WorldWideScience

Sample records for 25-27 portland oregon

  1. Urban carbon dioxide in Portland, Oregon

    Bostrom, G. A.; Brooks, M.; Rice, A. L.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are reported for the Portland, Oregon (USA) metropolitan region since late July, 2009. Three stationary locations were established: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of CO2 at the sites average 400-410ppm and show considerable variability due to CO2 sources, sinks and meteorological drivers of ventilation. Within this variability, a marked 20-30ppm diurnal cycle is observed due to photosynthetic activity and variations in the planetary boundary layer. In-city CO2 concentrations are on average enhanced by 5-6ppm over the Sauvie Island site during upgorge wind conditions, a difference which is greatest in the afternoon. Measurements of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2 in downtown Portland are significantly depleted in 13C relative to 12C compared with background air and suggest that regional CO2 is dominated by petroleum sources (70-80%). High degrees of relationship between CO2 variability and primary air pollutants CO and NO (r2=0.70 to 0.80), measured by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality at the Southeast Portland location, corroborate this finding and illustrate the importance of traffic emissions on elevated ambient CO2 concentrations. In addition to CO2 at the fixed sites, measurements of street-level CO2 concentrations were obtained using a mobile instrument mounted in a bike trailer. Results from these field data show relatively homogenous CO2 concentrations throughout residential Portland neighborhoods with significant enhancements in CO2 on busy roadways or near areas of traffic congestion.

  2. 77 FR 4006 - Foreign-Trade Zone 45-Portland, Oregon; Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Epson Portland, Inc...

    2012-01-26

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 45--Portland, Oregon; Expansion of Manufacturing Authority; Epson Portland, Inc. (Inkjet Ink Manufacturing); Portland, OR An application has been submitted to the... of the scope of manufacturing authority approved within Subzone 45F, on behalf of Epson Portland,...

  3. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Portland, OR, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  4. Measurements of Carbon Dioxide in the Portland, Oregon Metropolitan Region

    Bostrom, G. A.; Rice, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Urban centers provide large sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere through intensive use of fossil fuels. Due to a lack of federal regulatory framework in the United States, a patchwork of regional and statewide approaches to reducing CO2 emissions has emerged. The City of Portland together with Multnomah County established itself as an early frontier in this regard by creating greenhouse gas emissions inventories in 1990 and adopting a regional plan to reduce emissions in 1993. Most recent emissions inventories suggest that County-wide emissions of CO2 are near 1990 levels, despite a growing population, with an ambitious goal of reducing emissions 80% by 2050. However, there has been no validation of either emissions inventories or their trends in time. Here, we detail preliminary results of a study aimed at testing regional CO2 emissions inventories through measurements of CO2 concentrations and its 13C isotopic composition. In collaboration with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality three test sites were established: a downtown Portland location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential Southeast Portland location; and at Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest (upwind, rural) of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Continuous measurements of summertime CO2 concentrations since late July, 2009 range from approximately 370ppm to 420ppm (±2.7σ) for downtown and residential sites, and 360ppm to 420ppm for Sauvie Island, while maximum outlier levels at all three sites exceed 480ppm. Measurements at all three sites show a marked diurnal cycle averaging 25-35ppm. Maximum CO2 concentrations typically occur 6-8 am and minimum concentrations 5-7 pm. The two dominant forcing mechanisms of this strong diurnal cycle are varying biological sources and sinks and the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. There is also a significant enhancement of ~7ppm in the average measured concentrations at the two urban sites (~395ppm) compared with

  5. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Project Abstracts; May 25-27, Portland, Oregon, 1997 Annual Review.

    Allee, Brian J. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    1997-06-26

    Abstracts are presented from the 1997 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Review of Projects. The purpose was to provide information and education on the approximate 127 million dollars in Northwest electric ratepayer fish and wildlife mitigation projects funded annually.

  6. Inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon

    1994-04-01

    The authors conducted an inspection of surveillance activities and administrative leave policy at the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Oregon. The purpose of their inspection was to determine if a covert video surveillance operation conducted at Bonneville Power Administration was consistent with Department of Energy policies and procedures and other applicable regulations and procedures, and to determine if administrative leave policies and procedures used at Bonneville Power Administration in a specific instance were consistent with Department of Energy requirements and the Code of Federal Regulations. This inspection focused on a specific incident that occurred in 1989 on the 5th floor of the BPA Headquarters Building located in Portland, Oregon. The incident involved the soiling of an employee`s personal property with what appeared to be urine.

  7. Tabular data base construction and analysis from thematic classified Landsat imagery of Portland, Oregon

    Bryant, N. A.; George, A. J., Jr.; Hegdahl, R.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic verification of Landsat data classifications of the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area has been undertaken on the basis of census tract data. The degree of systematic misclassification due to the Bayesian classifier used to process the Landsat data was noted for the various suburban, industrialized and central business districts of the metropolitan area. The Landsat determinations of residential land use were employed to estimate the number of automobile trips generated in the region and to model air pollution hazards.

  8. Tritium/Helium-3 Apparent Ages of Shallow Ground Water, Portland Basin, Oregon, 1997-98

    Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples for tritium/helium-3 age dating were collected from 12 shallow monitoring wells in the Portland basin, Oregon, in 1997, and again in 1998. Robust tritium/helium-3 apparent (piston-flow) ages were obtained for water samples from 10 of the 12 wells; apparent ages ranged from 1.1 to 21.2 years. Method precision was demonstrated by close agreement between data collected in 1997 and 1998. Tritium/helium-3 apparent ages generally increase with increasing depth below the water table, and agree well with age/depth relations based on assumptions of effects of recharge rate on vertical ground-water movement.

  9. Food mirages: geographic and economic barriers to healthful food access in Portland, Oregon.

    Breyer, Betsy; Voss-Andreae, Adriana

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigated the role of grocery store prices in structuring food access for low-income households in Portland, Oregon. We conducted a detailed healthful foods market basket survey and developed an index of store cost based on the USDA Thrifty Food Plan. Using this index, we estimated the difference in street-network distance between the nearest low-cost grocery store and the nearest grocery store irrespective of cost. Spatial regression of this metric in relation to income, poverty, and gentrification at the census tract scale lead to a new theory regarding food access in the urban landscape. Food deserts are sparse in Portland, but food mirages are abundant, particularly in gentrifying areas where poverty remains high. In a food mirage, grocery stores are plentiful but prices are beyond the means of low-income households, making them functionally equivalent to food deserts in that a long journey to obtain affordable, nutritious food is required in either case. Results suggested that evaluation of food environments should, at a minimum, consider both proximity and price in assessing healthy food access for low-income households. PMID:24100236

  10. 2007 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DoGAMI) LiDAR: Northwest Oregon and Portland Metro Area

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DoGAMI) and the Oregon...

  11. Public health assessment for McCormick and Baxter Creosoting Company (Portland), Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, Region 10. Cerclis No. ORD009020603. Final report

    NONE

    1995-06-13

    The McCormick and Baxter Creosoting site is located on the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ATSDR considers the site to have been a public health hazard for former plant workers because of past ingestion exposure to arsenic, creosote, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans at levels of public health concern. The site also poses an ongoing and future public health hazard because people might encounter hazardous chemicals along the shoreline on or near the site at levels that can damage the skin, as was reported to have happened to two boys. Finally, dioxin levels would pose a public health hazard if people subsist on crayfish and suckers contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  12. Good Grief Kids: An Exploratory Analysis of Grieving Children and Teens at The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon

    Sorensen, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Every year in the United States, anywhere from 200,000 to 400,000 youths under the age of 19 will experience the death of a parent (or both) or a sibling. The Dougy Center in Portland, Oregon, was established in 1983 to assist grieving children. Support groups are based on principles of nondirective play therapy. During the years 1996-2000, The Dougy Center administered questionnaires to a number of its clients. The results of one of these questionnaires, The Center for Epidemiological Studie...

  13. Microbial dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo-p-dioxins, and -furans at the Portland Harbor Superfund site, Oregon, USA.

    Rodenburg, Lisa A; Krumins, Valdis; Curran, Joanna Crowe

    2015-06-16

    The Portland Harbor (Oregon, USA) has been declared a "Superfund" site because it is impacted by a variety of contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs). Using data collected in the remedial investigation, concentrations of PCBs and PCDD/Fs in sediment and water were examined using positive matrix factorization to look for evidence that PCBs and PCDD/Fs are dechlorinated by anaerobic bacteria. This process has long been known to occur in sediments. Recently, it has been recognized that PCB and PCDD/F dechlorination may also occur in other anaerobic environments, such as in landfills, sewers, and groundwater. The results indicate that a factor related to the dechlorination of PCBs and PCDD/Fs was present in the water but not in the sediment. Spatial patterns in dechlorination products suggest that they come primarily from groundwater. Dechlorination products comprise 22% of the PCBs in the water. The Portland Harbor therefore represents the third major US watershed in which PCBs appear to undergo dechlorination in an environment other than sediment, suggesting that the microbial dechlorination of PCBs and PCDD/Fs is more common than previously assumed. In addition, the Portland Harbor is impacted by PCBs generated inadvertently during the production of pigments, such as PCB 11, which alone exceeded the 64 pg/L federal water quality standard for the sum of PCBs in two of 120 whole water samples. PMID:26010118

  14. High Resolution Modeling of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Fluxes From the Portland Oregon Metropolitan Area

    Butenhoff, C. L.; Powell, J.; Tran, D.; Rice, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The future of the North American carbon cycle is heavily dependent on urban ecosystems and their development. Around 75-80% of the current U.S. population is urbanized and this percentage is likely to increase in the future. Despite the lack of national climate policy, cities nationwide are developing their own plans to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The city of Portland OR for example (along with Multnomah County) has in place an ambitious goal of reducing CO2 emissions by 80% by the year 2050. Monitoring and verifying emission reductions will be integral to the successful operation of this and other mitigation policies. To do so requires both the modeling and measurement of CO2 at high spatial and temporal resolution. To this effort we developed gridded inventories of anthropogenic and biogenic fluxes of CO2 from Portland and the surrounding metropolitan region at 1-km resolution and at hourly time steps. Mobile emissions were estimated using traffic count data, a land-use regression model, and the EPA MOVES model. Biogenic fluxes of CO2 were calculated using high resolution remote sensing vegetation maps and the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF-VPRM). This is part of an on-going effort to constrain emission estimates using measurements of CO2 from throughout the region. Here we compare simulated concentrations of CO2 with data available from three sites, representing upwind, downwind, and city center conditions.

  15. Symmetry or asymmetry -- Comfort is the question. (A study of the second floor of the west office wing of the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland, Oregon.)

    Gonzalez, A.F.; Gaba, P.; Kowitanupong, C.

    1999-07-01

    This article explores the effects of an asymmetric distribution of building components, and their relation to human comfort. The studied building was the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland, Oregon. This project, designed by the Miller/Hull Partnership, provides the perfect conditions to do such a study since it has very different ceiling heights within the same space, and an asymmetric distribution of the fenestration as well. Findings show that: (a) Variable ceiling heights affect the quantity of daylight received, and also affect the quality and distribution of electric light; (b) An asymmetric distribution of the fenestration creates very different conditions in both the luminous and thermal environments; and (c) The design of lighting and HVAC systems must take into consideration variations in ceiling height and the position of the fenestration into the space.

  16. Vulnerability of Water Systems to the Effects of Climate Change and Urbanization: A Comparison of Phoenix, Arizona and Portland, Oregon (USA)

    Larson, Kelli L.; Polsky, Colin; Gober, Patricia; Chang, Heejun; Shandas, Vivek

    2013-07-01

    The coupled processes of climate change and urbanization pose challenges for water resource management in cities worldwide. Comparing the vulnerabilities of water systems in Phoenix, Arizona and Portland, Oregon, this paper examines (1) exposures to these stressors, (2) sensitivities to the associated impacts, and (3) adaptive capacities for responding to realized or anticipated impacts. Based on a case study and survey-based approach, common points of vulnerability include: rising exposures to drier, warmer summers, and suburban growth; increasing sensitivities based on demand hardening; and limited capacities due to institutional and pro-growth pressures. Yet each region also exhibits unique vulnerabilities. Comparatively, Portland shows: amplified exposures to seasonal climatic extremes, heightened sensitivity based on less diversified municipal water sources and policies that favor more trees and other irrigated vegetation, and diminished adaptive capacities because of limited attention to demand management and climate planning for water resources. Phoenix exhibits elevated exposure from rapid growth, heightened sensitivities due to high water demands and widespread increases in residential and commercial uses, and limited adaptive capacities due to weak land use planning and "smart growth" strategies. Unique points of vulnerability suggest pathways for adapting to urban-environmental change, whether through water management or land planning. Greater coordination between the land and water sectors would substantially reduce vulnerabilities in the study regions and beyond.

  17. In-reservoir behavior, dam passage, and downstream migration of juvenile Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead from Detroit Reservoir and Dam to Portland, Oregon, February 2013-February 2014

    Beeman, John W.; Adams, Noah S.

    2015-01-01

    In the second year of 2 years of study, the movements of juvenile spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) through Detroit Reservoir, passing Detroit Dam, and migrating downstream to Portland, Oregon, were studied during a 1-year-long period beginning in February 2013. The primary purpose of the study was to provide empirical data to inform decisions about future alternatives for improving downstream passage of salmonids at Detroit Dam. A secondary purpose was to design and assess the performance of a system to detect juvenile salmonids implanted with acoustic transmitters migrating in the Willamette River. Inferences about fish migration were made from detections of juvenile fish of hatchery origin at least 95 millimeters in fork length surgically implanted with an acoustic transmitter and released during the spring (March–May) and fall (September–November) of 2013. Detection sites were placed throughout the reservoir, near the dam, and at two sites in the North Santiam River and at three sites in the Willamette River culminating at Portland, Oregon. We based most inferences on an analysis period up to the 90th percentile of tag life (68–78 days after release, depending on species and season), although a small number of fish passed after that period as late as April 8, 2014. Chinook salmon migrated from the tributaries of release to the reservoir in greater proportion than steelhead, particularly in the fall. The in-reservoir migration behaviors and dam passage of the two species were similar during the spring study, but during the fall study, few steelhead reached the reservoir and none passed the dam within the analysis period. Migrations in the reservoir were directed and non-random, except in the forebay. Depths of fish within 25 meters of the dam were deeper in the day than at night for Chinook salmon and similar in the day and night for steelhead; steelhead generally were at shallower depths

  18. Proceedings. Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges Annual Convention (63rd, Hilton Hotel, Portland, Oregon, December 1-4, 1979).

    Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges, Seattle, WA.

    The proceedings of the 1979 annual meeting of the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges begins by listing the officers, trustees, and commissioners of the association, and outlining the program of the meeting. The minutes from the Commission on Schools include reports from: the state committees of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon,…

  19. What is the Role of Universities in High-tech Economic Development? The Case of Portland, Oregon, and Washington, DC

    Heike Mayer

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on two regions in the United States that have emerged as high-technology regions in the absence of major research universities. The case of Portland's Silicon Forest is compared to Washington, DC. In both regions, high-technology economies grew because of industrial restructuring processes. The paper argues that in both regions other actors—such as firms and government laboratories—spurred the development of knowledge-based economies and catalysed the engagement of high...

  20. Low-cost computer classification of land cover in the Portland area, Oregon, by signature extension techniques

    Gaydos, Leonard

    1978-01-01

    Computer-aided techniques for interpreting multispectral data acquired by Landsat offer economies in the mapping of land cover. Even so, the actual establishment of the statistical classes, or "signatures," is one of the relatively more costly operations involved. Analysts have therefore been seeking cost-saving signature extension techniques that would accept training data acquired for one time or place and apply them to another. Opportunities to extend signatures occur in preprocessing steps and in the classification steps that follow. In the present example, land cover classes were derived by the simplest and most direct form of signature extension: Classes statistically derived from a Landsat scene for the Puget Sound area, Wash., were applied to the Portland area, Oreg., using data for the next Landsat scene acquired less than 25 seconds down orbit. Many features can be recognized on the reduced-scale version of the Portland land cover map shown in this report, although no statistical assessment of its accuracy is available.

  1. 75 FR 20778 - Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival Fleet Week, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    2010-04-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zone; Portland Rose Festival Fleet Week... Hawthorne and Steel Bridges in Portland, Oregon during the Portland Rose Festival Fleet Week from June 2... and other vessels participating in Fleet Week as well as the maritime public in general and will do...

  2. Neighborhood change and the role of environmental stewardship: a case study of green infrastructure for stormwater in the City of Portland, Oregon, USA

    Vivek Shandas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the history of cities, the ecological landscape has often been buried, removed, or taken for granted. A recent recognition that humans are part of the global ecosystem, and that human actions both cause and are affected by ecological change, brings with it an awareness of the value of nature in cities and of natural systems on which cities depend. The feedbacks between humans and their environment within an urban context can have profound implications for the growth of and change in cities, yet there is a limited understanding of the interactions between biophysical changes in cities and the implications of these changes on the quality of life for residents. The application of a coupled human and natural systems (CHANS framework provides a timely and fruitful opportunity to enrich the theory, methods, and understanding of these feedbacks and interconnections. Here, I integrated biophysical and social dimensions relevant to managing urban stormwater by examining a case study of Portland, Oregon, USA. I used empirical data from a pre-post survey (2-yr span of residents in eight urban neighborhoods to describe feedbacks and interactions between a localized biophysical change in the form of a large-scale decentralized stormwater program and the resulting changes in resident's perceptions in neighborhoods undergoing rapid change. My findings corroborate earlier findings suggesting that people with higher income and education levels are more likely to participate in stewardship actions. The results also suggest an overall and initial negative perception of neighborhoods facilities and services immediately following the construction of decentralized stormwater facilities, but conversely, high levels of anticipation for their construction. By describing these findings through a CHANS framework, I make explicit the importance of integrating scientific understanding, governance efforts, and human behaviors to address acute urban environmental

  3. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  4. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 1176 block groups in Portland, Oregon. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  5. Pre-and post-Missoula flood geomorphology of the Pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley in the Portland forearc basin, Oregon and Washington, USA

    Peterson, Curt D.; Minor, Rick; Peterson, Gary L.; Gates, Edward B.

    2011-06-01

    Geomorphic landscape development in the pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley (1-5 km width) in the Portland forearc basin (~ 50 km length) is established from depositional sequences, which pre-date and post-date the glacial Lake Missoula floods. The sequences are observed from selected borehole logs (150 in number) and intact terrace soil profiles (56 in number) in backhoe trenches. Four sequences are widespread, including (1) a vertically aggraded Pleistocene alluvial plain, (2) a steep sided valley that is incised (125-150 m) into the Pleistocene gravel plain, (3) Missoula flood terraces (19-13 ka) abandoned on the sides of the ancestral valley, and (4) Holocene flooding surfaces (11-8 ka) buried at 70-30 m depth in the axial Columbia River Valley. Weathering rims and cementation are used for relative dating of incised Pleistocene gravel units. Soil development on the abandoned Missoula flood terraces is directly related to terrace deposit lithology, including thin Bw horizons in gravel, irregular podzols in sand, and multiple Bw horizons in thicker loess-capping layers. Radiocarbon dating of sand and mud alluvium in the submerged axial valley ties Holocene flooding surfaces to a local sea level curve and establishes Holocene sedimentation rates of 1.5 cm year- 1 during 11-9 ka and 0.3 cm year- 1 during 9-0 ka. The sequences of Pleistocene gravel aggradation, river valley incision, cataclysmic Missoula flooding, and Holocene submergence yield complex geomorphic landscapes in the ancestral lower Columbia River Valley.

  6. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 1176 block groups in Portland, Oregon. The US EPA's...

  7. LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed..

  8. LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994

    The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed

  9. 77 FR 29897 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    2012-05-21

    ... efficient movement of light rail and roadway traffic associated with the Rose Parade in Portland, Oregon... Steel Bridge remain closed to vessel traffic to facilitate safe efficient movement of light rail and... schedule of the lower deck which opens on signal. Vessels which do not require an opening of the upper...

  10. A Portlander's View of Smart Growth

    Randal O'Toole

    2004-01-01

    Metro, a regional planning authority, has written and implemented the nation's strongest and most comprehensive smart-growth plan in Portland, Oregon. For a region expected to grow in population by 80 percent in the next five decades, Metro's plan calls for a mere 6 percent expansion of land area; high-density housing in the form of apartments, mixed-use developments, and single-family homes on small lots; pedestrian-friendly design codes; 125 miles of rail transit; and almost no new highway ...

  11. The African American Wellness Village in Portland, Ore

    McKeever, Corliss; Koroloff, Nancy; Faddis, Collaine

    2006-01-01

    More than 80% of African Americans in Oregon reside in the Portland metropolitan area; African Americans comprise 1.7% of the state's population. Although relatively small, the African American population in the state experiences substantial health disparities. The African American Health Coalition, Inc was developed to implement initiatives that would reduce these disparities and to promote increased communication and trust between the African American community and local institutions and or...

  12. Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report

    Jacob, Andria [City of Portland; Cyr, Shirley [Clean Energy Works

    2013-12-31

    In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOE’s program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

  13. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the Portland metropolitan region

    Rice, A. L.; Bostrom, G. A.; Brooks, M. K.; Hill, L.; Shandas, V.

    2011-12-01

    The Portland metropolitan region, located in the Columbia River Gorge, is the most populous region in Oregon. Greenhouse gas emissions inventories for Multnomah County (population ~710k) estimate 2008 emissions to be 8.5 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent, of which CO2 is the dominant source. These inventories suggest that County-wide greenhouse gas emissions are near 1990 levels, despite a 22% growth in population. This contrasts with US National greenhouse gas emissions, which are estimated to have grown ~14% since 1990. Despite this apparent progress, there has been no validation of either emissions inventories for the Portland metropolitan region or their trends in time. We present more than two years of measurements of CO2 at three stationary locations in the Portland metropolitan region: a downtown location on the campus of Portland State University; a residential site in southeast Portland; and a rural station on Sauvie Island, located ~30km northwest of Portland in the Columbia River Gorge. Beginning in July 2009, continuous measurements of CO2 at the sites show considerable variability due to global and regional CO2 sources, sinks and boundary layer meteorology. Here we focus on the enhancement of in-city concentrations above the rural Sauvie Island site (CO2 excess), a difference which averages ~6ppm during upgorge wind conditions. The southeast Portland residential site shows a significant enhancement of ~5ppm in CO2 concentration throughout the day. The downtown site shows a substantial diurnal cycle in CO2 excess with 10-15ppm higher values during the day and negative values for CO2 excess during the early morning hours, the cause of which is not well understood. Both in-city sites show an increase in CO2 excess centered around 7-8 am and 5-6 pm during the two rush-hour periods. To examine spatial variability, measurements of street-level CO2 concentrations were obtained using a mobile instrument mounted in a bike trailer during a summer

  14. Iterated transportation simulations for Dallas and Portland

    Nagel, K.; Simon, P.; Rickert, M.; Esser, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) is to combine the most important aspects of human decision-making related to transportation, from activities planning (sleep, work, eat, shop,...) via modal and route planning to driving, into a single, consistent methodological and software framework. This is meant to combine the functionalities of activities-based travel demand generation, modal choice and route assignment, and micro-simulation. TRANSIMS attempts to employ advanced methodologies in all these modules. Yet, it is probably the overall framework that is the most important part of this attempt. It is, for example, possible to replace the TRANSIMS microsimulation by another micro-simulation that uses the same input and generates the same output. TRANSIMS uses specific regions as examples in order to ensure that the technology is rooted in the real world. Until about the middle of 1997, an approximately five miles by five miles area in Dallas/Texas was used. Since then, TRANSIMS has moved to using data from Portland/Oregon; a case study for this region is planned to be completed by the end of the year 2000. In this paper the authors give short descriptions of these projects and give references to related publications.

  15. Beyond a Box of Documents: The Collaborative Partnership Behind the Oregon Chinese Disinterment Documents Collection

    Natalia M. Fernández

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is a case study of a collaboration between the Oregon Multicultural Archives of Oregon State University, Portland State University Library's Special Collections, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (CCBA, and the Northwest News Network to preserve and make accessible a recovered box of Oregon Chinese disinterment documents. By examining what influenced and engaged each partner, this case study offers an opportunity to better understand the motivations of diverse stakeholders in a "post-custodial era" project that challenges traditional practices of custody, control, and access.

  16. Portland's experience with land use tools to promote green roofs

    In the late 1990s, the City of Portland, Oregon faced environmental challenges that prompted the City to mandate environmentally sensitive development. Several programs were developed in response to these challenges, some of which resulted in the creation of land use policies and incentives that promote green roofs. Zoning code provisions were adopted in 2001 to promote eco-roofs in an effort to reduce stormwater runoff, mitigate urban heat island effects, provide habitat for birds, and improve air quality and energy efficiency. The Central City Fundamental Design Guidelines were also revised to encourage eco-roof development. In 2002, the South Waterfront Plan was created to integrate ecological design into an urban environment through sustainability principles and practices. Land use tools were developed to introduce developers to an approach that reduced energy costs and stormwater costs, while also contributing to a project's marketability. These tools were created with the support of programs and policies such as the CSO (Combined Sewer Overflow) Program; eco-roof research which began in 1995 to determine the stormwater management potential of eco-Green roofs; technical assistance to encourage and highlight sustainable development practices; the Stormwater Management Manual that set standards for the amount and quality of stormwater runoff leaving development sites; the G/Rated Program that offers resources for green building practices; the Green Investment Fund that supports the G/Rated Program; and, the Portland Development Commission Green Building Policy financing tool for earth-friendly designs and materials. 34 refs., 2 figs

  17. Network Level Carbon Dioxide Emissions From On-road Sources in the Portland OR, (USA) Metropolitan Area

    Powell, J.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Rice, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To mitigate climate change, governments at multiple levels are developing policies to decrease anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The City of Portland (Oregon) and Multnomah County have adopted a Climate Action Plan with a stated goal of reducing emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. The transportation sector alone accounts for about 40% of total emissions in the Portland metropolitan area. Here we show a new street-level model of on-road mobile CO2 emissions for the Portland, OR metropolitan region. The model uses hourly traffic counter recordings made by the Portland Bureau of Transportation at 9,352 sites over 21 years (1986-2006), augmented with freeway loop detector data from the Portland Regional Transportation Archive Listing (PORTAL) transportation data archive. We constructed a land use regression model to fill in traffic network gaps with traffic counts as the dependent variable using GIS data such as road class (32 categories) and population density. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) model was used to estimate transportation CO2 emissions. The street-level emissions can be aggregated and gridded and used as input to atmospheric transport models for comparison with atmospheric measurements. This model also provides an independent assessment of top-down inventories that determine emissions from fuel sales, while being an important component of our ongoing effort to assess the effectiveness of emission mitigation strategies at the urban scale.

  18. Southern California Educational Initiative Socioeconomics Workshop. Held in Santa Barbara, California on October 25-27, 1990

    The report presents an overview of the Socioeconomics Workshop together with the conclusions and recommendations of the workshop organizer. It is based on three days of panel presentations, workgroup sessions, and summary discussions among participants. The workshop was held in Santa Barbara from October 25-27, 1990 with around 100 participants drawn from government agencies, academic settings, private consulting firms, and environmental advocacy groups. The meetings were intended to review and critique existing socioeconomic work on the impacts of offshore oil development and look constructively toward the future in identifying needed research

  19. Gravity Data for the Greater Portland Area

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1,522 records) were compiled by the Portland State University. This data base was received in August 1990. Principal gravity parameters...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Block Groups

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Portland, OR EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  1. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    Fabian Höhn; Florian Kretz; Mitrofanis Pavlidis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and p...

  2. Synthesis of pure Portland cement phases

    Wesselsky, Andreas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    Pure phases commonly found in Portland cement clinkers are often used to test cement hydration behaviour in simplified experimental conditions. The synthesis of these phases is covered in this paper, starting with a description of phase relations and possible polymorphs of the four main phases in...

  3. Extraction properties of 25,27-bis(carbonylmethoxy)calix[4]arenes towards Sr2+. Competitive extraction and extraction in a synthetic groundwater

    The Sr2+ extraction properties of some 25,27-bis(carbonylmethoxy)calix[4]arenes, in which ester (-CH2CO2Et), keto (-CH2COCH3) and acid functionalities (-CH2CO2H) have been attached to the lower rim, are reported. Strontium ion extraction experiments were performed in a chloroform/water system, and the extraction performance analyzed by radiotracing using the short-lived radio nuclide 85Sr. Effects of pH value, ligand to metal ratio, temperature, extraction time and strontium species on the extraction behavior were examined. It was observed that the 25,27-bis(carboxymethoxy)calix[4]arene derivatives are potent extracting agents towards the strontium ion, showing remarkable extraction performance in competition with a series of organic and inorganic impurities and in a synthetic groundwater. The crystal structure of 25,27-bis(acetonyloxy)calix[4]arene is also reported. (author)

  4. Oregon trails revisted

    Lewis, A. J.; Alexander, C. J.; Hall, M. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Murray, R. J.; Schrumpf, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Oregon State University's Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL) has six full-time researchers with expertise in a variety of biological, Earth, atmospheric and computer sciences as well as image interpretation and statistical techniques. The primary emphasis of the ERSAL research and demonstration program is the development and application of remote sensing technology in operational resource management programs. LANDSAT multi-spectral, multi-date digital data and imagery are utilized in concert with high altitude NASA-acquired photography, low altitude ERSAL-acquired photography, and field observations and data to provide customized, inexpensive and useful final products. Synopses are given of 9 applications projects conducted in Oregon.

  5. MTA versus Portland cement: review of literature

    Naiana Viana Viola; Mário Tanomaru Filho; Paulo Sérgio Cerri

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Both Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement (PC) have been highlighted because of their favorable biological properties, with extensive applications in Endodontics, including the possibility of using into root canal filling. Objective: This article reviews literature related to MTA and PC comparing their physical, chemical and biological properties, as well as their indications. Literature review: Literature reports studies revealing the similarities between these ...

  6. New method for analysis of portland cements with secondary components

    Gomá, F.

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new method for the determination of the composition of Portland cement mixtures with active additions and the identification of the type of addition. This method enables us to classify a Portland cement or Portland with active additions, whatever this addition may be, and it is specially suitable for discriminating the type of slag when there are slags present.

    Se describe un nuevo método para determinar la composición de las mezclas de cemento Portland con adiciones activas e identificar el tipo de adición. Permite la clasificación de un cemento Portland o Portland con adiciones activas cualquiera que sea la adición y es especialmente indicado para discriminar el tipo de escoria cuando están presentes.

  7. 75 FR 20523 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Port of Portland Terminal 4, Willamette River, Portland, OR

    2010-04-20

    ..., Portland, OR'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 69047). We received one comment on the proposed rule. There... site. The RNAs will do so by prohibiting activities that could disturb or damage the engineered... viewing the docket, call Renee V. Wright, Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone...

  8. MTA versus Portland cement: review of literature

    Naiana Viana Viola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and Portland cement (PC have been highlighted because of their favorable biological properties, with extensive applications in Endodontics, including the possibility of using into root canal filling. Objective: This article reviews literature related to MTA and PC comparing their physical, chemical and biological properties, as well as their indications. Literature review: Literature reports studies revealing the similarities between these materials’ properties, including both biocompatibility and bone repair induction. Moreover, there is the need for the development of a root canal sealer based on these materials (MTA and PC. Conclusion: MTA and CP show promissory perspective both in Dentistry and Endodontics.

  9. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery.

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian; Pavlidis, Mitrofanis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2-18 months). Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%). No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%), elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%), and fibrin reaction (5.5%). There were no cases of hypotony (25-27-gauge vitrectomy combined with small incision phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract. PMID:26966558

  10. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    Fabian Höhn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2–18 months. Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%. No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%, elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%, and fibrin reaction (5.5%. There were no cases of hypotony (<7 mmHg, IOL decentration, or postoperative endophthalmitis. Visual acuity (mean ± SD improved from 0.52±0.6 logMAR preoperatively to 0.22±0.46 logMAR at final postoperative visit (P<0.0001. Conclusion. Surgical and visual outcomes suggest hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy combined with small incision phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract.

  11. Celebrating 24 years of Public Outreach of Science and Engineering in Portland Oregon

    Bristol, Terry

    2012-02-01

    There have been several core strategies in our highly successful 24-year Science, Technology and Society outreach program. However, the strategy for each season is also dynamic, requiring innovation and novel coalitions. As Bob Dylan put it so succinctly, ``He not busy being born is busy dying.'' Public outreach programs - as the Chautauquas of the past - should be positioned in the cultural milieu along with the opera, symphony and theatre. Support for the enterprise needs to be a broad and diverse coalition, based ideally on the creative formation of win-win relationship. You want people to see your success as their success: ``Together we can enhance the intellectual environment in ways that none of us could do alone.'' Being multi-disciplinary presents challenges but has considerable advantages. For instance, enlightened managers of established organizations recognize the value of exposing their employees to a diversity of problem solving approaches. Instead of inviting speakers for one large lecture we now invite them to be Resident Scholars for two-three days and develop a range of additional smaller public engagements. Science and engineering topics must be relevant - placed in the broader Science, Technology and Society framework. We avoid ``gee-whiz'' in favor of what stimulates reflection on who we are, where we came from, and our role in the universe. I will briefly review how we have survived and thrived and, finally, what I see as future trends and opportunities.

  12. 2012 NOAA NIR Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Oregon: Ports of Longview, Kalama, Vancouver, and Portland

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  14. Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation at the Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon

    Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges, reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals. This report provides an economic analysis of the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

  15. The Road Less Traveled: Land Use and Non-Work Travel Relationships in Portland, Oregon

    Greenwald, Michael Joseph

    2001-01-01

    New Urbanism seeks to exploit a relationship between urban form and travel behavior in order to develop communities which are simultaneously more egalitarian, more pleasant, and less costly to society as a whole. The focus of New Urbanist design practices is to create environments (both urban and suburban) which promote walking and transit over private automobile use as a mode of travel. Specifically, New Urbanists contend higher residential density, closer residential proximity to employment...

  16. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    2010-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  17. Lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Portland Base Bed and Portland Whit Bed limestone as related to durability

    Dubelaar, C.W.; Engering, S.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Koch, R.; Lorenz, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the differences in lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Base Bed and Whit Bed Portland limestone and the presumed relationships between these characteristics and the durability of this building stone. As Portland limestone probably will be used as a stone for several res

  18. Lithofacies and Petrophysical Properties of Portland Base Bed and Portland Whit Bed Limestone as Related to Durability

    Dubelaar, C.W.; Engering, S.; Van Hees, R.P.J.; Koch, R.; Lorenz, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the differences in lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Base Bed and Whit Bed Portland limestone and the presumed relationships between these characteristics and the durability of this building stone. As Portland limestone probably will be used as a stone for several res

  19. Lyme Disease in Oregon

    Doggett, J. Stone; Kohlhepp, Sue; Gresbrink, Robert; Metz, Paul; Gleaves, Curt; Gilbert, David

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of Lyme disease in Oregon is calculated from cases reported to the Oregon State Health Division. We reviewed the exposure history of reported cases of Lyme disease and performed field surveys for infected Ixodes pacificus ticks. The incidence of Lyme disease correlated with the distribution of infected I. pacificus ticks.

  20. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  1. Development of Conductometric Sensor Based on 25,27-Di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 for Determination of Ammonium.

    Saiapina, O Y; Kharchenko, S G; Vishnevskii, S G; Pyeshkova, V M; Kalchenko, V I; Dzyadevych, S V

    2016-12-01

    The conductometric sensor based on 25,27-di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 was developed for the quantitative analysis of ammonium. The calixarene was immobilized on the surface of the planar interdigitated electrodes by attachment of its dialkyl sulfide groups to the surface of the gold electrodes. The intrinsic ability of the calixarene to capture ammonium was studied in the conductometric measuring mode and by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The developed sensor showed high selectivity to ammonium in the presence of mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Selective and highly sensitive detection of ammonium resulted from the complexation between the ammonium ions and a crown-ether fragment of the upper rim of the 25,27-di-(5-thio-octyloxy)calix[4]arene-crown-6 macrocycle. The developed sensor had high signal repeatability. Its sensitivity was found to be satisfactory for the forthcoming sensor application in the water-sample analysis; the linear range was 0.01-1.5 mM and limit of detection 10 μM. PMID:26911569

  2. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian; Pavlidis, Mitrofanis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2–18 months). Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%). No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%), elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%), and fibrin reaction (5.5%). There were no cases of hypotony (phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract. PMID:26966558

  3. 2007 Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Northwest Oregon Lidar

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar dataset encompasses two areas in northwest Oregon. The northern area is located in Clatsop County, encompassing Clatsop State Forest ownership; the...

  4. 77 FR 26437 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    2012-05-04

    ... of Portland's Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed... facilitate safe, uninterrupted roadway passage of participants of the Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon event....

  5. 78 FR 21064 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Willamette River, Portland, OR

    2013-04-09

    ... Portland's Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed position to... roadway passage of participants of the Rock-n-Roll Half Marathon event. The Hawthorne Bridge crosses...

  6. Preterm delivery among people living around Portland cement plants.

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chang, Chih-Ching; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Ho, Chi-Kung; Wu, Trong-Neng; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2003-05-01

    The Portland cement industry is the main source of particulate air pollution in Kaohsiung city. Data in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to Portland cement plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants was significantly higher in mothers living within 0-2 km of a Portland cement plant than in mothers living within 2-4 km. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.30 (95% CI=1.09-1.54) for the delivery of preterm infants for mothers living close to the Portland cement plants, chosen at the start to be from 0 to 2 km. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect the outcome of pregnancy. PMID:12706757

  7. Preterm delivery among people living around Portland cement plants

    The Portland cement industry is the main source of particulate air pollution in Kaohsiung city. Data in this study concern outdoor air pollution and the health of individuals living in communities in close proximity to Portland cement plants. The prevalence of delivery of preterm birth infants as significantly higher in mothers living within 0-2 km of a Portland cement plant than in mothers living within 2-4 km. After controlling for several possible confounders (including maternal age, season, marital status, maternal education, and infant sex), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.30 (95% I=1.09-1.54) for the delivery of preterm infants for mothers living close to he Portland cement plants, chosen at the start to be from 0 to 2 km. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that air pollution can affect he outcome of pregnancy

  8. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Atlas Area Boundary

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, OR Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  9. Portland, Maine Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Portland, Maine Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  10. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - Ecosystem Services by Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset presents environmental benefits of the urban forest in 146 block groups in Portland, Maine. Carbon attributes, temperature reduction,...

  11. Sprague River Oregon Water 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  12. Sprague River Oregon Vegetation 1968

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  13. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain 1968

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  14. Sprague River Oregon Bars 1968

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  15. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  16. Sprague River Oregon Water 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  17. Umpqua River Oregon Geologic Floodplain

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  18. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  19. Sprague River Oregon Bars 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  20. Sprague River Oregon Bars 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  1. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain Centerline

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  2. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 1968

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  3. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain Boundary

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  4. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  5. Alkali segregation in Portland cement pastes

    Triviño, F.

    1966-09-01

    Full Text Available Not availableEn el presente trabajo se pone de manifiesto experimentalmente la formación y presencia de aphthitalita -sulfato doble de potasio y sodio en la relación S04K2/S04Na2 = 3/1 en las pastas puras de cemento portland, desde el comienzo del fraguado de las mismas. Se estudia el mecanismo de la citada formación, íntimamente relacionada con el proceso general de formación de eflorescencias salinas, a base de una emigración de sulfatos alcalinos hacia las partes externas de las pastas, en virtud de fenómenos de exudación equivalentes a arrastres capilares. Se sintetiza y aísla la aphthitalita por dos procedimientos y se obtiene su difractograma.de rayos· X, a efectos de su identificación y de la confirmación de los resultados experimentales obtenidos, así como de la interpretación de los mismos.

  6. Paleomagnetism, strike-slip fault systems and crustal rotation in the region 25-27°S of Northern Chile

    Taylor, G.; Randall, D.; Grocott, J.

    1996-01-01

    Les résultats paléomagnétiques entre 25-27°S dans le nord Chili montrent des rotations horaires qui diminuent de l'ouest vers l'est. La région est disséquée par 3 systèmes de failles orientés N-S, le système d'Atacama, le cisaillement de la vallée centrale et le système de La Ternera-Domeyko. Nous pensons que la transpression sur ces systèmes de failles est principalement responsable des rotations observées. (Résumé d'auteur)

  7. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; ; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  8. Teenage Suicide in Oregon 1983-1985.

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Portland.

    During the 3-year period from 1983 through 1985, 80 Oregon teenagers intentionally took their own lives, making suicide second only to accidents as the leading cause of death among Oregon teenagers. Data on suicides committed by individuals between the ages of 10 and 19 were retrieved from death certificates on file with the Oregon Health Division…

  9. Apatite formation on calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer.

    Pangdaeng, S; Sata, V; Aguiar, J B; Pacheco-Torgal, F; Chindaprasirt, P

    2015-06-01

    In this study, calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer was investigated for use as biomaterial. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate were used as activators. In vitro test was performed with simulated body fluid (SBF) for bioactivity characterization. The formation of hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked samples surface was tested using SEM, EDS and XRD analyses. The results showed that the morphology of hydroxyapatite was affected by the source material composition, alkali concentration and curing temperature. The calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer with relatively high compressive strength could be fabricated for use as biomaterial. The mix with 50% white Portland cement and 50% calcined kaolin had 28-day compressive strength of 59.0MPa and the hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked sample surface was clearly evident. PMID:25842101

  10. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover Data (2012)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Portland, OR land cover dataset includes data for the Portland metropolitan area plus the city of Vancouver, Washington and various smaller towns and rural...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2012) Web Service

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Portland, OR land cover web service includes data for the Portland metropolitan area plus the city of Vancouver, Washington and various smaller towns and rural...

  12. Education's Role in Land Use Planning. National Conference of the Conservation Education Association (23rd, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, August 15-19, 1976).

    1976

    Presented is an outline of the program and abstracts of most presented papers for the 23rd National Conference of the Conservation Education Association held in August, 1976. The theme of the conference was Education's Role in Land Use Planning. Papers presented include a variety of topics related to land use, conservation education, natural…

  13. Laboratory Investigation on the Strength Gaining of Brick Aggregate Concrete Using Ordinary Portland Cement and Portland Composite Cement

    Hoque M H, Numen E H, Islam N., Mohammed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the laboratory investigation of strength variation of brick aggregate concrete made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC and Portland composite cement (PCC.The investigation was conducted by testing concrete cylinder specimens at different ages of concrete with concrete mix ratios: 1:1.5:3 and 1:2:4 by volume and with water cement ratios=0.45 and 0.60. The test result reveals that at the early age, concrete composed with OPC attained larger compressive strength than the concrete made of PCC. However, in the later age concrete made with PCC achieved higher strength than OPC.

  14. Ion selective electrode for cesium based on 5-(4'-nitrophenylazo)25,27-bis(2-propyloxy)26,28-dihydroxycalix[4]arene

    Ramanjaneyulu, P.S. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400085 (India); Singh, Parminder [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Sayi, Y.S. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400085 (India); Chawla, H.M. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Ramakumar, K.L., E-mail: klram@barc.gov.in [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400085 (India)

    2010-03-15

    A polyvinylchloride (PVC) based liquid membrane ion selective electrode (ISE) for cesium was fabricated with 5-(4'-nitrophenylazo)25,27-bis(2-propyloxy)26,28-dihydroxycalix[4]arene as ionophore. Different membrane constituents were investigated to realise optimum performance of the ISE developed. Of the four plasticizers and two ion additives studied, the best response was observed with membrane having 2-nitro phenyl octyl ether (oNPOE) as plasticizer and potassium tetrakis (perchloro phenyl) borate (KTpClPB) as ion additive. Linear response over concentration range of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -1} M CsCl was obtained. The Nernstian slope of the response was 56 mV per decade for Cs with a response time less than 20 s. Matched potential method has been applied to find out the selectivity for Cs over several ions like Rb{sup +}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+}. The response of ISE for Cs{sup +} was fairly constant over the pH range of 3-11. The lifetime of the electrode is 9 months which is the longest life for any membrane-based Cs-ISE so far developed. The concentration of cesium in two simulated high level active waste streams was determined and results agreed well with those obtained independently employing atomic absorption spectrometry.

  15. Solid sample locations for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  16. Land Cover Classification for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  17. Stream Centerline for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  18. Active Channel for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  19. Water sample locations for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  20. Use of red mud as addition for portland cement mortars

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the possibility of adding red mud, an alkaline leaching waste that is obtained from bauxite during the Bayer process for alumina production, in the raw meal of Portland cement mortars. The red mud is classified as dangerous, according to NBR 10004/2004, and world while generation reached over 117 million tons/year. This huge production requires high consuming products to be used as incorporation matrix and we studied the influence of red mud addition on the characteristics of cement mortars and concrete. In this paper the properties of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of red mud was evaluated: pH variation, fresh (setting time, workability or normal consistency and water retention), and hardened state (mechanical strength, capillary water absorption, density and apparent porosity). Results seem promising for red mud additions up to 20 wt%. (author)

  1. Portland cement conditioning of the oil radioactive wastes

    Cementation is a widely used method to immobilize radioactive wastes generated during the operation of nuclear power plants. The oily radioactive wastes resulting during the normal service of Nuclear Power Plant at Cernavoda, Romania, can be conditioned in Portland cement as emulsions. In this way the interaction with cement water is not blocked. For this purpose, four compositions for conditioning were studied, namely: i) cement-emulsion; ii) cement-emulsion-sodium silicate; iii) cement-emulsion-sodium silicate-lime; iv) cement-emulsion-sand. The apparent density of hardened binding mixtures, setting time, compressive strength of hardened samples, leaching rate of tritium were determined. The results have shown that the oily wastes can be conditioned in a good manner when using Portland cement, emulsion conditioners, sodium silicate and lime. (authors)

  2. City of Portland: Businesses for an environmentally sustainable tomorrow

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The sustainable business development program in Portland (OR) is known as BEST. BEST stands for Businesses for an Environmentally Sustainable Tomorrow. The Portland Energy Office operates BEST as a {open_quotes}one-stop service center{close_quotes} for business owners and managers. BEST provides information and assistance on resource efficient buildings and business practices. The results of BEST`s two years of operation have been generally impressive. Nearly 150 new or expanding businesses have been connected with utility design assistance programs. Businesses have also received assistance with water conservation, telecommuting, construction debris recycling, and alternative fuel vehicles. BEST has received local and national publicity and BEST services have been the topic at more than a dozen conferences, meetings, or other speaking engagements. A guidebook for communities wishing to start a similar program will be available in early 1996.

  3. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M.; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the...

  4. Utilization of gold tailings as an additive in Portland cement.

    Celik, Ozlem; Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Piskin, Sabriye

    2006-06-01

    Mine tailings are formed as an industrial waste during coal and ore mining and processing. In the investigated process, following the extraction of gold from the ore, the remaining tailings are subjected to a two-stage chemical treatment in order to destroy the free cyanide and to stabilize and coagulate heavy metals prior to discharge into the tailings pond. The aim of this study was the investigation of the feasibility of utilization of the tailings as an additive material in Portland cement production. For this purpose, the effects of the tailings on the compressive strength properties of the ordinary Portland cement were investigated. Chemical and physical properties, mineralogical composition, particle size distribution and microstructure of the tailings were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), particle size analyzer (Mastersizer) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Following the characterization of the tailings, cement mortars were prepared by intergrinding Portland cement with dried tailings. Composition of the cement clinkers were adjusted to contain 5, 15, 25% (wt/wt) dried tailings and also silica fume and fly ash samples (C and F type) were added to clinker in different ratios. The mortars produced with different amounts of tailings, silica fume, fly ashes and also mixtures of them were tested for compressive strength values after 2, 7, 28 and 56 days according to the European Standard (EN 196-1). The results indicated that gold tailings up to 25% in clinker could be beneficially used as an additive in Portland cement production. It is suggested that the gold tailings used in the cement are blended with silica fume and C-type fly ash to obtain higher compressive strength values. PMID:16784164

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF ORTHOPHOSPHATES ON THE PROPERTIES OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Antanas Kaziliunas

    2014-01-01

    The article continues the research of input reduction of phosphogypsum preparation for the production of building materials. Desiccated apatite (2.18 % P2O5 in gypsum) makes the least changes in the properties of Portland cement: it prolongs the cement setting times and reduces the compressive strength about 10 %. The apatite formation in the pastes of soluble orthophosphate-cement occurs during the formation of X-ray amorphous colloidal calcium orthophosphate hydrate, which prolo...

  6. Apatite formation on calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer

    Pangdaeng, S.; Sata, V.; Aguiar, J. L. Barroso de; Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Chindaprasirt, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, calcined kaolin–white Portland cement geopolymerwas investigated for use as biomaterial. Sodiumhydroxide and sodium silicate were used as activators. In vitro test was performed with simulated body fluid (SBF) for bioactivity characterization. The formation of hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked samples surface was tested using SEM, EDS and XRD analyses. The results showed that the morphology of hydroxyapatite was affected by the source material composition, alkali co...

  7. 77 FR 23791 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00042

    2012-04-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00042 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OREGON dated 04/02/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  8. Oregon School Bond Manual. Sixth Edition.

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Office of School District Services.

    Given that purchasers of Oregon school bonds rely on recommendations of accredited bond attorneys, this document is designed to assist school districts in complying with state statutes regulating the issuance of school bond issues in order that attorney opinions may be favorable. Six initial steps toward a bond sale and Oregon laws regarding bonds…

  9. Reconstruction of radionuclide concentrations in the Columbia River from Hanford, Washington to Portland, Oregon, January 1950--January 1971

    Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories conducted this study of the Columbia River for the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The HEDR Project was established to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received from operations that began at the Hanford Site in 1944. The purpose of the study was to reconstruct concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River water for estimating doses to humans from the river pathway

  10. Integrating urban form and demographics in water-demand management: an empirical case study of Portland, Oregon

    Vivek Shandas; G Hossein Parandvash

    2010-01-01

    Theories of water-resource management suggest that water demand is mediated by three interacting factors: technological innovations, pricing structures, and individual behaviors and demographics. While these factors provide useful insights for ongoing water conservation strategies, such as outreach and education campaigns, pricing schemes, and incentives aimed at residential developments, few studies examine the relationship between land-use planning and water demand. This paper reports the r...

  11. Behavior, passage, and downstream migration of juvenile Chinook salmon from Detroit Reservoir to Portland, Oregon, 2014–15

    Kock, Tobias J.; Beeman, John W.; Hansen, Amy C.; Hansel, Hal C.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Hatton, Tyson W.; Kofoot, Eric E.; Sholtis, Matthew D.; Sprando, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation was conducted to estimate dam passage survival of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) at Detroit Dam during a period of spill. To estimate dam passage survival, we used a paired-release recapture study design and released groups of tagged fish upstream (997 fish) and downstream (625 fish) of Detroit Dam. A total of 43 fish (6.8 percent) passed Detroit Dam from the upstream release group and passage occurred through regulating outlets (54.8 percent), spill bays (31.0 percent), and turbines (14.3 percent). We do not present dam passage survival estimates from 2014 because these estimates would have been highly uncertain due to the low number of fish that passed Detroit Dam during the study. Secondary objectives were addressed using data collected from tagged fish that were released at the downstream release site.

  12. GIS data for the Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Pilot Study to modernize FEMA flood hazard maps

    Wong, Florence L.; Venturato, Angie J.; Geist, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    A Tsunami Pilot Study was conducted for the area surrounding the coastal town of Seaside, Oregon, as part of the Federal Emergency Management's (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Map Modernization Program (Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, 2006). The Cascadia subduction zone extends from Cape Mendocino, California, to Vancouver Island, Canada. The Seaside area was chosen because it is typical of many coastal communities subject to tsunamis generated by far- and near-field (Cascadia) earthquakes. Two goals of the pilot study were to develop probabilistic 100-year and 500-year tsunami inundation maps using Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) and to provide recommendations for improving tsunami hazard assessment guidelines for FEMA and state and local agencies. The study was an interagency effort by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, and FEMA, in collaboration with the University of Southern California, Middle East Technical University, Portland State University, Horning Geoscience, Northwest Hydraulics Consultants, and the Oregon Department of Geological and Mineral Industries. The pilot study model data and results are published separately as a geographic information systems (GIS) data report (Wong and others, 2006). The flood maps and GIS data are briefly described here.

  13. Synthesis report: D-cracking in portland cement concrete pavements

    Thompson, S. R.; Olsen, M. P. J.; Dempsey, B. J.

    1980-06-01

    The mechanisms and testing procedures for D-cracking in portland cement concrete pavements are examined. Benefication procedures are also investigated. The three general responses to freezing in the aggregate/paste system include elastic accommodation, high internal pressure, and high external pressure. It is found that the critical aggregate parameters influencing D-cracking are degree of saturation, maximum particle size, permeability, porosity, and pore size distribution. Evaluation of present laboratory testing procedures indicated that the ASTM C666, VPI slow-cool, Mercury Porosimetry, and Iowa Pore Index Tests correlated the best with field performance of concrete with respect to D-cracking.

  14. Symptoms, ventilatory function, and environmental exposures in Portland cement workers.

    Abrons, H L; Petersen, M R; Sanderson, W T; Engelberg, A L; Harber, P

    1988-01-01

    Data on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function were obtained for 2736 Portland cement plant workers and 755 controls. Personal dust samples contained a geometric mean concentration of 0.57 mg/m3 for respirable dust and 2.90 mg/m3 for total dust. Cement workers and controls had similar prevalences of symptoms, except that 5.4% of the cement workers had dyspnoea compared with 2.7% of the controls. The mean pulmonary function indices were similar for the two groups. Among cement plant worke...

  15. Low porosity portland cement pastes based on furan polymers

    The effect of three different types of Furan polymers on the porosity, mechanical properties, mechanism of hydration and microstructure of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) pastes was investigated. The results showed that mixing the OPC with Furan polymers, the standard water of consistency of the different cement pastes decreases and therefore the setting times (initial and final) are shortened. The total porosity of the hardened cement pastes decreased, while the mechanical properties improved and enhanced at all curing ages of hydration compared with those of the pure OPC pastes. The hydration process with Furan polymers proceeded according to the following decreasing order: F.ac. > F.ph. > F.alc. > OPC

  16. 75 FR 54969 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    2010-09-09

    ..., 1998; see also 63 FR at 14193 (March 24, 1998) (area source cement kilns' emissions of mercury, dibenzo... NESHAP on May 6, 2009. See 74 FR 21136. We received a total of 3,229 comments from the Portland cement... v. EPA Litigation On June 14, 1999 (64 FR 31898), EPA issued the NESHAP for the Portland...

  17. Differentiating seawater and groundwater sulfate attack in Portland cement mortars

    The study reported in this article deals with understanding the physical, chemical and microstructural differences in sulfate attack from seawater and groundwater. Portland cement mortars were completely immersed in solutions of seawater and groundwater. Physical properties such as length, mass, and compressive strength were monitored periodically. Thermal analysis was used to study the relative amounts of phases such as ettringite, gypsum, and calcium hydroxide, and microstructural studies were conducted by scanning electron microscopy. Portland cement mortars performed better in seawater solution compared to groundwater solution. The difference in performance could be attributed to the reduction in the quantity of the expansive attack products (gypsum and ettringite). The high Cl concentration of seawater could have played an important role by binding the C3A to form chloroaluminate compounds, such as Friedel's salt (detected in the microstructural studies), and also by lowering the expansive potential of ettringite. Furthermore, the thicker layer of brucite forming on the specimens in seawater could have afforded better protection against ingress of the solution than in groundwater

  18. Floodplain Mapping Submission for Oregon County, MO

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for Oregon County, MO. The City of Thayer and the Missouri State Emergency Management...

  19. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  20. Northern Oregon 6 arc-second DEM

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 6-second North Coast Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 6-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  1. Headwater Stream Barriers in Western Oregon

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — This data set is an ArcInfo point coverage depicting barriers to fish migration in headwater basins in western Oregon. Data were compiled from reports by fisheries...

  2. Bald eagle management guidelines, Oregon-Washington

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers bald eagle management guidelines in Oregon and Washington. The purpose of these guidelines is to maintain the environmental conditions that are...

  3. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan circa 1870

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  4. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  5. Sprague River Oregon Built Features 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  6. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  7. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1975

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  8. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  9. Oregon High Desert Discovery : An Overview

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a plan to link five BLM and FWS areas in southeast Oregon in order to provide better services for visitors. In order to most effectively and efficiently...

  10. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  11. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 1968

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  12. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.; Bennett, S.L.; Ringle, J.C.

    1979-08-31

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included.

  13. Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor annual report

    The use of the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor during the year ending June 30, 1979, is summarized. Environmental and radiation protection data related to reactor operation and effluents are included

  14. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 1994

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  15. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 1939

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  16. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 1967

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  17. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  18. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1940

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  19. Sprague River Oregon Water circa 1870

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  20. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the...

  1. Physical evaluation of a new pulp capping material developed from portland cement

    Negm, Ahmed; Hassanien, Ehab; Abu-Seida, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examined the effects of addition of 10% and 25% by weight calcium hydroxide on the physicochemical properties of Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide in order to develop a new pulp capping material. Material and Methods The solubility, pH value, setting time, compressive strength, and push out bond strength of modified Portland were evaluated and compared to those of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement containing 20% bismuth oxide. Results The statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and Duncan’s post-hoc test. The results show that the strength properties and push out bond strength of Portland cement were adversely affected by addition of calcium hydroxide especially with a ratio of 25 wt%, however, the setting time and pH were not affected. MTA showed a statistically significant lower setting time than other cements (P≤0.001). Portland cement with bismuth oxide and Port Cal I showed a statistically significant higher Push out Bond strength than MTA and Port Cal II (P=0.001). Conclusions Taking the setting time, push out bond strength and pH value into account, addition of 10 wt% calcium hydroxide to Portland cement associated with 20% bismuth oxide produces a new pulp capping material with acceptable physical and adhesive properties. Further studies are recommended to test this cement biologically as a new pulp capping material. Key words:Calcium hydroxide, MTA, Portland cement, setting time, solubility, strength. PMID:27398178

  2. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    Le Saout, Gwenn, E-mail: gwenn.le-saout@mines-ales.fr [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hori, Akihiro [DENKA Chemicals GmbH, Wehrhahn-Center, Cantadorstr. 3, D-40211 Duesseldorf (Germany); Higuchi, Takayuki [Denki Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (DENKA), Omi, Itoigawa, Niigata, 949-0393 (Japan); Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  3. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  4. Influence of Cellulose Ethers on Hydration Products of Portland Cement

    MA Baoguo; OU Zhihua; JIAN Shouwei; XU Rulin

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose ethers are widely used to mortar formulations, and it is significant to understand the interaction between cellulose ethers and cement pastes. FT-IR spectra, thermal analysis and SEM are used to investigate hydration products in the cement pastes modified by HEMC and HPMC in this article. The results show that the hydration products in modified cement pastes were finally identical with those in the unmodified cement paste, but the major hydration products, such as CH (calcium hydroxide), ettringite and C-S-H, appeared later in the modified cement pastes than in the unmodified cement paste. The cellulose ethers decrease the outer products and increase inner products of C-S-H gels. Compared to unmodified cement pastes, no new products are found in the modified cement pastes in the present experiment. The HEMC and HPMC investigation shows almost the same influence on the hydration products of Portland cement.

  5. Early hydration of portland cement with crystalline mineral additions

    This research presents the effects of finely divided crystalline mineral additions (quartz and limestone), commonly known as filler, on the early hydration of portland cements with very different mineralogical composition. The used techniques to study the early hydration of blended cements were conduction calorimeter, hydraulicity (Fratini's test), non-evaporable water and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that the stimulation and the dilution effects increase when the percentage of crystalline mineral additions used is increased. Depending on the replacement proportion, the mineralogical cement composition and the type of crystalline addition, at 2 days, the prevalence of the dilution effect or the stimulation effect shows that crystalline mineral additions could act as sites of heat dissipation or heat stimulation, respectively

  6. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Mammal Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon OCS Data Release presents marine mammal observations from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field activity 2014-607-FA in the Oregon Outer...

  8. Channel centerline for the Rogue River, Oregon in 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  9. Channel centerline for the Rogue River, Oregon in 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  10. 77 FR 16047 - Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    2012-03-19

    ... State of Oregon have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Benton, Columbia... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Oregon; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oregon (FEMA-4055-DR), dated March 2, 2012, and...

  11. EnviroAtlas -Portland, ME- One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2010)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EnviroAtlas Portland, ME land cover map was generated from USDA NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program) four band (red, green, blue and near infrared)...

  12. EnviroAtlas -Portland, ME- One Meter Resolution Urban Land Cover (2010) Web Service

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The Portland, ME land cover...

  13. Sulfatos en el cemento portland y su incidencia sobre el falso fraguado: Estado actual del conocimiento

    de la Cruz, Ignacio

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available A bibliographical study is carried out of the sulphates which may be present in the clinker and Portland cement, as likewise the effects of the aeration and temperature on the setting. This work is a prior phase of a wide experimental investigation carried out in the IETCC, on anomalies or setting and phenomena of "lumping" in Portland cement.

    Se realiza un estudio bibliográfico de los sulfatos que pueden estar presentes en el clínker y cemento portland, así como de los efectos de la aireación y temperatura sobre el fraguado. Este trabajo es la fase previa de una amplia investigación experimental realizada en el IETCC, sobre anomalías de fraguado y fenómenos de "aterronamiento" en el cemento portland.

  14. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME - BenMAP Results by Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset demonstrates the effect of changes in pollution concentration on local populations in 146 block groups in Portland, Maine. The US EPA's...

  15. HYDRATING CHARACTERISTICS OF MODIFIED PORTLAND WITH Ba-BEARING SULPHOALUMINATE MINERALS

    Chenchen Gong; Jibao Xin; Shoude Wang; Lingchao Lu

    2016-01-01

    The hydrating characteristics of modified Portland cement with Ba-bearing sulphoaluminate minerals were studied in this paper. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS), mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP) and compressive strength were determined to characterize hydrating products and microstructure. Results show that basic physical properties of modified Portland cement with Ba-bearing sulphoaluminate minerals (SMPC) are similar with PC except the shorter setting ...

  16. The comparison between sulfate salt weathering of portland cement paste and calcium sulfoaluminate cement paste

    Liu, Zanqun; Deng, Dehua; De Schutter, Geert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the damage performances of sulfate salt weathering of Portland cement paste and calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement paste were compared according to authors' previous studies. It was found that the evaporation zone of speciments partially immersed in 10% Na2SO4 solution were both severely deteriorated for Portland cement and CSA cement. However, the differences were more significant: (1) the CSA cement paste were damaged just after 7 days exposure compared to the 5 months expos...

  17. Utilization of Iron Ore Tailings as Raw Material for Portland Cement Clinker Production

    Li Luo; Yimin Zhang; Shenxu Bao; Tiejun Chen

    2016-01-01

    The cement industry has for some time been seeking alternative raw material for the Portland cement clinker production. The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of utilizing iron ore tailings (IOT) to replace clay as alumina-silicate raw material for the production of Portland cement clinker. For this purpose, two kinds of clinkers were prepared: one was prepared by IOT; the other was prepared by clay as a reference. The reactivity and burnability of raw meal, mineralogical...

  18. How Do Social Service Providers View Recent Immigrants? Perspectives from Portland, Maine, and Olympia, Washington

    CLEVENGER, CASEY; DERR, AMELIA SERAPHIA; Cadge, Wendy; CURRAN, SARA

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how social service providers in two small, geographically distinct cities—Portland, Maine, and Olympia, Washington—understand the importance of welcoming and incorporating new immigrants in their cities. We focus on how providers characterize their responsibilities, how they understand the importance of responding to new immigrants, and what they describe as the challenges and opportunities presented by recent immigration to their cities. Despite differences in Portland ...

  19. Superplasticized Portland cement: Production and compressive strength of mortars and concrete

    Bouzoubaa, N.; Zhang, M.H.; Malhotra, V.M. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-12-01

    This paper deals with the effect of intergrinding different percentages of a naphthalene-based superplasticizer with Portland cement clinker and gypsum on the fineness of the product, and on the water requirement and the compressive strength of the mortars made with the superplasticized cement. The properties of the fresh and hardened concrete made with the superplasticized cements were also investigated. The results showed that the intergrinding of a given amount of a naphthalene-based superplasticizer with Portland clinker and gypsum reduced the grinding time required for obtaining the same Blaine fineness as that of the control Portland cement without the superplasticizer. The water requirement of the mortars made with the superplasticized cements was similar to that of the mortars made with the control Portland cements when the same amount of the superplasticizer was added at the mortar mixer; for a given grinding time and a Blaine fineness of {approximately}4500 cm{sup 2}/g, the mortars made with the superplasticized cement had higher compressive strength than those made with the control Portland cement. For a given grinding time or Blaine fineness of cement {ge}5000 cm{sup 2}/g, the slump loss, air content stability, bleeding, autogenous temperature rise, setting times, and compressive strength of the concrete made with the superplasticized cements were generally comparable to those of the concrete made with the control Portland cements when the superplasticizer was added at the concrete mixer.

  20. Annotated bibliography of the geology of the Columbia Plateau (Columbia River Basalt) and adjacent areas of Oregon

    This bibliography containing approximately 2000 entries was prepared by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries under Subcontract SA-913 with Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. The objective of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program is to determine the feasibility of storing nuclear waste within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Under the geologic portion of this program, the stratigraphic, structural, tectonic, seismic, and hydrologic aspects of the Columbia Plateau are being examined. Other aspects of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program are concerned with systems integration, engineered barriers, engineering testing, and construction of a near-surface test facility. The area covered in this bibliography comprises that area north of 43030' latitude and east of the Willamette Meridian, which is located just west of Portland. The bibliographic entries are presented in two forms. The first is an alphabetized listing of all articles dealing with the geology of the Columbia Plateau (Columbia River Basalt) and adjacent areas of Oregon. The second form consists of an alphabetized listing of the entries subdivided under fourteen categories

  1. Annotated bibliography of the geology of the Columbia Plateau (Columbia River Basalt) and adjacent areas of Oregon

    Bela, J.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography containing approximately 2000 entries was prepared by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries under Subcontract SA-913 with Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. The objective of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program is to determine the feasibility of storing nuclear waste within the Columbia River Basalt Group. Under the geologic portion of this program, the stratigraphic, structural, tectonic, seismic, and hydrologic aspects of the Columbia Plateau are being examined. Other aspects of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program are concerned with systems integration, engineered barriers, engineering testing, and construction of a near-surface test facility. The area covered in this bibliography comprises that area north of 43/sup 0/30' latitude and east of the Willamette Meridian, which is located just west of Portland. The bibliographic entries are presented in two forms. The first is an alphabetized listing of all articles dealing with the geology of the Columbia Plateau (Columbia River Basalt) and adjacent areas of Oregon. The second form consists of an alphabetized listing of the entries subdivided under fourteen categories. (RWR)

  2. Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    BPA is considering whether to transfer (wheel) electrical power from a proposed privately-owned, combustion-turbine electrical generation plant in Oregon. The plant would be fired by natural gas and would use combined-cycle technology to generate up to 440 average megawatts (aMW) of energy. The plant would be developed, owned, and operated by Portland General Electric Company (PGE). The project would be built in eastern Oregon, just east of the City of Boardman in Morrow County. The proposed plant would be built on a site within the Port of Morrow Industrial Park. The proposed use for the site is consistent with the County land use plan. Building the transmission line needed to interconnect the power plant to BPA`s transmission system would require a variance from Morrow County. BPA would transfer power from the plant to its McNary-Slatt 500-kV transmission line. PGE would pay BPA for wheeling services. Key environmental concerns identified in the scoping process and evaluated in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) include these potential impacts: (1) air quality impacts, such as emissions and their contributions to the {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} effect; (2) health and safety impacts, such as effects of electric and magnetic fields, (3) noise impacts, (4) farmland impacts, (5) water vapor impacts to transportation, (6) economic development and employment impacts, (7) visual impacts, (8) consistency with local comprehensive plans, and (9) water quality and supply impacts, such as the amount of wastewater discharged, and the source and amount of water required to operate the plant. These and other issues are discussed in the DEIS. The proposed project includes features designed to reduce environmental impacts. Based on studies completed for the DEIS, adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed project were identified, and no evidence emerged to suggest that the proposed action is controversial.

  3. Monitoring Oregon Silverspot Butterfly Habitat Restoration Methods: Willapa Bay National Wildlife Refuge and Oregon Coast NWRs

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Oregon Silverspot Butterfly is thought to be extirpated from the northern portion oftheir historic range. Currently the entire population is only known to...

  4. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: North Coast

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  5. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: North Coast

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  6. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Willamette Valley

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  7. 2008 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Lake Billy Chinook, Oregon

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  8. Estimated longevity of performance of Portland cement grout seal materials

    The sealing of boreholes, fractures and underground workings of repositories is a common concern for all programs investigating the deep burial of nuclear waste as a disposal mechanism. Two grouting materials, bentonite and portland cement, have been identified by many programs as likely candidate seal materials. The longevity of performance of both of these materials is currently being investigated under the auspices of the Stripa Project. These investigations comprise coordinated laboratory, field and modeling studies to produce fundamental data, practical experience and estimates of long-range performance, respectively. Long-term performance is an especially sensitive issue for cement because the phases that comprise cement are metastable. Accordingly, it may be assumed that cement grout performance will degrade with time. For a simplified cement system, two mechanisms for chemical degradation have been considered: phase change and dissolution. When considering dissolution, both equilibrium (slow flow) and open (fast flow) systems have been analyzed to establish bounds. Granitic terrain groundwaters ranging from fresh to saline have been taken as solvents. To assess the consequences in terms of flow, an empirical relation between cement permeability and porosity has been developed. Predictions of performance changes with time have been produced by making conservative estimates of local hydraulic head conditions for various periods of repository history. For the crystalline rock environments considered, preliminary results indicate that cement grout performance may be acceptable for tens of thousands to millions of years providing its initial hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 10-12 m/s

  9. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty.

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the citrate anion was binding to one or more of the positively charged species causing charged repulsion between cement particles which dispersed aggregates and caused the liquefying effect of the anion. Analysis of the hydrating phases of PC indicated that the early strength producing PC phase (ettringite) developed within the first 2 h of setting following addition of the citrate anion, while this did not occur in the control cement (PC only). Within 24 h ettringite developed in PC as well as calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the major setting phase of PC, whereas cements containing citrate did not develop this phase. The evidence suggested that in the presence of citrate the cements limited water supply appeared to be utilized for ettringite formation, producing the early strength of the citrate cements. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to modify PC with citrate to both improve the injectability and crucially reduce the setting times of PC while improving the strength of the cement. PMID:24711245

  10. In situ hydration of Portland cement monitored by neutron diffraction

    Castellote, M.; Alonso, C.; Andrade, C.; Campo, J.; Turrillas, X.

    Ordinary Portland cement was mixed with deuterium oxide with a heavy water/cement ratio of 0.6 to monitor the in situ hydration, while acquiring diffraction patterns every 2.5min. Two different experiments were carried out under different heating conditions. In one case, the temperature was uniformly raised from room temperature to 98 °C at a heating rate of 20 °C/h. In the second case, the heating was performed from 32 °C to 100 °C at a slower rate: 12 °C/h. The disappearance and appearance of relevant anhydrous and hydrated phases were monitored and quantified by fitting isolated diffraction peaks to Gaussians. Ca3SiO5 dissolved completely during the experiment and Ca2SiO4 only partially disappeared. Ca(OD)2 precipitated and its growth rate exhibited a sigmoidal shape. Ettringite and hillebrandite formed but then dissolved before the end of the experiments. At the end only Ca(OD)2 and some Ca2SiO4 remained as crystalline phases.

  11. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Damir Barbir; Pero Dabić; Petar Krolo

    2012-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration. The microcalorimetrical results show that with increasing the share of chromium salt, heat maximums assume lower values and the occurrence of the maximum registered in the earlier hydration times. Conductometrical measurements show that with increasing addition of chromium salt, curve did not show any specific shape, immediate drop in specific conductivity is noticed and the maximum is reached earlier. This coincides with microcalorimetrical results. It can be concluded that the addition of chromium does not affect the mechanism of the hydration process, but it does affect the kinetic parameters and dynamics of the cement hydration process. It was found that chromium salt addition to the cement–water system is acceptable up to 2 wt.%. According to standard EN 196-3 for OPC, the beginning of binding time should occur after 60 minutes. Increased amount of chromium over 2 wt.% significantly accelerate the beginning of binding time and for the system it is not acceptable.

  12. Arsenic content in Portland cement: A literature review

    Tenorio de Franca Talita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement (PC is a hydraulic binding material widely used in the building industry. The main interest in its use in dentistry is focused on a possible alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA because PC is less expensive and is widely available. In dentistry, PC has been used in dental procedures such as pulpotomy, pulp capping, repair of root perforation and root-end filling. The purpose of this article is review the dental literature about the PC, its composition with special attention to arsenic content, properties, and application in dentistry. A bibliographic research was performed in Bireme, PubMed, LILACS and Scopus data bases looking for national and international studies about the PC composition, properties and clinical use. It was observed that PC has favorable biological properties very similar to those of MTA. The PC has shown good cell proliferation induction with formation of a monolayer cell, satisfactory inflammatory response, inhibitory effect of prostaglandin and antimicrobial effect. Studies have shown that PC is not cytotoxic, stimulates the apposition of reparative dentin and permits cellular attachment and growth. Regarding arsenic presence, its levels and release are low. PC has physical, chemical and biological properties similar to MTA. Arsenic levels and release are low, therefore, unable to cause toxic effects.

  13. Hydrolitical equilibrium of hydrates of portland cement, part 1

    Based on the basic principles of thermodynamics the present report (Part 1) provides a contribution to thermodynamically favoured stable states of the most important hydrated compounds of portland cement. An extensive literature search was made to find the related thermodynamic data for the data-base. According to our calculations even at room temperature the C-S-H-Gel is not the thermodynamically most stable end product of hydrated calcium silicates. The most stable products might be Hillebrandit, Foshagit, 11A Tobermorit or Gyrolit. It is generally agreed, that the cubic hydrate C3AH6 is the stable end product of calcium aluminate hydrates. Our calculations lead to the same results. By sulfates we have found, that at lower temperatures Ettringit is the stable phase, but at higher temperatures the corresponding monosulfate is more stable. Ettringit is not stable relative to C3AH6 even in its water solutions. Ettringit is also not stable relative to Friedl's salt. More information could be found in Part 2 of this report (in preparation). 46 figs., 13 refs., 18 tabs. (Authors)

  14. Change Planning and Implementation at Oregon.

    Van Hassel, H. J.; Retzlaff, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The strategic plan developed for the future of Oregon Health Sciences University School of Dentistry has as a major thrust the addition of a fifth-year extramural preceptorship to the program. Reinvigoration of the minority recruitment program, initiation of an early entry admissions track, and curriculum revision are additional goals. (MLW)

  15. 77 FR 14853 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00041

    2012-03-13

    ... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Benton, Columbia, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Hood River... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  16. Agriculture Cluster Brief. Vocational Education in Oregon.

    Galbraith, Gordon

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for vocational agriculture cluster programs in Oregon. The agriculture cluster program includes instruction in six areas: animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural economics, agriculture mechanics, and leadership development. The information in the guide is intended for use by…

  17. 76 FR 11835 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00036

    2011-03-03

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00036 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street,...

  18. Optimization of calcium chloride content on bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement

    This research investigates the optimization of calcium chloride content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement. Calcium chloride was used as an addition of White Portland cement at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. Calcium chloride was dissolved in sterile distilled water and blended with White Portland cement using a water to cement ratio of 0.5. Analysis of the bioactivity and pH of white Portland cement pastes with calcium chloride added at various amounts was carried out in simulated body fluid. Setting time, density, compressive strength and volume of permeable voids were also investigated. The characteristics of cement pastes were examined by X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope linked to an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. The result indicated that the addition of calcium chloride could accelerate the hydration of white Portland cement, resulting in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength of the pastes. The compressive strength of all cement pastes with added calcium chloride was higher than that of the pure cement paste, and the addition of calcium chloride at 8 wt.% led to achieving the highest strength. Furthermore, white Portland cement pastes both with and without calcium chloride showed well-established bioactivity with respect to the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the material within 7 days following immersion in simulated body fluid; white Portland cement paste with added 3%CaCl2 exhibited the best bioactivity. - Highlights: ► Optimization CaCl2 content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties. ► CaCl2 was used as an addition at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. ► CaCl2 resulted in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength. ► Addition of 3%CaCl2 exhibited the optimum formation of hydroxyapatite.

  19. Dissolved-oxygen regimen of the Willamette River, Oregon, under conditions of basinwide secondary treatment

    Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. DURABILIDAD DEL CEMENTO PORTLAND BLANCO ADICIONADO CON PIGMENTO AZUL ULTRAMAR

    CAROLINA GIRALDO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El pigmento Azul Ultramar (AU es un aluminosilicato polisulfurado de sodio que reacciona con el aluminato tricálcico (C3A y con el óxido de calcio (CaO del cemento Pórtland blanco en presencia de agua, generando cantidades considerables de etringita a edad temprana y en menor proporción de tobermorita. Esta etringita primaria se presenta en forma de fibras no orientadas mejorando el desempeño mecánico de los morteros, y al mismo tiempo dejando pocas cantidades de C3A disponible para la formación de etringita secundaria. En esta investigación se evalúa la durabilidad a diferentes edades de curado en morteros de cemento Portland blanco sustituidos por 0%, 10% y 20% de AU en peso, mediante pruebas de succión capilar y evaluación del cambio longitudinal de morteros expuestos a una solución de sulfato de sodio con una concentración del 5% (ASTM C1012. Los resultados evidencian una mayor resistencia a compresión y a flexión, una significativa disminución de la expansión y una reducción hasta del 800% de la absorción de agua en morteros con AU. Todo esto debido a la formación de las fases minerales adicionales (etringita primaria y tobermorita, las cuales fueron identificadas mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM.

  1. Immediate and delayed solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement

    Augusto Bodanezi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and Portland cement since its mixture until 672 hours, by means of two complimentary methods. Metal ring molds filled with the cements were covered with distilled water and, at each experimental time (3, 24, 72, 168, 336 and 672 hours, were weighed as soon as the plates in which the samples have been placed. Empty rings served as the control group (n=8. Mean weight gain and loss was determined and analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for all pairwise comparisons. Only Portland cement showed less than 3% weight loss through 24 hours. Detached MTA residues were heavier than those of Portland cement over the 3 to 168 hours. The weight of MTA rings increased more than that of Portland rings within 672 hours (p=0.05. The findings of the present study indicate that, in an aqueous environment MTA is more soluble than Portland cement and exceeds the maximum weight loss considered acceptable by ISO 6876 standard (2001.

  2. Utilization of Iron Ore Tailings as Raw Material for Portland Cement Clinker Production

    Li Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry has for some time been seeking alternative raw material for the Portland cement clinker production. The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of utilizing iron ore tailings (IOT to replace clay as alumina-silicate raw material for the production of Portland cement clinker. For this purpose, two kinds of clinkers were prepared: one was prepared by IOT; the other was prepared by clay as a reference. The reactivity and burnability of raw meal, mineralogical composition and physical properties of clinker, and hydration characteristic of cement were studied by burnability analysis, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and hydration analysis. The results showed that the raw meal containing IOT had higher reactivity and burnability than the raw meal containing clay, and the use of IOT did not affect the formation of characteristic mineralogical phases of Portland cement clinker. Furthermore, the physical and mechanical performance of two cement clinkers were similar. In addition, the use of IOT was found to improve the grindability of clinker and lower the hydration heat of Portland cement. These findings suggest that IOT can replace the clay as alumina-silicate raw material for the preparation of Portland cement clinker.

  3. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  4. State of Oregon 4th biennial energy plan

    State law directs the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) to prepare an energy plan every two years. This is the Fourth Biennial Energy Plan. The Plan is a policy blueprint for how to best meet Oregon's future energy needs. It identifies the key energy issues facing the state and sets forth policies and actions to achieve our energy goals of reliable, least-cost, and environmentally safe supply. This book presents: Oregon's demand and supply picture today. The progress Oregon has made toward energy efficiency. Oregon's energy demand and supply outlook for the next 20 years. Estimates of cost-effective conservation and other resources that could contribute to the state's energy supply. The major energy-related health, safety, and environmental issues facing the state. A strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent from 1988 levels by 2005. A two-year Action Plant that spells out ODOE's recommended actions for achieving Oregon's energy goals

  5. High-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction analysis of ordinary Portland cements: Phase coexistence of alite

    The mineralogical composition of four commercial and NIST RM-8488 Portland clinkers have been analysed by Rietveld methodology using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Alite phase coexistence has been observed in four patterns. White Portland clinkers show a single alite or a very small amount of a second alite with smaller volume due to higher magnesium content. Grey Portland clinkers show a much pronounced alite phase coexistence which has been related to higher magnesium contents. Details about these analyses are given. Furthermore, the full mineralogical composition (including the non-diffracting content) has been determined from the overestimation of the added standard, α-Al2O3, in the Rietveld analyses. White clinkers contain ∼15 wt.% of non-diffracting content while this fraction is much smaller in grey clinkers, ∼7 wt.%

  6. High-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction analysis of ordinary Portland cements: Phase coexistence of alite

    Torre, Angeles G. de la [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Losilla, Enrique R. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Cabeza, Aurelio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Aranda, Miguel A.G. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)]. E-mail: g_aranda@uma.es

    2005-08-15

    The mineralogical composition of four commercial and NIST RM-8488 Portland clinkers have been analysed by Rietveld methodology using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Alite phase coexistence has been observed in four patterns. White Portland clinkers show a single alite or a very small amount of a second alite with smaller volume due to higher magnesium content. Grey Portland clinkers show a much pronounced alite phase coexistence which has been related to higher magnesium contents. Details about these analyses are given. Furthermore, the full mineralogical composition (including the non-diffracting content) has been determined from the overestimation of the added standard, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, in the Rietveld analyses. White clinkers contain {approx}15 wt.% of non-diffracting content while this fraction is much smaller in grey clinkers, {approx}7 wt.%.

  7. Interfacial morphology and domain configurations in 0-3 PZT-Portland cement composites

    Cement-based piezoelectric composites have attracted great attention recently due to their promising applications as sensors in smart structures. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and Portland cement (PC) composite were fabricated using 60% of PZT by volume. Scanning Electron Microscope and piezoresponse force microscope were used to investigate the morphology and domain configurations at the interfacial zone of PZT-Portland cement composites. Angular PZT ceramic grains were found to bind well with the cement matrix. The submicro-scale domains were clearly observed by piezoresponse force microscope at the interfacial regions between the piezoelectric PZT phase and Portland cement phase, and are clearer than the images obtained for pure PZT. This is thought to be due to the applied internal stress of cement to the PZT ceramic particle which resulted to clearer images.

  8. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  9. Multi-scale simulation of capillary pores and gel pores in Portland cement paste

    Gao, Peng; YE, guang; Wei, Jiangxiong; Yu, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    The microstructures of Portland cement paste (water to cement ratio is 0.4, curing time is from 1 day to 28 days) are simulated based on the numerical cement hydration model, HUMOSTRUC3D (van Breugel, 1991; Koenders, 1997; Ye, 2003). The nanostructures of inner and outer C-S-H are simulated by the packing of monosized (5 nm) spheres. The pore structures (capillary pores and gel pores) of Portland cement paste are established by upgrading the simulated nanostructures of C-S-H to th...

  10. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    Moesgaard, M; Poulsen, Søren Lundsted; Herfort, D; Steenberg, M; Kirkegaard, L F; Skibsted, Jørgen; Yue, Y

    2012-01-01

    M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012).......M. MOESGAARD, S.L. POULSEN, D. HERFORT, M. STEENBERG, L.F. KIRKEGAARD, J. SKIBSTED, Y. YUE, Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone, Journal of the American Ceramic Society 95, 403 – 409 (2012)....

  11. Physical and Thermodynamical Properties of Water Phases in Hardening Portland Cement Systems

    Hansen, T. Bæk

    The present study is devoted to the description of water phases in hardening portland cement paste systems containing a significant amount of micro-filler and having a low to moderate water/powder ratio. Emphasis has been placed on the early stages of the hardening process.......The present study is devoted to the description of water phases in hardening portland cement paste systems containing a significant amount of micro-filler and having a low to moderate water/powder ratio. Emphasis has been placed on the early stages of the hardening process....

  12. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  13. Four Decades of Systems Science Teaching and Research in the USA at Portland State University

    Wayne Wakeland

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Systems science is defined in general fashion, and a brief background is provided that lists some of the systems science-related societies, conferences, journals, research institutes, and educational programs. The Systems Science Graduate Program at Portland State University in Portland, OR, USA, is described in detail, including its history, curriculum, students, faculty, and degrees granted. Dissertation topics are summarized via word diagrams created from dissertation titles over the years. MS degrees, student placement, and undergraduate courses are also mentioned, and future plans for the program are described including its support for sustainability education.

  14. Record of the Japan - U.S. Energy Discussions / Maui Meeting. March 25-27, 1996; Nichibei energy kyogi Maui kaigi. 1996 nen 3 gatsu 25 nichi - 27 nichi

    NONE

    1996-03-25

    The paper summarized the status of the Japan-U.S. Energy Discussions held in the Maui Island during March 25-27, 1996. With relation to the energy supply, reported and discussed were the present situation in the Middle East, Russia, Ukraine, and the former U.S.S.R. and effects of the political situation on the world. The paper also described effects of the intergovernmental resolutions on climate change on the energy issue. In addition to comprehensive prospects in the energy field, reported and discussed were issues related to coal, electric power, nuclear power, petroleum, gas and renewable energy. The following were generally commented on: There are uncertainties and unclearability in the future energy field in terms of politics, technology and environment, and in order to quickly respond these, dialogue of a global scale is necessary. In the energy industry, it is important to pursue effectiveness by the price mechanism, the market, and governmental policies. The international cooperation is much more needed, and the Japan-U.S. cooperation is desirable especially in the fields of stabilization of international politics, promotion of technical innovation, assistance for environmental orientation in developing countries, proposal of politics, etc.

  15. Use of copper slag in the manufacture of Portland cement

    Aquilar Elguézabal, A.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Given its chemical and mineralogical characteristics, copper slag, a solid industrial by-product, may serve as a partial substitute for silica and hematite in raw mixes used to manufacture Portland cement clinker. The benefits of such substitution include lower production costs and energy savings. The effect of slag-containing raw mixes on the reactivity of the CaO-Si02-Al203-Fe203 system was studied at three temperatures (1,350, 1,400 and 1,450ºC. Four mixes were used: M-1 and M-2 prepared with conventional prime materials and M-3 and M-4, in which ignimbrite and hematite were substituted for slag. In M-3 the slag replaced 45.54% of the ignimbrite and 100% of the hematite, and in M-4 100% of the mineral iron. The samples were clinkerized at 1,350, 1,400 and 1,450ºC. At 1,400ºC, clinker M-3 was found to have 10.7% less free lime than M-1, while the level in M-4 it was 15.93% lower than in M-2. The presence of the main clinker phases was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, which also showed that adding slag during c/inker manufacture slightly improves raw mix burnability without generating new unwanted phases. Consequently, recovery in cement kilns would appear to be an economically and environmentally feasible alternative to coprocessing such waste, although the industrial use of slag depends on its heavy metal content.En acuerdo con las características químicas y mineralógicas de la escoria de cobre, este residuo sólido industrial puede ser utilizado en el proceso de fabricación de clínker Portland como sustituto parcial de los minerales de sílice y hematita en la formación de mezclas crudas cuyos beneficios serían: disminución de los costos de producción de mezclas crudas y del consumo calorífico. El efecto de la adición de la escoria en las mezclas crudas sobre la reactividad del sistema CaO-Si02-Al203-Fe20 3 se estudió en tres niveles de temperatura (1.350, 1.400 Y 1.450ºC. Se trabajó con cuatro mezclas crudas, M-1 y M

  16. 78 FR 10005 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Portland Cement Manufacturing...

    2013-02-12

    ... Reporting Tool FR Federal Register gr/dscf grains per dry standard cubic foot HAP hazardous air pollutants... Information Document. On July 18, 2012 (77 FR 42368), the EPA proposed to amend the Portland cement... A. PM Parametric Monitoring B. Scaling for Continuous Parametric Monitoring of THC for...

  17. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    2011-12-08

    ... review. Background The Commission instituted this review on May 2, 2011 (76 FR 24519) and determined on August 5, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 50252, August 12, 2011). The Commission... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record...

  18. Radiopacity evaluation of Portland and MTA-based cements by digital radiographic system

    Alvaro Henrique Borges

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiopacity of Portland and MTA-based cements using the Digora TM digital radiographic system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The performed tests followed specification number 57 from the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association (2000 for endodontic sealing materials. The materials were placed in 5 acrylic plates, especially designed for this experiment, along with a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1 to 10 mm in thickness. The set was radiographed at a 30 cm focus-object distance and with 0.2 s exposure time. After the radiographs were taken, the optical laser readings of radiographs were performed by Digora TM system. Five radiographic density readings were performed for each studied material and for each step of the aluminum scale. RESULTS: White ProRoot MTA (155.99±8.04, gray ProRoot MTA (155.96±16.30 and MTA BIO (143.13±16.94 presented higher radiopacity values (p<0.05, while white non-structural Portland (119.76±22.34, gray Portland (109.71±4.90 and white structural Portland (99.59±12.88 presented lower radiopacity values (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that MTA-based cements were the only materials presenting radiopacity within the ANSI/ADA specifications.

  19. 76 FR 53054 - Safety Zone; TriMet Bridge Project, Willamette River; Portland, OR

    2011-08-25

    ... construction site. The safety hazards in the immediate area around this construction required actions to be... construction site. Discussion of Comments and Changes There were no comments received on the notice of proposed... safety zone during the construction of the TriMet Bridge on the Willamette River, in Portland, OR....

  20. STUDY OF AMMONIA SOURCE AT A PORTLAND CEMENT PRODUCTION PLANT (JOURNAL VERSION)

    A source and process sampling study was conducted at a dry process Portland Cement production plant. One aspect of the study focused on the source or point of NH3 within the production process. An extensive number of process solids from raw feeds to baghouse solids were collected...

  1. Energy Northwest: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington

    None

    1977-10-01

    The four-state area, one of 10 Federal regions established to streamline Federal operations and encourage Federal-state-local cooperation, includes Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The sources of energy and some energy technology are first reviewed briefly. The physical characteristics and regional developments are identified. Energy reserves, production, imports, facilities, and consumption are examined for the Northwest. The following energy issues are examined: conservation, electric rates, Clean Air Act of 1970, continental shelf development, transmission corridors, centralized electric generation, electric generation mix, electric power planning, environment and safety regulations, water use, electric energy forecasts, and oil tankers. (MCW)

  2. Effects of Thaumasite Formation on the Performance of Portland-limestone Concrete Stored in Magnesium Sulfate Solution

    GAO Lixiong; YAO Yan; WANG Ling

    2005-01-01

    The influence of thaumasite formation on the performance of Portland- limestone cement concrete stored in magnesium sulfate solution was studied. The experimental results show that the deterioration of Portlandlimestone cement concrete is higher than that of Portland cement concrete. The more the content of limestone, the more serious the deterioration of concrete, and also the lower the temperature, the earlier the deterioration of concrete. Thaumasite was detected to form in the Portland-limestone pastes when stored in 10wt% MgSO4 solution at 3- 10 ℃ and it was easy to form at lower temperatures.

  3. Field study of moisture damage in walls insulated without a vapor barrier. Final report for the Oregon Department of Energy

    Tsongas, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    Considerable uncertainty has existed over whether or not wall insulation installed without a vapor barrier causes an increased risk of moisture damage (wood decay) within walls. This report describes the results of one of the first major studies in the country aimed at finding out if such a moisture problem really exists. The exterior walls of a total of 96 homes in Portland, Oregon were opened, of which 70 had retrofitted insulation and 26 were uninsulated and were a control group. The types of insulation included urea-formaldehyde foam (44), mineral wool (16), and cellulose (10). In each opened wall cavity the moisture content of wood was measured and insulation and wood samples were taken for laboratory analysis of moisture content and for the determination of the presence of absence of decay fungi. Foam shrinkage was also measured. To evaluate the possible influence of the relative air tightness of the homes, fan depressurization tests were run using a door blower unit. The field and laboratory test results indicating the lack of a moisture damage problem in existing homes with wood siding in climates similar to that of western Oregon are described along with results of a statistical analysis of the data. Related problems of interest to homeowners and insulation installers are noted. The standard operating procedures used throughout the study are discussed, including the home selection process, quantitative and qualitative techniques used to identify wall locations with the highest moisture content, wall opening and data/sample collection methodology, laboratory analysis of samples, data processing and analysis, and applicability of the results. Recommendations for furutre tests are made. Finally, the potential and desirability for future retrofitting of wall insulation is explored.

  4. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  5. Thermal model for rotary kiln used in the production of Portland cement clinker; Modelo termico para forno rotativo utilizado para produzir clinquer de cimento Portland

    Duarte, Vanisa C.; Menon, Genesio J.; Silva, Rogerio J. [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a heat transfer model for a rotary kiln used for producing clinker of Portland cement. The temperatures will depend only on position throughout length of the kiln and time. It has been considered the heat loss through wall and the transferred heat to the solids. The finite element method has been utilized on a one-dimensional representation basis. From the results obtained it was possible to evaluate the kiln behavior, as starting point for a study of co-incineration of waste. (author)

  6. Contribución al estudio de los reacciones de hidratación del cemento portland por espectroscopia infrarroja II. Estudio de clínkeres y de cementos portland anhidros

    Vázquez-Moreno, Tomás

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available Not availableEn un artículo anterior (1 se dio cuenta de los trabajos realizados sobre la aplicación de la espectroscopia IR al estudio de las principales fases sintetizadas del clínker de cemento portland como fase previa al estudio de diversos clínkeres, obtenidos por nosotros en el laboratorio a partir de crudos industriales, y de distintos cementos portland comerciales anhidros.

  7. Synergistic use of Lagrangian dispersion and radiative transfer modelling with satellite and surface remote sensing measurements for the investigation of volcanic plumes: the Mount Etna eruption of 25-27 October 2013

    Sellitto, Pasquale; di Sarra, Alcide; Corradini, Stefano; Boichu, Marie; Herbin, Hervé; Dubuisson, Philippe; Sèze, Geneviève; Meloni, Daniela; Monteleone, Francesco; Merucci, Luca; Rusalem, Justin; Salerno, Giuseppe; Briole, Pierre; Legras, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we combine SO2 and ash plume dispersion modelling with satellite and surface remote sensing observations to study the regional influence of a relatively weak volcanic eruption from Mount Etna on the optical and micro-physical properties of Mediterranean aerosols. We analyse the Mount Etna eruption episode of 25-27 October 2013. The evolution of the plume along the trajectory is investigated by means of the FLEXible PARTicle Lagrangian dispersion (FLEXPART) model. The satellite data set includes true colour images, retrieved values of volcanic SO2 and ash, estimates of SO2 and ash emission rates derived from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations and estimates of cloud top pressure from SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager). Surface remote sensing measurements of aerosol and SO2 made at the ENEA Station for Climate Observations (35.52° N, 12.63° E; 50 m a.s.l.) on the island of Lampedusa are used in the analysis. The combination of these different data sets suggests that SO2 and ash, despite the initial injection at about 7.0 km altitude, reached altitudes around 10-12 km and influenced the column average aerosol particle size distribution at a distance of more than 350 km downwind. This study indicates that even a relatively weak volcanic eruption may produce an observable effect on the aerosol properties at the regional scale. The impact of secondary sulfate particles on the aerosol size distribution at Lampedusa is discussed and estimates of the clear-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing are derived. Daily shortwave radiative forcing efficiencies, i.e. radiative forcing per unit AOD (aerosol optical depth), are calculated with the LibRadtran model. They are estimated between -39 and -48 W m-2 AOD-1 at the top of the atmosphere and between -66 and -49 W m-2 AOD-1 at the surface, with the variability in the estimates mainly depending on the aerosol single scattering albedo. These results suggest that

  8. Compressive Strength and Hydration Process of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) mixed with Sea Water, Marine Sand and Portland Composite Cement

    Tjaronge, Wihardi; Irmawaty, Rita

    2014-01-01

    In order to eliminate the main problems of shortage of clean water and fine aggregate in the low land areas and the distant islands, this research utilized sea water and marine sand and Portland composite cement to produce high performance of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC). Portland composite cement containing of fly ash. The evaluation result on the mix design, workability (slumpflow, segregation), mechanical properties (compressive strength-static modulus) and hydration process of SCC were ...

  9. Oregon Trail Mushrooms geothermal loan guaranty application, Malheur County, Oregon: Environmental assessment

    1981-05-01

    The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance the construction and operation of a mushroom-growing facility that will use geothermal (hot) water for process and space heat. The project consists of two separate facilities: a growing facility located just outside of the eastern limit of the city of Vale, Oregon (Malheur County, Oregon) and a composting facility located about 6.4 km (4 miles) southwest of the city limits (also in Malheur County, Oregon). Five test wells have been drilled into the geothermal resource at the growing site. Either well No. 4 or well No. 5 will serve as a production well. All geothermal fluids will be reinjected into the geothermal aquifer, so either well No. 3 will be used for this purpose, wells Nos. 1 and 2 will be deepened, or a new well will be drilled on the site. A cold-water well will be drilled at the growing site, and another will be drilled at the composting site. The environmental effects of the proposed project are not expected to be significant.

  10. Search of a prompt gamma ray for chlorine analysis in a Portland cement sample

    Prompt Gamma Ray analysis of chlorine contaminated Portland cement samples have been carried out using an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma ray Neutron Activation Analysis setup. The chlorine concentration was measured over a range of 0.25-4 wt% using 1.165 MeV capture γ-rays from chlorine. The experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations and an excellent agreement was observed between the two results. Further theoretical study has shown that yield of the 1.165 MeV prompt γ-rays from chlorine is not very sensitive to variation in moisture contents of the Portland sample. An order of magnitude increase in sample moisture content resulted in only 16-20% increase in yield of 1.165 MeV prompt γ-rays

  11. Search of a prompt gamma ray for chlorine analysis in a Portland cement sample

    Naqvi, A.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Box 1815, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: annaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Kidwai, S. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran-31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2004-11-11

    Prompt Gamma Ray analysis of chlorine contaminated Portland cement samples have been carried out using an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma ray Neutron Activation Analysis setup. The chlorine concentration was measured over a range of 0.25-4 wt% using 1.165 MeV capture {gamma}-rays from chlorine. The experimental results were compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations and an excellent agreement was observed between the two results. Further theoretical study has shown that yield of the 1.165 MeV prompt {gamma}-rays from chlorine is not very sensitive to variation in moisture contents of the Portland sample. An order of magnitude increase in sample moisture content resulted in only 16-20% increase in yield of 1.165 MeV prompt {gamma}-rays.

  12. Study irradiation damage by fast neutrons in Portland cement by means of ultra-sound

    The effect of neutron irradiation in samples of Portland cement paste was evaluated, using the resonance frequency method and pulse velocity of ultra-sound technique. The samples were divide in three groups: 1) Monitoring samples; 2) Samples to gamma heating simulation; 3) Fast neutron irradiated samples in reactor core. Santa Rita Portland cement was utilized for samples preparation with water-cement rate of 0,40 l/kg. The irradiation was performed in the research reactor IEA-R1, at IPEN-CNEN/SP, with an integrated flux of 7,2 X 10 sup(18) n/cm sup(2) (E approx. 1 Mev). The samples of group 2 were submitted to special micro-waves heat treatment-with the same number of cycles of the reactor-which allowed the detection of fast neutron radiation effects within the predominant thermal effects. (author)

  13. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  14. Anti-Crack Performance of Low-Heat Portland Cement Concrete

    2007-01-01

    The properties of low-heat Portland cement concrete(LHC) were studied in detail. The experimental results show that the LHC concrete has characteristics of a higher physical mechanical behavior, deformation and durability. Compared with moderate-heat Portland cement(MHC), the average hydration heat of LHC concrete is reduced by about 17.5%. Under same mixing proportion, the adiabatic temperature rise of LHC concrete was reduced by 2℃-3℃,and the limits tension of LHC concrete was increased by 10×10-6-15×10-6 than that of MHC. Moreover, it is indicated that LHC concrete has a better anti-crack behavior than MHC concrete.

  15. The Property of Portland Cement and its Employment in Dentistry: Review of the Literature

    Antonio Vinícius Holanda BARBOSA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of the Portland cement when used as material in the dentistry. Methods: It was accomplished a bibliographical research using scientific goods published in national and international literature, which intended to evaluate the physical properties, chemical and biological behavior, as well as the antimicrobial activity of this product. In the selected article, the authors used methods of investigation in vitro and in vivo for study comparing the cement with materials consecrated in dentistry. Conclusion: In agreement with the consulted bibliography it was possible to ensure the similarity in the chemical composition between the Portland cement and the MTA, in the effectiveness of the sealing ability of the roads areas between the root canal and the periodontal tissue, satisfactory antimicrobial action, and demonstrate favorable biological properties, stimulating the deposition of the cement and inducing the reparative pulpar answer.

  16. Hydration of Blended Portland Cements Containing Calcium-Aluminosilicate Glass Powder and Limestone

    Moesgaard, Mette; Poulsen, S.L.; Herfort, D.;

    2012-01-01

    represents a potential alternative to traditional SCMs, used for reduction of the CO2 emission associated with cement production. It is found that the NCAS glass takes part in the hydration reactions after about two weeks of hydration and a degree of reaction of approx. 50 % is observed after 90 days of......This work investigates the hydration of blended Portland cement containing 30 wt.% Na2O-CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (NCAS) glass particles either as the only supplementary cementitious material (SCM) or in combination with limestone, using 29Si MAS NMR, powder XRD, and thermal analyses. The NCAS glass...... hydration. The hydrated glass contributes to the formation of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase, consuming a part of the Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) formed during hydration of the Portland cement. Furthermore, the presence of the glass and limestone particles, alone or in combination, results in an...

  17. Reverse extraction of early-age hydration kinetic equation from observed data of Portland cement

    2010-01-01

    The early-age hydration of Portland cement paste has an important impact on the formation of microstructure and development of strength.However,manual derivation of hydration kinetic equation is very difficult because there are multi-phased,multi-sized and interrelated complex chemical and physical reactions during cement hydration.In this paper,early-age hydration kinetic equation is reversely extracted automatically from the observed time series of hydration degree of Portland cement using evolutionary computation method that combines gene expression programming and particle swarm optimization algorithms.In order to reduce the computing time,GPUs are used for acceleration in parallel.Studies have shown that according to the extracted kinetic equation,simulation curve of early-age hydration is in good accordance with the observed experimental data.Furthermore,this equation still has a good generalization ability even changing chemical composition,particle size and curing conditions.

  18. X-ray diffractometry of steam cured ordinary Portland and blast-furnace-slag cements

    This work studies some aspects of the phases produced by hydration of ordinary and blast-furnace-slag cements, at normal conditions and steam cured (60 and 950 C), using an X-ray diffraction technique. The blast-furnace-slag cement was a mixture of 50% of ordinary Portland cement and 50% of blast-furnace-slag (separately grinding). After curing the X-ray diffraction reveals that, in relation to ordinary Portland cement, the main phases in blast-furnace-slag cement are hydrated silicates and aluminates, hydro garnet, etringitte and mono sulphate. After steam curing the hydration of blast-furnace-slag cement proceeds. This is a result of the slag activation by the curing temperature. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Thermal analysis of borogypsum and its effects on the physical properties of Portland cement

    Borogypsum, which consists mainly of gypsum crystals, B2O3 and some impurities, is formed during the production of boric acid from colemanite, which is an important borate ore. In this study, the effect of borogypsum and calcined borogypsum on the physical properties of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) has been investigated. The calcination temperature and transformations in the structures of borogypsum and natural gypsum were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Thermal experiments were carried out between ambient temperature and 500 deg. C in an air atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min-1. After calculation of enthalpy and determination of conversion temperatures, borogypsum (5% and 7%), hemihydrate borogypsum (5%) and natural gypsum (5%) were added separately to Portland cement clinker and cements were ground in the laboratory. The final products were tested for chemical analysis, compressive strength, setting time, Le Chatelier expansion and fineness properties according to the European Standard (EN 196). The results show that increasing the borogypsum level in Portland cement from 5% to 7% caused an increase in setting time and a decrease in soundness expansion and compressive strength. The cement prepared with borogypsum (5%) was found to have similar strength properties to those obtained with natural gypsum, whereas a mixture containing 5% of hemihydrate borogypsum was found to develop 25% higher compressive strength than the OPC control mixtures at 28 days. For this reason, utilization of calcined borogypsum in cement applications is expected to give better results than untreated borogypsum. It is concluded that hemihydrate borogypsum could be used as a retarder for Portland cement as an industrial side. This would play an important role in reducing environmental pollution

  20. Early and Late Strength Characterization of Portland Cement Containing Calcined Low-Grade Kaolin Clay

    Mark Bediako; Gawu, S. K. Y.; A. A. Adjaottor; John Solomon Ankrah

    2016-01-01

    Heat treated low-grade kaolin clays are now considered as a suitable pozzolanic material to metakaolins. However their suitability as a good pozzolanic material depends on the geochemistry and structure of the clay which is usually influenced by the geographical environment. This study investigated a low-grade kaolin clay from Nyamebekyere in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. The influence of the calcined material on the early and late strength development of Portland cement was analyzed. The earl...

  1. Experimental and modeling study of Portland cement paste degradation in boric acid

    In the framework of Spent Fuel Pools (SFP) lifetime studies, an investigation of the Portland cement degradation in boric acid has been requested by the Electric Power Research Institute. The main goal of this study is to identify the physico-chemical degradation mechanisms involved in boric acid media. Both experimental and modeling approaches are considered. Concerning degradation experiments, sample of cement paste are immersed during three and nine months in a boric acid solution at 2400 ppm that is periodically renewed. Boric acid concentration has been chosen to be representative of SFP solution. Results will be confronted with reactive transport numerical calculations performed by the reactive transport code HYTEC associated with a dedicated extended database called Thermoddem. The analysis of degradation solution revealed a main ions release mechanism driven by diffusion especially for calcium, nitrate, sodium and sulfate. Leaching behavior of magnesium seems to be more complex. Decalcification is the major degradation process involved, even if a non-negligible contribution of further cations (Mg2+, Na+) and anions (SO42-) has been noticed. Analysis of degradation soution also revealed that kinetic of Portland cement paste degradation in boric acid is higher than in pure water, regarding the degraded depths measured and calcium leaching rate. This observation has been confirmed by solid characterization. Microstructure analysis of degraded Portland cement paste showed a global porosity increase in the degraded zone that might be mainly attributed to Portlandite dissolution. An Ettringite reprecipitation in the degraded zone has been suspected but could also be Ettringite-like phases containing boron. The analysis techniques used did not allow us to differentiate it, and no others specific mineral phases containing boron has been identified. Profile pattern by XRD analysis allowed us to identify four zones composing the degraded Portland cement paste

  2. Influence of cellulose ethers on the kinetics of early Portland cement hydration

    Müller, Ingo

    2006-01-01

    The phase-specific influence of cellulose ether (CEs) on Portland cement hydration was investigated in-situ, using synchrotron X-ray diffractometry. CE-caused retardation can be traced to the polymers adsorption behaviour. The adsorption decreases in following order: silicates and their hydrates (high), sulfates (low), ettringite (zero). The retarding effect is strong on silicates, moderate on sulfates and unspecific on alluminates.

  3. EFFECT OF NATURAL ZEOLITE ON THE COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH AND FREEZE-THAW RESISTANCE OF PORTLAND CEMENT

    Bayartsetseg, E.; Lkhagvajargal, G.; Batgerel, D.; Sarangerel, D.; Ochirkhuyag, B

    2011-01-01

    Effects of zeolites in various natural deposits as replacement cementing material on mechanical performance of Portland cement were studied. The blended cement pastes with zeolites were cured at room temperature in air for various durations (1, 7 and 28 days). Mechanical performance of the blended cement samples such as setting time, volume of water, compressive strength, normal consistency and freeze-thaw resistance of the mortar are determined. The optimal substitution ratio was 20 wt. % of...

  4. Various durability aspects of calcined Kaolin-blended Portland cement pastes and concretes

    SAILLIO, Mickael; BAROGHEL BOUNY, Véronique; PRADELLE, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The use of calcined clay, in the form of metakaolin (MK), as a pozzolanic constituent for concrete has received considerable attention in recent years, due to the lower CO2 emission of this supplementary cementitious material compared to the production of a classic portland cement. Furthermore, concretes incorporating MK show some improve durability properties. In this paper, the durability of concretes and cement pastes with MK as partial replacement of cement (10 and 25%) has been investiga...

  5. Effects of High Temperature on the Residual Performance of Portland Cement Concretes

    Evandro Tolentino; Fernando S. Lameiras; Abdias M. Gomes; Cláudio A. Rigo da Silva; Wander L. Vasconcelos

    2002-01-01

    In this work we analyzed the "residual" performance of Portland cement concretes heat-treated at 600 °C after cooling down to room temperature. Concretes with characteristic compressive strength at 28 days of 45 MPa and of 60 MPa were studied. The heat-treatment was carried out without any imposed load. We measured the residual compressive strength and modulus of elasticity. The geometry of the structure was described by mercury intrusion porosimetry and nitrogen sorption tests. We observed a...

  6. DURABILITY PERFORMANCE OF RFCC SPENT CATALYSTBLENDED PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE EXPOSED TO SEA WATER ATTACK

    Allahverdi A.; Mahdavan M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the paste of Portland cement blended with spent catalyst from Resid Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (RFCC) unit of petroleum refining processes in sea water. 28-day cured paste specimens prepared from binary cement mixes containing different amounts of spent catalyst were exposed to Persian Gulf sea water. Compressive strength, weight, and length changes of the specimens were monitored and considered for evaluating the extent of deterioration. Laboratory t...

  7. Hydration and microstructure of Portland cement partially substituted with ultrafine silica

    J. I. Escalante; Gómez-Zamorano, L. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Geothermal waste, a by-product of steam power plants that use geothermal underground resources, was studied as a possible replacement for Portland cement. This waste consists primarily in amorphous nanometric silica with traces of sodium and potassium chlorides. The replacement ratios studied were 0, 10 and 20% in cements cured at 20 and 60 ºC. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that clinker phase hydration took place earlier in the presence of the geothermal waste. Scanning electron microscop...

  8. Substitution of the clayey mineral component by lignite fly ash in portland cement clinker synthesis

    Jovanović Nataša; Komljenović Miroslav; Petrašinović-Stojkanović Ljiljana; Baščarević Zvezdana; Bradić Violeta; Rosić Aleksandra

    2006-01-01

    Fly ash from four power plants in Serbia (PP "Morava" - Svilajnac, PP "Kolubara" - Veliki Grijani, PP "Kostolac" - units B1 and B2 - Kostolac and PP "Nikola Tesla" - units A and B - Obrenovac) was utilized as the starting raw component for Portland cement clinker synthesis. Limestone and quartz sand from the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory were the other two starting raw components. Based on the chemical composition of the raw components and from the projected cement moduli, the amount...

  9. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    Kara, P; Csetényi, L; Borosnyói, A

    2014-01-01

    In several countries, waste glass causes environmental concerns as quantities stockpiled exceed recycling in the packaging stream. Being amorphous and having relatively high silicium and calcium contents, glass is pozzolanic or even cementitious, when finely ground. Reducing particle sizes typically to less than 100 µm may give control over the alkali-silica reaction in concrete, therefore making this material a possible substitute to Portland cement. Such use may moderate the problem of dump...

  10. The influence of clay additives in Portland cement on the compressive strength of the cement stone

    A.R. Gaifullin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of mineral additives to binders, especially to Portland cement, is one of the promising trends for solving the resource and energy saving problems, as well as problems of environmental protection during production and application. Expanding the supplementary cementitious materials resource base can be achieved through the use of natural pozzolans and thermally activated polymineral clays(commonly known as glinites in Russia. One type of glinite is metakaolin, which is obtained by calcination of kaolin clays. Metakaolin is widely and effectively used as a pozzolanic additive due to its beneficial effect on the physical and mechanical properties of Portland cement-based materials. The obstacle to its wide production and use are the limited deposits of pure kaolin clays in many countries, including the Russian Federation. In this respect, the studies of pozzolanic activity of the most common mineral clays and their use in some countries have significantly advanced. Similar studies were widely performed in the 1940s in USSR. It seems reasonable to renew this trend to provide a scientific base for the production of local pozzolans made of clays commonly used in different regions. Comparative studies of the effect of 5 clays differing in mineral and chemical composition, calcination temperature and specific surface area, and high-quality metakaolin, on the strength of hardened Portland cement paste have been performed. It has been established that introducing 5…10 % of composite clays calcined at 400…8000 C° and milled to a specific surface area of 290…800 m2/kg into Portland cement enhanced the strength of the hardened cement paste considerably better than the introduction of metakaolin with a specific surface area of 1200 m2/kg. The findings of the study suggest that many kinds of commonly used polymineral clays have a specific calcination temperature and dispersity, which results in a higher pozzolanic activity compared with

  11. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  12. Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

  13. Oregon State TRIGA reactor power calibration study

    As a result of a recent review of the Oregon State TRIGA Reactor (OSTR) power calibration procedure, an investigation was performed on the origin and correctness of the OSTR tank factor and the calibration method. It was determined that there was no clear basis for the tank factor which was being used (0.0525 deg. C/kwh) and therefore a new value was calculated (0.0493 deg. C/kwh). The calculational method and likely errors are presented in the paper. In addition, a series of experimental tests were conducted to decide if the power calibration was best performed with or without a mixer, at 100 KW or at 1 MW. The results of these tests along with the final recommendation are presented. (author)

  14. Biological baseline data Youngs Bay, Oregon, 1974

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Higley, D.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1975-04-01

    This report presents biological baseline information gathered during the research project, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies on Youngs Bay.'' Youngs Bay is a shallow embayment located on the south shore of the Columbia River, near Astoria, Oregon. Research on Youngs Bay was motivated by the proposed construction by Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation of an aluminum reduction plant at Warrenton, Oregon. The research was designed to provide biological baseline information on Youngs Bay in anticipation of potential harmful effects from plant effluents. The information collected concerns the kinds of animals found in the Youngs Bay area, and their distribution and seasonal patterns of abundance. In addition, information was collected on the feeding habits of selected fish species, and on the life history and behavioral characteristics of the most abundant benthic amphipod, Corophium salmonis. Sampling was conducted at approximately three-week intervals, using commonly accepted methods of animal collection. Relatively few stations were sampled for fish, because of the need to standardize conditions of capture. Data on fish capture are reported in terms of catch-per-unit effort by a particular sampling gear at a specific station. Methods used in sampling invertebrates were generally more quantitative, and allowed sampling at a greater variety of places, as well as a valid basis for the computation of densities. Checklists of invertebrate species and fish species were developed from these samples, and are referred to throughout the report. The invertebrate checklist is more specific taxonomically than are tables reporting invertebrate densities. This is because the methods employed in identification were more precise than those used in counts. 9 refs., 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  15. Ettringite and C-S-H Portland cement phases for waste ion immobilization: A review

    The formation, structure and chemistry of the ettringite and C-S-H phases of Portland cement have been reviewed as they relate to waste ion immobilization. The purpose of this review was to investigate the use of Portland cement as a host for priority metallic pollutants as identified by the Environmental Protection Agency and as a host for radioactive waste ions as identified in 40 CFR 191. Ettringite acts as host to a number of these ions in both the columnar and channel sections of the crystal structure. Substitutions have been made at the calcium, aluminum, hydroxide and sulfate sites. C-S-H also hosts a number of the waste species in both ionic and salt form. Immobilization mechanisms for C-S-H include sorption, phase mixing and substitution. The following ions have not apparently been reported as specifically immobilized by one of these phases: Ag, Am, Np, Pu, Ra, Tc, Th and Sn; however, some of these ions are immobilized by Portland cement

  16. HYDRATING CHARACTERISTICS OF MODIFIED PORTLAND WITH Ba-BEARING SULPHOALUMINATE MINERALS

    Chenchen Gong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydrating characteristics of modified Portland cement with Ba-bearing sulphoaluminate minerals were studied in this paper. Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS, mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP and compressive strength were determined to characterize hydrating products and microstructure. Results show that basic physical properties of modified Portland cement with Ba-bearing sulphoaluminate minerals (SMPC are similar with PC except the shorter setting time. Ettringite and C-S-H are the main hydrating produces in SMPC, which is similar to Portland cement (PC. Because of volume expansion of ettringite, SMPC paste structure is denser than PC according to SEM-EDS analysis and the pore size and pore content of SMPC pastes was smaller especially for the harmful pores. Because sulfur aluminum barium calcium was a new early-strength mineral and parts of BaO went into the C₂S lattice and caused lattice distortion to enhance C₂S hydration activity, the compressive strengths of SMPC grew faster and higher than PC.

  17. Possibility of using waste tire rubber and fly ash with Portland cement as construction materials.

    Yilmaz, Arin; Degirmenci, Nurhayat

    2009-05-01

    The growing amount of waste rubber produced from used tires has resulted in an environmental problem. Recycling waste tires has been widely studied for the last 20 years in applications such as asphalt pavement, waterproofing systems and membrane liners. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash and rubber waste with Portland cement as a composite material for masonry applications. Class C fly ash and waste automobile tires in three different sizes were used with Portland cement. Compressive and flexural strength, dry unit weight and water absorption tests were performed on the composite specimens containing waste tire rubber. The compressive strength decreased by increasing the rubber content while increased by increasing the fly ash content for all curing periods. This trend is slightly influenced by particle size. For flexural strength, the specimens with waste tire rubber showed higher values than the control mix probably due to the effect of rubber fibers. The dry unit weight of all specimens decreased with increasing rubber content, which can be explained by the low specific gravity of rubber particles. Water absorption decreased slightly with the increase in rubber particles size. These composite materials containing 10% Portland cement, 70% and 60% fly ash and 20% and 30% tire rubber particles have sufficient strength for masonry applications. PMID:19110410

  18. Substitution of the clayey mineral component by lignite fly ash in portland cement clinker synthesis

    Jovanović Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash from four power plants in Serbia (PP "Morava" - Svilajnac, PP "Kolubara" - Veliki Grijani, PP "Kostolac" - units B1 and B2 - Kostolac and PP "Nikola Tesla" - units A and B - Obrenovac was utilized as the starting raw component for Portland cement clinker synthesis. Limestone and quartz sand from the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory were the other two starting raw components. Based on the chemical composition of the raw components and from the projected cement moduli, the amounts of raw components in the raw mixtures were calculated. Six different raw mixtures were prepared - each one consisted of limestone, sand and different fly ash. A raw mixture from the industrial production of the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory was used as the reference material. The prepared raw mixtures were sintered in a laboratory furnace at 1400°C. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of the synthesized clinkers were determined. The characteristics of clinkers, based on fly ash, were compared to the characteristics of the industrial Portland cement clinker from the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory. The results of the investigation showed that fly ash from power plants in Serbia can be suitable for Portland cement clinker synthesis.

  19. Rheological Properties of Very High-Strength Portland Cement Pastes: Influence of Very Effective Superplasticizers

    Riccardo Ricceri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the addition of very effective superplasticizers, that are commercially available, employed for maximising the solid loading of very high-strength Portland cement pastes, has been investigated. Cement pastes were prepared from deionized water and a commercially manufactured Portland cement (Ultracem 52.5 R. Cement and water were mixed with a vane stirrer according to ASTM Standard C305. The 0.38 to 0.44 water/cement ratio range was investigated. Three commercial superplasticizing agents produced by Ruredil S.p.a. were used. They are based on a melamine resin (Fluiment 33 M, on a modified lignosulphonate (Concretan 200 L, and on a modified polyacrylate (Ergomix 1000. Rheological tests were performed at 25°C by using the rate controlled coaxial cylinder viscometer Rotovisko-Haake 20, system M5-osc., measuring device MV2P with serrated surfaces. The tests were carried out under continuous flow conditions. The results of this study were compared with those obtained in a previous article for an ordinary Portland cement paste.

  20. Model Analysis of Initial Hydration and Structure Forming of Portland Cement

    2007-01-01

    The auto efficiently hydration heat arrangement and the non-contacting electrical resistivity device were used to test the thermology effect and the resistivity variation of Portland cement hydration.The structure forming model of Portland cement initial hydration was established through the systematical experiments with different cements, the amount of mixing water and the chemical admixture. The experimental results show that, the structure forming model of cement could be divided into three stages, i e, solution-solution equilibrium period, structure forming period and structure stabilizing period. Along with the increase of mixing water, the time of inflexion appeared is in advance for thermal process of cement hydration and worsened for the structure forming process. Comparison with the control specimen, adding Na2SO4 makes the minimum critical point lower, the flattening period shorter and the growing slope after stage one steeper. So the hydration and structure forming process of Portland cement could be described more exactly by applying the thermal model and the structure-forming model.

  1. Oregon Crest-to-Coast Environmental Monitoring Transect Dataset

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Environmental Protection Agency - Western Ecology Division (EPA) has been monitoring above- and belowground climate data from 23 locations along an Oregon...

  2. ESA Critical Habitat for the Oregon Coast Coho Salmon ESU

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These GIS data contain stream reaches that were designated as "critical habitat" for the Oregon Coast coho salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). The...

  3. Newport, Oregon 1/3 arc-second DEM

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Newport, Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  4. Channel centerline for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  5. Channel centerline for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 1967

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  6. Channel centerline for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  7. Florence, Oregon Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Florence, Oregon Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  8. Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seaside, Oregon Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  9. Seaside, Oregon 1/3 arc-second DEM

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Seaside Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  10. Oregon High Desert Interpretive Center : Economic feasibility and impact analysis

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a proposal to construct a High Desert Interpretive Center to inform visitors to Harney County, Oregon of the opportunities for education, recreation and...