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Sample records for 241-c-106 sluicing construction

  1. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C2

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits

  2. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C6

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

  3. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C7

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits

  4. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C2

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

  5. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C7

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

  6. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C6

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits

  7. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C5

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

  8. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C5

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the construction specifications for Project W-320 readily available. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits

  9. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C1

    Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits

  10. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Construction specification W-320-C1

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), specification is for procurement, fabrication and installation of equipment at the C Tank Farm, including Operator Station and some equipment just outside the C Tank Farm fence, necessary to support the sluicing operation. Work consists of furnishing labor, equipment, and materials to provide the means to procure materials and equipment, fabricate items, excavate and place concrete, and install equipment, piping, wiring, and structures in accordance with the Contract Documents. Major work elements include: Excavation for process and fire protection piping, electrical conduit trenches, and foundations for small structures; Placement of concrete cover blocks, foundations, and equipment pads; Procurement and installation of double walled piping, electrical conduit, fire and raw water piping, chilled water piping, and electrical cable; Procurement and installation of above-ground ventilation system piping between the (HVAC) Process building and Tank C-106; Core drill existing concrete; Furnish and installation of electrical distribution equipment; Installation of the concrete foundation, and assembly installation of the two Seismic Shutdown Systems with Environmental Enclosures; Fabrication and installation of in-pit pipe jumpers, including related valves, instruments and wiring; and Installation of a vertical submersible pump, horizontal booster pump, and winch assembly into tank access riser pits.

  11. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing, master calculation list

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the Master Calculation List readily retrievable. The list gives the status of the calculation (as-built, not used, applied, etc.), the calculation title, its originator, comments, and report number under which it was issued. Tank 241-C-106 has been included on the High Heat Load Watch List

  12. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing supporting documentation bibliography

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the listing of documentation used to develop, or in support of Project W-320, readily retrievable. All documents are sorted by document number and list the document type. Tank 241-C-106 has been included on the High Heat Load Watch List

  13. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process control plan

    Project W-320 has installed the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System at the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site to retrieve the sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it into double-shell tank 241-AY-102. Operation of the WRSS process will resolve the high-heat safety issue for tank 241-C-106 and demonstrate a technology for the retrieval of single-shell tank wastes. This process control plan coordinates the technical operating requirements (primarily mass transfer, temperature, and flammable gas) for the sluicing operation and provides overall technical guidance for the retrieval activity

  14. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process control plan

    Carothers, K.G.

    1998-07-25

    Project W-320 has installed the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System at the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site to retrieve the sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it into double-shell tank 241-AY-102. Operation of the WRSS process will resolve the high-heat safety issue for tank 241-C-106 and demonstrate a technology for the retrieval of single-shell tank wastes. This process control plan coordinates the technical operating requirements (primarily mass transfer, temperature, and flammable gas) for the sluicing operation and provides overall technical guidance for the retrieval activity.

  15. Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing. Revision 2

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-07-01

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the permanent disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes by utilizing safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost-effective disposal methods that meet applicable regulations. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established at the Hanford Site to manage and control activities specific to the remediation of safety watch list tanks, including high-heat-producing tanks, and for the ultimate characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal of the low- and high-level fractions of the tank waste. Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, provides the methodology, equipment, utilities, and facilities necessary for retrieving the high-heat waste from single-shell tank (SST) 24-C-106. Project W-320 is a fiscal year (FY) 1993 expense-funded major project, and has a design life of 2 years. Retrieval of the waste in tank 241-C-106 will be accomplished through mobilization of the sludge into a pumpable slurry using past-practice sluicing. The waste is then transferred directly to a double-shell tank for interim storage, subsequent pretreatment, and eventual disposal. A detailed description of the management organization and responsibilities of all participants is presented in this document.

  16. Project management plan for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 sluicing. Revision 2

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the permanent disposal of Hanford Site defense wastes by utilizing safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost-effective disposal methods that meet applicable regulations. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program was established at the Hanford Site to manage and control activities specific to the remediation of safety watch list tanks, including high-heat-producing tanks, and for the ultimate characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, and disposal of the low- and high-level fractions of the tank waste. Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, provides the methodology, equipment, utilities, and facilities necessary for retrieving the high-heat waste from single-shell tank (SST) 24-C-106. Project W-320 is a fiscal year (FY) 1993 expense-funded major project, and has a design life of 2 years. Retrieval of the waste in tank 241-C-106 will be accomplished through mobilization of the sludge into a pumpable slurry using past-practice sluicing. The waste is then transferred directly to a double-shell tank for interim storage, subsequent pretreatment, and eventual disposal. A detailed description of the management organization and responsibilities of all participants is presented in this document

  17. Tank 241-C-106 past-practice sluicing waste retrieval, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Environmental Assessment

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to eliminate safety concerns with storage of the high-heat waste in Tank 241-C-106 (Tank C-106), and demonstrate a tank waste retrieval technology. This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to analyze the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, past-practice sluicing of Tank C-106, an underground single-shell tank (SST). Past-practice sluicing is defined as the mode of waste retrieval used extensively in the past at the Hanford Site on the large underground waste tanks, and involves introducing a high-volume, low-pressure stream of liquid to mobilize sludge waste prior to pumping. It is proposed to retrieve the waste from Tank C-106 because this waste is classified not only as transuranic and high-level, but also as high-heat, which is caused by the radioactive decay of strontium. This waste characteristic has led DOE to place Tank C-106 on the safety ''Watchlist.''

  18. Tank 241-C-106 past-practice sluicing waste retrieval, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Environmental Assessment

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to eliminate safety concerns with storage of the high-heat waste in Tank 241-C-106 (Tank C-106), and demonstrate a tank waste retrieval technology. This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to analyze the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, past-practice sluicing of Tank C-106, an underground single-shell tank (SST). Past-practice sluicing is defined as the mode of waste retrieval used extensively in the past at the Hanford Site on the large underground waste tanks, and involves introducing a high-volume, low-pressure stream of liquid to mobilize sludge waste prior to pumping. It is proposed to retrieve the waste from Tank C-106 because this waste is classified not only as transuranic and high-level, but also as high-heat, which is caused by the radioactive decay of strontium. This waste characteristic has led DOE to place Tank C-106 on the safety ``Watchlist.``

  19. Safety evaluation for packaging transportation of equipment for tank 241-C-106 waste sluicing system

    Calmus, D.B.

    1994-08-25

    A Waste Sluicing System (WSS) is scheduled for installation in nd waste storage tank 241-C-106 (106-C). The WSS will transfer high rating sludge from single shell tank 106-C to double shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (102-AY). Prior to installation of the WSS, a heel pump and a transfer pump will be removed from tank 106-C and an agitator pump will be removed from tank 102-AY. Special flexible receivers will be used to contain the pumps during removal from the tanks. After equipment removal, the flexible receivers will be placed in separate containers (packagings). The packaging and contents (packages) will be transferred from the Tank Farms to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) for interim storage and then to T Plant for evaluation and processing for final disposition. Two sizes of packagings will be provided for transferring the equipment from the Tank Farms to the interim storage facility. The packagings will be designated as the WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings throughout the remainder of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP). The WSSP-1 packagings will transport the heel and transfer pumps from 106-C and the WSSP-2 packaging will transport the agitator pump from 102-AY. The WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings are similar except for the length.

  20. Safety evaluation for packaging transportation of equipment for tank 241-C-106 waste sluicing system

    A Waste Sluicing System (WSS) is scheduled for installation in nd waste storage tank 241-C-106 (106-C). The WSS will transfer high rating sludge from single shell tank 106-C to double shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (102-AY). Prior to installation of the WSS, a heel pump and a transfer pump will be removed from tank 106-C and an agitator pump will be removed from tank 102-AY. Special flexible receivers will be used to contain the pumps during removal from the tanks. After equipment removal, the flexible receivers will be placed in separate containers (packagings). The packaging and contents (packages) will be transferred from the Tank Farms to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) for interim storage and then to T Plant for evaluation and processing for final disposition. Two sizes of packagings will be provided for transferring the equipment from the Tank Farms to the interim storage facility. The packagings will be designated as the WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings throughout the remainder of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP). The WSSP-1 packagings will transport the heel and transfer pumps from 106-C and the WSSP-2 packaging will transport the agitator pump from 102-AY. The WSSP-1 and WSSP-2 packagings are similar except for the length

  1. Origins of volatile organic compounds emerging from tank 241-C-106 during sluicing

    STAUFFER, L.A.

    1999-06-02

    Unexpectedly high concentrations of inorganic gases and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were released from the ventilation stack of tank 241-C-106 during sluicing operations on November 18, 1998. Workers experienced serious discomfort. They reported an obnoxious acrid odor and the 450 ppm VOC in ventilation stack 296-C-006 exceeded the level approved in the air discharge permit. Consequently, the operation was terminated. Subsequent analyses of samples collected opportunistically from the stack indicated many organic compounds including heptenes, heptanones, and normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPH) and their remnants were present. Subsequently, a process test designed to avoid unnecessary worker exposure and enable collection of analytical samples from the stack, the breathing area, and the receiver tank was conducted on December 16, 1998. The samples obtained during that operation, in which the maximum VOC content of the stack was approximately 35 ppm, have been analyzed by teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Special Analytic Services (SAS). This report examines the results of these investigations. Future revisions of the report will examine the analytical results obtained for samples collected during sluicing operations in March. This report contains the available evidence about the source term for these emissions. Chapter 2 covers characterization work, including historical information about the layers of waste in the tank, the location of organic compounds in these layers, the total organic carbon (TOC) content and the speciation of organic compounds. Chapter 3 covers the data for the samples from the ventilation stack, which has the highest concentrations of organic compounds. Chapter 4 contains an interpretation of the information connecting the composition of the organic emissions with the composition of the original source term. Chapter 5 summarizes the characterization work, the sample data, and the interpretation of the results.

  2. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing piping calculations, Volume 7

    The object of this report is to calculate the hydraulic forces imposed at the sluicer nozzle. This is required by Project W-320 waste retrieval for tank 241-C-106. The method of analysis used is Bernoulli's momentum equation for stead flow

  3. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing piping calculations, Volume 7

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-29

    The object of this report is to calculate the hydraulic forces imposed at the sluicer nozzle. This is required by Project W-320 waste retrieval for tank 241-C-106. The method of analysis used is Bernoulli`s momentum equation for stead flow.

  4. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 1

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following calculations: Exhaust airflow sizing for Tank 241-C-106; Equipment sizing and selection recirculation fan; Sizing high efficiency mist eliminator; Sizing electric heating coil; Equipment sizing and selection of recirculation condenser; Chiller skid system sizing and selection; High efficiency metal filter shielding input and flushing frequency; and Exhaust skid stack sizing and fan sizing.

  5. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 1

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following calculations: Exhaust airflow sizing for Tank 241-C-106; Equipment sizing and selection recirculation fan; Sizing high efficiency mist eliminator; Sizing electric heating coil; Equipment sizing and selection of recirculation condenser; Chiller skid system sizing and selection; High efficiency metal filter shielding input and flushing frequency; and Exhaust skid stack sizing and fan sizing

  6. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  7. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III, sampled March 28, 1999

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999

  8. Interim safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, project W-320

    The purpose of this supporting document is to provide safety classifications for systems, structures, and components of the Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) and to document the methodology used to develop these safety classifications. The WRSS requires two transfer lines, one to carry sluiced waste slurry to tank 241-AY-102 and the other to return supernatant to tank 241-C-106; pumps in each tank; sluicers to direct the supernatant stream inside tank 241-C-106; a slurry distributor in tank 241-AY-102; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning for tank 241-C-106; and instrumentation and control devices

  9. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing

  10. Preliminary safety evaluation for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, project W-320

    Conner, J.C.

    1994-10-18

    This document presents the Preliminary Safety Evaluation for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS). The US DOE has been mandated to develop plans for response to safety issues associated with the waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, and to report the progress of implementing those plans to Congress. The objectives of Project W-230 are to design, fabricate, develop, test, and operate a new retrieval system capable of removing a minimum of about 75% of the high-heat waste contained in C-106. It is anticipated that sluicing operations can remove enough waste to reduce the remaining radiogenic heat load to levels low enough to resolve the high-heat safety issue as well as allow closure of the tank safety issue.

  11. Preliminary safety evaluation for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, project W-320

    This document presents the Preliminary Safety Evaluation for Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS). The US DOE has been mandated to develop plans for response to safety issues associated with the waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, and to report the progress of implementing those plans to Congress. The objectives of Project W-230 are to design, fabricate, develop, test, and operate a new retrieval system capable of removing a minimum of about 75% of the high-heat waste contained in C-106. It is anticipated that sluicing operations can remove enough waste to reduce the remaining radiogenic heat load to levels low enough to resolve the high-heat safety issue as well as allow closure of the tank safety issue

  12. Radiological and toxicological analyses of tank 241-AY-102 and tank 241-C-106 ventilation systems

    Himes, D.A.

    1998-08-11

    The high heat content solids contained in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W320. While sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from unagitated to agitated. This means that the partition fraction which describes the aerosol content of the head space will increase from IE-10 to IE-8 (see WHC-SD-WM-CN062, Rev. 2 for discussion of partition fractions). The head spare will become much more loaded with suspended material. Furthermore, the nature of this suspended material can change significantly: sluicing could bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is assumed that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split. It is further assumed that the sluicing line, the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters on Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split. The bases of these assumptions are discussed in Section 3.0. These waste compositions (referred to as mitigated compositions) were used in Attachments 1 through 4 to calculate survey meter exposure rates per liter of inventory in the various system components. Three accident scenarios are evaluated: a high temperature event which melts or burns the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; an overpressure event which crushes and blows out the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; and an unfiltered release of tank headspace air. The initiating event for the high temperature release is a fire caused by a heater malfunction inside the exhaust dust or a fire outside the duct. The initiating event for the overpressure event could be a steam bump which over pressurizes the tank and leads to a blowout of the HEPA filters in the ventilation system. The catastrophic destruction of the HEPA filters would release a fraction of the accumulated

  13. Radiological and toxicological analyses of tank 241-AY-102 and tank 241-C-106 ventilation systems

    The high heat content solids contained in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W320. While sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from unagitated to agitated. This means that the partition fraction which describes the aerosol content of the head space will increase from IE-10 to IE-8 (see WHC-SD-WM-CN062, Rev. 2 for discussion of partition fractions). The head spare will become much more loaded with suspended material. Furthermore, the nature of this suspended material can change significantly: sluicing could bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is assumed that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split. It is further assumed that the sluicing line, the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters on Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split. The bases of these assumptions are discussed in Section 3.0. These waste compositions (referred to as mitigated compositions) were used in Attachments 1 through 4 to calculate survey meter exposure rates per liter of inventory in the various system components. Three accident scenarios are evaluated: a high temperature event which melts or burns the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; an overpressure event which crushes and blows out the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; and an unfiltered release of tank headspace air. The initiating event for the high temperature release is a fire caused by a heater malfunction inside the exhaust dust or a fire outside the duct. The initiating event for the overpressure event could be a steam bump which over pressurizes the tank and leads to a blowout of the HEPA filters in the ventilation system. The catastrophic destruction of the HEPA filters would release a fraction of the accumulated

  14. Structural analysis of Hanford's single-shell 241-C-106 tank a first step toward waste-tank remediation

    The buried single-shell waste tank 241-C-106, located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, has been a repository for various liquid radioactive waste materials since its construction in 1943. A first step toward waste tank remediation is demonstrating that remediation activities can be performed safely. Determination of the current structural capacity of this high-heat tank is an important element in this assessment. A structural finite-element model of tank 241-C-106 has been developed to assess the tank's structural integrity with respect to in situ conditions and additional remediation surface loads. To predict structural integrity realistically, the model appropriately addresses two complex issues: (1) surrounding soil-tank interaction associated with thermal expansion cycling and surcharge load distribution and (2) concrete-property degradation and creep resulting from exposure to high temperatures generated by the waste. This paper describes the development of the 241-C-106 structural model, analysis methodology, and tank-specific structural acceptance criteria

  15. Engineering Task Plan for Tank 241-C-106 contingency chiller definitive design

    This document identifies the scope, cost, schedule and responsible organizations for completing a design of a contingency ventilation inlet air cooling system for Tank 241-C-106. The air cooling system, described in Rensink (1995), consists of a chiller, cooling coils, and supporting equipment that, when installed will be capable of assuring that the waste temperatures in Tank 241-C-106 are maintained within acceptable limits for safe storage. The effort described herein is scheduled for completion by May 31, 1995 to support Performance Based Incentive (PBI) Milestone SI-2x

  16. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 4

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-24

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the structural analysis of the Pipe Supports designed for Slurry and Supernate transfer pipe lines in order to meet the requirements of applicable ASME codes. The pipe support design loads are obtained from the piping stress calculations W320-27-I-4 and W320-27-I-5. These loads are the total summation of the gravity, pressure, thermal and seismic loads. Since standard typical designs are used for each type of pipe support such as Y-Stop, Guide and Anchors, each type of support is evaluated for the maximum loads to which this type of supports are subjected. These loads are obtained from the AutoPipe analysis and used to check the structural adequacy of these supports.

  17. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 8

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the hydraulic analysis on the slurry line and the supernate line for W-320. This calculation will use the As-Built conditions of the slurry line and the supernate line. Booster Pump Curves vs System Curves shall be generated for the supernate system and the slurry system

  18. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing electrical calculations, Volume 2

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. These calculations are required: To determine the power requirements needed to power electrical heat tracing segments contained within three manufactured insulated tubing assemblies; To verify thermal adequacy of tubing assembly selection by others; To size the heat tracing feeder and branch circuit conductors and conduits; To size protective circuit breaker and fuses; and To accomplish thermal design for two electrical heat tracing segments: One at C-106 tank riser 7 (CCTV) and one at the exhaust hatchway (condensate drain). Contents include: C-Farm electrical heat tracing; Cable ampacity, lighting, conduit fill and voltage drop; and Control circuit sizing and voltage drop analysis for the seismic shutdown system

  19. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing: Piping calculations. Volume 4

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320 readily retrievable. The objective of this calculation is to perform the structural analysis of the Pipe Supports designed for Slurry and Supernate transfer pipe lines in order to meet the requirements of applicable ASME codes. The pipe support design loads are obtained from the piping stress calculations W320-27-I-4 and W320-27-I-5. These loads are the total summation of the gravity, pressure, thermal and seismic loads. Since standard typical designs are used for each type of pipe support such as Y-Stop, Guide and Anchors, each type of support is evaluated for the maximum loads to which this type of supports are subjected. These loads are obtained from the AutoPipe analysis and used to check the structural adequacy of these supports

  20. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing electrical calculations, Volume 2

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. These calculations are required: To determine the power requirements needed to power electrical heat tracing segments contained within three manufactured insulated tubing assemblies; To verify thermal adequacy of tubing assembly selection by others; To size the heat tracing feeder and branch circuit conductors and conduits; To size protective circuit breaker and fuses; and To accomplish thermal design for two electrical heat tracing segments: One at C-106 tank riser 7 (CCTV) and one at the exhaust hatchway (condensate drain). Contents include: C-Farm electrical heat tracing; Cable ampacity, lighting, conduit fill and voltage drop; and Control circuit sizing and voltage drop analysis for the seismic shutdown system.

  1. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 4

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following design calculations: Cooling load in pump pit 241-AY-102; Pressure relief seal loop design; Process building piping stress analysis; Exhaust skid maximum allowable leakage criteria; and Recirculation heat, N509 duct requirements

  2. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing HVAC calculations, Volume 4

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-30

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the FDNW calculations for Project W-320, readily retrievable. The report contains the following design calculations: Cooling load in pump pit 241-AY-102; Pressure relief seal loop design; Process building piping stress analysis; Exhaust skid maximum allowable leakage criteria; and Recirculation heat, N509 duct requirements.

  3. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations

  4. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-06-03

    CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

  5. Tank 241-C-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  6. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL

  7. Calculation note: project W-320 primary ventilation air flow requirements for mitigation of steady state flammable gas concentrations in the headspaces of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102

    This calculation note analyzes headspace concentrations of hydrogen dependent upon assumed ventilation flow rates provided for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The analyses are based on measured or estimated steady state hydrogen release rates. Tank 241-C-106 is analyzed prior to sluicing; tank 241-AY-102 is analyzed both prior to and after completion of sluicing. Specific analyses, using both best estimated and bounding hydrogen generation rates, include the minimum primary ventilation flow rates required in the tanks to ensure that the steady state hydrogen concentration in the respective tank headspace does not exceed 25% and 100% of the LFL. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of time as well as the time required to reach 25% and 100% of LFL upon complete loss of active ventilation, starting from the steady state hydrogen concentration based on a 200 CFM minimum flow rate in tank 241-C-106 and a 100 CFM minimum flow rate in tank241-AY-102. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of thee following partial loss of active ventilation (i.e., step changes to l60, l20, 80, and 40 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-C-106, staffing from a 200 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 200 CFM flow rate. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of the following partial loss of active ventilation i.e., step changes to 80, 60, 40, and 20 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-AY-102, starting from a 100 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 100 CFM flow rate

  8. An assessment of the potential for a steam bump in Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-106

    This document is a preliminary assessment of the potential for a ''steam bump'' in Tank 241-C-106. The assessment is based on currently available data from significant transients which occurred in Tank C-106. Recommendations are made for additional data needs to clarify the current behavior of this tank. General criteria are provided for making decisions on removing or returning to work restrictions on Tank Farm operations. Also provided are additional actions which should be taken on C-106 to manage tank heat removal

  9. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-106

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1996-09-25

    This tank characterization report summarizes information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in single-shell underground tank 241-C-106. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-C-106 is the only tank on the High-Heat Load Watch List. As a result of the analyses addressed by this report, the supernate and upper 60 percent of the sludge in the tank do not pose any safety concerns in addition to the high-heat load issue based on the decision limits of the safety screening data quality objective (DQO) (Dukelow et al. 1995). The lower 40 percent of the sludge was not sampled; therefore, no statements regarding the safety of this waste can be made. A portion of the tank sludge is scheduled to be retrieved in fiscal year 1997 in order to mitigate the high-heat load in the tank.

  10. Type B Investigation Report for 241-SY-101 Pump Start and 241-C-106 Pit Cleanout

    Ewalt, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    In accordance with the direction of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manager, Richland Operations Office, a Type ``B`` investigation in accordance with the DOE Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements, has been conducted. The scope of the investigation included two events: The ``Inadvertent Mixer Pump Operation at 241-SY-101`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-069); ``Inadequate Work Control Results in Personnel Skin Contamination at 241-C-106, Pit B`` (RL-WHC-TANK FARM-1993-071) events. Additionally, at the request of the President of the WHC, a broader investigation into Waste Tank Farm ``safety practices`` and ``Conduct of Operations`` was also conducted. The review was focused on (1) WHC organizations performing operations, maintenance, and radiological safety tasks; and (2) KEH organizations performing major maintenance tasks.

  11. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2007-05-23

    This report was revised in May 2007 to correct values in Section 3.4.1.7, second paragraph, last sentence; 90Sr values in Tables 3.22 and 3.32; and 99Tc values Table 4.3 and in Chapter 5. In addition, the tables in Appendix F were updated to reflect corrections to the 90Sr values. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in May 2005. CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contam¬inants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

  12. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data

    This report was revised in May 2007 to correct values in Section 3.4.1.7, second paragraph, last sentence; 90Sr values in Tables 3.22 and 3.32; and 99Tc values Table 4.3 and in Chapter 5. In addition, the tables in Appendix F were updated to reflect corrections to the 90Sr values. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in May 2005. CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

  13. Action plan for response to excessive temperature in high heat source waste tank 241-C-106 at the Hanford site. Revision 1

    This action plan identifies the responses that shall be implemented if anomalies in temperature measurements, or conditions that could lead to temperature anomalies (such as a leaking tank), are observed in tank 241-C-106 of the Hanford site C Tank Farm. This plan also summarizes (1) the criteria and specification limits required for ensuring that tank 241-C-106 is maintained in a safe condition; (2) the responsible organizations for tank 241-C-106; and (3) response actions to prevent or mitigate safety concerns. The main safety concern unique to tank 241-C-106 is the temperature rise due to heat generation by the waste content

  14. Uncertainties in the measured quantities of water leaving waste Tank 241-C-106 via the ventilation system

    The purpose of this analysis is to estimate the uncertainty in the measured quantity of water which typically leaves Tank 241-C-106 via the ventilation system each month. Such measurements are essential for heat removal estimation and tank liquid level verification purposes. The uncertainty associated with the current, infrequent, manual method of measurement (involves various psychrometric and pressure measurements) is suspected to be unreasonably high. Thus, the possible reduction of this uncertainty using a continuous, automated method of measurement will also be estimated. There are three major conclusions as a result of this analysis: (1) the uncertainties associated with the current (infrequent, manual) method of measuring the water which typically leaves Tank 241-C-106 per month via the ventilation system are indeed quite high (80% to 120%); (2) given the current psychrometric and pressure measurement methods and any tank which loses considerable moisture through active ventilation, such as Tank 241-C-106, significant quantities of liquid can actually leak from the tank before a leak can be positively identified via liquid level measurement; (3) using improved (continuous, automated) methods of taking the psychrometric and pressure measurements, the uncertainty in the measured quantity of water leaving Tank 241-C-106 via the ventilation system can be reduced by approximately an order of magnitude

  15. Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Impact of Cement Reactions on Release of Contaminants from Residual Waste

    Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-09-01

    The CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. Initial work to produce release models was conducted on residual tank sludge using pure water as the leaching agent. The results were reported in an earlier report. The decision has now been made to close the tanks after waste retrieval with a cementitious grout to minimize infiltration and maintain the physical integrity of the tanks. This report describes testing of the residual waste with a leaching solution that simulates the composition of water passing through the grout and contacting the residual waste at the bottom of the tank.

  16. Tank 241C106 structural evaluation in support of Project W320 retrieval

    Tank 241C106 structural evaluation to support W320. It includes ACI code input and riser evaluations. This work uses the in situ conditions established by Julyk to develop a three-dimensional model of the tank. Non-axisymmetric loads associated with retrieval activities are applied to assess their influence on structural integrity of the tank. This study addresses loads associated with normal opertion and credible accident scenarios. The concrete structure of tank C106 is classified as a Safety Class I non-reactor structure in accordance with the definition given in SDC 4.1. The operating specifications document (OSD) limits applicable to tank C106 include a live load limit for the C Tank Farm of 100 tons. For the technical basis of this limit, the OSD references SD-RE-TI-012, which qualifies the 100 tons as that distributed over a 10-ft radius. However, there is no specification for a uniform live load that would accompany natural hazard phenomena such as snow or ash fall. There is no specific guidance on crane loads applied at the surface outside the tank radius. Further, there is no record of any seismic analysis of tanks in the C Tank Farm. The analysis documented in this report evaluates nonseismic conditions that include a concentrated live load, a uniform live load, and a crane load, in addition to the in situ loads. The model documented in this study also is used to provide the nonseismic stress contribution to the seismic load combination documented by Wallace

  17. Seismic evaluation of Tank 241C106 in support of retrieval activities

    Tank 241C106 (C106) is a domed, single-shell high-level waste storage tank that has been in service in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site since 1947. Tank C106 is one of twelve tanks in a 4 x 3 array with a 100-ft center-to-center spacing. Each of the tanks is approximately 75 ft in diameter, 24-ft high at the haunch, and 33-ft high at the dome apex. The level of waste in C106 and the associated thermal environment have varied throughout the life of the tanks with the peak temperature in the concrete reaching approximately 300 F at the base of the tank in the mid-1970's (Bander 1992). The calculated peak temperature in the concrete has decreased since that time to approximately 200 F. The peak temperature occurs at the inside bottom of the tank; concrete temperatures in the wall and dome are less than 130 F. The waste inside the tank is primarily solid matter approximately 7- to 8-ft deep. The tank is completely buried in dry, sandy soil to a depth of approximately 6 ft at the dome apex. The in situ evaluation of C106 documented in July 1994 includes only the effects of gravity and thermal loads. A preliminary seismic evaluation of C106 considering only horizontal excitation demonstrated the finite-element program SASSI (A System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction) and provided an estimate of seismic effects including soil-to-structure interaction. This final seismic evaluation expands on the preliminary seismic evaluation to include further verification and refinement of analysis parameters, quantification to tank-to-tank and waste-to-tank interaction, and examination of the effects of vertical seismic excitation. The concrete structure of tank C106 is classified as a Safety Class 1 non-reactor structure

  18. Safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, Project W-320: Revision 1

    Conner, J.C.

    1994-11-15

    The goals of the C-106 sluicing operation are: (1) to stabilize the tank by reducing the heat load in the tank to less than 42 MJ/hr (40,000 Btu/hour), and (2) to initiate demonstration of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval technology. The purpose of this supporting document (SD) is as follows: (1) to provide safety classifications for items (systems, structures, equipment, components, or parts) for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), and (2) to document and methodology used to develop safety classifications. Appropriate references are made with regard to use of existing systems, structures, equipments, components, and parts for C-106 single-shell transfer tank located in the C Tank Farm, and 241-AY-102 (AY-102) double shell receiver tanks (DST) located in the Aging Waste Facility (AWF). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System consists of two transfer lines that would connect the two tanks, one to carry the sluiced waste slurry to AY-102, and the other to return the supernatant liquid to C-106. The supernatant, or alternate fluid, will be used to mobilize waste in C-106 for the sluicing process. The equipment necessary for the WRSS include pumps in each tank, sluicers to direct the supernatant stream in C-106, a slurry distributor in AY-102, HVAC for C-106, instrumentation and control devices, and other existing components as required.

  19. Safety equipment list for 241-C-106 waste retrieval, Project W-320: Revision 1

    The goals of the C-106 sluicing operation are: (1) to stabilize the tank by reducing the heat load in the tank to less than 42 MJ/hr (40,000 Btu/hour), and (2) to initiate demonstration of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval technology. The purpose of this supporting document (SD) is as follows: (1) to provide safety classifications for items (systems, structures, equipment, components, or parts) for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), and (2) to document and methodology used to develop safety classifications. Appropriate references are made with regard to use of existing systems, structures, equipments, components, and parts for C-106 single-shell transfer tank located in the C Tank Farm, and 241-AY-102 (AY-102) double shell receiver tanks (DST) located in the Aging Waste Facility (AWF). The Waste Retrieval Sluicing System consists of two transfer lines that would connect the two tanks, one to carry the sluiced waste slurry to AY-102, and the other to return the supernatant liquid to C-106. The supernatant, or alternate fluid, will be used to mobilize waste in C-106 for the sluicing process. The equipment necessary for the WRSS include pumps in each tank, sluicers to direct the supernatant stream in C-106, a slurry distributor in AY-102, HVAC for C-106, instrumentation and control devices, and other existing components as required

  20. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-106: Results from samples collected on February 15, 1994

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-C-106. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text

  1. Structural analysis of the equipment removal system for tanks 241C106 and 241AY102

    The calculations documented in this report show that the ERS major components are structurally qualified to complete the objective: install the removed equipment into a shipping container, transport and store the container at the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The analysis for the structural members of the ERS components considers live load with an impact factor of 125% and dead load. An allowable stress of 1/3 yield is used for all structural components carrying the load based on DOE-RL-92-36. Adherence to DOE-RL-92-36 is not a code requirement. However, due to the loads considered, this factor of safety is appropriate. The calculations meet the strength requirements of the American Institute for Steel Construction (AISC 1989) for all non-critical structural elements

  2. Monitoring gas retention and slurry transport during the transfer of waste from Tank 241-C-106 to Tank 241-AY-102

    The retained gas volume can be estimated by several methods. All of these methods have significant uncertainties, but together they form a preponderance of evidence that describes the gas retention behavior of the tank. The methods are (1) an increase in nonconvective layer thickness; (2) a waste surface level rise (surface level effect [SLE] model); (3) the barometric pressure effect (BPE model); (4) direct void measurement; and (5) the consequences of the transfer process. The nonconvective layer thickness can be determined with sufficient accuracy to describe the overall waste configuration by means of temperature profiles or densitometer indications. However, the presence of a nonconvective layer does not necessarily indicate significant gas retention, and small changes in layer thickness that could quantify gas retention cannot be detected reliably with the methods available. The primary value of this measurement is in establishing the actual open-quotes fluffing factorclose quotes for thermal calculations. Surface level rise is not a useful measure of gas retention in Tank 241-C-106 (C-106) since the waste level fluctuates with regular makeup water additions. In Tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) with the existing ventilation system it should be possible to determine the gas retention rate within 30-60% uncertainty from the surface level rise, should a significant rise be observed. The planned ventilation system upgrades in AY- 102 will greatly reduce the exhaust flow and the headspace humidity, and the evaporation rate should be significantly lower when transfers begin. This could reduce the uncertainty in gas retention rate estimates to around ± 10%

  3. Chemical and chemically-related considerations associated with sluicing tank C-106 waste to tank AY-102

    New data on tank 241-C-106 were obtained from grab sampling and from compatibility testing of tank C-106 and tank AY-102 wastes. All chemistry-associated and other compatibility Information compiled in this report strongly suggests that the sluicing of the contents of tank C-106, in accord with appropriate controls, will pose no unacceptable risk to workers, public safety, or the environment. In addition, it is expected that the sluicing operation will successfully resolve the High-Heat Safety Issue for tank C-106

  4. Aerosol characteristics in the offgas from a pilot-scale sluicing operation

    A pilot-scale study was performed to simulate conditions anticipated during sluicing operations to retrieve waste in single-shell Tank 241-C-106 at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The objective of the study was to identify and characterize the potential aerosol source term at the inlet of the headspace exhaust ventilation system during sluicing operations. The information is needed to support decisions for components to be used in the full-scale operation. A secondary objective was to qualitatively evaluate the visibility during sluicing. Three simulated sluicing tests were performed in the 336 Building's quarter-scale waste tank facility located at Hanford. Scaling relationships were used to guide modifications to the quarter-scale tank to accommodate tests that simulated tank geometry, sluicing, and ventilation conditions in the full-scale tank. Simulated sluicing fluids were targeted on solid and liquid surfaces during the tests. Test conditions were monitored, and aerosol measurements were made in the offgas ventilation duct. Also during the tests, an in-tank camera was used to monitor visibility

  5. Infrastructure and adaptive management in an eco-hydrological Delta: Lessons learned from design and construction of the Haringvliet Sluices

    Linsen, Max; Mostert, Erik; van der Zaag, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    Consequences of climate change include an increase in extreme weather events in North-West Europe. The Netherlands is directly affected by these extreme events, in particular in water management practices. Large investments in infrastructure were made ever since the floods of 1953, leading to a higher level of protection against flooding from the sea and to a managed eco-hydrological Delta. Adaptive water management is presented as an approach to deal with challenges in water allocation and flood protection. One challenge to adaptive water management relates to infrastructure. Large works are often inevitable and essential in flood protection. Hydraulic infrastructure however tends to be inflexible by nature and requires a level of robustness to deliver the desired performance over time. In this study, we focus on the relation between desired performance of infrastructure and adaptation to environmental change and evolving social demands. The objective of this study is to gain an understanding of the evolution of the desired performance of water management infrastructure. This serves two purposes: an increased understanding of design and construction of existing infrastructure, and potential lessons learned for future hydraulic infrastructure in the context of adaptive management. A qualitative approach was used to evaluate over 130 reports on all stages of the design, planning and construction of the Haringvliet sluices as part of the realization of the Delta Works. The time frame is set between 1950 and 1970. The main source of information is a set of quarterly reports to the Dutch parliament, published between 1956 and 1988, and which provided detailed information on design, construction, maintenance, system behavior, policy needs, social demands and stakeholders. The original objectives of the infrastructure were reflected in its design: protection against flooding, protection against salt intrusion and discharge of water and ice - all with a desired ease of

  6. 团结水闸除险加固工程施工导流设计%Design of construction diversion for the reinforcement engineering of Tuanjie Sluice

    史广跃; 鄢涛

    2014-01-01

    根据团结水闸属Ⅱ等大(2)型水闸工程,结合闸址水文气象、地形地质条件和工程布置特点,本文介绍了水闸施工导流设计方案,并分析采用分期导流方式的原因及其优点,为类似水闸的导流设计提供参考。%Based on the meterological and hydrological and geological condeitions and the engineering layout of Tuanjie Sluice, which is the 2th grade sluice, the construction diversion design scheme of the sluice is introduced. The cause and its merits of adopting stage diversion are analyzed. It can be referred for the similar projects.

  7. Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report

    This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115

  8. Process Test Evaluation Report Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection (Phase 1, 2 and 3)

    During sluicing of the first batch of sludge from tank 241-C-106 on November 18, 1998, an unexpected high concentration of volatile organic compounds was measured in the 296-C-006 ventilation stack. Eleven workers reported irritation related symptoms and were sent to Hanford Environmental Health Foundation (HEHF) and Kadlec Hospital for medical evaluations. No residual health effects were reported. As a result of the unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds encountered during this November sluicing event, a phased process test designed to characterize the emission constituents was conducted on December 16, 1998, March 7, 1999, and March 28, 1999. The primary focus of this evaluation was to obtain samples of the 296-C-006 ventilation stack effluent and surrounding areas at elevated levels of volatile organic compounds initiated by sluicing. Characterization of the emission constituents was necessary to establish appropriate procedural and administrative exposure controls for continued sluicing. Additionally, this information would be used to evaluate the need for engineered equipment to mitigate any further potential chemical stack emissions. This evaluation confirms that the following actions taken during Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III of the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection Process Test were conservative and appropriate for continued sluicing: Implement stack limit of 500 ppm volatile organic compounds, with lower administrative limits; Ensure worker involvement through enhanced planning; Continue using the existing fenced boundary location; Continue using pressure demand fresh air respiratory protection inside the C-Farm as recommended by Industrial Hygiene; Continue using the existing respiratory protection/ take cover requirements outside the C-Farm boundary as recommended by Industrial Hygiene; Continue using existing anti-contamination clothing; Minimize the number of workers exposed to emissions; Maintain the

  9. Structural analysis of 241C106 contingency chiller design

    As part of the Tank 24lCl06 leak contingency plan, a chiller coil is to be installed on the existing HEPA-filtered air inlet unit. A natural phenomenon-hazard analysis per SDC 4.1, Standard Architectural-Civil Design Criteria, Design Loads for Facilities, Revision 12, was performed on several components of the design using both hand calculations and COSMOS/M computer models. The design meets SOC 4.1 requirements for safety class 3 equipment

  10. PILOT SCALE STUDIES OF CLOSED-LOOP ASH SLUICING

    The paper discusses pilot scale studies of closed-loop fly ash sluicing. Chemicals leached from fly ash in wet sluicing systems can cause scaling of equipment if the sluice water is recycled. A 50 gpm (190,000 cu cm/min) pilot unit was tested at two power plants to evaluate close...

  11. Project W-320, 241-C-106 waste retrieval spare parts list

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-03-23

    Spare parts for equipment installed in the tank dome space or pump or valve pits should not be inventoried onsite due to the extensive, time-consuming work package planning, personnel/equipment mobilization, and funding requirements that are prerequisites to any repair or replacement. These issues provide adequate time to procure parts from offsite sources. All parts listed in this inventory can either be stocked in the DynCorp Tri-Cities Services, Inc., 2101-M Warehouse, or are available from the vendor/manufacturer.

  12. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) privatization contractor samples waste envelope D material 241-C-106

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-04-14

    This report represents the Final Analytical Report on Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Contractor Samples for Waste Envelope D. All work was conducted in accordance with ''Addendum 1 of the Letter of Instruction (LOI) for TWRS Privatization Contractor Samples Addressing Waste Envelope D Materials - Revision 0, Revision 1, and Revision 2.'' (Jones 1996, Wiemers 1996a, Wiemers 1996b) Tank 241-C-1 06 (C-106) was selected by TWRS Privatization for the Part 1A Envelope D high-level waste demonstration. Twenty bottles of Tank C-106 material were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company using a grab sampling technique and transferred to the 325 building for processing by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). At the 325 building, the contents of the twenty bottles were combined into a single Initial Composite Material. This composite was subsampled for the laboratory-scale screening test and characterization testing, and the remainder was transferred to the 324 building for bench-scale preparation of the Privatization Contractor samples.

  13. Project W-320, 241-C-106 waste retrieval spare parts list

    Spare parts for equipment installed in the tank dome space or pump or valve pits should not be inventoried onsite due to the extensive, time-consuming work package planning, personnel/equipment mobilization, and funding requirements that are prerequisites to any repair or replacement. These issues provide adequate time to procure parts from offsite sources. All parts listed in this inventory can either be stocked in the DynCorp Tri-Cities Services, Inc., 2101-M Warehouse, or are available from the vendor/manufacturer

  14. Tank 241-C-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1994

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  15. Model tests on influence of combined construction of sluices and pump stations on estuarine navigation%闸站合建枢纽对河口通航影响的模型试验

    王法猛; 傅宗甫; 吕家才; 刘明明

    2012-01-01

    为了改善河口平面闸站合建枢纽水闸出流时容易在闸下河道内出现主流集中、偏流、回流,外河航道内横向流速大等问题,提出了在消力池下游海漫段设置八字形低坎的整流措施.基于平面闸站合建枢纽水力学模型试验,对有、无整流措施两种条件下闸下河道的水流流态、流速分布、特征断面流速不均匀系数以及航道内的最大横向流速进行了测试分析与比较.试验结果表明:闸下海漫段设置八字形整流低坎可以使外河入口断面流速不均匀系数从无整流措施的4.5 ~4.9降低到0.3 ~1.4,且使外河航道内的横向流速大大降低,模型试验实测的最大横向流速范围在0.30~0.50 m/s之间.外河入口断面流速不均匀系数和外河航道内横向流速的显著降低有助于河口闸站合建枢纽的通航安全,是一种简单而有效的工程措施.%In order to improve the discharge flows of a combined sluice-pump station project at estuary, that is, concentration, drift and reflux of the mainstream and increase of transverse velocity in outer river channel, a trapezoid type low ridge in the downstream apron of the stilling basin is proposed. Based on hydraulic model tests on the combined sluice-pump station project, the flow regime, velocity distribution, non-uniform coefficient of characteristic velocity and the maximum transverse velocity in the outer channel through the sluice gate with or without regulation measures are observed and compared. The test results show that the trapezoid type low ridge in the apron will make the non-uniform coefficient of the velocity at the entrance to the outer channel of 4. 5-4. 9 become 0. 3 - 1. 4, and the transverse velocity in the river greatly decreases. The observed range of the maximum transverse velocity is between 0. 3 m/s and 0. 5 m/s. The significant decrease of the non-uniform coefficient and the maximum transverse velocity may improve the effect of the

  16. Recurrence of Yuan Dynasty sluice from Zhidanyuan relics and paleostream evolution

    ZHANG Yulan; SONG jian; ZHAO Quanhong

    2003-01-01

    The excavation of Shanghai Zhidanyun relics makes the recurrence of a splendid Yuan Dynasty sluice. It is a good example for the study of Shanghai history in the Wusongjiang River irrigation, the ancient shipping and the town development. Based on the data of microfossil Pediastrum, Zygnema, Concentricystes, diatom, foraminifera and ostracods from the sediment section of the relics, the paleostream change after the construction of the sluice was guessed. The paleostream was influenced by the sea water due to the connection with the sea in the earlier stage. The upstream of the sea water was enhanced in the middle stage that was indicated by the increase of marine diatoms and foraminifera. The decrease of marine diatoms and foraminifera in abundance reflected that the connection of the paleostream with the sea was reduced, and the sea influence was decreased gradually in the later stage.

  17. Waste compatibility assessments to support project W-320

    The intent of this internal memo is to provide a recommendation for the transfer of tank 241-C-106 waste, Attachment 2, to tank 241-AY-102. This internal memo also identifies additional requirements which have been deemed necessary for safely receiving and storing the waste documented in Attachment 2 from tank 241-C-106 in tank 241-AY-102. This waste transfer is planned in support of tank 241-C-106 solids sluicing activities. Approximately 200,000 gallons of waste and flush water are expected to be pumped from tank 241-C-106 into tank 241-AY-102. Several transfers will be necessary to complete the sluicing of tank 241-C-106 solids. To assure ourselves that this waste transfer will not create any compatibility concerns, a waste compatibility assessment adhering to current waste compatibility requirements has been performed

  18. W-320 Department of Health documentation

    The purpose of this document is to gather information required to show that Project W-320 is in compliance with Washington State Department of Health requirements as specified in Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, DOE/RL-95-45. Specifically, that W-320 is in compliance with ASME N509-1989 (Nuclear Power Plant Air-Cleaning Units and Components) and ASME N5 10-1989 (Testing of Nuclear Air Treatment Systems) for the 296-C-006 exhaust system

  19. W-320 Department of Health documentation

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07

    The purpose of this document is to gather information required to show that Project W-320 is in compliance with Washington State Department of Health requirements as specified in Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing, DOE/RL-95-45. Specifically, that W-320 is in compliance with ASME N509-1989 (Nuclear Power Plant Air-Cleaning Units and Components) and ASME N5 10-1989 (Testing of Nuclear Air Treatment Systems) for the 296-C-006 exhaust system.

  20. GRAVEL SLUICING IN ALPINE RUN-OF-RIVER HYDROPOWER PLANTS

    Helmut SCHEUERLEIN

    2001-01-01

    Deposition of coarse sediment at the entrance of a reservoir is for many reasons an undesired side effect. Besides loss of storage volume which concerns also fine sediment carried in suspension, the coarser material transported as bedload - particularly the gravel fraction - is to cause additional effects upstream as well as downstream of the reservoir. Upstream the depositions at the entrance of the reservoir may result in a backup effect at flood events with increasing risk of inundations, and downstream of the reservoir the deficiency of coarse material inevitably results in degradation of the river bed. In the frame of a real hydropower plant (Bad TOlz in Southern Bavaria) the possibility of sluicing coarse material through the reservoir towards downstream has been studied and finally realized. The sluicing process has been coupled with water level drawdown at flood events of appropriate characteristics. The sluicing action was controlled by monitoring and evaluating environmentally significant parameters (sediment concentration, etc.). The results were promising and valuable hints for further actions of this kind could be extracted.

  1. The Paleohydrology of Sluice Pond, NE Massachusetts, and its Regional Significance

    Seismic, pollen, stable isotope and lithologic stratigraphies of Sluice Pond, northeastern Massachusetts, were investigated to reconstruct local climate conditions fromthe latest Pleistocene to present. We present a new lake-level curve, constrained largely by acoustic reflectors...

  2. System design description for portable 1,000 CFM exhauster Skids POR-007/Skid E and POR-008/Skid F

    The primary purpose of the two 1,000 CFM Exhauster Skids, POR-007-SKID E and POR-008-SKID F, is to provide backup to the waste tank primary ventilation systems for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102, and the AY-102 annulus in the event of a failure during the sluicing of tank 241-C-106 and subsequent transfer of sluiced waste to 241-AY-102. This redundancy is required since both of the tank ventilation systems have been declared as Safety Class systems

  3. System design description for portable 1,000 CFM exhauster Skids POR-007/Skid E and POR-008/Skid F

    Nelson, O.D.

    1998-07-25

    The primary purpose of the two 1,000 CFM Exhauster Skids, POR-007-SKID E and POR-008-SKID F, is to provide backup to the waste tank primary ventilation systems for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102, and the AY-102 annulus in the event of a failure during the sluicing of tank 241-C-106 and subsequent transfer of sluiced waste to 241-AY-102. This redundancy is required since both of the tank ventilation systems have been declared as Safety Class systems.

  4. Discussion on Monitoring Scheme of Boat Entering Restricted Sluice Zone%水闸禁区船只闯入监测方案探讨

    王翔

    2013-01-01

    The restricted sluice zone must be monitored automatically to avoid safety problem which is caused by boat entering. Outlining the common alarm technology outside and the camera technology, according to the special geographical environment and working characteristics of the sluice, the article makes a comparison of application about the infrared radiation, the microwave radiation, the vibration-cable and the laser radar. On this basis, the article points forward the security system architecture from the front-end equipment, the transmission equipment, the control equipment and the terminal equipment, so as to achieve a variety of functions like the sluice area being round-the-clock 24 hours monitored, and then, to complete the security architecture of the boat into the restricted sluice zone beforehand prevention and post processing, and to do the help of the safe sluice construction.%  水闸附近过往的船只误入水闸禁区会带来安全问题,必须进行自动监测。分析常见的户外监测报警和摄像技术,根据水闸的特殊地理环境和工作特点,对红外对射、微波对射、震动电缆和激光雷达4种探测方式在实践中的运用进行比较。在此基础上,从前端、传输、控制和终端设备4个方面,提出水闸禁区船只闯入监测安防系统设置的要点,并选择激光雷达和热红外摄像机作为探测及摄像设备,以实现水闸禁区全天候24 h监控,完成对船只闯入水闸禁区事先预防和事后处理的安防体系架构,实现自动监测。

  5. PERBANDINGAN EFEKTIFITAS HASIL PENGGELONTORAN SEDIMEN DI WADUK CARA FLUSHING DAN SLUICING

    Pranoto S. Atmodjo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the effectiveness of the flushing of sediment in the reservoir by means of flushing andSluicing way, based on Physical Hydraulic Test (Model Test in the laboratory. Flushing is removingaccumulated deposited sediment. While slucing is releasing of sediment through the reservoir beforesettled or keep sediment remain in suspension and its occur during flood period. Sediments FlushEffectiveness represented by the percentage of released sediment by sediment deposited or the amount ofsediment entering the reservoir during the flushing period.The model based on the prototipe from DetailDesign of Structural Countermeasures for Sedimentation on Wonogiri Reservoir by Nippon Koei 2009.Running model duration is one hour, used free flow and submergence condition, with discharge variationQ=100, 200 and 400 m3/s. Sluicing experiments conducted with some 60 liters of sediment sprinkle evenlywide flow, and Flushing implemented by 2,00 m thickness of deposited sediment that spreaded over thereservoir bottom before running. From this research showed that Sluicing way more efficient than theflushing way, where the number of efficiency of sediment Sluicing way bigger than the efficiency offlusing way, in the running an hour in the laboratory test

  6. A Siltation Simulation and Desiltation Measurement Study Downstream of the Suzhou Creek Sluice, China

    季永兴; 杨绯; 张汉云; 卢永金

    2013-01-01

    The Suzhou Creek Sluice is currently the largest underwater plain gate in the world, with a single span of 100 m. It is located in a tidal estuary at the junction of the Huangpu River and Suzhou Creek in Shanghai, China. In this study, physical and 2D vertical mathematical models were used to investigate and distinguish the mechanism of siltation downstream of an underwater plain gate from that of other gates types. According to quantitative data obtained by site investigation and the application of the physical hydrodynamic models, it was found that the characteristics of the tidal estuary as well as the fact that the sluice span is equal to the creek width are the major reasons contributing to siltation. A possible desiltation treatment system is proposed for the underwater plain gate. The system includes selection of a suitable location that allows the determination of a reasonable top elevation of the sluice floor, reserving sufficient space under the gate to accommodate siltation, setting up a mechanical desiltation system, and flushing silt along with overflow over the top of the gate. Furthermore, on-site hydraulic silt flushing experiments and a topography survey were conducted. These results showed that the measurement system is effective, and by maintaining this scheduled operation once a month, the downstream riverbed has been maintained in a good condition.

  7. Seismic Analysis of Sluice Structures and Foundation System Based on ANSYS%基于ANSYS的水闸-地基体系抗震分析

    麻媛

    2014-01-01

    在结构-地基体系动力有限元研究的基础上,针对闸底板结构特殊、受力条件复杂使得其抗震稳定分析难度较大的问题,以某水闸工程为例,考虑地震动水压力作用、闸室结构的空间耦联及闸室结构与地基相互作用的影响,利用通用有限元软件ANSYS对闸室与地基整体结构进行了抗震计算,并对比分析了反应谱法与时程分析法动力计算结果,同时对该水闸的安全稳定性进行了评价。结果表明,闸底板的转折部位承受拉应力较大,配筋及实际施工过程中应予以重点关注。反应谱法与时程分析法的动力分析结果具有一致性,但反应谱法对地基承载力计算的结果比时程分析的结果保守。%Based on structure and foundation system dynamic element study,the seismic response of a sluice structure and foundation system is con-ducted by the finite element software for solving seismic stability difficultly because of special floor structure and complex stress conditions. The effect of seismic water pressure,spatial coupling of sluice structure and the interaction of structure and foundation are considered. The results of ob-tained by the response spectrum method and the time history analysis are compared,meanwhile the security and stability of the system are evalua-ted. The results show that the large tensile stress are appeared in the turning parts of the sluice structure bottom and should pay more attention on the reinforcement and the actual construction process. In addition,the dynamic response spectrum method and time history analysis method has the consistency of the results,but the result of foundation bearing capacity calculated by the dynamic response spectrum are more conservative than what calculated by time history analysis.

  8. Actor coalitions and implementation in strategic delta planning: Opening the Haringvliet sluices in the Netherlands

    Vermoolen, Myrthe; Hermans, Leon

    2016-04-01

    The sustained development of urbanizing deltas is influenced by natural and societal processes. These processes are characterized by their long time span, in which conflicting interests of different stakeholders have to be reconciled. Reaching consent between actors is a challenge itself, but maintaining this consent throughout different stages of strategic planning - from advocacy and agenda setting to implementation - over these long periods of time is even more difficult. The implementation stage still includes many different actors involved, some of which are different than the ones who agreed before, due to both the long run of the strategic delta planning, and to a shift of tasks and responsibilities. Thus, implementation of strategic plans often features delays, deviations of agreed plans and unintended outcomes. A key question therefore is how coalition dynamics in (pre-)planning stages influence and are influenced by the coalition dynamics during implementation. The different stages in strategic planning are often studied from either a plan formulation or an implementation perspective, but the connection between the two proves an important bottleneck for strategic planning in deltas. For instance, many building with nature solutions are still in their pilot-phase, and their upscaling can profit from lessons concerning past implementation efforts. The proposed contribution will use the case of the management of the Dutch Haringvliet sluices and the decision ('Kierbesluit') in 2000 to put these sluices ajar, to study the link between the different strategic delta planning stages and the role of the formation and change of actor coalitions herein. With the completion of the Haringvliet dam with outlet sluices in 1970, the Haringvliet estuary of the rivers Rhine and Meuse was closed off from the sea, creating a fresh water lake. This was done to make the Dutch Southwest delta safe from flooding, and had positive effects for agricultural water supply and

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of non-submerged flow under a sluice gate

    Kiczko Adam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of sluice gate flow is analyzed using two models: a simplified one, derived according to the concept of the Potential Field (PF, and a more complex form, based on the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes (RANS equations. The numerical solution is compared with experimental data, including measurements performed by authors and results acquired from literature. Despite its simplicity, the PF model provides a satisfactory agreement with the measurements. The slightly worse performance of the RANS model comes from an overestimation of energy losses.

  10. Project W-320, waste retrieval sluicing system: BIO/SER implementation matrices

    This document provides verification that the safety related commitments specified in HNF-SD-WM-810-001, Addendum 1 for the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System, Project W-320 and Project W-320 Safety Evaluation Report (SER), have been implemented in the project hardware, procedures and administrative controls. Four appendices include matrices which show where the 810 commitments are implemented for limiting conditions of operation and surveillance requirements controls, administrative controls, defense-in-depth controls and controls discussed in 810 Addendum 1. A fifth appendix includes the implementation of Project W-320 SER issues and provisions

  11. Radiological and toxicological calculations for AY-102 and C-106HEPA filters and pre-filters

    The high heat content solids in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W-320. Once sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from 'unagitated' to 'agitated'. This means that the partition fraction which described the aerosol content of the head space will increase from 1 X 10-20 to 1 X 10-1. This head space will become much more loaded with suspended material. The nature of this suspended material may change significantly, sluicing may inadvertently bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is an enabling assumption that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split; there is an unmitigated and mitigated composition. It is an enabling assumption that the sluicing line; the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters in Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split; there is an unmitigated and mitigated composition

  12. Contingency plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Sluicing Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    This revised contingency plan addresses potential scenarios involving the release of radioactively contaminated waste from the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Contents Removal project to the environment. The tanks are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The project involves sluicing the contents of the five underground tanks to mix the sludge and supernatant layers, and pumping the mixture to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) for future processing. The sluicing system to be used for the project consists of a spray nozzle designated the open-quotes Borehole Miner,close quotes with an associated pump; in-tank submersible pumps to transfer tank contents from the sluice tanks to the recycle tank; high-pressure pumps providing slurry circulation and slurry transport to the MVST; piping; a ventilation system; a process water system; an instrumentation and control system centered around a programmable logic controller; a video monitoring system; and auxiliary equipment. The earlier version of this plan, which was developed during the preliminary design phase of the project, identified eight scenarios in which waste from the tanks might be released to the environment as a result of unanticipated equipment failure or an accident (e.g., vehicular accident). One of those scenarios, nuclear criticality, is no longer addressed by this plan because the tank waste will be isotopically diluted before sluicing begins. The other seven scenarios have been combined into three, and a fourth, Borehole Miner Failure, has been added as follows: (1) underground release from the tanks; (2) aboveground release or spill from the sluicing system, a tank riser, or the transfer pipeline; (3) release of unfiltered air through the ventilation system; and (4) Borehole Miner arm retraction failure. Methods for preventing, detecting, and responding to each release scenario are set out in the plan

  13. Comparison of Nozzle and Flow Straighteners for Tank Waste Sluicing Applications Letter Report

    Mullen, O Dennis; Jackson, David R.

    2000-09-29

    Nozzles and flow straighteners were compared to assess the relative quality of the water streams for sluicing waste from underground storage tankes. The criteria for comparison were 1) the impact force produced by the streams over a range of distance from the nozzle impinging on target plates, and 2) the coherence of the streams as manifest by the variation of force on targets of two different sizes. It was determined that 1) the standard Hanford flow straightener is measurable less effective than a commercial firefighting flow straightener at producing a coherent stream when used with the standard Hanford nozzle, and 2) a lighter and more compact firefighting deluge nozzle will deliver a stream of equal quality to that from the Hanford nozzle when either nozzle is used with the commercial flow straightener.

  14. Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320

    Conner, J.C.

    1997-04-18

    The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line.

  15. Repository of not readily available documents for project W-320

    The purpose of this document is to provide a readily available source of the technical reports needed for the development of the safety documentation provided for the waste retrieval sluicing system (WRSS), designed to remove the radioactive and chemical sludge from tank 241-C-106, and transport that material to double-shell tank 241-AY-102 via a new, temporary, shielded, encased transfer line

  16. Bird casualties and wind turbines near the Kreekrak sluices of Zeeland

    The impact of wind turbines on birds was investigated for an estuary, situated near the North Sea coast in the Dutch province of Zeeland, with large amount of bird migration. Five 250 kW, three-bladed 25m, 40 rpm turbines were installed on the western side of a dike. The distance between the turbines is 125 m. Since 1 April 1990 the turbines have been in action almost continuously. The study on the title subject was set up to investigate the number of bird casualties caused by the five wind turbines near the sluices of Kreekrak and the number that may be expected to be caused by a total of 20 turbines. The study also focused on the number of casualties among rare birds in relation to those among the common birds as a result of the wind turbines in the Kreekrak area. An area of 125 x 125 m around each wind turbine, consisting partly of land and partly of water, was searched for dead birds every other day during a period of one year (28 April 1990 - 29 April 1991). During this one-year period, the bodies of 26 birds of 17 different species were found; six birds were certainly or almost certainly killed by the turbines. In three other cases, the birds may have died because of the turbines, while in the case of eight birds, it was not possible to determine the cause of death. The remaining nine birds were not killed by the wind turbines. The annual number of bird victims expected following the installation of 20 wind turbines was estimated at a minimum of 7 and a maximum of 142. For each species a correlation was found between the number of victims and the estimated number of visitors to the area. This suggests that the rare species among the birds were not excessively endangered by the turbines. The number of bird casualties per turbine was low in comparison with the results of other Dutch investigations. On the basis of these results, it is concluded that there is no reason to advise against increasing the number of wind turbines near the sluices of Kreekrak to 20. 3

  17. Stagnation, circulation, and erosion of granular materials through belt conveyor sluice gate

    Pohlman, Nicholas; Moralda, Michael; Dunne, Ryan

    2013-11-01

    Control of flow rates in conversion reactors for discrete materials like biomass can be achieved in belt conveyors through a combination of belt speed, hopper size, and aperture opening. As material is extracted from the bottom of the storage hopper, other material cannot achieve plug flow and therefore is restricted from exiting through a sluice-gate type opening. The excess material moves vertically from the opening causing a pile up and recirculation back along the free surface of the hopper. Experimental results obtained through high speed imaging show the position of the stagnation point as well as the rate of circulation is dependent on the mass flow rate achieved and instantaneous fill level. The movement of material into the plug flow along the belt allows verification of deposition models on erodible beds rather than rigid surfaces with artificial roughness of glued particles. Similarly, the pile-up at the exit influences the efficiency of the transport affecting the narrow energy return on investment of biomass resources. The laboratory-scale behavior can therefore be translated into industrial performance metrics for increased operational efficiency. This work is supported by the NSF REU Site Operation E-Tank under award number 1156789.

  18. Imaging through obscurations for sluicing operations in the waste storage tanks

    Peters, T.J.; McMakin, D.L.; Sheen, D.M.; Chieda, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    Waste remediators have identified that surveillance of waste remediation operations and periodic inspections of stored waste are required under very demanding and difficult viewing environments. In many cases, obscurants such as dust or water vapor are generated as part of the remediation activity. Methods are required for viewing or imaging beyond the normal visual spectrum. Work space images guide the movement of remediation equipment, creating a need for rapidly updated, near real-time imaging capability. In addition, there is a need for three-dimensional topographical data to determine the contours of the wastes, to plan retrieval campaigns, and to provide a three-dimensional map of a robot`s work space as basis for collision avoidance. Three basic imaging techniques were evaluated: optical, acoustic and radar. The optical imaging methods that were examined used cameras which operated in the visible region and near-infrared region and infrared cameras which operated in the 3--5 micron and 8--12 micron wavelength regions. Various passive and active lighting schemes were tested, as well as the use of filters to eliminate reflection in the visible region. Image enhancement software was used to extend the range where visual techniques could be used. In addition, the operation of a laser range finder, which operated at 0.835 microns, was tested when fog/water droplets were suspended in the air. The acoustic technique involved using commercial acoustic sensors, operating at approximately 50 kHz and 215 kHz, to determine the attenuation of the acoustic beam in a high-humidity environment. The radar imaging methods involved performing millimeter wave (94 GHz) attenuation measurement sin the various simulated sluicing environments and performing preliminary experimental imaging studies using a W-Band (75--110 GHz) linearly scanned transceiver in a laboratory environment. The results of the tests are discussed.

  19. Imaging through obscurations for sluicing operations in the waste storage tanks

    Waste remediators have identified that surveillance of waste remediation operations and periodic inspections of stored waste are required under very demanding and difficult viewing environments. In many cases, obscurants such as dust or water vapor are generated as part of the remediation activity. Methods are required for viewing or imaging beyond the normal visual spectrum. Work space images guide the movement of remediation equipment, creating a need for rapidly updated, near real-time imaging capability. In addition, there is a need for three-dimensional topographical data to determine the contours of the wastes, to plan retrieval campaigns, and to provide a three-dimensional map of a robot's work space as basis for collision avoidance. Three basic imaging techniques were evaluated: optical, acoustic and radar. The optical imaging methods that were examined used cameras which operated in the visible region and near-infrared region and infrared cameras which operated in the 3--5 micron and 8--12 micron wavelength regions. Various passive and active lighting schemes were tested, as well as the use of filters to eliminate reflection in the visible region. Image enhancement software was used to extend the range where visual techniques could be used. In addition, the operation of a laser range finder, which operated at 0.835 microns, was tested when fog/water droplets were suspended in the air. The acoustic technique involved using commercial acoustic sensors, operating at approximately 50 kHz and 215 kHz, to determine the attenuation of the acoustic beam in a high-humidity environment. The radar imaging methods involved performing millimeter wave (94 GHz) attenuation measurement sin the various simulated sluicing environments and performing preliminary experimental imaging studies using a W-Band (75--110 GHz) linearly scanned transceiver in a laboratory environment. The results of the tests are discussed

  20. Impact of sediments resuspension on metal solubilization and water quality during recurrent reservoir sluicing management.

    Frémion, Franck; Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra; Bordas, François; Lenain, Jean-François; Jugé, Philippe; Kestens, Tim; Mourier, Brice

    2016-08-15

    In dam contexts, sluicing operations can be performed to reestablish sediments continuity, as proposed by the EU Water Framework Directive, as well as to preserve the reservoirs' water storage capacity. Such management permits the rapid release of high quantities of reservoir sediments through the opening of dam bottom valves. This work aims to study the impact of such operation on the evolution of environmental physicochemical conditions notably changes in dissolved metallic elements concentrations (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) through field and laboratory investigations. Results were interpreted in terms of concentrations and fluxes, and compared with data collected on an annual basis regarding both suspended matter and metallic elements. The release of high quantities of sediments (4,500tons dry weight in 24h), with concentrations representing up to 300 times the inter-annual mean suspended sediments discharge, significantly modified water parameters, notably solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, pH and redox conditions. Despite the fact that they are mainly trapped in stable phases, a clear increase of the solubilized metals content was measured, representing up to 60 times the maximum values of current exploitation. This solubilization is related to desorption phenomena from sediments through changes in chemical equilibriums as highlighted by laboratory characterizations and experiments. These chemical modifications are mainly attributed to S/L ratio variations. Indeed, the low S/L ratios (≤1.3g·L(-1)) measured in situ are typically the ones for which metals solubilization is the highest, as shown by laboratory experiments. Additional thermodynamic modeling highlighted that the decrease in pH measured during the operation favors the release of the free forms of metallic elements (Al and Cu), and decreases the OM complexation influence. These changes, either in term of physical conditions or speciation, increasing metals long term bioavailability notably

  1. SEDIMENT SLUICING MANAGEMENT BY DRAW DOWN OPERATION IN HYDROPOWER REGULATING RESERVOIRS CONSIDERING PROPERTIES OF SEDIMENTAION AND FACILITY CONDITION

    Okumura, Hirofumi; Sumi, Tetsuya

    Reservoir sedimentation is one of the most important problems for securing long term achievement of water power operation in the future. In order to solve the problem, we have to note that there are two major types of water power stations, which are storage type and regulating type, respectively. We have already discussed that we have to focus on sedimentation management in regulating type reservoirs more than storage type ones from the view point of flood disaster prevention in reservoir areas. In this paper, we study on technical and economical feasibility of sediment sluicing management by numerical analysis, and we found that it is very much advantageous in both way. We also analyze the relation between trap efficiency of reservoir sediment and proportion of spillway gate size and dam height, and get some outcomes which are useful for dam gate remodeling.

  2. Integrated Methodologies for the 3D Survey and the Structural Monitoring of Industrial Archaeology: The Case of the Casalecchio di Reno Sluice, Italy

    Gabriele Bitelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an example of integrated surveying and monitoring activities for the control of an ancient structure, the Casalecchio di Reno sluice, located near Bologna, Italy. Several geomatic techniques were applied (classical topography, high-precision spirit levelling, terrestrial laser scanning, digital close-range photogrammetry, and thermal imagery. All these measurements were put together in a unique reference system and used in order to study the stability and the movements of the structure over the period of time observed. Moreover, the metrical investigations allowed the creation of a 3D model of the structure, and the comparison between two situations, before and after the serious damages suffered by the sluice during the winter season 2008-2009. Along with the detailed investigations performed on individual portions of the structure, an analysis of the whole sluice, carried out at a regional scale, was done via the use of aerial photogrammetry, using both recently acquired images and historical photogrammetric coverage. The measurements were carried out as part of a major consolidation and restoration activity, carried out by the “Consorzio della Chiusa di Casalecchio e del Canale di Reno”.

  3. Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    Huckaby, James L.; Wells, Beric E.

    2004-03-05

    The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method that uses water jets to dissolve the water-soluble waste and mobilize the water-insoluble waste. Retrieval operations will liberate any waste gases trapped in the wetted solid waste matrix, and these gases will be released into the tank headspaces. Because the trapped gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, a concern exists that a flammable mixture could be formed in the tank headspaces. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during modified sluicing waste retrieval operations. Considered here are nine of the 12 tanks from the 241-S tank farm (241-S-107, 241-S-111, and 241-S 112 are not considered) and Tank 241-U-107. This report is intended to support the specification of process controls that ensure flammable conditions do not develop in the tank headspaces. Consequently, the physical scenarios considered, the models developed to estimate retained gas releases and the tank headspace compositions under these scenarios, and the model input data are intended to conservatively assess the potential to reach headspace flammability. The analyses are intended to address worst-case conditions and establish reasonable upper bounds on the achievable flammability of the tank headspaces. Flammable retained gas inventories, for example, are based on the 95th percentile developed by Barker and Hedengren (2003), giving 95% confidence that actual inventories are smaller than those used in the calculations. Gas releases and headspace flammability were evaluated for three general scenarios: a very aggressive dissolution and erosion of saltcake waste by water jets impinging on the waste surface, the drainage of interstitial liquids from saltcake during a shutdown of the

  4. Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method that uses water jets to dissolve the water-soluble waste and mobilize the water-insoluble waste. Retrieval operations will liberate any waste gases trapped in the wetted solid waste matrix, and these gases will be released into the tank headspaces. Because the trapped gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, a concern exists that a flammable mixture could be formed in the tank headspaces. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during modified sluicing waste retrieval operations. Considered here are nine of the 12 tanks from the 241-S tank farm (241-S-107, 241-S-111, and 241-S 112 are not considered) and Tank 241-U-107. This report is intended to support the specification of process controls that ensure flammable conditions do not develop in the tank headspaces. Consequently, the physical scenarios considered, the models developed to estimate retained gas releases and the tank headspace compositions under these scenarios, and the model input data are intended to conservatively assess the potential to reach headspace flammability. The analyses are intended to address worst-case conditions and establish reasonable upper bounds on the achievable flammability of the tank headspaces. Flammable retained gas inventories, for example, are based on the 95th percentile developed by Barker and Hedengren (2003), giving 95% confidence that actual inventories are smaller than those used in the calculations. Gas releases and headspace flammability were evaluated for three general scenarios: a very aggressive dissolution and erosion of saltcake waste by water jets impinging on the waste surface, the drainage of interstitial liquids from saltcake during a shutdown of the

  5. Flammable Gas Release Estimates for Modified Sluicing Retrieval of Waste from Selected Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    Huckaby, James L.; Wells, Beric E.

    2003-05-13

    The high-level radioactive wastes in many single-shell tanks (SSTs) at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved by a modified sluicing method. Retrieval operations will hydraulically erode and dissolve the saltcake waste, and the resulting brine will then be pumped to a double-shell tank (DST). Waste gases residing in the solid waste matrix will be released into the tank headspace when the matrix is eroded or dissolved. These retained waste gases include the flammable species hydrogen, methane, and ammonia, and there is a concern that these flammable gases could produce a flammable mixture in the tank headspaces during the retrieval operations. This report combines conservative retained gas inventory estimates and tank data with anticipated waste retrieval rates to estimate the potential headspace flammability of selected SSTs during waste retrieval operations. The SSTs considered here are ten of the twelve 241-S farm tanks (tanks 241-S-107 and 241-S-111 are excluded from consideration here) and tank 241-U-107 (U-107).

  6. Contingency plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks sluicing project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), plans to begin a sluicing (flushing) and pumping project to remove the contents from five inactive, underground storage tanks at the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The tank contents will be transferred to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, which are part of the active waste treatment system at ORNL. The purpose of the project is to minimize the risk of leaking the highly radioactive material to the environment. The five OHF tanks each contain a layer of sludge and a layer of supernatant. Based on a sampling project undertaken in 1995, the sludge in the tanks has been characterized as transuranic and mixed waste and the supernatants have been characterized as mixed waste. The combined radioactivity of the contents of the five tanks is approximately 29,500 Ci. This contingency plan is based on the preliminary design for the project and describes a series of potential accident/release scenarios for the project. It outlines Energy Systems' preliminary plans for prevention, detection, and mitigation. Prevention/detection methods range from using doubly contained pipelines to alarmed sensors and automatic pump cutoff systems. Plans for mitigation range from pumping leaked fluids from the built-in tank drainage systems and cleaning up spilled liquids to personnel evacuation

  7. 向家坝水电站冲沙孔体型优化设计%Optimization design of sand sluicing outlet shape of Xiangjiaba Hydropower Station

    刘要来; 周红波; 张永涛; 潘江洋

    2015-01-01

    The diversion bottom outlet of Xiangjiaba Hydropower Station was reconstructed into sand sluicing outlet , so its structure and shape were restricted;moreover, the water released from the sand sluicing outlet is high -velocity flow containing sediment, which is near the approach channel at downstream , so the design standard of energy dissipation and erosion control is high.By consideration of the engineering practice , through hydraulic model test , 3 shapes of sand sluicing outlets are analyzed and compared in terms of energy dissipation effect , velocity near bottom and boundary and reconstruction difficulty .The final op-timization is determined , which solved the problem of energy dissipation and erosion control .%向家坝水电站冲沙孔由导流底孔改建而成,结构体型受到了较大限制,加之冲沙孔下泄水流为高速含沙水流,且紧邻下游引航道,消能防冲设计标准较高。结合向家坝工程实际,通过水工模型试验,从消能效果、消力池临底及临边流速、改造难易度等多方面,对3种冲沙孔体型进行了分析比选,确定了最终的优化体型,较好的解决了出口消能防冲难题。

  8. 简述闸门运行工技能鉴定实操要点%Essentials of Sluice Operation Technicians Skill Appraisal

    刘敏

    2015-01-01

    In order to help technicians master the actual operation of sluice operation management , maintenance and inspection , and improve their application abilities , this paper is compiled for professional training and skill appraisal .%为了使广大的水闸运行管理、维护保养及检修等人员,掌握闸门运行工技能鉴定实际操作的范围和主要内容,并提高实际应用能力,撰写该文以供职业培训和技能鉴定参考。

  9. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for September 2000

    transfers and back-dilutions that remediated the flammable gas hazards and closed the surface level growth Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) associated with the tank. CHG transitioned from the Basis for Interim Operation to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) in October 1999. The High Heat Safety Issue on tank 241-C-106 was resolved, including the removal of the tank from the watch list. Several cross-site waste transfers were completed to support saltwell pumping efforts. In addition, Evaporator Campaign 00-1 began in April 2000, resulting in an estimated waste volume reduction of 600,000 gallons. Final sluicing operations of tank 241-C-106 were completed on October 6, 1999. The sludge recovery goal of 95 percent was exceeded. The total sludge transfer from tank 241-C-106 to 241-AY-102 was 67.8 inches (186,500 gallons). The successful test of the AZ-101 mixer pump was completed, proving that CHG has the technology necessary to retrieve tank waste for treatment. Approval of the Notice of Construction (NOC) for the AN Farm tank retrieval system was received from the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency on July 21,2000. This is a significant step forward for Project W-211, ''Initial Tank Retrieval Systems'' in preparing waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

  10. 新疆某工程导流洞闸井底板优化三维有限元分析%Sluice Bottom Board Optimization of Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis for one Diversion Tunnel Project of Xinjiang

    梁迟

    2016-01-01

    利用AutodeskRevit族库中的三维闸井模型,采用 ABAQUS有限元软件对三维闸井进行有限元静力分析,通过对闸井的应力与应变分析,研究2.0m、2.5m厚的闸底板在竣工期、满蓄期的受力情况,根据受力情况对闸底板配筋,找出最优方案,为类似工程数值模拟提供参考。%Taking 3-D sluice well model of families in AutodeskRevit and ABAQUS to analysis finite element of static force of 3-D sluice well.By analysising stress and strain of sluice well to study force condition of sluice bottom board in the thickness of 2.0m,2.5m in the time of completion and full storage.According to the force condition to assign steel and find the best project.The paper can be as references for similar projects in numerical simulation.

  11. Study on limited water level for pollution control of sluice and dam on heavily polluted river%重污染河流闸坝防污限制水位研究

    左其亭; 李冬锋

    2013-01-01

    The excess water stored by sluices and dams on heavily polluted rivers is a main causation of sudden pollution incident caused by the concentrated discharge of pollution regiment. Focusing on this problem, a concept of limited water level for the pollution control is proposed and defined herein. Furthermore, a model of limited water level for pollution control of sluices and dams on heavily polluted rivers is built by taking benefit promotion and pollution control as the target, so as to study the limited water level for preventing the sudden pollution incident caused by the concentrated discharge of pollution regiment and standardize the storage volumes of sluices and dams on heavily polluted rivers. As a case study, this method is applied to several sluices and dams on Shayinghe River; from which the results show that the limited water level for pollution control can be effectively obtained by the model, and then it has certain practicability. The study mentioned herein provides an important technological support for the research made on the operation of pollution control of sluice and dam on heavily polluted river.%重污染河流上的闸坝过量蓄水是导致污染团集中下泄造成水污染事件的主要诱因之一.针对这一问题,本文提出和定义了防污限制水位的概念,并以兴利和防污为目标,构建了重污染河流闸坝防污限制水位模型,以研究预防因污染团集中下泄造成水污染事件的闸坝防污限制水位,规范重污染河流闸坝的蓄水量.将该方法应用到淮河流域沙颍河的多个闸坝,计算结果表明,该模型能够有效地求解重污染河流的闸坝防污限制水位,具有一定的实用性.这对重污染河流开展闸坝防污调度研究提供重要的技术支撑.

  12. Research on Cost Estimation Model in Shandong Yellow River Sluice's Regular Reinforcement%山东黄河水闸定期加固中的成本估计模型研究

    李克

    2015-01-01

    在山东黄河水闸定期加固中的成本估计过程中,采用传统算法进行成本估计容易丢失信息,导致估计精度低。为此,本文提出了一种基于改进神经网络算法的山东黄河水闸定期加固中的成本估计方法,利用神经网络输入和输出关系的高度非线性映射关系和自我学习能力组建水闸定期加固中的成本估计模型,融合模糊理论集,得到水闸定期加固中的成本估计历史数据与主要特征属性,在分析成本估计组织结构的同时,比较不同时期黄河水闸加固中的成本估计类比,将其模糊相似性定量化,对黄河水闸定期加固中的成本进行了详细的估算。实验仿真证明,基于改进神经网络算法的山东黄河水闸定期加固中的成本估计方法精度高,实用性强。%In the cost estimation of the regular reinforcement of Yellow River sluice, the adoption of the traditional algo⁃rithm usually causes the loss of information and the low estimated accuracy.For this reason, based on improved neural net⁃work algorithm, this paper proposes a kind of cost estimation method for the regular reinforcement of Yellow River sluice. By use of the high nonlinear mapping relationship between the input and output of neural network and the ability of self learning, it forms a cost estimation model of the regular reinforcement of the sluice, through fusion with the fuzzy theory set, it gets the historical data and the main characteristic attributes of the cost estimation of the regular reinforcement of the sluice, when analyzing the organization structure of cost estimation, it compares the cost estimation analogies of the re⁃inforcement of Yellow River sluice in different times, and quantifies their fuzzy similarities, then accomplishes the successful estimation of the cost of the regular reinforcement of Yellow River sluice. Simulation experiment proves that the cost estimation method based on improved

  13. W-320 pit liner vs. coating cost risk benefit analysis

    This report evaluates the costs and the risk trade-offs associated with the two pit lining or confinement options being considered as part of the Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Project. Both of these pit secondary confinement options (i.e., stainless steel pit liners and epoxy coating) can be implemented in a fashion that complies with criteria for secondary containment systems specified by the Washington Administration Codes (WAC-173-303-604). Direct life cycle costs of the two options including design, fabrication, installation, radiation, exposure, and decontamination and disposal costs are compared. Risk is expressed as probability weighted with the confinement consequences that could be mitigated by the pit liner. The risk impact of the choice of the confinement option is also evaluated in the context of the overall risk associated with the sluicing project and continued storage of the high-heat waste in the Tank 241-C-106 pending completion of the W-320 Project. The two pit secondary containment options are stainless steel line and epoxy coating

  14. Functional testing of a fish sluice, Buchholz small hydro plant - Final report; Funktionskontrolle Fischschleuse, KWKW Buchholz - Schlussbericht

    Ruhle, Ch. [Buero fuer Jagd- und Fischereifragen, Schmerikon (Switzerland); Scherrer, I. [Entegra Wasserkraft AG, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2009-01-15

    Since more than 100 years the diversion hydropower plant of Buchholz at the river Glatt (canton Saint Gall) has been out of operation. With its reactivation as run-of-river scheme, the river meadow, originated due to sedimentation in the former storage basin, with its beaver habitat, could be preserved. For the first time in Switzerland, a fish lock was implemented for the upstream passage way for fish. The fish lock was built directly into for stability reasons newly constructed secondary concrete at the downstream side of the old dam. At the upper lock opening a weir basked is installed, where the migrating fish are recorded. The examination proofed that the fish lock in principle is working for strong swimming fish species (qualitative proof of the performance control). In case of flood caused drift, the migrating fish seem to accept the fish passage. The attempt to quantify the proportion of the migrating willing fish which actually swim through the lock (quantitative proof of the performance control) did not produce satisfactory results. (authors)

  15. 水闸与海堤连接段不均匀沉降预防措施初探%A Probe into Preventive Measures for Uneven Subsidence in Connections of Sluices and Seawalls

    刘建飞; 任红侠

    2013-01-01

    修建在软基上的水闸与海堤连接段的不均匀沉降,极易导致其他病害.因此,需要探讨其预防措施,以确保海堤自身安全及其减灾效益的发挥.在对浙江东部沿海水闸与海堤连接段沉降调查的基础上,分析不均匀沉降的成因,结合类似工程实践和数值模型计算分析结果,从勘探设计角度分析后确定:加强地质勘探工作,选择有效的地基加固处理方式和海堤护面形式,优化海堤设计断面,选用轻质堤身填筑材料部分取代土石料等措施,可有效地预防水闸与海堤连接段不均匀沉降及由此产生的危害.研究结果可为水闸与海堤连接段设计提供参考和指导.%Uneven subsidence in connections of sluices and seawalls on soft soil foundation,can easily lead to other diseases. An attempt is made to find preventive measures to ensure their own safety and disaster- reduction efficiency. Based on an investigation of the uneven subsidence in connections of sluices and seawalls on the eastern coast of Zhejiang, the causes of uneven subsidence are analyzed based on similar engineering practice and numerical simulation. Interviews were conducted from the exploration and design angle, strengthening geological exploration work, selection of effective ground- treatment methods and seawall- protection form, optimization of the seawall design- section, replacement of part soil and stone with light materials. These measures can effectively prevent uneven subsidence and it is harmful. The results serve as a reference and guidance for the design of connections of sluices and seawalls.

  16. Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102

    High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994)

  17. Construction management

    Pellicer, Eugenio; Teixeira, José C; Moura, Helder P; Catalá, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The management of construction projects is a wide ranging and challenging discipline in an increasingly international industry, facing continual challenges and demands for improvements in safety, in quality and cost control, and in the avoidance of contractual disputes. Construction Management grew out of a Leonardo da Vinci project to develop a series of Common Learning Outcomes for European Managers in Construction. Financed by the European Union, the project aimed to develop a library of basic materials for developing construction management skills for use in a pan-European context. Focused exclusively on the management of the construction phase of a building project from the contractor's point of view, Construction Management covers the complete range of topics of which mastery is required by the construction management professional for the effective delivery of new construction projects. With the continued internationalisation of the construction industry, Construction Management will be required rea...

  18. Usability Constructs

    Hertzum, Morten; Clemmesen, Torkil; Hornbæk, Kasper Anders Søren;

    2007-01-01

    Whereas research on usability predominantly employs universal definitions of the aspects that comprise usability, people experience their use of information systems through personal constructs. Based on 48 repertory-grid interviews, this study investigates how such personal constructs are affecte...

  19. Construction practice

    One has elaborated a virtual computer model (VRC) of construction of the AP1000 project reactor to demonstrate its viability, to improve the NPP project making it more easy for construction with simultaneous reduction of time, costs and risk of construction. The approach ensured time sequence of the 3-D visualization of NPP at the construction stages. The VRC ensures optimization of scheme implementation time period and specifies the basic costs. The VRC application offers essential advantages when planning construction of a nuclear power facility

  20. Construction supervision in construction project

    Struna, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Every construction project is a unique, complex process. Every completed structure is permanent act into space, and has therefore substantial influence upon social and natural environment. As a consequence, it is essential to provide professional supervision of the construction process that will ensure conformity of the construction with the project documentation and the building permit. The purpose of the thesis is to present the role of the construction supervision and the work of the s...

  1. Impact of Xinanchong Sluice Reconstruction on the Downstream Water Quality%西南水闸的改建方案对下游水体水质影响研究

    郭静翔; 王思颖

    2012-01-01

    西南涌属于北江下游大堤左岸的分洪河道。西南水闸重建后,通过调节西南水闸闸孔的开度,引入北江水进行河涌整治,将导致西南涌上游污染物向下游迁移,但涨潮时须关闸门,不让污染较严重的西南涌水进入北江。由于下游珠江口河水的上溯,上下游河水交汇处河水流速最小,污染物的交换能力最弱,导致污染物的最大浓度沉积。本研究将应用珠江口一维感潮河网模型,从水环境效果的角度出发,模拟分析在水环境容量较小的平、枯水期,不同的引水方案对水质的影响程度,提出最佳引水方案和河涌整治措施建议。%Xinanehong is the floodway in the left bank of the North River downstream. By adjusting the Xinanchong Sluice o- pening hole, introducting the North River to regulate the surge water, will remove the pollutants from upstream to downstream of the southwest sliuse, and pollutants will result in the greatest concentration, because the downstream of Pearl River flow up- stream, the water flows smallest in the interchanges of upstream and downstream, and the exchange capacity of pollutants achieves the weakest. In this study, This paper researches how the pilotage programme affecting the water quality from effectiveness of wa- ter environment, and bring forward the best pilotage programme and management program of sluice.

  2. C-106 tank process ventilation test

    Project W-320 Acceptance Test Report for tank 241-C-106, 296-C-006 Ventilation System Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-SD-W320-012, C-106 Tank Process Ventilation Test, was an in depth test of the 296-C-006 ventilation system and ventilation support systems required to perform the sluicing of tank C-106. Systems involved included electrical, instrumentation, chiller and HVAC. Tests began at component level, moved to loop level, up to system level and finally to an integrated systems level test. One criteria was to perform the test with the least amount of risk from a radioactive contamination potential stand point. To accomplish this a temporary configuration was designed that would simulate operation of the systems, without being connected directly to the waste tank air space. This was done by blanking off ducting to the tank and connecting temporary ducting and an inlet air filter and housing to the recirculation system. This configuration would eventually become the possible cause of exceptions. During the performance of the test, there were points where the equipment did not function per the directions listed in the ATP. These events fell into several different categories. The first and easiest problems were field configurations that did not match the design documentation. This was corrected by modifying the field configuration to meet design documentation and reperforming the applicable sections of the ATP. A second type of problem encountered was associated with equipment which did not operate correctly, at which point an exception was written against the ATP, to be resolved later. A third type of problem was with equipment that actually operated correctly but the directions in the ATP were in error. These were corrected by generating an Engineering Change Notice (ECN) against the ATP. The ATP with corrected directions was then re-performed. A fourth type of problem was where the directions in the ATP were as the equipment should operate, but the design of

  3. Torus Construction

    Valluri, Monica; Merritt, David

    1999-01-01

    The maximally compact representation of a regular orbit is in terms of its action-angle variables. Computing the map between a trajectory's Cartesian coordinates and its action-angle variables is called torus construction. This article reviews various approaches to torus construction and their application to galactic dynamics.

  4. Superstring construction

    1989-01-01

    The book includes a selection of papers on the construction of superstring theories, mainly written during the years 1984-1987. It covers ten-dimensional supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric strings, four-dimensional heterotic strings and four-dimensional type-II strings. An introduction to more recent developments in conformal field theory in relation to string construction is provided.

  5. Construction Management.

    Abbott, James F.

    This article provides a detailed discussion of a team approach to building that involves a construction manager, an architect, and a contractor. Bidding methods are outlined; the major components in construction management -- value engineering and fast track scheduling -- and the use of performance specifications are discussed. The construction…

  6. Construction management

    PEFP, Proton Engineering Frontier Project, puts its aim to building 100MeV 20mA linear proton accelerator which is national facility for NT, BT, IT, and future technologies, expected to boost up the national industry competitiveness. This R and D, Construction Management is in charge of the supportive works as site selection, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities, and overall construction management. The major goals of this work are as follows: At first, architecture and engineering of conventional facilities. Second, construction management, audit and inspection on construction of conventional facilities. Lastly, cooperation with the project host organization for adjusting technical issues of overall construction. In this research, We made a conceptual design, basic design and detail design of conventional facilities. Also, we made the engineering support for host site construction as follows : selection of project host organization and host site selection, construction technical work for project host organization and procedure management and impact analysis on the delay of project site selection

  7. Construction mathematics

    Virdi, Surinder

    2006-01-01

    Taking a starting point below that of GCSE level, by assuming no prior mathematical knowledge, Surinder Virdi and Roy Baker take the reader step by step through the mathematical requirements for Level 2 and 3 Building and Construction courses.Unlike the majority of basic level maths texts available, this book focuses exclusively on mathematics as it is applied in actual construction practice. As such, topics specific to the construction industry are presented, as well as essential areas for Level 2 craft NVQs - for example, costing calculations, labor costs, cost of materials and setting out o

  8. Worldwide construction

    The paper lists major construction projects in worldwide processing and pipelining, showing capacities, contractors, estimated costs, and time of construction. The lists are divided into refineries, petrochemical plants, sulfur recovery units, gas processing plants, pipelines, and related fuel facilities. This last classification includes cogeneration plants, coal liquefaction and gasification plants, biomass power plants, geothermal power plants, integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plants, and a coal briquetting plant

  9. Construction safety

    Li, Rita Yi Man

    2013-01-01

    A close-to-ideal blend of suburb and city, speedy construction of towers of Babylon, the sparkling proportion of glass and steel buildings’ facade at night showcase the wisdom of humans. They also witness the footsteps, sweats and tears of architects and engineers. Unfortunately, these signatures of human civilizations are swathed in towering figures of construction accidents. Fretting about these on sites, different countries adopt different measures on sites. This book firstly sketches the construction accidents on sites, followed by a review on safety measures in some of the developing countries such as Bermuda, Egypt, Kuwait and China; as well as developed countries, for example, the United States, France and Singapore. It also highlights the enormous compensation costs with the courts’ experiences in the United Kingdom and Hong Kong.

  10. Construction Physics

    Bertelsen, Sven; Henrich, Guilherme; Koskela, Lauri; Rooke, John

    2007-01-01

    At the 14th annual conference in the International Group for Lean Construction in 2006 the authors presented the concept of construction as a process being fed by a number of flows out of which one is the critical one deciding the speed with which the process takes place. This contribution takes the idea further and sets out by discussing production in general and the underlying mental flow models associated with this understanding. It then suggests a new model for the understanding of the na...

  11. Construction work

    2004-01-01

    Construction work on building 179 will start on the 16th February 2004 and continue until November 2004. The road between buildings 179 and 158 will temporarily become a one way street from Route Democrite towards building 7. The parking places between buildings 179 and 7 will become obsolete. The ISOLDE collaboration would like to apologize for any inconveniences.

  12. 闸下应用废旧轮胎消能防冲数值模拟结果验证%Verification of Mathematical Model Results of Scrap Tires in Energy Dissipation and Erosion Control Under Sluice

    史国庆; 文恒

    2015-01-01

    采用RNG k-ε湍流模型、PISO算法,将整个流场划分为67.27万个网格,选择标准壁面函数进行壁面处理,对海漫加糙后的流场进行模拟计算,分析不同网格数、不同收敛精度、不同湍流模型、不同流场计算方法对数值模拟结果的影响。通过对比分析,计算结果与模型试验实测结果吻合较好,说明数值模拟方法简捷、高效,能获得理想的数据成果,能较好地用于海漫段加糙后的流场模拟计算研究。%The influence of the numerical simulation results on different grid numbers,different residual convergence precisions,different turbulence models,and different flow calculation methods,using the RNG k-εturbulence model,PISO algorithm,the whole flow field was divided into 672 700 grids,wall functions were used to deal with the boundary condition,calculated the flow field of scrap tires in energy dis-sipation and erosion control under sluice. The calculation results are well agreed with the model test results. It indicates that the numerical simulation technique can calculate the flow field.

  13. Modelling Constructs

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2009-01-01

    There are many different notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and workflows. These notations and formalisms have been introduced with different purposes and objectives. Later, influenced by other notations, comparisons with other tools, or by standardization efforts, these...... notations have been extended in order to increase expressiveness and to be more competitive. This resulted in an increasing number of notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and in an increase of the different modelling constructs provided by modelling notations, which makes it difficult...... to compare modelling notations and to make transformations between them. One of the reasons is that, in each notation, the new concepts are introduced in a different way by extending the already existing constructs. In this chapter, we go the opposite direction: We show that it is possible to add...

  14. Constructive Interactions

    Lemoisson, Philippe; Cerri, Stefano A.; Mahe, Serge-André; Sallantin, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The new paradigm of "knowledge construction using experiential based and collaborative learning approaches" is an outstanding opportunity for interdisciplinary research. This document is an attempt to introduce and exemplify as much as possible using the lexicon of "social sciences", considerations and tools belonging to "artificial intelligence" (eg.:the machine learning tradition). In the paper we first draw a conceptual framework for rational agents in conversational interaction; then we u...

  15. Constructing Catalonia

    Bill Phillips

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalonia, in common with other nations, has long b een concerned with the question of identity and difference. Its problemati c relationship with Spain has led to an emphasis on differentiating itself from its larger neighbour (if we are to accept, as most Spaniards do not, that Catalonia is not Spain, a s ituation complicated by the loss of the Spanish colonies of Cuba and The Philippines in 189 8, and the Spanish Civil War and subsequent dictatorship from 1936 to 1976. Beginnin g in the late nineteenth century, the construction of a Catalan identity followed a simil ar route to that taken by other European nations such as England, Ireland and, inde ed, Spain, including an emphasis on rural values, activities and the countryside, and t he conversion of specifically local traditions into national past times. It is only in the last ten years or so that this model of Catalan identity has been recognised for what it is – a model constructed and encouraged for and by specific nationalist politica l interests. Ironically, Catalonia’s identity abroad has also been constructed and manip ulated for political purposes, but from quite a different perspective. Orwell’s /Homag e to Catalonia/ (1938 narrates an extremely blinkered version of the Spanish Civil Wa r which has achieved iconic status as a result of cold war politics. Subsequent portra yals of the Spanish Civil War – Valentine Cunningham’s /The Penguin Book of Spanish Civil War Verse/ (ed., Penguin, 1980, or Ken Loach’s 1995 film /Land and F reedom/ base their arguments unquestioningly on /Homage to Catalonia/, perpetuat ing a view of the nation’s recent history that is both reductive and inaccurate

  16. Constructing Costs

    Donner, Henrik af

    2000-01-01

    The economic analysis of building contracts is an unexplored field within Law and Economics. This paper makes an attempt to cast some light over the subject and encourage to more research within the field. The main purpose has been to describe why the actual price in a public construction project often turns out to be higher than the contract price and offer a way of handle that risk. In the paper a model is set up that shows an optimal contract given expectations on actual price and gaps in ...

  17. Constructing Brambles

    Chapelle, Mathieu; Mazoit, Frédéric; Todinca, Ioan

    Given an arbitrary graph G and a number k, it is well-known by a result of Seymour and Thomas [22] that G has treewidth strictly larger than k if and only if it has a bramble of order k + 2. Brambles are used in combinatorics as certificates proving that the treewidth of a graph is large. From an algorithmic point of view there are several algorithms computing tree-decompositions of G of width at most k, if such decompositions exist and the running time is polynomial for constant k. Nevertheless, when the treewidth of the input graph is larger than k, to our knowledge there is no algorithm constructing a bramble of order k + 2. We give here such an algorithm, running in {mathcal O}(n^{k+4}) time. For classes of graphs with polynomial number of minimal separators, we define a notion of compact brambles and show how to compute compact brambles of order k + 2 in polynomial time, not depending on k.

  18. 巩膜瓣下蓄水池样小梁切除术联合羊膜植入、丝裂霉素C治疗难治性青光眼%Clinical analysis of trabeculectomy with sluice pool like filtrating under scleral flap combined with amniotic membrane transplantation and mitomycin-C in treating refractory glaucoma

    刘伟; 李茜; 任晓冬; 田春玲; 魏玉斌; 乔玉春; 王建亮

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efffect of compound trabeculectomy with sluice pool like filtrating under scleral flap combined with amniotic membrane transplantation and mitomycin-C in treating refractory glaucoma. Methods 102 eyes of 83 refractory glaucoma patients were treated with compound trabeculectomy with sluice pool like filtrating under scleral flap, and conbined with mitomycin-C, adjustable stitches, and amniotic membrane transplantation. Results During an average follow up of 15months (4 months to 28 months). The vision improved 7 eyes, remained the same in 90 eyes, worse than before in 5 eyes, whose differences were not notable (P > 0. 05 ). The preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was 34.48±6.35 mmHg, and the postoperative IOP was 14.23±4.57 mmHg (P<0.01 ). Functional filtrating bleb formed in 95 eyes and nonfunctional one in 7 eyes. Conclusion Trabeculectomy with sluice pool like filtrating under scleral flap combined with amniotic membrance transplantation, adjustable stitches and mitomycin-C in treating refractory glaucoma can effectively decrease the intraocular pressure and keep visual funtion.%目的 探讨难治性青光眼应用巩膜瓣下蓄水池样小梁切除术联合羊膜植入及应用丝裂霉素C治疗的临床疗效.方法 83例(102眼)难治性青光眼进行瓣下蓄水池样小梁切除术,同时联合应用丝裂霉素C、羊膜植入和可拆除调整缝线.术后随访4~28个月,平均15个月.结果 视力:有7眼视力较术前提高,90眼视力无变化,5眼视力下降(P>0.05).眼压:术前(34.48±6.35)mmHg,术后(14.23±4.57)mmHg(P<0.01).滤过泡:全部病例出现功能性滤过泡95眼,非功能性滤过泡7眼.结论 瓣下蓄水池样小梁切除术联合羊膜植入、丝裂霉素C、可拆除调整缝线治疗难治性青光眼能有效降低眼压,进而保护视功能.

  19. Constructing Aligned Assessments Using Automated Test Construction

    Porter, Andrew; Polikoff, Morgan S.; Barghaus, Katherine M.; Yang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative automated test construction algorithm for building aligned achievement tests. By incorporating the algorithm into the test construction process, along with other test construction procedures for building reliable and unbiased assessments, the result is much more valid tests than result from current test construction…

  20. Concrete construction engineering handbook

    Nawy, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    Provides coverage of concrete construction engineering and technology. This work features discussions focusing on: the advances in engineered concrete materials; reinforced concrete construction; specialized construction techniques; and, design recommendations for high performance.

  1. Construction Method Study For Installation Of A Large Riser In A Single-Shell Tank

    This study evaluates and identifies a construction method for cutting a hole in a single-shell tank dome. This study also identifies and evaluates vendors for performing the cut. Single-shell tanks (SST) in the 241-C tank farm are currently being retrieved using various retrieval technologies (e.g., modified sluicing). The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order require that the SSTs be retrieved to less than 360 cubic feet of radioactive waste. The current technologies identified and deployed for tank retrieval have not been able to retrieve waste in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. As such, alternative retrieval systems have been proposed and are currently under construction that will have the ability to retrieve waste to this defined level. The proposed retrieval systems will not fit down existing risers. New risers will need to be installed to provide the retrieval systems access to the inside of the SSTs. The purpose of this study is two-fold. The first objective is to identify multiple concrete cutting technologies and perform an initial pre-screening, evaluate the technologies identified for more in-depth analysis, and recommend a technology/methodology for cutting a hole in the tank dome. The identified/pre-screened methods will be evaluated based on the following criteria: (1) Maturity/complexity; (2) Waste generation; (3) Safety; (4) Cost; and (5) Schedule. Once the preferred method is identified to cut the hole in the tank dome, the second objective is to identify, evaluate, and recommend a vendor for the technology selected that will perform the cutting process.

  2. Project W-320, WRSS PCP: Procedure implementation verification

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-25

    This document provides verification that the methodology for the safe retrieval of high-heat waste from Tank 241-C-106 as specified in the WRSS Process Control Plan HNF-SD-PCP-013, Revision 1, has been adequately implemented into the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operational procedures. Tank 241-C-106 is listed on the High Heat Load Watch List.

  3. Project W-320, WRSS PCP: Procedure implementation verification

    This document provides verification that the methodology for the safe retrieval of high-heat waste from Tank 241-C-106 as specified in the WRSS Process Control Plan HNF-SD-PCP-013, Revision 1, has been adequately implemented into the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operational procedures. Tank 241-C-106 is listed on the High Heat Load Watch List

  4. USAID Construction Assessment

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID construction assessment is a survey of the character, scope, value and management of construction activities supported by USAID during the period from...

  5. Professional entrepreneurial identity construction

    Ramsgaard, Michael Breum

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the construction of a professional identity as an entrepreneur in a sample of people with educational background in nutrition and health. The study examines the connection between professional identity construction and entrepreneurial business emergence using...

  6. Organizational Behaviour in Construction

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Review of: Organizational Behaviour in Construction / Anthony Walker (Wiley-Blackwell,2011 336 pp)......Review of: Organizational Behaviour in Construction / Anthony Walker (Wiley-Blackwell,2011 336 pp)...

  7. NANOTECHNOLOGY IN CONSTRUCTION

    Saeli, .

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology, which has a vast number of possibilities in construction, ranging from energy conservation and coatings to structural enhancement and stress monitoring, has not yet made an important difference in construction compared to other major industries even when there has been a big progress in awareness and investigation in the last years. Nanotechnology has the potential to extend the limits of construction bringing new and enhanced products that can foster the construction activity...

  8. Construction Management : Study Book

    Ilveskoski, Olli; Niittymäki, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    This publication is a summary of the Construction Management course handscript. The objective is that as the students gets involved with the Construction Management of Building Projects they will learn Construction Management topics like Building Process, Production planning, Quantity Take Off, Cost Estimation, Scheduling, Work Safety and Quality Control. The study book has been in use in Construction Management courses in Häme University of Applied Sciences.

  9. Operational test report - Project W-320 cathodic protection systems

    Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems

  10. Track Construction Manual.

    Banke, Ron; Di Gennaro, Guy; Ediger, Rick; Garner, Lanny; Hersom, Steve; Miller, Jack; Nemeth, Ron; Petrucelli, Jim; Sierks, Donna; Smith, Don; Swank, Kevin; West, Kevin

    This book establishes guidelines for the construction and maintenance of tracks by providing information for building new tracks or upgrading existing tracks. Subjects covered include running track planning and construction, physical layout, available surfaces, and maintenance. General track requirements and construction specifications are…

  11. GPS Applications in Construction

    Stranger, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    This session will explore the use of GPS technology in the construction engineering aspects of highway projects. Discussion will include control of line and grade for construction equipment and how the state inspector can verify the construction is according to plans without physical surveying stakes.

  12. Towards green construction

    Sustainability is the key to any development works. In the operation phase, hydro power is the most sustainable form of energy. However construction activities for the same power station are usually far from being green. The popular myth is that construction activity converts green into grey. Despite this popular myth, construction of a hydro power project in Nepal has made the project area greener than earlier during the construction phase itself. Choice of construction technology, appropriate level of environmental impact assessment, monitoring of environmental parameters along side the construction progress followed by mitigation at the right time; launching community development programmes side by side, having environmental specification in contractual documents and self-reliance to fulfill environmental obligations by contractors itself are the key factors in the environmental management within the construction activities. The main conclusions in the paper is the need to change the way to think about the project constraints

  13. Construction Automation and Robotics

    Bock, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Due to the high complexity of the construction process and the stagnating technological development a long-term preparation is necessary to adapt it to advanced construction methods. Architects, engineers and all other participants of the construction process have to be integrated in this adaptation process. The short- and long-term development of automation will take place step-by-step and will be oriented to the respective application and requirements. In the initial phase existing building...

  14. Tilt-up construction

    Crompton, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    CIVINS Tilt-up construction is a special form of precast concrete construction. The technique is used for constructing buildings by prefabricating concrete wall sections (panels) in a horizontal position on either the building's floor slab or on a temporary casting slab. Once the wall sections have cured, they are tilted to a vertical position using a mobile crane, they are temporarily braced in their final upright position, and finally, they are tied into the building's roof and floor sys...

  15. Construction Project Organization

    Pytlíčková, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    The bachelor‘s thesis deals with „Construction Project Organization“. The theoretical part of this thesis explains the basic concepts of project management, describes the project´s life cycle, time planning and deals with the change management at the end of the theoretical part. The practical part deals with the project management of construction and mainly with time planning done by construction work schedule. The issue is solved on a real project led by the Czech construction company, and t...

  16. HITACHI construction CAE system

    Construction and maintenance of nuclear power plants have important problems such as shortening the construction period and reducing the construction cost. Recently, the problem of insufficient construction labor has arisen, and as drastic strategic development has become a necessary counter-measure. The following four principles are included in the measures to be taken for efficient execution of the construction work within the short construction period: (1) reduction of on-site work and expansion of module block making, (2)improvement of the accuracy of the on-site work process, adjustment and expansion of the work in parallel with the construction process, (3)improvement of efficiency of the on-site work and mechanization and automation of the work, (4)improvement of the accuracy of the management of the construction. A three dimensional simulation system plant construction plan CAE, comprising five modules has been developed. A project management system was also developed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of management work in the field

  17. 兴凯湖第二泄洪闸消力池底板施工技术%Constructure technique of No.2 sluice gate force reduction pool bottom in Xingkai Lake

    石友; 王开顺; 马库

    2001-01-01

    针对在软基上修建消力池底板难度大的特点,阐述了混凝土板的施工技术及质量控制方法。%For the hardness in building force reduction pool bottom on soft rock and soil,the paper made a discussion on the construction technique and the quality control method of the concrete bottom.

  18. Rural Infrastructure Construction in New Socialist Countryside Construction

    Guo, Hong-sheng; Guo, Yue-jun

    2012-01-01

    In the background of new socialist countryside construction, rural infrastructure construction is favorable to consolidating fundamental position of agriculture, expanding rural job opportunities, increasing farmers’ income, and favorable to development of rural economy and the national economy. Rural infrastructure construction mainly includes construction of agricultural basic production conditions, construction of rural ecological environment, construction of agricultural service system,...

  19. Safety in construction?

    Swuste, P.H.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The available literature on Construction Safety is not very optimistic about the chances of evidence-based safety in the construction industry exerting a positive influence. Many articles indicate that the structures and processes that are designed to ensure safety in the industry are poor. Safety m

  20. Intentionality Versus Constructive Empiricism

    Buekens, F.A.I.; Muller, Archibald

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBy focussing on the intentional character of observation in science, we argue that Constructive Empiricism-B. C. van Fraassen's much debated and explored view of science-is inconsistent. We then argue there are at least two ways out of our Inconsistency Argument, one of which is more easily to square with Constructive Empiricism than the other.

  1. Nuclear reactor constructions

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  2. Financing Public Library Construction.

    Rohlf, Robert H.; Stoffel, Lester L.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews financing options available to Illinois public libraries for construction or expansion, including general obligation bonds, mortgage funds, building reserve funds, building fund levies, lease back arrangements, sale of air or ground development rights, interest on special funds, gift funds and grants, Library Service and Construction Act…

  3. Personal Usability Constructs

    Hertzum, Morten; Clemmensen, Torkil; Hornbæk, Kasper;

    2011-01-01

    Whereas the concept of usability is predominantly defined analytically, people relate to systems through personal usability constructs. Based on 48 repertory-grid interviews, this study investigates how such personal constructs are affected by two factors crucial to the international development...

  4. Curriculum Guide Construction Cluster.

    Kline, Ken

    As part of a model construction cluster curriculum development project, this guide was developed and implemented in the Beaverton (Oregon) School District. The curriculum guide contains 16 units covering the following topics: introduction to construction jobs; safety and first aid; blueprint readings; basic mathematics; site work; framing; roofing…

  5. Operations management for construction

    March, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Students studying construction management and related subjects need to have a broad understanding of the major aspects of controlling the building processes. Operations Management for Construction is one of three textbooks (Business Organisation, Operations Management and Finance Control) written to systematically cover the field. Focusing on construction sites and operations which are challenging to run, Chris March explores issues such as the setting up of the site, the deciding of the methodology of construction, and the sequence of work and resourcing. As changing and increasing regulations affect the way sites are managed, he also considers the issues and methods of successful administering, safety, quality and environment. Finally, the contractor's responsibility to the environment, including relationships with third parties, selection of materials, waste management and sustainability is discussed. Chris March has a wealth of practical experience in the construction industry, as well as considerable exp...

  6. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options

  7. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  8. Motivating Workers in Construction

    Jason E. Barg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the motivation of construction workers is limited to a relatively small body of knowledge. Although there is considerable research available regarding motivation and productivity, few researchers have provided a comprehensive analysis on the motivation of construction workers. The research stated that productivity in construction has not improved compared to other industry sectors such as manufacturing. This trend has been echoed in publications throughout the past five decades, and suggested that motivation is one of the key factors impacting productivity. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the published work that directly links the key words—construction and motivation. The findings have been presented in five themes, that is, motivation models, environment and culture, incentives and empowerment, and worker management. This paper concludes with two methods suggested by previous researchers to improve motivation of construction workers: (1 relevant worker incentives (intrinsic or extrinsic and (2 improved management practices, specifically regarding communication with workers.

  9. Radon resistant new construction

    This paper consist of the awareness about the ill effects of radon gas and the methods adopted to detect the presence of radon gas and to remove the radon gas. It explains the installation of radon resistant structures during home construction. Radon is commonly found in the air and water, where it poses little risk. But radon that creeps into your home from the soil can be a much greater risk. Radon-resistant construction combines common building techniques and materials to seal entry points and route the gases outdoors, helping to prevent radon from entering the home. The benefits due to radon resistant construction is also explained in this paper. (author)

  10. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  11. Construction and Demolition Waste

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...... therefore should be managed accordingly. Another reason is that it has been documented that a large fraction of C&D waste (about 90 %) can be easily recycled and thus can conserve landfill capacity. C&D waste may conveniently be divided into three subcategories: Buildings, roads and excavations. This...

  12. Construction program management

    Delaney, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Although construction is one of the largest industries in the United States, it lags behind other industries in its implementation of modern management techniques such as those contained in the Standard for Program Management (the Standard) by the Project Management Institute (PMI(R)). Construction Program Management details the successful use of the PMI(R) approach for the construction of capital programs. It demonstrates, through case studies, how implementation of PMI's set of tools and techniques can improve the chances of program success. Exploring tactical and strategic management method

  13. Construction Experience Program (CONEX)

    A summary of the activities of the NEA WGRNR is introduced. In particular the following tasks related to the ConEx (Construction Experience Program) are presented: Rationale and goals of the ConEx program, Development of the event construction database ConEx and its structure, ConEx procedure for program management (uses of ConEx to create knowledge, conclusions of the ConEx synthesis first report on lessons learned during construction, Potential ConEx program uses for operating experience, training, etc.)

  14. Quantitative constructional attributes selection in construction series of types

    P. Gendarz; M. Cielniak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of research was to analyze the selection process of quantitative constructional attributes in construction series of types.Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative constructional attributes selection process is based on constructional similarity theory.Findings: The constructional similarity theory allows to select the quantitative constructional attributes.Research limitations/implications: The final construction similarity is not complete because of adjusting the ...

  15. Construction Minerals Operations

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes construction minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  16. Nuclear power plant construction

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.)

  17. Pluto's Putative Cryovolcanic Constructs

    Singer, K. N.; White, O. L.; Schenk, P. M.; Moore, J. M.; Spencer, J. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Howard, A. D.; Stern, A. S.; Cook, J. C.; Grundy, W. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Beyer, R. A.; Umurhan, O.; Howett, C. J. A.; Parker, A. H.; Protopapa, S.; Lauer, T. R.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Ennico, K.

    2016-06-01

    New Horizons imaged two large mounds with deep central depressions on Pluto. Both features appear constructional, and have relatively young surfaces. This mapping is part of effort to characterize and assess the age and origin of the mounds.

  18. On Construction Grammar

    XIAO Kunxue

    2005-01-01

    Constructionist approach with its brand-new perspective has begun to demonstrate its dynamic power. This paper attempts to review the basic ideas, achievements and comparison with generative grammar of Construction Grammar and generalize some problems and future research prospects.

  19. Construction, fabrication, and installation

    This standard specifies the construction, fabrication, and installation requirements that apply to concrete containment structures of a containment system designated as class containment components, parts and appurtenances for nuclear power plants

  20. Power plant construction method

    Each building is covered at upper than the position of a ceiling crane, each of the ceiling crane always disposed for every building is moved to an optional building to treat equipments and building materials by each of the ceiling crane. A plurality of ceiling cranes are used for transporting one large and heavy weighted equipment or each ceiling crane is used also individually to transport equipments to each building, construction operations are thus conducted using a plurality of ceiling cranes in one identical building or in each of buildings in a state undergoing no influences of the outer circumstance by covering the roofs. Large sized or heavy weighted equipments can be carried in, to proceed the construction smoothly, and in addition, since the construction can be performed in a state scarcely undergoing influence of outer circumstance, the period of time required for the construction can be shortened. (N.H.)

  1. Passive solar construction handbook

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  2. Constructions of Peripherality

    Carter, Helen Frances Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    rural area of Northern Ireland, and the manner in which peripherality is constructed by a variety of different actors in this debate. In the case discussed in the article, peripherality is constructed in different ways by different actors, yet the debate becomes somewhat polarised into the environmental......In this paper I focus on the concept of peripheralisation. In particular, I consider how peripheries can be discursively constructed in the debates surrounding planning cases, and how this might serve to legitimate particular interests. This is related to the case of a proposed golf resort in a...... values of a periphery versus the ‘need’ for economic development in such a periphery. In this paper I will analyse these constructions of peripherality and discuss the manner in which different framings of the region affects planning, and perhaps legitimates certain developments. This offers a...

  3. Predictable grammatical constructions

    Lucas, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    My aim in this paper is to provide evidence from diachronic linguistics for the view that some predictable units are entrenched in grammar and consequently in human cognition, in a way that makes them functionally and structurally equal to nonpredictable grammatical units, suggesting that these...... predictable units should be considered grammatical constructions on a par with the nonpredictable constructions. Frequency has usually been seen as the only possible argument speaking in favor of viewing some formally and semantically fully predictable units as grammatical constructions. However, this paper...... semantically and formally predictable. Despite this difference, [méllo INF], like the other future periphrases, seems to be highly entrenched in the cognition (and grammar) of Early Medieval Greek language users, and consequently a grammatical construction. The syntactic evidence speaking in favor of [méllo...

  4. Employment and winter construction

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    2011-01-01

    possibilities exist for reducing seasonal variation in employment? In addition to a literature review related to winter construction, European and national employment and meteorological data were studied. Finally, ministerial acts, ministerial orders or other public policy documents related to winter...

  5. Steep Cut Construction

    Kumaraswamy, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    One element of the CIVCAL project Web-based resources containing images, tables, texts and associated data on the Steep Cut Construction. This project describes construction of a petrol filling station on Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong. The project was unique in that the necessary area for the filling station was required to be cut from the base of a steeply sloping soil/rock slope adjacent to a busy highway.

  6. Constructing quantum codes

    2008-01-01

    Quantum error correcting codes are indispensable for quantum information processing and quantum computation.In 1995 and 1996,Shor and Steane gave first several examples of quantum codes from classical error correcting codes.The construction of efficient quantum codes is now an active multi-discipline research field.In this paper we review the known several constructions of quantum codes and present some examples.

  7. Construction of Permutation Snarks

    Hägglund, Jonas; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    A permutation snark is a snark which has a 2-factor $F_2$ consisting of two chordless circuits; $F_2$ is called the permutation 2-factor of $G$. We construct an infinite family $\\mathcal H$ of cyclically 5-edge connected permutation snarks. Moreover, we prove for every member $G \\in \\mathcal H$ that the permutation 2-factor given by the construction of $G$ is not contained in any circuit double cover of $G$.

  8. Education for sustainable construction

    Bragança, L.; Koukkari, Heli; Veljkovic, Milan; Borg, Ruben Paul

    2011-01-01

    The COST Action C25 "Sustainability of Constructions - Integrated Approach to Life-time Structural Engineering" is a network of scientists and researchers from 28 European countries and the EU Joint Research Centre in Ispra. It was established to promote science-based developments in sustainable construction in Europe through research on life-time structural engineering. The COST Action has been active since 2006.

  9. CONTRACT CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY

    ANTOANETA CLAUDIA BUTUZA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main types of contractual arrangements used worldwide in construction: traditional contracts, cost reimbursable type contracts, management contracts and other contractual arrangements such as partnership, offering two-phase, contracts in series and turnkey contracts. Also, based on a comparison of the main types of contractual arrangements a number of recommendations are suggested for choosing the appropriate type of contract construction project to be realized.

  10. KARATE WITH CONSTRUCTIVE LEARNING

    Srikrishna Karanam; Amarjot Singh; Devinder Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Any conventional learning process involves the traditional hierarchy of garnering of information and then recall gathered information. Constructive learning is an important research area having wide impact on teaching methods in education, learning theories, and plays a major role in many education reform movements. It is observed that constructive learning advocates the interconnection between emotions and learning. Human teachers identify the emotions of students with varying degrees of acc...

  11. Management for Construction Materials and Control of Construction Waste in Construction Industry: A Review

    A. A. Gulghane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent treads a wide range of building materials is available for the construction of civil engineering structures. The total cost of materials may be up to 60% or more of the total cost incurred in construction project dependent upon the type of project. Effective construction materials management is a key to success for a construction project. Construction waste is another serious problem in construction industry. A large and various types of construction waste with different characteristics are created at all the stages of construction. Construction industries have a larger part in contributing environmental problems. The economic and environmental benefits must be gained from construction waste minimization. This paper presents a review on systematically investigation of the management of construction materials and construction waste, material management techniques, control of construction waste and existing situation of construction management and construction waste in the industry.

  12. AP1000 construction schedule

    Westinghouse performed this study as part of EPRI interest in advancing the use of computer aided processes to reduce the cost of nuclear power plants. EPRI believed that if one could relate appropriate portions of an advanced light water reactor plant model to activities in its construction sequence, and this relationship could be portrayed visually, then optimization of the construction sequence could be developed as never before. By seeing a 3-D representation of the plant at any point in its construction sequence, more informed decisions can be made on the feasibility or attractiveness of follow on or parallel steps in the sequence. The 3-D representation of construction as a function of time (4-D) could also increase the confidence of potential investors concerning the viability of the schedule and the plant ultimate cost. This study performed by Westinghouse confirmed that it is useful to be able to visualize a plant construction in 3-D as a function of time in order to optimize the sequence of construction activities. (author)

  13. Management for Construction Materials and Control of Construction Waste in Construction Industry: A Review

    A. A. Gulghane; Prof P. V. Khandve

    2015-01-01

    In recent treads a wide range of building materials is available for the construction of civil engineering structures. The total cost of materials may be up to 60% or more of the total cost incurred in construction project dependent upon the type of project. Effective construction materials management is a key to success for a construction project. Construction waste is another serious problem in construction industry. A large and various types of construction waste with different...

  14. Construction time of PWRs

    Carajilescov, Pedro; Moreira, Joao M.L., E-mail: pedro.carajilescov@ufabc.edu.b, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.b [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Center of Engineering, Modeling and Applied Social Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The cost of electricity generated by nuclear power is greatly affected by the capital cost, which is dependent on the construction time of the plant. This work analyses the construction time of PWRs in several countries with different market structure and licensing experience. Countries which succeeded to establish a more collaborative environment among utilities, constructors, regulators, and energy planners through effective partnerships were able to build PWRs in shorter times. The construction time in Germany, France and Russia was around 80 months and in Japan, about 60 months. The envelope of 95% of the cases includes a range between 50 and 250 months of construction time. The evaluations show that construction time of PWRs has been longer for countries that did not hold the technology to build their own reactors, and depended on contracts with foreign suppliers. The nominal power of the reactors was considered a measure of plant size, technology complexity and standardization. Countries with standardized reactor designs (France, Japan and Russia) were able to build plants in shorter times. (author)

  15. Construction time of PWRs

    The cost of electricity generated by nuclear power is greatly affected by the capital cost, which is dependent on the construction time of the plant. This work analyses the construction time of PWRs in several countries with different market structure and licensing experience. Countries which succeeded to establish a more collaborative environment among utilities, constructors, regulators, and energy planners through effective partnerships were able to build PWRs in shorter times. The construction time in Germany, France and Russia was around 80 months and in Japan, about 60 months. The envelope of 95% of the cases includes a range between 50 and 250 months of construction time. The evaluations show that construction time of PWRs has been longer for countries that did not hold the technology to build their own reactors, and depended on contracts with foreign suppliers. The nominal power of the reactors was considered a measure of plant size, technology complexity and standardization. Countries with standardized reactor designs (France, Japan and Russia) were able to build plants in shorter times. (author)

  16. Construction and Demolition Waste

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...... and has just been landfilled. However, in recent years more focus has been put on C&D waste and data are starting to appear. One reason is that it has been recognized that C&D waste may include many materials that are contaminated either as part of their original design or through their use and...... therefore should be managed accordingly. Another reason is that it has been documented that a large fraction of C&D waste (about 90 %) can be easily recycled and thus can conserve landfill capacity. C&D waste may conveniently be divided into three subcategories: Buildings, roads and excavations. This...

  17. Constructing populations in biobanking

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose a.

    2015-01-01

    This article poses the question of whether biobanking practices and standards are giving rise to the construction of populations from which various biobanking initiatives increasingly draw on for legitimacy? We argue that although recent biobanking policies encourage various forms of engagement...... construction of populations, whereby specific nationalities, communities, societies, patient groups and political systems become imbued or bio-objectified with particular characteristics, such as compliant, distant, positive, commercialized or authoritarian. This bio-objectification process is problematic in...... relation to policy aspirations ascribed to biobanking engagement since it gives rise to reified notions of different populations....

  18. Bipolar battery construction

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor); Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, bipolar battery construction for lead acid batteries in which a plurality of thin, rigid, biplates each comprise a graphite fiber thermoplastic composition in conductive relation to lead stripes plated on opposite flat surfaces of the plates, and wherein a plurality of nonconductive thermoplastic separator plates support resilient yieldable porous glass mats in which active material is carried, the biplates and separator plates with active material being contained and maintained in stacked assembly by axial compression of the stacked assembly. A method of assembling such a bipolar battery construction.

  19. Logic, construction, computation

    Berger, Ulrich; Diener, Hannes; Seisenberger, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few decades the interest of logicians and mathematicians in constructive and computational aspects of their subjects has been steadily growing, and researchers from disparate areas realized that they can benefit enormously from the mutual exchange of techniques concerned with those aspects. A key figure in this exciting development is the logician and mathematician Helmut Schwichtenberg to whom this volume is dedicated on the occasion of his 70th birthday and his turning emeritus. The volume contains 20 articles from leading experts about recent developments in Constructive set t

  20. Construction Management Meets Today's Realities.

    Day, C. William

    1979-01-01

    Construction management--the control of cost and time from concept through construction--grew out of a need to meet the realities of today's economy. A checklist of services a construction manager provides is presented. (Author/MLF)

  1. Rural Infrastructure Construction in New Socialist Countryside Construction

    2012-01-01

    In the background of new socialist countryside construction,rural infrastructure construction is favorable to consolidating fundamental position of agriculture,expanding rural job opportunities,increasing farmers’ income,and favorable to development of rural economy and the national economy. Rural infrastructure construction mainly includes construction of agricultural basic production conditions,construction of rural ecological environment,construction of agricultural service system,and construction of rural living facilities. Finally,we put forward approaches and methods for strengthening rural infrastructure construction: firstly,increase fund input to provide financial support for rural infrastructure construction; second ly,make scientific village planning to ensure sustainability of rural infrastructure construction; thirdly,arouse farmers’ enthusiasm and initiative to promote stable development of rural infrastructure construction.

  2. Federal Environmental Requirements for Construction

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This guide provides information on federal environmental requirements for construction projects. It is written primarily for owners of construction projects and for...

  3. Structural safety during construction

    Terwel, K.C.; Mud, M.; Frijters, A.

    2014-01-01

    Structural safety during construction is a main concern for the building industry. Collapses of temporary structures or incomplete permanent structures are a threat for the safety of persons. Based on data from Dutch Labour Inspectorate this study concluded that approximately 20% of the fatalities d

  4. Neuroeconomics: Constructing identity

    J.B. Davis

    2010-01-01

    The paper asks whether neuroeconomics will make instrumental use of neuroscience to adjudicate existing disputes in economics or be more seriously transformed by neuroscience in ways that might transform economics. The paper pursues the question by asking how neuroscience constructs an understanding

  5. Nanotechnologies for sustainable construction

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Andersen, Maj Munch

    2009-01-01

    This chapter aims to highlight key aspects and recent trends in the development and application of nanotechnology to facilitate sustainable construction, use and demolition of buildings and infrastructure structures, ‘nanoconstruction’. Nanotechnology is not a technology but a very diverse...

  6. Construct for excellence II

    McInnis, A

    2001-01-01

    Professor Arthur McInnis continues his review of the Report of the Construction Industry Review Committee ('CIRC'). This month he looks at its recommendations on risk management, quality, value management, sub-contractor registration, structured site supervision and independent audits — as well as a proposed new institutional framework.

  7. Skin Problems in Construction

    ... 1926.95 www.osha.gov Check the Label & Safety Data Sheet: OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard – 29 CFR 1926.59 www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/index.html Physician’s Alert: Occupational Contact Dermatitis Among Construction Workers – give this Alert ...

  8. Construction of Resilient Functions

    ZHANG Jie; WEN Qiao-yan

    2005-01-01

    Based on the relationship between nonlinearity and resiliency of a multi-output function, we present a method for constructing nonintersecting linear codes from packing design. Through these linear codes, we obtain n-variable, moutput, t-resilient functions with very high nonlinearity.Their nonlinearities are currently the best results for most of cases.

  9. Constructions in Wonderland

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard; Shibuya, Yoshikata

    -gram analysis to some different texts, including Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (AW), Mark Twain's 1884/5 novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (HF), and some US presidential speeches, to identify frequently (co)occurring words that may be indicative of underlying constructions...

  10. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  11. On the Kummer construction

    Andreatta, Marco; Wisniewski, Jaroslaw A.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss a generalization of Kummer construction which, on the base of an integral representation of a finite group and local resolution of its quotient, produces a higher dimensional variety with trivial canonical class. As an application we compute cohomology of some generalized Kummer varieties.

  12. Mortality table construction

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  13. Principles of constructional change

    Fried, Mirjam

    Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013 - (Hoffmann, T.; Trousdale, G.), s. 419-437 ISBN 978-0-19-539668-3 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP406/11/2021 Keywords : grammaticalization * gradualness of change * constructionalization * constructional map Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  14. Constructing Regional advantage

    Asheim, Bjørn T.; Boschma, Ron; Cooke, Phil

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a regional innovation policy model based on the idea of constructing regional advantage. This policy model brings together concepts like related variety, knowledge bases and policy platforms. Related variety attaches importance to knowledge spillovers across complementary...... economic development within and between regions in action lines appropriate to incorporate the basic principles behind related variety and differentiated knowledge bases....

  15. Handley Page metal construction

    1929-01-01

    In this report Handley Page construction techniques are shown such as: solid-drawn tubular duralumin spars are used in the stabilizer; plain channel sections are used extensively for minor components; and the manner of assembling them into a stabilizer compression strut is shown.

  16. Constructive Approach Towards Protocells

    Sugawara, Tadashi; Kurihara, Kensuke; Suzuki, Kentaro

    2013-12-01

    In this chapter, we describe the construction of a self-reproducing giant vesicle (GV) and the replication of an informational substance (DNA) in the GV. The linkage between these two amplification dynamics has led to generation of a model protocell.

  17. Construction Mechanic 1 & C.

    Seitz, Thomas E.

    This Rate Training Manual and Nonresident Career Course (RTM/NRCC) form a self-study package that will enable Naval Construction Mechanics First and Chief to fulfill the requirements of their rating. (Persons holding these ratings direct and coordinate efforts of individuals and crews in maintaining, repairing, and overhauling automotive,…

  18. Construction Management: Planning Ahead.

    Arsht, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explains that preconstruction planning is essential when undertaking the challenges of a school building renovation or expansion, focusing on developing a detailed estimate, creating an effective construction strategy, conducting reviews and value-engineering workshops, and realizing savings through effective risk analysis and contingency…

  19. ACCELERATING CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT

    Mohan M. Kumaraswamy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The needs for construction industry development are initially viewed from the broader perspectives of imperatives for infrastructure development and national development. All these are clearly more critical in developing countries. A non-exhaustive set of potential drivers and common barriers to construction industry development is identified from previous research. These suggest the usefulness of consolidating a cluster of recent proposals and exercises aiming at (a construction organization development in terms of an over-arching management support system model, as well as improved information and knowledge management; and (b project team development in the context of relationally integrated teams and supply chains, joint risk management and ‘technology and knowledge exchange’ in joint ventures, as well as longer term public private partnerships. These apparently disparate research thrusts are threaded together into a pattern that may inspire, if not feed, specific research and development (R & D agendas for construction industry development in different countries according to their own priorities, constraints and stages of infrastructure and national development.

  20. Mirror Symmetry Constructions

    Clader, Emily

    2014-01-01

    These expository notes are based on lectures by Yongbin Ruan during a special semester on the B-model at the University of Michigan in Winter 2014. They outline and compare the mirror symmetry constructions of Batyrev-Borisov, Hori-Vafa, and Bergland-Hubsch-Krawitz.

  1. Energy-Friendly Construction

    2006-01-01

    A building is a base for human activities, but it also consumes a large amount of energy and resources. Of all the newly constructed buildings throughout China, it is estimated only 10 to 15 percent are up to the state standard, and over 80 percent require enormous energy consumption. This

  2. KARATE WITH CONSTRUCTIVE LEARNING

    Srikrishna Karanam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Any conventional learning process involves the traditional hierarchy of garnering of information and then recall gathered information. Constructive learning is an important research area having wide impact on teaching methods in education, learning theories, and plays a major role in many education reform movements. It is observed that constructive learning advocates the interconnection between emotions and learning. Human teachers identify the emotions of students with varying degrees of accuracy and can improve the learning rate of the students by motivating them. In learning with computers, computers also should be given the capability to recognize emotions so as to optimize the learning process. Image Processing is a very popular tool used in the process of establishing the theory of Constructive Learning. In this paper we use the Optical Flow computation in image sequences to analyze the accuracy of the moves of a karate player. We have used the Lucas-Kanade method for computing the optical flow in image sequences. A database consisting of optical flow images by a group of persons learning karate is formed and the learning rates are analyzed in order to main constructive learning. The contours of flow images are compared with the standard images and the error graphs are plotted. Analysis of the emotion of the amateur karate player is made by observing the error plots.

  3. Quantitative constructional attributes selection in construction series of types

    P. Gendarz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main aim of research was to analyze the selection process of quantitative constructional attributes in construction series of types.Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative constructional attributes selection process is based on constructional similarity theory.Findings: The constructional similarity theory allows to select the quantitative constructional attributes.Research limitations/implications: The final construction similarity is not complete because of adjusting the dimension values to preferred numbers, catalogue and standardized elements dimensions etc.Practical implications: Presented method was applied to generate the constructions series of types with the use of quantitative constructional attributes selection process.Originality/value: Described analysis presents the process of selecting the quantitative constructional attributes with computer aid.

  4. Constructing futures : industry leaders and future thinking in construction.

    Chan, Paul; Cooper, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest in future scenario planning of the construction industry but a disconnect between thinking about the future at the policy-making level and implementing real change. Constructing Futures: industry leaders and futures thinking in construction takes a thematic approach to the future of the UK construction industry by presenting the results of a series of in-depth interviews conducted with leading construction figures and structuring this material into chapters addressin...

  5. Recycling construction waste and re – use in road construction

    Kumlanc, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Construction activities have a huge harmful influence on environment, caused by the explotation of natural resourcess, production and transportation of materials, construction and demolition and finally the building itself. To minimize construction activities on environment, we need to reduce usage of primary sources and attend to prepare secundary sources. The present work describes recycling construction and demolition waste and re-using in building roads and other construction. In Diploma ...

  6. Foreign construction workers in Singapore.

    Ofori G

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the construction industry in Singapore. Studies the structure of the construction workforce, the terms of employment, policies towards worker, the effects of employment of foreign workers on local industry, the reducing reliance on foreign construction workers, and the future trends in Singapore's requirements for construction workers.

  7. Constructing the Audience

    Willig, Ida

    2010-01-01

    No more than twenty years ago, the doors between the newsrooms and the marketing departments of Danish newspapers were tightly shut. Today, all major Danish newspapers work with reader profiles using marketing data to create journalistic concepts. This article identifies two dominant reader...... constructions in policy papers of Danish newspapers: the reader-as-citizen, which can be traced back to the late 1940s, and the reader-as-consumer, visible in the historically new reader profiles, where we also find a third reader construction, the reader-as-commodity. The development indicates a transformation...... from an Omnibus press system with a publicist logic of practice to a Segment press system with a commercial logic of practice....

  8. Construction with macromolecules

    Stefan Hecht

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of nanosized features via the bottom-up organization of individual atoms and molecules represents one of the most rapidly emerging fields in modern science and technology. In order to gain general and modular access to nanostructures, a construction kit consisting of molecular building blocks with defined nanoscale dimensions, shape, and functionality is required. While nature has developed a hierarchical strategy to construct sophisticated and complex nanostructures, chemistry is just starting to explore artificial macromolecules as a means to synthesize specific nano-objects. In this review, recent advances in achieving control over conformation within macromolecules and the interconnection of conformationally defined subunits by either covalent bonds or self-assembly are discussed in analogy to natural structure evolution.

  9. Construction quality assurance report

    Roscha, V.

    1994-09-08

    This report provides a summary of the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and test results, including: The results of the geosynthetic and soil materials conformance testing. The observation and testing results associates with the installation of the soil liners. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the HDPE geomembrane liner systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the leachate collection and removal systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the working surfaces. The observation and testing results associated with in-plant manufacturing process. Summary of submittal reviews by Golder Construction Services, Inc. The submittal and certification of the piping material specifications. The observation and verification associated of the Acceptance Test Procedure results of the operational equipment functions. Summary of the ECNs which are incorporated into the project.

  10. Constructing populations in biobanking.

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    This article poses the question of whether biobanking practices and standards are giving rise to the construction of populations from which various biobanking initiatives increasingly draw on for legitimacy? We argue that although recent biobanking policies encourage various forms of engagement with publics to ensure legitimacy, different biobanks conceptualize their engagement strategies very differently. We suggest that biobanks undertake a broad range of different strategies with regard to engagement. We argue that these different approaches to engagement strategies are contributing to the construction of populations, whereby specific nationalities, communities, societies, patient groups and political systems become imbued or bio-objectified with particular characteristics, such as compliant, distant, positive, commercialized or authoritarian. This bio-objectification process is problematic in relation to policy aspirations ascribed to biobanking engagement since it gives rise to reified notions of different populations. PMID:26194269

  11. Constructing Time Machines

    Shore, Graham M

    2003-01-01

    The existence of time machines, understood as spacetime constructions exhibiting physically realised closed timelike curves (CTCs), would raise fundamental problems with causality and challenge our current understanding of classical and quantum theories of gravity. In this paper, we investigate three proposals for time machines which share some common features: cosmic strings in relative motion, where the conical spacetime appears to allow CTCs; colliding gravitational shock waves, which in Aichelburg-Sexl coordinates imply discontinuous geodesics; and the superluminal propagation of light in gravitational radiation metrics in a modified electrodynamics featuring violations of the strong equivalence principle. While we show that ultimately none of these constructions creates a working time machine, their study illustrates the subtle levels at which causal self-consistency imposes itself, and we consider what intuition can be drawn from these examples for future theories.

  12. Construction quality assurance report

    This report provides a summary of the construction quality assurance (CQA) observation and test results, including: The results of the geosynthetic and soil materials conformance testing. The observation and testing results associates with the installation of the soil liners. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the HDPE geomembrane liner systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the leachate collection and removal systems. The observation and testing results associated with the installation of the working surfaces. The observation and testing results associated with in-plant manufacturing process. Summary of submittal reviews by Golder Construction Services, Inc. The submittal and certification of the piping material specifications. The observation and verification associated of the Acceptance Test Procedure results of the operational equipment functions. Summary of the ECNs which are incorporated into the project

  13. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    Goldberg, L.A. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom) Dept. of Computer Science; Goldberg, P.W. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom) Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorkin, G.B. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  14. Construction of thyroid simulators

    Full text: This work exposes the methodology of construction of thyroid simulators; which was developed considering the mathematical model for the man of reference proposed by Cristy M. The physical models are designed for different ages and is conformed by two concentric cylinders of polyvynil chloride and its anatomic form was molded with silicone (polyimethyl siloxano). The cavities that represent the lobes of the thyroid contain a radioactive solution. It was made a theoretical calculation of the damping factors for this structure reproducing the values reported in literature with a rank of acceptable uncertainty within the margin of energies of photons emitted by the radionuclides ones but using. Here a protocol of construction of these simulators appears to be used like patterns in dosimetry in alive. (orig.)

  15. Pseudorandomness and Combinatorial Constructions

    Trevisan, Luca

    2006-01-01

    In combinatorics, the probabilistic method is a very powerful tool to prove the existence of combinatorial objects with interesting and useful properties. Explicit constructions of objects with such properties are often very difficult, or unknown. In computer science, probabilistic algorithms are sometimes simpler and more efficient than the best known deterministic algorithms for the same problem. Despite this evidence for the power of random choices, the computational theory of pseudorandom...

  16. Nuclear reactor constructions

    An improvement in the construction of liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors of the kind in which the fuel assembly is submerged in a pool of coolant contained by a primary vessel housed in a concrete vault, is described. In this modification the roof of the vault carries heat exchangers immersed in the pool of coolant, the lower ends of which are hydraulically damped against oscillation caused by seismic disturbances. (U.K.)

  17. Nature Conquers Construction

    Rosenberg, Ryan Michael

    2010-01-01

    This project began as a critique of the current notions of â greenâ architecture. It grew into the creation of a system for integrating nature with structure, the organic with the constructed. A grand entry for the Highline Park on the lower Westside of Manhattan is used as a means for generating a domain which plants, specifically hanging ivy, could thrive. Simple elements such as columns, cables, stairs and ramps, can become a means for creating immersive living volumes, fostering instan...

  18. Fullerene - Porphyrin constructs

    Boyd, PDW; Reed, CA

    2005-01-01

    Porphyrins and fullerenes are spontaneously attracted to each other. This new supramolecular recognition element can be used to construct discrete host-guest complexes, as well as ordered arrays of interleaved porphyrins and fullerenes. The fullerene-porphyrin interaction underlies successful Chromatographic separations of fullerenes, and there are promising applications in the areas of porous framework solids and photovoltaic devices. © 2005 American Chemical Society.

  19. Construct of emotional intelligence

    Sonja Pečjak in Andreja Avsec

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the construct of emotional intelligence, that has appeared about then years ago. We present the popular and scientific comprehension of emotional intelligence, briefly describe the development of the concept and than in detail we propose the existing comprehension of emotional intelligence: through the models of Goleman (1995 and Bar-On (1997 we present the comprehension of emotional intelligence as a non-cognitive (personality traits.

  20. ISO: Isochrone construction

    Dotter, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    ISO transforms MESA history files into a uniform basis for interpolation and then constructs new stellar evolution tracks and isochrones from that basis. It is written in Fortran and requires MESA (ascl:1010.083), primarily for interpolation. Though designed to ingest MESA star history files, tracks from other stellar evolution codes can be incorporated by loading the tracks into the data structures used in the codes.

  1. Re-construction

    Bernadette Marie Devilat

    2013-01-01

    Re-construct: to build again. The necessary reconstruction process after an earthquake can be seen as an opportunity to improve previous conditions. All damaged buildings undergo a renovation process in which every piece is carefully returned to its original place. The photograph shows roof reconstruction work in San Pedro de Alcántara, a heritage area in the central valley of Chile, which was particularly affected by the 2010 earthquake. 

  2. Self constructing in adolescence

    Vranješević Jelena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore “theories” adolescents have about themselves, i.e. about the changes in the ways they construe themselves in the period of middle adolescence: how they construe changes and estimate them according to some dimensions relevant for change (appreciation of change, its importance, expectancy, timing, comprehensiveness, intensity and visibility in social surroundings. The study was explorative and it was performed on the sample of 96 adolescents aged 15-17 (middle adolescence. Instruments used for the study were: interview and Role Construct Repertory Grid, adjusted to the need of study. The results show that the adolescents’ construct system is highly monolithic and tight in regard to constructs (black and white construing, but at the same time vague and predictively unclear in regard to elements, i. e. the stated changes, meaning that adolescents are not able to construe those changes according to certain constructs. It seems that this study included the beginning of the loosening phase (creativity cycle in which the system is still tight and, therefore, protects from threat and anxiety, while the elements are not predictively (this is what Erikson calls moratorium, i.e. the process of active experimenting. Changes which are fully predictively are those which refer to adults' roles, such as: self confident, experienced, independent and has responsibilities, worries. On the hand, changes which are predictably the most clear to adolescents (and not appreciated are depression and nervousness. Adolescents face an implicative dilemma: positive implications of maturity are not enough, while negative implications, such as nervousness, depression and not trusting people are clear, predictable and negative. This dilemma can be the cause of their ambivalence towards growing-up and accepting the roles of adults.

  3. Construct Graph Logic

    Tan, Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, author uses set theory to construct a logic model of abstract figure from binary relation. Based on the uniform quantified structure, author gives two logic system for graph traversal and graph coloring respectively, moreover shows a new method of cutting graph. Around this model, there are six algorithms in this paper including exact graph traversal, Algebra calculation of natural number, graph partition and graph coloring.

  4. Construction 'Work Study'

    Kumaraswamy, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    One element of the CIVCAL project Web-based resources containing images, tables, texts and associated data relating to approaches to 'Construction Work Study'. This is defined as 'A management service based on those techniques, particularly Method Study and Work Measurement, which are used in examining human work in all its contexts, and which lead to systematic investigation of all the resources and factors affecting the efficiency and economy of the situation being reviewed, in order ...

  5. LEAR construction completed

    1982-01-01

    In July 1982, LEAR construction was completed, the individual systems had been dry-tested. On 16 July, the first 50 MeV (309 MeV/c) protons from Linac 1 were injected and circulated. On 11 October, the first antiprotons from the AA, decelerated in the PS to 609 MeV/c, were injected. Also in 1982, acceleration, deceleration and stochastic cooling were successfully tested. See 9007366 for a more detailed description. See also 8201061, 8204131, 8309026.

  6. Tactical Portfolio Construction

    Chen, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Modern portfolio theory says that unsystematic risk can always be diversified away. Although it is unrealistic to achieve perfect diversification, people developed different strategies trying to find an optimal portfolio. In this paper, issues of how to make a diversified portfolio are discussed. Six models of tactical portfolio construction strategies are used to make the optimal portfolios using the historical data from Jan. 2007 to Dec. 2009. From the out-of-sample test by market data from...

  7. Constructing HSOC data platform

    HXMT is the only independent space astronomic secondary planet during 2006-2010 in China. Also it is the first independent astronomic secondary planet of China. HSOC, which is the data management sub-system, is the fundamental infrastructure of HXMT's scientific administration center. The data platform is the object of data management sub-system, which is an integrated platform supporting storage, share, exchange, query, statistics and management of data. The paper introduces the meaning and construction of HSOC data platform. (authors)

  8. 1997 construction & design survey.

    Pinto, C

    1997-03-31

    Managed care might seem to be putting a damper on healthcare construction, but in fact it's one of several industry changes creating opportunities for architectural and design firms. One example of a trend toward making surroundings as pleasant as possible is the west campus expansion at East Texas Medical Center in Tyler (left). Designed and built by Ellerbe Becket and completed in 1995, the project, including a nine-story medical office building, features artwork and rooftop gardens. PMID:10165801

  9. Construct of emotional intelligence

    Sonja Pečjak in Andreja Avsec

    2003-01-01

    The article highlights the construct of emotional intelligence, that has appeared about then years ago. We present the popular and scientific comprehension of emotional intelligence, briefly describe the development of the concept and than in detail we propose the existing comprehension of emotional intelligence: through the models of Goleman (1995) and Bar-On (1997) we present the comprehension of emotional intelligence as a non-cognitive (personality) traits.

  10. Toward a constructive physics

    We argue that the discretization of physics which has occurred thanks to the advent of quantum mechanics has replaced the continuum standards of time, length and mass which brought physics to maturity by counting. The (arbitrary in the sense of conventional dimensional analysis) standards have been replaced by three dimensional constants: the limiting velocity c, the unit of action h, and either a reference mass (eg m/sub p/) or a coupling constant (eg G related to the mass scale by hc/(2πGm/sub p/2) approx. = 1.7 x 1038). Once these physical and experimental reference standards are accepted, the conventional approach is to connect physics to mathematics by means of dimensionless ratios. But these standards now rest on counting rather than ratios, and allow us to think of a fourth dimensionless mathematical concept, which is counting integers. According to constructive mathematics, counting has to be understood before engaging in the practice of mathematics in order to avoid redundancy. In its strict form constructive mathematics allows no completed infinities, and must provide finite algorithms for the computation of any acceptable concept. This finite requirement in constructive mathematics is in keeping with the practice of physics when that practice is restricted to hypotheses which are testable in a finite time. In this paper we attempt to outline a program for physics which will meet these rigid criteria while preserving, in so far as possible, the successes that conventional physics has already achieved