altitude exposure. Fifteen study participants were randomly assigned in a double blind fashion to receive placebo or acetazolamide (2 × 125 mg) before (10 hours and 1 hour) exposure to high altitude (Monte Rosa plateau, 3480 m). Beside AMS scoring, heart rate, minute ventilation, and blood gas analyses were performed during rest and submaximal exercise at low altitude and on day 1, 2 and 3 at high altitude. From low altitude to day 1 at high altitude changes of pH (7.41 ± 0.01 vs. 7.48 ± 0.04) and HCO3 (24.0 ± 0.46 vs. 24.6 ± 2.6 mmol/L) within the placebo group differed significantly from those within the acetazolamide group (7.41 ± 0.01 vs. 7.41 ± 0.02; 23.6 ± 0.38 vs. 20.7 ± 1.8 mmol/L) (P effect on AMS development. PMID:25550957

  3. Time-varying signal analysis to detect high-altitude periodic breathing in climbers ascending to extreme altitude.

    Garde, A; Giraldo, B F; Jané, R; Latshang, T D; Turk, A J; Hess, T; Bosch, M M; Barthelmes, D; Merz, T M; Hefti, J Pichler; Schoch, O D; Bloch, K E

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the performance of cardiorespiratory analysis detecting periodic breathing (PB) in chest wall recordings in mountaineers climbing to extreme altitude. The breathing patterns of 34 mountaineers were monitored unobtrusively by inductance plethysmography, ECG and pulse oximetry using a portable recorder during climbs at altitudes between 4497 and 7546 m on Mt. Muztagh Ata. The minute ventilation (VE) and heart rate (HR) signals were studied, to identify visually scored PB, applying time-varying spectral, coherence and entropy analysis. In 411 climbing periods, 30-120 min in duration, high values of mean power (MP(VE)) and slope (MSlope(VE)) of the modulation frequency band of VE, accurately identified PB, with an area under the ROC curve of 88 and 89%, respectively. Prolonged stay at altitude was associated with an increase in PB. During PB episodes, higher peak power of ventilatory (MP(VE)) and cardiac (MP(LF)(HR) ) oscillations and cardiorespiratory coherence (MP(LF)(Coher)), but reduced ventilation entropy (SampEn(VE)), was observed. Therefore, the characterization of cardiorespiratory dynamics by the analysis of VE and HR signals accurately identifies PB and effects of altitude acclimatization, providing promising tools for investigating physiologic effects of environmental exposures and diseases. PMID:25820153

  4. Changes in maximal double poling performance during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    Höög, Martina; Jensen, Kurt; Willis, Sarah; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2014, the Olympic cross-country ski competitions will be held in Sochi, Russia at approximately 1500m altitude. Even moderate altitude can have negative effects on performance in highly trained endurance athletes and individuals may adapt and react differently to altitude exposure...... trained elite skiers seems to be less affected by moderate altitude indicating a greater dependence of the anaerobic energy system during upper body exercise. REFERENCES 1. Chapman, R.F., et al Journal of applied physiology, 1998. 85: p. 1448-1456. 2. Ainegren, M., et al . Engineering of Sport 7, Vol 2...

  5. Rocket Engine Altitude Simulation Technologies

    Woods, Jody L.; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center is embarking on a very ambitious era in its rocket engine propulsion test history. The first new large rocket engine test stand to be built at Stennis Space Center in over 40 years is under construction. The new A3 Test Stand is designed to test very large (294,000 Ibf thrust) cryogenic propellant rocket engines at a simulated altitude of 100,000 feet. A3 Test Stand will have an engine testing chamber where the engine will be fired after the air in the chamber has been evacuated to a pressure at the simulated altitude of less than 0.16 PSIA. This will result in a very unique environment with extremely low pressures inside a very large chamber and ambient pressures outside this chamber. The test chamber is evacuated of air using a 2-stage diffuser / ejector system powered by 5000 lb/sec of steam produced by 27 chemical steam generators. This large amount of power and flow during an engine test will result in a significant acoustic and vibrational environment in and around A3 Test Stand.

  6. Radiation doses at high altitudes and during space flights

    There are three main sources of radiation exposure during space flights and at high altitudes--galactic cosmic radiation, solar cosmic radiation and radiation of the earth's radiation belt. Their basic characteristics are presented in the first part of this paper.Man's exposure during space flights is discussed in the second part of the paper. Particular attention is devoted to the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiation exposure on near-earth orbits: both theoretical estimation as well as experimental data are presented. Some remarks on radiation protection rules on-board space vehicles are also given.The problems connected with the radiation protection of air crew and passengers of subsonic and supersonic air transport are discussed in the last part of the paper. General characteristics of on-board radiation fields and their variations with flight altitude, geomagnetic parameters of a flight and the solar activity are presented, both based on theoretical estimates and experimental studies. The questions concerning air crew and passenger radiation protection arising after the publication of ICRP 60 recommendation are also discussed. Activities of different institutions relevant to the topic are mentioned; strategies to manage and check this type of radiation exposure are presented and discussed. Examples of results based on the author's personal experience are given, analyzed and discussed. (author)

  7. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sens...

  8. Dosimetry at aviation altitudes (2006-2008)

    Based upon the European Union (EU)-Directive 96/29/EURATOM, legal regulations on the radiation protection of aircrew had to be implemented into the corresponding national law within the member states of the EU by 13 May 2000. In Article 42 the directive stipulates, among other things, that the exposure of the crew concerned shall be assessed. This requirement has been implemented by dose calculations for most aircrew members in the EU. Some airlines and research institutes regularly spot check the calculated doses by measuring flights. The solar minimum is a time period of particular interest since the dose rates at aviation altitudes reach their maximum within the 11-year solar cycle. For this reason, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) performed repeated measuring flights in cooperation with several German airlines during the past solar minimum from March 2006 to August 2008. The measuring devices used consisted of a tissue equivalent proportional counter, various types of Liulin semiconductor detectors and several bubble detectors. (authors)

  9. Aspirated Compressors for High Altitude Engines Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences proposes to incorporate aspirated compressor technology into a high altitude, long endurance (HALE) concept engine. Aspiration has been...

  10. Fire Fighting from High Altitude

    Cobleigh, Brent; Ambrosia, Vince

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on high altitude fire fighting is shown. The topics include: 1) Yellowstone Fire - 1988; 2) 2006 Western States Fire Mission Over-View; 3) AMS-Wildfire Scanner; 4) October 24-25 Mission: Yosemite NP and NF; 5) October 24-25 Mission MODIS Overpass; 6) October 24-25 Mission Highlights; 7) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire, California; 8) Response to the Esperanza Fire in Southern California -- Timeline Oct 27-29 2006; 9) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Flight Routing; 10) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Over-Flights; 11) October 28-29 Mission Highlights; 12) Results from the Esperanza Fire Response; 13) 2007 Western States Fire Mission; and 14) Western States UAS Fire Mission 2007

  11. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia.

    Carr, Amelia J; Saunders, Philo U; Vallance, Brent S; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Gore, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities) on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10) or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night(-1) at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8). A control group (CON; n = 10) lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p night (p = 0.03) and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006) after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m) combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m) as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass. Key pointsIn some countries, it may not be possible to perform classical altitude training effectively, due to the low elevation at altitude training venues. An additional hypoxic stimulus can be provided by simulating higher altitudes overnight, using altitude tents.Three weeks of combined (living and training at 1380 m) and simulated altitude exposure (at 3000 m) can improve haemoglobin mass by over 3% in comparison to control values, and can also improve time to exhaustion by ~9% in comparison to baseline.We recommend that, in the context of an altitude training camp at low altitudes (~1400 m) the addition of a relatively short

  12. Physiological aspects of altitude training and the use of altitude simulators

    Ranković Goran; Radovanović Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Altitude training in various forms is widely practiced by athletes and coaches in an attempt to improve sea level endurance. Training at high altitude may improve performance at sea level through altitude acclimatization, which improves oxygen transport and/or utilization, or through hypoxia, which intensifies the training stimulus. This basic physiological aspect allows three training modalities: live high and train high (classic high-altitude training), live low and train high (training thr...

  13. Altitude as handicap in rank-order football tournaments

    Fawaz, Yarine; Casas, Agustin

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, based on medical reports, FIFA ruled that no international football competition could be played in stadiums with an altitude higher than 2500 meters. We provide stark evidence which supports the claim that playing in high altitude benefits the home team through two channels. First, in these scenarios, high altitude teams (HAT) do better against low altitude teams than against other high altitude teams. Second, every time that low altitude teams visit other high altitude teams they ge...

  14. Remote ischemic preconditioning for prevention of high-altitude diseases: fact or fiction?

    Berger, Marc Moritz; Macholz, Franziska; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Bärtsch, Peter

    2015-11-15

    Preconditioning refers to exposure to brief episodes of potentially adverse stimuli and protects against injury during subsequent exposures. This was first described in the heart, where episodes of ischemia/reperfusion render the myocardium resistant to subsequent ischemic injury, which is likely caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory processes. Protection of the heart was also found when preconditioning was performed in an organ different from the target, which is called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). The mechanisms causing protection seem to include stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, increase in antioxidant enzymes, and downregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. These pathways are also thought to play a role in high-altitude diseases: high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is associated with decreased bioavailability of NO and increased generation of ROS, whereas mechanisms causing acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) seem to involve cytotoxic effects by ROS and inflammation. Based on these apparent similarities between ischemic damage and AMS, HACE, and HAPE, it is reasonable to assume that RIPC might be protective and improve altitude tolerance. In studies addressing high-altitude/hypoxia tolerance, RIPC has been shown to decrease pulmonary arterial systolic pressure in normobaric hypoxia (13% O2) and at high altitude (4,342 m). Our own results indicate that RIPC transiently decreases the severity of AMS at 12% O2. Thus preliminary studies show some benefit, but clearly, further experiments to establish the efficacy and potential mechanism of RIPC are needed. PMID:26089545

  15. The re-establishment of the normal blood lactate response to exercise in humans after prolonged acclimatization to altitude

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Calbet, J A; Søndergaard, H; Saltin, B

    1. One to five weeks of chronic exposure to hypoxia has been shown to reduce peak blood lactate concentration compared to acute exposure to hypoxia during exercise, the high altitude 'lactate paradox'. However, we hypothesize that a sufficiently long exposure to hypoxia would result in a blood...... lowlanders acclimatized for 9 weeks to an altitude of 5260 m, the arterial lactate concentration was similar at 0 m acute hypoxia and 5260 m chronic hypoxia. The net lactate release from the active leg was higher at 5260 m chronic hypoxia compared to 0 m acute hypoxia, implying an enhanced lactate...... utilization with prolonged acclimatization to altitude. The present study clearly shows the absence of a lactate paradox in lowlanders sufficiently acclimatized to altitude....

  16. Jupiter's High-Altitude Clouds

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) snapped this incredibly detailed picture of Jupiter's high-altitude clouds starting at 06:00 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, when the spacecraft was only 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from the solar system's largest planet. Features as small as 50 kilometers (30 miles) are visible. The image was taken through a narrow filter centered on a methane absorption band near 890 nanometers, a considerably redder wavelength than what the eye can see. Images taken through this filter preferentially pick out clouds that are relatively high in the sky of this gas giant planet because sunlight at the wavelengths transmitted by the filter is completely absorbed by the methane gas that permeates Jupiter's atmosphere before it can reach the lower clouds. The image reveals a range of diverse features. The south pole is capped with a haze of small particles probably created by the precipitation of charged particles into the polar regions during auroral activity. Just north of the cap is a well-formed anticyclonic vortex with rising white thunderheads at its core. Slightly north of the vortex are the tendrils of some rather disorganized storms and more pinpoint-like thunderheads. The dark 'measles' that appear a bit farther north are actually cloud-free regions where light is completely absorbed by the methane gas and essentially disappears from view. The wind action considerably picks up in the equatorial regions where giant plumes are stretched into a long wave pattern. Proceeding north of the equator, cirrus-like clouds are shredded by winds reaching speeds of up to 400 miles per hour, and more pinpoint-like thunderheads are visible. Although some of the famous belt and zone structure of Jupiter's atmosphere is washed out when viewed at this wavelength, the relatively thin North Temperate Belt shows up quite nicely, as does a series of waves just north of the belt. The north polar region of Jupiter in

  17. High altitude aircraft flight tests

    Helmken, Henry; Emmons, Peter; Homeyer, David

    1996-03-01

    In order to make low earth orbit L-band propagation measurements and test new voice communication concepts, a payload was proposed and accepted for flight aboard the COMET (now METEOR) spacecraft. This Low Earth Orbiting EXperiment payload (LEOEX) was designed and developed by Motorola Inc. and sponsored by the Space Communications Technology Center (SCTC), a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) located at Florida Atlantic University. In order to verify the LEOEX payload for satellite operation and obtain some preliminary propagation data, a series of 9 high altitude aircraft (SR-71 and ER-2) flight tests were conducted. These flights took place during a period of 7 months, from October 1993 to April 1994. This paper will summarize the operation of the LEOEX payload and the particular configuration used for these flights. The series of flyby tests were very successful and demonstrated how bi-directional, Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) voice communication will work in space-to-ground L-band channels. The flight tests also acquired propagation data which will be representative of L-band Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) communication systems. In addition to verifying the LEOEX system operation, it also uncovered and ultimately aided the resolution of several key technical issues associated with the payload.

  18. Haematological Studies in High Altitude Natives at Plains and on Return to High Altitude

    S. C. Jain

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available Haematologic studies were carried out in 20 high altitude natives during two months stay at plains (200 m and on their return to an altitude of 3,500 m. Haemoglobin, erythrocyte count, haematocrit and reticulocyte count decreased rapidly on arrival to plains and attained minimum level by the end of fourth week. All these parameters increased rapidly on return to high altitude and were found to attain maximum values by 23rd day on return to high altitude. Mean cell volume and mean cell haemoglobin showed significant increase at altitude. Blood volume and red cell mass increased significantly at altitude. It is concluded that the high altitude natives of Ladakh were well adapted to hypoxic environment due to normocythaemic hypervolemia.

  19. Heart rate and respiratory rhythm dynamics on ascent to high altitude

    Lipsitz, L. A.; Hashimoto, F.; Lubowsky, L. P.; Mietus, J.; Moody, G. B.; Appenzeller, O.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the alterations in autonomic control of heart rate at high altitude and to test the hypothesis that hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude induces non-linear, periodic heart rate oscillations, similar to those seen in heart failure and the sleep apnoea syndrome. SUBJECTS--11 healthy subjects aged 24-64. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiogram records obtained at baseline (1524 m) and at 4700 m. Simultaneous heart rate and respiratory dynamics during 2.5 hours of sleep by fast Fourier transform analysis of beat to beat heart rate and of an electrocardiographically derived respiration signal. RESULTS--All subjects had resting hypoxaemia at high altitude, with an average oxyhaemoglobin saturation of 81% (5%). There was no significant change in mean heart rate, but low frequency (0.01-0.05 Hz) spectral power was increased (P high altitude. Time series analysis showed a complex range of non-linear sinus rhythm dynamics. Striking low frequency (0.04-0.06 Hz) heart rate oscillations were observed during sleep in eight subjects at high altitude. Analysis of the electrocardiographically derived respiration signal indicated that these heart rate oscillations correlated with low frequency respiratory oscillations. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest (a) that increased low frequency power during high altitude exposure is not simply attributable to increased sympathetic modulation of heart rate, but relates to distinctive cardiopulmonary oscillations at approximately 0.05 Hz and (b) that the emergence of periodic heart rate oscillations at high altitude is consistent with an unstable cardiopulmonary control system that may develop on acute exposure to hypoxaemic stress.

  20. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) as environmental risk factors in remote high-altitude ecosystems.

    Kallenborn, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and their transformation products, are the most investigated organic environmental contaminants within the past five decades. Organochlorines have been found in virtually all environmental compartments on the globe. Severe environmental implications have been shown to be associated with the presence of the POP group of contaminants in the environment. However, in the late 1990s, Canadian scientists first pinpointed the implication of POPs for high-altitude environments in a comprehensive way (Blais et al., 1998, Nature 395, 585-588). Under certain meteorological and geographic conditions, high-altitude environments can serve as "cold condensers" for atmospheric POP loadings. Subsequent investigations in high-altitude environments in Asia, Europe, and North and South America have confirmed suspicions that high-altitude mountainous regions have the potential to serve as focus regions for POPs and even for nonpersistent, medium-lived contaminants, such as "currently used pesticides", due to cold condensation and deposition in high altitudes. Although the presence and the altitude-dependent increase of POP levels in mountainous regions are confirmed by many international studies, the ecotoxicological consequences still remain largely unknown. At present, only a few studies have been published describing the biological effects in high-altitude environments due to increased POP exposure. Therefore, in this early stage of the international research effort on the ecotoxicological risk evaluation of persistent contaminants in high-altitude, pristine ecosystems, the present review intends to summarize the current state of research on POPs in high-altitude environments and draw preliminary conclusions on possible consequences of the presence of POPs in mountainous ecosystems based on currently available information from alpine and related Arctic environments. PMID:16399161

  1. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  2. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  3. [Sildenafil and exercise performance at altitude].

    Peidro, Roberto M

    2015-01-01

    Barometric pressure and partial oxygen pressure decrease with increasing altitude. Hypobaric hypoxia produced is responsible for altitude-related diseases and it can cause severe decrements in exercise performance. The physiological adaptations to the altitude are multiple and they contribute to alter different athletic qualities. The VO2 worsening could be associated to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and nitric oxide diffusion alteration. Performance impairments at altitude can also be accentuated by hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of sildenafil on the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. These effects have led to suggest that its indication for competitions at altitude might improve athletic performance. The investigations demonstrate different results depending on the altitude level and times and intensities of exercise. Some studies show performance improvements, although not in all participants. Individual responses vary widely between different athletes. This presentation examines the effects of altitude on exercise capacity and shows studies about the use of sildenafil to improve sport performance. This text also discusses the possible side effects and implications for the use of sildenafil in athletes, indication that is not the basic one of the drug. The physicians must know in each athlete the individual sildenafil side effects that could arise and that would influence negatively on health and performance. PMID:26339884

  4. High-Altitude Hydration System

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  5. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    Smedley, Tom; Grocott, Michael PW

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk fa...

  6. Renin and aldosterone at high altitude in man.

    Keynes, R J; Smith, G W; Slater, J D; Brown, M M; Brown, S E; Payne, N N; Jowett, T P; Monge, C C

    1982-01-01

    Measurements have been made of hormonal changes relevant to salt and water balance during prolonged exposure to hypoxia to improve our understanding of the syndrome of acute mountain sickness. We have attempted to delineate the detailed inter-relationships between the renin-aldosterone and the vasopressin systems by a metabolically controlled study, involving an orthostatic stress (45 degrees head-up tilt) and an injection of a standard dose of ACTH to test adrenal responsiveness. Three Caucasian medical students underwent a 7-day equilibration at 150 m (Lima, Peru), followed by a 6-day sojourn at 4350 m (Cerro de Pasco, Peru) and a final 7 days at 150 m. Measurements were made of sodium and potassium balance, body weight and the 24-h renal excretion of vasopressin, cortisol and aldosterone 18-glucuronide. These variables showed little change, except for that of aldosterone 18-glucuronide, which fell sharply at altitude and rebounded even more sharply on return to sea level. At altitude, basal plasma levels of renin activity and aldosterone fell, and the response to orthostasis was attenuated, but the fall of plasma renin activity, as compared to plasma aldosterone, was delayed; on return to sea level this dissociation was exacerbated with the return of normal renin responsiveness lagging behind that of aldosterone. We suggest that unknown factors which dissociate the orthodox renin-aldosterone relationship, other than the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme, are operative on exposure to hypoxia. PMID:7057120

  7. Radiation doses at high altitudes and during space flights

    There are three main sources of the radiation exposure during space flight and at high altitudes: galactic cosmic radiation; solar cosmic radiation; and the radiation of Earth's radiation belts. The first is coming to the Earth's surroundings from the deep cosmos, the second from the Sun. Two radiation belts are centered at thousands of km from the Earth's surface. All the three sources are briefly characterized to give a general idea on their composition, their variations over time and the level of exposure due to them. Radiation doses during space flights will be discussed in the second part of the invited paper, including the possible radiation barriers of long time space exploration missions. Particular attention will be devoted to the quantitative and qualitative characterization of radiation exposure on near-Earth orbits, both theoretical estimation as well as experimental data will be presented. Some remarks on radiation protection philosophy on the board of space vehicles will be also given. The problems concerning the radiation protection of air crew and passengers of subsonic and supersonic air transport will be discussed in the last part of the lecture. General characteristics of on-board radiation fields and their variations with the flight altitude, geomagnetic parameters of a flight and the solar activity will be presented, both based on the theoretical estimation and experimental studies. The questions concerning of aircrew and passengers radiation protection arising after the publication of ICRP 60 recommendations will be also arisen. Activities of different international bodies in this field will be mentioned, the approaches how to manage and check this type of radiation exposure will be presented and discussed. Some examples based on the author's personal experience will be given. (author)

  8. Long-term stay at low altitude (1,200 m) promotes better hypoxia adaptation and performance.

    Singh, Krishan; Gupta, R K; Soree, Poonam; Rai, Lokesh; Himashree, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia is known to decrease physical performance. The exercise performance increases during moderate altitude training (2000-3000 m) but benefits are overshadowed by adverse effect associated with hypoxia. Therefore, the study was designed to address whether low altitude of 1200 m could increase exercise performance without any adverse effects and a correlation with stay period (stay > 6 month) was optimized. In the present study residents of lower altitude (1200 m altitude) (LA) and sea level (SL) residents were subjected to sub-maximal exercise test and their exercise response in terms of post-exercise heart rate and change in oxygen saturation was compared. Post-exercise peak heart rate (129.89 ± 13.42 vs 146.00 ± 11.81, p exercise had a significant fall (95.3 ± 2.26% vs 98 ± 0% p exercise response and hematological benefit compared to sea level residents. PMID:26215004

  9. High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory conducted the High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project in the mid 1960s with the intention of better understanding air...

  10. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke.

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  11. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  12. Does high altitude increase risks of the elderly patients with coronary artery disease?

    Tian-Yi Wu; Zhong-Yan Zhan; Qin-Li Wu; Suo-Lung Baomu; Yu-Ling Jie; Min Sun

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of altitude hypoxia on the elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Three subject groups were surveyed during their train trip on the highest railroad--the Qinghai-Tibet Railway: 22 elderly individuals with documented CAD, 20 healthy elderly controls, and 20 healthy young controls, all of whom from Beijing near the sea level (76 m). Survey questions addressed clinical features of their healthy conditions and aspects of their coronary disease. The baseline study was performed at Xining at an altitude of 2261 m, and then during acute exposure to altitudes of 2808 m, 4768m, 5072 m and 4257 m by train for 24 hours. Resting pulse rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiograph (ECG), and cardiac work estimated by the heart rate-blood pressure double product were obtained five times in each subject at different altitudes. Results On arrival to altitudes between 4768 m and 5072 m, the older passengers, especially those with preexisting coronary disease, had higher HR, higher BP, and lower SaO2, as well as more frequent abnormalities on ECG, as compared to the younger healthy subjects. As compared with the healthy elderly controls, incomplete right bundle branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy, and ST segment depression were more frequently seen in the elderly coronary patients (P<0.01). Cardiac work in group 1 was increased by 13% 12 hours after arrival to altitudes between 2808 m and 5072 m. Oxygen saturation decreased significantly with the altitude increasing by train ascent but improved after inhalation of oxygen. Most of the older subjects tolerated their sojourn at high altitude well except one who developed angina repeatedly with a significant ST segment depression. Conclusions Coronary events and ECG signs of myocardial ischemia are rare in elderly individuals with CAD who travel from sea level to moderate altitudes of 1500m to 2800 m. Patients with CAD who are well compensated at sea level

  13. Considerations for resuscitation at high altitude in elderly and untrained populations and rescuers.

    Suto, Takashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    With the development of transportation technologies, elderly people with chronic diseases are increasingly enjoying trekking and tours of nature resorts that include mountain highlands. Because of problems related to circulation, respiration, metabolism, and/or the musculoskeletal system in this population, the impact of high altitude on cardiopulmonary function is increased. Alpine accidents, therefore, tend to be more common in this population, and cases of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at high altitudes seem to be increasing. However, relatively few studies have described cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at high altitudes. Although insufficient studies are available to standardize CPR guidelines at high altitude at this time, the aim of this review is to summarize previous studies relevant to physiologic changes after exposure to high-altitude environments and exercise, which may be a risk factor for CPA in elderly trekkers. In addition, we summarize our previous studies that described the effect of CPR procedures on cardiopulmonary function in untrained rescuers. The available data suggest that prolonged CPR at high altitudes requires strenuous work from rescuers and negatively affects their cardiopulmonary physics and subjectively measured fatigue. Alpine rescue teams should therefore be well prepared for their increased physical burden and difficult conditions. Elderly travelers should be made aware of their increased risk of CPA in alpine settings. The use of mechanical devices to assist CPR should be considered wherever possible. PMID:24388065

  14. Airway responses to methacholine and exercise at high altitude in healthy lowlanders.

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Pompilio, Pasquale; Quaranta, Marco; Aliverti, Andrea; Kayser, Bengt; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Fasano, Valter; Cogo, Annalisa; Milanese, Manlio; Cornara, Giuseppe; Brusasco, Vito; Dellacà, Raffaele

    2010-02-01

    Peribronchial edema has been proposed as a mechanism enhancing airway responses to constrictor stimuli. Acute exposure to altitude in nonacclimatized lowlanders leads to subclinical interstitial pulmonary edema that lasts for several days after ascent, as suggested by changes in lung mechanics. We, therefore, investigated whether changes in lung mechanics consistent with fluid accumulation at high altitude within the lungs are associated with changes in airway responses to methacholine or exercise. Fourteen healthy subjects were studied at 4,559 and at 120 m above sea level. At high altitude, both static and dynamic lung compliances and respiratory reactance at 5 Hz significantly decreased, suggestive of interstitial pulmonary edema. Resting minute ventilation significantly increased by approximately 30%. Compared with sea level, inhalation of methacholine at high altitude caused a similar reduction of partial forced expiratory flow but less reduction of maximal forced expiratory flow, less increments of pulmonary resistance and respiratory resistance at 5 Hz, and similar effects of deep breath on pulmonary and respiratory resistance. During maximal incremental exercise at high altitude, partial forced expiratory flow gradually increased with the increase in minute ventilation similarly to sea level but both achieved higher values at peak exercise. In conclusion, airway responsiveness to methacholine at high altitude is well preserved despite the occurrence of interstitial pulmonary edema. We suggest that this may be the result of the increase in resting minute ventilation opposing the effects and/or the development of airway smooth muscle force, reduced gas density, and well preserved airway-to-parenchyma interdependence. PMID:19940099

  15. Physiological aspects of altitude training and the use of altitude simulators

    Ranković Goran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Altitude training in various forms is widely practiced by athletes and coaches in an attempt to improve sea level endurance. Training at high altitude may improve performance at sea level through altitude acclimatization, which improves oxygen transport and/or utilization, or through hypoxia, which intensifies the training stimulus. This basic physiological aspect allows three training modalities: live high and train high (classic high-altitude training, live low and train high (training through hypoxia, and live high and train low (the new trend. In an effort to reduce the financial and logistical challenges of traveling to high-altitude training sites, scientists and manufactures have developed artificial high-altitude environments, which simulate the hypoxic conditions of moderate altitude (2000-3000 meters. Endurance athletes from many sports have recently started using nitrogen environments, or hypoxic rooms and tents as part of their altitude training programmes. The results of controlled studies on these modalities of high-altitude training, their practical approach, and ethics are summarized.

  16. Haematological Studies in High Altitude Natives at Plains and on Return to High Altitude

    Jain, S C; H. M. Divekar; Jaya Bardhan; R S Sharma; Swamy, Y. V.

    1988-01-01

    Haematologic studies were carried out in 20 high altitude natives during two months stay at plains (200 m) and on their return to an altitude of 3,500 m. Haemoglobin, erythrocyte count, haematocrit and reticulocyte count decreased rapidly on arrival to plains and attained minimum level by the end of fourth week. All these parameters increased rapidly on return to high altitude and were found to attain maximum values by 23rd day on return to high altitude. Mean cell volume and mean cell haemog...

  17. Comparative study of acetazolamide and spironolactone on body fluid compartments on induction to high altitude

    Singh, M. V.; Jain, S. C.; Rawal, S. B.; Divekar, H. M.; Parshad, Rajinder; Tyagi, A. K.; Sinha, K. C.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were conducted on 29 male healthy subjects having no previous experience of living at high altitude. These subjects were divided into three groups, i.e., subjects treated with placebo, acetazolamide and spironolactone. These subjects were first studied in Delhi. The drug schedule was started 24 hour prior to the airlift of these subjects to an altitude of 3,500 m and was continued for 48 hour after arrival at high altitude. Total body water, extra cellular water, plasma volume, blood electrolytes, pH, pO2, pCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on 3rd and 12th day of their stay at high altitude. Total body water, extra cellular water intracellular water and plasma volume decreased on high altitude exposure. There was a further slight decrease in these compartments with acetazolamide and spironolactone. It was also observed that spironolactone drives out more water from the extracellular compartment. Loss of plasma water was also confirmed by increased plasma osmolality. Increase in arterial blood pH was noticed on hypoxic exposure but the increase was found less in acetazolamide and spironolactone cases. This decrease in pH is expected to result in better oxygen delivery to the tissues at the low oxygen tension. It was also confirmed because blood pO2 increased in both the groups. No significant change in plasma electrolytes was observed in subjects of various groups. Blood viscosity slightly increased on exposure to high altitude. The degree of rise was found less in the group treated with spironolactone. This study suggests that both the drugs are likely to be beneficial in ameliorating/prevention of AMS syndrome.

  18. Effect of altitude on solar UVR and spectral and spatial variations of UV irradiances measured inWagrain, Austria in winter

    Baczynska, Katarzyna A; Pearson, Andy J; O'Hagan, John B;

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation spectral irradiance was measured at different altitudes on horizontal and tilted planes in different azimuth directions on cloudless days in Austria, in March 2010, within the Impact of Climatic and Environmental factors on Personal Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure project...

  19. Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudes

    Watanabe, S.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Kakinami, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Neutral Wind Observations below 200 km altitudesS. Watanabe1, T. Abe2, H. Habu2, Y. Kakinami3, M. Larsen4, R. Pfaff5, M. Yamamoto6, M-Y. Yamamoto31Hokkaido University/Hokkaido Information University, 2JAXA/ISAS, 3Kochi University of Technology, 4Clemson University, 5NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, 6Kyoto University, Neutral wind in the thermosphere is one of the key parameters to understand the ionosphere-thermosphere coupling process. JAXA/ISAS successfully launched sounding rockets from Uchinoura Space Center (USC) on September 2, 2007, January 12, 2012, and July 20, 2013, and NASA launched sounding rockets from Kwajalein on May 7, 2013 and from Wallops on July 4, 2013. The rockets installed Lithium and/or TMA canisters as well as instruments for plasma and electric and magnetic fields. The atomic Lithium gases were released at altitudes between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on September 2, 2007, at altitude of ~100 km in the morning on January 12, 2012, at altitude of ~120km in the midnight on July 20, 2013, at altitude between 150 km and 300 km in the evening on May 7, 2013 and at altitude of ~150 km in the noon on July 4, 2013. The Lithium atoms were scattering sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670nm. However, the Lithium atoms scattered moon light on July 20, 2013. The moon light scattering is the first time to use for thermospheric wind measurement in the midnight. The Lithium clouds/trails and TMA trails showed clearly the neutral wind shears and atmospheric waves at ~150 km altitude in the lower thermosphere for all local time.

  20. An Undergraduate-Built Prototype Altitude Determination System (PADS) for High Altitude Research Balloons.

    Verner, E.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Abot, J.; Casarotto, V.; Dichoso, J.; Doody, E.; Esteves, F.; Morsch Filho, E.; Gonteski, D.; Lamos, M.; Leo, A.; Mulder, N.; Matubara, F.; Schramm, P.; Silva, R.; Quisberth, J.; Uritsky, G.; Kogut, A.; Lowe, L.; Mirel, P.; Lazear, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this project a multi-disciplinary undergraduate team from CUA, comprising majors in Physics, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Biology, design, build, test, fly, and analyze the data from a prototype attitude determination system (PADS). The goal of the experiment is to determine if an inexpensive attitude determination system could be built for high altitude research balloons using MEMS gyros. PADS is a NASA funded project, built by students with the cooperation of CUA faculty, Verner, Bruhweiler, and Abot, along with the contributed expertise of researchers and engineers at NASA/GSFC, Kogut, Lowe, Mirel, and Lazear. The project was initiated through a course taught in CUA's School of Engineering, which was followed by a devoted effort by students during the summer of 2014. The project is an experiment to use 18 MEMS gyros, similar to those used in many smartphones, to produce an averaged positional error signal that could be compared with the motion of the fixed optical system as recorded through a string of optical images of stellar fields to be stored on a hard drive flown with the experiment. The optical system, camera microprocessor, and hard drive are enclosed in a pressure vessel, which maintains approximately atmospheric pressure throughout the balloon flight. The experiment uses multiple microprocessors to control the camera exposures, record gyro data, and provide thermal control. CUA students also participated in NASA-led design reviews. Four students traveled to NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas to integrate PADS into a large balloon gondola containing other experiments, before being shipped, then launched in mid-August at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. The payload is to fly at a float altitude of 40-45,000 m, and the flight last approximately 15 hours. The payload is to return to earth by parachute and the retrieved data are to be analyzed by CUA undergraduates. A description of the instrument is presented

  1. The effect of chronic erythrocytic polycythemia and high altitude upon plasma and blood volumes.

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of two kinds of physiological chronic erythrocytic polycythemias in order to differentiate the specific effect of erythrocytic polycythemia from the general effects of high altitude upon the plasma volume. The two kinds were produced hormonally in female chickens, at sea level, or by protracted high-altitude exposures. It appears that the vascular system of the body may account for an increase in red blood cell mass either by reduction in plasma volume, or by no change in plasma volume, resulting in differential changes in total blood volumes.

  2. Reversibility of electrophysiological changes induced by chronic high-altitude hypoxia in adult rat heart.

    Chouabe, C; Amsellem, J; Espinosa, L; Ribaux, P; Blaineau, S; Mégas, P; Bonvallet, R

    2002-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that regression of left ventricular hypertrophy normalizes membrane ionic current abnormalities. This work was designed to determine whether regression of right ventricular hypertrophy induced by permanent high-altitude exposure (4,500 m, 20 days) in adult rats also normalizes changes of ventricular myocyte electrophysiology. According to the current data, prolonged action potential, decreased transient outward current density, and increased inward sodium/calcium exchange current density normalized 20 days after the end of altitude exposure, whereas right ventricular hypertrophy evidenced by both the right ventricular weight-to-heart weight ratio and the right ventricular free wall thickness measurement normalized 40 days after the end of altitude exposure. This morphological normalization occurred at both the level of muscular tissue, as shown by the decrease toward control values of some myocyte parameters (perimeter, capacitance, and width), and the level of the interstitial collagenous connective tissue. In the chronic high-altitude hypoxia model, the regression of right ventricular hypertrophy would not be a prerequisite for normalization of ventricular electrophysiological abnormalities. PMID:11893582

  3. MIBG scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic activity in response to altitude hypoxia

    High altitude hypoxia induces a decrease in the cardiac chronotropic function at maximal exercise or in response to isoproterenol infusion, suggesting an alteration in the cardiac sympathetic activation. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine [(123I]MIBG) was used to map scintigraphically the cardiac sympathetic neuronal function in six male subjects (aged 32 ± 7 yr) after an exposure to high altitude that created hypoxic conditions. Results obtained just after return to sea level (RSL) were compared with the normal values obtained after 2 or 3 mo of normoxia (N). A static image was created as the sum of the 16-EKG gated images recorded for 10 min in the anterior view of the chest at 20, 60, 120, and 240 min after injection. Regions of interest were located over the heart (H), lungs (L), and mediastinum (M) regions. There was a significant decrease in the H/M and the L/M ratios in RSL compared to N condition. Plasma norepinephrine concentration was elevated during the stay at altitude but not significantly different in RSL compared to N. In conclusion, cardiac [123I]MIBG uptake is reduced after an exposure to altitude hypoxia, supporting the hypothesis of an hypoxia-induced reduction of adrenergic neurotransmitter reserve in the myocardium. Furthermore, the observed significant decrease in pulmonary MIBG uptake suggests an alteration of endothelial cell function after exposure to chronic hypoxia

  4. The Impact of Altitude on Infant Health in South America

    Wehby, George L; Eduardo E. Castilla; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Previous Studies have reported that altitude reduces birth weight in South America. However, much remains unknown about the heterogeneities in altitude effects by fetal health endowments and about the effects in various ranges of altitude. This study estimates the effects of altitude on the means and quantiles of birth weight and gestational age separately for two large samples o...

  5. HIGH ALTITUDE TESTING OF RESIDENTIAL WOOD-FIRED COMBUSTION EQUIPMENT

    To determine whether emissions from operating a wood stove at high altitude differ from those at low altitude, a high altitude sampling program was conducted which was compared to previously collected low altitude data. Emission tests were conducted in the identical model stove u...

  6. Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea at Altitude.

    Bloch, Konrad E; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Bloch, Konrad E., Tsogyal D. Latshang, and Silvia Ulrich. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea at altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:110-116, 2015.--Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the general population, in particular in men and women of older age. In OSA patients sleeping near sea level, the apneas/hypopneas associated with intermittent hypoxemia are predominantly due to upper airway collapse. When OSA patients stay at altitudes above 1600 m, corresponding to that of many tourist destinations, hypobaric hypoxia promotes frequent central apneas in addition to obstructive events, resulting in combined intermittent and sustained hypoxia. This induces strong sympathetic activation with elevated heart rate, cardiac arrhythmia, and systemic hypertension. There are concerns that these changes expose susceptible OSA patients, in particular those with advanced age and co-morbidities, to an excessive risk of cardiovascular and other adverse events during a stay at altitude. Based on data from randomized trials, it seems advisable for OSA patients to use continuous positive airway pressure treatment with computer controlled mask pressure adjustment (autoCPAP) in combination with acetazolamide during an altitude sojourn. If CPAP therapy is not feasible, acetazolamide alone is better than no treatment at all, as it improves oxygenation and sleep apnea and prevents excessive blood pressure rises of OSA patients at altitude. PMID:25973669

  7. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  8. Radiation environment at aviation altitudes and in space

    On the Earth, protection from cosmic radiation is provided by the magnetosphere and the atmosphere, but the radiation exposure increases with increasing altitude. Aircrew and especially space crew members are therefore exposed to an increased level of ionising radiation. Dosimetry onboard aircraft and spacecraft is however complicated by the presence of neutrons and high linear energy transfer particles. Film and thermoluminescent dosimeters, routinely used for ground-based personnel, do not reliably cover the range of particle types and energies found in cosmic radiation. Further, the radiation field onboard aircraft and spacecraft is not constant; its intensity and composition change mainly with altitude, geomagnetic position and solar activity (marginally also with the aircraft/spacecraft type, number of people aboard, amount of fuel etc.). The European Union Council directive 96/29/Euroatom of 1996 specifies that air crews that could receive dose of >1 mSv y-1 must be evaluated. The dose evaluation is routinely performed by computer programs, e.g. CARI-6, EPCARD, SIEVERT, PCAire, JISCARD and AVIDOS. Such calculations should however be carefully verified and validated. Measurements of the radiation field in aircraft are thus of a great importance. A promising option is the long-term deployment of active detectors, e.g. silicon spectrometer Liulin, TEPC Hawk and pixel detector Timepix. Outside the Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetosphere, the environment is much harsher than at aviation altitudes. In addition to the exposure to high energetic ionising cosmic radiation, there are microgravity, lack of atmosphere, psychological and psychosocial components etc. The milieu is therefore very unfriendly for any living organism. In case of solar flares, exposures of spacecraft crews may even be lethal. In this paper, long-term measurements of the radiation environment onboard Czech aircraft performed with the Liulin since 2001, as well as measurements and

  9. Effects of Ascent to High Altitude on Human Antimycobacterial Immunity

    Eisen, S; Pealing, L.; Aldridge, RW; Siedner, MJ; Necochea, A.; Leybell, I.; Valencia, T; Herrera, B.; Wiles, S; Friedland, JS; Gilman, RH; Evans, CA

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis infection, disease and mortality are all less common at high than low altitude and ascent to high altitude was historically recommended for treatment. The immunological and mycobacterial mechanisms underlying the association between altitude and tuberculosis are unclear. We studied the effects of altitude on mycobacteria and antimycobacterial immunity. METHODS: Antimycobacterial immunity was assayed in 15 healthy adults residing at low altitude before and after they a...

  10. Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    The sonic thermometer is a specialized application of well-known sonic anemometer technology. Adaptations have been made to the circuit, including the addition of supporting sensors, which enable its use in the high-altitude environment and in non-air gas mixtures. There is a need to measure gas temperatures inside and outside of superpressure balloons that are flown at high altitudes. These measurements will allow the performance of the balloon to be modeled more accurately, leading to better flight performance. Small thermistors (solid-state temperature sensors) have been used for this general purpose, and for temperature measurements on radiosondes. A disadvantage to thermistors and other physical (as distinct from sonic) temperature sensors is that they are subject to solar heating errors when they are exposed to the Sun, and this leads to issues with their use in a very high-altitude environment

  11. Atmospheric electron flux at airplane altitude

    We have developed a new detector to systematically measure the cosmic-ray electron flux at airplane altitudes. We loaded a lead-glass-based electron telescope onto a commercial cargo airplane. The first experiment was carried out using the air route between Narita (Japan) and Sydney (Australia); during this flight we measured the electron flux at various altitudes and latitudes. The thresholds of the electron energies were 1, 2, and 4 GeV. The results agree with a simple estimation using one-dimensional shower theory. A comparison with a Monte Carlo calculation was made

  12. Image Positioning Accuracy Analysis for the Super Low Altitude Remote Sensing Satellite

    Ming Xu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Super low altitude remote sensing satellites maintain lower flight altitudes by means of ion propulsion in order to improve image resolution and positioning accuracy. The use of engineering data in design for achieving image positioning accuracy is discussed in this paper based on the principles of the photogrammetry theory. The exact line‐of‐sight rebuilding of each detection element and this direction precisely intersecting with the Earth’s elliptical when the camera on the satellite is imaging are both ensured by the combined design of key parameters. These parameters include: orbit determination accuracy, attitude determination accuracy, camera exposure time, accurately synchronizing the reception of ephemeris with attitude data, geometric calibration and precise orbit verification. Precise simulation calculations show that image positioning accuracy of super low altitude remote sensing satellites is not obviously improved. The attitude determination error of a satellite still restricts its positioning accuracy.

  13. EFFECT OF MODERATE ALTITUDE ON PERIPHERAL MUSCLE OXYGENATION DURING LEG RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN YOUNG MALES

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Training at moderate altitude (~1800m is often used by athletes to stimulate muscle hypoxia. However, limited date is available on peripheral muscle oxidative metabolism at this altitude (1800AL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute exposure to 1800AL alters muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis muscle during resistance exercise. Twenty young active male subjects (aged 16 - 21 yr performed up to 50 repetitions of the parallel squat at 1800AL and near sea level (SL. They performed the exercise protocol within 3 h after arrival at 1800 AL. During the exercise, the changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2, and heart rate were measured using near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (NIRcws and pulse oximetry, respectively. Changes in OxyHb were expressed by Deff defined as the relative index of the maximum change ratio (% from the resting level. OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle decreased dramatically from the resting level immediately after the start of exercise at both altitudes. The Deff during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (60.4 ± 6.2 % than at near SL (74.4 ± 7.6 %. SpO2 during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (92.0 ± 1.7 % than at near SL (96.7 ± 1.2 %. Differences (SL - 1800AL in Deff during exercise correlated fairly strongly with differences in SpO2 during exercise (r = 0.660. These results suggested that acute exposure to moderate altitude caused a more dramatical decrease in peripheral muscle oxygenation during leg resistance exercise. It is salient to note, therefore , that peripheral muscle oxygenation status at moderate altitude could be evaluated using NIRcws and that moderate altitudes might be effectively used to apply hypoxic stress on peripheral muscles.

  14. Sextant measures spacecraft altitude without gravitational reference

    1966-01-01

    Horizon-sensing sextant measures the altitude of an orbiting spacecraft without gravitational reference by optically measuring the dip angle to the horizon along a line of sight in each of two planes. The sextant scans over a relatively limited field of view.

  15. High-altitude physiology: lessons from Tibet

    Wagner, Peter D.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Wei, Guan; Wagner, Harrieth; Wuren, Tanna; Yan, Ma; Qin, Ga; Ge, Rili

    2013-05-01

    Polycythemia is a universal lowlander response to altitude; healthy Andean high-altitude natives also have elevated [Hb]. While this may enhance O2 transport to tissues, studies have shown that acute isovolumic changes in [Hb] do not affect exercise capacity. Many high-altitude Tibetans have evolved sea-level values of [Hb], providing a natural opportunity to study this issue. In 21 young healthy male Tibetans with [Hb] between 15 and 23 g/dl, we measured VO2MAX and O2 transport capacity at 4200m. VO2MAX was higher when [Hb] was lower (Phigh altitude natives remain polycythemic with larger lungs and higher lung diffusing capacity, a smaller exercising AaPO2, and lower ventilation. The challenges now are (1) to understand the different adaptive pathways used by Andeans and Tibetans, and (2) to determine in Tibetans whether, during evolution, reduced [Hb] appeared first, causing compensatory cardiac and muscle adaptations, or if enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport capacity appeared first, permitting secondary reduction in [Hb]. For (2), further research is necessary to determine the basis of enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport, and identify molecular targets of evolution in heart and muscle. Putative mutations can then be timed and compared to appearance of those affecting [Hb].

  16. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  17. Pathology of high altitude pulmonary oedema

    Objective: To describe autopsy findings in fatal cases of high altitude pulmonary oedema. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out between 1999 and 2002 at an army field medical unit in Baltistan, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi and Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Patients and Methods:Autopsies were performed in 17 fatal cases of High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) occurring among soldiers serving in Siachen. Results:All cases were males with a mean age of 26.8 years (19-35). The mean altitude at which HAPE occurred was 5192 meters (2895-6492), and the mean duration of stay at these altitudes was 15.3 days (1-30). Eleven individuals had undergone proper acclimatization. The commonest clinical findings were cough (70%), dyspnoea (53%), nausea (47%), headache (41%), vomiting (35%), chest pain (35%) and tightness in chest (24%). Cyanosis and frothy secretions in the nostrils and mouth were present in all but one case. Mean combined weight of lungs was 1470 grams (1070-1810). There was marked congestion of outer and cut surfaces. Interstitial oedema was present in all cases. RBCs and leukocyte infiltrates were seen in 13 and alveolar hyaline membranes in 9 cases. Thrombi were seen in 2 cases. Cerebral oedema was present in 9 cases. Conclusion:HAPE can occur after more than two weeks of stay at high altitudes despite proper acclimatization. Concomitant cerebral oedema is frequently present. Our autopsy findings are consistent with what has been reported previously. (author)

  18. High altitude pulmonary edema among "Amarnath Yatris"

    Parvaiz A Koul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Annual pilgrimage (Yatra to the cave shrine of Shri Amarnath Ji′ is a holy ritual among the Hindu devotees of Lord Shiva. Located in the Himalayan Mountain Range (altitude 13,000 ft in south Kashmir, the shrine is visited by thousands of devotees and altitude sickness is reportedly common. Materials and Methods: More than 600,000 pilgrims visited the cave shrine in 2011 and 2012 with 239 recorded deaths. Thirty one patients with suspected altitude sickness were referred from medical centers en-route the cave to Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, a tertiary-care center in capital Srinagar (5,000 ft. The clinical features and the response to treatment were recorded. Results: Thirty-one patients (all lowlanders, 19 male; age 18-60 years, median 41 had presented with acute onset breathlessness of 1-4 days (median 1.9 d starting within 12-24 h of a rapid ascent; accompanied by cough (68%, headache (8%, dizziness and nausea (65%. Sixteen patients had associated encephalopathy. Clinical features on admission included tachypnea ( n = 31, tachycardia ( n = 23, bilateral chest rales ( n = 29, cyanosis ( n = 22 and grade 2-4 encephalopathy. Hypoxemia was demonstrable in 24 cases and bilateral infiltrates on radiologic imaging in 29. Ten patients had evidence of high-altitude cerebral edema. All patients were managed with oxygen, steroids, nifedipine, sildenafil and other supportive measures including invasive ventilation ( n = 3. Three patients died due to multiorgan dysfunction. Conclusions: Altitude sickness is common among Amaranath Yatris from the plains and appropriate educational strategies should be invoked for prevention and prompt treatment.

  19. Nutrição para os praticantes de exercício em grandes altitudes Nutritional strategy for exercising in high altitudes

    Caroline Buss

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Quando o atleta ascende a uma grande altitude, ele é exposto a uma pressão barométrica reduzida, e os efeitos fisiológicos que acompanham estas mudanças da pressão atmosférica podem ter grande influência sobre o seu organismo e seu desempenho físico. Acredita-se que a hipóxia seja responsável pelo início de uma cascata de eventos sinalizadores que, ao final, levam à adaptação à altitude. A exposição aguda à hipóxia provoca sonolência, fadiga mental e muscular e prostração. Cefaléia, náusea e anorexia são sintomas provocados pela Doença Aguda das Montanhas, que pode ocorrer nos primeiros dias de permanência na altitude. Uma estratégia nutricional adequada é fundamental para que o organismo não sofra nenhum estresse adicional. O objetivo deste trabalho foi apresentar os principais efeitos da altitude sobre o organismo e sobre o desempenho físico, discutir e/ou sugerir recomendações nutricionais para esta situação e, se possível, apresentar uma orientação nutricional prática para o atleta na altitude. Algumas das principais conclusões encontradas foram: o consumo energético deve ser aumentado; é fundamental monitorar a quantidade de líquidos ingeridos e escolher alimentos agradáveis ao paladar, ricos em energia e nutrientes. Recomenda-se trabalhar com um nutricionista do esporte com antecedência, para que um plano alimentar individual seja elaborado e colocado em prática antes mesmo da viagem à altitude.When athletes are subject to high altitudes, they are exposed to a lower barometric pressure and the physiological effects that accompany these atmospheric pressure changes can have a strong influence on their bodies and performance. Hypoxia is thought to be responsible for triggering a cascade of signaling events that eventually leads to altitude acclimatization. Acute exposure to hypoxia causes sleepiness, mental and muscle fatigue and prostration. Headache, nausea and anorexia are some of the

  20. Why Are High-Altitude Natives So Strong at Altitude? Maximal Oxygen Transport to the Muscle Cell in Altitude Natives.

    Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-01-01

    In hypoxia aerobic exercise performance of high-altitude natives is suggested to be superior to that of lowlanders; i.e., for a given altitude natives are reported to have higher maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The likely basis for this is a higher pulmonary diffusion capacity, which in turn ensures higher arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) and therefore also potentially a higher delivery of O2 to the exercising muscles. This review focuses on O2 transport in high-altitude Aymara. We have quantified femoral artery O2 delivery, arterial O2 extraction and calculated leg VO2 in Aymara, and compared their values with that of acclimatizing Danish lowlanders. All subjects were studied at 4100 m. At maximal exercise SaO2 dropped tremendously in the lowlanders, but did not change in the Aymara. Therefore arterial O2 content was also higher in the Aymara. At maximal exercise however, fractional O2 extraction was lower in the Aymara, and the a-vO2 difference was similar in both populations. The lower extraction levels in the Aymara were associated with lower muscle O2 conductance (a measure of muscle diffusion capacity). At any given submaximal exercise intensity, leg VO2 was always of similar magnitude in both groups, but at maximal exercise the lowlanders had higher leg blood flow, and hence also higher maximum leg VO2. With the induction of acute normoxia fractional arterial O2 extraction fell in the highlanders, but remained unchanged in the lowlanders. Hence high-altitude natives seem to be more diffusion limited at the muscle level as compared to lowlanders. In conclusion Aymara preserve very high SaO2 during hypoxic exercise (likely due to a higher lung diffusion capacity), but the effect on VO2max is reduced by a lower ability to extract O2 at the muscle level. PMID:27343089

  1. Characteristics of trapped proton anisotropy at Space Station Freedom altitudes

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Watts, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The ionizing radiation dose for spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO) is produced mainly by protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field. Current data bases describing this trapped radiation environment assume the protons to have an isotropic angular distribution, although the fluxes are actually highly anisotropic in LEO. The general nature of this directionality is understood theoretically and has been observed by several satellites. The anisotropy of the trapped proton exposure has not been an important practical consideration for most previous LEO missions because the random spacecraft orientation during passage through the radiation belt 'averages out' the anisotropy. Thus, in spite of the actual exposure anisotropy, cumulative radiation effects over many orbits can be predicted as if the environment were isotropic when the spacecraft orientation is variable during exposure. However, Space Station Freedom will be gravity gradient stabilized to reduce drag, and, due to this fixed orientation, the cumulative incident proton flux will remain anisotropic. The anisotropy could potentially influence several aspects of Space Station design and operation, such as the appropriate location for radiation sensitive components and experiments, location of workstations and sleeping quarters, and the design and placement of radiation monitors. Also, on-board mass could possible be utilized to counteract the anisotropy effects and reduce the dose exposure. Until recently only omnidirectional data bases for the trapped proton environment were available. However, a method to predict orbit-average, angular dependent ('vector') trapped proton flux spectra has been developed from the standard omnidirectional trapped proton data bases. This method was used to characterize the trapped proton anisotropy for the Space Station orbit (28.5 degree inclination, circular) in terms of its dependence on altitude, solar cycle modulation (solar minimum vs. solar maximum), shielding thickness

  2. Pulmonary Function Parameters Changes at Different Altitudes in Healthy Athletes

    Vahid Ziaee

    2008-06-01

    It could be concluded that changes in some pulmonary ventilatory parameters were proportional to the magnitude of change in altitude during a high-altitude trek. These changes are significant at the beginning of ascending.

  3. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars

    Andersson, L.; Weber, T. D.; Malaspina, D.; Crary, F.; Ergun, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Fowler, C. M.; Morooka, M. W.; McEnulty, T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Andrews, D. J.; Horanyi, M.; Collette, A.; Yelle, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars’s atmosphere.

  4. The visual control of simulated altitude

    Johnson, Walter W.; Bennett, C. Thomas; Tsang, Pamela S.; Phatak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of a subject flying an experimental flight to use the different sources of visual information by looking at the vertical tracking error was investigated using a 3 (altitude) x 3 (texture) x 2 (replication) factorial design. Each subject flew these 18 flights in the same partially counterbalanced order, constructed such that there was one flight at each of the three altitudes, and over each of the three surface textures within each successive set of three flights. The three ground-surface textures used consisted of meridian, latitudinal, and square textures described by Wolpert et al. (1983). The results showed that, in displays where only splay information was available, the subjects tended to confuse lateral motion with vertical.

  5. CT diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema

    Objective: To explore the value of CT diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Methods: The CT findings in 16 patients unfit to high altitude were analyzed. Results: The findings on CT were as follows: (1) The early stage of HAPE showed ground glass opacity, most of which located at the superior segment and posterior basis segment of inferior lobes, with the right lung to occur earlier than that of the left lung. (2) The advanced stage showed shaggy opacity. (3) The late stage lesions developed to posterior and apical segment of the superior lobes, air bronchus sign could be seen on involved segments. (4) Right lung was more serious than left lung. Conclusion: CT was an ideal method to find HAPE. The accuracy of CT diagnosis in HAPE was 100%

  6. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere. PMID:26542578

  7. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  8. Predator foraging altitudes reveal the structure of aerial insect communities

    Helms, Jackson A.; Aaron P. Godfrey; Tayna Ames; Bridge, Eli S.

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere is populated by a diverse array of dispersing insects and their predators. We studied aerial insect communities by tracking the foraging altitudes of an avian insectivore, the Purple Martin (Progne subis). By attaching altitude loggers to nesting Purple Martins and collecting prey delivered to their nestlings, we determined the flight altitudes of ants and other insects. We then tested hypotheses relating ant body size and reproductive ecology to flight altitude. Purple Martins...

  9. The yak genome and adaptation to life at high altitude

    Qiu, Qiang; Zhang, Guojie; Ma, Tao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Junyi; Ye, Zhiqiang; Cao, Changchang; Hu, Quanjun; Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Ma, Jian; Lewin, Harris A; Qian, Xiaoju; Lang, Yongshan; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jinquan; Liao, Shengguang; Pan, Shengkai; Lu, Xu; Hou, Haolong; Wang, Yan; Zang, Xuetao; Yin, Ye; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Dawei; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Shengxiang; Long, Ruijun; Yang, Huanming; Lenstra, Johannes A; Cooper, David N; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Domestic yaks (Bos grunniens) provide meat and other necessities for Tibetans living at high altitude on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and in adjacent regions. Comparison between yak and the closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus) is informative in studying animal adaptation to high altitude...... important implications for understanding adaptation to high altitude in other animal species and for hypoxia-related diseases in humans....

  10. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    Cornell, Seth Lewis

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high alti...

  11. Pulmonary embolism in young natives of high altitude

    Sanjay Singhal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic events are relatively common in high altitude areas and known to occur in young soldiers working at high altitude without usual risk factors associated with thrombosis at sea-level. However, till now, cases with thrombotic events were reported only in lowlanders staying at high altitude. These two cases of pulmonary embolism demonstrate that thrombotic events can occur in highlanders after a prolonged stay at the extreme altitude.

  12. Pulse oximetry reference values at high altitude.

    Lozano, J.M.; Duque, O R; Buitrago, T; Behaine, S

    1992-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is becoming popular for measuring oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in paediatric patients. There are no reference values for children living at high altitudes, and the aim of this study was to determine the values of oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in healthy children in Bogota (2640 m above sea level). The saturation was determined in 189 children aged 5 days to 24 months with a Nellcor N10 oximeter. Mean values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Analysis of v...

  13. Cardiovascular Response to High Altitude Hypoxia

    Manchanda, S C

    1984-01-01

    Normal and abnormal cardiovascular response to high altitude (HA) hypoxia were studied in 98 healthy subjects and in 15 patients with HA pulmonary oedema (HAPO) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) at an altitudeof 3,658 m. The healthy sea level (SL) residents showed marked blood volume changes during the first week with pulmonary hypotension and depression of left ventricular (LV) performance and physical work capacity (PWC). The HA natives, however, had better LV performance and PWC indicating...

  14. Magion-4 High-Altitude Cusp Study

    Merka, J.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Šimůnek, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1-3 (2005), s. 57-69. ISSN 0169-3298 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/02/0947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : cusp-like plasma * dipole tilt angle * high - altitude cusp * magnetopause * magnetopause * reconnection Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2005

  15. Is high-altitude mountaineering Russian roulette?

    Cheng Edward K.

    2013-01-01

    Whether the nature of the risks associated with climbing high-altitude (8000 m) peaks is in some sense “controllable” is a longstanding debate in the mountaineering community. Well-known mountaineers David Roberts and Ed Viesturs explore this issue in their recent memoirs. Roberts views the primary risks as “objective” or uncontrollable, whereas Viesturs maintains that experience and attention to safety can make a significant difference. This study sheds light on the Roberts-Viesturs debate u...

  16. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  17. Nutritional Aspects of High Altitude and Snow Bound Areas

    K. Sridharan; R. M. Rai

    1984-01-01

    The precise nutritional requirement of humans at high altitude area is not well defined. Further there are many conflicting reports on the effects of hypoxia on digestion, absorption and utilization of food at high altitude. In this review the nutritional requirements at high altitude and the effects of hypoxia on humans in relation to nutrition have been discussed.

  18. Nutritional Aspects of High Altitude and Snow Bound Areas

    K. Sridharan

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available The precise nutritional requirement of humans at high altitude area is not well defined. Further there are many conflicting reports on the effects of hypoxia on digestion, absorption and utilization of food at high altitude. In this review the nutritional requirements at high altitude and the effects of hypoxia on humans in relation to nutrition have been discussed.

  19. Sleep quality alterations in healthy workers at high altitude in Yushu area

    Wu Tianyi; Li Wenxiang; Zhang Jianqing; Qi Shengui; Hao Lijuan; Wen Jialin

    2013-01-01

    During the period of reconstruction after Yushu Earthquake,a large number of sea-level or lowland workers ascended there and worked at altitudes between 3750 m and 4878 m which is a hypoxic environment.To investigate the sleep quality at that altitude,we performed two full polysomnographies (PSGs) in 10 volunteers,who were healthy male workers,aged 31±6.6,born and living at sea level,without experience of pre-altitude exposure.The assessment of subjective sleep quality was performed twice in each volunteer.The first investigations were carried out at sea level in Jinan city (pB=760 torr,1 torr=133.322 4 Pa).The second studies were performed at an altitude of 3750 m (pB=416 tonr) in Yushu Jiegu in the same 10 workers after they lived and worked at that altitude for 5 months.At sea level,workers presented a normal sleep structure and a higher oxygenation during sleep.However,as compared to sea-level sleep,at 3750 m,workers had a shorter total sleep time (TST) (p < 0.001),a longer stage 1 non-rapid eye movement (nREM) sleep (p < 0.05) and a shorter 3+4 nREM and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (p < 0.05) with a severe sleep hypoxemia (p < 0.01).Our data suggested that sea-level workers revealed a disturbed sleep and a bad sleep quality with a significant sleep hypoxemia at altitude of 3750 m.Strengthening the prevention and treatment are thereby sorely necessary.

  20. Pulmonary vascular reserve and exercise capacity at sea level and at high altitude.

    Pavelescu, Adriana; Faoro, Vitalie; Guenard, Hervé; de Bisschop, Claire; Martinot, Jean-Benoit; Mélot, Christian; Naeije, Robert

    2013-03-01

    It has been suggested that increased pulmonary vascular reserve, as defined by reduced pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and increased pulmonary transit of agitated contrast measured by echocardiography, might be associated with increased exercise capacity. Thus, at altitude, where PVR is increased because of hypoxic vasoconstriction, a reduced pulmonary vascular reserve could contribute to reduced exercise capacity. Furthermore, a lower PVR could be associated with higher capillary blood volume and an increased lung diffusing capacity. We reviewed echocardiographic estimates of PVR and measurements of lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DL(NO)) and for carbon monoxide (DL(CO)) at rest, and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise tests in 64 healthy subjects at sea level and during 4 different medical expeditions at altitudes around 5000 m. Altitude exposure was associated with a decrease in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), from 42±10 to 32±8 mL/min/kg and increases in PVR, ventilatory equivalents for CO2 (V(E)/VCO2), DL(NO), and DL(CO). By univariate linear regression VO2max at sea level and at altitude was associated with V(E)/VCO2 (pstroke volume index (SVI, paltitude was associated with V(E)/VCO2, mPpa, SVI, and DL(NO). The multivariable analysis also showed that the altitude-related decrease in VO2max was associated with increased PVR and V(E)/VCO2. These results suggest that pulmonary vascular reserve, defined by a combination of decreased PVR and increased DL(NO), allows for superior aerobic exercise capacity at a lower ventilatory cost, at sea level and at high altitude. PMID:23537256

  1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression in healthy adults rapidly transported to high altitude

    Herman NM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Herman,1 Diane E Grill,2 Paul J Anderson,1 Andrew D Miller,1 Jacob B Johnson,1 Kathy A O’Malley,1 Maile L Ceridon Richert,1 Bruce D Johnson1 1Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, 2Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Although mechanisms of high altitude illness have been studied extensively, the processes behind the development of these conditions are still unclear. Few genome-wide studies on rapid exposure to high altitude have been performed. Each year, scientists and support workers are transferred by plane from McMurdo Station in Antarctica (sea level to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station at 2,835 meters. This uniform and rapid transfer to altitude provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of hypobaric hypoxia on gene expression that may help illustrate the body's adaptations to these conditions. We hypothesized that an extensive number of genes would change with rapid exposure to altitude and further expected that these genes would correspond to inflammatory pathways proposed as a mechanism in development of acute mountain sickness. Peripheral venous blood samples were drawn from 98 healthy subjects at sea level and again on day two at altitude. Microarray analysis was performed on these samples. In total, 1,118 probe sets with significant P-values and fold changes (90% upregulated were identified and entered into MetaCore™ software. Several pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, cytoskeleton remodeling, and platelet aggregation, were significantly represented by the data set and all were upregulated. Many genes changed expression, and the vast majority of these increased. Increased metabolism in peripheral blood mononuclear cells suggests increased inflammatory activity. Keywords: peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microarray, gene expression, acute mountain sickness

  2. Longterm monitoring of ambient dose equivalent rates at aviation altitudes

    The complex radiation field at flight altitudes results mainly from the interaction of energetic charged particles with atmospheric molecules and atoms and consists of secondary neutrons, protons, gamma rays, electrons, positrons and muons. Due to the continuous interactions of primary and secondary particles within the atmosphere, the intensity of each component depends on the height. Since the Earth's magnetic field acts as rigidity filter for the charged primary particles, the flux of the primary particles into the atmosphere and the resulting intensity of secondary particles depend on the geomagnetic latitude being highest over the geomagnetic poles. The main primary component consists of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), mainly protons and alpha particles, whose flux is modulated in the heliosphere. Beside this slowly varying galactic component, solar energetic particle events may temporarily increase the intensity of this radiation field. In the frame of the Radiation Monitoring on Board Aircraft (RAMONA) collaboration, three NAVIgation and DOSimetry (NAVIDOS) systems were installed in 2008 and 2009 on board of three Lufthansa Airbus A340 aircraft. They have been maintained since then by the consortium. Two of the NAVIDOS units rely on the DOSimetry TELescopes (DOSTELs), one is based on a LIULIN detector. This unique setup is ideally suited to investigate variations in the radiation field at different flight altitudes and geomagnetic positions and has been used to measure the radiation exposure during the recent extended solar minimum and thereafter. With increasing solar activity in 2010 the measured dose rates have been decreasing. Since these variations depend on the location of the aircraft, a detailed data analysis is required and presented.

  3. Altitude training and its influence on physical endurance in swimmers.

    Strzała, Marek; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Szyguła, Zbigniew

    2011-06-01

    It is possible to plan an altitude training (AT) period in such a way that the enhanced physical endurance obtained as a result of adaptation to hypoxia will appear and can be used to improve performance in competition. Yet finding rationales for usage of AT in highly trained swimmers is problematic. In practice AT, in its various forms, is still controversial, and an objective review of research concentrating on the advantages and disadvantages of AT has been presented in several scientific publications, including in no small part the observations of swimmers. The aim of this article is to review the various methods and present both the advantageous and unfavourable physiological changes that occur in athletes as a result of AT. Moreover, AT results in the sport of swimming have been collected. They include an approach towards primary models of altitude/hypoxic training: live high + train high, live high + train low, live low + train high, as well as subsequent methods: Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE) and Intermittent Hypoxic Training (IHT). Apnoea training, which is descended from freediving, is also mentioned, and which can be used with, or as a substitute for, the well-known IHE or IHT methods. In conclusion, swimmers who train using hypoxia may be among the best-trained athletes, and that even a slight improvement in physical endurance might result in the shortening of a swimming time in a given competition, and the achievement of a personal best, which is hard to obtain by normal training methods, when the personal results of the swimmer have reached a plateau. PMID:23486564

  4. Division I College Football Concussion Rates Are Higher at Higher Altitudes.

    Lynall, Robert C; Kerr, Zachary Y; Parr, Matthew S; Hackney, Anthony C; Mihalik, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort. Background Participating in sports at high altitude may have a protective effect on the brain, according to research studies. Research using validated data-collection methods in a previously unexplored cohort may better estimate the association between concussion injury risk and altitude. Objectives To determine the association between concussion rates and altitude during college football games. Methods Athletic trainers from 21 Division I football programs provided exposure and injury data to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) from the 2009-2010 to 2013-2014 academic years. The elevation of each stadium was determined. Concussion rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) were compared in 2 ways, based on the sample of stadium elevations: (1) median split (elevation higher than 178 m or lower than 178 m), and (2) quartile split. Rate ratios (RRs), rate differences, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Results One hundred sixty-nine concussions were reported over 49 040 AEs (3.45/1000 AEs). Using the median split, the concussion rate above 178 m (RR = 4.18/1000 AEs) was 1.47 times the concussion rate below 178 m (RR = 2.84/1000 AEs; 95% CI: 1.09, 2.00; P = .01). The concussion rate at the highest altitude quartile (higher than 284 m; RR = 5.01/1000 AEs) was 1.67 times greater than the concussion rate at the lowest altitude quartile (lower than 43 m; RR = 3.00/1000 AEs; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.48; P = .01). Conclusion College football game concussion rates appear to increase at higher altitudes. The clinical significance of this relatively small increase is unknown. Future research should explore potential physiologic underpinnings associated with concussion risk at relatively higher and lower altitudes. Level of Evidence Prognosis, level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(2):96-103. Epub 11 Jan 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6315. PMID:26755407

  5. Physiological and Clinical Implications of Adrenergic Pathways at High Altitude.

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The adrenergic system is part of a full array of mechanisms allowing the human body to adapt to the hypoxic environment. Triggered by the stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors, the adrenergic centers in the medulla are activated in acute hypoxia and augment the adrenergic drive to the organs, especially to the heart, leading to tachycardia. With prolonged exposure to altitude hypoxia, the adrenergic drive persists, as witnessed by elevated blood concentrations of catecholamines and nerve activity in adrenergic fibers. In response to this persistent stimulation, the pathways leading to the activation of adenylate cyclase are modified. A downregulation of β-adrenergic and adenosinergic receptors is observed, while muscarinic receptors are upregulated. The expression and activity of Gi and Gs proteins are modified, leading to a decreased response of adenylate cyclase activity to adrenergic stimulation. The clinical consequences of these cellular and molecular changes are of importance, especially for exercise performance and protection of heart function. The decrease in maximal exercise heart rate in prolonged hypoxia is fully accounted for the observed changes in adrenergic and muscarinic pathways. The decreased heart rate response to isoproterenol infusion is another marker of the desensitization of adrenergic pathways. These changes can be considered as mechanisms protecting the heart from a too high oxygen consumption in conditions where the oxygen availability is severely reduced. Similarly, intermittent exposure to hypoxia has been shown to protect the heart from an ischemic insult with similar mechanisms involving G proteins and downregulation of β receptors. Other pathways with G proteins are concerned in adaptation to hypoxia, such as lactate release by the muscles and renal handling of calcium. Altogether, the activation of the adrenergic system is useful for the acute physiological response to hypoxia. With prolonged exposure to hypoxia, the autonomous

  6. Short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude in children compared with adults.

    Kriemler, S; Radtke, T; Bürgi, F; Lambrecht, J; Zehnder, M; Brunner-La Rocca, H P

    2016-02-01

    As short-term cardiorespiratory adaptation to high altitude (HA) exposure has not yet been studied in children, we assessed acute mountain sickness (AMS), hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) at rest and maximal exercise capacity (CPET) at low altitude (LA) and HA in pre-pubertal children and their fathers. Twenty father-child pairs (11 ± 1 years and 44 ± 4 years) were tested at LA (450 m) and HA (3450 m) at days 1, 2, and 3 after fast ascent (HA1/2/3). HVR was measured at rest and CPET was performed on a cycle ergometer. AMS severity was mild to moderate with no differences between generations. HVR was higher in children than adults at LA and increased at HA similarly in both groups. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) relative to body weight was similar in children and adults at LA and decreased significantly by 20% in both groups at HA; maximal heart rate did not change at HA in children while it decreased by 16% in adults (P altitude seems to be at least partly hereditary. Even though children and their fathers lose similar fractions of aerobic capacity going to high altitude, the mechanisms might be different. PMID:25648726

  7. The role of oxygen-increased respirator in humans ascending to high altitude

    Shen Guanghao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute mountain sickness (AMS is common for people who live in low altitude areas ascending to the high altitude. Many instruments have been developed to treat mild cases of AMS. However, long-lasting and portable anti-hypoxia equipment for individual is not yet available. Methods Oxygen-increased respirator (OIR has been designed to reduce the risk of acute mountain sickness in acute exposure to low air pressure. It can increase the density of oxygen by increasing total atmospheric pressure in a mask. Male subjects were screened, and eighty-eight were qualified to perform the experiments. The subjects were divided into 5 groups and were involved in some of the tests at 4 different altitudes (Group 1, 2: 3700 m; Group 3,4,5: 4000 m, 4700 m, 5380 m with and without OIR. These tests include heart rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, blood lactate (BLA and PWC (physical work capacity -170. Results The results showed that higher SpO2, lower heart rate (except during exercise and better recovery of heart rate were observed from all the subjects ’with OIR’ compared with ’without OIR’ (P Conclusions We suggested that OIR may play a useful role in protecting people ascending to high altitude before acclimatization.

  8. The assessment of the aircrew exposure

    In 1991 ICRP first included exposure of aircraft crew to cosmic radiation as occupational exposure. The European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) established a working group in 1992 to address this issue. The report 'Exposure of Air Crew to Cosmic Radiation' was published in the European Commission's Radiation Protection series as report 85. The first section of the report assesses the existing data on radiation exposure, describes the radiation environment at civil aviation altitudes and summarizes the computational models that have been developed to describe the cosmic ray radiation field in the atmosphere. The second section describes the quantities used to assess the radiation doses. It is clear that conventional radiation protection dosimetry as applied on the ground is not quite applicable to the situation for air crews. A multinational European research project was launched to investigate the problem of cosmic rays and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. The major objective was to measure the flux and energy spectra of neutrons and charged particles over a wide energy interval at aviation altitudes and compare the results with those calculated with various computer codes. Within the project much progress was made in different areas, for instance the determination of the fundamental physical characteristics of the cosmic radiation field at aircraft altitudes, development of instrumentation, measurements of dose rates and route doses and application of routine radiation protection. Surveys of air crew exposure have been carried out with different advanced dosimetric systems and comparisons were made between passive and real-time detector systems

  9. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    ’s intrinsic O2-affinity and its allosteric interaction with cellular effectors (organic phosphates, protons and chloride). Whereas short-term altitudinal adaptations predominantly involve adjustments in allosteric interactions, long-term, genetically-coded adaptations typically involve changes in the....... Molecular heterogeneity (multiple isoHbs with differentiated oxygenation properties) can further broaden the range of physico-chemical conditions where Hb functions under altitudinal hypoxia. This treatise reviews the molecular and cellular mechanisms that adapt haemoglobin-oxygen affinities in mammals......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  10. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  11. Ion gun operations at high altitudes

    Werner, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments in charge control were conducted on the P78-2 (SCATHA) satellite as part of a program on spacecraft charging at high altitudes. Experiments with the SCATHA ion gun were monitored by charged particle detectors and the electric field experiment. It was found that the electric field experiment could be used to measure satellite potential during ion beam emission in sunlight and eclipse. Unneutralized ion beam emission in high energy (1-2 KeV) and high current (1-2 mA) modes resulted ...

  12. Ascent schedules, acute altitude illness, and altitude acclimatization: Observations on the Yushu Earthquake

    Wu Tianyi; Hou Shike; Li Shuzhi; Li Wenxiang; Gen Deng

    2013-01-01

    During the Yushu Earthquake on April 14,2010,a large number of rescuers from sea level or lowlands ascended to the quake areas very rapidly or rapidly less than 24 h.However,Yushu Earthquake is the highest quake in the world at altitudes between 3750 m and 4878 m where is a serious hypoxic environment.A high incidence of acute altitude illness was found in the unacclimatized rescuers; the mountain rescue operation changed as "rescue the rescuers".Lesson from the Yushu Earthquake is that the occurrence of acute altitude illness may be closely related to the ascent schedules.This prompted us to study the relationship between ascent rate and the incidence and severity of acute altitude illness; five different groups were compared.The first group was 42 sea level male young soldiers who ascended to quake area very rapidly within 8 h at 4000 m; the second group was 48 sea level male young soldiers who ascended to 4000 m rapidly less than 18 h; the third group was 66 acclimatized medical workers from 2261 m who ascended to 4000 m rapidly within 12 h; the fourth group was 56 Tibetan medical workers from 2800 m who ascended to 4000 m rapidly within 8 h; the fifth group was 50 male sea level workers who ascended to 4000 m gradually over a period of 4 d.The results showed that the sea level rescuers ascended to 4000 m very rapidly or rapidly had the highest incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) with the greatest AMS scores and the lowest arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) ; the sea level workers ascended to 4000 m gradually had moderate incidence of AMS with moderate AMS scores and SaO2 values; whereas the acclimatized and adapted rescuers had the lowest incidence of AMS,lowest AMS scores and higher SaO2; especially none AMS occurred in Tibetan rescuers.AMS score is inversely related to the ascent rate (r=-0.24,p<0.001).Additionally,acute altitude illness is significantly influenced by altitude acclimatization.The ascent rate is inversely related to

  13. Effects of high altitude on sleep and respiratory system and theirs adaptations.

    San, Turhan; Polat, Senol; Cingi, Cemal; Eskiizmir, Gorkem; Oghan, Fatih; Cakir, Burak

    2013-01-01

    High-altitude (HA) environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbon-dioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2. PMID:23690739

  14. Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

    Turhan San

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude (HA environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbondioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2.

  15. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  16. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    Ni, Qian [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Department of Pediatrics, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Shao, Yuan; Wang, Ying Zhen [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Jing, Yu Hong [Institute of Anatomy, School of Basic Medicine, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, You Cheng, E-mail: zhangychmd@126.com [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  17. Glycolytic intermediates and adenosine phosphates in rat liver at high altitude /3,800 m/.

    Cipriano, L. F.; Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Liver tissue obtained from adult rats exposed to 3800 m altitude for intervals ranging from 1.5 hr to 63 days was examined by enzymatic analysis. During the first 3 hr of exposure, an immediate decrease in rephosphorylation of high-energy phosphates led to reduced glycogenesis and eventual pileup of AMP, pyruvate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose. This was accompanied by a reduction of pentose phosphate pathway activity. After 3 to 6 hr, a secondary adjustment of substrate concentrations occurred along with the apparent facilitation of phosphofructokinase. This secondary adjustment appears to increase anaerobic production of ATP and represents a significant intracellular contribution to the acclimatization process at high altitude.

  18. Bronchial asthma: advice for patients traveling to high altitude.

    Cogo, Annalisa; Fiorenzano, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the possibility of traveling to altitude for patients suffering from bronchial asthma. The mountain environment, the adaptations of the respiratory system to high altitude, the underlying patho-physiologies of asthma, and the recommendations for patients, according to altitude, are discussed. In summary, staying at low altitude has a significant beneficial effect for asthmatic patients, due to the reduction of airway inflammation and the lower response to bronchoconstrictor stimuli; for staying at moderate altitude, there is conflicting information and no clinical data; at high altitude, the environment seems beneficial for well-controlled asthmatics, but intense exercise and upper airway infections (frequent during trekking) can be additional risks and should be avoided. Further, in remote areas health facilities are often difficult to reach. PMID:19519226

  19. The physiology and biomechanics of avian flight at high altitude

    Altshuler, Douglas L.; Dudley, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Many birds fly at high altitude, either during long-distance flights or by virtue of residence in high-elevation habitats. Among the many environmental features that vary systematically with altitude, five have significant consequences for avian flight performance: ambient wind speeds, air temperature, humidity, oxygen availability, and air density. During migratory flights, birds select flight altitudes that minimize energy expenditure via selection of advantageous tail- and cross-winds. Oxy...

  20. Altitude, Immigration and Suicide Rates: A Study from Turkey

    Selek, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the altitude, immigration and suicide rates association in Turkey. Methods Suicide and immigration rates of 81 provinces and their elevation data were obtained. Results There were not significant correlations between country elevation, immigration and mean suicide rate. Conclusion The findings of this study points out that altitude related hypoxia and suicide association may not be generalized and further research will be needed to clarify the effects of altitude on s...

  1. Genomic insights into adaptation to high-altitude environments

    Cheviron, Z A; Brumfield, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular genetic basis of adaptive traits is a central goal of evolutionary genetics. The cold, hypoxic conditions of high-altitude habitats impose severe metabolic demands on endothermic vertebrates, and understanding how high-altitude endotherms cope with the combined effects of hypoxia and cold can provide important insights into the process of adaptive evolution. The physiological responses to high-altitude stress have been the subject of over a century of research, and r...

  2. The effect of acetazolamide on breath holding at high altitude.

    Morrissey, S. C.; Keohane, K.; Coote, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of altitude and acetazolamide on breath holding was studied in 20 individuals. Breath holding time was reduced progressively during ascent. There was an additional reduction in the acetazolamide group at low but not at high altitude. The initial difference between the two groups may have been related to a lower CSF pH when on acetazolamide. At high altitude the finding of similar breath holding times in the two groups may have been due to acclimatization in the placebo group.

  3. High-Altitude Illnesses: Physiology, Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment

    Taylor, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS) which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute m...

  4. Respiratory Function of University Students Living at High Altitude

    Roh, HyoLyun; Lee, Daehee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the respiratory function and oxygen saturation levels of university students living at high altitude, to present a new approach for improving respiratory function using high altitudes above sea level. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 100 female students attending a university located approximately 850 m above sea level and 104 female students attending a university located at low altitude. Oxygen saturation, heart rate (HR), and respiratory function level...

  5. Genetic and phenotypic differentiation of an Andean intermediate altitude population

    Eichstaedt, Christina A; Antão, Tiago; Cardona, Alexia; Pagani, Luca; Kivisild, Toomas; Mormina, Maru

    2015-01-01

    Highland populations living permanently under hypobaric hypoxia have been subject of extensive research because of the relevance of their physiological adaptations for the understanding of human health and disease. In this context, what is considered high altitude is a matter of interpretation and while the adaptive processes at high altitude (above 3000 m) are well documented, the effects of moderate altitude (below 3000 m) on the phenotype are less well established. In this study, we compar...

  6. Exercise at simulated high altitude facilitates the increase in capillarity in skeletal muscle of rats

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the changes in capillarity of skeletal muscle during acclimation to high altitude, and explore the effects of a certain extent physical activity under hypoxia on capillary formation and the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in this process. METHODS: 48 Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: Ⅰ normoxic control; Ⅱ hypoxia and Ⅲ hypoxia+exercise. Rats of Ⅱ and Ⅲ groups were subjected to hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks (23 h/d). They were first brought to simulated 4 000 m altitude, where rats of the Ⅲgroup were forced to swim for 1 h/d (6 d/week). Then the animals were ascent to 5 000 m. Biomicrosphere method was used to determine blood flow of skeletal muscle. The mean fiber cross-sectional area (FCSA), capillary density (CD) and capillary/fiber ratio (C/F) of red portion of the lateral head of the gastrocneminus were assayed by myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry. VEGF and its receptor KDR were assayed with immunohistochemistry method.RESULTS: By comparison with the normoxic control, 5-week hypoxic exposure resulted in a decrease in cross-sectional area of skeletal muscle fiber and an increase in CD, but the C/F remained unchanged. The blood supply to the gastrocnemius was not changed. After 5-week-exercise at high altitude, the muscle fibers did not undergo atrophy. CD, C/F, and the blood flow at rest increased significantly. VEGF protein was found primarily in the matrix between muscle fibers; KDR were shown mainly in endothelial cells of capillary. VEGF was more strongly stained in the skeletal muscle of hypoxia-exercise rats.CONCLUSION: Hypoxia itself can not induce neovascularization. While exercise during hypoxic exposure can lead to capillary formation. VEGF and KDR may play roles in it. New capillary formation benefits the blood supply, oxygen delivery and working performance at high altitude.

  7. Neurophysiological Problems in Snow Bound High Altitude Areas

    W. Selvamurthy

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies have been conducted to evaluate the neurophysiological responses in young healthy soldiers during acclimatization at 3,500m altitude in Western Himalayas. The responses of autonomic nervous system, electroencephalogram hypothalamic thermoregulatory efficiency, orthostatic tolerance, sleep profile and effects of sleep deprivation have been studied in fresh inductees during three to five weeks of acclimatization at high altitude and compared with those of one year acclimatized lowlanders and high altitude natives. Physiological significance of these neurophysiological responses in the process of altitude adaptation is discussed in the light of current knowledge in the field.

  8. Aviation fuel property effects on altitude relight

    Venkataramani, K.

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of this experimental program was to investigate the effects of fuel property variation on altitude relight characteristics. Four fuels with widely varying volatility properties (JP-4, Jet A, a blend of Jet A and 2040 Solvent, and Diesel 2) were tested in a five-swirl-cup-sector combustor at inlet temperatures and flows representative of windmilling conditions of turbofan engines. The effects of fuel physical properties on atomization were eliminated by using four sets of pressure-atomizing nozzles designed to give the same spray Sauter mean diameter (50 + or - 10 micron) for each fuel at the same design fuel flow. A second series of tests was run with a set of air-blast nozzles. With comparable atomization levels, fuel volatility assumes only a secondary role for first-swirl-cup lightoff and complete blowout. Full propagation first-cup blowout were independent of fuel volatility and depended only on the combustor operating conditions.

  9. Cardiovascular Response to High Altitude Hypoxia

    S. C. Manchanda

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal and abnormal cardiovascular response to high altitude (HA hypoxia were studied in 98 healthy subjects and in 15 patients with HA pulmonary oedema (HAPO and acute mountain sickness (AMS at an altitudeof 3,658 m. The healthy sea level (SL residents showed marked blood volume changes during the first week with pulmonary hypotension and depression of left ventricular (LV performance and physical work capacity (PWC. The HA natives, however, had better LV performance and PWC indicating a better adaptation to HA hypoxia. HAPO subjects showed evidence of severe pulmonary hypertension with normal left atrial pressures but the exact mechanism of this condition is still not clear. AMS subjects showed no circulatory abnormalities 'but had relative hypercapnia and severe hypoxemia suggesting that AMS may be causcd by relative hyposensitiveness of the respiratory centre to hypoxia or hypercapnia.

  10. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip. PMID:26186419

  11. Exposure Forecaster

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Exposure Forecaster Database (ExpoCastDB) is EPA's database for aggregating chemical exposure information and can be used to help with chemical exposure...

  12. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  13. Mechanisms of Altitude-Related Cough/Mécanismes de la Toux Liée à l’Altitude

    Mason, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The original work presented in this thesis investigates some of the mechanisms that may be responsible for the aetiology of altitude-related cough. Particular attention is paid to its relationship to the long recognised, but poorly understood, changes in lung volumes that occur on ascent to altitude. The literature relevant to this thesis is reviewed in Chapter 1. Widespread reports have long existed of a debilitating cough affecting visitors to high altitude that can incapacitate the suff...

  14. Radiation exposure profile and dose estimates to flyers en route Frankfurt to Mumbai

    The earth is continuously bombarded by the high energy radiation (galactic radiation) from solar system commonly known as cosmic radiation. Intensity of cosmic ray radiation exposures change with altitude and increases rapidly with the increase in altitude from the earth. Passenger and cargo flights fly at different altitudes and therefore the crew and passengers are exposed to radiation levels significantly higher than the average background levels on the earth. A typical commercial jet aircraft fly at an altitude of 30,000 - 40,000 feet (9-12 km) and at these heights radiation exposure rates increase by about 100 times from the background levels. European countries have guidelines and suggestions on radiation exposure to air crew members in sectors that may potentially expose them to levels exceeding 1 mSv per annum. The paper details the radiation exposure profile recorded in Frankfurt-Dubai-Mumbai sector and evaluation of average radiation exposure received by the flyers and air crew members

  15. The effect of high altitude on platelet counts, thrombopoietin and erythropoietin levels in young Bolivian airmen visiting the Andes

    Hudson, J. G.; Bowen, Angela L.; Navia, Pilar; Rios-Dalenz, Jaime; Pollard, Andrew J.; Williams, David; Heath, Donald

    Recognition of thrombosis as a complication of exposure to high altitude has stimulated interest in rheological changes resulting from hypobaric hypoxia. Previous studies of platelet counts at high altitude have yielded conflicting results and have not been studied in conjunction with potential mediating cytokines. We studied the effects of high-altitude exposure on platelet numbers, thrombopoietin (tpo) and erythropoietin (epo) levels in man. A group of 28 volunteers from the Bolivian Airforce stationed at Santa Cruz (600 m altitude) were studied 48 h and 1 week after their ascent to La Paz (3600 m). In addition 105 volunteers based at Santa Cruz for at least 1 year were compared with 175 age- and sex-matched residents at El Alto (4200 m). Platelet counts were measured immediately after sampling and serum samples assayed for tpo and epo. In the ascending group, mean platelet counts were 251×109, 367×109 and 398×109/l at 600 m and following 48 h and 1 week at 3600 m respectively. Mean tpo levels were 132.5, 76 and 92 pg/ml with epo values of 2.98, 11.6 and 7.9 mIU/ml respectively. In the resident populations mean platelet counts were 271×109/l in the low- and 471×109/l in the high-altitude groups. Mean tpo and epo levels measured 69.3 pg/ml and 4.5 mIU/ml respectively at 600 m and 58.5 pg/ml and 5.1 mIU/ml at 4200 m. In conclusion we have demonstrated a significant and sustained elevation in platelet numbers within 48 h of ascent to high altitude. Our findings do not support a role for tpo as a mediator of the increased platelet count. However, these data do not discount epo as a potential candidate.

  16. Effects of ascent to high altitude on human antimycobacterial immunity.

    Sarah Eisen

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis infection, disease and mortality are all less common at high than low altitude and ascent to high altitude was historically recommended for treatment. The immunological and mycobacterial mechanisms underlying the association between altitude and tuberculosis are unclear. We studied the effects of altitude on mycobacteria and antimycobacterial immunity.Antimycobacterial immunity was assayed in 15 healthy adults residing at low altitude before and after they ascended to 3400 meters; and in 47 long-term high-altitude residents. Antimycobacterial immunity was assessed as the extent to which participants' whole blood supported or restricted growth of genetically modified luminescent Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG mycobacteria during 96 hours incubation. We developed a simplified whole blood assay that could be used by a technician in a low-technology setting. We used this to compare mycobacterial growth in participants' whole blood versus positive-control culture broth and versus negative-control plasma.Measurements of mycobacterial luminescence predicted the number of mycobacterial colonies cultured six weeks later. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood at similar rates to positive-control culture broth whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p ≤ 0.002 of mycobacterial growth to be 4-times less than in culture broth. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood 25-times more than negative-control plasma whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p ≤ 0.01 of mycobacterial growth to be only 6-times more than in plasma. There was no evidence of differences in antimycobacterial immunity at high altitude between people who had recently ascended to high altitude versus long-term high-altitude residents.An assay of luminescent mycobacterial growth in whole blood was adapted and found to be feasible in low-resource settings. This demonstrated that ascent to or residence at high altitude was

  17. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  18. 14 CFR 121.661 - Initial approach altitude: Flag operations.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial approach altitude: Flag operations... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.661 Initial approach altitude: Flag operations. When making an initial approach to a...

  19. 14 CFR 91.177 - Minimum altitudes for IFR operations.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum altitudes for IFR operations. 91.177 Section 91.177 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.177 Minimum altitudes for IFR operations. (a) Operation of aircraft at...

  20. Sequencing of 50 human exomes reveals adaptation to high altitude

    Yi, Xin; Liang, Yu; Huerta-Sanchez, Emilia;

    2010-01-01

    Residents of the Tibetan Plateau show heritable adaptations to extreme altitude. We sequenced 50 exomes of ethnic Tibetans, encompassing coding sequences of 92% of human genes, with an average coverage of 18x per individual. Genes showing population-specific allele frequency changes, which repres...... in genetic adaptation to high altitude....

  1. Altitude acclimatization. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography of citations to the international literature covers aspects of altitude acclimatization. Included are articles concerning high altitude environments, hypoxia, heart function and hemodynamic responses, physical exercise, human tolerances and reactions, physiological responses, and oxygen consumption. This updated bibliography contains 164 citations, 35 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  2. Increased resting bronchial tone in normal subjects acclimatised to altitude

    Wilson, C.; Bakewell, S; M. Miller; Hart, N; McMorrow, R; BARRY, P.; Collier, D; Watt, S; Pollard, A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Normal subjects frequently experience troublesome respiratory symptoms when acclimatised to altitude. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and full and partial flow-volume loops were measured before and after ascent to 5000 m altitude to determine if there are changes in resting bronchial tone and BHR that might explain the symptoms.

  3. Microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon.

    Kan, Yuji

    In JAXA, microgravity experiment system using a high altitude balloon was developed , for good microgravity environment and short turn-around time. In this publication, I give an account of themicrogravity experiment system and a combustion experiment to utilize the system. The balloon operated vehicle (BOV) as a microgravity experiment system was developed from 2004 to 2009. Features of the BOV are (1) BOV has double capsule structure. Outside-capsule and inside-capsule are kept the non-contact state by 3-axis drag-free control. (2) The payload is spherical shape and itsdiameter is about 300 mm. (3) Keep 10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds However, BOV’s payload was small, and could not mount large experiment module. In this study, inherits the results of past, we established a new experimental system called “iBOV” in order toaccommodate larger payload. Features of the iBOV are (1) Drag-free control use for only vertical direction. (2) The payload is a cylindrical shape and its size is about 300 mm in diameter and 700 mm in height. (3) Keep 10-3-10-4 G level microgravity environment for about 30 seconds We have "Observation experiment of flame propagation behavior of the droplets column" as experiment using iBOV. This experiment is a theme that was selected first for technical demonstration of iBOV. We are conducting the flame propagation mechanism elucidation study of fuel droplets array was placed at regular intervals. We conducted a microgravity experiments using TEXUS rocket ESA and drop tower. For this microgravity combustion experiment using high altitude balloon, we use the Engineering Model (EM) for TEXUS rocket experiment. The EM (This payload) consists of combustion vessel, droplets supporter, droplets generator, fuel syringe, igniter, digital camera, high-speed camera. And, This payload was improved from the EM as follows. (1) Add a control unit. (2) Add inside batteries for control unit and heater of combustion

  4. General introduction to altitude adaptation and mountain sickness

    Bartsch, P.; Saltin, B.

    2008-01-01

    over 24-48 h to improve the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, and is further improved during a prolonged sojourn at altitude through an enhanced erythropoiesis and larger Hb mass, allowing for a partial or full restoration of the blood volume and arterial oxygen content. Most of these adaptations......-30% of subjects at altitudes between 2500 and 3000 m a.s.l. Pulmonary edema is rarely seen below 3000 m a.s.l. and brain edema is not seen below 4000 m a.s.l. It is possible to travel to altitudes of 2500-3000 m a.s.l., wait for 2 days, and then gradually start to train. At higher altitudes, one should...... modalities using hypoxia and altitude for improvement of performance Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  5. The energy spectrum of high energy gamma rays observed at an airplane altitude

    In order to get some knowledge of altitude variation of high energy cosmic rays in the atmosphere, an emulsion chamber (EC) has been flown at the atmospheric depth of 260 g/cm2 on an airplane jet cargo. The total amount of exposure is 165 m2hour. Approximately 400 showers with energy greater than 1.0 TeV are observed. The energy spectrum of high energy gamma rays is presented. The comparison with similar measurement at greater depth is made. (orig.)

  6. Incidence and possible causes of dental pain during simulated high altitude flights.

    Kollmann, W

    1993-03-01

    Of 11,617 personnel participating in simulated high altitude flights up to 43,000 feet, only 30 (0.26%) complained of toothache (barodontalgia). The cause of the barodontalgia in 28 episodes of pain in 25 of these subjects was investigated. Chronic pulpitis was suspected as the cause in 22 cases and maxillary sinusitis in 2. No pathosis was detected in the other four. In 10 cases in which the pulpitis was treated by root filling or replacing a deep filling, subsequent exposure to low pressure caused no pain. PMID:8509756

  7. Impact of Altitude on Power Output during Cycling Stage Racing.

    Laura A Garvican-Lewis

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of moderate-high altitude on power output, cadence, speed and heart rate during a multi-day cycling tour.Power output, heart rate, speed and cadence were collected from elite male road cyclists during maximal efforts of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 600 s. The efforts were completed in a laboratory power-profile assessment, and spontaneously during a cycling race simulation near sea-level and an international cycling race at moderate-high altitude. Matched data from the laboratory power-profile and the highest maximal mean power output (MMP and corresponding speed and heart rate recorded during the cycling race simulation and cycling race at moderate-high altitude were compared using paired t-tests. Additionally, all MMP and corresponding speeds and heart rates were binned per 1000 m (3000 m according to the average altitude of each ride. Mixed linear modelling was used to compare cycling performance data from each altitude bin.Power output was similar between the laboratory power-profile and the race simulation, however MMPs for 5-600 s and 15, 60, 240 and 600 s were lower (p ≤ 0.005 during the race at altitude compared with the laboratory power-profile and race simulation, respectively. Furthermore, peak power output and all MMPs were lower (≥ 11.7%, p ≤ 0.001 while racing >3000 m compared with rides completed near sea-level. However, speed associated with MMP 60 and 240 s was greater (p < 0.001 during racing at moderate-high altitude compared with the race simulation near sea-level.A reduction in oxygen availability as altitude increases leads to attenuation of cycling power output during competition. Decrement in cycling power output at altitude does not seem to affect speed which tended to be greater at higher altitudes.

  8. Accuracy of handheld blood glucose meters at high altitude.

    Pieter de Mol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e.g., high-altitude trekking, reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior studies reported bias in blood glucose measurements using different BGMs at high altitude. We hypothesized that glucose-oxidase based BGMs are more influenced by the lower atmospheric oxygen pressure at altitude than glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Glucose measurements at simulated altitude of nine BGMs (six glucose dehydrogenase and three glucose oxidase BGMs were compared to glucose measurement on a similar BGM at sea level and to a laboratory glucose reference method. Venous blood samples of four different glucose levels were used. Moreover, two glucose oxidase and two glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs were evaluated at different altitudes on Mount Kilimanjaro. Accuracy criteria were set at a bias 6.5 mmol/L and <1 mmol/L from reference glucose (when <6.5 mmol/L. No significant difference was observed between measurements at simulated altitude and sea level for either glucose oxidase based BGMs or glucose dehydrogenase based BGMs as a group phenomenon. Two GDH based BGMs did not meet set performance criteria. Most BGMs are generally overestimating true glucose concentration at high altitude. CONCLUSION: At simulated high altitude all tested BGMs, including glucose oxidase based BGMs, did not show influence of low atmospheric oxygen pressure. All BGMs, except for two GDH based BGMs, performed within predefined criteria. At true high altitude one GDH based BGM had best precision and accuracy.

  9. Spatial sensitivities of human health risk to intercontinental and high-altitude pollution

    Koo, Jamin; Wang, Qiqi; Henze, Daven K.; Waitz, Ian A.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2013-06-01

    We perform the first long-term (>1 year) continuous adjoint simulations with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model focusing on population exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and associated risk of early death. Sensitivities relevant to intercontinental and high-altitude PM pollution are calculated with particular application to aircraft emissions. Specifically, the sensitivities of premature mortality risk in different regions to NOx, SOx, CO, VOC and primary PM2.5 emissions as a function of location are computed. We apply the resultant sensitivity matrices to aircraft emissions, finding that NOx emissions are responsible for 93% of population exposure to aircraft-attributable PM2.5. Aircraft NOx accounts for all of aircraft-attributable nitrate exposure (as expected) and 53% of aircraft-attributable sulfate exposure due to the strong "oxidative coupling" between aircraft NOx emissions and non-aviation SO2 emissions in terms of sulfate formation. Of the health risk-weighted human PM2.5 exposure attributable to aviation, 73% occurs in Asia, followed by 18% in Europe. 95% of the air quality impacts of aircraft emissions in the US are incurred outside the US. We also assess the impact of uncertainty or changes in (non-aviation) ammonia emissions on aviation-attributable PM2.5 exposure by calculating second-order sensitivities. We note the potential application of the sensitivity matrices as a rapid policy analysis tool in aviation environmental policy contexts.

  10. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  11. The high-altitude water Cherenkov Observatory

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ -ray experiment under construction at 4,100ma.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ -ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ -ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array. (author)

  12. Solar electric energy supply at high altitude

    Knaupp, W.; Mundschau, E. [Zentrum fur Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW), Ulm (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Solar-hydrogen systems were analyzed regarding their usability as energy supply system for high altitude platforms. In a first step for an assessment of solar and photovoltaic resources near-ground spectral transmittances of atmosphere were extended with simplified height correction functions to achieve spectral irradiance descriptions versus atmospheric height up to 25 km. The influence of atmospheric height to different solar cell technologies regarding electrical performance was quantified at some examples for the aspect of spectral distribution with the help of the introduced spectral height factor. The main attention during analysis of the whole solar-hydrogen energy system was directed to characteristics of current or near term available technology. Specific power weight of photovoltaic system, electrolyzer, fuel cell and gas tanks and their dependence on operation mode and power range were assessed. A pre-design of a solar-hydrogen energy system was carried out for an airship (volume 580,000 m3) withstanding continuous wind speeds up to {approx} 130 km/h. The calculated coverage ratio of photovoltaic and load share of energy system mark the frame of usability. Depending on the airship size, shape and other external boundary conditions the total electrical energy demand could be covered by a solar-hydrogen energy system of current or near term technology for full year operation. However further investigations are necessary regarding e.g. further mass reductions. (author)

  13. The high-altitude water Cherenkov Observatory

    Mostafa, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel@psu.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Ft Collins, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ -ray experiment under construction at 4,100ma.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ -ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ -ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array. (author)

  14. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV gamma-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV gamma-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first thirty WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer...

  15. Training Diaries during Altitude Training Camp in Two Olympic Champions: An Observational Case Study

    Lorenzo Pugliese, Fabio R. Serpiello, Grégoire P. Millet, Antonio La Torre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Live High-Train High (LHTH interventions were adopted when athletes trained and lived at altitude to try maximising the benefits offered by hypoxic exposure and improving sea level performance. Nevertheless, scientific research has proposed that the possible benefits of hypoxia would be offset by the inability to maintain high training intensity at altitude. However, elite athletes have been rarely recruited as an experimental sample, and training intensity has almost never been monitored during altitude research. This case study is an attempt to provide a practical example of successful LHTH interventions in two Olympic gold medal athletes. Training diaries were collected and total training volumes, volumes at different intensities, and sea level performance recorded before, during and after a 3-week LHTH camp. Both athletes successfully completed the LHTH camp (2090 m maintaining similar absolute training intensity and training volume at high-intensity (> 91% of race pace compared to sea level. After the LHTH intervention both athletes obtained enhancements in performance and they won an Olympic gold medal. In our opinion, LHTH interventions can be used as a simple, yet effective, method to maintain absolute, and improve relative training intensity in elite endurance athletes.

  16. Mechanisms underlying reductions in stroke volume at rest and during exercise at high altitude.

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Shave, Rob

    2016-08-01

    High-altitude exposure challenges the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen delivery to the mitochondria under conditions of hypoxic stress. Following acclimatisation (3-5 days), stroke volume (SV) falls to below sea-level values but heart rate remains elevated, such that cardiac output is maintained compared to sea level. The decrease in SV has been a topic of research for over 40 years, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Impaired systolic contractile function secondary to reduced coronary arterial oxygen tension has been investigated as a potential cause for the decrease in SV. However, despite in vitro evidence of impaired cardiac contractile force in severe hypoxia, the majority of studies to date have reported enhanced in vivo ventricular systolic function at rest and during exercise in humans up to and above 5000 m. However, the elevated function observed at rest has recently been suggested to reduce the functional reserve available during exercise. While in vivo systolic function appears enhanced at high altitude, a decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) and altered filling patterns of both ventricles has been observed. The reduction in ventricular filling will undoubtedly affect SV, and four potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the reduction in left ventricular filling. In this article, both historical and recent reports of systolic function at high altitude will be reviewed, and evidence supporting and refuting each of the four mechanisms underpinning reduced left ventricular filling will be discussed. PMID:26325452

  17. Cerebral glucose metabolism 2 weeks following an 8000 m high altitude excursion

    Introduction: Little is known of regional cerebral glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) following high altitude excursions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate LCMRglu following an 40 day high altitude excursion. Methods: The study was performed on 11 male mountaineers, mean age 31.36 y, range 27-36. The subjects climbed Mount Shisha Pangma in the Himalaya (8048 m), an excursion which lasted 43 days. The total duration above 6000 m was 18 days. 18F-FDG PET was performed before and 2 weeks after the excursion on a GE Advance scanner. A single 10 minute image was acquired 40 minutes following the injection of 70 MBq 18F-FDG. The scans were first transformed into stereotactic space and normalized to mean whole brain activity, then statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was performed to assess the change of LCMRglu. In addition a region of interest analysis was performed on the interesting structures identified by SPM. Results: Significant increases (corrected for multiple comparisons) of relative FDG uptake were found in cerebellum (Z=5.36, 7.6±7.0, mean±s.d. of percent increase) and the left thalamus (Z= 4.91, 8.2±3.2%). The right thalamus demonstrated a trend towards increased LCMRglu. Conclusion: There are circumscribed areas with an increase in glucose metabolism following exposure to high altitude. The physiological meaning of this finding is at present not clear. One could speculate that it represents a compensatory reaction to excessive hypoxic stress

  18. [Interaction of hypoxia and haemostasis--hypoxia as a prothrombotic factor at high altitude?].

    Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Georg; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2005-04-01

    For an extended period of time various research projects have been conducted on the relationship of hypoxia and haemostasis. The enclosed article contains the conclusion to which extent lack of oxygen can activate the coagulation system and induce a prothrombotic state. The majority of studies proved a shortening of coagulation times during acute exposure to hypoxia, whereas activated parameters of coagulation and fibrinolysis like prothrombin fragment F1+2 as well as thrombin-antithrombin III complexes and D-dimer remained mostly unmodified. It is suggested that a prolonged sojourn at high altitudes could lead to activation of the coagulation system through an increase of haematocrit and blood viscosity. Recently it was proven that people living at high altitudes show an enhanced risk of stroke incidents. The significance of the change in haemostasis on that outcome has not yet been part of the research. However, it has been proven that the activity of the coagulation system does not play a pathophysiological part in the development of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary edema. Recent studies also demonstrated that moderate hypoxia during long haul flights may not be the main trigger in inducing deep vein thrombosis in passengers. PMID:15966261

  19. High-altitude headache: the effects of real vs sham oxygen administration.

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Durando, Jennifer; Giudetti, Lucia; Pampallona, Alan; Vighetti, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    High-altitude, or hypobaric hypoxia, headache has recently emerged as an interesting model to study placebo and nocebo responses, and particularly their peripheral mechanisms. In this study, we analyze the response of this type of headache to either real or sham (placebo) oxygen (O(2)) administration at an altitude of 3500 m, where blood oxygen saturation (SO(2)) drops from the normal value of about 98% to about 85%. In a trial in which a double-blind administration of either 100% O(2) or sham O(2) was administered, we tested pre- and post-exercise headache, along with fatigue, heart rate (HR) responses, and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) salivary concentration. Although real O(2) breathing increased SO(2) along with a decrease in pre- and post-exercise headache, fatigue, HR, and PGE(2), placebo O(2) changed neither pre-/post-exercise headache nor SO(2)/HR/PGE(2), but it decreased fatigue. However, in another group of subjects, when sham O(2) was delivered after 2 previous exposures to O(2) (O(2) preconditioning), it decreased fatigue, post-exercise headache, HR, and PGE(2), yet without any increase in SO(2). Three main findings emerge from these data. First, placebo O(2) is effective in reducing post-exercise headache, along with HR and PGE(2) decrease, only after O(2) preconditioning. Second, pre-exercise (at rest) headache is not affected by placebo O(2), which emphasizes the limits of a placebo treatment at high altitude. Third, fatigue is affected by placebo O(2) even without prior O(2) conditioning, which suggests the higher placebo sensitivity of fatigue compared with headache pain at high altitude. PMID:26164587

  20. HIGH LIFE: High altitude fatalities led to pulse oximetry.

    Severinghaus, John W

    2016-01-15

    In 1875, Paul Bert linked high altitude danger to the low partial pressure of oxygen when 2 of 3 French balloonists died euphorically at about 8,600 m altitude. World War I fatal crashes of high altitude fighter pilots led to a century of efforts to use oximetry to warn pilots. The carotid body, discovered in 1932 to be the hypoxia detector, led to most current physiologic understanding of the body's respiratory responses to hypoxia and CO2. The author describes some of his UCSF group's work: In 1963, we reported both the brain's ventral medullary near-surface CO2 (and pH) chemosensors and the role of cerebrospinal fluid in acclimatization to altitude. In 1966, we reported the effect of altitude on cerebral blood flow and later the changes of carotid body sensitivity at altitude and the differences in natives of high altitude. In 1973, pulse oximetry was invented when Japanese biophysicist Takuo Aoyagi read and applied to pulses a largely forgotten 35-year-old discovery by English medical student J. R. Squire of a method of computing oxygen saturation from red and infrared light passing through both perfused and blanched tissue. PMID:26251514

  1. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Metabolized by CYP3A4 in Chinese Han Volunteers Living at Low Altitude and in Native Han and Tibetan Chinese Volunteers Living at High Altitude.

    Zhang, Juanling; Zhu, Junbo; Yao, Xingchen; Duan, Yabin; Zhou, Xuejiao; Yang, Meng; Li, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine hydrochloride metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) in Chinese Han volunteers living at low altitude (LA) and in native Han and Tibetan Chinese volunteers living at high altitude, lidocaine hydrochloride 10 mg was given by intramuscular injection to 3 groups: Han volunteers living at LA, and native Han and Tibetan volunteers living at a high altitude. Blood samples were collected before the (baseline) study drug was given and at 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 h after study drug administration. Lidocaine hydrochloride in plasma was determined by RP-HPLC. Pharmacokinetics parameters of lidocaine hydrochloride showed that there were no significant difference between the native Han and Tibetan volunteers, but the t1/2 was 29.8 and 29.8% higher in 2 groups, respectively, than in the LA group. To study related mechanism, the effects of exposure to chronic high-altitude hypoxia (CHH) on the activity and expression of CYP3A1 were examined in rats. Rats were divided into LA, chronic moderate altitude hypoxia, and CHH groups. CHH caused significant decreases in the activity and protein and mRNA expression of rat CYP3A1 in vivo. This study found significant changes in the disposition of lidocaine hydrochloride in native healthy Tibetan and Han Chinese subjects living at a high altitude in comparison to healthy Han Chinese subjects living at LA, it might be due to significant decreases in the activity and protein and mRNA expression of CYP3A4 under CHH condition. PMID:26730802

  3. High altitude cerebral oedema during adventure training on Mount Kenya.

    Raitt, S

    2012-09-01

    The trekking ascent to Point Lenana (4,985m) on Mount Kenya is a popular objective for soldiers on adventurous training in Kenya. The standard route previously taken has been the Naro Moru route which involves an ascent rate far in excess of that recommended to avoid altitude illness. This article describes the case of a British soldier who developed high altitude cerebral oedema during an ascent of Point Lenana via the Naro Moro route. Recommendations to reduce the risk of altitude illness on Mount Kenya include alternative and more gradual routes of ascent. Early symptom recognition and descent are vital to prevent clinical deterioration. PMID:23472574

  4. Genetic adaptation to high altitude in the Ethiopian highlands

    Scheinfeldt, Laura B.; Soi, Sameer; Thompson, Simon; Ranciaro, Alessia; Woldemeskel, Dawit; Beggs, William; Lambert, Charla; Jarvis, Joseph P.; Abate, Dawit; Belay, Gurja; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Genomic analysis of high-altitude populations residing in the Andes and Tibet has revealed several candidate loci for involvement in high-altitude adaptation, a subset of which have also been shown to be associated with hemoglobin levels, including EPAS1, EGLN1, and PPARA, which play a role in the HIF-1 pathway. Here, we have extended this work to high- and low-altitude populations living in Ethiopia, for which we have measured hemoglobin levels. We genotyped the Illumina 1M SNP ar...

  5. High-altitude illness induced by tooth root infection

    FINSTERER, J.

    1999-01-01

    High-altitude illness may occur after recent pulmonary infection, but high-altitude illness after root canal therapy has not been described previously. A 44-year-old man is presented who skied to a 3333 m high peak in the Eastern Alps one day after he had undergone root canal therapy because of a tooth root infection. After 4 hours above 3000 m severe symptoms of high-altitude illness, including pulmonary oedema, developed. His condition improved after immediate descent. The next day he prese...

  6. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G.; Stöhr, Eric J.; Cotter, James D.; Nio, Amanda Q. X.; Shave, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at s...

  7. New tendencies in the application of altitude training in sport preparation

    RANISAVLJEV IGOR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Competitive athletes frequently use altitude training (AT to improve sea-level performance. ATbecame interesting for sport scientists and athletes since Olympic Games in Mexico City in 1968. Exercise ataltitude may increase the training stimulus and enlarge the effects of endurance training. The first notedadaptation induced by staying at altitude is an increase in red blood cell mass that improves aerobic power andsea-level performance. Currently, there are several types of AT modalities: traditional ‘live high-train high’,contemporary ‘live high-train low’, intermittent hypoxic exposure during rest, live low-train high andintermittent hypoxic exposure during continuous session. Despite several substantial differences between thesemethods of hypoxic all of them have the same goal: to stimulate an improvement in athletic performance at sealevel. A proper distinction must be made between altitude acclimatization during preparation for competitions ataltitude and AT and acclimatization for improvement of the sea-level performances. Former scientific researchesidentified two longer phases of enhanced work capacity after AT. First phase of enhanced work capacityoccurring between days 3-7 and 12-13, while the best results are achieved during 18 and 20 days after AT.Second phase of enhanced work capacity is reported between days 36 and 48 after AT. The further developmentof practical knowledge in area of AT should predominantly include recommendations about application ofdifferent AT methods in training periodization in different sports. Improvement of the work capacity andduration of enhanced work capacity at the sea level after AT stimuli are the main questions opened for futurescientific researches.

  8. Cognitive performance in high altitude Andean residents compared to low altitude populations: from childhood to older age

    Hill, Catherine M.; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Baya, Ana; Webster, Rebecca; Gavlak-Dingle, Johanna; Lesperance, Veline; Healthcote, Kate; Romola S Bucks

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess cognition in populations born and living at high (3700m) and low altitude (500m) in Bolivia, who were similar for both socio-economic status and genetic ancestry. To determine whether high altitude hypoxia influences cognitive decline across the life-span. Method: In total, 191 healthy participants aged 4 to 85 years were assessed at high (N = 94; 33; 35% male) and low altitude (N = 97; 46, 47% male) on a battery of cognitive tasks: fluid intelligence, attention, s...

  9. 14 CFR 91.119 - Minimum safe altitudes: General.

    2010-01-01

    ... fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface. (b) Over... § 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General. Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person...

  10. Multi Rotor Uav at Different Altitudes for Slope Mapping Studies

    Tahar, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Most of consultation work only involves a small area, especially for slope mapping studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of slope mapping results from different altitudes at semi-undulated area and undulated area. Multi-rotor UAV is used as an instrument for data acquisition for this study. The images of slope were captured from five different altitudes in the same study area. All images were processed using photogrammetric software to produce digital elevation models and digital orthophoto. In this study, slope map from all different altitudes were identified and recorded for analysis purposes. It was found that the accuracy of slope is increase when altitude is increase. In conclusion, the condition of slope such as semi-undulated and undulated area did have an influence on the slope accuracy.

  11. Biochemical Aspects of Acclimatization of Man to High Altitude Stress

    K. K. Srivastava

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the biochemical aspects of acclimatization of human body to high altitude with particular reference to the adaptive changes in Skeletal muscles, hepatic function, adrenal function and carbohydrate metabolism.

  12. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Transonic Performance Flight Demonstration Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altitude compensating nozzles continue to be of interest for use on future launch vehicle boosters and upper stages because of their higher mission average Isp and...

  13. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers

  14. Investigation of Correction Method of the Spacecraft Low Altitude Ranging

    Liu, Jing-Lei; Wu, Shi-Tong; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    gamma ray altitude control system is an important equipment for deep space exploration and sample return mission, its main purpose is a low altitude measurement of the spacecraft based on Compton Effect at the moment when it lands on extraterrestrial celestial or sampling returns to the Earth land, and an ignition altitude correction of the spacecraft retrograde landing rocket at different landing speeds. This paper presents an ignition altitude correction method of the spacecraft at different landing speeds, based on the number of particles gamma ray reflected field gradient graded. Through the establishment of a theoretical model, its algorithm feasibility is proved by a mathematical derivation and verified by an experiment, and also the adaptability of the algorithm under different parameters is described. The method provides a certain value for landing control of the deep space exploration spacecraft landing the planet surface.

  15. NHAP = National High-Altitude Aerial Photography: 1980 - 1989

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program, which was operated from 1980-1989, was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project to...

  16. Altitude-related deaths in seven trekkers in the Himalayas.

    Dickinson, J; Heath, D.; Gosney, J.; Williams, D

    1983-01-01

    The clinical features and necropsy findings are described for seven trekkers in the Himalayas whose deaths were related to high altitude. The fatal outcome was due to serious pulmonary and cerebral disease. Oedema of the lungs and brain was prominent but so was thrombosis and haemorrhage, features of acute mountain sickness that have received insufficient recognition in the past. Most of the men were middle aged. Some began their trekking soon after flying to high altitude before becoming acc...

  17. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons

    Kuo, Kirsty A.; Hunt, Hugh E.M.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal...

  18. LOW ALTITUDE AIRSHIPS FOR SEAMLESS MOBILE COMMUNICATION IN AIR TRAVEL

    Madhu D; Santhoshkumar M K; Swarnalatha Srinivas; Narendra Kumar G

    2014-01-01

    The Aviation Administration policy prohibits the use of mobile phones in Aircraft during transition for the reason it may harm their communication system due to Electromagnetic interference. In case the user wants to access cellular network at higher altitudes, base station access is a problem. Large number of channels are allocated to a single user moving at high speed by various Base Stations in the vicinity to service the request requiring more resources. Low Altitude Platfo...

  19. Functions and Design Scheme of Tibet High Altitude Test Base

    Yu Yongqing; Guo Jian; Yin Yu; Mao Yan; Li Guangfan; Fan Jianbin; Lu Jiayu; Su Zhiyi; Li Peng; Li Qingfeng; Liao Weiming; Zhou Jun

    2010-01-01

    @@ The functional orientation of the Tibet High Altitude Test Base, subordinated to the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), is to serve power transmission projects in high altitude areas, especially to provide technical support for southwestern hydropower delivery projects by UHVDC transmission and Qinghai-Tibet grid interconnection project. This paper presents the matters concerned during siting and planning, functions,design scheme, the main performances and parameters of the test facilities, as well as the tests and research tasks already carried out.

  20. Aging, Tolerance to High Altitude, and Cardiorespiratory Response to Hypoxia.

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Lhuissier, François J

    2015-06-01

    Richalet, Jean-Paul, and François J. Lhuissier. Aging, tolerance to high altitude, and cardiorespiratory response to hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 16:117-124, 2015.--It is generally accepted that aging is rather protective, at least at moderate altitude. Some anecdotal reports even mention successful ascent of peaks over 8000 m and even Everest by elderly people. However, very few studies have explored the influence of aging on tolerance to high altitude and prevalence of acute high altitude related diseases, taking into account all confounding factors such as speed of ascent, altitude reached, sex, training status, and chemo-responsiveness. Changes in physiological responses to hypoxia with aging were assessed through a cross-sectional 20-year study including 4675 subjects (2789 men, 1886 women; 14-85 yrs old) and a longitudinal study including 30 subjects explored at a mean 10.4-year interval. In men, ventilatory response to hypoxia increased, while desaturation was less pronounced with aging. Cardiac response to hypoxia was blunted with aging in both genders. Similar results were found in the longitudinal study, with a decrease in cardiac and an increase in ventilatory response to hypoxia with aging. These adaptive responses were less pronounced or absent in post-menopausal untrained women. In conclusion, in normal healthy and active subjects, aging has no deleterious effect on cardiac and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, at least up to the eighth decade. Aging is not a contraindication for high altitude, as far as no pathological condition interferes and physical fitness is compatible with the intensity of the expected physical demand of one's individual. Physiological evaluation through hypoxic exercise testing before going to high altitude is helpful to detect risk factors of severe high altitude-related diseases. PMID:25946570

  1. Volume regulation and renal function at high altitude across gender.

    Bernd Haditsch

    Full Text Available We investigated changes in volume regulating hormones and renal function at high altitudes and across gender.Included in this study were 28 subjects (n = 20 males; n = 8 females. ages: 19 - 65 yrs, who ascended to a height of 3440m (HA1, on the 3rd day and to 5050m (HA2, on the 14th day. Plasma and urinary creatinine and urinary osmolality as well as plasma levels of plasma renin activity (PRA, Aldosterone, antidiuretic hormone (ADH, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP were measured. The plasma volume loss (PVL was estimated from plasma density and hematocrit. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR was measured based on nocturnal (9 hour creatinine clearance; this was compared with various methods for estimation of GFR.The mean 24-hour urine production increased significantly in both sexes across the expedition. But PVL reached significance only in males. No changes in Na+ in plasma, urine or its fractional excretion were seen at both altitudes. Urinary osmolality decreased upon ascent to the higher altitudes. ADH and PRA decreased significantly at both altitudes in males but only at HA2 in females. However, no changes in aldosterone were seen across the sexes and at different altitudes. ANP increased significantly only in males during the expedition. GFR, derived from 9-h creatinine clearance (CreaCl, decreased in both sexes at HA1 but remained stable at HA2. Conventional Crea[p]-based GFR estimates (eGFR showed only poor correlation to CreaCl.We report details of changes in hormonal patterns across high altitude sojourn. To our knowledge we are not aware of any study that has examined these hormones in same subjects and across gender during high altitude sojourn. Our results also suggest that depending on the estimation formula used, eGFR underestimated the observed decrease in renal function measured by CreaCl, thus opening the debate regarding the use of estimated glomerular filtration rates at high altitudes.

  2. Evolutionary adaptation to high altitude: a view from in utero

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Wilson, Megan J.; Moore, Lorna G.

    2009-01-01

    A primary focus within biological anthropology has been to elucidate the processes of evolutionary adaptation. A. Roberto Frisancho helped move anthropology towards more mechanistic explanations of human adaptation by drawing attention to the importance of the functional relevance of human variation. Using the natural laboratory of high altitude, he and others asked whether the unique physiology of indigenous high-altitude residents was the result of acclimatization, developmental plasticity ...

  3. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    Matthys Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax), sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms...

  4. Functions and Design Scheme of Tibet High Altitude Test Base

    2010-01-01

    The functional orientation of the Tibet High Altitude Test Base, subordinated to the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), is to serve power transmission projects in high altitude areas, especially to provide technical support for southwestern hydropower delivery projects by UHVDC transmission and Qinghai-Tibet grid interconnection project. This paper presents the matters concerned during siting and planning, functions, design scheme, the main performances and parameters of the test facilities, as well as...

  5. Predator foraging altitudes reveal the structure of aerial insect communities.

    Helms, Jackson A; Godfrey, Aaron P; Ames, Tayna; Bridge, Eli S

    2016-01-01

    The atmosphere is populated by a diverse array of dispersing insects and their predators. We studied aerial insect communities by tracking the foraging altitudes of an avian insectivore, the Purple Martin (Progne subis). By attaching altitude loggers to nesting Purple Martins and collecting prey delivered to their nestlings, we determined the flight altitudes of ants and other insects. We then tested hypotheses relating ant body size and reproductive ecology to flight altitude. Purple Martins flew up to 1,889 meters above ground, and nestling provisioning trips ranged up to 922 meters. Insect communities were structured by body size such that species of all sizes flew near the ground but only light insects flew to the highest altitudes. Ant maximum flight altitudes decreased by 60% from the lightest to the heaviest species. Winged sexuals of social insects (ants, honey bees, and termites) dominated the Purple Martin diet, making up 88% of prey individuals and 45% of prey biomass. By transferring energy from terrestrial to aerial food webs, mating swarms of social insects play a substantial role in aerial ecosystems. Although we focus on Purple Martins and ants, our combined logger and diet method could be applied to a range of aerial organisms. PMID:27352817

  6. Prior altitude experience of climbers attempting to summit Aconcagua.

    Borm, Nicholas; Van Roo, Jon D; Pesce, Carlos; Courtney, D Mark; Malik, Sanjeev; Lazio, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    Aconcagua (6962 m) is one of the seven summits and the highest mountain outside of Asia. Climbers of varying experience are drawn to its nontechnical route. Our objective was to detail the prior altitude experience of climbers attempting to summit Aconcagua. We asked all climbers on the normal route of Aconcagua to complete questionnaires with demographics and prior high altitude experience while acclimatizing at Plaza de Mulas base camp during 9 nonconsecutive days in January 2009. 127 volunteers from 22 countries were enrolled. Mean age was 39.8 years and 88.2% were male. Median altitude at place of residence was 200 m (IQR: 30, 700). Median previous maximum altitude reached was 5895 m (IQR: 5365, 6150). 7.1% of climbers had never been above 4000 m. Median previous maximum sleeping altitude was 4800 m (IQR: 4300, 5486). 12.6% of climbers had never slept above 4000 m. Climbers who performed acclimatization treks spent a mean of 3.6 (2.5, 4.7) days at>3000 m in the previous 2 months. However, 50.4% of climbers performed no acclimatization treks. Although the majority of mountaineers who attempt Aconcagua have prior high altitude experience, a substantial minority has never been above 4000 m. PMID:22206564

  7. Skeletal muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates are affected differently by altitude-induced hypoxia in native lowlanders

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul;

    2010-01-01

    and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%⋅hr(-1) (p... acclimatized to high altitude. The sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was in contrast unaffected by altitude exposure; 0.052±0.019 at sea-level to 0.059±0.010%⋅hr(-1) (p>0.05). Trends to increments in whole body protein kinetics were seen: Degradation rate elevated from 2.51±0.21 at sea level to 2.......73±0.13 µmol⋅kg(-1)⋅min(-1) (p = 0.05) at high altitude and synthesis rate similar; 2.24±0.20 at sea level and 2.43±0.13 µmol⋅kg(-1)⋅min(-1) (p>0.05) at altitude. We conclude that whole body amino acid flux is increased due to an elevated protein turnover rate. Resting skeletal muscle myocontractile protein...

  8. Time-varying signal analysis to detect high-altitude periodic breathing in climbers ascending to extreme altitude

    Garde, Ainara; Giraldo Giraldo, Beatriz; Jané Campos, Raimon; Latshang, T D; Turk, A.J.; Hess, T.; Bosch, M M; Barthelmes, D.; Merz, T M; Pichler Hefti, J.; Schoch, O.D.; Bloch, Konrad E

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the performance of cardiorespiratory analysis detecting periodic breathing (PB) in chest wall recordings in mountaineers climbing to extreme altitude. The breathing patterns of 34 mountaineers were monitored unobtrusively by inductance plethysmography, ECG and pulse oximetry using a portable recorder during climbs at altitudes between 4497 and 7546 m on Mt. Muztagh Ata. The minute ventilation (VE) and heart rate (HR) signals were studied, to identify visually scored ...

  9. Lower obesity rate during residence at high altitude among a military population with frequent migration: a quasi experimental model for investigating spatial causation.

    Jameson D Voss

    Full Text Available We sought to evaluate whether residence at high altitude is associated with the development of obesity among those at increased risk of becoming obese. Obesity, a leading global health priority, is often refractory to care. A potentially novel intervention is hypoxia, which has demonstrated positive long-term metabolic effects in rats. Whether or not high altitude residence confers benefit in humans, however, remains unknown. Using a quasi-experimental, retrospective study design, we observed all outpatient medical encounters for overweight active component enlisted service members in the U.S. Army or Air Force from January 2006 to December 2012 who were stationed in the United States. We compared high altitude (>1.96 kilometers above sea level duty assignment with low altitude (<0.98 kilometers. The outcome of interest was obesity related ICD-9 codes (278.00-01, V85.3x-V85.54 by Cox regression. We found service members had a lower hazard ratio (HR of incident obesity diagnosis if stationed at high altitude as compared to low altitude (HR 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.65; p<0.001. Using geographic distribution of obesity prevalence among civilians throughout the U.S. as a covariate (as measured by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the REGARDS study also predicted obesity onset among service members. In conclusion, high altitude residence predicts lower rates of new obesity diagnoses among overweight service members in the U.S. Army and Air Force. Future studies should assign exposure using randomization, clarify the mechanism(s of this relationship, and assess the net balance of harms and benefits of high altitude on obesity prevention.

  10. Transmural coronary vasodilator reserve in conscious swine exposed to a simulated altitude of 4300m for five weeks

    This study was carried out to ascertain whether exposure to a simulated altitude of 4,300 m (P /SUB B/ = 450 mm Hg) for five wk results in physiologic changes in the porcine coronary vascular bed that could be demonstrated by examining transmural myocardial blood flow at maximal coronary vasodilatation and minimal coronary vascular resistance (CVR). We examined transmural distribution of myocardial blood flow (MFB; 15 microm diameter radionuclide labeled microspheres) before (baseline) and during adenosine infusion (1.50 mg.kg-1min-1) in two groups of young swine (group I: sea level (SL) pigs, n = 8; group II: high altitude (HA) exposed pigs, n = 9). In HA pigs, marked right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy developed and hemoglobin concentration increased by 42%. Baseline transmural MBF in both ventricles of HA pigs was decreased but subendocardial:subepicardial (endo:epi) flow ratios and myocardial O2 delivery were not different from SL pigs. With adenosine infusion, blood flow in all regions of ventricular myocardium increased to a similar level in both groups of pigs and endo:epi flow ratios remained similar. For both ventricles, minimal CVR (per unit weight) was not different in the two groups of swine. Left ventricular coronary vasodilator capacity was not increased with prolonged exposure to 4,300 m altitude

  11. Antioxidant and oxidative stress responses of sojourners at high altitude in different climatic temperatures

    Sinha, Sanchari; Singh, Som Nath; Saha, Mantu; Kain, T. C.; Tyagi, A. K.; Ray, Uday Sankar

    2010-01-01

    High altitude (HA) is a multi-stressor environment comprising hypobaric hypoxia and cold. Climatic temperature varies with seasonal variation at HA. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on antioxidant profile among sojourners at HA. The study was conducted on sojourners exposed to an altitude of 4,560 m in two different seasons and categorized into two groups (SOJ 1, n = 63, ambient temp. at HA: -6º to +10ºC; SOJ 2, n = 81, ambient temp. at HA: 3º-22ºC). Blood was collected at sea level (SL) and after 4 weeks of HA exposure. Antioxidant enzymes showed significant upregulation in SOJ 2 at HA. In SOJ 1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase showed significant upregulation but catalase and glutathione reductase showed significant decrease at HA. Non-enzymatic antioxidants showed significant reduction in SOJ 1 whereas a sustained antioxidant profile was observed in SOJ 2 at HA. Oxidative stress markers showed higher levels in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2 at HA. Differences observed between SOJ 1 and SOJ 2 at HA may be the consequence of different environmental temperatures. Cold stress was higher in SOJ 1 as evidenced from the significantly lower oral temperature in SOJ 1 as compared to SOJ 2. Cold- and hypoxia-induced increase in energy expenditure was significantly high in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2. To conclude, chronic exposure to hypoxia in moderate climatic temperature has a potential preconditioning effect on antioxidant system, but exposure to both cold and hypoxia causes greater oxidative stress due to altered metabolic rate.

  12. The Role of Visual Occlusion in Altitude Maintenance during Simulated Flight

    Gray, R.; Geri, G. A.; Akhtar, S. C.; Covas, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of visual occlusion as a cue to altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight (LAF) was investigated. The extent to which the ground surface is occluded by 3-D objects varies with altitude and depends on the height, radius, and density of the objects. Participants attempted to maintain a constant altitude during simulated flight over an…

  13. 40 CFR 600.310-86 - Labeling of high altitude vehicles.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling of high altitude vehicles... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.310-86 Labeling of high altitude vehicles... altitude vehicles according to § 600.306. (b) A high altitude vehicle may be labeled with a general...

  14. The physiology and biomechanics of avian flight at high altitude.

    Altshuler, Douglas L; Dudley, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Many birds fly at high altitude, either during long-distance flights or by virtue of residence in high-elevation habitats. Among the many environmental features that vary systematically with altitude, five have significant consequences for avian flight performance: ambient wind speeds, air temperature, humidity, oxygen availability, and air density. During migratory flights, birds select flight altitudes that minimize energy expenditure via selection of advantageous tail- and cross-winds. Oxygen partial pressure decreases substantially to as little as 26% of sea-level values for the highest altitudes at which birds migrate, whereas many taxa reside above 3000 meters in hypoxic air. Birds exhibit numerous adaptations in pulmonary, cardiovascular, and muscular systems to alleviate such hypoxia. The systematic decrease in air density with altitude can lead to a benefit for forward flight through reduced drag but imposes an increased aerodynamic demand for hovering by degrading lift production and simultaneously elevating the induced power requirements of flight. This effect has been well-studied in the hovering flight of hummingbirds, which occur throughout high-elevation habitats in the western hemisphere. Phylogenetically controlled studies have shown that hummingbirds compensate morphologically for such hypodense air through relative increases in wing size, and kinematically via increased stroke amplitude during the wingbeat. Such compensatory mechanisms result in fairly constant power requirements for hovering at different elevations, but decrease the margin of excess power available for other flight behaviors. PMID:21672723

  15. Antioxidant Properties of Honey from Different Altitudes of Nepal Himalayas

    Neupane Bishnu Prasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty two multifloral honey samples representing central western parts of Nepal were examined spectrophotometrically for their antioxidant properties and total phenol content. The modified Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine total phenol content and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH• assay for antiradical activity. In all samples, physicochemical parameters like moisture, reducing sugar, sucrose, ash, free acidity and water insoluble matter were also measured according to harmonized methods of the International Honey Commission (IHC. The results of physicochemical analysis showed that all the values, except for moisture of a small number of high altitude honey samples, are in good agreement with the current Nepalese standard. The total phenolic contents of honey, collected from high and low altitude, ranged from 154.87 to 41.90 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/100 g respectively, at corresponding antiradical activity using DPPH• expressed as percent inhibition of 76.66% and 25.69%. The IC50 values of selected high altitude honey samples ranged from 56 to 72 mg/mL. The total antioxidant properties were correlated (P<0.01 between total phenol content and antiradical activity (r=0.992. The obtained results demonstrate that the Nepalese honey collected from high altitude region contained more antioxidants than honey of low altitude region.

  16. Effect of phosphate supplementation on oxygen delivery at high altitude

    Jain, S. C.; Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Sharma, V. M.; Divekar, H. M.; Tyagi, A. K.; Panwar, M. R.; Swamy, Y. V.

    1987-09-01

    In the present communication, effect of low doses of phosphate supplementation on short-term high altitude adaptation has been examined. Studies were carried out in 36 healthy, male, sea-level residents divided in a double blind fashion into drug and placebo treated groups. 3.2 mmol of phosphate were given orally to each subject of the drug treated group once a day for 4 days on arrival at an altitude of 3,500 m. Sequential studies were done in the subjects in both groups on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st day of their altitude stay. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, erythrocyte and reticulocyte counts increased to the similar extent in both groups. Blood pH, pO2 and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) did not differ between the two groups. On 3rd day of the altitude stay, inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG) levels in the drug treated group increased significantly as compared to the placebo group. No significant difference in inorganic phosphate and 2,3 DPG was observed later on in the two groups. Psychological and clinical tests also indicated that the drug treated subjects felt better as compared to the placebo treated subjects. The present study suggests that low doses of phosphate increases circulating 2,3-DPG concentration which in turn brings about beneficial effect towards short term high altitude adaptation.

  17. Environmental stress and 3-day eventing: effects of altitude.

    Foreman, J H; Waldsmith, J K; Lalum, R B

    1999-07-01

    Three-day event horses are subject to various external environmental stresses including changes in ambient temperature, humidity, altitude, and test severity. Considerable research on the adverse effects of increased heat and humidity preceded the 1996 Olympic Summer Games in Atlanta, Georgia USA, but no research has been done previously on the effects of altitude on 3-day eventing. Physical and venous blood gas data were collected on horses (n = 24) competing in the High Prairie Preliminary (CCN*) and Intermediate (CCN**) 3-day events and Preliminary Horse Trials in Parker, Colorado (1900 m above sea level). Despite the increased altitude, only post exercise rectal temperature and pH were higher (P 0.05). When these preliminary horse trial horses in Colorado were compared to those previously studied at preliminary horse trials at sea level in Arizona, post exercise HR and RR were higher (P < 0.05) and pH, PCO2, [tCO2], [HCO3-], BE and [iCa++] were lower (P < 0.05) at altitude. These data show that increased altitude (1900 m above sea level) was more stressful for 3-day event horses, but did not result in the severe physiological changes and inability to complete prescribed exercise tests seen in previous studies with increased heat and humidity. It is clear from these and previous data that increased heat and humidity are the more important environmental stressors in 3-day eventing. PMID:10659288

  18. Transcriptome and network changes in climbers at extreme altitudes.

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available Extreme altitude can induce a range of cellular and systemic responses. Although it is known that hypoxia underlies the major changes and that the physiological responses include hemodynamic changes and erythropoiesis, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways mediating such changes are largely unknown. To obtain a more complete picture of the transcriptional regulatory landscape and networks involved in extreme altitude response, we followed four climbers on an expedition up Mount Xixiabangma (8,012 m, and collected blood samples at four stages during the climb for mRNA and miRNA expression assays. By analyzing dynamic changes of gene networks in response to extreme altitudes, we uncovered a highly modular network with 7 modules of various functions that changed in response to extreme altitudes. The erythrocyte differentiation module is the most prominently up-regulated, reflecting increased erythrocyte differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells, probably at the expense of differentiation into other cell lineages. These changes are accompanied by coordinated down-regulation of general translation. Network topology and flow analyses also uncovered regulators known to modulate hypoxia responses and erythrocyte development, as well as unknown regulators, such as the OCT4 gene, an important regulator in stem cells and assumed to only function in stem cells. We predicted computationally and validated experimentally that increased OCT4 expression at extreme altitude can directly elevate the expression of hemoglobin genes. Our approach established a new framework for analyzing the transcriptional regulatory network from a very limited number of samples.

  19. Atmospheric Sampling of Aerosols to Stratospheric Altitudes using High Altitude Balloons

    Jerde, E. A.; Thomas, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide represents a long-lived atmospheric component relevant to global climate change, it is also understood that many additional contributors influence the overall climate of Earth. Among these, short-lived components are more difficult to incorporate into models due to uncertainties in the abundances of these both spatially and temporally. Possibly the most significant of these short-lived components falls under the heading of “black carbon” (BC). There are numerous overlapping definitions of BC, but it is basically carbonaceous in nature and light absorbing. Due to its potential as a climate forcer, an understanding of the BC population in the atmosphere is critical for modeling of radiative forcing. Prior measurements of atmospheric BC generally consist of airplane- and ground-based sampling, typically below 5000 m and restricted in time and space. Given that BC has a residence time on the order of days, short-term variability is easily missed. Further, since the radiative forcing is a result of BC distributed through the entire atmospheric column, aircraft sampling is by definition incomplete. We are in the process of planning a more comprehensive sampling of the atmosphere for BC using high-altitude balloons. Balloon-borne sampling is a highly reliable means to sample air through the entire troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Our system will incorporate a balloon and a flight train of two modules. One module will house an atmospheric sampler. This sampler will be single-stage (samples all particle sizes together), and will place particles directly on an SEM sample stub for analysis. The nozzle depositing the sample will be offset from the center of the stub, placing the aerosol particles toward the edge. At various altitudes, the stub will be rotated 45 degrees, providing 6-8 sample “cuts” of particle populations through the atmospheric column. The flights will reach approximately 27 km altitude, above which the balloons

  20. Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X): High-Altitude Balloon Flight Mission for Improving the NAIRAS Model

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Alston, Erica J.; Straume, Tore; Gersey, Brad; Lusby, Terry C.; Tobiska, W. Kent; Wilkins, Rick

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) high-altitude balloon mission was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico USA on 25 September, 2015. Over 15 hours of science data were obtained from four dosimeters at altitudes above about 25 km. One of the main goals of the RaD-X mission is to improve aviation radiation model characterization of cosmic ray primaries by taking dosimetric measurements above the Pfotzer maximum before the production of secondary particles occurs. The second goal of the RaD-X mission is to facilitate the pathway toward real-time, data assimilative predictions of atmospheric cosmic radiation exposure by identifying and characterizing low-cost radiation measurement solutions.

  1. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large 'evaporation' peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was eight times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56-201 g cm-2 atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons

  2. Current-use pesticide transport to Costa Rica's high-altitude tropical cloud forest.

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Gouin, Todd; Lei, Ying D; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa E; Wania, Frank

    2011-12-01

    To gain insight into the atmospheric transport and deposition of organic contaminants in high-altitude forests in the humid tropics, pesticides were analyzed in air, water, and soil samples from Costa Rica. Passive samplers deployed across the country revealed annually averaged air concentrations of chlorothalonil, endosulfan, and pendimethalin that were higher in areas with intensive agricultural activities than in more remote areas. Atmospheric concentrations were particularly high in the intensively cultivated central valley. Only endosulfan and its degradation products were found in soils sampled along an altitudinal transect on the northern side of Volcano Turrialba, which is facing heavily cultivated coastal plains. Consistent with calculations of cold trapping in tropical mountains, concentrations of endosulfan sulfate increased with altitude. Pesticide levels in lake, creek, fog, and arboreal water samples from high-elevation cloud forests were generally below 10 ng · L(-1). Endosulfan sulfate was the most abundant pesticide in water, with concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 9.4 ng · L(-1). Its levels were highest in water sampled from bromeliads. Levels of total endosulfan in water are much lower than the reported median lethal concentration (LC50) value for acute toxicity of α-endosulfan to tadpoles. Although this suggests that the presence of pesticide might not have a direct impact on amphibian populations, the possibility of effects of chronic exposure to a mixture of substances cannot be excluded. Fog was relatively enriched in some of the analyzed pesticides, such as dacthal and chlorothalonil, and may constitute an important deposition pathway to high-altitude tropical cloud forest. PMID:21898568

  3. High Altitude Journeys, Flights and Hypoxia: Any Role for Disease Flares in IBD Patients?

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Rogler, Gerhard; Biedermann, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The importance of environmental factors in the pathogenesis including their disease-modifying potential are increasingly recognized in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, largely driven by the perception that the prevalence and incidence of IBD are on the rise within the last few years, especially in non-western countries. One of those factors is believed to be hypoxia. The role of hypoxia as a modifying or even causative factor in the genesis and maintenance of inflammation has been increasingly elucidated in recent years. Hypoxia is believed to be a main inducing factor of inflammation. This has been studied in different animal experiments as well as in humans exposed to hypoxia. In several studies - mainly in mice - animals exposed to short-term hypoxia accumulated inflammatory cells in multiple organs and showed elevated cytokines in the blood. Comparable studies were performed in humans, mainly in healthy mountaineers. Recently, we reported on the association between IBD flare-up episodes and antecedent journeys to high-altitude region and aircraft travels. According to these findings, we concluded that flights and stays at high altitudes of >2,000 mg are a risk factor for increased disease activity in IBD. To evaluate the potential influence of hypoxia on the course of IBD on a biomolecular level and to test the effects of hypoxia under standardized conditions, we initiated a prospective and controlled investigation in both healthy controls and IBD patients in stable remission. The study participants underwent a 3-hour exposure to hypoxic conditions simulating an altitude of 4,000 m above sea level in a hyperbaric pressure chamber and clinical parameters as well as blood and stool samples were collected at several time points. The first results of this study are expected in the near future. PMID:26981864

  4. Microcomputer-controlled high-altitude data aquisition system

    1985-05-01

    A new microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system was developed. The system provides a new technique for data acquisition from China's astronomical, meteorological and other high altitude experiments and opens up new territory in microcomputer applications. This microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system is made up of a Z80 single board computer, 10 K memory expansion board, and keyboard and display board which can collect 16 analog signals simultaneously, and through analog/digital conversion can convert external analog signals into digital signals then encode them in a certain form through program modulation and store them on audio cassette. The data is immediately retrieved from the tape and sent to the surface microcomputer system for data processing and analysis.

  5. Latitudinal dependence of the variability of the micrometeor altitude distribution

    Sparks, J. J.; Janches, D.

    2009-06-01

    We present a study of the diurnal behavior of the observed meteor altitude distribution at different seasons and latitudes. The meteor altitude distribution provides an indication of where the meteoric mass deposition occurs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This can be utilized to model the input of metallic constituents into the MLT and accurately understand the chemistry of this region. We show that the observed altitude distributions have distinct variability at each location: at high latitudes there is a weak diurnal and strong seasonal variability while at tropical latitudes the opposite behavior is observed. We explain these results by correlating them with the astronomical and physical properties of the meteoric flux. Finally, we discussed the potential influences that these results have on the metal chemistry and aeronomy of this atmospheric region.

  6. Conductivity and electric field variations with altitude in the stratosphere

    Holzworth, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Data regarding electric field, derived current density, and conductivity are presented for two balloons from the Electrodynamics of the Middle Atmosphere experiment which underwent the longest period of daily altitude variation. The magnetic L values range from 4.3 to 9.5 for the 18 days of Southern Hemisphere statistics, and the average conductivity and vertical electric fields are given. Simultaneous measurements of the average conductivity scale height and the vertical electric-field scale height indicate that vertical current density does not vary with altitude in the 10-28-km range. The measured conductivity varies significantly at a given altitude on a particular day, and some conductivity data sets are similar to other measurements between 10 and 30 km. Comparisons of the measured data to predictions from models of stratospheric conductivity demonstrate significant discrepancies.

  7. Are macroinvertebrates in high altitude streams affected by oxygen deficiency?

    Jacobsen, Dean; Rostgaard, S.; Vásconez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    1. The solubility of oxygen in water increases with decreasing temperature. This has led to a general perception of cold, high mountain streams as more oxygen rich than warmer lowland streams, and that macroinvertebrates inhabiting high altitude streams have had no need to adapt to critical oxygen...... conditions. However, this fails to take into account that oxygen solubility declines with decreasing atmospheric pressure, which may be of importance at high altitudes. 2. Based on samples of macroinvertebrate benthos and in situ measurements of respiratory oxygen demand of macroinvertebrates in small...... include relatively few groups normally regarded as oxygen-sensitive. Nevertheless, high altitude assemblages react more strongly to lowering of oxygen saturation, and are thus more sensitive to organic pollution. 5. Oxygen deficiency has been overlooked completely in studies of the altitudinal...

  8. Effect of Air Pollution, Contamination and High Altitude on Bronchial Asthma

    Nesriene El margoushy*, Mohamad El Nashar**, Hatem Khairy*, Nihad El Nashar*, Hala Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    , associated with a high rate of rhinitis symptoms and hay fever. In addition to bronchial asthma, prevalence of allergic diseases in a sample of Taif citizens assessed by an original Arabic questionnaire (phase I evidenced a high prevalence of allergic diseases as Urticaria, allergic rhinitis with or without other co-morbidities, and atopic dermatitis. Effect of high altitude on bronchial asthma is controversial; at high altitudes, the concentrations of the allergens are reduced due to the reduced amounts of vegetation, animal populations and human influences, high UV light exposure and low humidity could be contributing factors to the benefits of high altitude other than allergen avoidance. On the contrary, Lower altitudes have significant beneficial effects for bronchial asthma patients but lessen with increasing altitudes; the mountain climate can modify respiratory function and bronchial responsiveness of asthmatic subjects. Hypoxia, hyperventilation of cold and dry air and physical exertion may worsen asthma or enhance bronchial hyper-responsiveness while a reduction in pollen and pollution may play an important role in reducing bronchial inflammation. Increasing attention has to be paid to the potential of urban air toxics to exacerbate asthma. Continued emphasis on the identification of strategies for reducing levels of urban air pollutants is warranted to reduce respiratory diseases and other diseases related to pollution. Efforts for reducing the asthma burden must focus on primary prevention to reduce the level of exposure of individuals and populations to common risk factors, particularly tobacco smoke, frequent lower respiratory infections during childhood, and environmental air pollution (indoor, outdoor, and occupational.

  9. Radiation exposure during air and ground transportation

    The results of a one year study program of radiation exposure experienced on both domestic and international flights of the China Airline and the Far East Airline in the Pacific, Southeast Asia and Taiwan areas and on trains and buses on Taiwan island are reported. CaSO4:Dy thermoluminescent dosimeters were used. It has been shown that transit exposures may amount to 10 times that on the ground with an altitude varying from 3,050 to 12,200 m. (U.K.)

  10. Metal layers at high altitudes: A possible connection to meteoroids

    J. Höffner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, many studies have been carried out to demonstrate the influence of meteoroids on the atmospheric metal layer, observed roughly in the altitude range 80–105 km. Even with the capability of present day resonance lidars to measure metal densities within single meteor trails, it has been difficult to prove any influence of meteors on the average metal layer. In contrast to approaches taken earlier, we discuss here the seasonal characteristics of potassium, calcium, calcium ion, iron and sodium above 110 km altitude where the average nocturnal densities are so low that the existence of a baseline level of metal atoms and ions is often overlooked. By comparing simultaneous and common-volume observations of different metal layers at one location, we demonstrate that despite their different seasonal characteristics at lower altitudes remarkably similar seasonal characteristics are observed at higher altitudes. In addition, for potassium at different latitudes a qualitative agreement is also found. A comparison of metal densities at 113 km altitude with known meteor showers indicates a strong influence of shower meteoroids on the topside of the metal layers. Simultaneous observations of K along with Ca, Fe and/or Na permits the calculation of abundance ratios. We find that these ratios at 113 km altitude are quite similar to values measured in single meteor trails by ground based lidars. Given these evidences, we contend that there is a direct influence of ablating meteoroids on the topside of the mesospheric metal layer. Furthermore, the increase in densities throughout summer with similar abundance ratios as observed during meteor showers is a strong evidence for the influence of sporadic meteoroids on the high metal layers.

  11. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field

    Shah NM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neeraj M Shah,1 Sidra Hussain,2 Mark Cooke,3 John P O’Hara,3 Adrian Mellor3,4 1Division of Asthma, Allergy and Lung Biology, King’s College London, UK; 2School of Medicine, University College London, London, UK; 3Research Institute for Sport, Physical Activity and Leisure, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK; 4Academic Department of Military Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS, increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive. Keywords: hypoxia, acute mountain sickness, acclimatization, biomarkers, preacclimatization

  12. The GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica

    Eichhorn, G. (Space Astronomy Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32609 (US)); Coldwell, R.L.; Dunnam, F.E.; Rester, A.C. (Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Exploration, University of Florida, Alachua, FL 32615 (US)); Trombka, J.I.; Starr, R. (NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (US)); Lasche, G.P. (DARPA/NMO, Arlington, VA (US))

    1989-05-15

    The Gamma Ray Advanced Detector(GRAD) consists of a n-type germanium detector inside an active bismuth-germanate Compton and charged particle shield with additional active plastic shielding across the aperture. It will be flown on a high altitude balloon at 36 km altitude at a latitude of 78{degree} S over Antarctica for observations of gamma radiation emitted by the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Co in the Supernova SN1987A, for assessment of the performance of bismuth-germanate scintillation material in the radiation environment of near space, for gathering information on the gamma-ray background over Antarctica, and for testing fault-tolerant software.

  13. The GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica

    Eichhorn, G.; Coldwell, R. L.; Dunnam, F. E.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Advanced Detector (GRAD) consists of a n-type germanium detector inside an active bismuth-germanate Compton and charged particle shield with additional active plastic shielding across the aperture. It will be flown on a high-altitude balloon at 36 km altitude at a latitude of 78 deg S over Antarctica for observations of gamma radiation emitted by the radioactive decay of Co-56 in the supernova SN1987A, for assessment of the performance of bismuth-germanate scintillation material in the radiation environment of near space, for gathering information on the gamma-ray background over Antarctica, and for testing fault-tolerant software.

  14. The GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica

    The Gamma Ray Advanced Detector(GRAD) consists of a n-type germanium detector inside an active bismuth-germanate Compton and charged particle shield with additional active plastic shielding across the aperture. It will be flown on a high altitude balloon at 36 km altitude at a latitude of 78 degree S over Antarctica for observations of gamma radiation emitted by the radioactive decay of 56Co in the Supernova SN1987A, for assessment of the performance of bismuth-germanate scintillation material in the radiation environment of near space, for gathering information on the gamma-ray background over Antarctica, and for testing fault-tolerant software

  15. Investigating the auroral electrojets with low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils; Ritter, P.; Lu, G.

    2002-01-01

    Three geomagnetic satellite missions currently provide high precision magnetic field measurements from low altitude polar orbiting spacecraft. We demonstrate how these data can be used to determine the intensity and location of the horizontal currents that flow in the ionosphere, predominantly in...... the auroral electrojets. First, we examine the results during a recent geomagnetic storm. The currents derived from two satellites at different altitudes are in very good agreement, which verifies good stability of the method. Further, a very high degree of correlation (correlation coefficients of 0...

  16. Measurements of radioactive dust in high altitude air

    The radioactivities of airborne dust in samples were measured. The samples had been collected at high altitude by the Japan Air Self-Defense Force from April 2009 to March 2010. The data were obtained for the gross beta activity, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis. It was shown that there was no appreciable difference between the activity levels of this time and in the year before. Seasonal variations were not very pronounced. It is found that the radioactivity has been stable at a low level at high altitude. Radioactive gas (gaseous radioiodine) was not detected. (author)

  17. Measurements of radioactive dusts in high altitude air

    The radioactively of airborne dust in samples collected by aircraft of the Japan Air Self-Defense Force at high altitude during the period between April 2001 to March 2002 were measured. The data of the gross beta activity, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis show that there is no appreciable difference from the activity levels of the year before. Seasonal variations are becoming less pronounced and this shows that the low level radioactivity at high altitude is stable. Radioactive gas (gaseous radioiodine) was not detected. (author)

  18. The simulation of high-altitude nuclear explosion debris movement

    Based on shell theory of debris and interactions between debris and atmospheric molecules at high altitudes, a method was developed to model HANE debris movement under the effect of geomagnetic field and atmosphere. The charge-exchange section item and collision-ionization section item in the magnetohydrodynamic equation showed the stop action of atmosphere. The Lagrangian differential method was applied to solve the magnetohydrodynamic equation of debris motion in the geomagnetic field. Debris cloud expansion of a typical high altitude detonation was simulated. Expansion scale, velocity, pressure and temperature of early debris in deferent direction were given. (authors)

  19. Scientific Verification of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    Marinelli, Antonio; Sparks, Kathryne; Alfaro, Ruben; González, María Magdalena; Patricelli, Barbara; Fraija, Nissim; Collaboration, for the HAWC

    2014-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a TeV gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector currently under construction at an altitude of 4100 m close to volcano Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC observatory is an extensive air-shower array comprised of 300 optically-isolated water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs). Each WCD contains $\\sim$200,000 liters of filtered water and four upward-facing photomultiplier tubes. In Fall 2014, when the HAWC observatory will reach an area...

  20. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Meier, Matthias M.; Trompier, François; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Matthiä, Daniel; Ploc, Ondrej; Santen, Nicole; Wirtz, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR). Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  1. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Meier Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR. Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  2. Hemostasis in prolonged exposure to γ-radiation at high altitudes

    It is shown that the development of thrombohemorrhagic syndrome besides violation of thrombocytopoiesis in pathogenesis of hypocoagulation in non-adapted to Alpine conditions dogs during radiation disease plays definite role. Development of ultravascular blood coagulation on the third day of arrival to mountains leads to appearance in animals of features of secondary hypocoagulation, which promotes the decrease of development intensity of post-irradiation thrombomorrhagic syndrome under Alpine conditions

  3. Validation of modelling the radiation exposure due to solar particle events at aircraft altitudes

    Beck, P.; Bartlett, D. T.; Bilski, P.; Dyer, C.; Fluckiger, E.; Fuller, N.; Lantos, P.; Reitz, G.; Ruhm, W.; Spurný, František; Taylor, G.; Trompier, F.; Wissmann, F.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 1 (2008), s. 51-58. ISSN 0144-8420. [Annual Meeting of the European-Radiation-Dosimetry-Group (EURADOS). Paris, 21.01.2008-25.01.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC032 Grant ostatní: Evropské společenství(XE) ILSRA - 2004 - 248 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : on-board airplanes * cosmic radiation * simulations Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.951, year: 2008

  4. Surgical Exposure

    Hendra Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Surgical exposure is a surgical method to expose mucous or bone which prevent delayed or unerupted permanent crown teeth, in order to provide normal eruption and to prevent malocclusion. Surgical exposure is usually carried out on maxillary caninces as they have higher incidence of delayed eruption. Nevertheless, this procedure can also be performed on other teeth. For patient management, this procedure need cooperation betweent oral surgeon and orthodontist.

  5. An empirical approach to the measurement of the cosmic radiation field at jet aircraft altitudes

    Green, A R; Lewis, B J; Kitching, F; McCall, M J; Desormeaux, M; Butler, A A

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the Royal Military College of Canada have accumulated extensive dose measurements performed at jet altitudes on over 160 flights and with a wide variety of detectors including a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a smart wide energy neutron detection instrument (SWENDI), bubble detectors, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and an ion chamber. The summation of the individual low and high LET results from the latter equipment compared successfully to those from the TEPC on each flight. The data from these numerous worldwide flights have been encapsulated into a program that calculates the radiation dose for any flight in the world at any period in the solar cycle. This experimentally based program, Predictive Code for AIRcrew Exposure (PCAIRE) has been designed to be used by the airline industry to meet national dosimetry requirements. In Canada, for example, such a code can be used, supported by periodic measurements. With this latter requirement in mind and a desire to decrease equip...

  6. Can migraine prophylaxis prevent acute mountain sickness at high altitude?

    Kim, M W; Kim, M

    2011-11-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) develops in people trekking at high altitude. The underlying mechanism is vasodilation due to low pressure of oxygen. However, individual susceptibility for AMS is unknown, thus, one cannot predict when or to whom it happens. Because AMS usually begins with headache, and because migraineurs are more vulnerable to AMS, we studied by the literatures review on the mechanism and clinical features in common, and assessed the treatment modalities for both disorders. This led to us the following hypothesis that, migraine prophylaxis may prevent or delay the onset of AMS at high altitude. Clinical features of AMS include nausea or vomiting when it progresses. Hypobaric hypoxia, dehydration or increased physical exertion trigger or aggravate both disorders. In migraine, cerebral vasodilation can happen following alteration of neuronal activity, whereas the AMS is associated with peripheral vessel dilation. Medications that dilate the vessels worsen both conditions. Acute treatment strategies for migraine overlap with to those of AMS, including drugs such as vasoconstrictors, or other analgesics. To prevent AMS, adaptation to high altitude or pharmacological prophylaxis, i.e., acetazolamide has been recommended. This carbonic anhydrase inhibitor lowers serum potassium level, and thus stabilizes membrane excitability. Acetazolamide is also effective on specific forms of migraine. Taken together, these evidences implicate that migraine prophylaxis may prevent or delay the onset of AMS by elevating the threshold for high altitude. PMID:21856088

  7. Sleep patterns at an altitude of 3500 metres

    Selvamurthy, W.; Raju, V. R. K.; Ranganathan, S.; Hegde, K. S.; Ray, U. S.

    1986-06-01

    Alterations in sleep pattern during acclimatisation at an altitude of 3500 m were studied on 27 healthy men (20 30 years of age). Of these, 15 were sojourners (SJ), 6 were acclimatised lowlanders (AL) and 6 were high altitude natives (HAN). Baseline sleep profile of SJ was electrophysiologically monitored, initially at Delhi (260 m) and later at 3500 m altitude in Western Himalayas for 2 weeks. At high altitude (HA) the sleep patterns of AL and HAN were also monitored for comparison. There were 4 cases of acute mountain sickness (AMS) among SJ, whose sleep profiles were also recorded. The state of autonomic arousal was assessed by a battery of indices, while the psychological arousal was measured by the anxiety scales. On completion of studies at HA, the SJ were flown back to the plains and re-tested within one week of return. SJ showed curtailment of slow wave sleep (SWS) and frequent short episodes of arousal during sleep at HA. AL and HAN also had lesser amounts of SWS; however, the arousals and awakenings during sleep were less frequent. Subjects who experienced AMS had normal amounts of SWS at HA. There was sympathetic hyperactivity and slight increase in anxiety level in SJ, while HAN and AL had relatively reduced level of sympathetic activity. The curtailment of SWS and frequent arousals observed in SJ during the initial phase of acclimatisation at HA, appear to be adaptive features to prevent the accentuation of arterial hypoxemia due to sleep hypoventilation.

  8. Climate Change Impacts on High-Altitude Ecosystems

    Harald Pauli

    2016-01-01

    Reviewed: Climate Change Impacts on High-Altitude Ecosystems By Münir Öztürk, Khalid Rehman Hakeem, I. Faridah-Hanum and Efe. Recep, Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2015. xvii + 696 pp. US$ 239.00. ISBN 978-3-319-12858-0.

  9. Bats aloft: Variation in echolocation call structure at high altitudes

    Bats alter their echolocation calls in response to changes in ecological and behavioral conditions, but little is known about how they adjust their call structure in response to changes in altitude. This study examines altitudinal variation in the echolocation calls of Brazilian free-tailed bats, T...

  10. High-altitude stations and high energy cosmic rays

    The advantages of high-altitude ground-based cosmic ray station have been discussed in many past reports and conferences. It is very satisfying to observe this renewed attention to the research potentials of the Chacaltaya Laboratory. Specific research opportunities are reviewed, and possible future scenarios are noted

  11. Pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary oedema

    Sutton, J R; Lassen, N

    1979-01-01

    We review the evidence that acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) occur together more often than is realized. We hypothesize that AMS and HAPO have a common pathophysiological basis: both are due to increased pressure and flow in the microcirculation, causing...

  12. Acetazolamide improves cerebral oxygenation during exercise at high altitude

    Vuyk, J.; Bos, J. van den; Terhell, K.; Bos, R. de; Vletter, A.; Valk, P.; Beuzekom, M. van; Kleef, J. van; Dahan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness is thought to be triggered by cerebral hypoxemia and be prevented by acetazolamide (Actz). The effect of Actz on cerebral oxygenation at altitude remains unknown. In 16 members of the 2005 Dutch Cho Oyu (8201 m, Tibet) expedition, the influence of Actz and exercise (750 mg PO

  13. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions. PMID:26183475

  14. Diurnal variations of serum erythropoietin at sea level and altitude

    Klausen, T; Poulsen, T D; Fogh-Andersen, N;

    1996-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the diurnal variations of serum-erythropoietin concentration (serum-EPO) observed in normoxia also exist in hypoxia. The study also attempted to investigate the regulation of EPO production during sustained hypoxia. Nine subjects were investigated at sea level...... and during 4 days at an altitude of 4350 m. Median sea level serum-EPO concentration was 6 (range 6-13) U.l-1. Serum-EPO concentration increased after 18 and 42 h at altitude, [58 (range 39-240) and 54 (range 36-340) U.l-1, respectively], and then decreased after 64 and 88 h at altitude [34 (range 18...... changes in 2, 3 diphosphoglycerate. After 64 h at altitude, six of the nine subjects had down-regulated their serum-EPO concentrations so that median values were three times above those at sea level. These six subjects had significant diurnal variations of serum-EPO concentration at sea level; the nadir...

  15. Diurnal variations of serum erythropoietin at sea level and altitude

    Klausen, T; Poulsen, T D; Fogh-Andersen, N;

    1996-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the diurnal variations of serum-erythropoietin concentration (serum-EPO) observed in normoxia also exist in hypoxia. The study also attempted to investigate the regulation of EPO production during sustained hypoxia. Nine subjects were investigated at sea level...... and during 4 days at an altitude of 4350 m. Median sea level serum-EPO concentration was 6 (range 6-13) U.l-1. Serum-EPO concentration increased after 18 and 42 h at altitude, [58 (range 39-240) and 54 (range 36-340) U.l-1, respectively], and then decreased after 64 and 88 h at altitude [34 (range 18...... in 2, 3 diphosphoglycerate. After 64 h at altitude, six of the nine subjects had down-regulated their serum-EPO concentrations so that median values were three times above those at sea level. These six subjects had significant diurnal variations of serum-EPO concentration at sea level; the nadir...

  16. Variation in the isotopic content of precipitation with altitude

    Monthly precipitation and single storms have been collected during three years at 12 stations along a W-E profile in Chile, going from Juan Fernandez Islands to Valparaiso, Santiago and Infiernillo in the Andes, and analysed for their deuterium content. The deltaD values are correlated with the altitude of the station, the mean temperature - which also largely depends on the altitude - and the distance from the sea. The correlation parameters show however important variations from year to year and even more from month to month. For instance, in the stretch Santiago (520 m a.s.l.) - La Parva (2680 m) the mean isotopic gradient with altitude were: -1.84 deltaD per mil/100 m in 1970, -1.09 in 1971 and -2.0 in 1972. The low value observed in 1971 could be a consequence of the peculiar weather characteristics of this unusually dry year. In the stretch from the coast to Santiago the trend of the isotopic composition of precipitation is more complicated, because the so-called continental effect is superimposed to the altitude effect. The deuterium content variations have been also determined in snowpack profiles at La Parva station. The results show that snow melting occurs slowly at the bottom during the whole winter, at the expenses of the heat stored during summer in the soil. The melting of the surface snow layers only starts at the end of the winter and then proceeds very fast

  17. Structural and Material Mechanical Quality of Femoral Shafts in Rats Exposed to Simulated High Altitude from Infancy to Adulthood.

    Bozzini, Clarisa; Picasso, Emilio O; Champin, Graciela M; Alippi, Rosa Maria; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2016-03-01

    The growth of the body and bone mass and the mechanical properties of appendicular bone are impaired in immature rats exposed to different simulated high altitudes (SHA) (1850-5450 m) between the 32nd and the 74th days of postnatal life. Now, we report the effects of exposure to 4100 m on the above cited variables in female rats from infancy (age: 1 month) to adulthood (age: 8 months) to define the occurrence of catch up and to establish whether the effects of altitude are transient or permanent. The ex vivo right femur was mechanically tested in three-point bending. Body weight and length, and structural (loads at yielding and fracture, and stiffness) and architectural (diaphyseal cross-sectional area, cortical area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia) properties were measured at 2, 4, 6, and 8 months of exposure to SHA. The negative influence of hypoxia on all variables was similar at different ages or, in other words, the difference among ages was maintained at any extent of hypoxia. Hypoxia did not affect the elastic modulus, thus suggesting that the mechanical properties of the bone tissue were maintained. Catch up did not occur. The resulting osteopenic bone remained appropriate to its mechanical function during the entire exposure to SHA. PMID:26949914

  18. Martian high-altitude photoelectrons independent of solar zenith angle

    Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael; Bougher, Stephen; Mitchell, David

    2016-04-01

    Many aspects of the Martian upper atmosphere are known to vary with solar zenith angle (SZA). One would assume that dayside photoelectron fluxes are also SZA dependent, especially when transport along a semivertical magnetic field line is significant. However, our investigation presented here of the observed Martian high-altitude (˜400 km) photoelectron fluxes by the magnetometer/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) instruments on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) shows that the photoelectron fluxes are better correlated with just the solar irradiance, without SZA factored in, and also that the median photoelectron fluxes are independent of SZA, especially for high energies (above 100 eV). For lower energies (below 70 eV), the observed fluxes tend to vary to some degree with SZA. Such counterintuitive results are due to the existence of a photoelectron exobase, only above which the photoelectrons are able to transport and escape to high altitudes. Two methods are used here to determine the altitude range of this exobase, which varies between 145 km and 165 km depending on the atmosphere and SZA. Through our SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) model, we found that the integral of the production rate above the photoelectron exobase, and therefore the high-altitude photoelectron fluxes, is rather independent of SZA. Such an independent relationship concerns energy redistribution in the Martian upper atmosphere, using photoelectrons to map magnetic topology and connectivity, as well as ion escape. This finding can also be carefully adapted to other solar bodies with semivertical magnetic fields at ionospheric altitudes, such as Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn.

  19. Analysis of the neutron component and determination of the LET spectrum at high altitudes

    The European Council directive 96/29/Euratom of 13 May 1996 emphasizes the introduction of two categories for occupational exposure. Category A includes the employees for whom the annual effective dose is likely to exceed 6 mSv. Suggesting an average flight time between 600 and 1000 hours per year for aircrew, the typical annual dose lies between 4 and 8 mSv with a maximum value of 15 mSv for Concorde flights. This requires the surveillance of aircrew members and thus the development of proper measurement devices. Because of the similar radiation environment, high altitude mountains seem to be an ideal choice to test and to improve recently developed measurement systems. Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS) with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillation counter and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), respectively, were used to determine the neutron energy spectrum as well as the absorbed dose and the average linear energy transfer (LET) in a complex mixed radiation field on top of Mt. Sonnblick (3105 m). The neutron component makes up 35 to 60% of the biologically relevant dose at high altitudes, depending on the geomagnetic latitude. The average LET of the mixed radiation field was determined using the high temperature ratio (HTR)-method. Paired TLD-600 and TLD-700 dosemeters as well as an extended range Sievert counter were employed for determination of the neutron dose equivalent. Furthermore, a LET spectrum was recorded on Mt. Kitzsteinhorn (3029 m) using the laboratory-manufactured tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC)-system PART. All detectors were calibrated with standard radiation sources and in the CERN EC neutron reference field. The measurements performed with the passive BSS as well as the Sievert counters show that there exists a neutron component with energies up to 100 MeV (and probably more) at such altitudes. The total dose equivalent rate measured on top of Mt. Sonnblick was 200 nSv.h-1 compared to an absorbed dose rate of 120 nGy.h-1. The neutron dose

  20. Assessment of hypoxia right heart remodeling after acclimatization at high different altitude areas

    Xiao-jin LAI; Xin-rong XIAO; Jin-chun GUO; Ming-song LIAO; Liang, Yan; Dan DENG; Tao, Jie; Huang, Yue; Li, Wei; Kai-qiang ZHANG; Peng, Yan; Kuan-jun MA

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess hypoxic right heart remodeling after acclimatization at high altitude area. Methods One hundred volunteers who came to Tibet from the low-altitude areas by plane were randomly selected to serve as control group, and another 100 servicemen, who were dispatched from low altitude area to a station in Tibet area 3000m above sea level and got acclimatized to serve as altitude group. The altitude group was divided into altitude group 1 (3000-4000m above sea level, n=67) and alti...

  1. Wide distribution and altitude correlation of an archaic high-altitude-adaptive EPAS1 haplotype in the Himalayas.

    Hackinger, Sophie; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Xue, Yali; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Asan; van Driem, George; Jobling, Mark A; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Ayub, Qasim

    2016-04-01

    High-altitude adaptation in Tibetans is influenced by introgression of a 32.7-kb haplotype from the Denisovans, an extinct branch of archaic humans, lying within the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), and has also been reported in Sherpa. We genotyped 19 variants in this genomic region in 1507 Eurasian individuals, including 1188 from Bhutan and Nepal residing at altitudes between 86 and 4550 m above sea level. Derived alleles for five SNPs characterizing the core Denisovan haplotype (AGGAA) were present at high frequency not only in Tibetans and Sherpa, but also among many populations from the Himalayas, showing a significant correlation with altitude (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.75, p value 3.9 × 10(-11)). Seven East- and South-Asian 1000 Genomes Project individuals shared the Denisovan haplotype extending beyond the 32-kb region, enabling us to refine the haplotype structure and identify a candidate regulatory variant (rs370299814) that might be interacting in an additive manner with the derived G allele of rs150877473, the variant previously associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Denisovan-derived alleles were also observed at frequencies of 3-14 % in the 1000 Genomes Project African samples. The closest African haplotype is, however, separated from the Asian high-altitude haplotype by 22 mutations whereas only three mutations, including rs150877473, separate the Asians from the Denisovan, consistent with distant shared ancestry for African and Asian haplotypes and Denisovan adaptive introgression. PMID:26883865

  2. Fluid distribution and tissue thickness changes in 29 men during 1 week at moderate altitude (2,315 m).

    Gunga, H C; Kirsch, K; Baartz, F; Steiner, H J; Wittels, P; Röcker, L

    1995-01-01

    To quantify fluid distribution at a moderate altitude (2,315 m) 29 male subjects were studied with respect to tissue thickness changes [front (forehead), sternum, tibia], changes of total body water, changes of plasma volume, total protein concentrations (TPC), colloid osmotic pressure (COP), and electrolytes. Tissue thickness at the forehead showed a significant increase from 4.14 mm to 4.41 mm 48 h after ascent to the Rudolfshuette (2,315 m) (P Rudolf-shuette in Saalfelden (744 m) COP was back to the control values. The TPC also showed an initial drop from 7.75 g.dl-1 to 7.48 g.dl-1 after 48 h at altitude and remained below the control value during the whole week (P < 0.01). It seems from our study that even with exposure to moderate altitude measurable fluid shifts to the upper part of the body occurred which were detected by our ultrasound method. PMID:7729432

  3. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia

    Amelia J. Carr, Philo U. Saunders, Brent S. Vallance, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Christopher J. Gore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass, maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max, time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10 or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night-1 at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8. A control group (CON; n = 10 lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p < 0.05. There was a 3.7% increase in Hbmass in lowHH+NHnight compared with CON (p = 0.02. In comparison to baseline, Hbmass increased by 1.2% (±1.4% in the lowHH group, 2.6% (±1.8% in lowHH+NHnight, and there was a decrease of 0.9% (±4.9% in CON. VO2max increased by ~4% within both experimental conditions but was not significantly greater than the 1% increase in CON. There was a ~9% difference in pre and post-intervention values in time to exhaustion after lowHH+NH-night (p = 0.03 and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006 after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass.

  4. Numerical simulation of the ionization effects of low- and high-altitude nuclear explosions

    Low-altitude and high-altitude nuclear explosions are sources of intensive additional ionization in ionosphere. In this paper, in terms of the ionization equilibrium equation system and the equation of energy deposition of radiation in atmosphere, and considering the influence of atmosphere, the temporal and spatial distribution of ionization effects caused by atmospheric nuclear detonation are investigated. The calculated results show that the maximum of additional free electron density produced by low-altitude nuclear explosion is greater than that by the high-altitude nuclear burst. As to the influence of instant nuclear radiation, there is obvious difference between the low-altitude and the high-altitude explosions. The influence range and the continuance time caused by delayed nuclear radiation is less for the low-altitude nuclear detonation than that for the high-altitude one. (authors)

  5. Surface altitude of hydrogeologic layers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — PP1773_unit_alt_grid is a polygon shapefile of surface altitudes for 16 hydrogeologic units as described in report Professional Paper 1773. Surface altitudes were...

  6. Sub-Scale Re-entry Capsule Drop via High Altitude Balloons Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-altitude balloon flights are an inexpensive method used to lift payloads to high altitudes. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations permit payloads...

  7. Altitude Variations of the Peak Auroral Emissions within Auroral Structures

    Sangalli, L.

    2015-12-01

    The MIRACLE network monitors auroral activity in the Fennoscandian sector of Europe. Network stations cover the range of 55° to 57° magnetic latitude North and span two hours in magnetic local time. Some of the MIRACLE network stations include digital all-sky cameras (ASC) with overlapping field-of-views located at the latitude aurora occurs. The ASCs in this network operate at three different wavelengths: 427.8 nm (blue line), 557.7 nm (green line) and 630.0 nm (red line). These wavelengths are selected using narrow band filters. The new ASC systems are based on electron multiplying CCDs (emCCD), which allow higher time and spatial resolutions. The peak auroral emission altitude is determined using two ASC images from a station pair. Different auroral events are used to evaluate the altitude variations of the peak auroral emissions within auroral structures and its evolution in time.

  8. Initial Feasibility Assessment of a High Altitude Long Endurance Airship

    Colozza, Anthony; Dolce, James (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A high altitude solar powered airship provides the ability to carry large payloads to high altitudes and remain on station for extended periods of time. This study examines the feasibility of this concept. Factors such as time of year, latitude, wind speeds and payload are considered in establishing the capabilities of a given size airship. East and West coast operation were evaluated. The key aspect to success of this type of airship is the design and operation of the propulsion and power system. A preliminary propulsion/power system design was produced based on a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system and solar photovoltaic array for energy production. A modular system design was chosen with four independent power/propulsion units utilized by the airship. Results on payload capacity and flight envelope (latitude and time of year) were produced for a range of airship sizes.

  9. Measurements of radioactive dust in high altitude air

    The radioactivity in samples of airborne dust was measured. The samples had been collected at high altitude by the Japan Air Self-Defense Force. The data were obtained for the gross beta activity, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis. It was shown that there was no appreciable difference between the activity levels obtained in this time and in the year before. Seasonal variations were not very pronounced. It was found that the radioactivity at high altitude had been stable at a low level. Radioactive gases (gaseous radioiodine and xenon gas) were not detected. This report does not include the result on radionuclide measurements that Technical Research and Development Institute executed for examining the nuclear emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power plants after Tohoku Region Pacific Ocean Earthquake on March 11, 2011. (author)

  10. HAWC – The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  11. Measurements of radioactive dusts in high altitude air

    The radioactivities of the airborne dusts were measured in samples collected by aircrafts of the Japan Air Self-Defense Force in high altitude during the period between April 2000 and March 2001. From June 2000 the newly designed filters composed of electret filter and fibrous activated carbon filter were used to collect air suspended dust and radioactive gas at the same time. The data of the gross beta activities, gamma nuclide determination and radiochemical analysis show that there is no appreciable difference from the activity levels of the year before and seasonal variations are becoming not so clear, that shows the radioactivities in high altitude is stable in a low level. Radioactive gas (gaseous radioiodine) was not detected. (author)

  12. Population variation revealed high-altitude adaptation of Tibetan mastiffs.

    Li, Yan; Wu, Dong-Dong; Boyko, Adam R; Wang, Guo-Dong; Wu, Shi-Fang; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-05-01

    With the assistance of their human companions, dogs have dispersed into new environments during the expansion of human civilization. Tibetan Mastiff (TM), a native of the Tibetan Plateau, was derived from the domesticated Chinese native dog and, like Tibetans, has adapted to the extreme environment of high altitude. Here, we genotyped genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 32 TMs and compared them with SNPs from 20 Chinese native dogs and 14 gray wolves (Canis lupus). We identified 16 genes with signals of positive selection in the TM, with 12 of these candidate genes associated with functions that have roles in adaptation to high-altitude adaptation, such as EPAS1, SIRT7, PLXNA4, and MAFG that have roles in responses to hypoxia. This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of the TM and potential mechanisms for adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:24520091

  13. Applications of a high-altitude powered platform /HAPP/

    Kuhner, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    The high-altitude powered platform (HAPP) is a conceptual unmanned vehicle which could be either an airship or airplane. It would keep station at an altitude of 70,000 ft above a fixed point on the ground. A microwave power transmission system would beam energy from the ground up to the HAPP to power an electric motor-driven propeller and the payload. A study of the HAPP has shown that it could potentially be a cost-competitive platform for such remote sensing applications as forest fire detection, Great Lakes ice monitoring and Coast Guard law enforcement. It also has significant potential as a communications relay platform for (among other things) direct broadcast to home TVs over a large region.

  14. First year results of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    Carramiñana, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (1.8 Sr) and high duty cycle (>95% up-time) detector of unique capabilities for the study of TeV gamma-ray sources. Installed at an altitude of 4100m in the Northern slope of Volc\\'an Sierra Negra, Puebla, by a collaboration of about thirty institutions of Mexico and the United States, HAWC has been in full operations since March 2015, surveying 2/3 of the sky every sidereal day, monitoring active galaxies and mapping sources in the Galactic Plane to a detection level of 1 Crab per day. This contribution summarizes the main results of the first year of observations of the HAWC gamma-ray observatory.

  15. Observations of polar rain at low and high altitudes

    Observations in the distant magnetotail lobes (rapprox. >100 R/sub E/)= reveal that electrons in the ∼50- to 1000-eV energy range often exhibit strong, field-aligned bidirectional anisotropies. Because of large tail motions in the variable flow of the solar wind, ISEE 3 data provide extensive sampling of most tail plasma regions in rapid succession. It is found that bidirectional electron fluxes occur predominantly in the lobe connected directly to the sunward interplanetary magnetic field in the open magnetosphere model (north lobe for away sectors and south lobe for toward sectors). Using data from the low-altitude DMSP spacecraft, we compare polar rain electron intensities, energy spectra, and time variations at low altitudes with concurrent bidirectional electron properties measured by ISEE 3. The field-aligned lobe electron phase space densities above ∼200 eV agree well (i.e., to within a factor of ∼2--3) with DMSP-measured polar rain phase space densities near the polar cap. Furthermore, the spectral slopes above 200 eV also are similar at low and high altitudes. Below 100--200 eV there is a thermal electron population in the distant tail, probably arising from local entry of plasma through the distant magnetopause, which is not present at DMSP altitudes. These data suggest that the suprathermal tail lobe electrons are essentially a test particle population which can move freely along field lines to form polar rain; in contrast, the thermal electrons are bound to the tailward flowing lobe ion population far down the tail and thus cannot reach the polar cap regions. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  16. Altitude Training: Strong Bounds for Single-Layer Dropout

    Wager, Stefan; Fithian, William; Wang, Sida; Liang, Percy

    2014-01-01

    Dropout training, originally designed for deep neural networks, has been successful on high-dimensional single-layer natural language tasks. This paper proposes a theoretical explanation for this phenomenon: we show that, under a generative Poisson topic model with long documents, dropout training improves the exponent in the generalization bound for empirical risk minimization. Dropout achieves this gain much like a marathon runner who practices at altitude: once a classifier learns to perfo...

  17. Animal-habitat relationships in high altitude rangelands

    Singh, Navinder J.

    2008-01-01

    This study conducted in the high altitude rangelands of Indian Transhimalaya, deals with basic questions regarding the ecology of an endangered species, the wildsheep Tibetan argali (Ovis ammon hodgsoni) and applied issues related to its conservation and potential conflict with the local nomadic pastoralists. The basic questions on ecology are aimed at delineating the habitat and resource selection processes, identifying factors causing sexual segregation and efficient surveyin...

  18. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field

    Shah NM; Hussain S; Cooke M.; O’Hara JP; Mellor A

    2015-01-01

    Neeraj M Shah,1 Sidra Hussain,2 Mark Cooke,3 John P O’Hara,3 Adrian Mellor3,4 1Division of Asthma, Allergy and Lung Biology, King’s College London, UK; 2School of Medicine, University College London, London, UK; 3Research Institute for Sport, Physical Activity and Leisure, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK; 4Academic Department of Military Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Travel to high altitude is increasingly p...

  19. Measurements of radioactive dusts in high altitude air

    The radioactivities of the airborne dusts were measured in samples collected by an aircraft of the Japan Air Self-Defence Force in high altitude during the period between April 1997 and March 1998. The data of the gross beta activities show that there is no appreciable difference from the activity levels of the year before and seasonal variations are becoming not so clear. (author)

  20. High energy astrophysics and high-altitude laboratories

    These are some summary remarks given at the Chacaltaya meeting on cosmic ray physics, held in La Paz (Bolivia), July 23-27, 2000. The meeting covered a wide range of topics in cosmic ray physics and high energy astrophysics. This contribution briefly touches on some of the highlights of the meeting, and discusses the important role that high-altitude laboratories can have in the future of these fundamental fields

  1. Altitude Training and its Influence on Physical Endurance in Swimmers

    Strzała, Marek; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Szyguła, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    It is possible to plan an altitude training (AT) period in such a way that the enhanced physical endurance obtained as a result of adaptation to hypoxia will appear and can be used to improve performance in competition. Yet finding rationales for usage of AT in highly trained swimmers is problematic. In practice AT, in its various forms, is still controversial, and an objective review of research concentrating on the advantages and disadvantages of AT has been presented in several scientific ...

  2. Nike Black Brant V high altitude dynamic instability characteristics

    Montag, W. H.; Walker, L. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Flight experience on the Nike Black Brant V has demonstrated the existence of plume induced flow separation over the fins and aft body of the Black Brant V motor. Modelling of the forces associated with this phenomenon as well as analysis of the resultant vehicle coning motion and its effect on the velocity vector heading are presented. A summary of Nike Black Brant V flight experience with high altitude dynamic instability is included.

  3. Measurement and Characterization of Helicopter Noise at Different Altitudes

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Stephenson, James

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a flight test campaign performed at different test sites whose altitudes ranged from 0 to 7000 feet above mean sea level (AMSL) between September 2014 and February 2015. The purposes of this campaign were to: investigate the effects of altitude variation on noise generation, investigate the effects of gross weight variation on noise generation, establish the statistical variability in acoustic flight testing of helicopters, and characterize the effects of transient maneuvers on radiated noise for a medium-lift utility helicopter. In addition to describing the test campaign, results of the acoustic effects of altitude variation for the AS350 SD1 and EH-60L aircraft are presented. Large changes in acoustic amplitudes were observed in response to changes in ambient conditions when the helicopter was flown at constant indicated airspeed and gross weight at the three test sites. However, acoustic amplitudes were found to scale with ambient pressure when flight conditions were defined in terms of the non-dimensional parameters, such as the weight coefficient and effective hover tip Mach number.

  4. The individual response to training and competition at altitude.

    Chapman, Robert F

    2013-12-01

    Performance in athletic activities that include a significant aerobic component at mild or moderate altitudes shows a large individual variation. Physiologically, a large portion of the negative effect of altitude on exercise performance can be traced to limitations of oxygen diffusion, either at the level of the alveoli or the muscle microvasculature. In the lung, the ability to maintain arterial oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SaO₂) appears to be a primary factor, ultimately influencing oxygen delivery to the periphery. SaO₂ in hypoxia can be defended by increasing ventilatory drive; however, during heavy exercise, many athletes demonstrate limitations to expiratory flow and are unable to increase ventilation in hypoxia. Additionally, increasing ventilatory work in hypoxia may actually be negative for performance, if dyspnoea increases or muscle blood flow is reduced secondary to an increased sympathetic outflow (eg, the muscle metaboreflex response). Taken together, some athletes are clearly more negatively affected during exercise in hypoxia than other athletes. With careful screening, it may be possible to develop a protocol for determining which athletes may be the most negatively affected during competition and/or training at altitude. PMID:24282206

  5. Space environment monitoring by low-altitude operational satellites

    The primary task of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is the acquisition of meteorological data in the visual and infrared spectral regions. The Air Weather Service operates two satellites in low-altitude, sun-synchronous, polar orbits at 850 km altitude, 98.7 deg inclination, 101.5 minute period and dawn-dusk or noon-midnight equatorial crossing times. Special DMSP sensors of interest to the space science community are the precipitating electron spectrometer, the terrestrial noise receiver, and the topside ionosphere plasma monitor. Data from low-altitude, meteorological satellites can be used to build empirical models of precipitating electron characteristics of the auroral zone and polar cap. The Tiros-NOAA satellite program complements the DMSP program. The orbital elements are the same as DMSP's, except for the times of equatorial crossing, and the tilt of the orbital plane. The Tiros-NOAA program meets the civilian community's needs for meteorological data as the DMSP program does for the military

  6. Altitude Correction for Breakdown Voltages of Long Air-Gaps

    Wang Xuan; Li Yunge; Cao Xiaolong; Su Zhiyi; Liu Ying

    2006-01-01

    The breakdown voltage of long air-gaps in high-voltage transmission systems depends on not only the waveform of the applied voltage, but also the atmospheric conditions. Based on the results of the research project on the minimum air clearance for 800-Kv HVDC substations at high altitudes, and also on the monthly and yearly statistics of the atmospheric data of last ten years and the altitude correction of the atmospheric data of last ten years, the altitude correction of the air-gaps for the 800-Kv DC system under plan, 500-Kv AC system to be built, and 1000-Kv AC system under plan in the Inner Mongolia Plateau and the Yungui Plateau in China were studied with parameter G method. Correction factors for switching and lightning impulses were calculated and then compared with those achieved according to IEC 71. It is shown that IEC 71 is appropriate for damp regions, and correction factors differ between plateau regions in China because of different atmospheric conditions.

  7. Key issues of ultraviolet radiation of OH at high altitudes

    Ultraviolet (UV) emissions radiated by hydroxyl (OH) is one of the fundamental elements in the prediction of radiation signature of high-altitude and high-speed vehicle. In this work, the OH A2Σ+→X2Π ultraviolet emission band behind the bow shock is computed under the experimental condition of the second bow-shock ultraviolet flight (BSUV-2). Four related key issues are discussed, namely, the source of hydrogen element in the high-altitude atmosphere, the formation mechanism of OH species, efficient computational algorithm of trace species in rarefied flows, and accurate calculation of OH emission spectra. Firstly, by analyzing the typical atmospheric model, the vertical distributions of the number densities of different species containing hydrogen element are given. According to the different dominating species containing hydrogen element, the atmosphere is divided into three zones, and the formation mechanism of OH species is analyzed in the different zones. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method and the Navier-Stokes equations are employed to compute the number densities of the different OH electronically and vibrationally excited states. Different to the previous work, the trace species separation (TSS) algorithm is applied twice in order to accurately calculate the densities of OH species and its excited states. Using a non-equilibrium radiation model, the OH ultraviolet emission spectra and intensity at different altitudes are computed, and good agreement is obtained with the flight measured data

  8. Recent gamma background measurements at high mountain altitude

    Results from recent measurements of radiation gamma background at high mountain altitude, namely at Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala (42.11 N, 23.35 E, 2925 m a.s.l.) are reported. The measurements are fulfilled with several devices, namely IGS-421 gamma probe and MDU Liulin. A comparative analysis with previous measurements performed with SBN-90 SAPHYMO NaI(Tl) gamma probe is carried out. A temperature effect during winter period of SAPHYMO probe is observed. In addition the measurements are compared with CaSO4:Dy TLD. The obtained results are widely discussed. A numerical model for galactic cosmic ray contribution to the dose rate in air is presented. The model is based on a full Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic ray induced cascade in the atmosphere. The simulation is carried out with CORSIKA 6.52 code using FLUKA 2006b and QGSJET II hadron interaction models. - Highlights: ► We measure radiation gamma background at high mountain altitude. ► The obtained results are compared with previously obtained measurements with measurements carried out with TLD detectors. ► We simulate cosmic ray induced cascade in the atmosphere. ► The contribution of galactic cosmic ray to dose rate at various altitudes is estimated.

  9. Differentiation of pulmonary embolism from high altitude pulmonary edema

    Objective: To differentiate the high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) from pulmonary embolism (PE) by clinical probability model of PE, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate transaminase (AST) and D-dimer assays at high altitude. Subjects and Methods: Consecutive 40 patients evacuated from height > 3000 meters with symptoms of PE or HAPE were included. Clinical pretest probabilities scores of PE, Minutex D-dimer assay (Biopool international) and cardiac enzymes estimation by IFCC approved methods, were used for diagnosis. Mann-Whitney U test was applied by using SPSS and level of significance was taken at (p 500 ng/ml. Plasma D-dimer of 500 ng/ml was considered as cut-off value; 6(66.7%) patients of PE could be diagnosed and 30 (96.7%) cases of HAPE excluded indicating very good negative predictive value. Serum LDH, AST and CK were raised above the reference ranges in 8 (89%), 7 (78%) and 3 (33%) patients of PE as compared to 11 (35%), 6 (19%) and 9 (29%) of HAPE respectively. Conclusion: Clinical assessment in combination with D-dimer assay, LDH and AST can be used for timely differentiation of PE from HAPE at high altitude where diagnostic imaging procedures are not available. (author)

  10. Role of thyroid hormones in thermoregulatory reactions during altitude adaptation

    Bazhenov, Yu.I.; Sydykov, B.K.

    1981-02-01

    The influence of thyroid hormones on thermogenesis at various stages of altitude adaptation is investigated. Oxygen demand, muscle electrical activity and body temperatures were monitored in white rats at ambient temperatures of 22-24 C and 4-6 C during adaptation to an altitude of 3200 m in control animals and in rats injected daily with triiodothyronine or an antithyroidal preparation of thiamazole. Adaptation to altitude hypoxia is found to decrease the metabolic reactions of the control rats to cold. Injections of thiamazole are observed to lead to a decrease in transport processes and heat production, thus adding to the effects of hypoxia and decreasing the thermal stability of the organism. Triiodothyronine, on the other hand, is observed to increase transport levels and body temperatures and reverse the effects of hypoxia. It is thus proposed that a decrease in the functional capability of the thyroid may be partly responsible for the decrease in the effects of cold on muscular contractions observed during adaptation to hypoxia.

  11. Elevated Suicide Rates at High Altitude: Sociodemographic and Health Issues May Be to Blame

    Betz, Marian E.; Valley, Morgan A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low less…

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix...—High-Altitude Counties In some cases the standard-setting part includes requirements or other specifications that apply for high-altitude counties. The following counties have substantial populated...

  13. Altitude acclimatization and blood volume: effects of exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion

    Sawka, M N; Young, Jette Feveile; Rock, P B;

    1996-01-01

    blood oxygen content alters erythropoietin responses during altitude acclimatization, and 4) mechanisms responsible for plasma loss at altitude. Sixteen healthy men had a series of hematologic measurements made at sea level, on the first and ninth days of altitude (4,300 m) residence, and after...

  14. Polymorphism profiling of nine high altitude relevant candidate gene loci in acclimatized sojourners and adapted natives

    Tomar, Arvind; Malhotra, Seema; Sarkar, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Background Sea level sojourners, on ascent to high altitude, undergo acclimatization through integrated physiological processes for defending the body against oxygen deprivation while the high altitude natives (resident population) are adapted to the prevailing hypobaric hypoxic condition through natural selection. Separating the acclimatization processes from adaptive changes and identifying genetic markers in lowlanders that may be beneficial for offsetting the high altitude hypoxic stress,...

  15. Regression of Body Density on Skinfold Thicknesses in High Altitude Natives: Decline in the Predictive Efficiency on De-Acclimatisation to Low Altitude

    H. Bharadwaj; T. Zachariah; S. Kishnani; S. N. Pramanik; Prasad, J.; K.L. Chaudhary; G. P. Dimri; T. L. Rao; W. Selvamurthy

    1995-01-01

    Body density, stature, body weight and skinfold thickness at 11 sites were experimentally measured on two groups of high altitude natives (HAN) of Ladakh. Group 1, consisting of 38 similar volunteers was studied after 4-week stay at an altitude of 3658 m and Group 2, consisting of 38 similar volunteers was studied after 4-week stay at Delhi (altitude, 200m). Although, there was a strong relationship between skinfolds, other anthropometric measurements and body density (R=0.898) at high...

  16. Diagnostic criteria of high-altitude de-adaptation for high-altitude migrants returning to the plains: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Qi-quan ZHOU; Sheng-yue YANG; Zhen-cai YUAN; Wang, Yin-Hu; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Gao, Wei; Zi-fu SHI; Yang, You-Li; Yun-hong WU; Fan, Yong; Guan-song WANG; Yu-qi GAO

    2012-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the diagnostic method of high-altitude de-adaptation and constitute the diagnostic criteria of high-altitude de-adaptation for people returning to the plains from high-altitude. Methods  Epidemiological survey and clinical multicenter randomized controlled studies were used to determine/perform blood picture, routine urine analysis, routine stool examination, myocardial enzymes, liver and kidney functions, nerve function, sex hormone, microalbuminuria, ECG, echocardi...

  17. Energy status and oxidation reduction status in rat liver at high altitude /3.8 km/

    Reed, R. D.; Pace, N.

    1980-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed to 3.8-km altitude for intervals ranging from 1 h-60 d. Liver samples were taken under light ether anesthesia and were examined by enzymatic analyses. Within 1-6 h of hypoxic exposure, ATP levels decreased while ADP and AMP levels increased, producing a fall in calculated ATP/ADP and adenylate charge ratios. Concurrently, lactate/pyruvate and alpha-glycerophosphate/dihydroxyacetone phosphate ratios increased markedly. Direct measurements of cellular pyridine nucleotides indicated increased NADH/NAD and NADPH/NADP ratios. Levels of total adenosine phosphates and pyridine nucleotides decreased in a significant accompanying response. Many metabolite levels and calculated ratios returned to near-normal values within 1 week of exposure, indicating secondary intracellular adjustments to hypoxic stress; however, persistence of that stress is reflected in lactate concentrations and both substrate redox ratios. Results support and explore concepts that increased oxidation-reduction status and decreased energy status are primary events during hypoxia.

  18. Ataxia, acute mountain sickness, and high altitude cerebral edema

    Wu Tianyi; Ma Siqing; Bian Huiping; Zhang Minming

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations suggest that ataxia is common and often one of the most reliable warning signs of high altitude cerebral edema(HACE).The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic role of ataxia in acute mountain sickness (AMS) and HACE among mountain rescuers on the quake areas,and in approaching the relation between AMS and HACE.After the earthquake on April 14,2010,approximately 24080 lowland rescuers were rapidly transported from sea level or lowlands to the mountainous rescue sites at 3750 ~ 4568 m,and extremely hardly worked for an emergency treatment after arrival.Assessments of acute altitude illness on the quake areas were using the Lake Louise Scoring System.73 % of the rescuers were found to be developed AMS.The incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema(HAPE) and HACE was 0.73 % and 0.26 %,respectively,on the second to third day at altitude.Ataxia sign was measured by simple tests of coordination including a modified Romberg test.The clinical features of 62 patients with HACE were analyzed.It was found that the most frequent,serious neurological symptoms and signs were altered mental status(50/62,80.6 %)and truncal ataxia (47/62,75.8 %).Mental status change was rated slightly higher than ataxia,but ataxia occurred earlier than mental status change and other symptoms.The earliest sign of ataxia was a vague unsteadiness of gait,which may be present alone in association with or without AMS.Advanced ataxia was correlated with the AMS scores,but mild ataxia did not correlate with AMS scores at altitudes of 3750~4568 m.Of them,14 patients were further examined by computerized tomographic scanning of the brain and cerebral magnetic resonance imagines were examined in another 15 cases.These imaging studies indicated that the presence of the cerebral edema was in 97 % of cases who were clinically diagnosed as HACE (28/29).Ataxia seems to be a reliable sign of advanced AMS or HACE,so does altered mental status.

  19. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  20. Aerodynamic performance of osculating-cones waveriders at high altitudes

    Graves, Rick Evan

    The steady-state aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional waverider configurations immersed in hypersonic rarefied flows are investigated. Representative geometries are generated using an inverse design procedure, the method of osculating cones, which defines an exit plane shock shape and approximates the flow properties of the compression surface by assuming that each spanwise station along the shock profile lies within a region of locally conical flow. Vehicle surface and flow field properties are predicted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a probabilistic numerical scheme in which simulated molecules are followed through representative collisions with each other and solid surfaces, and subsequent deterministic displacement. The aerodynamic properties of high- and low-Reynolds number waverider geometries, optimized for maximum lift-to-drag ratio and subject to mission-oriented constraints, are contrasted with results from reference caret and delta wings with similar internal volumes to quantify the relevance and advantage of the waverider concept at high altitudes. The high-Reynolds number waverider, optimized for the continuum regime at Minfinity = 4 and Reinfinity = 250 million, was the focus of recent wind tunnel testing for near on-design and off-design conditions, including low subsonic speeds. The present work extends the previous analyses into the high-altitude regime. The low-Reynolds number waverider, optimized at Minfinity = 20 and Reinfinity = 2.5 million, is studied to determine if optimization potential exists for a high-Mach number waverider at high altitudes. A characteristic length of 5 m is assumed for both waverider configurations, representative of a hypersonic missile concept. The geometries are aerodynamically evaluated over a parametric space consisting of an altitude variation of 95 km to 150 km and an angle of attack range of --5° to 10°. The effect of off-design Mach number on the performance of the high

  1. Effect of altitude on body composition during mountaineering expeditions: interrelationships with changes in dietary habits.

    Zamboni, M; Armellini, F; Turcato, E; Robbi, R; Micciolo, R; Todesco, T; Mandragona, R; Angelini, G; Bosello, O

    1996-01-01

    Loss of body weight occurs during high mountain expeditions but whether it is due to inadequate diet or other factors is unknown. Moreover the composition of the weight loss is unclear. The aim of our study was to compare the nutritional, anthropometric and metabolic changes during a mountaineering expedition in two groups of climbers, whose dietary energy intake was ad libitum, one given a lacto-fish-ovo-vegetarian diet and one an omnivorous diet. The intake of various nutrients, body weight, body composition and metabolic variables were evaluated before and during high altitude exposure and after the return to low altitude. The two groups were matched for age, body mass index and gender. No significant differences were found for nutritional variables between the two groups. Energy, animal and vegetable protein and fiber intake were significantly lower at climbing quote than before the beginning of the expedition. Significant differences between before the beginning and base camp in all variables were found. Energy and animal protein intake, but not vegetable protein and fiber intake, were significantly lower at climbing quote than at base camp. All subjects significantly reduced body weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumferences but not fat-free mass and fat mass. Metabolic variables significantly improved after the mountaineering expedition. Our study seems to confirm that a mountaineering expedition decreases energy and protein intake, reduces body weight and improves metabolic variables. Because our subjects spontaneously tended to have the same food intake despite the different dietary recommendations, our study failed to observe any differences between the two groups. However, our study shows that a low protein diet, in which the type of protein is mostly vegetable protein, could be adapted for climbers determining only a small decrease of fat-free mass. PMID:9087309

  2. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction.

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-08-15

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600-4,100 m) residents aged 18-25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  3. Hemorrhages and hemostasis in guinea-pigs exposed to irradiation at high altitude

    Hemorrhagic intensity, hemostasis and blood vessel wall resistance to mechanical effects were studied in guinea-pigs exposed to whole-body irradiation (3.0 Gy). The animals were irradiated at low altitude (760 m above sea level) and at high altitude (3200 m above sea level) after 1 and 31 days of adaptation. It was demonstrated that hemorrhagic intensity in both groups of guinea-pigs irradiated at high altitude was significantly reduced in comparison with that at low altitude. The decrease of radiation-induced hemorrhages at high altitude is associated with less severe changes in thrombopoiesis, blood vessel wall and blood coagulation

  4. Radiation exposure monitoring in civil aircraft

    Schrewe, Ulrich J.

    1999-02-01

    Based on the 1990 Recommendation of the ICRP (ICRP Publication 60, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1991) a European Directive [Official J. Eur. Communities 19 (1996) L159, 1-114] commits the European Union (EU) member states to revise their national radiation protection laws by the year 2000 such that the exposure of aircrews to the increased cosmic radiation prevailing at aviation flight altitudes will be treated as occupational risks. A consequence will be that employers must assess the aircrew exposure. The ACREM (Air Crew Radiation Exposure Monitoring) research project intends to investigate practically methods for aircraft dose equivalent determination. The in-flight measurements were carried out on cargo aircraft. Field calibrations were performed using Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPC) as the reference instrument. Various monitors were used to investigate the spatial doserate distribution. The measured data were collated according to the different altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes. The results obtained from various in-flight measurements are reported and a concept for a future routine dose assessment for aircrew is proposed.

  5. Radiation exposure monitoring in civil aircraft

    Based on the 1990 Recommendation of the ICRP (ICRP Publication 60, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1991) a European Directive [Official J. Eur. Communities 19 (1996) L159, 1-114] commits the European Union (EU) member states to revise their national radiation protection laws by the year 2000 such that the exposure of aircrews to the increased cosmic radiation prevailing at aviation flight altitudes will be treated as occupational risks. A consequence will be that employers must assess the aircrew exposure. The ACREM (Air Crew Radiation Exposure Monitoring) research project intends to investigate practically methods for aircraft dose equivalent determination. The in-flight measurements were carried out on cargo aircraft. Field calibrations were performed using Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counters (TEPC) as the reference instrument. Various monitors were used to investigate the spatial doserate distribution. The measured data were collated according to the different altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes. The results obtained from various in-flight measurements are reported and a concept for a future routine dose assessment for aircrew is proposed

  6. Body water metabolism in high altitude natives during and after a stay at sea level

    Jain, S. C.; Bardhan, Jaya; Swamy, Y. V.; Grover, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-03-01

    Body fluid compartments were studied in a group of high altitude natives after a stay of two months at sea level and during 12 days at an altitude of 3,500 m. Measurements of total body water and extracellular water were made on day 3 and 12 of reinduction to altitude, while plasma volume was measured on day 12 only. The intracellular water, blood volume and red cell mass were computed from the above parameters. Total body water and intracellular water decreased by 3.3% (Paltitude and did not change thereafter. Extracellular water increased progressively at altitude, but the increase was not significant. Blood volume and red cell mass increased significantly while plasma volume decreased at altitude. These data were compared with that of low landers. This study suggested body hypohydration on high altitude induction in low landers as well as in high altitude natives on reinduction.

  7. Milestones in the research of risks to aircraft crew due to cosmic radiation in flight altitudes

    Full text: More than a solar cycle ago the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended in the publication ICRP60 to consider the radiation exposure to aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation at flight altitudes. The European Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM of 13 May 1996 provided the legal basis for the radiation dose assessment for Europe. Several international aviation organizations have taken into account these considerations, and formulated recommendations for their members. The paper describes the milestones in health physics research which provide the scientific basis. Long term measurements on board aircraft have been undertaken by several institutes. The characterization of different dosimeter for the operation in mixed radiation field was a challenging undertaking. Intercomparison campaigns were made during instrument calibration and in-flight measurements. The Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) has been developed to an appropriate, mobile radiation reference instrument for on board measurements. Recently long term measurements during a solar storm provided experimental results of the radiation dose caused by solar particle events. LET spectra of the mixed radiation field in the atmosphere gathered by TEPC have been analyzed and simulated by the high energy transport code FLUKA. To provide efficient dose assessment under low costs, software codes for the calculation of the radiation dose to aircraft crew have been developed and were evaluated by measurements. Epidemiology studies have been undertaken to study the risk caused by cosmic radiation. Those studies have been compared with the radiation exposure to medical occupational workers. The paper summarizes the main results of the research and gives appropriate references. Further it provides an outline of future analysis in simulation and measurements of the radiation exposure due to solar particle events. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit. PMID:26256622

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B.

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  10. Assessment of hypoxia right heart remodeling after acclimatization at high different altitude areas

    Xiao-jin LAI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess hypoxic right heart remodeling after acclimatization at high altitude area. Methods One hundred volunteers who came to Tibet from the low-altitude areas by plane were randomly selected to serve as control group, and another 100 servicemen, who were dispatched from low altitude area to a station in Tibet area 3000m above sea level and got acclimatized to serve as altitude group. The altitude group was divided into altitude group 1 (3000-4000m above sea level, n=67 and altitude group 2 (4000-5500m above sea level, n=33 according to the altitude of the campsite, and also into migration-time group 1 (entered and stationed in Xizang for 1-2 years, n=72 and migration-time group 2 (entered and stationed in Xizang for over 2 years, n=28. The structure and function of the right heart were measured using a portable multi-functional composite echocardiography in a quiescent state, and hypoxic right heart remodeling after high-altitude acclimatization was comprehensively analyzed and assessed. Results Compared with control group, the main manifestations of the subjects in the altitude group were right ventricular and right atrial enlargement, right ventricular wall thickening, aggravation of tricuspid regurgitation, and broadening of pulmonary trunk and branch (P 4000m above sea level than in those who were in the area 2 years, particularly in those for > 5 years, than those who lived there for < 2 years (P < 0.01. Conclusions The altitude and living time in high-altitude are main factors for hypoxic right heart remodeling. Altitude acclimatization is only the adjustment of human body to hypoxic environment. A portable multi-functional composite echocardiography can early and timely assess hypoxic right heart remodeling and it is of important significance for ensuring the health of the serviceman in high-altitude area.

  11. Capabilities of unmanned aircraft vehicles for low altitude weed detection

    Pflanz, Michael; Nordmeyer, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production and food security require a consumer and environmental safe plant protection. It is recently known, that precise weed monitoring approaches could help apply pesticides corresponding to field variability. In this regard the site-specific weed management may contribute to an application of herbicides with higher ecologically aware and economical savings. First attempts of precision agriculture date back to the 1980's. Since that time, remote sensing from satellites or manned aircrafts have been investigated and used in agricultural practice, but are currently inadequate for the separation of weeds in an early growth stage from cultivated plants. In contrast, low-cost image capturing at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAV) provides higher spatial resolution and almost real-time processing. Particularly, rotary-wing aircrafts are suitable for precise path or stationary flight. This minimises motion blur and provides better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and the recent increase in the availability of microcontrollers and powerful batteries for UAVs, it can be expected that the spatial mapping of weeds will be enhanced in the future. A six rotors microcopter was equipped with a modified RGB camera taking images from agricultural fields. The hexacopter operates within predefined pathways at adjusted altitudes (from 5 to 10 m) by using GPS navigation. Different scenarios of optical weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. Our experiences showed high capabilities for site-specific weed control. Image analyses with regard to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide application to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  12. Improvement of metabolic syndrome markers through altitude specific hiking vacations.

    Greie, S; Humpeler, E; Gunga, H C; Koralewski, E; Klingler, A; Mittermayr, M; Fries, D; Lechleitner, M; Hoertnagl, H; Hoffmann, G; Strauss-Blasche, G; Schobersberger, W

    2006-06-01

    To study the influence of a 3-week hiking vacation at moderate (1700 m) and low altitude (LA) (200 m) on key-markers of the metabolic syndrome, 71 male volunteers (age 36-66 yr old) with the metabolic syndrome [according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III) - or World Health Organization (WHO) - definition] participated in the study and were randomly assigned into a moderate altitude (MA) group (1700 m, no. 36) and a low altitude (LA) group (200 m, no. 35). The 3-week vacation program included 12 moderate- intensity guided hiking tours [4 times/week, 55-65% heart rate maximum (HRmax)] with a total exercise time of 29 h plus moderate recreational activities. Both study groups had a comparable and balanced nutrition with no specific dietary restrictions. Anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular parameters were measured 10-14 days before vacation, several times during the 3-week vacation, 7-10 days and 6-8 weeks after return. All participants tolerated the vacation without any adverse effects. Body weight, body fat, waist-circumference, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), plasma fibrinogen, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly decreased over time in both study groups. In the LA group, fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-index were significantly decreased one week after return. Relative cycle ergometry performance was significantly increased after return compared to baseline. In both study groups, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides remained unchanged. The 3-week vacation intervention at moderate and LA had a positive influence on all key-markers of the metabolic syndrome. No clinically relevant differences could be detected between the study groups. A hiking vacation at moderate and LA can be recommended for people with stable, controlled metabolic and cardiovascular

  13. Benefits Assessment of Algorithmically Combining Generic High Altitude Airspace Sectors

    Bloem, Michael; Gupta, Pramod; Lai, Chok Fung; Kopardekar, Parimal

    2009-01-01

    In today's air traffic control operations, sectors that have traffic demand below capacity are combined so that fewer controller teams are required to manage air traffic. Controllers in current operations are certified to control a group of six to eight sectors, known as an area of specialization. Sector combinations are restricted to occur within areas of specialization. Since there are few sector combination possibilities in each area of specialization, human supervisors can effectively make sector combination decisions. In the future, automation and procedures will allow any appropriately trained controller to control any of a large set of generic sectors. The primary benefit of this will be increased controller staffing flexibility. Generic sectors will also allow more options for combining sectors, making sector combination decisions difficult for human supervisors. A sector-combining algorithm can assist supervisors as they make generic sector combination decisions. A heuristic algorithm for combining under-utilized air space sectors to conserve air traffic control resources has been described and analyzed. Analysis of the algorithm and comparisons with operational sector combinations indicate that this algorithm could more efficiently utilize air traffic control resources than current sector combinations. This paper investigates the benefits of using the sector-combining algorithm proposed in previous research to combine high altitude generic airspace sectors. Simulations are conducted in which all the high altitude sectors in a center are allowed to combine, as will be possible in generic high altitude airspace. Furthermore, the algorithm is adjusted to use a version of the simplified dynamic density (SDD) workload metric that has been modified to account for workload reductions due to automatic handoffs and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B). This modified metric is referred to here as future simplified dynamic density (FSDD). Finally

  14. Cosmic radiation exposure to airline flight passenger

    At the high altitudes, airline flight passengers can be exposed to some levels of cosmic radiation. The purpose of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure. Cosmic radiation was measured during 5 flights using a personal dosimeter (PDM-102, Aloka). Cosmic radiation equivalent dose rates ranged from 0.7 to 1.43 microsieverts per hour, the average rate was 1.08. For the passenger who travels only occasionally, the cosmic radiation levels are well below occupational limits, and the risks are extremely small. (author)

  15. Radiation exposure measurement onboard civil aircraft

    The active dosemeter DOSTEL based on two silicon planar detectors was flown on civil aircraft flights to study the radiation exposure of air crew members. The altitude and latitude dependence of count and dose rates as well as long-term variations are measured. After calibration of the DOSTEL response against measurements of a TEPC instrument, total dose-equivalent values for various flights are compared with H*(10) calculations by EPCARD yielding a ratio of 1.02 ± 0.09 (standard variation). (authors)

  16. Los primeros contactos de los europeos con las grandes altitudes

    Mas Galvañ, Cayetano

    2011-01-01

    Uno de los aspectos menos conocidos en el proceso de la expansión mundial europea es el del contacto con las altas cadenas montañosas americanas y asiáticas (Andes e Himalaya), y en especial la penetración en las grandes altitudes, superiores a 4.000 metros. En este trabajo se analizan las principales fuentes relacionadas con la presencia de europeos por encima de esas cotas, en el doble terreno de la percepción subjetiva y los episodios de mal agudo de montaña, y en el del avance en la medic...

  17. the APL Balloonborne High Altitude Research Platform (HARP)

    Adams, D.; Arnold, S.; Bernasconi, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has developed and demonstrated a multi-purpose stratospheric balloonborne gondola known as the High Altitude Research Platform (HARP). HARP provides the power, mechanical supports, thermal control, and data transmission for multiple forms of high-altitude scientific research equipment. The platform has been used for astronomy, cosmology and heliophysics experiments but can also be applied to atmospheric studies, space weather and other forms of high altitude research. HARP has executed five missions. The first was Flare Genesis from Antarctica in 1993 and the most recent was the Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS) from New Mexico in 2014. HARP will next be used to perform again the Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory mission, a mission that it first performed in 2009. The structure, composed of an aluminum framework is designed for easy transport and field assembly while providing ready access to the payload and supporting avionics. A light-weighted structure, capable of supporting Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights that can last more than 100 days is available. Scientific research payloads as heavy as 600 kg (1322 pounds) and requiring up to 800 Watts electrical power can be supported. The platform comprises all subsystems required to support and operate the science payload, including both line-of-sight (LOS) and over-the-horizon (0TH) telecommunications, the latter provided by Iridium Pilot. Electrical power is produced by solar panels for multi-day missions and batteries for single-day missions. The avionics design is primarily single-string; however, use of ruggedized industrial components provides high reliability. The avionics features a Command and Control (C&C) computer and a Pointing Control System (PCS) computer housed within a common unpressurized unit. The avionics operates from ground pressure to 2 Torr and over a temperature range from —30 C to +85 C

  18. Impact of Altitude on Power Output during Cycling Stage Racing

    Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Clark, Bradley; Martin, David T.; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; McDonald, Warren; Stephens, Brian; Ma, Fuhai; Kevin G Thompson; Gore, Christopher J.; Menaspà, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of moderate-high altitude on power output, cadence, speed and heart rate during a multi-day cycling tour. Methods Power output, heart rate, speed and cadence were collected from elite male road cyclists during maximal efforts of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 600 s. The efforts were completed in a laboratory power-profile assessment, and spontaneously during a cycling race simulation near sea-level and an international cycling race at mode...

  19. A non-linear UAV altitude PSO-PD control

    Orlando, Calogero

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a nonlinear model based approach is presented for the altitude stabilization of a hexarotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The mathematical model and control of the hexacopter airframe is presented. To stabilize the system along the vertical direction, a Proportional Derivative (PD) control is taken into account. A particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach is used in this paper to select the optimal parameters of the control algorithm taking into account different objective functions. Simulation sets are performed to carry out the results for the non-linear system to show how the PSO tuned PD controller leads to zero the error of the position along Z earth direction.

  20. Solar Energy Generation Model for High Altitude Long Endurance Platforms

    Brizon, Mathilde

    2015-01-01

    For designing and evaluating new concepts for HALE platforms, the energy provided by solar cells is a key factor. The purpose of this thesis is to model the electrical power which can be harnessed by such a platform along any flight trajectory for different aircraft designs. At first, a model of the solar irradiance received at high altitude will be performed using the solar irradiance models already existing for ground level applications as a basis. A calculation of the efficiency of the energy g...

  1. WCDMA Uplink Interference Assessment from Multiple High Altitude Platform Configurations

    A. Mohammed

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the possibility of multiple high altitude platform (HAP coverage of a common cell area using a wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA system. In particular, we study the uplink system performance of the system. The results show that depending on the traffic demand and the type of service used, there is a possibility of deploying 3–6 HAPs covering the same cell area. The results also show the effect of cell radius on performance and the position of the multiple HAP base stations which give the worst performance.

  2. High altitude smoke in the NASA GISS GCM

    Field, Robert; Luo, M.; Fromm, M.; Voulgarakis, A.; Mangeon, S.; Worden, J.

    2015-01-01

    High altitude smoke-plumes from large, explosive fires were discovered in the late 1990sThey can now be observed with unprecedented detail from space-borne instruments with high vertical resolution in the UTLS such as CALIOP, MLS and ACE. These events inject large quantities of pollutants into a relatively clean and dry environment They serve as unique natural experiments with which to understand, using chemical transport and composition-climate models, the chemical and radiative impacts of long-lived biomass burning emissions. We are currently studying the Black Saturday bushfires in Australia during February 2009

  3. Cardiac arrhythmia at high altitude: the progressive effect of aging.

    Alexander, J K

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of aging on cardiac rhythm at high altitude, I wore a Holter monitor at age 75 during a climb to 5,100 m on Mt. Kilimanjaro, then compared findings with those from my climb to 5,895 m at age 65. Holter leads were placed to identify left or right ventricular source of ectopy, and on the 2nd ascent arterial oxygen saturation was monitored by finger oximetry. Sea-level testing revealed no evidence of cardiac disease. During ascent from 4,710 to 5,100 m, when arterial oxyg...

  4. Blood lactate changes during exercise at high altitude.

    Binns, N.; Wright, A. D.; Singh, B. M.; Coote, J.H.; Bradwell, A R

    1987-01-01

    Blood lactate concentrations were measured in 18 normal subjects at the end of an exercise test designed to maintain heart rate at 85% of maximum for 15 minutes. Blood lactate concentrations were reduced at high altitude (4846 m) and correlated positively with basal pH and negatively with basal Pa,O2 levels. Blood lactate concentrations tended to be lower in those subjects on acetazolamide but were not correlated with the severity of acute mountain sickness or with the workload of the exercis...

  5. Moessbauer studies of hemoglobin in high altitude polycythemia

    The Moessbauer spectra have been measured in erythrocytes from normal adults and the patients with high altitude polycythemia (HAPC). The results indicated that two subspectra ''a'' and ''b'', corresponding to oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin respectively, were present in all blood samples, and a third subspectrum ''c'' was found to exist in almost all samples from the patients. The parameters of the third subspectra ''c1'' in most samples from the patients were similar to those of carbon monoxyhemoglobin. The components were considered to be the denatured hemoglobin in RBCs (red blood cells). Together with clinical analysis, a possible mechanism of HAPC has been discussed. (orig.)

  6. DETECTION OF JOVIAN RADIO BURSTS AT HIGH ALTITUDES

    A. SARKAR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the formation of Jovian magnetosphere has been critically discussed with special emphasis on decametric radio source. Emission of radio signals originating in Jupiter magnetic field and the selection of frequency for detecting the bursts have been considered. The meteorology of the high altitude observing station Darjeeling including the GPS data taken at the observatory has been presented. The Jove receiver used for the reception of radio signals and the technique employed for the detection of bursts are also outlined in this preliminary report.

  7. Investigating the auroral electrojets with low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils; Ritter, P.;

    2002-01-01

    in the auroral electrojets. First, we examine the results during a recent geomagnetic storm. The currents derived from two satellites at different altitudes are in very good agreement, which verifies good stability of the method. Further, a very high degree of correlation (correlation coefficients of 0...... to another event for which the combined measurements of the three satellites provide a comprehensive view of the current systems. The analysis hereof reveals some surprising results concerning the connection between solar wind driver and the resulting ionospheric currents. Specifically, preconditioning...

  8. CAPACITY CALCULATION OF TD-CDMA HIGH ALTITUDE PLATFORM SYSTEM

    Wang Zhenyong; Liu Xiaowei; Li Zhuoshi

    2011-01-01

    A capacity calculation method of High Altitude Platform System (HAPS) is proposed in which TD-CDMA multiple access schemes are applied.With the influence of both power limit and bandwidth limit on capacity integrated,the paper derives the equations by which the capacity of TD-CDMA systems can be calculated,and performs calculation on a practical system.This calculation method is quite simple and effective with a comparatively small error,which is essential to the designing and research on HAPS.

  9. Effect of altitude on protein metabolism in Bolivian children

    Protein utilization during feeding is difficult to assess by classical tracer methodology, particularly under field conditions. We propose a new approach using the measurement of tracer recovery (expired 13CO2) after the ingestion of a single oral dose of a 13C-leucine labelled milk protein. Protein will be obtained by infusing a cow with 13C-leucine. The difference between the amounts of tracer given and recovered should be an index of protein utilization. Since altitude might influence protein absorption, this non-invasive method will be used in Bolivian children, living either at 3600 m (La Paz) or at sea level. (author). 14 refs

  10. Regression of Body Density on Skinfold Thicknesses in High Altitude Natives: Decline in the Predictive Efficiency on De-Acclimatisation to Low Altitude

    H. Bharadwaj

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Body density, stature, body weight and skinfold thickness at 11 sites were experimentally measured on two groups of high altitude natives (HAN of Ladakh. Group 1, consisting of 38 similar volunteers was studied after 4-week stay at an altitude of 3658 m and Group 2, consisting of 38 similar volunteers was studied after 4-week stay at Delhi (altitude, 200m. Although, there was a strong relationship between skinfolds, other anthropometric measurements and body density (R=0.898 at high altitude (HA, this relationship was significantly reduced at Delhi (R=0.642. Appropriate regression equations predicting body density from skinfold thicknesses, stature and body weight are given for HAN at both the locations. It is concluded that hyperhydration of the lean body and the adipose tissue may be responsible for the weakening of the multiple Rs on de-acclimatisation to low altitude.

  11. ACREM: A new air crew radiation exposure measuring system

    Cosmic radiation has already been discovered in 1912 by the Austrian Nobel Laureate Victor F. Hess. After Hess up to now numerous measurements of the radiation exposure by cosmic rays in different altitudes have been performed, however, this has not been taken serious in view of radiation protection.Today, with the fast development of modern airplanes, an ever increasing number of civil aircraft is flying in increasing altitudes for considerable time. Members of civil aircrew spending up to 1000 hours per year in cruising altitudes and therefore are subject to significant levels of radiation exposure. In 1990 ICRP published its report ICRP 60 with updated excess cancer risk estimates, which led to significantly higher risk coefficients for some radiation qualities. An increase of the radiation weighting factors for mean energy neutron radiation increases the contribution for the neutron component to the equivalent dose by about 60%, as compared to the earlier values of ICRP26. This higher risk coefficients lead to the recommendation of the ICRP, that cosmic radiation exposure in civil aviation should be taken into account as occupational exposure. Numerous recent exposure measurements at civil airliners in Germany, Sweden, USA, and Russia show exposure levels in the range of 3-10 mSv/year. This is significantly more than the average annual dose of radiation workers (in Austria about 1.5 mSv/year). Up to now no practicable and economic radiation monitoring system for routine application on board exits. A fairly simple and economic approach to a practical, active in-flight dosimeter for the assessment of individual crew exposure is discussed in this paper

  12. Does altitude moderate the impact of lithium on suicide? A spatial analysis of Austria

    Marco Helbich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Suicide, the tenth leading cause of death worldwide, is a complex phenomenon. Models aiming to explain the interaction of ambient variables such as socioeconomic factors, lithium content of drinking water and altitude are poorly developed. While controlling for several risk factors, this research bridges two different, but complementary research lines by investigating statistically the relationship on suicide mortality between lithium levels in drinking water in response to altitude above sea level. Besides regression models with main effects, a multiplicative interaction model between lithium and altitude has been developed providing estimates at the district-level for Austria where spatial autocorrelation was accounted for through spatial filtering. The correlation results showed a negative association between lithium levels and altitude. The regression confirmed a negative association of lithium levels and suicide mortality. Altitude was found to be positively associated with suicide mortality. On the other hand, lithium effects on suicide mortality were found to be moderated by altitude. In lower altitude regions the effect turned out to be negatively related to suicide mortality, while lithium had a positive association in high-altitude regions. These results provide evidence for the fact that the relationship between lithium, altitude and suicide rates is more complex than hitherto assumed. Further research on the effects of ambient variables such as low levels of lithium on suicide is needed and particularly the lithium-altitude interaction is worth further investigation to understand possible underlying neurochemical processes.

  13. LOW ALTITUDE AIRSHIPS FOR SEAMLESS MOBILE COMMUNICATION IN AIR TRAVEL

    Madhu D

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Aviation Administration policy prohibits the use of mobile phones in Aircraft during transition for the reason it may harm their communication system due to Electromagnetic interference. In case the user wants to access cellular network at higher altitudes, base station access is a problem. Large number of channels are allocated to a single user moving at high speed by various Base Stations in the vicinity to service the request requiring more resources. Low Altitude Platforms (LAPs are provided in the form of Base stations in the Airships with antennas projected upwards which has direct link with the Ground Station. LAPs using LongEndurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle (LEMVs equipped with an engine for mobility and stable positioning against rough winds are utilized. This paper proposes a system that allows the passengers to use their mobiles in Aircraft using LAPs as an intermediate system between Aircraft and Ground station. As the Aircraft is dynamic, it has to change its link frequently with the Airships, MANETs using AODV protocol is established in the prototype using NS2 to provide the service and the results are encouraging

  14. Air to muscle O2 delivery during exercise at altitude

    Calbet, J.A.; Lundby, C.

    2009-01-01

    saturation (Sao2) 6 to 12 percentage units. Pulmonary gas exchange (PGE) is efficient at rest and, hence, the alveolar-arterial Po2 difference (Pao2-Pao2) remains close to 0 to 5mm Hg. The (Pao2-Pao2) increases with exercise duration and intensity and the level of hypoxia. During exercise in hypoxia......, diffusion limitation explains most of the additional Pao2-Pao2. With altitude, acclimatization exercise (Pao2-Pao2) is reduced, but does not reach the low values observed in high altitude natives, who possess an exceptionally high DLo2. Convective O2 transport depends on arterial O2 content (Cao2), cardiac...... output (Q), and muscle blood flow (LBF). During whole-body exercise in severe acute hypoxia and in chronic hypoxia, peak Q and LBF are blunted, contributing to the limitation of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max). During small-muscle exercise in hypoxia, PGE is less perturbed, Cao2 is higher, and peak Q and...

  15. Reduction of Altitude Diffuser Jet Noise Using Water Injection

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Saunders, Grady P.; Langford, Lester A.

    2014-01-01

    A feasibility study on the effects of injecting water into the exhaust plume of an altitude rocket diffuser for the purpose of reducing the far-field acoustic noise has been performed. Water injection design parameters such as axial placement, angle of injection, diameter of injectors, and mass flow rate of water have been systematically varied during the operation of a subscale altitude test facility. The changes in acoustic far-field noise were measured with an array of free-field microphones in order to quantify the effects of the water injection on overall sound pressure level spectra and directivity. The results showed significant reductions in noise levels were possible with optimum conditions corresponding to water injection at or just upstream of the exit plane of the diffuser. Increasing the angle and mass flow rate of water injection also showed improvements in noise reduction. However, a limit on the maximum water flow rate existed as too large of flow rate could result in un-starting the supersonic diffuser.

  16. Scientific verification of High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a TeV gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector currently under construction at an altitude of 4100 m close to volcano Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The HAWC [1] observatory is an extensive air-shower array composed of 300 optically isolated water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs). Each WCD contains ∼200,000 l of filtered water and four upward-facing photomultiplier tubes. In Fall 2014, when the HAWC observatory will reach an area of 22,000 m2, the sensitivity will be 15 times higher than its predecessor Milagro [2]. Since September 2012, more than 30 WCDs have been instrumented and taking data. This first commissioning phase has been crucial for the verification of the data acquisition and event reconstruction algorithms. Moreover, with the increasing number of instrumented WCDs, it is important to verify the data taken with different configuration geometries. In this work we present a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and data recorded by the experiment during 24 h of live time between 14 and 15 April of 2013 when 29 WCDs were active

  17. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  18. Increased choroidal thickness in patient with high-altitude retinopathy

    Kyoko Hirukawa-Nakayama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of high-altitude retinopathy with increased choroidal thickness detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. A 36-year-old Japanese man developed an acute vision decrease in his left eye after he had trekked at an altitude of 4600 m in Tibet for 1 week. His visual acuity was 20/20 OD and 20/200 OS with refractive errors of − 0.25 diopters (D OD and − 0.50 D OS 3 weeks after the onset of the visual decrease. Funduscopic examinations revealed multiple intraretinal hemorrhages bilaterally and a macular hemorrhage in the left eye. SD-OCT showed that the thickness of choroidal layer at the fovea was 530 μm OD and 490 μm OS which is thicker than that in normal subjects of approximately 300 μm. We suggest that the increase in the retinal blood flow under hypoxic conditions may be associated with an increase in the choroidal blood flow resulting in an increase in choroidal thickness.

  19. Semianalytic Integration of High-Altitude Orbits under Lunisolar Effects

    Martin Lara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effect of lunisolar perturbations on high-altitude orbits is studied after a double averaging procedure that removes both the mean anomaly of the satellite and that of the moon. Lunisolar effects acting on high-altitude orbits are comparable in magnitude to the Earth’s oblateness perturbation. Hence, their accurate modeling does not allow for the usual truncation of the expansion of the third-body disturbing function up to the second degree. Using canonical perturbation theory, the averaging is carried out up to the order where second-order terms in the Earth oblateness coefficient are apparent. This truncation order forces to take into account up to the fifth degree in the expansion of the lunar disturbing function. The small values of the moon’s orbital eccentricity and inclination with respect to the ecliptic allow for some simplification. Nevertheless, as far as the averaging is carried out in closed form of the satellite’s orbit eccentricity, it is not restricted to low-eccentricity orbits.

  20. Cloud Altitude Determination of Overshooting Tops in Severe Thunderstorms

    Goldberg, R.; Magee, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    The maximum heights of deep convective clouds and overshooting tops have been analyzed and compared using a combination of space and ground-based measurement systems. Deeply convective cumulonimbus clouds are capable of reaching and penetrating the tropopause. The portions of convective clouds that extend into the stratosphere are known as overshooting tops. Instances of tornado onset have been observed to match or slightly lag the timing of maximum cloud-top altitudes. In addition, precise forecasting and measurement of convective cloud-top heights are of critical importance to the safety and efficiency of commercial aviation flight routings. This study included the use of data from three NASA A-Train satellites, 88-D and TDWR Doppler radar, NAM modeling output, and direct visual sightings. The three polar-orbiting satellites included Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat, and Aqua. CALIPSO and CloudSat return a vertical profile of microphysical parameters as their near-nadir beams intersect clouds. CALIPSO uses a lidar instrument (CALIOP), operating at 532 and 1064 nm, that is capable of detecting aerosol and small cloud particles. CloudSat uses a radar system called Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), operating at 94 GHz (3.2 mm), that can penetrate thicker clouds, including those with precipitation. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board Aqua provided a 250m resolution map view that permitted identification of the unique texture of overshooting tops. Satellite data and ground-based Doppler radar were co-located and used to compare cloud-top and echo-top measurements and products. In addition to co-located observational data, North American Mesoscale (NAM) model output with maximum 6-hour lead time was analyzed for convective cloud top forecasts. Finally, direct sightings of cloud tops were made at the time of CALIPSO overpasses of New Jersey. Using a surveyor's transit, the angle from the

  1. Personal UVR exposure of farming families in four European countries

    Bodekær, M; Harrison, G I; Philipsen, P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main risk factor for skin cancer is ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Farming families living in rural areas with easy outdoor access may experience excessive UVR exposure. Differences between countries in latitude, altitude and sun behaviour could result in different personal UVR...... exposures. However, no studies have examined this until now. OBJECTIVES: To determine personal UVR exposure in work and leisure situations among farming families in Europe. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of farmers, their partners (spouses) and children in Denmark (DK), Poland (PL), Austria (AT), and...... Spain (ES) from 2009 to 2011. Personal UVR exposure and sun behaviour were recorded by dosimetry and diaries. RESULTS: Farmers' average daily UVR exposure on working days ranged from 1.4 SED (DK, AT) to 2.7 SED (ES). Corresponding figures for partners were: 0.6 SED (DK) to 1.9 SED (PL), and for children...

  2. Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine position statement: athletes at high altitude.

    Koehle, Michael S; Cheng, Ivy; Sporer, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    Many sports incorporate training at altitude as a key component of their athlete training plan. Furthermore, many sports are required to compete at high altitude venues. Exercise at high altitude provides unique challenges to the athlete and to the sport medicine clinician working with these athletes. These challenges include altitude illness, alterations in training intensity and performance, nutritional and hydration difficulties, and challenges related to the austerity of the environment. Furthermore, many of the strategies that are typically utilized by visitors to altitude may have implications from an anti-doping point of view.This position statement was commissioned and approved by the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine. The purpose of this statement was to provide an evidence-based, best practices summary to assist clinicians with the preparation and management of athletes and individuals travelling to altitude for both competition and training. PMID:24569430

  3. A strategy for reducing neonatal mortality at high altitude using oxygen conditioning.

    West, J B

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal mortality increases with altitude. For example, in Peru the incidence of neonatal mortality in the highlands has been shown to be about double that at lower altitudes. An important factor is the low inspired PO2 of newborn babies. Typically, expectant mothers at high altitude will travel to low altitude to have their babies if possible, but often this is not feasible because of economic factors. The procedure described here raises the oxygen concentration in the air of rooms where neonates are being housed and, in effect, this means that both the mother and baby are at a much lower altitude. Oxygen conditioning is similar to air conditioning except that the oxygen concentration of the air is increased rather than the temperature being reduced. The procedure is now used at high altitude in many hotels, dormitories and telescope facilities, and has been shown to be feasible and effective. PMID:26426252

  4. Genetic Differentiation of Pinus koraiensis under Different Altitude Conditions in Changbai Mountain

    FENGFujuan

    2004-01-01

    The genetic differentiation of Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) in different altitudes in Changbai Mountain was analyzed by ISSR technique, and it was found that the level of genetic diversity of Korean pine reduces along with altitude increasing in Changbai Mountain. The variation of Korean pine is mainly from intra-population and there is a positive relativity between genetic distance and vertical geographic distance of Korean pine in different altitudes. The genetic coherence shows that altitude has less insulation to Korean pine. Therefore, it is deduced that the terrain formation of vertical distribution of Korean pine is a result of diffusion from lower altitude to higher altitude in the course of enlarging its adaptability.

  5. Correlation analysis of the changes in arterial blood pressure in people with acute mountain sickness when exposed to high altitude

    Yang LIU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives  To investigate the changes in arterial blood pressure in the healthy lowlanders when they were exposed to different altitudes and duration, and the relationship of the exposure with the prevalence and susceptibility of acute mountain sickness (AMS, in order to evaluate the significance of arterial blood pressure changes in the diagnosis of AMS and its clinical risk. Methods  Demographic data and blood pressure parameters [systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial BP (MABP] of healthy lowlanders (inhabitants in ≤500m were collected after being exposed to 3700m on day 1, 3, 5 and 7, and also after being exposed to 4400m on day 5, while healthy young men living at low altitude were randomly selected as the control group. Simultaneously the AMS symptoms Questionnaire was filled. The Lake Louise acute mountain sickness scoring system (LLS was used to diagnose AMS. The changes in arterial blood pressure in people above and its correlation with AMS were analyzed. Results  After acute exposure to 3700m (day 1, SBP, DBP and MABP rose obviously, and then descended moderately after adaptation for about a week, but still higher than that of LA level (P<0.05. And then SBP, DBP and MABP rose again at high-altitude of 4400m, but lower than the levels of day 1 at 3700m. MABP at 3700m and 4400m were related to LLS (r=0.138, P=0.048; r=0.145, P=0.045, respectively. MABP levels for diagnosis of AMS at 3700m showed an cut-off point of 98.5mmHg with sensitivity of 32.8% and specificity of 73.7% (P<0.05, and MABP levels for diagnosis of AMS at 4400m showed an cut-off point of 97.8mmHg with sensitivity of 42.4% and specificity of 75.5% (P<0.05. Conclusions  After exposure to acute hypoxia, MABP may serve as a predictive parameter for diagnosis of AMS. However, the clinical application of MABP as a diagnostic criterion is limited because of its poor specificity or sensitivity. The use of MABP as a diagnostic

  6. Reproduction of a rat model of acute high-altitude sickness and evaluation of its related indexes

    Chi WANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce a rat model of acute mountain sickness by using a hypobaric chamber to simulate the plateau environment, and to study the related physiological parameters. Methods A total of 70 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group, and 6 hypobaric hypoxia groups (10 each in which rats were housed in a hypobaric chamber and exposed to the enviroment simulating high altitude of 5000m and 6000m for 12h, 24h and 48h respectively. Memory Morris water maze test was conducted to evaluate the changes in working memory of rats in space. Histological changes in lung and brain tissue were observed. Blood from abdominal aorta was collected to analyze the parameters of blood gas. The histopathological changes in lung and cerebrum were observed, and their wet/dry ratios were calculated. Results Reduction in activity or even death was found in hypobaric hypoxia groups, and arterial PaO2 was significantly decreased in all rats of hypobaric hypoxia groups. Compared with NC group, rats exposed to a simulated altitude of 5000m for longer than 24h and 6000m for longer than 12h exhibited longer latency period in finding the hidden platform, shorter expedition time for target quadrant, and less frequency of platform crossing in the Morris water maze test (P<0.05. After exposure to simulated altitudes of both 5000m and 6000m for 48h, pathological changes were observed in lung and cerebrum, and wet/dry ratio of lung and brain was significantly increased compared with that of NC group. Conclusion Indexes of rat model of acute mountain sickness by using a hypobaric chamber show different changes at respective time points. Therefore the changes in multiple physiological indexes of mountain sickness can be assessed by using this animal model. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.06

  7. Thermoluminescent detectors for neutron dosimetry at high altitudes

    At high altitudes in the earth's atmosphere cosmic-ray induced neutrons become the dominant contributors to the biologically relevant dose equivalent. Depending on the geomagnetic latitude and the solar activity cycle, neutron dose onboard aircraft amounts, for example, to roughly 50 to 70 % of the overall dose equivalent. Neutron detection in complexly mixed radiation environments by means of active, i.e. power-consuming, detectors is commonly aggravated by the fact that a variety of charged particles present in the field cannot be discriminated and therefore biases the measurement. Passive thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are proposed as a convenient alternative. They are easy-to-handle in practical use, contain no flammable gases and emit no electromagnetic radiation that could interfere with sensitive electronics. The simultaneous application of specific detector types is known in neutron dosimetry as the pair method. Neutron-sensitive TLD-600 (6LiF) is combined with TLD-700 (7LiF) which is almost insensitive to neutrons. The sensitivity for all other radiations is identical for both types, so that a simple subtraction of the measured detector signals leads to the thermal neutron dose. As the neutron cross sections of 6Li and 7Li differ significantly only below 200 keV, the pair method in its conventional form assesses the dose only from neutrons in this energy region. The method can be extended for utilization at high altitudes, such as onboard aircraft, if the calibration of the TLDs is performed in a reference field which simulates in close proximity the atmospheric neutron environment. For our purposes we used the CERN-EU High-Energy Reference Field (CERF) for which the relative contribution of neutrons with energies below 200 keV to the entire fluence is practically the same as for the cosmic-ray induced neutron spectrum. Measurements with Bonner sphere spectrometers at the CERF facility and onboard aircraft and subsequent comparison with a FLUKA Monte

  8. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels

    Chun Guo; Jianfeng Xu; Mingnian Wang; Tao Yan; Lu Yang; Zhitao Sun

    2015-01-01

    The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. ...

  9. Butterflies of the high altitude Atacama Desert: habitat use and conservation

    Emma eDespland

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the high-altitude desert of Northern Chile, though depauperate, shows high endemism, is poorly known and is of considerable conservation concern. This study surveys butterflies along the Andean slope between 2400 and 500 m asl (prepuna, puna and Andean steppe habitats) as well as in high and low altitude wetlands and in the neoriparian vegetation of agricultural sites. We also include historical sightings from museum records. We compare abundances between altitudes, be...

  10. AKR-like emissions observed at low altitude by the DEMETER satellite

    Parrot, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    International audience This paper reports observations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) by the low altitude satellite DEMETER (700 km) during the super magnetic storm of November 2004. AKR is generated along auroral field lines at altitudes above ~ 3000 km and escapes from the Earth so that most observations have been made close to the source regions or at large distances from the Earth. However, EM waves with AKR-like frequency spectra detected by the low altitude EXOS-C satellite we...

  11. Novel drugs in the management of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary edema

    Sikri G; Bhattacharya A

    2015-01-01

    Gaurav Sikri, Anirban Bhattacharya Department of Physiology, Armed Forces Medical College, Wanowarie, Pune, IndiaWe read with great interest the review article titled “Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field” by Shah et al.1 The authors have comprehensively summarized the recent advances in the field of high altitude medicine relevant to sports and travel medicine. However, Shah et al have described potential drugs for management of high-altitude ill...

  12. The comparison of physical fitness in secondary male students in altitude and coastal areas

    ZAHIBI, Esmaeil; ALAVI, Seyed Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is the comparison of physical fitness in secondary male students in altitude and coastal areas and difference between the physical fitness on based AAHPERD test. The samples consist of 450 subjects of 1017 subjects in altitude (Shahrekord) and coastal area (Mahmood Abad) in Iran in years of 2013 which were selected cluster- randomly sampling by Morgan Table. We investigated the effect of high altitude on the tests of physical fitness resident students near sea level (...

  13. Metabolic insight into mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans

    Ge, Ri-Li; Simonson, Tatum S.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Tanna, Uran; Qin, Ga; Huff, Chad D.; WITHERSPOON, DAVID J.; Xing, Jinchuan; Zhengzhong, Bai; Prchal, Josef T.; Jorde, Lynn B.; McClain, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genes involved in high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Genetic variants/haplotypes within regions containing three of these genes (EPAS1, EGLN1, and PPARA) are associated with relatively decreased hemoglobin levels observed in Tibetans at high altitude, providing corroborative evidence for genetic adaptation to this extreme environment. The mechanisms that afford adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, however, remain unclear. Considering the strong metabolic dema...

  14. High-altitude Pulmonary Hypertension: an Update on Disease Pathogenesis and Management

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.; Strohl, Kingman P.

    2016-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH) affects individuals residing at altitudes of 2,500 meters and higher. Numerous pathogenic variables play a role in disease inception and progression and include low oxygen concentration in inspired air, vasculopathy, and metabolic abnormalities. Since HAPH affects only some people living at high altitude genetic factors play a significant role in its pathogenesis. The clinical presentation of HAPH is nonspecific and includes fatigue, shortness of br...

  15. Butterflies of the high-altitude Atacama Desert: habitat use and conservation

    Despland, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the high-altitude desert of Northern Chile, though depauperate, shows high endemism, is poorly known and is of considerable conservation concern. This study surveys butterflies along the Andean slope between 2400 and 5000 m asl (prepuna, puna and Andean steppe habitats) as well as in high and low-altitude wetlands and in the neoriparian vegetation of agricultural sites. We also include historical sightings from museum records. We compare abundances between altitudes, be...

  16. Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

  17. Analysis of the neutron component at high altitude mountains using active and passive measurement devices

    The European Council directive 96/29/Euratom requires dosimetric precautions if the effective dose exceeds 1 mSv/a. On an average, this value is exceeded by aircrew members. Roughly half of the radiation exposure at flight altitudes is caused by cosmic ray-induced neutrons. Active (6LiI(Eu)-scintillator) and passive (TLDs) Bonner sphere spectrometers were used to determine the neutron energy spectra atop Mt. Sonnblick (3105 m) and Mt. Kitzsteinhorn (3029 m). Further measurements in a mixed radiation field at CERN as well as in a proton beam of 62 MeV at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, confirmed that not only neutrons but also charged particles contribute to the readings of active detectors, whereas TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allow the determination of the thermal neutron flux. Unfolding of the detector data obtained atop both mountains shows two relative maxima around 1 MeV and 85 MeV, which have to be considered for the assessment of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. By convoluting the spectra with appropriate conversion functions the neutron dose equivalent rate was determined to be 150±15 nSv/h. The total dose equivalent rate determined by the HTR-method was 210±15 nSv/h. The results are in good agreement with LET-spectrometer and Sievert counter measurements carried out simultaneously

  18. Endolithic microbial colonization of limestone in a high-altitude arid environment.

    Wong, Fiona K Y; Lau, Maggie C Y; Lacap, Donnabella C; Aitchison, Jonathan C; Cowan, Donald A; Pointing, Stephen B

    2010-05-01

    The morphology of endolithic colonization in a limestone escarpment and surrounding rocky debris (termed float) at a high-altitude arid site in central Tibet was documented using scanning electron microscopy. Putative lichenized structures and extensive coccoid bacterial colonization were observed. Absolute and relative abundance of rRNA gene signatures using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis of environmental phylotypes were used to characterize community structure across all domains. Escarpment endoliths were dominated by eukaryotic phylotypes suggestive of lichenised associations (a Trebouxia lichen phycobiont and Leptodontidium lichen mycobiont), whereas float endoliths were dominated by bacterial phylotypes, including the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis plus several unidentified beta proteobacteria and crenarchaea. Among a range of abiotic variables tested, ultraviolet (UV) transmittance by rock substrates was the factor best able to explain differences in community structure, with eukaryotic lichen phylotypes more abundant under conditions of greater UV-exposure compared to prokaryotes. Variously pigmented float rocks did not support significantly different communities. Estimates of in situ carbon fixation based upon (14)C radio-labelled bicarbonate uptake indicated endolithic productivity of approximately 2.01 g C/m(2)/year(-1), intermediate between estimates for Antarctic and temperate communities. PMID:19937324

  19. Chernobyl radioactivity and high altitude air-particulate monitoring at Islamabad

    High altitude sampling of air particulates for radioactivity monitoring was conducted at Islamabad after the CHERNOBYL accident. Smears from aeroplanes flying at varying altitudes were collected and analysed for fresh fission products mainly gamma emitters e.g. Ru-103 and Cs-137 etc. The maximum radioactivity observed was of the order of 15Bq/sample for Ru-103 and 9Bq/sample for Cs-137 respectively. The study was purely qualitative in nature indicated the presence of fresh fission radioactivity at high altitudes over Islamabad. For quantitative measurements at high altitudes sophisticated instrumentation/procedure needs to be adopted. (author)

  20. What high altitude observations tell us about the auroral acceleration: A Cluster/DMSP conjunction

    A. Vaivads; ANDRE, M; S. Buchert; Eriksson, A.; Olsson, A; Wahlund, J. E.; Janhunen, P.; Marklund, G.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, S.; Winningham, D.; Fazakerley, A.N.; Newell, P.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic conjugate observations by Cluster and DMSP F14 satellites are used to study the field lines of auroral arc. Cluster is well above the acceleration region and observes upward keV ion beams and bipolar electric structures. The integrated potential at Cluster altitudes shows a dip that is consistent with the keV electron acceleration energy at low altitude. The earthward Poynting flux at Cluster altitudes is comparable to the electron energy flux at low altitudes. Thus, for this event t...

  1. Different responses of different altitudes surrounding Taklimankan Desert to global climate change

    Chongyi, E.; Yong, Wang; Taibao, Yang; Jiankang, Han; Hongchang, Hu; Fengmei, Yang

    2009-02-01

    Chongce Ice Cap (35°14'N, 81°07'E), located in the south margin of Taklimakan Desert, West Kunlun Mts. of China was sampled by coring in 1992, and this provides us with climate proxy of high altitudes (6,530 m). Through analyzing the weather observation stations surrounding Taklimakan Desert, the climate record of Hotan station was chosen to be the representative of low altitudes. Wavelet analysis were used to investigate the climatic variations of patterns, cycles and frequencies of different altitudes from 1954 to 1992, and different responses of different altitude surrounding Taklimakan Desert to global warming were recorded: (1) coherent decline of snow accumulation rate and dust deposition of high altitude recorded in Chongce ice core; (2) coherent increase of summer half-year precipitation and SAT of Hotan; (3) consistent variation tendency between dust deposit recorded in Chongce ice core and Hotan spring sandstorm days; (4) opposite variation tendency between Hotan precipitation and Chongce ice core snow accumulation rate and consistent cycles in general. By analyzing the mechanism of different responses, the predominant factors were determined of different altitudes: (1) at the low altitude, the vapor supply is predominant, and more vapor supplying means more precipitation; (2) at the high altitude, probably the population of dust aerosols which act as cloud ice nuclei in high altitude takes advantage over the vapor supply to affect the precipitation, and so the dust aerosol population reducing results in the wet deposition being reduced, thus the dust aerosol is the predominant factor.

  2. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  3. Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Technology for High-Altitude Airships

    Choi, Sang H.; Elliott, James R.; King, Glen C.; Park, Yeonjoon; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon

    2011-01-01

    The High Altitude Airship (HAA) has various application potential and mission scenarios that require onboard energy harvesting and power distribution systems. The power technology for HAA maneuverability and mission-oriented applications must come from its surroundings, e.g. solar power. The energy harvesting system considered for HAA is based on the advanced thermoelectric (ATE) materials being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The materials selected for ATE are silicon germanium (SiGe) and bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3), in multiple layers. The layered structure of the advanced TE materials is specifically engineered to provide maximum efficiency for the corresponding range of operational temperatures. For three layers of the advanced TE materials that operate at high, medium, and low temperatures, correspondingly in a tandem mode, the cascaded efficiency is estimated to be greater than 60 percent.

  4. Transport System for Delivery Tourists At Altitude 140 km

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The author offers a new method and installation for flight in space. This method uses the centrifugal force of a rotating circular cable that provides a means for the launch of a payload into outer space, to keep the fixed space stations at high altitudes (up to 200 km). The method may also be useful for landing to space bodies, for launching of the space ships (crafts), and for moving and accelerating other artificial apparatuses. The offered installation may be used as a propulsion system for space ships and/or probes. This system uses the material of any space body (i.e. stones) for acceleration and change of the space vehicle trajectory. The suggested system may be also used as a high capacity energy accumulator.

  5. Clock distribution system for large high altitude air shower observatory

    In this paper, we report a clock distribution system for Water Cherenkov Detector Arrays (WCDAs) in Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project. The designed electronics system is of high performance in implementing the clock distribution among detectors of a large scale of dimension. Based on Serializer/Deserializer (SerDes) and fiber transmission, the clock distribution system is the modules of central back end to distributed front end. The clock distribution system has been evaluated with a two modules system. While all the four SerDes candidates for clock transmission with jitters below 17 ps, the DS92LV16 has a fixed phase relationship between transmission clock and recovered clock, hence its use in LHAASO WCDAs. (authors)

  6. Limb skeletal muscle adaptation in athletes after training at altitude

    Mizuno, M; Juel, C; Bro-Rasmussen, Thomas;

    1990-01-01

    Morphological and biochemical characteristics of biopsies obtained from gastrocnemius (GAS) and triceps brachii muscle (TRI), as well as maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) and O2 deficit, were determined in 10 well-trained cross-country skiers before and after a 2-wk stay (2,100 m above sea level) and...... training (2,700 m above sea level) at altitude. On return to sea level, VO2 max was the same as the prealtitude value, whereas an increase in O2 deficit (29%) and in short-term running performance (17%) was observed (P less than 0.05). GAS showed maintained capillary supply but a 10% decrease in...

  7. Analysis of the low-altitude proton flux asymmetry: methodology

    Kruglanski, M

    1999-01-01

    Existing East-West asymmetry models of the trapped proton fluxes at low altitudes depend on the local magnetic dip angle and a density scale height derived from atmospheric models. We propose an alternative approach which maps the directional flux over a drift shell (B sub m , L) in terms of the local pitch and azimuthal angles alpha and beta, where beta is defined in the local mirror plane as the angle between the proton arrival direction and the surface normal to the drift shell. This approach has the advantage that it only depends on drift shell parameters and does not involve an atmosphere model. A semi-empirical model based on the new methodology is able to reproduce the angular distribution of a set of SAMPEX/PET proton flux measurements. Guidelines are proposed for spacecraft missions and data analysis procedures that are intended to be used for the building of new trapped radiation environment models.

  8. Analysis of the low-altitude proton flux asymmetry: methodology

    Existing East-West asymmetry models of the trapped proton fluxes at low altitudes depend on the local magnetic dip angle and a density scale height derived from atmospheric models. We propose an alternative approach which maps the directional flux over a drift shell (Bm, L) in terms of the local pitch and azimuthal angles α and β, where β is defined in the local mirror plane as the angle between the proton arrival direction and the surface normal to the drift shell. This approach has the advantage that it only depends on drift shell parameters and does not involve an atmosphere model. A semi-empirical model based on the new methodology is able to reproduce the angular distribution of a set of SAMPEX/PET proton flux measurements. Guidelines are proposed for spacecraft missions and data analysis procedures that are intended to be used for the building of new trapped radiation environment models

  9. Status of the large high altitude air shower observatory project

    The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project is a multipurpose project. The main scientific tasks can be summarized as follows: (1) searching for galactic cosmic ray origins through gamma ray source detection above 30 TeV; (2) wide field of view survey for gamma ray sources at energies higher than 100 GeV; (3) energy spectrum measurements for individual cosmic ray species from 30 TeV to 10 PeV. To target above tasks, a complex detector array is designed. This paper describes the progress on the research and development of all kind of detectors. Construction and operation of a prototype detector array at Tibet site with 4300 m a.s.l. are also presented.

  10. Calculation of high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse propagation in ionosphere

    Additional current density, which is a function of frequency, can be used to describe the effect of the ionosphere in the process of electromagnetic pulse propagation.In time domain,however, this effect can be expressed in two terms: current density and conductivity. Their time-domain expressions were derived in differential equation forms, which are the functions of ionosphere parameters and the electric field exerted. These current and conductivity were used directly in the high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) calculations, for which these computations need to be held in time domain to simulate the HEMP stimulation and propagation in the ionosphere simultaneously. As an example,three cases of the stimulation and propagation of HEMP exploded at a height of 100 km were calculated. Comparison and analysis of the results show that the computation methods are reasonable and effective, and the amplitude of HEMP above the burst point influenced by the ionosphere is much smaller than that not influenced. (authors)

  11. Large high altitude air shower observatory (LHAASO) project

    The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project focuses mainly on the study of 40 GeV-1 PeV gamma ray astronomy and 10 TeV-1 EeV cosmic ray physics. It consists of a 1 km2 extensive air shower array with 40 000 m2 muon detectors, 90,000m2 water Cerenkov detector array, 5 000 m2 shower core detector array and an air Cerenkov/fluorescence telescope array. Prototype detectors are designed with some of them already in operation. A prototype array of 1% size of LHAASO will be built at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory and used to coincidently measure cosmic rays with the ARGO-YBJ experiment. (authors)

  12. Development of High Altitude UAV Weather Radars for Hurricane Research

    Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Li-Hua

    2005-01-01

    A proposed effort within NASA called (ASHE) over the past few years was aimed at studying the genesis of tropical disturbances off the east coast of Africa. This effort was focused on using an instrumented Global Hawk UAV with high altitude (%Ok ft) and long duration (30 h) capability. While the Global Hawk availability remains uncertain, development of two relevant instruments, a Doppler radar (URAD - UAV Radar) and a backscatter lidar (CPL-UAV - Cloud Physics Lidar), are in progress. The radar to be discussed here is based on two previous high-altitude, autonomously operating radars on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, the ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) at X-band (9.6 GHz), and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) at W- band (94 GHz). The nadir-pointing EDOP and CRS radars profile vertical reflectivity structure and vertical Doppler winds in precipitation and clouds, respectively. EDOP has flown in all of the CAMEX flight series to study hurricanes over storms such as Hurricanes Bonnie, Humberto, Georges, Erin, and TS Chantal. These radars were developed at Goddard over the last decade and have been used for satellite algorithm development and validation (TRMM and Cloudsat), and for hurricane and convective storm research. We describe here the development of URAD that will measure wind and reflectivity in hurricanes and other weather systems from a top down, high-altitude view. URAD for the Global Hawk consists of two subsystems both of which are at X-band (9.3-9.6 GHz) and Doppler: a nadir fixed-beam Doppler radar for vertical motion and precipitation measurement, and a Conical scanning radar for horizontal winds in cloud and at the surface, and precipitation structure. These radars are being designed with size, weight, and power consumption suitable for the Global Hawk and other UAV's. The nadir radar uses a magnetron transmitter and the scanning radar uses a TWT transmitter. With conical scanning of the radar at a 35" incidence angle over an ocean surface in the absence of

  13. High-Altitude Platforms - Present Situation and Technology Trends

    Flavio Araripe D'Oliveira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude platforms (HAPs are aircraft, usually unmanned airships or airplanes positioned above 20 km, in the stratosphere, in order to compose a telecommunications network or perform remote sensing. In the 1990 and 2000 decades, several projects were launched, but very few had continued. In 2014, 2 major Internet companies (Google and Facebook announced investments in new HAP projects to provide Internet access in regions without communication infrastructure (terrestrial or satellite, bringing back attention to the development of HAP. This article aims to survey the history of HAPs, the current state-of-the-art (April 2016, technology trends and challenges. The main focus of this review will be on technologies directly related to the aerial platform, inserted in the aeronautical engineering field of knowledge, not detailing aspects of the telecommunications area.

  14. Multivariable control altitude demonstration on the F100 turbofan engine

    Lehtinen, B.; Dehoff, R. L.; Hackney, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The control system designed under the Multivariable Control Synthesis (MVCS) program for the F100 turbofan engine is described. The MVCS program, applied the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) synthesis methods in the design of a multivariable engine control system to obtain enhanced performance from cross-coupled controls, maximum use of engine variable geometry, and a systematic design procedure that can be applied efficiently to new engine systems. Basic components of the control system, a reference value generator for deriving a desired equilibrium state and an approximate control vector, a transition model to produce compatible reference point trajectories during gross transients, gain schedules for producing feedback terms appropriate to the flight condition, and integral switching logic to produce acceptable steady-state performance without engine operating limit exceedance are described and the details of the F100 implementation presented. The engine altitude test phase of the MVCS program, and engine responses in a variety of test operating points and power transitions are presented.

  15. Monte Carlo calculation of the radiation field at aircraft altitudes

    Energy spectra of secondary cosmic rays are calculated for aircraft altitudes and a discrete set of solar modulation parameters and rigidity cut-off values covering all possible conditions. The calculations are based on the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and on the most recent information on the interstellar cosmic ray flux including a detailed model of solar modulation. Results are compared to a large variety of experimental data obtained on the ground and aboard aircraft and balloons, such as neutron, proton, and muon spectra and yields of charged particles. Furthermore, particle fluence is converted into ambient dose equivalent and effective dose and the dependence of these quantities on height above sea level, solar modulation, and geographical location is studied. Finally, calculated dose equivalent is compared to results of comprehensive measurements performed aboard aircraft. (author)

  16. Analytical estimate for low-altitude ENA emissivity

    Goldstein, J.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; Gérard, J.-C.; Søraas, F.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.; LLera, K.; Redfern, J.

    2016-02-01

    We formulate the first analytical model for energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissivity that partially corrects for the global viewing geometry dependence of low-altitude emissions (LAEs) observed by Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS). The emissivity correction requires the pitch angle distribution (PAD) and geophysical location of low-altitude ENAs. To estimate PAD, we create an energy-dependent analytical model, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. We account for energy binning by integrating model PAD over each energy bin. We account for finite angular pixels by computing emissivity as an integral over the pitch angle range sampled by the pixel. We investigate location uncertainty in TWINS pixels by performing nine variations of the emissivity calculation. Using TWINS 2 ENA imaging data from 1131 to 1145 UT on 6 April 2010, we derive emissivity-corrected ion fluxes for two angular pixel sizes: 4° and 1°. To evaluate the method, we compare TWINS-derived ion fluxes to simultaneous in situ data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 17 satellite. The TWINS-NOAA agreement for emissivity-corrected flux is improved by up to a factor of 7, compared to uncorrected flux. The highest 1° pixel fluxes are a factor of 2 higher than for 4° pixels, consistent with pixel-derived fluxes that are artificially low because subpixel structures are smoothed out, and indicating a possible slight advantage to oversampling the instrument-measured LAE signal. Both TWINS and NOAA ion fluxes decrease westward of 2000 magnetic local time. The TWINS-NOAA comparison indicates that the global ion precipitation oval comprises multiple smaller-scale (3-5° of latitude) structures.

  17. [Human life at high altitudes: myths and realities].

    Vargas, E; Villena, M

    1989-01-01

    Life at high altitude presents very interesting biological and medical aspects. For countries such as the Andeans, it also has socio-economical implications. The most important towns of Bolivia are situated between 3,000 and 4,850 m. It's to say that a great percentage of the population is permanently staying there. Moreover owing to the improvement of the roads and transport, an extensive migration (professional life, business, tourism, sport) developed some years ago. At 3,000 to 4,850 m, an oxygen arterial pressure (PaO2) between 40 and 70 mm Hg is resulting from the environmental hypoxia. The adaptation to hypoxia takes place in two phases: --that incomplete, observed at short time in people who recently arrived, --that at very long time, observed in the native. The rapid arrival at more than 3,000 m, exposes the traveller to an hypoxic ventilatory stimulus which produces a hyperventilation response to increased PaO2. This hyperventilation brings out a decreasing of carbon dioxide arterial pressure (PaCO2) and alkalosis of the blood. This respiratory alkalosis seems to be responsible for most troubles which are present in the Acute Mountain Sickness linked to the CO2 role in cerebral blood circulation. At the same time but more slowly the classical high altitude polycythemia develops which permits compensate partially the hypoxic effect in 3 to 4 weeks. In the native the adaptation implies physiological variations of some parameters concerning the individual development. The principal studies showed that the native present a notable hyposensitivity to hypoxia and also to the stimulus CO2-H+. The Chronic Mountain Sickness patients have a less sensitivity to the same stimuli than the natives. PMID:2699275

  18. Computer vision techniques for rotorcraft low altitude flight

    Sridhar, Banavar

    1990-01-01

    Rotorcraft operating in high-threat environments fly close to the earth's surface to utilize surrounding terrain, vegetation, or manmade objects to minimize the risk of being detected by an enemy. Increasing levels of concealment are achieved by adopting different tactics during low-altitude flight. Rotorcraft employ three tactics during low-altitude flight: low-level, contour, and nap-of-the-earth (NOE). The key feature distinguishing the NOE mode from the other two modes is that the whole rotorcraft, including the main rotor, is below tree-top whenever possible. This leads to the use of lateral maneuvers for avoiding obstacles, which in fact constitutes the means for concealment. The piloting of the rotorcraft is at best a very demanding task and the pilot will need help from onboard automation tools in order to devote more time to mission-related activities. The development of an automation tool which has the potential to detect obstacles in the rotorcraft flight path, warn the crew, and interact with the guidance system to avoid detected obstacles, presents challenging problems. Research is described which applies techniques from computer vision to automation of rotorcraft navigtion. The effort emphasizes the development of a methodology for detecting the ranges to obstacles in the region of interest based on the maximum utilization of passive sensors. The range map derived from the obstacle-detection approach can be used as obstacle data for the obstacle avoidance in an automatic guidance system and as advisory display to the pilot. The lack of suitable flight imagery data presents a problem in the verification of concepts for obstacle detection. This problem is being addressed by the development of an adequate flight database and by preprocessing of currently available flight imagery. The presentation concludes with some comments on future work and how research in this area relates to the guidance of other autonomous vehicles.

  19. Viticultura tropical a gran altitud. Condiciones y expresiones del terroir

    Marco Quijano Rico

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro proyecto se inició en 1982 en la Loma de Puntalarga, entre 2500 y2600 metros de altitud, a 5,78 ºN y 72,98 ºW, en la cordillera oriental de los Andes. Las variedades más utilizadas actualmente son Pinot noir, Riesling y cruzamientos de Riesling x Silvaner. Desde 1984 se realizan trabajos de investigación sobre temas pertinentes. La baja latitud, la elevada altitud, el volumen de precipitación relativamente modesto y la transparencia del cielo, determinan el flujo de radiación solar incidente y su composición espectral, así como la amplitud del cambio de temperatura entre el día y la noche y las bajas temperaturas nocturnas, que son los rasgos del clima frío imperante en la región. El comportamiento de las cepas y las características del vino indican que las condiciones climáticas locales, pueden considerarse térmicamente equivalentesa las de ciertos territorios tradicionales renombrados. La coexistencia durante el año de todos los estadios de vegetación de la vid y la producción de vendimias con buen contenido de azúcar y niveles suficientes de acidez, hace posible la elaboración de vinos de calidad sobresaliente, de modo secuencial y continuo.En los viñedos del proyecto, las condiciones climáticas anuales son equivalentesa las otoñales, de maduración de las uvas en regiones septentrionales y australes. Al mismo tiempo, el flujo de radiación solar no sufre cambios notables y es rico en las longitudes de onda del ultravioleta B. Los dos factores pueden marcar las características de las uvas, haciendo parte así del efecto terroir.

  20. Oxidative stress at high altitude: genotype–phenotype correlations

    Pandey P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Pandey,1,2 MA Qadar Pasha1,2 1CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India; 2Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India Abstract: It has been well-documented that the hypobaric hypoxic environment at high altitude (HA causes stress to both the permanent residents of HA and the sojourners. This oxidative stress primarily disturbs the oxygen-sensing and vascular homeostasis pathways, thereby upsetting normal human physiology, especially in sojourners. These environmental challenges have caused dynamic evolutionary changes within natives of HA, allowing them to develop adaptive plasticity. This review focuses on the genomic and biochemical features of the molecules involved in the oxygen-sensing and vascular homeostasis pathways with respect to HA pulmonary edema (HAPE and adaptation. We review the role of genetic markers such as HIF-prolyl hydroxylase 2, endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, endothelin 1, cytochrome b-245 alpha polypeptide, and glutathione S-transferase pi 1, as well as three circulatory biomarkers (nitric oxide, endothelin 1, and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, by highlighting approaches such as candidate gene and genome-wide, adopted in deciphering the pathways. A disagreement between the two approaches has also been highlighted. In addition, we discuss that an overrepresentation of wild-type alleles in HA natives and mutant alleles of same polymorphisms in HAPE patients implies that the allelic variants at the same locus are involved in adaptation and HAPE, respectively. Moreover, healthy sojourners present a number of genomic features similar to HA natives, further strengthening the concept of genetic predisposition. A trend in correlation between protective and risk alleles and altered levels of circulatory markers clearly documents the phenomenon of genotype–phenotype correlations. We conclude that the genetic and biochemical

  1. Canadian-based aircrew exposure from cosmic radiation on commercial airline routes

    As part of a continuing study on the occupational exposure of Canadian-based aircrew, a Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) was used to monitor this exposure on 64 flight routes spanning a range of geomagnetic latitudes between 40oS and 85oN. The microdosimetric data obtained from these flights were compared to that obtained from several terrestrial sources and were used to characterize the radiation field at jet altitudes. From 20 000 ambient dose equivalent rates obtained at various altitudes and geomagnetic latitudes, a correlation was developed to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position, altitude and date. By integration of this dose rate function over a great circle flight path, a predictive code was developed to provide a total ambient dose equivalent prediction for a given flight. (author)

  2. Cognitive functions and cerebral oxygenation changes during acute and prolonged hypoxic exposure.

    Davranche, Karen; Casini, Laurence; Arnal, Pierrick J; Rupp, Thomas; Perrey, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to assess specific cognitive processes (cognitive control and time perception) and hemodynamic correlates using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during acute and prolonged high-altitude exposure. Eleven male subjects were transported via helicopter and dropped at 14 272 ft (4 350 meters) of altitude where they stayed for 4 days. Cognitive tasks, involving a conflict task and temporal bisection task, were performed at sea level the week before ascending to high altitude, the day of arrival (D0), the second (D2) and fourth (D4) day at high altitude. Cortical hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) area were monitored with fNIRS at rest and during the conflict task. Results showed that high altitude impacts information processing in terms of speed and accuracy. In the early hours of exposure (D0), participants displayed slower reaction times (RT) and decision errors were twice as high. While error rate for simple spontaneous responses remained twice that at sea level, the slow-down of RT was not detectable after 2 days at high-altitude. The larger fNIRS responses from D0 to D2 suggest that higher prefrontal activity partially counteracted cognitive performance decrements. Cognitive control, assessed through the build-up of a top-down response suppression mechanism, the early automatic response activation and the post-error adjustment were not impacted by hypoxia. However, during prolonged hypoxic exposure the temporal judgments were underestimated suggesting a slowdown of the internal clock. A decrease in cortical arousal level induced by hypoxia could consistently explain both the slowdown of the internal clock and the persistence of a higher number of errors after several days of exposure. PMID:27262217

  3. Relationship between the intensity of exposure to malaria parasites and infection in the Usambara Mountains, Tanzania

    Bødker, Rene; Msangeni, H.A.; Kisinza, W.;

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between exposure to Plasmodium falciparum malaria and parasite density and prevalence was studied in six communities along an attitude transect. Prevalence of parasitemia in children decreased by 5% for every 100 meter increase in altitude from 82% in the lowlands at 300 meters to...

  4. Acúmulo de nutrientes em frutos de cafeeiro em duas altitudes de cultivo: micronutrientes Nutrient accumulation in coffee fruits at two at two plantation altitudes: micronutrients

    Bruno Galvêas Laviola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Dado à importância de se conhecer a exportação de micronutrientes pelos frutos, bem como, as épocas em que são mais demandados pelo cafeeiro, estudou-se o acúmulo de B, Cu, Fe, Mn e Zn em frutos de Coffea arabica L da antese à maturação, em lavouras estabelecidas em duas altitudes. Estudou-se também a variação no teor desses elementos. Estudou-se o acúmulo de B, Cu, Fe, Mn e Zn em frutos de cafeeiro arábico da antese à maturação em duas altitudes, bem como a variação na concentração dos elementos em folhas dos ramos produtivos. O experimento foi constituído da variedade de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. Catuaí IAC 44 cultivada a 720 e 950 m de altitude, no município de Martins Soares-MG. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente ao acaso, com três repetições, usando um esquema de parcela subdividida no tempo. O aumento da altitude influenciou o ciclo reprodutivo do cafeeiro, demandando maior tempo para formação dos frutos. O consumo de nutrientes pelos frutos, assim como o enchimento de grãos, foi mais crítico em condições de menor altitude, já que a planta necessitou completar esses processos em menor espaço de tempo. No estádio de expansão rápida, a percentagem de acúmulo de micronutrientes foi maior na altitude de 720 m, comparada à de 950 m. De modo geral, a altitude influenciou a variação das concentrações foliares de nutrientes, apesar de não se ter observado resposta-padrão da concentração foliar ao aumento da altitude. Conclui-se que a altitude teve influência na extensão do ciclo, bem como no acúmulo de micronutrientes em frutos e na variação, das concentrações foliares destes elementos em folhas de cafeeiro.In view of the importance of knowing fruit micronutrients export from the soil, and the season in which its coffee-plant demand is higher, the accumulation of B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in fruits as well as the variation in the leaf content of the elements in productive branches of

  5. Radar-anomalous, high-altitude features on Venus

    Muhleman, Duane O.; Butler, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    Over nearly all of the surface of Venus the reflectivity and emissivity at centimeter wavelengths are about 0.15 and 0.85 respectively. These values are consistent with moderately dense soils and rock populations, but the mean reflectivity is about a factor of 2 greater than that for the Moon and other terrestrial planets. Pettingill and Ford, using Pioneer Venus reflectivities and emissivities, found a number of anomalous features on Venus that showed much higher reflectivities and much lower emissivities with both values approaching 0.5. These include Maxwell Montes, a number of high regions in Aphrodite Terra and Beta Regio, and several isolated mountain peaks. Most of the features are at altitudes above the mean radius by 2 to 3 km or more. However, such features have been found in the Magellan data at low altitudes and the anomalies do not exist on all high structures, Maat Mons being the most outstanding example. A number of papers have been written that attempt to explain the phenomena in terms of the geochemistry balance of weathering effects on likely surface minerals. The geochemists have shown that the fundamentally basaltic surface would be stable at the temperatures and pressures of the mean radius in the form of magnetite, but would evolve to pyrite and/or pyrrhotite in the presence of sulfur-bearing compounds such as SO2. Pyrite will be stable at altitudes above 4 or 5 km on Venus. Although the geochemical arguments are rather compelling, it is vitally important to rationally look at other explanations for radar and radio emission measurements such as that presented by Tryka and Muhleman. The radar reflectivity values are retrieved from the raw Magellan backscatter measurements by fitting the Hagfors' radar scattering model in which a surface roughness parameters and a normal incidence electrical reflectivity are estimated. The assumptions of the theory behind the model must be considered carefully before the results can be believed. These include

  6. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels.

    Guo, Chun; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Mingnian; Yan, Tao; Yang, Lu; Sun, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. However, there are no provisions for oxygen supply standard for tunnel construction personnel in high-altitude areas in current tunnel construction specifications. As a result, this paper has theoretically studied the impacts of high-altitude environment on human bodies, analyzed the relationship between labor intensity and oxygen consumption in high-altitude areas and determined the critical oxygen-supply altitude values for tunnel construction based on two different standard evaluation systems, i.e., variation of air density and equivalent PIO₂. In addition, it has finally determined the oxygen supply standard for construction personnel in high-altitude areas based on the relationship between construction labor intensity and oxygen consumption. PMID:26703703

  7. From Doktor Kurowski's Schneegrenze to our modern glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA

    R. J. Braithwaite

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Translated into modern terminology, Kurowski suggested in 1891 that the equilibrium line altitude (ELA of a glacier is equal to the mean altitude of the glacier when the whole glacier is in balance between accumulation and ablation. Kurowski's method has been widely misunderstood, partly due to inappropriate use of statistical terminology by later workers, and has been little tested except by Braithwaite and Müller in a 1980 paper (for 32 glaciers. I now compare Kurowski's mean altitude with balanced-budget ELA calculated for 103 modern glaciers with measured surface mass balance data. Kurowski's mean altitude is significantly higher (at 95% level than balanced-budget ELA for 19 outlet and 42 valley glaciers, but not significantly higher for 34 mountain glaciers. The error in Kurowski mean altitude as a predictor of balanced-budget ELA might be due to generally lower balance gradients in accumulation area compared with ablation areas for many glaciers, as suggested by several workers, but some glaciers have higher gradients, presumably due to precipitation increase with altitude. The relatively close agreement between balanced-budget ELA and mean altitude for mountain glaciers (mean error −8 m with standard deviation 59 m may reflect smaller altitude ranges for these glaciers such that there is less room for effects of different balance gradients to manifest themselves.

  8. From Doktor Kurowski's Schneegrenze to our modern glacier equilibrium line altitude (ELA)

    Braithwaite, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Translated into modern terminology, Kurowski suggested in 1891 that the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of a glacier is equal to the mean altitude of the glacier when the whole glacier is in balance between accumulation and ablation. Kurowski's method has been widely misunderstood, partly due to inappropriate use of statistical terminology by later workers, and has only been tested by Braithwaite and Müller in a 1980 paper (for 32 glaciers). I now compare Kurowski's mean altitude with balanced-budget ELA calculated for 103 present-day glaciers with measured surface mass-balance data. Kurowski's mean altitude is significantly higher (at 95 % level) than balanced-budget ELA for 19 outlet and 42 valley glaciers, but not significantly higher for 34 mountain glaciers. The error in Kurowski mean altitude as a predictor of balanced-budget ELA might be due to generally lower balance gradients in accumulation areas compared with ablation areas for many glaciers, as suggested by several workers, but some glaciers have higher gradients, presumably due to precipitation increase with altitude. The relatively close agreement between balanced-budget ELA and mean altitude for mountain glaciers (mean error - 8 m with standard deviation 59 m) may reflect smaller altitude ranges for these glaciers such that there is less room for effects of different balance gradients to manifest themselves.

  9. Considerations on safety and treatment of patients with chronic heart failure at high altitude.

    Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Prognosis and quality of life of chronic heart failure (HF) patients have greatly improved over the last decade. Consequently, many patients are willing to spend leisure time at altitude, usually spending time at altitude is likely different from optimal treatment at sea level, particularly as regards β-blockers. Carvedilol, a β1-β2-α-blocker, reduces the hypoxic ventilatory response through a reduction of the chemoreflex response, and it reduces alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, which is under control by β2-receptors. These actions are not shared by selective β1-blockers such as bisoprolol and nebivolol, which should be preferred for treatment of HF patients willing to spend time at altitude. In conclusion, spending time at altitude (<3500 m) is safe for HF patients, provided that subjects are free of co-morbidities that may directly interfere with the adaptation to altitude. However, HF patients experience a reduction of exercise capacity in proportion to HF severity and altitude. Finally, HF patients should undergo a specific "altitude-tailored treatment" to avoid pharmacological interference with altitude adaptation mechanisms. PMID:23795728

  10. Metabolic Effects of High Altitude Trekking in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    de Mol, Pieter; Fokkert, Marion J.; de Vries, Suzanna T.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Dikkeschei, Bert D.; Gans, Rijnold O. B.; Tack, Cees J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Limited information is available regarding the metabolic effects of high altitude trekking in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Thirteen individuals with type 2 diabetes took part, in a 12-day expedition to the summit of Mount Toubkal (altitude, 4,167 m), Morocco,

  11. Active Learning in the Atmospheric Science Classroom and beyond through High-Altitude Ballooning

    Coleman, Jill S. M.; Mitchell, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of high-altitude balloon (HAB) research into a variety of undergraduate atmospheric science classes as a means of increasing active student engagement in real-world, problem-solving events. Because high-altitude balloons are capable of reaching heights of 80,000-100,000 ft (24-30 km), they provide a…

  12. Development of Air Force aerial spray night operations: High altitude swath characterization

    Multiple trials were conducted from 2006 to 2014 in an attempt to validate aerial spray efficacy at altitudes conducive to night spray operations using night vision goggles (NVG). Higher altitude application of pesticide (>400 feet above ground level [AGL]) suggested that effective vector control mi...

  13. Cosmic Rays with Portable Geiger Counters: From Sea Level to Airplane Cruise Altitudes

    Blanco, Francesco; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic ray count rates with a set of portable Geiger counters were measured at different altitudes on the way to a mountain top and aboard an aircraft, between sea level and cruise altitude. Basic measurements may constitute an educational activity even with high school teams. For the understanding of the results obtained, simulations of extensive…

  14. The impact of altitude on early outcome following the Fontan operation

    Nashef Samer AM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of a Fontan circulation depends on several factors including low pulmonary vascular resistance. Pulmonary vascular resistance rises in response to hypoxia. Hypoxia is associated with altitude. Therefore, we wondered whether altitude is a risk factor for early failure after the Fontan operation. The aim was to test this hypothesis. Methods Data were obtained from all published series of 'total cavopulmonary' Fontan operations since 1990. The early failure rate from each series and the altitude of the respective cities were recorded. Early failure was defined as death, takedown of Fontan, or transplantation during the same hospital admission. The association between altitude and failure rate was investigated by rank correlation and logistic regression. Results 24 series were identified from centres situated at altitudes ranging from sea level to 520 metres. The plot of failure rate versus altitude suggests that failure rate increases with altitude. Logistic regression did not fit the data adequately. This was possibly due to the influence of unmeasured and unknown factors affecting the results, as well as the fact that centres were not randomly chosen but were self-selected by virtue of publishing their results. However, Spearman's rank correlation was 0.74 (p = 0.001. Conclusion The early outcome of the Fontan circulation appears to be adversely affected by altitude.

  15. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels

    Chun Guo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. However, there are no provisions for oxygen supply standard for tunnel construction personnel in high-altitude areas in current tunnel construction specifications. As a result, this paper has theoretically studied the impacts of high-altitude environment on human bodies, analyzed the relationship between labor intensity and oxygen consumption in high-altitude areas and determined the critical oxygen-supply altitude values for tunnel construction based on two different standard evaluation systems, i.e., variation of air density and equivalent PIO2. In addition, it has finally determined the oxygen supply standard for construction personnel in high-altitude areas based on the relationship between construction labor intensity and oxygen consumption.

  16. High altitude, continuous positive airway pressure, and obstructive sleep apnea: subjective observations and objective data.

    Ginosar, Yehuda; Malhotra, Atul; Schwartz, Eli

    2013-06-01

    We report observations made by one of the authors who ascended to the Thorang La pass (5416 m) in the Nepal Himalaya in October 2010, despite moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. We report the first recorded use of nasal CPAP to treat high altitude pulmonary edema (progressively severe dyspnea at rest and severe orthopnea, with tachycardia and tachypnea) that occurred at 4400 meters, when snow and darkness made safe evacuation difficult. We also present objective longitudinal data of the effects of altitude on auto-adjusting CPAP delivered via a portable nasal CPAP device, and on the apnea hypopnea index measured during sleep while using the device. OSA may be a risk factor for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema and we suggest that a nasal CPAP device located in high altitude trekking stations may provide an additional or alternative treatment option for managing high altitude pulmonary edema until evacuation is possible. PMID:23795742

  17. High-altitude pulmonary edema among visitors to Summit County, Colorado.

    Sophocles, A M; Bachman, J

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-nine cases of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) affecting visitors to Summit County, Colorado, were analyzed. The mean age of the group was 37.8 years, and all the patients were male. These results differ from previous studies and suggest that there are two varieties of HAPE. The first type (type 1, or nonresident-ascent HAPE) affects visitors to altitudes above 8,000 ft (2,439 m). At altitudes up to 11,000 ft (3,354 m), it is a disease that affects primarily adult men. The second variety (type 2, or resident-reascent HAPE) affects residents of high altitudes when they descend to an elevation below 8,000 ft (2,430 m) and then return to high altitude. This type of HAPE affects male and female residents almost equally and is a disease of childhood and adolescence. PMID:6644250

  18. A 45-year-old man with excessive daytime somnolence, and witnessed apnea at altitude

    Welsh CH

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A sleepy man without sleep apnea at 1609m (5280 feet had disturbed sleep at his home altitude of 3200m (10500 feet. In addition to common disruptors of sleep such as psychophysiologic insomnia, restless leg syndrome, alcohol and excessive caffeine use, central sleep apnea with periodic breathing can be a significant cause of disturbed sleep at altitude. In symptomatic patients living at altitude, a sleep study at their home altitude should be considered to accurately diagnose the presence and magnitude of sleep disordered breathing as sleep studies performed at lower altitudes may miss this diagnosis. Treatments options differ from those to treat obstructive apnea. Supplemental oxygen is considered by many to be first-line therapy.

  19. Characteristics of flame spread over the surface of charring solid combustibles at high altitude

    LI Jie; JI Jie; ZHANG Ying; SUN JinHua

    2009-01-01

    To explore the characteristics of flame spread over the surface of charring solid combustibles at high altitude, the whitewood with uniform texture was chosen to conduct a series of experiments in Lhasa and Hefei, with altitude of 3658 m and 50 m respectively. Several parameters, including the flame height, flame spread rate, flame temperature, surface temperature, were measured on samples with different width and inclinations. A quantitative analysis of flame spread characteristics over sample surface at high altitude was performed. Results showed that, in the environment of lower pressure and oxygen concentration at high altitude, the flame height and flame spread rate over sample surface decreased, but the flame temperature increased slightly. However, with increasing of sample width, the relative difference between the flame spread rates at different altitudes decreased.

  20. Simultaneous radio and satellite optical measurements of high-altitude sprite current and lightning continuing current

    Cummer, Steven A.; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong; Chen, Alfred B.; Fukunishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2006-10-01

    We report coordinated measurements of lightning and resulting sprites using ground-level magnetic field sensors (altitude optical emissions from the lightning flash, indicating that this radio signature is produced by continuing lightning current. Second, in two events with strong postreturn stroke extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic pulses, the optical emissions demonstrate that there are no observable intensifications of low-altitude optical emissions associated with those pulses. If they were produced by a lightning process, such as an M-component, the connection between optical emissions and current seen in the return stroke and the continuing current suggests they should be visible. However, as has been observed previously, the bright, high-altitude optical emissions associated with the sprite are simultaneous with the ELF pulse. This is strong evidence that these ELF pulses originate in high-altitude electric current in the sprite itself and are not produced by a low-altitude lightning process.

  1. Usefulness of training camps at high altitude for well-trained adolescents

    Jiří Suchý

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Opinions on the suitability of sports training at altitudes of 1800-2200 m above sea level (ASL for increasing performance in youth are not unanimous. The objective of this study was to test the influence of a ten day altitude training camp on performance in well-trained adolescent cross-country skiers. Methods: A running test of 3 × 2 km (aerobic, anaerobic and critical intensity was used with a rest interval of 10 minutes. The test was performed 4 times - an initial test at a lowland (900 m ASL prior to departure for altitude, two tests at altitude (1850 m ASL, a final test ten days after returning to lower altitudes. The aerobic, anaerobic and critical load intensities were set by graded a load test. For all individual tests, the participants maintained the same heart rate individually defined for the various segments using a heart rate monitor. Changes in speed between the tests were compared. The body's internal response was also monitored by the concentration of lactate (2 and 8 minutes after each exertion. Participants: Well-trained adolescent cross-country skiers (N = 11, age: 14.4 ± 1.2 years, weight: 54.4 ± 8.6 kg, height: 170 ± 7 cm, fat: 13 ± 2.6%. Results: The average times attained in the first altitude test for aerobic and anaerobic load were higher (p < .05 than in the entry test at low altitude. In the second altitude test the average times for all intensities were significantly (p < .05 higher than in the first altitude test. In the tests after returning to the lower altitudes the times attained for all intensities were on average higher than at altitude. The average lactate concentration levels following the various intensities were similar (p > .05. The dynamics of the cool-down monitored via the lactate value at the eighth minute after completing the relevant segment showed that at altitude the adolescents cooled down significantly (p < .05 slower rate following the aerobic and anaerobic intensity than at

  2. Lens autofluorescence is not increased at high altitude

    Kessel, Line; Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the relation between ambient environmental ultraviolet radiation exposure and lens fluorescence. METHODS: Non-invasive lens fluorometry measurements were compared in healthy Bolivian and Danish subjects. Background ultraviolet radiation was 4.5 times higher in Bolivia than in...

  3. De-adaptation change in cardiac function of laborers engaged in physical labor at high altitude after returning to lower altitude

    En-zhi FENG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the effects of physical labor on cardiac function of laborers at high altitude and changes in cardiac function after returning to lower altitude. Methods According to symptomatic scores on Chinese acute high altitude reaction (AHAR, 96 male officers and soldiers, who rapidly entered high altitude areas (3700m altitude,and engaged in heavy physical work for 50 days, were be scored and graded. Levels of creatine kinase isoenzymes -MB (CK-MB and lactic dehydrogenase isoenzyme -1 (LDH-1 in the serum, Tei index, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS were measured in the 96 servicemen at the 50th day of residing at high altitude, and the 2nd and 15th day after returning to lower altitude (1500m altitude, and the results were compared with that of 50 healthy controls residing at 1500m. Results  Among the 96 male servicemen, 71 developed AHAR, and 24 of them had severe AHAR, 47 mild to moderate AHAR, and the rest 25 had no AHAR. Levels of serum CK-MB, LDH-1 and Tei index were higher in the severe AHAR group than in the mild to moderate AHAR group, higher in the mild to moderate AHAR group than in the no AHAR group and higher in the no AHAR group than in the healthy group. As far as the values of LVEF and LVFS were concerned, the severe AHAR group < mild to moderate AHAR group < no AHAR group < control group. Significant difference was found in these levels between every two successive groups (P < 0.01. Linear correlation analysis showed that levels of CK-MB and LDH-1 of persons staying at 3700m altitude for 50 days were positively correlated with Tei index (r= 0.625, 0.598, respectively, P<0.01, and negatively correlated with LVEF(r=-0.716, -0.658, respectively, P<0.01, and also negatively correlated with LVFS (r=-0.639, -0.727, respectively, P<0.01. Level of serum CK-MB, LDH-1 and Tei index at 3700m altitude for 50 days were significantly higher than those 2

  4. High-Altitude Balloon Observatories for Planetary Science

    Arnold, S. P.; Tibor, K.; Cheng, A. F.; Hibbitts, C.; Young, E. F.; Andrews, J.; Landis, R.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that progress can be made on over 20% of the key questions called out in the current Planetary Science Decadal Survey by a high-altitude balloon borne observatory. Therefore NASA has been assessing concepts for a gondola based observatory that would achieve the most possible science in a low risk and cost effective manner. As a first application of the concept, a stratospheric balloon mission to observe the newly discovered comet ISON is being developed and planned to fly in late 2013. This flight will demonstrate some of the characteristic features of balloon borne observatories and how those impact planetary science observations. That flight will result in mission proven instrument payloads which can be applied to future flights and science investigations. This paper documents the current status of stratospheric balloon applications to planetary science and some of the contributions that BRRISON will provide for a potential future planetary observatory system. The paper will also discuss the science benefits to be expected if larger aperture telescopes are flown, better pointing systems are realized, or different instruments are utilized with the telescopes. The paper concludes with a high level summary of ways to interface and utilize the potential platform for the readers own scientific interests.

  5. Field measurements on high altitude alpine areas of Austria

    Austrian-Hungarian common action was organised by three teams to investigate the radiological situation using mobile environmental monitoring laboratories in some selected regions in Salzburg and in high altitude Alpine areas in 1993. In situ gamma spectrometric and dose rate measurements were performed in the following three places of different site characteristics 1. Krauthuegel (Salzburg), undisturbed grassy meadow, 2. Nassfeld (near Badgastein), Alpine meadow, 3. Kringsalm (Obertauern), Alpine meadow. The main aims of the action were: - confirm the high fallout radionuclide concentration of Chernobyl origin previously observed by soil sample measurements having quite different depth distribution characteristics of the caesium radionuclides in the soil; - to investigate the suitability of these sites for larger scale international intercomparison exercise of mobile laboratories in 1994; - to test a new method of in situ gamma spectrometry with collimated detector arrangement and to compare it with traditional uncollimated wide area monitoring method; - to compare the results obtained by the three participating teams using uncollimated in situ gamma spectrometry; - to test the recently established on route monitoring system

  6. Solar regenerative fuel cell system for high altitude airships

    'Full text': A closed-loop regenerative fuel cell (RFC) system that serves as an energy storage device for space activities is studied through dynamic simulations. The unique nature of the closed-loop RFC makes it an ideal power system for key applications in homeland defense and earth observatory systems such as high altitude aircrafts /airships, unmanned aerial vehicles, and in planetary exploration for flyer or for surface power. The RFC considered using the photovoltaic cells to produce electric power during the day, part of which is used to produce hydrogen and oxygen through electrolysis. The stored hydrogen and oxygen is used through a fuel cell to produce electric power during night hours. A MATLAB/SIMULINK model was developed for the components of the RFC that include a fuel cell, electrolyzer, photovoltaic solar array, power bus, humidifiers, compressor/motor assembly, expander, pumps, phase separators, storage tanks for hydrogen, oxygen and water, control valves and piping, electric grid system and controls. A proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell and PEM electrolyzer were modeled in detail that included the mass momentum, energy, chemical reaction rates at cathode and anode. The PEM fuel cell voltage was modeled accounting cell activation and ohmic polarizations. A modular approach was used to develop models for each component. Component models were based on fundamental physics to the extent practical. Steady state and dynamic response of the RFC for different operational conditions including start-up, shut down, load changes and (accidental) transients was studied. (author)

  7. An extremely high altitude plume seen at Mars morning terminator

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Garcia-Melendo, Enrique; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Gomez-Forrellad, Josep M.; Pellier, Christophe; Delcroix, Marc; Lopez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Gonzalez-Galindo, Francisco; Jaeschke, Wayne; Parker, Donald C.; Phillips, James H.; Peach, Damian

    2014-11-01

    We report the occurrence in March and April 2012 of two bright very high altitude plumes at the Martian terminator at 250 km or more above the surface, thus well into the ionosphere and bordering on the exosphere. They were located at about 195 deg West longitude and -45 deg latitude (at Terra Cimmeria) and lasted for about 10 days. The features showed day-to-day variability, and were seen at the morning terminator but not at the evening limb, which indicates rapid evolution in less than 10 hours and a cyclic behavior. Photometric measurements are used to explore two possible scenarios to explain their nature. If the phenomenon is due to suspended particles (dust, CO2 or H2O ice clouds) reflecting solar radiation, the mean size is about 0.1 microns with a nadir optical depth > 0.06. Alternatively, the plume could be auroral emission above a region with a strong magnetic anomaly and where aurora has previously been detected. Importantly, both explanations defy our current understanding of the Mars upper atmosphere.AcknowledgementsThis work was supported by the Spanish MINECO projects AYA2012-36666 with FEDER support, CONSOLIDER program ASTROMOL CSD2009-00038 and AYA2011-30613-CO2-1. Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT765-13 and UPV/EHU UFI11/55.

  8. High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC): Proofs of Concept

    Jones, Christopher A.; Arney, Dale C.; Bassett, George Z.; Clark, James R.; Hennig, Anthony I.; Snyder, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    The atmosphere of Venus is an exciting destination for both further scientific study and future human exploration. A recent internal NASA study of a High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC) led to the development of an evolutionary program for the exploration of Venus, with focus on the mission architecture and vehicle concept for a 30-day crewed mission into Venus's atmosphere at 50 kilometers. Key technical challenges for the mission include performing the aerocapture maneuvers at Venus and Earth, inserting and inflating the airship at Venus during the entry sequence, and protecting the solar panels and structure from the sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. Two proofs of concept were identified that would aid in addressing some of the key technical challenges. To mitigate the threat posed by the sulfuric acid ambient in the atmosphere of Venus, a material was needed that could protect the systems while being lightweight and not inhibiting the performance of the solar panels. The first proof of concept identified candidate materials and evaluated them, finding FEP-Teflon (Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene-Teflon) to maintain 90 percent transmittance to relevant spectra even after 30 days of immersion in concentrated sulfuric acid. The second proof of concept developed and verified a packaging algorithm for the airship envelope to inform the entry, descent, and inflation analysis.

  9. Medium altitude airborne Geiger-mode mapping LIDAR system

    Clifton, William E.; Steele, Bradley; Nelson, Graham; Truscott, Antony; Itzler, Mark; Entwistle, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 15 years the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and private industry have been developing airborne LiDAR systems based on arrays of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (GmAPD) detectors capable of detecting a single photon. The extreme sensitivity of GmAPD detectors allows operation of LiDAR sensors at unprecedented altitudes and area collection rates in excess of 1,000 km2/hr. Up until now the primary emphasis of this technology has been limited to defense applications despite the significant benefits of applying this technology to non-military uses such as mapping, monitoring critical infrastructure and disaster relief. This paper briefly describes the operation of GmAPDs, design and operation of a Geiger-mode LiDAR, a comparison of Geiger-mode and traditional linear mode LiDARs, and a description of the first commercial Geiger-mode LiDAR system, the IntelliEarth™ Geospatial Solutions Geiger-mode LiDAR sensor.

  10. Low-Altitude Magnetic Topology with MAVEN SWEA and MAG

    Mitchell, David; Xu, Shaosui; Mazelle, Christian; Luhmann, Janet; McFadden, James; Connerney, John; Liemohn, Michael; Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen; Fillingim, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) and Magnetometer (MAG) onboard the MAVEN spacecraft measure electron pitch angle and energy distributions at 2-second resolution (~8 km along the orbit track) to determine the topology of magnetic fields from both external and crustal sources. Electrons from different regions of the Mars environment can be distinguished by their energy distributions. Thus, pitch angle resolved energy spectra can be used to determine the plasma source regions sampled by a field line at large distances from the spacecraft. From 12/1/2014 to 2/15/2015, when periapsis was at high northern latitudes, SWEA observed ionospheric photoelectrons at low altitudes (140-200 km) and high solar zenith angles (120-145 degrees) on ~35% of the orbits. Since this electron population is unambiguously produced in the dayside ionosphere, these observations demonstrate that the deep Martian nightside is at times magnetically connected to the sunlit hemisphere. The BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD model suggests the presence of closed crustal magnetic field lines over the northern hemisphere that straddle the terminator and extend to high SZA. Simulations with the SuperThermal Electron Transport (STET) model show that photoelectron transport along such field lines can take place without significant attenuation. Precipitation of photoelectrons onto the night-side atmosphere should cause ionization and possibly auroral emissions in localized regions. On one orbit, the O2+ energy flux measured by STATIC correlates well with precipitating photoelectron fluxes.

  11. Star formation in a diffuse high-altitude cloud?

    Kerp, J; Roehser, T

    2016-01-01

    A recent discovery of two stellar clusters associated with the diffuse high-latitude cloud HRK 81.4-77.8 has important implications for star formation in the Galactic halo. We derive a plausible distance estimate to HRK 81.4-77.8 primarily from its gaseous properties. We spatially correlate state-of-the-art HI, far-infrared and soft X-ray data to analyze the diffuse gas in the cloud. The absorption of the soft X-ray emission from the Galactic halo by HRK 81.4-77.8 is used to constrain the distance to the cloud. HRK 81.4-77.8 is most likely located at an altitude of about 400 pc within the disk-halo interface of the Milky Way Galaxy. The HI data discloses a disbalance in density and pressure between the warm and cold gaseous phases. Apparently, the cold gas is compressed by the warm medium. This disbalance might trigger the formation of molecular gas high above the Galactic plane on pc to sub-pc scales.

  12. Latest news from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    González Muñoz, A.; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory is an air shower detector designed to study very-high-energy gamma rays (∼ 100 GeV to ∼ 100 TeV). It is located in the Pico de Orizaba National Park, Mexico, at an elevation of 4100 m. HAWC started operations since August 2013 with 111 tanks and in April of 2015 the 300 tanks array was completed. HAWC's unique capabilities, with a field of view of ∼ 2 sr and a high duty cycle of 5%, allow it to survey 2/3 of the sky every day. These features makes HAWC an excellent instrument for searching new TeV sources and for the detection of transient events, like gamma-ray bursts. Moreover, HAWC provides almost continuous monitoring of already known sources with variable gamma-ray fluxes in most of the northern and part of the southern sky. These observations will bring new information about the acceleration processes that take place in astrophysical environments. In this contribution, some of the latest scientific results of the observatory will be presented.

  13. Highlights from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    Pretz, John

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory was completed this year at a 4100-meter site on the flank of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico. HAWC is a water Cherenkov ground array with the capability to distinguish 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays from the hadronic cosmic-ray background. HAWC is uniquely suited to study extremely high energy cosmic-ray sources, search for regions of extended gamma-ray emission, and to identify transient gamma-ray phenomena. HAWC will play a key role in triggering multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies of active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Observation of TeV photons also provide unique tests for a number of fundamental physics phenomena including dark matter annihilation and primordial black hole evaporation. Operation began mid-2013 with the partially-completed detector. Multi-TeV emission from the Galactic Plane is clearly seen in the first year of operation, confirming a number of known TeV sources, and a numb...

  14. Effects of 12-Week Endurance Training at Natural Low Altitude on the Blood Redox Homeostasis of Professional Adolescent Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Field Trial

    Tomas K. Tong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This field study investigated the influences of exposure to natural low altitude on endurance training-induced alterations of redox homeostasis in professional adolescent runners undergoing 12-week off-season conditioning program at an altitude of 1700 m (Alt, by comparison with that of their counterparts completing the program at sea-level (SL. For age-, gender-, and Tanner-stage-matched comparison, 26 runners (n=13 in each group were selected and studied. Following the conditioning program, unaltered serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC, and superoxide dismutase accompanied with an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG and decreases of xanthine oxidase, reduced glutathione (GSH, and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in both Alt and SL groups. Serum glutathione peroxidase and catalase did not change in SL, whereas these enzymes, respectively, decreased and increased in Alt. Uric acid (UA decreased in SL and increased in Alt. Moreover, the decreases in GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio in Alt were relatively lower compared to those in SL. Further, significant interindividual correlations were found between changes in catalase and TBARS, as well as between UA and T-AOC. These findings suggest that long-term training at natural low altitude is unlikely to cause retained oxidative stress in professional adolescent runners.

  15. Effects of 12-Week Endurance Training at Natural Low Altitude on the Blood Redox Homeostasis of Professional Adolescent Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Field Trial.

    Tong, Tomas K; Kong, Zhaowei; Lin, Hua; He, Yeheng; Lippi, Giuseppe; Shi, Qingde; Zhang, Haifeng; Nie, Jinlei

    2016-01-01

    This field study investigated the influences of exposure to natural low altitude on endurance training-induced alterations of redox homeostasis in professional adolescent runners undergoing 12-week off-season conditioning program at an altitude of 1700 m (Alt), by comparison with that of their counterparts completing the program at sea-level (SL). For age-, gender-, and Tanner-stage-matched comparison, 26 runners (n = 13 in each group) were selected and studied. Following the conditioning program, unaltered serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and superoxide dismutase accompanied with an increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and decreases of xanthine oxidase, reduced glutathione (GSH), and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in both Alt and SL groups. Serum glutathione peroxidase and catalase did not change in SL, whereas these enzymes, respectively, decreased and increased in Alt. Uric acid (UA) decreased in SL and increased in Alt. Moreover, the decreases in GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio in Alt were relatively lower compared to those in SL. Further, significant interindividual correlations were found between changes in catalase and TBARS, as well as between UA and T-AOC. These findings suggest that long-term training at natural low altitude is unlikely to cause retained oxidative stress in professional adolescent runners. PMID:26783415

  16. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons measured on an airplane over a wide range of altitude and latitude

    Crews of high-altitude aircraft are exposed to radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). To help determine such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude airplane. The primary instrument was a sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer. Its detector responses were calculated for energies up to 100 GeV using the radiation transport code MCNPX 2.5.d with improved nuclear models and including the effects of the airplane structure. New calculations of GCR-induced particle spectra in the atmosphere were used to correct for spectrometer counts produced by protons, pions and light nuclear ions. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the corrected measured count rates using the deconvolution code MAXED 3.1. The results for the measured cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron dose equivalent and effective dose rates, and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cut-off agree well with results from recent calculations of GCR-induced neutron spectra. (authors)

  17. ROCK2 and MYLK variants under hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude associate with high altitude pulmonary edema and adaptation

    Pandey P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Pandey,1,2 Ghulam Mohammad,1,3 Yogendra Singh,1,2 MA Qadar Pasha1,2 1Functional Genomics Unit, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, 2Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 3Department of Medicine, SNM Hospital, Leh, Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir, IndiaObjective: To date, a major class of kinases, serine–threonine kinase, has been scantly investigated in stress-induced rare, fatal (if not treated early, and morbid disorder, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. This study examined three major serine–threonine kinases, ROCK2, MYLK, and JNK1, along with six other genes, tyrosine hydroxylase, G-protein subunits GNA11 and GNB3, and alpha1 adrenergic receptor isoforms 1A, 1B, and 1D as candidate gene markers of HAPE and adaptation.Methods: For this, 57 variants across these nine genes were genotyped in HAPE patients (n=225, HAPE controls (n=210, and highlanders (n=259 by Sequenom MS (TOF-based MassARRAY® platform using iPLEX™ Gold technology. In addition, to study the gene expression, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the three study groups.Results: A significant association was observed for C allele (ROCK2 single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs10929728 with HAPE (P=0.03 and C, T, and A alleles (MYLK single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs11717814, rs40305, and rs820336 with both HAPE and adaptation (P=0.001, P=0.006, and P=0.02, respectively. ROCK2 88 kb GGGTTGGT haplotype was associated with lower risk of HAPE (P=0.0009. MYLK 7 kb haplotype CTA, composed of variant alleles, was associated with higher risk of HAPE (P=0.0006 and lower association with adaptation (P=1E–06, whereas haplotype GCG, composed of wild-type alleles, was associated with lower risk of HAPE (P=0.001 and higher association with adaptation (P=1E–06. Haplotype–haplotype and gene–gene interactions demonstrated a correlation in working

  18. Certification and safety aspects relating to the transport of passengers on high altitude balloons in Europe

    Schoenmaker, Annelie

    2014-07-01

    High-altitude balloons typically fly between 25 and 50 km in altitude, which, while below the Karman line of 100 km, is yet far above the altitudes typically flown by aircraft. For example, the highest-flying commercial aircraft - the Concorde - had a maximum cruising altitude of only 18 km. zero2infinity, a Spanish company, is currently developing a pressurized pod named “bloon” which will be capable of lifting six people, including two pilot crew members and four paying passengers, to an altitude of 36 km through the use of high-altitude balloons. The boundary between Airspace and Outer Space has never been legally defined, mostly because of the lack of activities taking place between the altitude where airplanes fly and the lowest orbiting spacecraft. High-altitude balloons do fly at these in-between altitudes and the prospect of commercializing access to these parts of the stratosphere poses some questions in a new light. Given the relatively low altitude at which they fly, it may well be that these types of balloons would be considered to operate exclusively within air space. However, given the technology involved in crewed high altitude balloon flights, which is more similar to spacecraft engineering than to traditional hot-air or gas ballooning, it is necessary to evaluate the various legal regimes, codes, and regulations that would apply to such flights, especially regarding licenses and liabilities. For high altitude balloon flights commencing in Europe, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) would very likely be the competent certification or licensing agency for these flights, although there would likely be input from various national aviation authorities as well. However, because the European Commission (EC) has not yet issued regulations regarding commercial spaceflight, particularly the use of high altitude balloons, new rules and regulations governing such flights may still need to be drafted and promulgated. With the development of

  19. Hemoglobina y testosterona: importancia en la aclimatación y adaptación a la altura Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation

    Gustavo F. Gonzales

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Los diferentes tipos de mecanismos que emplea el organismo cuando se enfrenta a una situación de hipoxia incluyen la acomodación, la aclimatación y la adaptación. La acomodación es la respuesta inicial a la exposición aguda a la hipoxia de altura y se caracteriza por aumento de la ventilación y de la frecuencia cardiaca. La aclimatación se presenta en los individuos que están temporalmente expuestos a la altura y, que en cierto grado, les permite tolerar la altura. En esta fase hay un incremento en la eritropoyesis, se incrementa la concentración de hemoglobina y mejora la capacidad de transporte de oxígeno. La adaptación es el proceso de aclimatación natural donde entra en juego las variaciones genéticas y la aclimatación que les permiten a los individuos vivir sin dificultad en la altura. La testosterona es una hormona que regula la eritropoyesis y la ventilación, podría estar asociada con los procesos de aclimatación y adaptación a la altura. La eritrocitosis excesiva que conduce al mal de montaña crónico es causada por una baja saturación arterial de oxígeno, una ineficiencia ventilatoria y reducida respuesta ventilatoria a la hipoxia. La testosterona se incrementa en la exposición aguda en la altura y en los nativos de altura con eritrocitosis excesiva. Los resultados de las investigaciones actuales permitirían concluir que el incremento de la testosterona y de la hemoglobina son buenas para la aclimatación adquirida pues mejoran el transporte de oxígeno pero no para la adaptación a la altura, dado que valores altos de testosterona en suero se asocian con eritrocitosis excesiva.The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals

  20. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation.

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G; Stöhr, Eric J; Cotter, James D; Nio, Amanda Q X; Shave, Rob

    2014-08-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function. PMID:24876358