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Sample records for 23na nuclear magnetic

  1. 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of gramicidin-induced ion transport through membranes under equilibrium conditions.

    Buster, D C; Hinton, J F; Millett, F S; Shungu, D C

    1988-01-01

    A technique for investigating the gramicidin-facilitated transport of Na+ ions across lipid bilayers of large unilamellar vesicles under the condition of ionic equilibrium has been developed using a combination of heat incubation of the gramicidin with the vesicles and 23Na-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Isolation of the two 23Na-NMR signals from the intra- and extravesicular Na+ with the shift reagent, dysprosium (III) tripolyphosphate, allows the equilibrium flux of Na+ thro...

  2. Crystalline phase of sodium germanate system determined by x-ray diffraction and 23Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Crystalline products of sodium germanate glasses system with composition from 10 mol% to 50 mol% Na2O have been investigated using 23Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Fitting of the 23Na NMR spectra of the crystalline phases concerning different crystallographically sodium atom in sodium germanate system are reasonably reproducible as observed by the spectra obtained. The line shape simulations of the 23Na NMR spectra yielded NMR quadrupolar parameters such as nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (CQ), asymmetry parameters (η), and isotropic chemical shifts (δi). 23Na NMR isotropic chemical shift may also provide further information on the structural environment of the sodium atom. A simple correlation between structure and NMR parameters to be tested can be used to probe the structure of sodium germanate glasses. The experimental 23Na chemical shifts correlate well with an empirical shift parameter based on the total oxygen-cation bond valence and Na-O distances of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of the sodium cation. In this study the different phases in the sodium germanate system were identified. These results show that 23Na NMR can provide examples of the types of structural information for sodium germanate system. (Author)

  3. Sodium ion dynamics in a sulfonate based ionomer system studied by 23Na solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and impedance spectroscopy

    A poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane-sulphonate) (PAMPS) ionomer containing both sodium and quaternary ammonium cations functionalised with an ether group, has been characterised in terms of its thermal properties, ionic conductivity and sodium ion dynamics. The ether oxygen was incorporated to reduce the Na+ association with the anionic sulfonate groups tethered to the polymer backbone, thereby promoting ion dissociation and ultimately enhancing the ionic conductivity. This functionalised ammonium cation led to a significant reduction in the ionomer Tg compared to an analogue system without an ether group, resulting in an increase in ionic conductivity of approximately four orders of magnitude. The sodium ion dynamics were probed by 23Na solid-state NMR, which allowed the signals from the dissociated (mobile) and bound Na+ cations to be distinguished. This demonstrates the utility of 23Na solid-state NMR as a probe of sodium dynamics in ionomer systems

  4. 23Na and 1H NMR Relaxometry of Shale at High Magnetic Field

    Yang, Donghan

    2016-01-01

    Formation evaluation of unconventional reservoirs is challenging due to the coexistence of different phases such as kerogen, bitumen, movable and bound light hydrocarbon and water. Current low-frequency (0.05 T) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) laboratory and logging methods are incapable of quantitatively separating the different phases. We demonstrate the utility of high-field (9 T) NMR 2D T1-T2 measurements for separating hydrocarbon and the clay-interacting aqueous phases in shale based on the difference in the frequency dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time. Furthermore, we demonstrate 23Na NMR as a promising complementary technique to conventional 1H NMR for shale fluid typing, taking advantage of the fact that sodium ions are only present in the aqueous phase. We validate high-field (9 T) 23Na-1H NMR relaxometry for assessing brine-filled porosity and brine salinity in various porous materials, including porous glass, conventional rocks, clays, and shale, and apply it for differentiating hydro...

  5. Development of a magnetic resonance sensor for on-line monitoring of 99Tc and 23Na in tank waste cleanup processes: Final report and implementation plan

    In response to US Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for advanced cross-cutting technologies, Argonne National Laboratory is developing an on-line sensor system for the real-time monitoring of 99Tc and 23Na in various locations throughout radioactive-waste processing facilities. Based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the highly automated sensor system can provide near-real-time response with minimal sampling. The technology, in the form of a flow-through nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based on-line process sensing and control system, can rapidly monitor 99Tc speciation and concentration (from 0.1 molar to 10 micro molar) in the feedstocks and eluents of radioactive-waste treatment processes. The system is nonintrusive, capable of withstanding harsh plant environments, and reasonably immune to contaminants. Furthermore, the system is capable of operating over large variations in pH, conductivity, and salinity. This document describes design parameters, results from sensitivity studies, and initial results obtained from oxidation-reduction studies that were conducted on technetium standards and waste specimens obtained from DOE's Hanford site. A cursory investigation of the system's capabilities to monitor 23Na at high concentrations are also reported, as are descriptions of site requirements, implementation recommendations, and testing techniques

  6. Second-Scale Nuclear Spin Coherence Time of Trapped Ultracold $^{23}$Na$^{40}$K Molecules

    Park, Jee Woo; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian A; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2016-01-01

    Coherence, the stability of the relative phase between quantum states, lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. Applications such as precision measurement, interferometry, and quantum computation are enabled by physical systems that have quantum states with robust coherence. With the creation of molecular ensembles at sub-$\\mu$K temperatures, diatomic molecules have become a novel system under full quantum control. Here, we report on the observation of stable coherence between a pair of nuclear spin states of ultracold fermionic NaK molecules in the singlet rovibrational ground state. Employing microwave fields, we perform Ramsey spectroscopy and observe coherence times on the scale of one second. This work opens the door for the exploration of single molecules as a versatile quantum memory. Switchable long-range interactions between dipolar molecules can further enable two-qubit gates, allowing quantum storage and processing in the same physical system. Within the observed coherence time, $10^4$ one- and two-...

  7. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular 23Na + signals in yeast cell suspensions using longitudinal magnetic resonance relaxography

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirer-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the ability of MR relaxography (MRR) to discriminate intra- (Nai+) and extracellular (Nae+)23Na + signals using their longitudinal relaxation time constant ( T1) values. Na +-loaded yeast cell ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspensions were investigated. Two types of compartmental 23Na +T1 differences were examined: a selective Nae+T1 decrease induced by an extracellular relaxation reagent (RR e), GdDOTP 5-; and, an intrinsic T1 difference. Parallel studies using the established method of 23Na MRS with an extracellular shift reagent (SR e), TmDOTP 5-, were used to validate the MRR measurements. With 12.8 mM RR e, the 23Nae+T1 was 2.4 ms and the 23Nai+T1 was 9.5 ms (9.4T, 24 °C). The Na + amounts and spontaneous efflux rate constants were found to be identical within experimental error whether measured by MRR/RR e or by MRS/SR e. Without RR e, the Na +-loaded yeast cell suspension 23Na MR signal exhibited two T1 values, 9.1 (±0.3) ms and 32.7 (±2.3) ms, assigned to 23Nai+ and 23Nae+, respectively. The Nai+ content measured was lower, 0.88 (±0.06); while Nae+ was higher, 1.43 (±0.12) compared with MRS/SR e measures on the same samples. However, the measured efflux rate constant was identical. T1 MRR potentially may be used for Nai+ determination in vivo and Na + flux measurements; with RR e for animal studies and without RR e for humans.

  8. Scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging using the chemical shift imaging sequence. Evaluation of an iterative reconstruction method

    Weingaertner, Sebastian; Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wetterling, Friedrich [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Dublin Univ. (Ireland) Trinity Inst. of Neuroscience; Fatar, Marc [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Neumaier-Probst, Eva [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate potential scan time reduction in {sup 23}Na-Magnetic Resonance Imaging with the chemical shift imaging sequence (CSI) using undersampled data of high-quality datasets, reconstructed with an iterative constrained reconstruction, compared to reduced resolution or reduced signal-to-noise ratio. CSI {sup 23}Na-images were retrospectively undersampled and reconstructed with a constrained reconstruction scheme. The results were compared to conventional methods of scan time reduction. The constrained reconstruction scheme used a phase constraint and a finite object support, which was extracted from a spatially registered {sup 1}H-image acquired with a double-tuned coil. The methods were evaluated using numerical simulations, phantom images and in-vivo images of a healthy volunteer and a patient who suffered from cerebral ischemic stroke. The constrained reconstruction scheme showed improved image quality compared to a decreased number of averages, images with decreased resolution or circular undersampling with weighted averaging for any undersampling factor. Brain images of a stroke patient, which were reconstructed from three-fold undersampled k-space data, resulted in only minor differences from the original image (normalized root means square error < 12%) and an almost identical delineation of the stroke region (mismatch < 6%). The acquisition of undersampled {sup 23}Na-CSI images enables up to three-fold scan time reduction with improved image quality compared to conventional methods of scan time saving.

  9. Development of a magnetic resonance sensor for on-line monitoring of {sup 99}Tc and {sup 23}Na in tank waste cleanup processes: Final report and implementation plan

    Dieckman, S. L.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    2000-02-24

    In response to US Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for advanced cross-cutting technologies, Argonne National Laboratory is developing an on-line sensor system for the real-time monitoring of {sup 99}Tc and {sup 23}Na in various locations throughout radioactive-waste processing facilities. Based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the highly automated sensor system can provide near-real-time response with minimal sampling. The technology, in the form of a flow-through nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based on-line process sensing and control system, can rapidly monitor {sup 99}Tc speciation and concentration (from 0.1 molar to 10 micro molar) in the feedstocks and eluents of radioactive-waste treatment processes. The system is nonintrusive, capable of withstanding harsh plant environments, and reasonably immune to contaminants. Furthermore, the system is capable of operating over large variations in pH, conductivity, and salinity. This document describes design parameters, results from sensitivity studies, and initial results obtained from oxidation-reduction studies that were conducted on technetium standards and waste specimens obtained from DOE's Hanford site. A cursory investigation of the system's capabilities to monitor {sup 23}Na at high concentrations are also reported, as are descriptions of site requirements, implementation recommendations, and testing techniques.

  10. 23Na and 1H NMR studies on melittin channels activated by tricyclic tranquilizers.

    Tanaka, H.; Matsunaga, K.; Kawazura, H

    1992-01-01

    A dynamic 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique was applied to the exchange system of Na+ ions present inside and outside large unilamellar vesicles at an equivalent concentration. Addition of melittin to phosphatidylcholine vesicles did not induce any detectable Na+ transport across the membrane but subsequent addition of a trace of chlorpromazine or imipramine did induce Na+ transport. Because the formation of a drug-melittin adduct in a solution was detected by 1H NMR, the activa...

  11. Low-spin states of 23Na

    A study of 23Na via the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na and 23Na(γ,γ)23Na reactions is presented. Only a limited number of resonances has been studied, selected on the basis of strong excitation of the lowest levels of which the spin was unknown. As a result the spins are now known of all levels of 23Na with excitation energies up to 7 MeV, except for a few high-spin states which are too weakly excited in the decay of the known 22Ne(p,γ) resonances. The mean lifetimes of the 23Na levels at 4.43 and 7.89 MeV were found to be 350±70 and 220±17 attoseconds (1 attosecond = 10-18 seconds) respectively. 97 refs.; 22 figs.; 12 tabs

  12. High spin states in 26Mg and 23Na populated by heavy ion reactions

    Two experiments were used to produce high-spin states in sd-shell nuclei. Beams of 18O and 15N were extracted from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory EN tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Alpha particles from the 12C(18O,α)26Mg and 12C-(15N,α)23Na reactions were detected with a Borkowski-Kopp proportional counter at the focal plane of an Enge split-pole magnetic spectrograph. The differential cross sections extracted for many levels in the respective residual nuclei were averaged over several bombarding energies. These cross sections were analyzed in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach formalism applicable to compound nuclear reactions. Both reactions are shown to be generally well predicted by the statistical model, though an apparent anomaly exists for certain states observed in the 12C(15N,α)23Na reaction. Several of the high-spin states are discussed in terms of the rotational model, and levels in 23Na are compared to high-spin state predictions from large basis shell model calculations

  13. Sepsis does not alter red blood cell glucose metabolism or Na+ concentration: A 2H-, 23Na-NMR study

    The effects of sepsis on intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) and glucose metabolism were examined in rat red blood cells (RBCs) by using 23Na- and 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Sepsis was induced in 15 halothane-anesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats by using the cecal ligation and perforation technique; 14 control rats underwent cecal manipulation without ligation. The animals were fasted for 36 h, but allowed free access to water. At 36 h postsurgery, RBCs were examined by 23Na-NMR by using dysprosium tripolyphosphate as a chemical shift reagent. Human RBCs from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients and from 7 patients who were diagnosed as septic were also examined for [Na+]i. Five rat RBC specimens had [Na+]i determined by both 23Na-NMR and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). For glucose metabolism studies, RBCs from septic and control rats were suspended in modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing [6,6-2H2]glucose and examined by 2H-NMR. No significant differences in [Na+]i or glucose utilization were found in RBCs from control or septic rats. There were no differences in [Na+]i in the two groups of patients. The [Na+]i determined by NMR spectroscopy agreed closely with measurements using ICP-AES and establish that 100% of the [Na+]i of the RBC is visible by NMR. Glucose measurements determined by 2H-NMR correlated closely (correlation coefficient = 0.93) with enzymatic analysis. These studies showed no evidence that sepsis disturbed RBC membrane function or metabolism

  14. Functional MRI 2.0. 23Na and CEST imaging

    In recent years the purely morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly flanked by so-called functional imaging methods, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to obtain additional information about tissue or pathological processes. This review article presents two MR techniques that can detect physiological processes in the human body. In contrast to all other functional MR imaging techniques, which are based on hydrogen protons, the first technique presented (X-nuclei imaging) uses the spin of other nuclei for imaging and consequently allows a completely different insight into the human body. In this article X-nuclei imaging is focused on sodium (23Na) MRI because it currently represents the main focus of research in this field due to the favorable MR properties of sodium. The second MR technique presented is the relatively novel chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging that can detect exchange processes between protons in metabolites and protons in free water. The first part of this article introduces the basic technical principles, problems, advantages and disadvantages of these two MR techniques, whereas the second part highlights the potential clinical applications. Examples illustrate several potential applications in neuroimaging (e. g. stroke and tumors), musculoskeletal imaging (e. g. osteoarthritis and degenerative processes) and abdominal imaging (e. g. kidneys and hypertension). Both techniques inherently contain an incredible potential for future imaging but are still on the threshold of clinical use and are currently under evaluation in many university centers. (orig.)

  15. {sup 23}Na-MRI of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after intraoperative radiotherapy: technical note

    Haneder, Stefan; Buesing, Karen A.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Ong, Melissa M. [Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Wenz, Frederik [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg University, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Brehmer, Stefanie; Schmiedek, Peter [Heidelberg University, Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We report the first case of an intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who was followed up with a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method - {sup 23}Na-MRI - in comparison to a standard contrast-enhanced {sup 1}H-MRI and {sup 18}F-FET-PET. A 56-year-old female patient with diagnosed GBM in July 2012 underwent tumor resection, radiochemotherapy, and three cycles of chemotherapy. After a relapse, 6 months after the initial diagnosis, an IORT was recommended which was performed in March 2013 using the INTRABEAM system (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) with a 3-cm applicator and a surface dose of 20 Gy. Early post-operative contrast-enhanced and 1-month follow-up {sup 1}H-MRI and a {sup 18}F-FET-PET were performed. In addition, an IRB-approved {sup 23}Na-MRI was performed on a 3.0-T MR scanner (MAGNETOM TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Germany). After re-surgery and IORT in March 2013, only a faint contrast enhancement but considerable surrounding edema was visible at the medio-posterior resection margins. In April 2013, new and progressive contrast enhancement, edema, {sup 23}Na content, and increased uptake in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET were visible, indicating tumor recurrence. Increased sodium content within the area of contrast enhancement was found in the {sup 23}Na-MRI, but also exceeding this area, very similar to the increased uptake depicted in the {sup 18}F-FET-PET. The clearly delineable zone of edema in both examinations exhibits a lower {sup 23}Na content compared to areas with suspected proliferating tumor tissue. {sup 23}Na-MRI provided similar information in the suspicious area compared to {sup 18}F-FET-PET, exceeding conventional {sup 1}H-MRI. Still, {sup 23}Na-MRI remains an investigational technique, which is worth to be further evaluated. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic catalysis in nuclear matter

    Haber, Alexander; Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A strong magnetic field enhances the chiral condensate at low temperatures. This so-called magnetic catalysis thus seeks to increase the vacuum mass of nucleons. We employ two relativistic field-theoretical models for nuclear matter, the Walecka model and an extended linear sigma model, to discuss the resulting effect on the transition between vacuum and nuclear matter at zero temperature. In both models we find that the creation of nuclear matter in a sufficiently strong magnetic field becom...

  17. Three New Low-Energy Resonances in the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na Reaction

    Cavanna, F.; Depalo, R.; Aliotta, M.; Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Bruno, C. G.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Prati, P.; Scott, D. A.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.; LUNA Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    The 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The 22Ne(p ,γ )23Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400 keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the 22Ne (p ,γ )23Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7 keV are reported. Their resonance strengths are derived with 2%-7% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances are greatly reduced. Data are taken using a windowless 22Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy, taking advantage of the ultralow background observed deep underground. The new reaction rate is a factor of 20 higher than the recent evaluation at a temperature of 0.1 GK, relevant to nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars.

  18. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  19. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of 23Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na+ distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na+ ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of 23Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na+ is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T2. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo 23Na T2 values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic 1H and 23Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25μs, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form

  20. A 125Te and 23Na NMR investigation of the structure and crystallisation of sodium tellurite glasses.

    Holland, D; Bailey, J; Ward, G; Turner, B; Tierney, P; Dupree, R

    2005-01-01

    125Te static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 23Na and 125Te magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR have been used, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction, to examine the structure and crystallisation behaviour of glasses of composition xNa2O.(1-x)TeO2 (0.075 x 0.4). The MAS NMR 23Na spectra from the glasses are broad and featureless but shift by approximately +5 ppm with increased x, i.e. as the system becomes more ionic. The static 125Te NMR spectra show an increase in axial symmetry with increasing x, indicating a shift from predominantly [TeO4] to [TeO3] structural units. The 23Na and 125Te spectra from the crystallised samples have been fitted to obtain information on the sites in the metastable crystal phases, which are the first to form on heating and which are therefore more closely related to the glass structure than thermodynamically stable crystal phases. New sodium tellurite phases are reported, including a sodium stabilised, face centred cubic phase related to delta-TeO2; a metastable form of Na2Te4O9 containing 3 sodium and 4 tellurium sites; and a metastable form of Na2Te2O5 containing 2 sodium sites. There is evidence of oxidation of TeIV to TeVI occurring in glasses with high values of x and, at x=0.40 and 0.50 (outside the glass forming range), some sodium metatellurate (Na2TeO4) is formed at the same time as sodium metatellurite (Na2TeO3). The 125Te shift is very sensitive to environment within the sodium tellurite system, covering more than 320 ppm, with anisotropies varying from 640 to 1540 ppm. The lack of features in the 125Te spectra of the glass phases, combined with the large shift range and high but variable anisotropy, means than it is not possible to obtain a unique fit to any presumed species present. Furthermore, the chemical shift anisotropy parameters for three of the four Te sites in the Na2Te4O9 phase are found to lie outside the range used for previous simulations of glass spectra. PMID:15589724

  1. Three new low-energy resonances in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    Cavanna, F; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Böltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Prati, P; Scott, D A; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2015-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle affects the synthesis of the elements between $^{20}$Ne and $^{27}$Al in asymptotic giant branch stars and novae. The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of unobserved resonances lying in the Gamow window. At proton energies below 400\\,keV, only upper limits exist in the literature for the resonance strengths. Previous reaction rate evaluations differ by large factors. In the present work, the first direct observations of the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances at 156.2, 189.5, and 259.7\\,keV are reported. Their resonance strengths have been derived with 2-7\\% uncertainty. In addition, upper limits for three other resonances have been greatly reduced. Data were taken using a windowless $^{22}$Ne gas target and high-purity germanium detectors at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in the Gran Sasso laboratory of the National I...

  2. Nuclear Current and Magnetic Rotation

    PENG Jing; XING Li-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic rotational bands based on the configuration πh211/2 ⊕Vh-211/2 in 142 Gd are investigated with the newly developed tilted axis cranking relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with and without nuclear current.The effect of the nuclear current is discussed by comparing the total Routhians,single particle levels,electromagnetic transition probabilities B(M1) and B(E2) in self-consistent tilted axis cranking RMF calculation with those obtained without the nuclear current.The nuclear currents are found to play an important role in the magnetic rotation of nuclei.

  3. Dose-dependent changes in renal {sup 1}H-/{sup 23}Na MRI after adjuvant radiochemotherapy for gastric cancer

    Haneder, Stefan [University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Budjan, Johannes Michael; Schoenberg, Stefan Oswald [University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Konstandin, Simon; Schad, Lothar Rudi [University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Hofheinz, Ralf Dieter [University Medical Centre Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, III. Department of Internal Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Gramlich, Veronika; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Boda-Heggemann, Judit [University Medical Centre Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Combined radiochemotherapy (RCT) for gastric cancer with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) results in ablative doses to the upper left kidney, while image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) allows kidney sparing despite improved target coverage. Renal function in long-term gastric cancer survivors was evaluated with 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and {sup 23}Na imaging. Five healthy volunteers and 13 patients after radiotherapy were included: 11 x IG-IMRT; 1 x 3D-CRT; 1 x ''positive control'' with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of a metastasis between the spleen/left kidney. Radiation doses were documented for the upper/middle/lower kidney subvolumes. Late toxicity was evaluated based on CTC criteria, questionnaire, and creatinine values. Morphological sequences, DWI images, and {sup 23}Na images were acquired using a {sup 1}H/{sup 23}Na-tuned body-coil before/after intravenous water load (WL). Statistics for [{sup 23}Na] (concentration) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for upper/middle/lower renal subvolumes. Corticomedullary [{sup 23}Na] gradients and [{sup 23}Na] differences after WL were determined. No major morphological alteration was detected in any patient. Minor scars were observed in the cranial subvolume of the left kidney of the 3D-CRT and the whole kidney of the control SBRT patient. All participants presented a corticomedullary [{sup 23}Na] gradient. After WL, a significant physiological [{sup 23}Na] gradient decrease (p < 0.001) was observed in all HV and IG-IMRT patients. In the cranial left kidney of the 3D-CRT patient and the positive control SBRT patient, the decrease was nonsignificant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02). ADC values were altered nonsignificantly in all renal subvolumes (all participants). Renal subvolumes with doses ≥ 35 Gy showed a reduced change of the [{sup 23}Na] gradient after WL (p = 0

  4. Nuclear Bag Model and Nuclear Magnetic Moments

    Liu, Liang-Gang

    1999-01-01

    In 1991, we proposed a model in which nucleus is treated as a spherical symmetric MIT bag and nucleon satisfies the MIT bag model boundary condition. The model was employed to calculate nuclear magnetic moments. The results are in good agreement with experiment data. Now, we found this model is still interesting and illuminating.

  5. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  6. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio

  7. Moissanite anvil cell design for giga-pascal nuclear magnetic resonance

    Meier, Thomas; Herzig, Tobias; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    A new design of a non-magnetic high-pressure anvil cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at Giga-Pascal pressures is presented, which uses a micro-coil inside the pressurized region for high-sensitivity NMR. The comparably small cell has a length of 22 mm and a diameter of 18 mm, so it can be used with most NMR magnets. The performance of the cell is demonstrated with external-force vs. internal-pressure experiments, and the cell is shown to perform well at pressures up to 23.5 GPa using 800 μm 6H-SiC large cone Boehler-type anvils. 1H, 23Na, 27Al, 69Ga, and 71Ga NMR test measurements are presented, which show a resolution of better than 4.5 ppm, and an almost maximum possible signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pancreatic disorders

    Ofer Kaplan

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS is a powerful technique that enables continuous monitoring of biochemical processes in tissues and organs in a non-invasive manner. A model of isolated perfused rat pancreas, suitable for NMRS studies, was developed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injections of either 0.5 ml 5% sodium taurocholate (TC into the bile duets, or 1.0 ml 10% TC injections into the pancreatic parenchyma. Phosphorous (31P NMRS of experimental pancreatitis were characterized by a transient signal at -0.18±0.04 ppm which was assigned as solubilized lecithin, and can be used as an indicator of the early phases of the discase. Depletion of the high energy phosphorous compounds, phosphocreatine and ATP, were also found during acute pancreatitis, and paralleled the extension of the pathological damage. The role of NMRS in pancreatic cancer diagnosis and its treatment were assessed in three models of pancreatic neoplasms. Perfused MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells, subcutancously implanted pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and pancreatic tumors induced in-situ in rats by direct appiication of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene, were studied by phosphorous (31P, sodium (23Na and proton (¹H NMRS. 31P spectra of pancreatic cancer were qualitatively similar to those of intact organs. However, 31P NMRS was found to be useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Total (infra- and extracellular sodium concentrations, measured in the solid tumors, were similar in both the normal pancreas and the pancreatic tumors (39-40 mmol/g wet weight. Proton spectra of perchloric acid extracts revealed several differences between tumors and control pancreases. The principal findings were elevated levels of the amino acid taurine, from I.17±O.39 mmol/g wet weight in healthy pancreases, to 2.79±0.71 mmol/g wet weight in pancreatic carcinoma in rats, and lactate levels which increased from 0.92±0.2 to 6.19±1.93 mmol/g wet weight

  9. Nuclear magnetic gamma double resonance

    A number of problems corresponding to different variants of experiments using nuclear magnetic-gamma double resonance (NMGDR) are theoretically investigated. Calculation is carried out and its results are compared to experimental ones concerning NMGDR for tantalum. Time dynamics of the source or scatterer nucleus sublevel populations under double resonance conditions with non-uniform initial population of this nucleus sublevels is studied

  10. Positive and Negative Mixed Glass Former Effects in Sodium Borosilicate and Borophosphate Glasses Studied by (23)Na NMR.

    Storek, Michael; Adjei-Acheamfour, Mischa; Christensen, Randilynn; Martin, Steve W; Böhmer, Roland

    2016-05-19

    Glasses with varying compositions of constituent network formers but constant mobile ion content can display minima or maxima in their ion transport which are known as the negative or the positive mixed glass former effect, MGFE, respectively. Various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to probe the ion hopping dynamics via the (23)Na nucleus on the microscopic level, and the results are compared with those from conductivity spectroscopy, which are more sensitive to the macroscopic charge carrier mobility. In this way, the current work examines two series of sodium borosilicate and sodium borophosphate glasses that display positive and negative MGFEs, respectively, in the composition dependence of their Na(+) ion conductivities at intermediate compositions of boron oxide substitution for silicon oxide and phosphorus oxide, respectively. A coherent theoretical analysis is performed for these glasses which jointly captures the results from measurements of spin relaxation and central-transition line shapes. On this basis and including new information from (11)B magic-angle spinning NMR regarding the speciation in the sodium borosilicate glasses, a comparison is carried out with predictions from theoretical approaches, notably from the network unit trap model. This comparison yields detailed insights into how a variation of the boron oxide content and thus of either the population of silicon or phosphorus containing network-forming units with different charge-trapping capabilities leads to nonlinear changes of the microscopic transport properties. PMID:27092392

  11. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  12. Quadrupolar-coupling-specific binomial pulse sequences for in vivo 23Na NMR and MRI.

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Ringgaard, Steffen; Pedersen, Michael; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2010-09-01

    Aimed at selective detection of (23)Na with specific quadrupolar couplings for in vitro NMR and MRI, we present a series of quadrupolar binomial pulse sequences offering high specificity with respect to the quadrupolar couplings of the excited species. It is demonstrated that pulse sequences with an increasing number of elements, e.g., 11, 121, 1331, 14641, and 15101051, with the units representing flip angles smaller than the 90 degrees pulses typically encountered in binomial spin-1/2 solvent suppression experiments, and different phase combinations may provide a high degree of flexibility with respect to quadrupolar coupling selectivity and robustness towards rf inhomogeneity. This may facilitate efficient separation of, for example, intra and extracellular (23)Na in tissues with efficient control of the excitation (or suppression) of central as well as satellite transitions through on- and off-resonance irradiation. The pulse sequences are described in terms of their analogy to binomial liquid-state NMR solvent suppression experiments and demonstrated numerically and experimentally through NMR and MRI experiments on a 7 T horizontal small-bore animal magnet system. PMID:20673642

  13. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad;

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  14. Tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Imaging methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance allow the production of sectional images of the human body without ionizing radiation. It is possible to measure the density and relaxation times of the water protons in body fluids or tissue. This allows not only to obtain morphological information but also to get some insight into the spatial distribution of physiological data. Starting with a review of the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance it is explained how the measured signal can be associated with an image point; it is also explained what type of apparatus is necessary and what the physical limitations are. Possible risks the patient may be exposed to in an examination using nuclear magnetic resonance are discussed. The present state of the technical development enables the production of whole-body sectional images of a living person within about one minute. By means of some typical examples the nature and properties of these images are explained. Although extensive clinical studies will be necessary before a more general assessment can be made of this method, an outlook is provided on expected further developments and possible future fields of application. (orig.)

  15. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  16. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  17. Nuclear magnetic ordering in silver

    Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed by neutron diffraction in a single crystal of 109Ag. The critical temperature is found to 700 pK, and the critical field is 100 μT. From the paramagnetic phase a second order phase transition leads into a type-I 1-k structure with long range order. The experiments have taken place at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin in collaboration with the low Temperature Laboratory in Helsinki, the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde. The present report is a Ph.D. thesis which has been successfully defended at the Niels Bohr Institute. Besides the results of the nuclear ordering experiments the thesis contains a description of the theoretical background for nuclear magnetism and a review of earlier nuclear ordering experiments as well as theoretical work. The principles for studying polarized nuclei with use of polarized and unpolarized neutrons are presented, as well as the results of such experiments. (au) 11 tabs., 59 ills., 143 refs

  18. Nuclear magnetic ordering in silver

    Lefmann, K.

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed by neutron diffraction in a single crystal of {sup 109}Ag. The critical temperature is found to 700 pK, and the critical field is 100 {mu}T. From the paramagnetic phase a second order phase transition leads into a type-I 1-k structure with long range order. The experiments have taken place at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin in collaboration with the low Temperature Laboratory in Helsinki, the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde. The present report is a Ph.D. thesis which has been successfully defended at the Niels Bohr Institute. Besides the results of the nuclear ordering experiments the thesis contains a description of the theoretical background for nuclear magnetism and a review of earlier nuclear ordering experiments as well as theoretical work. The principles for studying polarized nuclei with use of polarized and unpolarized neutrons are presented, as well as the results of such experiments. (au) 11 tabs., 59 ills., 143 refs.

  19. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations. PMID:26932314

  20. Experimental study of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction and its implications for novae scenarios

    The 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction belongs to the catalytic neon-sodium cycle and has an important role in the explosive hydrogen burning. The neon-sodium cycle takes place at temperatures of T = 0.1 - 0.5 GK and is assumed to occur in different astrophysical systems: e.g. in novae, in super novae of type Ia and during the shell-burning of red giant branch stars. The implications of 22Ne(p,γ)23Na and the neon-sodium cycle in a nova scenario have been studied by using the nuclear network code libnucnet at GSI in Darmstadt. A nova is an outburst of matter in a binary system consisting of a white dwarf and a red giant star. It is therefore a representative phenomenon for explosive hydrogen burning. For the calculation of the nucleosynthesis during the nova outburst, the code libnucnet requires the initial mass composition of the novae partners, the temperature and density profiles of the nova explosion and the thermonuclear reaction rates of the participating reactions. In the following, the code determined the flow and the final atomic abundance in the neon-sodium cycle during the entire nova process. Additionally, the influence of the temperature profile of the novae outburst as well as the thermonuclear reaction rate of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction on the final atomic abundance in the outburst has been studied. A characteristic measure for the reactions in astrophysical environments is the thermonuclear reaction rate. The reaction rate of 22Ne(p,γ)23Na has still strong uncertainties in the temperature range of T = 0.03 - 0.3 GK. These uncertainties are based on insufficient upper limits of the resonance strengths as well as the possible existence of tentative states that are populated in the energy range of Elabp = 30 - 300 keV. The research presented in this thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction for an improved determination of the thermonuclear reaction rate. Furthermore, the implications of 22Ne(p,γ)23Na and the neon

  1. Experimental study of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction and its implications for novae scenarios

    Menzel, Marie-Luise

    2013-08-01

    The {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction belongs to the catalytic neon-sodium cycle and has an important role in the explosive hydrogen burning. The neon-sodium cycle takes place at temperatures of T = 0.1 - 0.5 GK and is assumed to occur in different astrophysical systems: e.g. in novae, in super novae of type Ia and during the shell-burning of red giant branch stars. The implications of {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na and the neon-sodium cycle in a nova scenario have been studied by using the nuclear network code libnucnet at GSI in Darmstadt. A nova is an outburst of matter in a binary system consisting of a white dwarf and a red giant star. It is therefore a representative phenomenon for explosive hydrogen burning. For the calculation of the nucleosynthesis during the nova outburst, the code libnucnet requires the initial mass composition of the novae partners, the temperature and density profiles of the nova explosion and the thermonuclear reaction rates of the participating reactions. In the following, the code determined the flow and the final atomic abundance in the neon-sodium cycle during the entire nova process. Additionally, the influence of the temperature profile of the novae outburst as well as the thermonuclear reaction rate of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction on the final atomic abundance in the outburst has been studied. A characteristic measure for the reactions in astrophysical environments is the thermonuclear reaction rate. The reaction rate of {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na has still strong uncertainties in the temperature range of T = 0.03 - 0.3 GK. These uncertainties are based on insufficient upper limits of the resonance strengths as well as the possible existence of tentative states that are populated in the energy range of E{sup lab}{sub p} = 30 - 300 keV. The research presented in this thesis is dedicated to the experimental study of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction for an improved determination of the

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of erythrocyte membranes

    Chapman, D.; Kamat, V.B.; Gier, J. de; Penkett, S.A.

    1968-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying molecular interactions in biological membranes has been investigated using erythrocyte membrane fragments. Sonic dispersion of these fragments produces a sharp and well-defined high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. The sp

  3. Contribution to nuclear magnetic resonance imager using permanent magnets

    After some recalls of nuclear magnetic resonance, ways to get a stable and homogeneous magnetic field are studied with permanent magnets. Development of correction coils on integrated circuits has been particularly stressed. Gradient coil specific systems have been studied taking in account ferromagnetic material presence. Antenna system has been improved and possibility of image obtention with the prototype realized has been shown

  4. Functional MRI 2.0. {sup 23}Na and CEST imaging; Funktionelle MRT 2.0. {sup 23}Na- und CEST-Bildgebung

    Haneder, S. [Uniklinik Koeln, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Koeln (Germany); Konstandin, S. [Universitaet Bremen, MR-Bildgebung und -Spektroskopie, Fachbereich 1 (Physik/Elektrotechnik), Bremen (Germany); Fraunhofer MEVIS, Institut fuer Bildgestuetzte Medizin, Bremen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In recent years the purely morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly flanked by so-called functional imaging methods, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to obtain additional information about tissue or pathological processes. This review article presents two MR techniques that can detect physiological processes in the human body. In contrast to all other functional MR imaging techniques, which are based on hydrogen protons, the first technique presented (X-nuclei imaging) uses the spin of other nuclei for imaging and consequently allows a completely different insight into the human body. In this article X-nuclei imaging is focused on sodium ({sup 23}Na) MRI because it currently represents the main focus of research in this field due to the favorable MR properties of sodium. The second MR technique presented is the relatively novel chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging that can detect exchange processes between protons in metabolites and protons in free water. The first part of this article introduces the basic technical principles, problems, advantages and disadvantages of these two MR techniques, whereas the second part highlights the potential clinical applications. Examples illustrate several potential applications in neuroimaging (e. g. stroke and tumors), musculoskeletal imaging (e. g. osteoarthritis and degenerative processes) and abdominal imaging (e. g. kidneys and hypertension). Both techniques inherently contain an incredible potential for future imaging but are still on the threshold of clinical use and are currently under evaluation in many university centers. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren wird die reine morphologische Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zunehmend von sogenannten funktionellen Bildgebungsmethoden, wie der diffusionsgewichteten Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI), flankiert, um zusaetzliche Informationen ueber Gewebe oder pathologische Prozesse zu

  5. NMR study of 23Na shielding tensor in sodium bromate single crystal

    NMR-investigations of sodium bromate showed that the electronic shielding of the 23Na nucleus is anisotropic. The effect is qualitatively explained by the deformation of electronic shells of the Na+ ion

  6. Nuclear reactions in ultra-magnetized supernovae

    The statistical model is employed to investigate nuclear reactions in ultrastrong magnetic fields relevant for supernovae and neutron stars. For radiative capture processes the predominant mechanisms are argued to correspond to modifications of nuclear level densities, and γ-transition energies due to interactions of the field with magnetic moments of nuclei. The density of states reflects the nuclear structure and results in oscillations of reaction cross sections as a function of field strength, while magnetic interaction energy enhances radiative neutron capture process. Implications in the synthesis of r-process nuclei in supernova site are discussed. (author)

  7. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using 23Na-MRI

    23Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of 23Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of 23Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of 23Na-MRI with 1H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. 23Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All 23Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of 23Na-MRI images with 1H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 ± 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 ± 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. 23Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using {sup 23}Na-MRI

    Henzler, T.; Apfaltrer, P.; Haneder, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Fink, C. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Schmid-Bindert, G.; Manegold, C. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Interdisciplinary Thoracic Oncology; Wenz, F. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    {sup 23}Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of {sup 23}Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of {sup 23}Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of {sup 23}Na-MRI with {sup 1}H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. {sup 23}Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All {sup 23}Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of {sup 23}Na-MRI images with {sup 1}H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 {+-} 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 {+-} 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. {sup 23}Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of (23)Na(n,2n) cross section in well-defined reactor spectra.

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Milčák, Ján; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The present paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of (23)Na(n,2n)(22)Na in a well-defined reactor spectra of a special core assembled in the LR-0 reactor. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination. The resulting value averaged in spectra is 0.91±0.02µb. This cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010 and CENDL-3.1 nuclear data libraries. Generally the best C/E agreement, within 2%, was found using the ROSFOND-2010 data set, whereas the worst, as high as 40%, was found using the ENDF/B-VII.0. PMID:26894323

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  11. Nuclear magnetic (ratio-frequency) tomography

    Physical foundations of nuclear magnetic tomography and factors limiting its spatial, contrast and time precision are considered. On the basis of analysis of literature data, it is established that using peculiarities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) it is possible to detect malignant tumors and edemas, to investigate metabolic processes, to determine blood flow rate and to solve a number of other problems. The classification of methods of NMR - tomography is given

  12. Nuclear magnetic (radio-frequency) tomography

    Pavlov, A.S.; Gurvich, A.M.; Karyakina, N.F.; Revokatov, O.P.; Chikirdin, Eh.G. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Rentgenologii i Radiologii, Moscow (USSR))

    Physical foundations of nuclear magnetic tomography and factors limiting its spatial, contrast and time precision are considered. On the basis of analysis of literature data, it is established that using peculiarities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) it is possible to detect malignant tumors and edemas, to investigate metabolic processes, to determine blood flow rate and to solve a number of other problems. The classification of methods of NMR - tomography is given.

  13. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  15. Theory of nuclear magnetic moments - LT-35

    The purpose of these notes is to give an account of some attempts at interpreting the observed values of nuclear magnetic moments. There is no attempt at a complete summary of the field as that would take much more space than is used here. In many cases the arguments are only outlined and references are given for those interested in further details. A discussion of the theory of nuclear magnetic moments necessitates many excursions into the details of the nuclear models because the magnetic moments have a direct bearing on the validity of these models. However the main emphasis here is on those features which tend to explain the magnetic moments and other evidence is not discussed unless it has a direct bearing on the problem. In the first part of the discussion the Shell Model of the nucleus is used, as this model seems to correlate a large body of data relating to the heavier nuclei. Included here are the modifications proposed to explain the fact that the experimental magnetic moments do not fit quantitatively with the exact predictions of the Shell Model. The next sections deal with some of the more drastic modifications introduced to explain the large nuclear quadrupole moments and the effect of these modifications on the magnetic moments. Finally we turn to more detailed investigations of the light nuclei, in particular the - Conjugate nuclei. (author)

  16. Skin sodium measured with (23) Na MRI at 7.0 T

    Linz, P.; Santoro, D.; Renz, W.; J. Rieger; Ruehle, A.; Ruff, J; Deimling, M.; Rakova, N.; Muller, D.N.; Luft, F. C.; Titze, J.; Niendorf, T

    2015-01-01

    Skin sodium (Na+ ) storage, as a physiologically important regulatory mechanism for blood pressure, volume regulation and, indeed, survival, has recently been rediscovered. This has prompted the development of MRI methods to assess Na+ storage in humans (23 Na MRI) at 3.0 T. This work examines the feasibility of high in-plane spatial resolution 23 Na MRI in skin at 7.0 T. A two-channel transceiver radiofrequency (RF) coil array tailored for skin MRI at 7.0 T (f = 78.5 MHz) is proposed. Specif...

  17. Hyperfine splitting and isotope shift of 22Na, 23Na by high resolution laser spectroscopy at the atomic D2-line

    The hyperfine structure of D2 optical line in 22Na and 23Na has been investigated using high resolution laser spectroscopy of a well-collimated atomic beam. The hyperfine splitting constants A and B for the excited 3p2P3/2 level for both investigated sodium isotopes have been obtained. They are as follows: A(22)=7.31(4) MHz, B(22)=4.71(28) MHz, A(23)=18.572(24) MHz, B(23)=2.723(55) MHz. With these data, using the high precision MCHFF calculations for the electric field gradient at the nucleus, the electric quadrupole moment of 22Na has been deduced: Qs(22)=+0.185(11) b. The sign of Qs(22), determined for the first time, indicates a prolate nuclear deformation. Precise value of the isotope shift 22,23Na in D2-line has also been obtained

  18. Pulsed nuclear-electronic magnetic resonance

    Morley, Gavin W; Mohammady, M Hamed; Aeppli, Gabriel; Kay, Christopher W M; Jeschke, Gunnar; Monteiro, Tania S

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic resonance is a wide-reaching technology allowing the quantum state of electronic and nuclear spins to be controlled on the timescale of nanoseconds and microseconds respectively. The time required to flip either dilute electronic or nuclear spins is orders of magnitude shorter than their decoherence times, leading to several schemes for quantum information processing with spin qubits. We investigate instead the novel regime where the eigenstates approximate 50:50 superpositions of the electronic and nuclear spin states forming "nuclear-electronic" qubits. Here we demonstrate quantum control of these states, using bismuth-doped silicon, in just 32 ns: orders of magnitude shorter than previous experiments where pure nuclear states were used. The coherence times of our states are over four orders of magnitude longer, being 1 ms or more at 8 K, and are limited by the naturally-occurring 29Si nuclear spin impurities. There is quantitative agreement between our experiments and no-free-parameter anal...

  19. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems

    Curro, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  2. magnetic order studied by nuclear methods

    Reichl, C

    2001-01-01

    investigated within the frame of this work. The studies on the highly concentrated deuterides revealed a gradual loss in local field due to a distribution of 'local Curie temperatures' depending on the number of Fe neighbours and their distances from the Moessbauer nucleus. On rising the temperature, during a magnetic transition, an increasing number of Fe sites with different local environment loose their hyperfine fields, whereas bulk measurements showed a relatively sharp, however, incomplete transition. By using a combination of neutron diffraction- and muon spin relaxation studies the complex magnetic phase diagram of the system Ce(Rh,Ru) sub 3 B sub 2 , where weak magnetic moments exist, could be studied. There, transitions from para- to ferromagnetism, and more complicated magnetic structures could be observed. Due to the existence of several isotopes of B and Ru, each carrying different nuclear spins and magnetic moment, particularly complicated second moment simulations for interpreting the muon data...

  3. Resonance neutron capture in 23Na and 27Al from 3 to 600 keV

    The radiative capture cross sections of 23Na and 27Al were measured with the high resolution facility at the 40 m station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Resonance parameters for the individual resonances below 600 keV are given. Particular care was taken to correct the data for prompt neutron scattering effects by Monte Carlo methods

  4. Elastic Scattering between Ultracold 23Na and 85Rb Atoms in the Triplet State

    HU Qiu-Bo; ZHANG Yong-Sheng; SUN Jin-Feng; YU Ke

    2011-01-01

    @@ The elastic scattering Properties between ultracold 23Na and 85Rd atoms for the triplet state(a3∑u+ )are researched.The s-wave scattering lengts of 23Na and 85Rb are calculate by the Numerov ana semtc asstc method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard-Jones potential(LJ12,6)by the same phase 4φ Shape resonances appear clearly in the l= 5 partial waves for the a- Lu state.Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.%The elastic scattering properties between ultracold 23Na and 85 Rb atoms for the triplet state (a3Σu+ ) are researched. The s-wave scattering lengths of 23Na and 85Rb are calculated by the Numerov and semiclassical method with two kinds of interatomic potentials, which are the interpolation potential and Lennard-Jones potential (LJ12,6) by the same phase φ. Shape resonances appear clearly in the l= 5 partial waves for the a3 Σu+state. Moreover, the s-wave scattering cross section, total cross section and energy positions of shape resonances are also discussed.

  5. Phosphonate Based High Nuclearity Magnetic Cages.

    Sheikh, Javeed Ahmad; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Clearfield, Abraham; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-06-21

    Transition metal based high nuclearity molecular magnetic cages are a very important class of compounds owing to their potential applications in fabricating new generation molecular magnets such as single molecular magnets, magnetic refrigerants, etc. Most of the reported polynuclear cages contain carboxylates or alkoxides as ligands. However, the binding ability of phosphonates with transition metal ions is stronger than the carboxylates or alkoxides. The presence of three oxygen donor sites enables phosphonates to bridge up to nine metal centers simultaneously. But very few phosphonate based transition metal cages were reported in the literature until recently, mainly because of synthetic difficulties, propensity to result in layered compounds, and also their poor crystalline properties. Accordingly, various synthetic strategies have been followed by several groups in order to overcome such synthetic difficulties. These strategies mainly include use of small preformed metal precursors, proper choice of coligands along with the phosphonate ligands, and use of sterically hindered bulky phosphonate ligands. Currently, the phosphonate system offers a library of high nuclearity transition metal and mixed metal (3d-4f) cages with aesthetically pleasing structures and interesting magnetic properties. This Account is in the form of a research landscape on our efforts to synthesize and characterize new types of phosphonate based high nuclearity paramagnetic transition metal cages. We quite often experienced synthetic difficulties with such versatile systems in assembling high nuclearity metal cages. Few methods have been emphasized for the self-assembly of phosphonate systems with suitable transition metal ions in achieving high nuclearity. We highlighted our journey from 2005 until today for phosphonate based high nuclearity transition metal cages with V(IV/V), Mn(II/III), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) metal ions and their magnetic properties. We observed that

  6. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the 23Na, 27Al and 17O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the 17O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  7. Modelling studies in aqueous solution of lanthanide (III) chelates designed for nuclear magnetic resonance biomedical applications

    Henriques, E. S.; Geraldes, C. F. G. C.; Ramos, M. J.

    Molecular dynamics simulations and complementary modelling studies have been carried out for the [Gd(DOTA)·(H2O)]- and [Tm(DOTP)]5- chelates in aqueous media, to provide a better understanding of several structural and dynamical properties of these versatile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes, including coordination shells and corresponding water exchange mechanisms, and interactions of these complexes with alkali metal ions. This knowledge is of key importance in the areas of 1H relaxation and shift reagents for NMR applications in medical diagnosis. A new refinement of our own previously developed set of parameters for these Ln(III) chelates has been used, and is reported here. Calculations of water mean residence times suggest a reassessment of the characterization of the chelates' second coordination shell, one where the simple spherical distribution model is discarded in favour of a more detailed approach. Na+ probe interaction maps are in good agreement with the available site location predictions derived from 23Na NMR shifts.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a petrophysical measurement

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen nuclei in fluids which saturate porous rocks is important in oil exploration and production, since NMR logs can provide good estimates of permeability and fluid flow. This paper reviews developments which connect the NMR properties of rocks with petrophysical properties, and particularly those relating to fluid flow. The recent advances in the use of NMR in boreholes which have spurred these developments are also discussed. The relevance of other NMR measurements on geological samples, including magnetic resonance imaging, is briefly referred to. (author)

  9. Nuclear magnetic ordering ''avant toute chose''

    We give an overview of the research initiated at Saclay to study cooperative phenomena between nuclear spins in the presence of a high magnetic field. These systems exhibit a wealth of different orderings including antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism with domains and transverse structures rotating about the static magnetic field. These states have been characterized by NMR of the ordered nuclei, NMR of dilute probe nuclei, double resonance methods and neutron diffraction. Some related phenomena involving the coupling of spins with the lattice are reported. Finally we outline future experiments which will benefit of the insight brought by the study of dipolar ordering. (authors). 30 refs., 11 figs

  10. Thin layer and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

    In the first part of this text, magnetometers with sensitive elements in the form of thin cylindrical ferromagnetic layers are described. These layers are anisotropic, uniaxial, C orientated and single domains. In the second part of the text, the principles of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized at the LETI are presented. This instrument is accurate, of high efficiency, and isotropic. Very small variations in magnetic field intensity (10-7 oersteds) can be detected with a 1Hz pass band at zero frequency

  11. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  12. Pionic 2p-1s X-ray transitions in 19F and 23Na

    Pi-atomic 2p-1s transitions have been studied in 19F and 23Na. The measured energies are 195.17 +-0.16 and 275.75 +- 0.26 keV, and the Lorentzian full-widths at half-maximum are 10.12 +- 0.74 and 12.0 +- 1.2 keV respectively. A comparison is made with optical model calculations. (Auth.)

  13. Investigation of Sodium Distribution in Phosphate Glasses Using Spin-Echo {sup 23}Na NMR

    ALAM, TODD M.; BOYLE, TIMOTHY J.; BROW, RICHARD K.; CLICK, CAROL C.; CONZONE, SAM; McLAUGHLIN, JAY; ZWANZIGER, JOE

    1999-09-16

    The spatial arrangement of sodium cations for a series of sodium phosphate glasses, xNa{sub 2}O(100-x)P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (x<55), were investigated using {sup 23}Na spin-echo NMR spectroscopy. The spin-echo decay rate is a function of the Na-Na homonuclear dipolar coupling and is related to the spatial proximity of neighboring Na nuclei. The spin-echo decay rate in these sodium phosphate glasses increases non-linearly with higher sodium number density, and thus provides a measure of the Na-Na extended range order. The results of these {sup 23}Na NMR experiments are discussed within the context of several structural models, including a decimated crystal lattice model, cubic dilation lattice model, a hard sphere (HS) random distribution model and a pair-wise cluster hard sphere model. While the experimental {sup 23}Na spin-echo M{sub 2} are described adequately by both the decimated lattice and the random HS model, it is demonstrated that the slight non-linear behavior of M{sub 2} as a function of sodium number density is more correctly described by the random distribution in the HS model. At low sodium number densities the experimental M{sub 2} is inconsistent with models incorporating Na-Na clustering. The ability to distinguish between Na-Na clusters and non-clustered distributions becomes more difficult at higher sodium concentrations.

  14. 3D {sup 23}Na MRI of human skeletal muscle at 7 Tesla: initial experience

    Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R. [Center for Biomedical Imaging/Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [Ottawa General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate healthy skeletal muscle pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI and muscle proton T{sub 2} mapping, and to evaluate diabetic muscle pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI. The calves of seven healthy subjects underwent imaging pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI (3D fast low angle shot, TR/TE = 80 ms/0.160 ms, 4 mm x 4 mm x 4 mm) and 1 week later by {sup 1}H MRI (multiple spin-echo sequence, TR/TE = 3,000 ms/15-90 ms). Four type 2 diabetics also participated in the {sup 23}Na MRI protocol. Pre- and post-exercise sodium signal intensity (SI) and proton T{sub 2} relaxation values were measured/calculated for soleus (S), gastrocnemius (G), and a control, tibialis anterior (TA). Two-tailed t tests were performed. In S/G in healthy subjects post-exercise, sodium SI increased 8-13% (p < 0.03), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 22 min), and {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values increased 12-17% (p < 0.03), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 12-15 min). In TA, no significant changes in sodium SI or {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values were seen (-2.4 to 1%, p > 0.17). In S/G in diabetics, sodium SI increased 10-11% (p < 0.04), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 27-37 min) without significant change in the TA SI (-3.6%, p = 0.066). It is feasible to evaluate skeletal muscle via 3D {sup 23}Na MRI at 7 T. Post-exercise muscle {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values return to baseline more rapidly than sodium SI. Diabetics may demonstrate delayed muscle sodium SI recovery compared with healthy subjects. (orig.)

  15. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to place

  16. Nuclear magnetic moments measured by nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei

    The configurations of nuclei near the shell closures N=40 and Z=40 were studied. The nuclear magnetic moments have been measured by nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei (NMR/ON). We have determined the ground state spin of 73Se and magnetic moments of isotopes 73Se(9/2+), 77Br3/2-) and 74Brm(4). The 9/2+ spin and parity assignment to the parent state of 73Se is perfectly compatible with the systematics of N + 39 and N = 41 isotones. The bromine moments around the shell closure N = 40, show a change in protonic configuration. In the second part of this work a precise hyperfine field value of zinc in iron has been determined. The relaxation constant of Zn in iron is established. The new hyperfine field value of zinc in iron allows a more precise reevaluation of the magnetic moments of 69Znm and 71Znm measured with NMR/ON

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Liquids and Solids

    The paper outlines the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, trying wherever possible to compare and contrast the method with that of slow neutron scattering as a technique for studying the properties of condensed phases and especially of molecular and atomic motions. It is emphasized that this is not a review of nmr for an expert audience but has a pedagogical aim. It is hoped to give persons with a main interest in neutron scattering some appreciation of the scope and limitations of the nmr method. This is illustrated by recent results on one substance which covers many but by no means all of the important points. (author)

  19. Connection of nuclear magnetic and infiltration parameters of porous rocks

    The infiltration parameters of porous rocks are determined among others by the specific pore surface. In the case of the sandostones the nuclear magnetic behaviour of the water influx is also influenced by the specific surface of the pores. On this basis the nuclear magnetic and the infiltration parameters of the rocks can be brought into connection with each other. The paper deals with the rock-physics of the nuclear magnetic logging. (author)

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance in hexaferrite/maghemite composite nanoparticles

    Kříšťan, P.; Hondlík, O.; Štěpánková, H.; Chlan, V.; Kouřil, K.; Řezníček, R.; Pollert, Emil; Veverka, Pavel

    Warszawa: Polish Academy of Sciences, 2015, s. 514-516. ISSN 0587-4246. [The European Conference PHYSICS OF MAGNETISM 2014/PM'14/. Poznań (PL), 23.06.2014-27.06.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nuclear magnetic resonance and relaxation * ferrimagnetics * fine-particle systems * nanocrystalline materials * magnetic oxides * inorganic compounds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Optically pumped polarized 23Na vapor target for use in polarized ion source. Technical progress report

    We are currently measuring relaxation times in an optically pumped 23Na vapor target. Our research is directed toward improvements in the optically pumped Na vapor targets used for the production of polarized H- ions. In this progress report we review the properties of the optically pumped polarized H- ion source and especially the optically pumped Na vapor target employed in this source as well as discussing the progress of our research on relaxation times in an optically pumped Na vapor target. 30 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  2. R-Matrix Analysis of the Total and Inelastic Scattering Cross Section of 23Na

    Kopecky, Stefan; Plompen, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Resonance parameters characterizing the interaction of neutrons with 23Na in the energy range from 0.3 to 2 MeV were obtained. These parameters describe the total and inelastic cross section. They were obtained from an analysis of data reported by Märten et al. for inelastic and elastic scattering and by D.C. Larson et al. for the total cross section. The data analysis and deduced resonance parameters are presented in some detail. This report serves to clarify the resonance parameters deliver...

  3. Decay properties of 266Bh and 262Db produced in the 248Cm+23Na reaction

    Decay properties of an isotope 266Bh and its daughter nucleus 262Db produced by the 248Cm(23Na,5n) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. 266Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, 262Db. The obtained decay properties of 266Bh and 262Db are consistent with those observed in the 278113 chain, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of 278113. (author)

  4. Direct measurement of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction cross section at LUNA

    Ferraro, Federico; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction takes part in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning, influencing the production of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in red giant stars, asymptotic giant stars and classical novae. The 22Ne(p,γ)27Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of tentative resonances in the Gamow window, where only upper limits were quoted in literature. A direct measurement of the 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction cross section has been carried out at LUNA using a windowless differential-pumping gas target with two high- purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. A new measurement with a 4π bismuth germanate (BGO) summing detector is ongoing. During the HPGe phase of the experiment the strengths of the resonances at 156.2 keV, 189.5 keV and 259.7 keV have been directly measured for the first time and their contribution to the reaction rate has been calculated. The decay scheme of the newly discovered resonances has been established as well and some improved upper limits on the unobserved resonances have been put. The BGO detector with its 70% γ-detection efficiency allows to measure the cross section at lower energy. In order to further investigate the resonances at 71 keV and 105 keV and the direct-capture component, the data taking is ongoing.

  5. 23Na-Magnetresonanzspektroskopie-Untersuchungen zum Verlauf der Narbenentwicklung nach Myokardinfarkt

    Scheffer H

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetresonanzspektroskopie (MRS erlaubt die nichtinvasive Untersuchung der Konzentrationen von Stoffwechselprodukten und Ionen im Herzen. Der Gesamtnatrium (Na-Gehalt könnte für die Untersuchung der Vitalität von Myokardgewebe verwendet werden, jedoch gibt es keine Berichte über die Entwicklung des Na-Gehalts in der chronischen Infarktnarbe im Vergleich zum normalen Myokard. Die vorliegende Studie untersucht die Änderungen des myokardialen Na-Gehalts während der Narbenentwicklung nach einem Myokardinfarkt (MI am Modell der Koronarligatur in der Ratte. Ratten wurden einer Ligatur des Ramus intraventricularis anterior unterzogen. Myokardgewebe von Kontrolltieren sowie infarziertes Gewebe wurden 1, 3, 7, 28 und 56 Tage postoperativ entnommen und der Na-Gehalt mittels 23Na-MRS und Ionenchromatographie bestimmt. Der Na-Gehalt nach MI war zu allen Zeitpunkten bei beiden Bestimmungsmethoden auf Werte zwischen 306 und 160 % des Kontrollwertes erhöht (n = 6-8 je Gruppe, p 0,01 vs. Kontrolle. Der Na-Gehalt ist im chronisch infarzierten Myokardgewebe zu allen Zeitpunkten erhöht. Damit kann überlebendes Myokard von einer Infarktnarbe anhand des Na-Gehalts unterschieden werden. Diese Information könnte in der 23Na-Magnetresonanzbildgebung (MRI zur Bestimmung der Infarktnarbe eine klinische Anwendung finden.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and method

    A nuclear magnetic resonance techniis described that allows simultaneous temperature determination and spectral acquisition. The technique employs a modification of the lock circuit of a varian xl-100 spectrometer which permits accurate measurement of the difference in resonance frequency between a primary lock nucleus and another , secondary, nucleus. The field stabilization function of the main lock circuit is not compromised. A feedback signal having a frequency equal to the frequency difference is substituted for the normal power supply in the spectrometer's existing radio frequency transmitter to modulate that transmitter. Thus, the transmitter's radio frequency signal is enhanced in a frequency corresponding to the resonance peak of the secondary nucleus. Determination of the frequency difference allows the determination of temperature without interference with the observed spectrum. The feedback character of the circuit and the presence of noise make the circuit self-activating

  7. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  8. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities

  9. Application of potential harmonic expansion method to BEC: Thermodynamic properties of trapped 23Na atoms

    Anasuya Kundu; Barnali Chakrabarti; Tapan Kumar Das

    2005-07-01

    We adopt the potential harmonics expansion method for an ab initio solution of the many-body system in a Bose condensate containing interacting bosons. Unlike commonly adopted mean-field theories, our method is capable of handling two-body correlation properly. We disregard three- and higher-body correlations. This simplification is ideally suited to dilute Bose Einstein condensates, whose number density is required to be so small that the interparticle separation is much larger than the range of two-body interaction to avoid three- and higher-body collisions, leading to the formation of molecules and consequent instability of the condensate. In our method we can incorporate realistic finite range interactions. We calculate energies of low-lying states of a condensate containing 23Na atoms and some thermodynamical properties of the condensate.

  10. Investigation of thermal neutron capture in 23Na, 138Ba, 140Ce and 142Ce

    A measurement of the angular correlation of γ-rays emitted in the capture of thermal neutrons in 23Na has been used to determine the multipole mixing ratio delta for seventeen transitions in 24Na, of which seven are primary transitions. For these primary transitions also the capture state spin admixture α has been derived. The neutron capture reaction proceeds predominantly through the Jsup(π)=1+ channel, as expected from previous cross-section measurements. A measurement of the circular polarization of γ-rays resulting from the capture of polarized thermal neutrons in 138Ba, 140Ce and 142Ce has yielded spin assignments for p-states in the final nuclei. Excitation energies and reaction Q-values have been obtained from the analysis of singles spectra taken with unpolarized neutrons. (Auth.)

  11. Enhanced nuclear magnetism: some novel features and prospective experiments

    It is shown that methods used for studying nuclear magnetism and nuclear magnetic ordering can be extended to 'enhanced nuclear magnetism'. These methods include the use of r.f. fields for adiabatic demagnetization in the rotating frame (a.d.r.f) and beams of neutrons whose spins interact with the nuclear spins. The 'enhancement' of the nuclear moment arises from the electronic magnetization M1 induced through the hyperfine interaction. It is shown that the spatial distribution of M1 is the same as that of The Van Vleck magnetization induced by an external field, provided that J is a good quantum number. The spatial distributions are not in general the same in Russell-Saunders coupling, eg. in the 3d group. The Bloch equations are extended to include anisotropic nuclear moments. The 'truncated' spin Hamiltonian is derived for spin-spin interaction between enhanced moments. A general cancellation theorem for second-order processes in spin-lattice relaxation is derived. The interactions of neutrons with the true nuclear moment, the Van Vleck moment, the 'pseudonuclear' moment and the 'pseudomagnetic' nuclear moment are discussed. Ordered states of enhanced nuclear moment systems are considered, together with the conditions under which they might be produced by a.d.r.f. following dynamic nuclear polarization. (U.K.)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance of randomly diluted magnetic materials

    The temperature dependence of the nuclear relaxation rates and line shapes of the FO resonance in the diluted antiferromagnet Fex Zn1-x F2 and Mnx Zn1-x F2 are studied over a large temperature range TN 1) of the FO nuclei, which are not transfer hyperfine coupled to the Fe (or Mn) spins, have been measured and calculated as a function of the concentration x. Good agreement with experiment is found for the theoretical results, which have been obtained in the range 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.8. The temperature dependence of 1/T1 for TN1 data near TN was used to study Random Field Effects on the critical behavior of Mn.65 Zn.35 F2, for fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the easy (C) axis. It was found that the transition temperature TN depressed substantially with field only for Ho || C. The experimental results are in general accord with the theory for Random Field Effects in disordered, anisotropic antiferromagnets. The critical divergence of the inhomogeneously broadened FO NMR was studied in Fe.6 Zn.4 F2 above TN. The experimental results agree with Heller's calculation of the NMR line broadening by Random Field Effects. With Ho || C the line shape changes from Gaussian towards Lozentzian for t -2 and below TN its line width increase qualitatively following the increase in the sublattice magnetization. (author)

  13. Sensitive Magnetic Control of Ensemble Nuclear Spin Hyperpolarisation in Diamond

    Wang, Hai-Jing; Avalos, Claudia E; Seltzer, Scott J; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Bajaj, Vikram S

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation, which transfers the spin polarisation of electrons to nuclei, is routinely applied to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance; it is also critical in spintronics, particularly when spin hyperpolarisation can be produced and controlled optically or electrically. Here we show the complete polarisation of nuclei located near the optically-polarised nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond. When approaching the ground-state level anti-crossing condition of the NV electron spins, 13C nuclei in the first-shell are polarised in a pattern that depends sensitively and sharply upon the magnetic field. Based on the anisotropy of the hyperfine coupling and of the optical polarisation mechanism, we predict and observe a complete reversal of the nuclear spin polarisation with a few-mT change in the magnetic field. The demonstrated sensitive magnetic control of nuclear polarisation at room temperature will be useful for sensitivity-enhanced NMR, nuclear-based spintronics, and quant...

  14. Search for magnetic monopoles with nuclear track detectors

    Giorgini, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental search for GUT magnetic monopoles in the MACRO experiment using the nuclear track subdetector CR39. After discussing the working principle, the charge resolution and the calibration of the detector, the experimental procedure for searching for magnetic monopoles is described. Since no candidates were found, the upper flux limits obtained by the MACRO CR39 used as a "stand alone detector" for magnetic monopoles of different magnetic charges are presented.

  15. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum in a cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16,100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32,200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable 'sensitive volumes'

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of metabolic regulation

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the detection of the metabolic transformations of biological compounds labeled with stable isotopes, particularly carbon-13 have been explored. We have studied adipose tissue in the intact rat, the exteriorized epididymal fat pad, and the isolated adipocyte. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue is regulated by lipogenic factors (insulin, corticosterone, thyroxine, and growth hormone) and lipolytic factors (glucagon and catecholamines). The synthesis of triglyceride from 5.5 mM glucose was stimulated by about 4-fold by 10 nM insulin. Triglyceride synthesis from glucose in the presence of insulin occurred at a rate of 330 nmol/hr/106 cells. Since the NMR signals from free and esterified fatty acids and glycerol are distinct, we could directly measure the rate of hormone-stimulated lipolysis. Epinephrine (10 μM) gave a lipolytic rate of 0.30 μmol/hr/106 cells as monitored by free-glycerol appearance in the medium. 13C NMR provides a superior method for the measurement of triglyceride metabolism since it directly measures the changes in the substrates and products in situ

  17. Nuclear Composition of Magnetized GRB Jets

    Shibata, Sanshiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the fraction of metal nuclei in the relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts associated with core-collapse supernovae. We simulate the fallback in jet-induced explosions with two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics calculations and the jet acceleration with steady, radial, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics calculations, and derive detail nuclear composition of the jet by postprocessing calculation. We found that if the temperature at the jet launch site is above $4.7\\times 10^9$K, quasi-statistical equilibrium (QSE) is established and heavy nuclei are dissociated to light particles such as $^4$He during the acceleration of the jets. The criterion for the survival of metal nuclei is written in terms of the isotropic jet luminosity as $L_{\\rm j}^{\\rm iso} \\lesssim 3.9\\times 10^{50}(R_{\\rm i}/10^7{\\rm cm})^2 (1+\\sigma_{\\rm i})~{\\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, where $R_{\\rm i}$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm i}$ are the initial radius of the jets and the initial magnetization parameter, respectively. If the jet is initially d...

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics.

    Keun, Hector C; Athersuch, Toby J

    2011-01-01

    Biofluids are by far the most commonly studied sample type in metabolic profiling studies, encompassing blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, cell culture media and many others. A number of these fluids can be obtained at a high sampling frequency with minimal invasion, permitting detailed characterisation of dynamic metabolic events. One of the attractive properties of solution-state metabolomics is the ability to generate profiles from these fluids following simple preparation, allowing the analyst to gain a naturalistic, largely unbiased view of their composition that is highly representative of the in vivo situation. Solution-state samples can also be generated from the extraction of tissue or cellular samples that can be tailored to target metabolites with particular properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides an excellent technique for profiling these fluids and is especially adept at characterising complex solutions. Profiling biofluid samples by NMR requires appropriate preparation and experimental conditions to overcome the demands of varied sample matrices, including those with high protein, lipid or saline content, as well as the presence of water in aqueous samples. PMID:21207299

  19. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible

  20. Measurement of thermal neutron distribution from a medical cyclotron using auto radiography with 23Na activation detector and medical imaging plate

    When the generated activity of 18F was 100 GBq, about 1015 neutrons are emitted by the nuclear reaction in target of the medical cyclotron. These neutrons induce activity in the cyclotron and the indoor concrete of the cyclotron room, and will contribute to the exposure of the staff maintaining the cyclotron. This paper describes the basic characteristics of the thermal neutron measurement method of 23Na activation detector by auto radiography (ARG) using the medical imaging plate (IP). Simple linear regression lines were able to describe the relationship between the scanner unit and the activity of 24Na. The optimal S value and exposure time of ARG method was found to be 1,000 and 24 hours. This method that uses the salt instead of gold foil allows hospitals to measure the thermal neutron fluencies easily at many locations for the radiation safety management of routine work and the decommissioning of the cyclotron facility. (author)

  1. Nuclear magnetic tomography in the differential diagnosis of liver disease

    Roedl, W.

    1985-05-01

    In evaluating nuclear magnetic tomography for the diagnosis of liver disease, one must differentiate between circumscribed and diffuse lesions. Nuclear magnetic tomography provides additional information for lesions which are echogenic on ultrasound and can differentiate between metastases, haemangiomas and hamartomas. In diffuse parenchymal disease measurement of relaxation time can differentiate between fatty liver, cirrhosis (alcoholic, primary biliary), haemochromatosis (cirrhotic transformation) and hepatoma. NMR spectroscopy is a method for the future.

  2. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  3. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  4. Long Hyperfine Coherence Time of Ultracold Fermionic 23 Na40 K Molecules

    Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold molecules created and trapped at sub uK temperatures allow the full control of the molecule's external and internal degrees of freedom down to a single hyperfine state. In particular, an ensemble of molecules all initialized in a single rotational and hyperfine state can be prepared and be coherently addressed using microwave fields. In this talk, we report on the observation of long coherence time between two hyperfine states of fermionic 23 Na40 K molecules in the ro-vibronic ground state (v = 0 , J = 0). A direct two-photon microwave transition via the J = 1 state is used to prepare a superposition of two lowest hyperfine states of J = 0 , and we perform Ramsey spectroscopy as a direct probe of phase coherence between these states. The fermionic nature of the molecules and the lack of electronic angular momentum in the ro-vibronic ground state heavily suppress the decoherence from collisions and external fields, respectively, and we observe long coherence times upto 0.5 sec for this hyperfine superposition state. The observed long coherence time is a crucial step for applications of trapped dipolar molecules in quantum information processing schemes.

  5. Estimation of multi-group cross section covariances for 235,238U, 239Pu, 241Am, 56Fe, 23Na and 27Al

    This paper presents the methodology used to estimate multi-group covariances for some major isotopes used in reactor physics. The starting point of this evaluation is the modelling of the neutron induced reactions based on nuclear reaction models with parameters. These latest are the vectors of uncertainties as they are absorbing uncertainties and correlation arising from the confrontation of nuclear reaction model to microscopic experiment. These uncertainties are then propagated towards multi-group cross sections. As major breakthroughs were then asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications, a solution is proposed by the use of integral experiment information at two different stages in the covariance estimation. In this paper, we will explain briefly the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) as well as those coming from validation of nuclear data on dedicated integral experiment (nuclear data oriented). We will illustrate the use of this methodology with various isotopes such as 235,238U, 239Pu, 241Am, 56Fe, 23Na and 27Al. (authors)

  6. 170 Nanometer Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Thurber, K R; Smith, D D; Thurber, Kent R.; Harrell, Lee E.; Smith, Doran D.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the semiconductor GaAs with 170 nanometer slice separation and resolve two regions of reduced nuclear spin polarization density separated by only 500 nanometers. This is achieved by force detection of the magnetic resonance, Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM), in combination with optical pumping to increase the nuclear spin polarization. Optical pumping of the GaAs creates spin polarization up to 12 times larger than the thermal nuclear spin polarization at 5 K and 4 T. The experiment is sensitive to sample volumes containing $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{11}$ $^{71}$Ga$/\\sqrt{Hz}$. These results demonstrate the ability of force-detected magnetic resonance to apply magnetic resonance imaging to semiconductor devices and other nanostructures.

  7. A new study of the {sup 22}Ne(p, γ){sup 23}Na reaction deep underground: Feasibility, setup and first observation of the 186 keV resonance

    Cavanna, F.; Corvisiero, P.; Ferraro, F.; Prati, P. [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Genova (Italy); Depalo, R. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); Menzel, M.L.; Anders, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Aliotta, M.; Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T.; Scott, D.A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bemmerer, D.; Szuecs, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Broggini, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Rossi Alvarez, C. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Caciolli, A. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Z.; Gyuerky, G.; Somorjai, E. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Formicola, A.; Junker, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Gervino, G. [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Torino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Guglielmetti, A.; Trezzi, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, and INFN, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Gustavino, C. [INFN, Sezione di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Roma (Italy); Straniero, O. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Strieder, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2014-11-15

    The {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na reaction takes part in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. This cycle is active in asymptotic giant branch stars as well as in novae and contributes to the nucleosythesis of neon and sodium isotopes. In order to reduce the uncertainties in the predicted nucleosynthesis yields, new experimental efforts to measure the {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na cross section directly at the astrophysically relevant energies are needed. In the present work, a feasibility study for a {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na experiment at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) 400 kV accelerator deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory, Italy, is reported. The ion-beam-induced γ-ray background has been studied. The feasibility study led to the first observation of the E{sub p}=186 keV resonance in a direct experiment. An experimental lower limit of 0.12 x 10{sup -6} eV has been obtained for the resonance strength. Informed by the feasibility study, a dedicated experimental setup for the {sup 22}Ne(p,γ){sup 23}Na experiment has been developed. The new setup has been characterized by a study of the temperature and pressure profiles. The beam heating effect that reduces the effective neon gas density due to the heating by the incident proton beam has been studied using the resonance scan technique, and the size of this effect has been determined for a neon gas target. (orig.)

  8. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  9. 2D 23Na-23Na DQ/MAS NMR spectroscopy: interface induced clustering and immobilization of sodium ions in nanostructured aluminosilicates

    Kobera, Libor; Urbanová, Martina; Brus, Jiří

    International Society of Magnetic Resonance, 2015. P 112. [Alpine Conference on Solid-State NMR /9./. 13.09.2015-17.09.2015, Chamonix Mont-Blanc] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-24155S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : MAS NMR * geopolymers * zeolites Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  10. Quantitative sodium MR imaging of native versus transplanted kidneys using a dual-tuned proton/sodium (1H/23Na) coil: initial experience

    To compare sodium (23Na) characteristics between native and transplanted kidneys using dual-tuned proton (1H)/sodium MRI. Six healthy volunteers and six renal transplant patients (3 normal function, 3 acute allograft rejection) were included. Proton/sodium MRI was obtained at 3 T using a dual-tuned coil. Signal to noise ratio (SNR), sodium concentration ([23Na]) and cortico-medullary sodium gradient (CMSG) were measured. Reproducibility of [23Na] measurement was also tested. SNR, [23Na] and CMSG of the native and transplanted kidneys were compared. Proton and sodium images of kidneys were successfully acquired. SNR and [23Na] measurements of the native kidneys were reproducible at two different sessions. [23Na] and CMSG of the transplanted kidneys was significantly lower than those of the native kidneys: 153.5 ± 11.9 vs. 192.9 ± 9.6 mM (P = 0.002) and 8.9 ± 1.5 vs. 10.5 ± 0.9 mM/mm (P = 0.041), respectively. [23Na] and CMSG of the transplanted kidneys with normal function vs. acute rejection were not statistically different. Sodium quantification of kidneys was reliably performed using proton/sodium MRI. [23Na] and CMSG of the transplanted kidneys were lower than those of the native kidneys, but without a statistically significant difference between patients with or without renal allograft rejection. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative sodium MR imaging of native versus transplanted kidneys using a dual-tuned proton/sodium ({sup 1}H/{sup 23}Na) coil: initial experience

    Moon, Chan Hong; Furlan, Alessandro [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Jung-Hwan; Bae, Kyongtae Ty [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh, Department of Bioengineering, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zhao, Tiejun [MR R and D Collaborations, Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Shapiro, Ron [Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute, Department of Surgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    To compare sodium ({sup 23}Na) characteristics between native and transplanted kidneys using dual-tuned proton ({sup 1}H)/sodium MRI. Six healthy volunteers and six renal transplant patients (3 normal function, 3 acute allograft rejection) were included. Proton/sodium MRI was obtained at 3 T using a dual-tuned coil. Signal to noise ratio (SNR), sodium concentration ([{sup 23}Na]) and cortico-medullary sodium gradient (CMSG) were measured. Reproducibility of [{sup 23}Na] measurement was also tested. SNR, [{sup 23}Na] and CMSG of the native and transplanted kidneys were compared. Proton and sodium images of kidneys were successfully acquired. SNR and [{sup 23}Na] measurements of the native kidneys were reproducible at two different sessions. [{sup 23}Na] and CMSG of the transplanted kidneys was significantly lower than those of the native kidneys: 153.5 ± 11.9 vs. 192.9 ± 9.6 mM (P = 0.002) and 8.9 ± 1.5 vs. 10.5 ± 0.9 mM/mm (P = 0.041), respectively. [{sup 23}Na] and CMSG of the transplanted kidneys with normal function vs. acute rejection were not statistically different. Sodium quantification of kidneys was reliably performed using proton/sodium MRI. [{sup 23}Na] and CMSG of the transplanted kidneys were lower than those of the native kidneys, but without a statistically significant difference between patients with or without renal allograft rejection. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs

  13. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Tomimatsu, Toru, E-mail: tomimatsu@ils.uec.ac.jp; Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi, E-mail: hashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp; Sato, Ken [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Hirayama, Yoshiro [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  14. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Toru Tomimatsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance involving quantum Hall states (QHSs was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  15. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    Popov E.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  16. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kessel, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Fusion Technology Institute; Titus, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  17. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  19. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  20. Contribution to studies of magnetic nuclear dipolar order

    The magnetic nuclear dipolar order concept is first introduced. Two original studies on the 19F spin system of CaF2 are then presented; the first deals with the behavior of a dipolar nuclear antiferromagnetic material in the presence of an effective nonnull field and leads to the determination of the ''field-entropy'' phase diagram of the system; the second study reveals the existence of rotating transverse structures

  1. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  2. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  3. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D2O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10-5 on the D2O concentration. (author)

  4. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: investigating the spins of nuclear related materials

    The author reviews his successive research works: his research thesis work on the Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) which is a quadric-polar nucleus multi-quanta correlation spectroscopy method, the modelling of NMR spectra of disordered materials, the application to materials of interest for the nuclear industry (notably the glasses used for nuclear waste containment). He presents the various research projects in which he is involved: storing glasses, nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetism, solid hydrogen storing matrices, methodological and instrument developments in high magnetic field and high resolution solid NMR, long range distance measurement by solid state Tritium NMR (observing the structure and dynamics of biological complex systems at work)

  5. Electron-nuclear magnetism of praseodymium and its compounds

    A consistent theory of electron-nuclear spin ordering in singlet magnetics is developed. The results of some recent experiments with PrNi5 are exlained. The effect of a magnetic field perpendicular to the basal plane on the phase transition is investigated. Depending on the magnitude of the exchange interaction, the magnetic field may either increase or decrease the transition temperature. An increase of the transition temperature on application of the field should occur, for example, in the hexagonal modification of praseodymium

  6. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    Kahn, Stephen [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramesh [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  7. Optimization and Construction of Single-side Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet

    Ji Yongliang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-sided NMR devices can operate under conditions inaccessible to conventional NMR while featuring portability and the ability to analyze arbitrary-sized objects. In this paper, a semi-elliptic Halbach magnet array was designed and built for single-side Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR. We present an easy-to-implement target field algorithm for single-side NMR magnet design based on Gram-Schmidt Orthogonal method. The creating magnetic field of designed magnet structure could achieve best flatness in the region of interesting for NMR applications. The optimizing result shows that the best magnet structure can generate magnetic fields which flatly distributed in the horizontal direction and the gradient was distributed in the vertical direction with gradient of 2mT/mm. The field strength and gradient were measured by a three dimensions Hall probe and agreed well with the simulations.  

  8. Acoustic nuclear magnetic resonance in easy-axis antiferromagnets

    Obtained and investigated is the dispersion equation which shows that in the rouge of the tipping field at low temperatures the study of effects conditioned by the bond between the oscillations of electron and nuclear spins depends upon the fact, whethe the interaction of the sound with a nuclear spin subsystem is taken into account. The same concerns the effects conditioned by a strong bond between the oscillations of the lattice and electron spins. Shown is the effect of anisotropy of magnitostriction relative part on the nature of orientation phase transitions and the value of the coefficient of strengthening nuclear magnetic resonance

  9. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies on polyelectrolytes with water

    Studies on the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times (T1 and T2) of 1H and 23Na in water-polyelectrolytes systems were carried out. The polyelectrolyte samples used were sodium polystyrene sulfonate, sodium lignosulfonate and sodium cellulose sulfate. The water content (Wc's) of the samples was varied from 0 to 2.0 (grams of water per gram of polyelectrolyte). A minimum value for 1HT1 values of water in the system was observed at a temperature ranging from -25 to -40 degree C. The temperature where the 1HT1 minimum value was observed depended on Wc, corresponding to the crystallization of water in each system. From 1HT1 two groups of water molecules (bound and free water) are considered to exist in water-polyelectrolyte systems. The calculated τc values of bound water increased with decreasing temperature from the order of 10-7 sec to 10-6 sec. The observed 23Na in the water-polyelectrolyte systems relaxed with a single T1. 23NaT2 values showed that the relaxation process was separated into two fractions

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  11. Selection of planes in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography

    A prototype aiming to obtain images in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was developed, by adjusting NMR spectrometer in the IFQSC Laboratory. The techniques for selecting planes were analysed by a set of computer codes, which were elaborated from Bloch equation solutions to simulate the spin system behaviour. Images were obtained using planes with thickness inferior to 1 cm. (M.C.K.)

  12. Nuclear magnetic response imaging of sap flow in plants

    Windt, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging of long distance transport in plants. Long distance transport in plants is an enigmatic process. The theoretical framework that describes its basic properties has been in place for almost a century, yet at the same time only little is k

  13. Yeast Lipid Estimation by Enzymatic and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods

    Moreton, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    Low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance and enzymatic glycerol estimation were compared with a solvent extraction method for estimating the intracellular lipid content of lipid-accumulating yeasts. Both methods correlated well with the solvent extraction procedure and were more convenient with large numbers of samples.

  14. Observation of the uranium 235 nuclear magnetic resonance signal

    Le Bail, H.; Chachaty, C.; Rigny, P.; Bougon, R.

    1983-01-01

    The first observation of the nuclear magnetic resonance of the uranium 235 is reported. It has been performed on pure liquid uranium hexafluoride at 380 K. The measured magnetogyric ratio is | γ(235U) | = 492.6 ± 0.2 rad.s-1 G-1.

  15. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  16. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  17. General anesthesia for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    The core of the MAGNETOM diagnostic device is a liquid helium-cooled cryogenic magnet, having the shape of a hollow cylinder about 2 m long, 50 to 60 cm i.d. Its inner space is designed to accommodate a bench with the patient, whose part examined, usually the head, is enclosed in a smaller coil and is located roughly in the center of the magnet. The examination takes 4 to 20 minutes, during which the patient must be fixed to prevent any motion. Inhalation anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation using the Jackson-Rees or Bain's system and a laryngeal mask is considered the safest way where no special equipment is employed. If artificial ventilation is necessary, balanced anesthesia with either manual ventilation using Bain's system or a fluidic type ventilator seems to be the best choice. The preparation of the patient prior to the examination, the premedication, and the monitoring equipment are described. (J.B.). 1 tab., 5 figs., 11 refs

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and prostatic cancer

    The diagnosis of prostatic cancer is histological. Apart from rectal examination, only imaging techniques allow evaluation of the extension of the cancer. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with a Magniscan 5000 (Thomson C.G.R., France) apparatus. Three types of sequences were used: a short RT sequence (30/500, a multi-echo sequence with a long RT (40/2500) and echo gradient sequences (12 scans in less than 3 minutes). The MRI study of the pelvis is favoured by the abundance of fat which gives good contrast, spontaneous visualization of the vessels and the presence of the bladder with a high signal for urine in T2. This provides a very good anatomical study in three planes. In prostatic cancer, the study of the long sequence signal reveals heterogeneity of the prostatic signal on the second echo, but this is a non-specific variation. The staging of prostatic cancer is facilitated by scans in three planes. Different examples are presented in relation to various stages of the disease. Three clinical cases demonstrate that Magnetic Resonance may become an important element in the choice of treatment

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T1 relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by 31P NMR

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  1. 23Na NMR and FT-IR studies of sodium complexes with the ionophore lasalocid in solution

    Schroeder, G.; Gierczyk, B.; Brzezinski, B.; Różalski, B.; Bartl, F.; Zundel, G.; Sośnicki, J.; Grech, E.

    2000-01-01

    Lasalocid forms 1:1 or 2:2 complexes with sodium ions. The process of complexation was studied in different solvents at various temperatures by 23Na NMR. The formation constants and Δ G values were determined. The nature of the complex between lasalocid and Na + ions was also studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. In chloroform, a 2:2 complex of lasalocid and Na + ions is formed. A continuous absorption is observed in the far FT-IR spectrum of this complex. It indicates the large Na + polarizability due to fast fluctuations of the Na + ions in multiminima potentials, in the dimeric structure.

  2. Enhanced Nuclear Magnetism: Some Novel Features and Prospective Experiments

    Abragam, A.; Bleaney, B.

    1983-06-01

    This review of enhanced nuclear magnetism discusses a number of features not previously considered, with special reference to new experiments that use dynamic methods to produce high nuclear polarization, followed by adiabatic demagnetization in the rotating frame (a.d.r.f.) to produce nuclear ordered states that may be investigated by the scattering of beams of neutrons. Section 2. The 'enhancement' of the nuclear moment arises from the electronic magnetization M_I induced through the hyperfine interaction. It is shown that the spatial distribution of M_I is the same as that of M_H, the Van Vleck magnetization induced by an external field, provided that J is a good quantum number. The spatial distributions are not in general the same in Russell-Saunders coupling, e.g. in the 3d group. Section 3. The Bloch equations are extended to include anisotropic nuclear moments. Section 4. The 'truncated' spin Hamiltonian is derived for spin-spin interaction between enhanced moments. Section 5. A general cancellation theorem for second-order processes in spin-lattice relaxation is derived, showing that the intrinsic direct process must be of third order. The relaxation rate obeys an equation similar to that for Kramers electronic ions, but reduced as the fifth power of the resonance frequencies. The relaxation rates observed experimentally (except in very high fields) are ascribed to paramagnetic impurities, so that these can be used to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (d.n.p.). Section 6. The interactions of neutrons with the true nuclear moment μ_I, the Van Vleck moment M_H, the 'pseudonuclear' moment M_I and the 'pseudomagnetic' nuclear moment μ *_I are discussed. It is shown that the four contributions can be observed separately by measurement of the form factor for neutron scattering as a function of temperature and direction of the applied magnetic field. Precession of the neutron spin in the 'pseudomagnetic' field H* is discussed with reference to the case of Ho

  3. A double-tuned 1H/23Na dual resonator system for tissue sodium concentration measurements in the rat brain via Na-MRI

    A method for quantifying the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the rat brain from 23Na-MR images was developed. TSC is known to change in a variety of common human diseases and holds considerable potential to contribute to their study; however, its accurate measurement in small laboratory animals has been hindered by the extremely low signal to noise ratio (SNR) in 23Na images. To address this, the design, construction and characterization of a double-tuned 1H/23Na dual resonator system for 1H-guided quantitative 23Na-MRI are described. This system comprises an SNR-optimized surface detector coil for 23Na image acquisition, and a volume resonator producing a highly homogeneous B1 field (23Na resonance frequency. A quantification accuracy of TSC of <10 mM was achieved in Na-images with 1.2 μl voxel resolution acquired in 10 min. The potential of the quantification technique was demonstrated in an in vivo experiment of a rat model of cerebral stroke, where the evolution of the TSC was successfully monitored for 8 h after the stroke was induced.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance in pulse radiolysis. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) were applied to the study of pulse radiolysis. Samples were irradiated with a 3-MeV electron beam from the Argonne Van de Graaff accelerator in an EPR magnet (approximately 4000 G) which had axial holes for beam access. A fast flow system transferred the irradiated solution to the rotating 5-mm NMR sample tube. The NMR spectra of mixtures of sodium acetate and methanol were presented to demonstrate the features of the CIDNP in pulse radiolysis

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance method for observation of ferromagnetic pulmonary contaminants

    A method is proposed for measurement of tissue concentration of asbestos and other contaminants containing magnetite. The method uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons as a means of detection of the magnetic particles present in the dust. Results of the study of the effect of concentration of iron particles and particle size on the NMR signal are presented. The NMR signal had linear relationship to the concentration particles. Experiments with different particle size indicated that the signal was proportional to the mass of particles rather than to their number. Quantitative detection of 7RF02 chrysotile asbestos in gel and in rat lungs was demonstrated

  6. Algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase qubit purification level; namely, it reduces the qubit system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering, an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of C132-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. In particular, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems. PMID:10335581

  8. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC–CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  9. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    Meng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of tilted axis cranking CDFT and its application for magnetic and antimagnetic rotation phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets (M\\c{hi}D) in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  10. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear magnetic response imaging of sap flow in plants

    Windt, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging of long distance transport in plants. Long distance transport in plants is an enigmatic process. The theoretical framework that describes its basic properties has been in place for almost a century, yet at the same time only little is known about the dynamics of long distance transport inside the living plant. The latter is caused by the fact that the two pathways in which transport takes place, the xylem and the phloem, are virt...

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance in LaNi/sub 5/

    Rubinstein, M.; Swartzendruber, L.J.; Bennett, L.H.

    1979-03-01

    Proton and La/sup 139/ nuclear magnetic resonance measurements have been performed on LaNi/sub 5/, LaNi/sub 5/ hydrides, and LaNi/sub 5/H/sub x/ with ternary additions. With ternary additions, the activation energy for proton diffusion remained unchanged, but the motionally narrowed linewidth broadened. The quadrupole interaction on the La site has been determined in LaNi/sub 5/ and LaNi/sub 5/H/sub x/.

  13. Science and history explored by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Baias, Maria Antoaneta

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was chosen as the main tool for investigating different biological and chemical systems, as it is unique in providing the information details about the morphology and molecular structures and conformations by which the fundamental properties of these biological and chemical systems can be understood. Proton spin-diffusion experiments combined with 13C CPMAS spectroscopy were successfully applied to characterize the changes that occur during the thermal denaturation ...

  14. Experimental Implementation of Remote State Preparation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2002-01-01

    We have experimentally implemented remote state preparation (RSP) of a qubit from a hydrogen to a carbon nucleus in molecules of carbon-13 labeled chloroform $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ over interatomic distances using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. Full RSP of a special ensemble of qubits, i.e., a qubit chosen from equatorial and polar great circles on a Bloch sphere with Pati's scheme, was achieved with one cbit communication. Such a RSP scheme can be generalized to prepare ...

  15. Experimental implementation of remote state preparation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Peng Xinhua; Zhu Xiwen; Fang Ximing; Feng Mang; Liu Maili; Gao Kelin

    2003-01-13

    We have experimentally implemented remote state preparation of a qubit from a hydrogen to a carbon nucleus in molecules of carbon-13 labeled chloroform {sup 13}CHCl{sub 3} over interatomic distances using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Full RSP of a special ensemble of qubits, i.e., a qubit chosen from either an equatorial or a polar great circle on a Bloch sphere with Pati's scheme, was achieved with one cbit communication.

  16. PWM high frequency oscillator in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    In this article we propose a new architecture for pulsed oscillator, in the area of radio frequency (RF), which operates with pulses of few microseconds in spectrometers of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Pulsed. This new topology substitutes the classic amplifying systems with valves by field effect semiconductors of the type MOS-FET channel N, allowing a larger compacting and efficiency. This oscillator possibly reaching potencies of the order of 103 Watts at a low cost. (author)

  17. Optimal grouping for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scanner

    VANDAELE, Nico; VAN NIEUWENHUYSE, Inneke; CUPERS, Sascha

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Scanner can be managed more efficiently, simultaneously improving patient comfort (in terms of total time spent in the system) and increasing availability in case of emergency calls. By means of a superposition approach, all relevant data on the arrival and service process of different patient types are transformed into a general single server, single class queueing model. The objective function consists of the weighted average patient...

  18. Nonadiabatic Geometric Angle in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Connection

    Cherbal, Omar; Maamache, Mustapha; Drir, Mahrez

    2005-01-01

    By using the Grassmannian invariant-angle coherents states approach, the classical analogue of the Aharonov-Anandan nonadiabatic geometrical phase is found for a spin one-half in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). In the adiabatic limit, the semi-classical relation between the adiabatic Berry’s phase and Hannay’s angle gives exactly the experimental result observed by Suter et al[12].

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Li-ion Battery

    D. Ohno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging has high sensitivity to proton (1H and lithium (7Li. It is a useful measurement for electrolyte in Li-ion battery. 1H NMR images of lithium ion battery which is composed of LiMn2O4 / LiClO4 + propylene carbonate (PC / Li-metal have been studied. 1H NMR images of electrolyte near cathode material (LiMn2O4 showed anomalous intensity distribution, which was quite inhomogeneous. From NMR images as a function of repetition time (TR, it was concluded that the anomalous intensity distribution was not due to change of relaxation time but an indirect (spatial para-magnetization effect from cathode material. The paramagnetization induced by high magnetic field distorts linearity of magnetic gradient field, leading to apparent intensity variance. This functional image is an easy diagnostic measurement for magnetization of cathode material, which allows the possibility to check uniformity of cathode material and change of magnetization under electrochemical process.

  20. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  1. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  2. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Theis, Thomas; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared to conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated via parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP), enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H J-couplings in compounds with 13C in natural abundance in a single transient. The resulting spectra display distinct features that have straightforward interpretation and can be...

  3. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects Nuclear magnetic resonance

    Gutteridge, S

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. Thes...

  4. Design and construction of a nuclear magnetic resonator circuit

    It is described the operation of a feedback circuit that it using the nuclear resonance phenomena and that covers a broad sweeping interval in frequency with a minimum adjustment of the circuit elements and it produces an appropriate nuclear absorption for a sign relation at reasonable noise. The circuit is an oscillator amplifier modulated that it is based its sensibility and stability in an inductive-capacitive arrangement in parallel and always operate in resonant condition, in such a way that the quality factor of Q arrangement has been very elevated. Thus when the nuclear absorption occurs it is producing a fall of Q effective. The oscillation amplitude is controllable and it maintains in a convenient value over the operation interval using control by feedback. The circuit uses a configuration 'Auto dyne Hop kin' that it suffers as a follower of inductive charge, which have the main characteristic of to cause a negative resistance that it appears through the tuning circuit. It is introduced a control for feedback via two trajectories, the first by differential pair for to maintain the amplitude level in RF and the second for to stability a band wide interval in the modulation condition. It is necessary since the RF signal value must have a value to excite the specimen nucleus without to carry to saturate it and that the permanence in the absorption region was appropriate. Between applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomena we have the magnetic fields measurements, physicochemical molecular properties studies, training and medical instrumentation. (Author)

  5. Nuclear magnetic and electric dipole moments of neon-19

    This thesis presents a detailed discussion of a series of experiments designed to measure the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the β-emitting nucleus 19Ne. The 19Ne is generated in the reaction 19F(p,n)19Ne and is polarized by a ''stern-Gerlach'' magnet in a rare gas atomic beams machine. The atoms are stored in a cell for many seconds without depolarizing. The parity violating asymmetry in the β angular distribution is used to monitor the nuclear polarization. The polarized atoms are stored in a cell in a uniform magnetic field. The β-asymmetry is monitored by a pair of β-detectors located on either side of the cell. Transitions between the M/sub J/ = +1/2 and M/sub J/ = -1/2 spin states are induced by an rf field generated by a small Helmholtz coil pair surrounding the cell. Nuclear magnetic resonance lines are observed and the magnetic moment of 19Ne measured to be μ(19Ne) = -1.88542(8)μ/sub N/. A new magnet, cell and detectors were designed to give narrow resonance lines. The equipment is described in detail and several resonance line shapes are discussed. The narrowest resonance line achieved with this system was 0.043 Hz FWHM. This width is primarily due to the 19Ne lifetime. Pulsed NMR lineshapes were also observed. The narrow NMR lines observed in the previous experiment were then used as a probe to look for an electric dipole moment (EDM) in 19Ne. Any shift in the resonance frequency correlated with changes in an externally applied electric field would be evidence for an EDM. The EDM of the 19Ne atom was measured to (7.2 +/- 6.2 X 10-22 e-cm. This experiment and possible improvements are discussed in detail

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of metallic scandium chlorides

    The 45Sc nuclear magnetic resonance was studied in samples having the general composition CsSc/sub x/Cl3 (0.67 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.0) in the CsCl-ScCl3-Sc system. In particular the structure of CsScCl3 suggests that it may be a one-dimensional conductor, and an attempt was therefore made to detect the occurrence of a metal-insulator transition of the type characteristic of one-dimensional conductors. Conventional crossed-coil (nuclear induction) techniques were employed. The 45Sc resonance was studied over a wide frequency range (4 to 24 MHz) at 300K, these measurements yielding the Knight shift and nuclear electric quadrupole coupling parameters. No significant variation in the spectra occurred from 4.2K to 450K, indicating the absence of a metal-insulator transition in this temperature range

  7. Practical design of a 4 Tesla double-tuned RF surface coil for interleaved 1H and 23Na MRI of rat brain

    Alecci, M.; Romanzetti, S.; Kaffanke, J.; Celik, A.; Wegener, H. P.; Shah, N. J.

    2006-08-01

    MRI is proving to be a very useful tool for sodium quantification in animal models of stroke, ischemia, and cancer. In this work, we present the practical design of a dual-frequency RF surface coil that provides 1H and 23Na images of the rat head at 4 T. The dual-frequency RF surface coil comprised of a large loop tuned to the 1H frequency and a smaller co-planar loop tuned to the 23Na frequency. The mutual coupling between the two loops was eliminated by the use of a trap circuit inserted in the smaller coil. This independent-loop design was versatile since it enabled a separate optimisation of the sensitivity and RF field distributions of the two coils. To allow for an easy extension of this simple double-tuned coil design to other frequencies (nuclei) and dimensions, we describe in detail the practical aspects of the workbench design and MRI testing using a phantom that mimics in vivo conditions. A comparison between our independent-loop, double-tuned coil and a single-tuned 23Na coil of equal size obtained with a phantom matching in vivo conditions, showed a reduction of the 23Na sensitivity (about 28 %) because of signal losses in the trap inductance. Typical congruent 1H and 23Na rat brain images showing good SNR ( 23Na: brain 7, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid 11) and spatial resolution ( 23Na: 1.25 × 1.25 × 5 mm 3) are also reported. The in vivo SNR values obtained with this coil were comparable to, if not better than, other contemporary designs in the literature.

  8. Characterization of 22Ne implanted target by 22Ne(p,γ)23Na resonance reaction

    Studies of nuclear reactions relevant to astrophysical scenario, often require measurement of cross section in picobarn to nano-barn range (1 barn = 10−24 cm2). So we need targets which are isotopically pure and can withstand high beam load over a long time. Even the backings used should contain no or very low concentration of impurities. Implantation technique has been found to be one of the most effective methods to produce such targets

  9. Analysis of ringing due to magnetic core materials used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Prabhu Gaunkar, Neelam; Nlebedim, Cajetan; Hadimani, Ravi; Bulu, Irfan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Mina, Mani; Jiles, David

    Oil-field well logging instruments employ pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and use inductive sensors to detect and evaluate the presence of particular fluids in geological formations. Acting as both signal transmitters and receivers most inductive sensors employ magnetic cores to enhance the quality and amplitude of signals recorded during field measurements. It is observed that the magnetic core also responds to the applied input signal thereby generating a signal (`ringing') that interferes with the measurement of the signals from the target formations. This causes significant noise and receiver dead time and it is beneficial to eliminate/suppress the signals received from the magnetic core. In this work a detailed analysis of the magnetic core response and in particular loading of the sensor due to the presence of the magnetic core is presented. Pulsed NMR measurements over a frequency band of 100 kHz to 1MHz are used to determine the amplitude and linewidth of the signals acquired from different magnetic core materials. A lower signal amplitude and a higher linewidth are vital since these would correspond to minimal contributions from the magnetic core to the inductive sensor response and thus leading to minimized receiver dead time.

  10. Transformation of Symmetrization Order to Nuclear-Spin Magnetization by Chemical Reaction and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Bowers, C. Russell; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    1986-01-01

    A method of obtaining very large nuclear-spin polarizations is proposed and illustrated by density-operator calculations. The prediction is that chemical reaction and rf irradiation can convert the scalar parahydrogen state into polarization of order unity on the nuclear spins of the products of molecular-hydrogen addition reactions. A means of extending the resultant sensitivity enhancement to other spins is proposed in which the transfer of order occurs through population differences not as...

  11. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy

  12. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  14. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  15. Nuclear spin relaxation in systems of magnetic spheres

    A new approach to the NMR relaxation theory for a system of magnetic spheres (sufficiently big spherical molecules) is presented. In this paper the NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 and spin-spin relaxation time T2 are calculated for nuclear spins I→j, taking into account intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions between the spins I→j, and spins S→k in the magnetic spheres. By an expansion of the dipole-dipole interaction in a series of spherical harmonics, it is possible to separate spatial variables of the interacting spins in a laboratory frame. A simultaneous effect of isotropic rotational and translation diffusion of the spins and relaxation rate of spins S→k is also taken into account

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy with a microwire rf source

    The authors use a 1.0 μm wide patterned Cu wire with an integrated nanomagnetic tip to measure the statistical nuclear polarization of 19F in CaF2 by magnetic resonance force microscopy. With less than 350 μW of dissipated power, the authors achieve rf magnetic fields over 4 mT at 115 MHz for a sample positioned within 100 nm of the 'microwire' rf source. A 200 nm diameter FeCo tip integrated onto the wire produces field gradients greater than 105 T/m at the same position. The large rf fields from the broadband microwire enable long rotating-frame spin lifetimes of up to 15 s at 4 K

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance with the Distant Dipolar Field

    Corum, C A

    2005-01-01

    Distant dipolar field (DDF)-based nuclear magnetic resonance is an active research area with many fundamental properties still not well understood. Already several intriguing applications have developed, like HOMOGENIZED and IDEAL spectroscopy, that allow high resolution spectra to be obtained in inhomogeneous fields, such as in-vivo. The theoretical and experimental research in this thesis concentrates on the fundamental signal properties of DDF-based sequences in the presence of relaxation (T1 and T2) and diffusion. A general introduction to magnetic resonance phenomenon is followed by a more in depth introduction to the DDF and its effects. A novel analytical signal equation has been developed to describe the effects of T2 relaxation and diffusing spatially modulated longitudinal spins during the signal build period of an HOMOGENIZED cross peak. Diffusion of the longitudinal spins results in a lengthening of the effective dipolar demagnetization time, delaying the re-phasing of coupled anti-phase states in...

  18. 2.3 Tomography using nuclear magnetic resonance

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) not only allows the tomographic imaging of tissues but also the identification of the biochemical structure of tissues. The principles of the method are described as is a NMR examination unit based on a giant magnet with a central opening in which is placed the patient. The application of the said method allows to distinguish in the skull structures 2 mm in size, in the trunk 3 mm in size. The morphological image may be obtained in 2 mins, data on chemical composition in 7 mins. The method may be applied for diagnosing edemas of the brain, hematomas, for distinguishing benign and malignant tumours, for measuring blood vessel flow and for monitoring biochemical processes. The advantage of the method is that it does not load the patient with radioactive radiation. (J.P.)

  19. A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    Job, Constantin; Pearson, Robert M.; Brown, Michael F.

    1994-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using personal computer-based hardware has the potential of enabling the application of NMR methods to fields where conventional state of the art equipment is either impractical or too costly. With such a strategy for data acquisition and processing, disciplines including civil engineering, agriculture, geology, archaeology, and others have the possibility of utilizing magnetic resonance techniques within the laboratory or conducting applications directly in the field. Another aspect is the possibility of utilizing existing NMR magnets which may be in good condition but unused because of outdated or nonrepairable electronics. Moreover, NMR applications based on personal computer technology may open up teaching possibilities at the college or even secondary school level. The goal of developing such a personal computer (PC)-based NMR standard is facilitated by existing technologies including logic cell arrays, direct digital frequency synthesis, use of PC-based electrical engineering software tools to fabricate electronic circuits, and the use of permanent magnets based on neodymium-iron-boron alloy. Utilizing such an approach, we have been able to place essentially an entire NMR spectrometer console on two printed circuit boards, with the exception of the receiver and radio frequency power amplifier. Future upgrades to include the deuterium lock and the decoupler unit are readily envisioned. The continued development of such PC-based NMR spectrometers is expected to benefit from the fast growing, practical, and low cost personal computer market.

  20. On the quantumness of correlations in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Soares-Pinto, D O; Maziero, J; Gavini-Viana, A; Serra, R M; Céleri, L C

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was successfully employed to test several protocols and ideas in Quantum Information Science. In most of these implementations the existence of entanglement was ruled out. This fact introduced concerns and questions about the quantum nature of such bench tests. In this article we address some issues related to the non-classical aspects of NMR systems. We discuss some experiments where the quantum aspects of this system are supported by quantum correlations of separable states. Such quantumness, beyond the entanglement-separability paradigm, is revealed via a departure between the quantum and the classical versions of information theory. In this scenario, the concept of quantum discord seems to play an important role. We also present an experimental implementation of an analogous of the single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing two nuclear spins to encode the interferometric paths. This experiment illustrate how non-classical correlations of separable states may be us...

  1. Time-efficient interleaved human (23)Na and (1)H data acquisition at 7 T.

    de Bruin, Paul W; Koken, Peter; Versluis, Maarten J; Aussenhofer, Sebastian A; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Börnert, Peter; Webb, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate a flexible and time-efficient interleaved imaging approach for the acquisition of proton and sodium images of the human knee at 7 T within a clinically relevant timescale. A flexible software framework was established which allowed the interleaving of multiple, different, fully specific absorption ratio (SAR)-validated scans. The system was able to switch between these different scans at flexible time points. The practical example presented consists of interleaved proton (Dixon imaging and T2* mapping) and sodium (mapping the sodium content and fluid-suppressed component separately) sequences with the key idea to perform proton MRI whilst the sodium nuclei relax towards thermal equilibrium, and vice versa. Comparisons were made between these four scans being acquired sequentially in the normal mode of scanner operation and those acquired in an interleaved fashion. Images acquired in the interleaved mode were very similar to those acquired in sequential scans with no image artifacts produced by the slight intra-sequence variation in steady-state magnetization. A reduction in scanning time of almost a factor of two was established using the interleaved scans, allowing such a protocol to be completed within 30 min. Phantom experiments and in vivo scans performed in healthy volunteers and in one patient proved the basic feasibility of this approach. This approach for the interleaving of multiple proton and sodium scans, each with different contrasts, is an efficient method for the design of new practical clinical protocols for sodium MRI. PMID:26269329

  2. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to certifiable food colors

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for the identification of individual colours, for distinguishing individual colours from colour mixtures, for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of the individual colours in mixtures and for proofs of the adulteration of certified colours adding noncertified colours. The method is well suited for observing the purity of colours and may also be used as the control method in the manufacture of colours and in assessing their stability and their resistance to increased temperature and light. (M.K.)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the posterior fossa disorders

    Ikeda, Toshiaki; Fukaya, Takashi; Nomura, Yasuya; Yoshikawa, Kouki

    1985-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance scans (NMR-CT) were performed on patients with posterior fossa disorders such as acoustic neurinoma, cerebellar tumour (gangliocytoma), epidermoid tumour and spinocerebellar degeneration, and compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The advantages of NMR-CT include lack of bone artifact, variety of image planes, transverse, sagital and coronal imaging, and high ability to differentiate tissues. The disadvantages include prolonged data accumulation time, lack of bone detail and calcification, limited spatial resolution and suitability of patients. (author).

  4. Thermo-magnetic systems for space nuclear reactors an introduction

    Maidana, Carlos O

    2014-01-01

    Introduces the reader to engineering magnetohydrodynamics applications and presents a comprehensive guide of how to approach different problems found in this multidisciplinary field. An introduction to engineering magnetohydrodynamics, this brief focuses heavily on the design of thermo-magnetic systems for liquid metals, with emphasis on the design of electromagnetic annular linear induction pumps for space nuclear reactors. Alloy systems that are liquid at room temperature have a high degree of thermal conductivity far superior to ordinary non-metallic liquids. This results in their use for

  5. Experimental Implementation of Remote State Preparation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Feng, M; Liu, M; Gao, K; Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2003-01-01

    We have experimentally implemented remote state preparation (RSP) of a qubit from a hydrogen to a carbon nucleus in molecules of carbon-13 labeled chloroform $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ over interatomic distances using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. Full RSP of a special ensemble of qubits, i.e., a qubit chosen from equatorial and polar great circles on a Bloch sphere with Pati's scheme, was achieved with one cbit communication. Such a RSP scheme can be generalized to prepare a large number of qubit states and may be used in other quantum information processing and quantum computing.

  6. Neutron studies of nuclear magnetism at ultralow temperature

    Siemensmeyer, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Lefmann, K.;

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic order in copper and silver has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in these simple, diamagnetic metals at temperatures below 50 nK and 560 pK, respectively. Both crystallize in the FCC-symmetry which is fully frustrated for nearest...... phase diagram in applied fields. The low-and the high-field structures are of type I, while in intermediate fields the unconventional ordering vector q = 2 pi(1,1/3,1/3) is observed. Strong hysteresis effects indicate first-order phase boundaries in copper. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  7. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    WANG Chuan; HAO Liang; ZHAO Lian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database.Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation,the query process can be realized in a two-mode database.In the query process,the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information,and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query.We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system.The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of apple juice containing enzyme preparations

    In this work, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) was employed to evaluate changes in apple juice in response to the addition of Panzym Yieldmash and Ultrazym AFP-L enzymatic complexes and compare it with premium apple juice. The juice was processed at different temperatures and concentrations of enzymatic complexes. The differences in the results were attributed mainly to the enzyme concentrations, since temperature did not cause any variation. A quantitative analysis indicated that the concentration of fructose increased while the concentrations of sucrose and glucose decreased in response to increasing concentrations of the enzymatic complexes. (author)

  9. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database. Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation, the query process can be realized in a two-mode database. In the query process, the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information, and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query. We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed. (general)

  10. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Bates, Cameron Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  11. Enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance in a non-magnetic cubic doublet

    In this thesis two lanthanide compounds are studied which show enhanced nuclear magnetism at low temperatures: Rb2NaHoF6 and CsNaHoF6. Chapter II gives a description of the 4He-circulating refrigerator, which was built to provide the low temperatures required for the polarization of the enhanced nuclear moments. This type of dilution refrigerator was chosen because of its simple design and large cooling power. Chapter III is devoted to a comparison of the different types of dilution refrigerators. A theoretical discussion is given of their performance, starting from the differential equations, which govern the temperature distribution in the refrigerator. In chapter IV the actual performance of the refrigerator, described in chapter II is discussed. In chapter V a description of the NMR-apparatus, developed for very-low-temperature NMR experiments is given. In chapter VI experimental results on the compound Rb2NaHoF6 are presented. The CEF-ground state of this compound is probably the non-magnetic doublet GAMMA3, but at a temperature of 170 K a structural phase transition lowers the crystal symmetry from cubic to tetragonal and the doublet is split into two singlets. In chapter VII specific heat, (enhanced) nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetization measurements on the compound Cs2NaHoF6 are presented which also has a GAMMA3-doublet ground state. In zero magnetic field the degeneracy of the doublet is removed at a temperature of 393 mK, where a phase transition is induced by quadrupolar interactions. (Auth.)

  12. Measurement of magnetic field strengths in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    The production of the proper magnetic field profile is fundamental to plasma confinement in magnetic mirror systems. The knowledge of this profile is important for the control of a variety of physical processes which affect particle confinement, including thermal barrier and potential well formation. A system of probes using the nuclear magnetic resonance of protons in magnetic fields is used to measure the field strengths at various points in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The system operates at high fields (1-12 T) with significant nonuniformity (≤ 1.5 T/m) by taking advantage of the phenomenon of spin echo. In addition, the probes can operate in the MFTF-B environment where low temperature capability and remote operation is necessary. These probes have been tested with laboratory magnets to develop an engineering model which relates probe signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio to probe parameters and magnetic field strengths and gradients. Engineering design formula and techniques are presented as well as data from laboratory test stands

  13. Saturation properties of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field

    Rezaei, Z

    2016-01-01

    Different saturation properties of cold symmetric nuclear matter in the strong magnetic field have been considered. We have seen that for magnetic fields about $B> 3 \\times 10 ^ {17}\\ G$, {for both cases with and without nucleon anomalous magnetic moments}, the saturation density and saturation energy grow by increasing the magnetic field. It is indicated that the magnetic susceptibility of symmetric nuclear matter becomes negative showing the diamagnetic response especially at $B 3 \\times 10 ^ {17}\\ G$, {the softening of equation of state caused by Landau quantization is overwhelmed by stiffening due to the magnetization of nuclear matter.} We have shown that the effects of strong magnetic field on nuclear matter may affect the constraints on the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter obtained applying the experimental observable.

  14. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N., E-mail: neelampg@iastate.edu; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  15. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUNFLOWER AND RAPESEED LECITHIN

    Lisovaya E. V.; Victorova E. P.; Agafonov O. S.; Kornen N. N.; Shahray T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a comparative assessment and peculiarities of nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics of rapeseed and sunflower lecithin. It was established, that lecithin’s nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics, namely, protons’ spin-spin relaxation time and amplitudes of nuclear magnetic relaxation signals of lecithin components, depend on content of oil’s fat acids and phospholipids, contained in the lecithin. Comparative assessment of protons’ spin-spin relaxation time of r...

  16. Characterization of polymers by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    After having recalled some generalities which are necessary for the obtention of a spectrum and the method to be chosen, the author considers the use of the hydrogen 1 and carbon 13 high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (in liquid and solid phase) on some examples in the field of polymers. In the case of the polymers in solution, this technology seems to be limited to liquid or soluble polymers and to insoluble polymers which are inflatable in some solvents. The other polymers (infusible and non-inflatable) require the use of the CP-MAS solid phase NMR (cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance). For liquids, the NMR allows to better know the microstructure of these compounds and to better understand the reaction mechanisms (in the case of poly-condensation, polymerization, degradation..) which can control the polymerization. The CP-MAS solid phase NMR is a particularly interesting method for the determination of insoluble three-dimensional polymers structures and for the study of the conformations and configurations of the chain carbonated skeleton. (O.M.). 46 refs., 18 figs

  17. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of liquids in porous media

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation is useful for probing physical and chemical properties of liquids in porous media. Examples are given on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, plaster pastes, cement-based materials and natural porous materials, such as sandstone and carbonate rocks. Here, we outline our recent NMR relaxation work for these very different porous materials. For instance, low field NMR relaxation of water in calibrated granular packings leads to striking different pore-size dependencies of the relaxation times T1 and T2 when changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities. This allows separation of the diffusion and surface limited regimes of relaxation in these macroporous media. The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1(ω0) is also a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in porous media. This allows a continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials. Our recent applications of two-dimensional (2D) T1-T2 and T2-z-store-T2 correlation experiments have evidenced the water exchange in connected micropores of cement pastes. The direct probing of water adsorption time on a solid surface gives access to an original characterization of the surface nano-wettability of porous plaster pastes. We show that such a parameter depends directly on the physical chemistry of the pore surfaces. Lastly, we outline our recent measurements of wettability in oil/brine/reservoir carbonate rocks.

  18. Nuclear orientation with combined electric and magnetic interactions

    The combined interaction of a static electric field gradient and a static magnetic field with the electromagnetic moments of a nucleus is considered for the case of nuclear orientation at low temperature. The general expression of the angular distribution of a radiation emitted from the oriented state is developed for polycrystalline samples, where the principal axis of the electric field gradients are randomly distributed with respect to a fixed magnetic direction. Due to axial symmetry of the ensemble the effect of the quadrupole interaction is reduced to an attenuation factor on the usual Bsub(K) coefficients. Numerical calculations of these attenuation factors, for K=1, 2, 4 have been performed in the case of symmetric electric field gradient for a wide range of the electric to magnetic interactions ratio and spin values I=1/2, 1, 3/2, ...8. Typical attenuation curves for spin 5/2 and 9/2 are presented. Comparing the experimental anisotropies with the tabulated values, one can extract the quadrupole interaction value hωsub(Q)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  20. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze and INSTM, Firenze (Italy); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Corti, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.corti@unipv.it; Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  1. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  2. Magnetism and superconductivity in iron-based superconductors as probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs and LiFeAs.

  3. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology

  5. Nuclear magnetic shielding in molecules. The application of GIAO's in LCAO-Xα-calculations

    A nonempirical method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding based on the four current density functional formalism is presented. Using SCF-LCAO-Xα-calculations with application of GIAO's effective one particle equations are solved. The results for nuclear magnetic shielding in diatomic molecules are of good quality, compared with other theoretical and experimental data. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  7. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  8. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  10. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of photosynthesizing Chlorella

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intact Chlorella cells under light and dark conditions are described. Psub(i), ATP, NAD, UDP-glucose and polyphosphate were observed in the cell. The presence of two compartments was postulated from two intracellular Psub(i) signals, whose chemical shift values were dependent on illumination. These two Psub(i) signals were assigned to those in the stroma of chloroplasts and in the cytoplasm based on their response to the light and dark cycle, and to the treatment of cells with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. In the light the chloroplastic pH became more alkaline, while the cytoplasmic pH became more acidic. An increase in ATP was also observed upon illumination. (orig.)

  11. Explosives Detection Using Magnetic and Nuclear Resonance Techniques

    Fraissard, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) a highly promising new technique for bulk explosives detection: relatively inexpensive, more compact than NMR, but with considerable selectivity. Since the NQR frequency is insensitive to long-range variations in composition, mixing explosives with other materials, such as the plasticizers in plastic explosives, makes no difference. The NQR signal strength varies linearly with the amount of explosive, and is independent of its distribution within the volume monitored. NQR spots explosive types in configurations missed by the X-ray imaging method. But if NQR is so good, why it is not used everywhere? Its main limitation is the low signal-to-noise ratio, particularly with the radio-frequency interference that exists in a field environment, NQR polarization being much weaker than that from an external magnetic field. The distinctive signatures are there, but are difficult to extract from the noise. In addition, the high selectivity is partly a disadvantage, as it is hard to bui...

  12. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -1200 C to +1600 C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cytochromes c in solution

    Cytochromes c are small soluble proteins, which have been extensively studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The specific NMR features of paramagnetic proteins are discussed for the oxidized form (paramagnetic shift and line broadening). Early NMR studies have focused on the electronic structure of the heme and its direct environment. The conformations of cytochromes c are now investigated by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy combined with restrained molecular dynamics. 15N and 13C NMR, which greatly benefit from isotopic enrichment, may help in obtaining reliable 1H assignments and thus high quality solution structure. Finally, hydrogen exchange rates provide insight in the rigidity (and stability) of cytochromes c in both redox states at the atomic level. (author). 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. High field nuclear magnetic resonance application to polysaccharide chemistry

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been applied to polysaccharide chemistry using time averaging technique and high fields (100 and 250 MHz). The three methyl signals of methyl cellulose and cellulose triacetate are separated, and the C-6 substituent has been identified. Biosynthesis of bacterial cellulose has been performed using deuterium labelled D-glucose and Acetobacter xylinum. Per-acetylated derivative of bacterial cellulose has been studied by NMR; this study permitted us to determine the quantity of deuterium on each position of the anhydro-glucose unit in the polymer. NMR has also been used to see the anomeric end chain of cellulose and amylose derivatives and to show the fixation of bromine and t-butyl group on the free anomeric end chain of cellulose triacetate. (author)

  15. State interrogation in nuclear magnetic resonance quantum-information processing

    Reconstruction of a reduced density operator for weakly coupled systems of spins (1/2) from fits to nuclear magnetic resonance spectra is described in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on data treatment procedures that specify fewer than the 3n complete spectra that are implicitly prescribed in published references to state tomography on n-spin systems. It is shown that if the density operator is expanded in the so-called product-operator basis, it is always possible to estimate a desired coefficient in the expansion by measuring a single spectral multiplet. This simple observation can substantially reduce the experimental effort required for either complete density-matrix reconstruction or estimation of subsets of the coefficients in the product-operator expansion. A simple iterative algorithm can be used to produce reduced measurement procedures for experiments involving small numbers of qubits

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single subnanoliter ova

    Grisi, Marco; Guidetti, Roberto; Harris, Nicola; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is, in principle, a promising candidate to study the intracellular chemistry of single microscopic living entities. However, due to sensitivity limitations, NMR experiments were reported only on very few and relatively large single cells down to a minimum volume of 10 nl. Here we show NMR spectroscopy of single ova at volume scales (0.1 and 0.5 nl) where life development begins for a broad variety of animals, humans included. We demonstrate that the sensitivity achieved by miniaturized inductive NMR probes (few pmol of 1H nuclei in some hours at 7 T) is sufficient to observe chemical heterogeneities among subnanoliter ova of tardigrades. Such sensitivities should allow to non-invasively monitor variations of concentrated intracellular compounds, such as glutathione, in single mammalian zygotes.

  17. Physical principles of medical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance

    The theoretical principles of zeumatography a new method of visualization of internal organs in the human body are discussed. Zeumatography is a method based on the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. It opens fairly broad possibilities in diagnosis as well as in theoretical research. Its sensitivity and accuracy will probably be equal to those of X-ray emission and computer tomography. The main advantage of the method which will make its future use particularly widespread is that it eliminates exposure to ionizing radiation, makes possible determination of the character of the tissue based on the content of hydrogen nucleus in a given area and enables differentiation of the tissues with different interatomic bonds, that is those which contain different chemical compounds. (author)

  18. Method to calculate reservoir permeability using nuclear magnetic resonance logging and capillary pressure data

    In view of the problems of SDR and Tim-Coates models in calculating permeability using nuclear magnetic resonance logging data, based on the fact that nuclear magnetic resonance T2 distribution and capillary pressure curves reflect the reservoir pore structure, a method was presented to calculate reservoir permeability using nuclear magnetic resonance logging and capillary pressure data. The correlation between Swanson parameter and permeability was established by comparing 31 core samples which were measured by mercury penetration and nuclear magnetic resonance logging. Considering the problem that capillary pressure data are limited by their quantity, the good correlativity between T2 geometric mean value of lateral relaxation time of nuclear magnetic resonance and Swanson parameter can be used to determine the Swanson parameter and to calculate reservoir permeability consecutively. The processing of the data in well A yields a permeability closer to the result of core analysis, and this indicates the accuracy of the method. (authors)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of materials for spintronic applications

    Since its discovery in liquids and also in solid matter in 1946, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely established as a standard tool for structural analysis of a wide range of materials. This review outlines recent NMR studies on materials considered to be useful in spintronic applications. Spintronics is a new research field which combines the use of both the charge and the spin of an electron as information carriers, which promises distinct advantages over conventional electronics which makes use only of the charge of electrons. A successful application of materials in spintronic devices requires a detailed knowledge of the interplay between the structure and the magnetic and electronic properties on an atomic scale. NMR probes the local environments of the active nuclei. This local character of NMR arises from local contributions to the hyperfine field, namely, the transferred field which depends on the nearest neighbour atoms and their magnetic moments. This enables NMR to study the structural properties of bulk samples as well as of thin films of spin polarized materials. Moreover, NMR spectroscopy also provides an indirect tool to measure the density of states of spin polarized materials via a measurement of the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time. This review starts with an introduction into the basic concepts of NMR followed by a description of the important aspects of a pulsed NMR experiment. Thereafter, information obtained by an NMR experiment is addressed. In the subsequent main part, selected recent NMR studies (published roughly after the year 2000) of materials for spintronic applications are presented including NMR studies of, for example, Co thin films, Heusler compounds, double perovskites and pyrites. (topical review)

  20. Theoretical study on nuclear structure by the multiple Coulomb scattering and magnetic scattering of relativistic electrons

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Chang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-04-01

    Electron scattering is an effective method to study the nuclear structure. For the odd-A nuclei with proton holes in the outmost orbits, we investigate the contributions of proton holes to the nuclear quadrupole moments Q and magnetic moments μ by the multiple Coulomb scattering and magnetic scattering. The deformed nuclear charge densities are constructed by the relativistic mean-field (RMF) models. Comparing the theoretical Coulomb and magnetic form factors with the experimental data, the nuclear quadrupole moments Q and nuclear magnetic moments μ are investigated. From the electron scattering, the wave functions of the proton holes of odd-A nuclei can be tested, which can also reflect the validity of the nuclear structure model.

  1. Magnetic Moments of Octet Baryons in Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter

    Singh, Harpreet; Dahiya, Harleen

    2016-01-01

    We have calculated the in-medium magnetic moments of octet baryons in the presence of hot and dense symmetric nuclear matter. Effective magnetic moments of baryons have been derived from medium modified quark masses within chiral SU(3) quark mean field model.Further, for better insight of medium modification of baryonic magnetic moments, we have considered the explicit contributions from the valence as well as sea quark effects. These effects have been successful in giving the description of baryonic magnetic moments in vacuum. The magnetic moments of baryons are found to vary significantly as a function of density of nuclear medium.

  2. Nuclear orientation experiments on the magnetic moments of europium and gadolinium nuclei

    In this thesis, experimental results on the ground state nuclear magnetic moments of europium and gadolinium isotopes are presented. The nuclear orientation experiments were performed on europium and gadolinium nuclei embedded in several host lattices. Attention is paid to the hyperfine interactions of the ions. Nuclear moments are discussed in the context of nuclear shell model. The theoretical framework is described for nuclear structure and low temperature nuclear orientation. Furthermore, the experimental techniques, the technical arrangement of the orientation apparatus, the methods for radiative detection and the use of nuclear orientation thermometry are described. (Auth.)

  3. Characterization of sodium transport in Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing purified A. laidlawii (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 22Na tracer techniques

    The active transport of sodium ions in live Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase from the plasma membrane of this microorganism was studied by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and 22Na tracer techniques, respectively. In live A. laidlawii B cells, the transport of sodium was an active process in which metabolic energy was harnessed for the extrusion of sodium ions against a concentration gradient. The process was inhibited by low temperatures and by the formation of gel state lipid in the plasma membrane of this organism. In reconstituted proteoliposomes containing the purified (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase, the hydrolysis of ATP was accompanied by the transport of sodium ions into the lipid vesicles, and the transport process was impaired by reagents known to inhibit ATPase activity. At the normal growth temperature (37 degrees C), this transport process required a maximum of 1 mol of ATP per mol of sodium ion transported. Together, these results provide direct experimental evidence that the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase of the Acholeplasma laidlawii B membrane is the cation pump which maintains the low levels of intracellular sodium characteristic of this microorganism

  4. Structure and aqueous reactivity of silicate glasses high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance contribution; Structure et reactivite aqueuse des verres silicates apport de la resonance magnetique nucleaire haute-resolution

    Angeli, F

    2000-10-25

    This research aims at getting a better understanding of the relations which may exist between the chemical composition of the oxide silicate glasses, the structure and the aqueous reactivity. We study the cations present in most glasses, more particularly the radioactive waste glasses, and those which are more liable to bring information both about structure and reactivity. Among the experimental methods used, the nuclear magnetic resonance of multi-quantum magic-angle spinning (NMR MQ-MAS) has been carried out for the structural characterization of the pristine and altered glasses. In the first part, we discuss the possibility of deducting a type of information from a quantitative approach of the {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 17}O NMR MQ-MAS. In the second part, we apply this method to glasses containing between two and six oxides. The vitreous compositions studied permit to focus our attention on the influence of sodium, aluminum and calcium on their local structural environment. We point out an evolution of the distributions of bond distances and angles in relation to the glass chemical composition. We show the strong potentiality of the {sup 17}O used to probe the pristine and altered glasses. The influence of the different cations studied on the rate of glass dissolution is debated from the alterations made on short periods. On the basis of all these data, we discuss the importance of the structural effect which may influence the kinetic phenomena of alteration. (author)

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (φ/ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  6. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al2O3/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 1017 in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies

  8. The 12C(12C,α)20Ne and 12C(12C,p)23Na reactions at the Gamow peak via the Trojan Horse Method

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Guardo, L.; Gulino, M.; Indelicato, I.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartá, R.

    2016-05-01

    A measurement of the 12C(14N,α20Ne)2H and 12C(14N,p23Na)2Hreactions has been performed at a 14N beam energy of 30.0 MeV. The experiment aims to explore the extent to which contributing 24Mg excited states can be populated in the quasi-free reaction off the deuteron in 14N. In particular, the 24Mg excitation region explored in the measurement plays a key role in stellar carbon burning whose cross section is commonly determined by extrapolating high-energy fusion data. From preliminary results, α and proton channels are clearly identified. In particular, ground and first excited states of 20Ne and 23Na play a major role.

  9. The 12C(12C,α20Ne and 12C(12C,p23Na reactions at the Gamow peak via the Trojan Horse Method

    Tumino A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement of the 12C(14N,α20Ne2H and 12C(14N,p23Na2Hreactions has been performed at a 14N beam energy of 30.0 MeV. The experiment aims to explore the extent to which contributing 24Mg excited states can be populated in the quasi-free reaction off the deuteron in 14N. In particular, the 24Mg excitation region explored in the measurement plays a key role in stellar carbon burning whose cross section is commonly determined by extrapolating high-energy fusion data. From preliminary results, α and proton channels are clearly identified. In particular, ground and first excited states of 20Ne and 23Na play a major role.

  10. The measurement of (n,2n) cross section for 23Na at 13.3 to 18.5 MeV

    The (n,2n) cross-section for 23Na has been measured by the activation method in the energy range 13.3 to 18.5 MeV. Monoenergitic neutrons were obtained from T(d,n)4He reaction with 2.3 MeV deuteron energy. The induced specific activities were detected by a coincidence counting setup. For comparison existed data and theoretical calculation from 12∼20 MeV are also given

  11. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of water in aggrecan solutions

    Foster, Richard J.; Damion, Robin A.; Baboolal, Thomas G.; Smye, Stephen W.; Ries, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Aggrecan, a highly charged macromolecule found in articular cartilage, was investigated in aqueous salt solutions with proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates were determined at two different field strengths, 9.4 T and 0.5 T, for a range of temperatures and aggrecan concentrations. The diffusion coefficients of the water molecules were also measured as a function of temperature and aggrecan concentration, using a pulsed field gradient technique at 9.4 T. Assuming an Arrhenius relationship, the activation energies for the various relaxation processes and the translational motion of the water molecules were determined from temperature dependencies as a function of aggrecan concentration in the range 0–5.3% w/w. The longitudinal relaxation rate and inverse diffusion coefficient were approximately equally dependent on concentration and only increased by upto 20% from that of the salt solution. The transverse relaxation rate at high field demonstrated greatest concentration dependence, changing by an order of magnitude across the concentration range examined. We attribute this primarily to chemical exchange. Activation energies appeared to be approximately independent of aggrecan concentration, except for that of the low-field transverse relaxation rate, which decreased with concentration. PMID:27069663

  12. Work in progress: nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the gallbladder

    A preliminary study of the relation between food intake and intensity of gallbladder bile on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images was made. Twelve subjects (seven volunteers, five patients) were imaged following a minimum of 14 hours of fasting. Six of seven volunteers were reimaged one hour after stimulation by either a fatty meal or an alcoholic beverage. An additional seven patients were imaged two hours after a hospital breakfast. It was found that concentrated bile emits a high-intensity spin echo signal (SE), while hepatic bile in the gallbladder produces a low-intensity SE signal. Following ingestion of cholecystogogue, dilute hepatic bile settles on top of the concentrated bile, each emitting SE signals of different intensity. The average T1 value of concentrated bile was 594 msec, while the T1 vaue of dilute hepatic bile was 2,646 msec. The average T2 values were 104 msec for concentrated bile and 126 msec for dilute bile. The most likely cause for the different SE intensities of bile is the higher water content, and therefore longer T1 or T2 relaxation times, of hepatic bile. It is suggested that NMR imaging has the ability to provide physiological information about the gallbladder and that it may prove to be a simple and safe clinical test of gallbladder function

  13. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique

  14. Measurement of total lung water from nuclear magnetic resonance images

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to show that the water content of lung tissue could be predicted accurately from the intensity of signal resulting from a 900 saturation recovery sequence. The water contained in an image section may, therefore, be calculated by reference to a 100% water standard. Lung water was obtained by imaging the lung in continuous sections and summing the water contents of the component sections. The method performed well when applied to a sponge phantom, but underestimated by up to 30% in excised sheep lung. The total (vascular and extravascular) pulmonary water measured by NMR in six healthy volunteers was 292 g (SD 58 g) or 4.6 g/kg body weight, less than predicted by some other indirect methods and post-mortem values. A briefer examination comprising two axial sections at standardised levels was also devised. In 15 healthy volunteers the mean water content of a 1.6 cm-thick axial section through the right lung was 17.8 g at the sternal angle, and 23.3 g 5 cm caudally. In the left lung, the values were 16.4 g and 16.3 g, respectively. (author)

  15. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  16. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabonomics: methods for drug discovery and development.

    Ott, Karl-Heinz; Aranibar, Nelly

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics is gaining popularity in drug discovery and development and in academia in a variety of settings, ranging from toxicology, preclinical, and clinical approaches to nutrition research, studies on microorganisms, and research on plants. This chapter focuses on the basic steps in a metabonomics study and emphasizes experience and lessons learned in our lab where we focused on metabonomic analyses of plant extracts, cell lines, and a variety of animal tissues and biofluids. We emphasize that a comprehensive and suitable study design is pivotal for a correct biological interpretation of the results, as well as highly controlled experimental conditions. Sample preparation and NMR protocols are detailed for a wide range of sample types. We discuss alternative data processing strategies and considerations for a general data analysis approach, paying particular attention to the statistical interpretation and validation of the results while also highlighting approaches to avoid possible pitfalls resulting from systematic and random errors. A tutorial written for the R statistical package and other small utilities are available from the authors upon request. PMID:17035690

  18. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information. PMID:23733702

  19. Cardiac energy metabolism probed with nuclear magnetic resonance. Chapter 12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy possesses great potential for studying myocardial energy metabolism. To ensure that the observed NMR signal predominantly originates from the heart, localization is required, which can be achieved by excision or exposure of the heart, or by means of sophisticated NMR localization techniques. A number of different atomic nuclei have been employed. H-1 NMR has been mainly used to follow lactate accumulation is ischemic or anoxic hearts. C-13 NMR has been applied to study the fate of different substrates in the citric acid cycle and amino acid pools, and the role of glycogen metabolism in ischemia or anoxia. F-19, Na-23 and K-39 have been employed to investigate the consequences of altered energy metabolism for myocardial intracellular concentrations of Ca2+, Na+ and K+. The most abundantly used nucleus for studying myocardial energy metabolism is P-31. Numerous contributions have been made to the investigation of ischemia and reperfusion, protection of the heart against the consequences of ischemia and reperfusion, contractile failure, variation of high-energy phosphate levels over the cardiac cycle, regulation of oxidative phosphorylation and intracellular enzyme kinetics of both isolated perfused hearts and hearts in situ. Even human myocardial metabolism can be assessed by P-31 NMR, which is on the verge of becoming a clinical tool for investigating heart disease. 106 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  20. Distinguishing Carbonate Reservoir Pore Facies with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Characterization of carbonate rocks may involve identifying the important pore types which are present. In the past, this task has required detailed petrographic analysis of many core samples. Here, we describe a method which uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to reduce the amount of petrographic analysis needed for porosity typing of carbonate reservoir rocks.For a rock sample which has been measured with NMR, our method decomposes the log(T2) spectrum into at most three Gaussian-shaped components and gives a set of nine parameters. Two characteristic quantities having geological significance are extracted from the nine parameters. Values of the two quantities are compared with a reference set, established from samples having both NMR and petrographic evaluations of porosity types. We use a Bayesian approach to the classification of the dominant porosity type.Tests of our method on 103 samples show a correct prediction in 60 to 90 percent of the samples. The lower success rate was obtained for samples with five porosity types from three fields; the higher success rate obtained with samples with three porosity types from one well. The use of geologically significant quantities extracted from the decomposition gives comparable success rate to those obtained using a standard, non-geological approach such as canonical variates

  1. Synthesis and physical studies of thiophospholipids using nuclear magnetic resonance

    1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thiophosphocholine, DPPsC, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thiophospho-L-serine, DPPsS, were synthesized and used to probe bilayer structural properties and enzymatic stereoselectivity. Using resolved diastereomers of DPPsC, the effect of a chiral phosphorus center on the thermotropic properties of lipid dispersions was probed. 31P and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, were utilized to confirm the thermotropic phase assignments for DPPsC diastereomers observed by differential scanning calorimetry. 31P NMR of the thiophosphate analogs revealed a more rigid subgel and Lβ' gel phase than DPPC, in regard to the phosphate rotational motion. In the Pβ' gel phase, the degree of motion of Sp and (Rp+Sp) was similar to DPPC. The tiophosphate analogs in the liquid crystalline phase experienced a freer rotational environment compared to DPPC. 2H NMR was performed on DPPsC diastereomers deuterated at the three choline carbons, α, β, γ. The liquid crystalline phase was used to detect differences between the diastereomers along the choline moiety. The diastereomeric mixture of DPPsS was used as a substrate for two stereoselective enzymes, phospholipases A2 and C. Phospholipase A2 hydrolyzed (Rp)-DPPsS, while no apparent reaction was detected for the hydrolysis of (Sp)-DPPsS with phospholipase C

  2. Determination of reservoir effective porosity using nuclear magnetic logging data

    In connection with the development of nuclear magnetic logging (NML) the possibility has occurred to determine the effective porosity coefficient for rocks directly under the conditions of their occurrence. The initial amplitude of a signal of free precession of NML is proportional to the quantity of free fluid in the rock volume, which is determined by the index of free fluid (IFF). On the basis of the laboratory studies it is shown that the relation between IFF and free water content is always linear and doesn't depend on lithological characteristics of rocks, porous dimensions and distribution. Using this relation it's possible to estimate bound water content. While filling the reservoir with weakly mineralized water the IFF value coincides numerically with the effective porosity coefficient. Otherwise the content of hydrogen nuclei in a volume unit is much less; while calculating the effective porosity coefficient this fact is recorded by the index of the amplitude decrease which depends on temperature and increases with its growth (for oils). In strata containing intercalations of reservoirs and non-reservoirs the averaged according to stratum IFF value determines the mean-weighted values of effective porosity

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  4. Electron and nuclear magnetic resonances in compounds and metallic hydrides

    Proton pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements were performed on the metallic hydrides ZrCr2Hx (x = 2, 3, 4) and ZrV2Hy (y = 2, 3, 4, 5) as a function of temperature between 180 and 400K. The ultimate aim was the investigation of the relaxation mechanisms in these systems by means of the measurement of both the proton (1H) spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times and to use these data to obtain information about the diffusive motion of the hydrogen atoms. The diffusional activation energies, the jump frequencies and the Korringa constant, Ck, related with the conduction electron contribution to the 1H relaxation were determined for the above hydrides as a function of hydrogen concentration. Our results were analysed in terms of the relaxation models described by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP model) and by Torrey. The Korringa type relaxation due to the conduction electrons in metallic systems was also used to interpret the experimental results. We also present the Electron Paramagnetic Ressonance (EPR) study of Gd3+, Nd3+ and Er3+ ions as impurities in several AB3 intermetallic compounds where A = LA, Ce, Y, Sc, Th, Zr and B = Rh, Ir, Pt. The results were analysed in terms of the multiband model previously suggested to explain the behaviour of the resonance parameter in AB2 Laves Phase compounds. (author)

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  6. Some concepts of the advanced mass spectrometry at the COMBAS magnetic separator of nuclear reaction products

    Proposed is an in-flight measurement method of recoil nuclei masses with the help of a Penning trap located behind the COMBAS magnetic separator for nuclear reaction products. The method is based on the following operations: (i) Accepting the recoil nuclear reaction products by the magnetic separator and decreasing their kinetic energy by degraders. (ii) In-flight transportation of the retarded nuclei into the magnetic field of the Penning trap's solenoid and transforming their remaining longitudinal momentum into orbital rotation by the fringing magnetic field of the solenoid. (iii) Cooling the orbital rotation of the ions by the high-frequency azimuthal electric field of the Penning trap's electric hyperboloid. (orig.)

  7. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  8. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation

    Brown, Keith A. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vassiliou, Christophoros C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cima, Michael J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Westervelt, R.M., E-mail: westervelt@seas.harvard.ed [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Harvard University, Department of Physics, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T{sub 2}{sup CP} of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T{sub 2}{sup CP} and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T{sub 2}{sup CP} scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T{sub 2}{sup CP{proportional_to}{Nu}-0.44} for aggregates with d=2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T{sub 2}{sup CP} is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times.

  9. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl2 in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Goodson, Boyd M.

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C8H10N4O2

    Jain, M.

    This document is part of Subvolume C `Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Hydrogen-1, Heterocycles' of Landolt-Börnstein III/40 `Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III `Condensed Matter'.

  14. Calculation of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field using LOCV technique

    Bordbar, G H

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we are interested in the properties of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the presence of strong magnetic fields using the lowest order constraint variational (LOCV) method employing $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. Our results indicate that in the absence of a magnetic field, the energy per particle is a symmetric function of the spin polarization parameter. This shows that for the nuclear matter, the spontaneous phase transition to a ferromagnetic state does not occur. However, we have found that for the magnetic fields $ B\\gtrsim 10 ^ {18}\\ G$, the symmetry of energy is broken and the energy has a minimum at a positive value of the spin polarization parameter. We have also found that the effect of magnetic field on the value of energy is more significant at the low densities. Our calculations show that at lower densities, the spin polarization parameter is more sensitive to the magnetic field.

  15. Time-odd mean fields in the rotating frame: microscopic nature of nuclear magnetism

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Ring, P.

    2000-01-01

    The microscopic role of nuclear magnetism in rotating frame is investigated for the first time in the framework of the cranked relativistic mean field theory. It is shown that nuclear magnetism modifies the expectation values of single-particle spin, orbital and total angular momenta along the rotational axis effectively creating additional angular momentum. This effect leads to the increase of kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia at given rotational frequency and has an impact on effecti...

  16. Nuclear Spin Maser at Highly Stabilized Low Magnetic Field and Search for Atomic EDM

    A nuclear spin maser is operated at a low static field through an active feedback scheme based on an optical nuclear spin detection and succeeding spin control by a transverse field application. The frequency stability of this optical-coupling spin maser is improved by installation of a low-noise current source for a solenoid magnet producing a static magnetic field in the maser operation. Experimental devices for application of the maser to EDM experiment are being developed.

  17. Nuclear and magnetic structures of nonpolar ferrofluids by small-angle neutron scattering

    Small-angle scattering of nonpolarized and polarized neutrons has proved to be a powerful technique for studying features of nuclear and magnetic structures of ferrofluids at nanoscale. The paper presents our recent results on application of the technique for comparative analysis of nonpolar ferrofluids (d-cyclohexane) stabilized by different surfactants, which are oleic and myristic acids. Qualitative difference both in nuclear and magnetic structural organization is observed and discussed

  18. Science and history explored by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was chosen as the main tool for investigating different biological and chemical systems, as it is unique in providing the information details about the morphology and molecular structures and conformations by which the fundamental properties of these biological and chemical systems can be understood. Proton spin-diffusion experiments combined with 13C CPMAS spectroscopy were successfully applied to characterize the changes that occur during the thermal denaturation of keratin fibers from wool and hair. A model describing both the effect of thermal denaturation and the effect of different chemical treatments on keratin fibers is presented. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for studying the proton exchange in Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone proton exchange membranes revealing that the water exchange processes in hydrated SPEEK-silica membranes are more efficient when low concentrations of polyethoxysiloxane (PEOS) are used for the membrane preparation. Proton 1D exchange spectroscopy combined with transverse relaxation measurements offered good insight in the state of water in hydrated SPEEK/SiO2 membranes revealing that concentrations of 5%-10% wt. PEOS could enhance the electrical conductivity of PEM. Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR spectroscopy was successfully applied for monitoring the free radical polymerization reactions of methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate and the copolymerization of methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate. The observation of Xe chemical shift and linewidths during the reactions reveal information about the polymer chain growths during the polymerizations. The successful application of the NMR-MOUSE to visualise the different anatomical layers with varying proton densities opens the possibility of its use in clinical studies such as osteoporosis for bone density measurements. The NMR-MOUSE was also successfully applied for the analysis of violins and bows and a classification of the violins and bows as a function of

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample's density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of homeopathic solutions.

    Aabel, S; Fossheim, S; Rise, F

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of homeopathy is controversial. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to study homeopathic solutions, showing provocative results. We examined the reproducibility of one of the allegedly positive studies. 1H NMR spectra were recorded for Sulphur D4, diluted and succussed up to D30 (called potentization) at two different frequencies (300 and 500 MHz). The Sulphur solution had been potentiated according to homeopathic principles with deionized water and alcohol. Water proton T1 relaxation measurements were performed also at 20 MHz for the different potentiated Sulphur solutions. Furthermore, the homeopathic remedy Betula alba 30c (birch pollen extract) and appropriate control solution (deionized water, unsuccussed solutions and placebo globules) were measured analogously, both with frequencies giving spectra and T1 relaxometry. The Sulphur remedies showed identical one dimensional proton spectra (1H NMR) at 300 and 500 MHz, regardless of dilution/succussion stage, from D4 to D30. Furthermore, Betula 30c as a potentiated solution and its controls (ethanol dilutions and Betula diluted but not succussed) showed identical spectra. Nor were there any statistically significant differences in longitudinal (T1) relaxation times between deionized water and Sulphur D10 to D30 preparations. The shorter T1 of the Sulphur D4 preparation could be ascribed to the higher microviscosity within the sample matrix caused by the high concentration of dissolved material. Also, the T1 values of the Betula alba 30c preparation (in globular form) and control placebo globules were identical. In conclusion, published results from NMR research on homeopathy indicating differences between homeopathic solutions and control samples could not be reproduced. PMID:11212083

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    Barrall, G A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  2. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C13-enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C13-labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C13-enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C13 spin pairs. (author)

  3. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  4. Development and applications of NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] in low fields and zero field

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab

  5. Nuclear magnetic relaxation and origins of RMN signals from GdAl2

    The intermetallic compound GdAl2 crystallizes in the cubic Laves phase C15. It is a simple ferromagnet below 176K. The easy direction of magnetization in this compound is such that the Al ions are distributed among two magnetically inequivalent sites. The pulsed NMR technique was used to study the origin of the signals from these two sites and the nuclear magnetic relaxation. (author)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  7. Neutron Fermi Liquids under the presence of a strong magnetic field with effective nuclear forces

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Polls, A

    2009-01-01

    Landau's Fermi Liquid parameters are calculated for non-superfluid pure neutron matter in the presence of a strong magnetic field at zero temperature. The particle-hole interactions in the system, where a net magnetization may be present, are characterized by these parameters in the framework of a multipolar formalism. We use either zero- or finite-range effective nuclear forces to describe the nuclear interaction. Using the obtained Fermi Liquid parameters, the effect of a strong magnetic field on some bulk magnitudes such as isothermal compressibility and spin susceptibility is also investigated.

  8. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  9. Neutron experiments on nuclear magnetism in copper and silver. Doctoral thesis

    Tuoriniemi, J.T.

    1995-12-15

    This thesis adds to the series of investigations on nuclear magnetism in metals performed during the past 20 years at the Low Temperature Laboratory of the Helsinki University of Technology. Collective behavior of nuclear spins is expected only at very low temperatures because the mutual interactions are extremely weak. To learn what the spin structure below the transition point in these metals is, neutron-diffraction experiments have been performed. The subject of this thesis is to present the results of neutron experiments on nuclear magnetism in copper and silver.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear da D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzil penicilina

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1995-12-31

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using {sup 13} C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Coexistence of phases in asymmetric nuclear matter under strong magnetic fields

    Aguirre, R

    2014-01-01

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is strongly affected by the presence of a magnetic field. Here we study the equilibrium configuration of asymmetric nuclear matter for a wide range of densities, isospin composition, temperatures and magnetic fields. Special attention is paid to the low density and low temperature domain, where a thermodynamical instability exists. Neglecting fluctuations of the Coulomb force, a coexistence of phases is found under such conditions, even for extreme magnetic intensities. We describe the nuclear interaction by using the non--relativistic Skyrme potential model within a Hartree--Fock approach. We found that the coexistence of phases modifies the equilibrium configuration, masking most of the manifestations of the spin polarized matter. However, the compressibility and the magnetic susceptibility show clear signals of this fact. Thermal effects are significative for both quantities, mainly out of the coexistence region.

  12. In Situ 13C and 23Na Magic Angle Spinning NMR Investigation of Supercritical CO2 Incorporation in Smectite-Natural Organic Matter Composites

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Hoyt, David W.; Burton, Sarah D.; Ferguson, Brennan O.; Varga, Tamas; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2014-01-29

    This paper presents an in situ NMR study of clay-natural organic polymer systems (a hectoritehumic acid [HA] composite) under CO2 storage reservoir conditions (90 bars CO2 pressure, 50°C). The 13C and 23Na NMR data show that supercritical CO2 interacts more strongly with the composite than with the base clay and does not react to form other C-containing species over several days at elevated CO2. With and without organic matter, the data suggest that CO2 enters the interlayer space of Na-hectorite equilibrated at 43% relative humidity. The presence of supercritical CO2 also leads to increased 23Na signal intensity, reduced line width at half height, increased basal width, more rapid 23Na T1 relaxation rates, and a shift to more positive resonance frequencies. Larger changes are observed for the hectorite-HA composite than for the base clay. In light of recently reported MD simulations of other polymer-Na-smectite composites, we interpret the observed changes as an increase in the rate of Na+ site hopping in the presence of supercritical CO2, the presence of potential new Na+ sorption sites when the humic acid is present, and perhaps an accompanying increase in the number of Na+ ions actively involved in site hopping. The results suggest that the presence of organic material either in clay interlayers or on external particle surfaces can significantly affect the behavior of supercritical CO2 and the mobility of metal ions in reservoir rocks.

  13. Nuclear spin magnetic resonance force microscopy using slice modulation

    We report a Boltzmann polarization nuclear spins detection of cycle adiabatic inversion based on resonance slice thickness modulation. The nano-scale localized spin scanning NMRFM is applied using spins locked and anti-locked in the cycling frame. We also create a number of polarization spins among 1012 observing the spin relaxation and dipole-dipole interaction at gradient field 1520 T/m. The changes of nuclear spin signal intensity and relaxation time could be evidence for the nuclear collective excitation and predictions of nuclear spin collective excitation energy

  14. Decay Properties of 266Bh and 262Db Produced in the 248Cm+23Na Reaction - Further Confirmation of the 278113 Decay Chain

    Decay properties of an isotope 266Bh and its daughter nucleus 262Db produced by the 248Cm(23Na,5n) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. 266Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, 262Db. The obtained decay properties of 266Bh and 262Db are consistent with those observed in the 278113 chain by RIKEN collaboration, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of 278113.

  15. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Nuclear Magnetic Ordering in Copper

    Jyrkkiö, T.A.; Huiku, M.T.; Siemensmeyer, K.;

    1989-01-01

    neutrons. By observing the (100) Bragg reflection, we have unambiguously proven antiferromagnetic ordering of the copper nuclear spins. Using a linear, position-sensitive detector, the time evolution of this peak was followed during the warm-up of the nuclear spin system. The peak intensity was found to...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance at 310 MHz in a superconducting solenoid

    The realisation of an NMR spectrometer with a superconducting magnet is presented in the first section. The methods to attain the best possible homogeneity of the magnetic field and to minimize the error in the spectrometer are described. The second section is devoted to the study of elastomers and nitr-oxides free radicals. A shift of the transition temperature with the magnetic field appears for the elastomers. The increasing paramagnetic shift has allowed a complete study by NMR of piperidinic and pyrrolidinic nitroxide free radicals. (author)

  17. Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges

    We review recent efforts to detect small numbers of nuclear spins using magnetic resonance force microscopy. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that relies on the mechanical measurement of the weak magnetic force between a microscopic magnet and the magnetic moments in a sample. Spurred by the recent progress in fabricating ultrasensitive force detectors, MRFM has rapidly improved its capability over the last decade. Today it boasts a spin sensitivity that surpasses conventional, inductive nuclear magnetic resonance detectors by about eight orders of magnitude. In this review we touch on the origins of this technique and focus on its recent application to nanoscale nuclear spin ensembles, in particular on the imaging of nanoscale objects with a three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We consider the experimental advances driving this work and highlight the underlying physical principles and limitations of the method. Finally, we discuss the challenges that must be met in order to advance the technique towards single nuclear spin sensitivity-and perhaps-to 3D microscopy of molecules with atomic resolution. (topical review)

  18. Introduction to the controlled nuclear fusion (magnetic containment systems)

    The magnetic containment systems, their more important features, and their potentiality to became thermonuclear reactors is described. The work is based upon the first part of a set of lectures dedicated to Plasma and Fusion Physics. (author)

  19. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    Depalo, Rosanna; Ferraro, Federico; Slemer, Alessandra; Al-Abdullah, Tariq; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Elekes, Zoltán; Mattei, Giovanni; Reinicke, Stefan; Schmidt, Konrad; Scian, Carlo; Wagner, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which i...

  20. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  1. Development of magnetic dynamic damper for nuclear power plant

    This paper describes a magnetic dynamic damper (MDD), which is a passive vibration absorber employing a permanent magnet and a conductor for both the restoring and damping force. The basic characteristics of this magnetic spring and damper system are examined through static loading tests and vibration tests using a pair of double cylindrical magnets. It is confirmed that the magnetic force analysis accurately simulates these test results. Application of this system to a rotating machinery model shows that the MDD can effectively reduce two-dimensional vibration. Moreover, through the forced vibration test in which MDD is attached to the bottom of vertical pump, it is examined that the proposed MDD can be applicable for seismic response reduction over the wide region of pump casing displacement. The top heavy valve equipped on piping vibrates biaxially at different frequencies. In this case, it is confirmed from the vibration tests using a valve-piping model that the MDD with multiple rectangular magnets is effective in reducing two-dimensional vibration with different frequencies. (author)

  2. Low-energy resonances in the 22Ne(p,γ23Na reaction directly observed at LUNA

    Cavanna Francesca

    2015-01-01

    A study of this reaction has been carried out at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA, in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, using a windowless gas target and two high-purity germanium detectors. Several resonances have been observed for the first time in a direct experiment.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sushkov, A. O.; Urbach, E.; de Leon, N. P.; Choi, S.; De Greve, K.; Evans, R.; Gertner, R.; Bersin, E.; Müller, C.; McGuinness, L.; Jelezko, F.; Walsworth, R. L.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of pure and Ni/Co doped LiFeAs

    We present Nuclear Magnetic and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) measurements on pure, Ni and Co doped LiFeAs single crystals. The parent compound LiFeAs exhibits unconventional superconductivity with a transition temperature of about 17 K. Unlike other Fe based superconductors, where superconductivity is induced or stabilized by Co or Ni doping, replacement of Fe by these elements leads to a suppression of the superconducting transition temperature in LiFeAs. In case of Ni doping, a bulk magnetic order is induced below about 160 K. In contrast, for Co doping, the superconducting transition temperature is only reduced, but no magnetic order is observed. We discuss the nature and the origin of this magnetic order and its relation to unconventional superconductivity in pure LiFeAs.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    Patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and normal subjects were investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. To evaluate the NMR scanner possibilities, the results were compared with the echocardiographic investigation of the same patients. The capabilities of NMR imaging to provide information about intracardiac anatomy are emphasized. This study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of the techniques used to obtain NMR images and a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging for cardiac diagnosis

  6. Diamond-nitrogen-vacancy electronic and nuclear spin-state anticrossings under weak transverse magnetic fields

    Clevenson, Hannah; Chen, Edward H.; Dolde, Florian; Teale, Carson; Englund, Dirk; Braje, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    We report on detailed studies of electronic and nuclear spin states in the diamond-nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center under weak transverse magnetic fields. We numerically predict and experimentally verify a previously unobserved NV hyperfine level anticrossing (LAC) occurring at bias fields of tens of gauss—two orders of magnitude lower than previously reported LACs at ˜500 and ˜1000 G axial magnetic fields. We then discuss how the NV ground-state Hamiltonian can be manipulated in this regime to tailor the NV's sensitivity to environmental factors and to map into the nuclear spin state.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of freeze-thaw damage in natural pumice concrete

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Shen, Xiangdong; Wang, Hailong; Gao, Chu; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the damage propagation features of the pore structure of natural pumice lightweight aggregate concrete (LWC) under freeze-thaw cyclic action. After freeze-thaw cycling, we conducted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tests on the concrete and acquired the porosity, distribution of transverse relaxation time T2, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The results showed the following. The T2 distribution of the LWC prior to freeze-thaw cycling presented f...

  8. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison

    Matlashov, Andrei N.; Schultz, Larry J.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Robert H.; Savukov, Igor M.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wurden, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives d...

  9. Materials of the 39 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    The Report comprises abstracts of 78 communications presented during the 39 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on November, 30 - December, 2006 in Cracow (PL). They cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  10. Determination of the Defining Boundary in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Experiments

    Laun, Frederik Bernd; Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Semmler, Wolfhard; Stieltjes, Bram

    2010-01-01

    While nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion experiments are widely used to resolve structures confining the diffusion process, it has been elusive whether they can exactly reveal these structures. This question is closely related to X-ray scattering and to Kac's "hear the drum" problem. Although the shape of the drum is not "hearable", we show that the confining boundary of closed pores can indeed be detected using modified Stejskal-Tanner magnetic field gradients that preserve the phase infor...

  11. 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications - Abstracts

    The Report consist of abstracts of 63 communications presented during the 41 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 1-2, 2008 in Cracow. Presentations cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  12. Quantum Computation Based on Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Ding, Shangwu; McDowell, Charles A.; Ye, Chaohui; Zhan, Mingsheng; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Sun, Xianping; Mao, Xi-An; Liu, Maili

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is shown to be a promising technique for implementing quantum computing. The theory underlying the principles of quantum computing with nuclear spin systems undergoing MAS is formulated in the framework of formalized quantum Floquet theory. The procedures for realizing state labeling, state transformation and coherence selection in Floquet space are given. It suggests that by this method, the largest number o...

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements. PMID:20365625

  14. 59Co NMR and nuclear magnetic relaxation study of the magnetic superconductor Y9Co7

    The magnetic superconductor Y9Co7 presented in its structure magnetic and non-magnetic Co atoms. A search was made of the 59Co NMR lines attributed in the literature to magnetic Co atoms, With negative results. For the strong 59Co NMR line arising from nuclei of non-magnetic Co atoms the relaxation times T1 and T2 versus temperature were measured directly at 6.5 MHz and 9.0 MHz. A linear dependence on temperature was observed for 1/T1 which can be attributed to interactions with conduction electrons. 1/T2 is not linear with temperature, an effect that is related to the temperature dependence of the magnetization. (Authors)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    In this article a review is given of the use of magnetic resonance imaging for the central nervous system. An example of the screening of the population for multiple scelerosis is given. A good preliminary examination and the supply of relevant information to the person which performs the imaging is necessary. (R.B.). 9 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. Design of Matrix Shim Coils System for Nuclear magnetic resonance

    Konzbul, Pavel; Švéda, Karel; Srnka, Aleš

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (2000), s. 1732-1735. ISSN 0018-9464. [COMPUMAG /12./. Sapporo, 25.10.1999-28.10.1999] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 181 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2000

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance J coupling constant polarizabilities of hydrogen peroxide

    Kjær, Hanna; Nielsen, Monia R.; Pagola, Gabriel I.;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the so far most extended investigation of the calculation of the coupling constant polarizability of a molecule. The components of the coupling constant polarizability are derivatives of the NMR indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant with respect to an external elec...

  18. One-pion exchange current corrections for nuclear magnetic moments in relativistic mean field theory

    Li, Jian; Meng, J; Arima, A

    2010-01-01

    The one-pion exchange current corrections to isoscalar and isovector magnetic moments of double-closed shell nuclei plus and minus one nucleon with $A=15,17,39$ and 41 have been studied in the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory and compared with previous relativistic and non-relativistic results. It has been found that the one-pion exchange current gives a negligible contribution to the isoscalar magnetic moments but a significant correction to the isovector ones. However, the one-pion exchange current doesn't improve the description of nuclear isovector magnetic moments for the concerned nuclei.

  19. Bohr-Weisskopf effect: influence of the distributed nuclear magnetization on hfs

    Nuclear magnetic moments provide a sensitive test of nuclear wave functions, in particular those of neutrons, which are not readily obtainable from other nuclear data. These are taking added importance by recent proposals to study parity non-conservation (PNC) effects in alkali atoms in isotopic series. By taking ratios of the PNC effects in pairs of isotopes, uncertainties in the atomic wave functions are largely cancelled out at the cost of knowledge of the change in the neutron wave function. The Bohr-Weisskopf effect (B-W) in the hyperfine structure interaction of atoms measures the influence of the spatial distribution of the nuclear magnetization, and thereby provides an additional constraint on the determination of the neutron wave function. The added great importance of B-W in the determination of QED effects from the hfs in hydrogen-like ions of heavy elements, as measured recently at GSI, is noted. The B-W experiments require precision measurements of the hfs interactions and, independently, of the nuclear magnetic moments. A novel atomic beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) method, combining rf and laser excitation, has been developed for a systematic study and initially applied to stable isotopes. Difficulties in adapting the experiment to the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam, which have now been surmounted, are discussed. A first radioactive beam measurement for this study, the precision hfs of 126Cs, has been obtained recently. The result is 3629.515( 0.001) MHz. The ability of ABMR to determine with high precision nuclear magnetic moments in free atoms is a desideratum for the extraction of QED effects from the hfs of the hydrogen-like ions. We also point out manifestations of B-W in condensed matter and atomic physics

  20. Progress on tilted axis cranking covariant density functional theory for nuclear magnetic and antimagnetic rotation

    孟杰; 彭婧; 张双全; 赵鹏巍

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic rotation and antimagnetic rotation are exotic rotational phenomena observed in weakly deformed or near-spherical nuclei, which are respectively interpreted in terms of the shears mechanism and two shearslike mechanism. Since their observations, magnetic rotation and antimagnetic rotation phenomena have been mainly investigated in the framework of tilted axis cranking based on the pairing plus quadrupole model. For the last decades, the covariant density functional theory and its extension have been proved to be successful in describing series of nuclear ground-states and excited states properties, including the binding energies, radii, single-particle spectra, reso- nance states, halo phenomena, magnetic moments, magnetic rotation, low-lying excitations, shape phase transitions, collective rotation and vibrations, etc. This review will mainly focus on the tilted axis cranking covariant density functional theory and its application for the magnetic rotation and antimagnetic rotation phenomena.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in diseases of the white matter

    The progress made in the field of medical imaging since the advent of magnetic resonance tomography is particularly evident in many disorders that are a domain of neuroradiology. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis of diseases of the white matter not only require accurate examination techniques but must just as well be based on the clinical symptoms observed. In the detection of diseases of the white matter magnetic resonance tomography is much more sensitive a tool than computed tomography. As it is normal for the images of any lesions to be isointense or hypointense as a result of T1 weighting and hyperintense in connection with T2 weighting, they may lead to a doubtful diagnosis, unless the interpretation is made by an experienced investigator taking account also of the pattern of structural changes and the neurologic-psychiatric manifestations of the disease. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Separation for Nuclear Material Detection and Surveillance

    A high performance superconducting magnet is being developed for particle retrieval from field collected samples. Results show that maximum separation effectiveness is obtained when the matrix fiber diameter approaches the diameter of the particles to be captured. Experimentally, the authors obtained a single particle capture limit with 0.8microm PuO2 particles with dodecane as a carrier fluid. The development of new matrix materials is being pursued through the controlled corrosion of stainless steel wool, or the deposition of nickel dendrites on the existing stainless steel matrix material. They have also derived a model from a continuity equation that uses empirically determined capture cross section values. This enables the prediction of high gradient magnetic separator performance for a variety of materials and applications. The model can be used to optimize the capture cross section and thus increase the capture efficiency

  3. Value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in cardiology

    The present study summarizes an experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of twelve patients with a variety of cardiac abnormalities (myocardial infarction, mural thrombi, obstructive cardiomyopathy, pericarditis). The results are compared with clinical data, with measurements from other techniques such as two-dimensional echocardiography and with the images in normal subjects. An anticipated advantage of MRI is the ability to provide better tissue characterization, than has been attained with other imaging techniques, by relaxation time measurement

  4. Wavelet and adaptive filtration of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal

    Bartušek, Karel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2002), s. 13 - 18. ISSN 0862-9846. [Datastat'01. Brno, 27.08.2001-30.08.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/96/1136; GA AV ČR IAA2065201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : Wavelet filtration * adaptive filtration * magnetic resonance signal Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  5. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  6. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  7. Investigating the astrophysical 22Ne(p, γ23Na and 22Mg(p, γ23Al reactions with a multi-channel scattering formalism

    Fraser P. R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction 22Ne(p, γ23Na is key to the NeNa cycle of stellar nucleogenesis, and better understanding of the 22Mg(p, γ23Al reaction is needed to understand the 22Na puzzle in ONe white dwarf novae. We aim to study these reactions using a multi-channel algebraic scattering (MCAS formalism for low-energy nucleon-nucleus scattering, recently expanded to investigate radiative capture. As a first step towards this goal, we here calculate the energy levels of the mass-23 (Ne, Mg, Na, Al nuclei. This is not only because the resonant structure of these nuclei are related to the astrophysical -rates of interest, but also because the interaction parameters determined for describing the energy levels are an integral part of the future calculation of the astrophysical reactions when using the MCAS scheme.

  8. Investigating the astrophysical 22Ne(p,γ)23Na and 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reactions with a multi-channel scattering formalism

    The reaction 22Ne(p,γ)23Na is key to the NeNa cycle of stellar nucleogenesis, and a better understanding of the 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reaction is needed to understand the 22Na puzzle in ONe white dwarf novae. We aim at studying these reactions using a multi-channel algebraic scattering (MCAS) formalism for low-energy nucleon-nucleus scattering, recently expanded to investigate radiative capture. As a first step towards this goal, we here calculate the energy levels of the mass-23 (Ne, Mg, Na, Al) nuclei. This is not only because the resonant structure of these nuclei are related to the astrophysical γ-rates of interest, but also because the interaction parameters determined for describing the energy levels are an integral part of the future calculation of the astrophysical reactions when using the MCAS scheme. (authors)

  9. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  10. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Nail Polish Remover Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Revisited

    Hoffmann, Markus M.; Caccamis, Joshua T.; Heitz, Mark P.; Schlecht, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Substantial modifications are presented for a previously described experiment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to quantitatively determine analytes in commercial nail polish remover. The revised experiment is intended for a second- or third-year laboratory course in analytical chemistry and can be conducted for larger laboratory…

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Elastic Wave Velocity of Chalk Saturated with Brines Containing Divalent Ions

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven a good technique for measuring pore size distribution in reservoir rocks. The use of low field NMR together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, can contribute to illustrate the effect of adsorbing ions on chalk elasticity. NMR is useful...

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  15. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin;

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  16. Water balance in Cucumis plants measured by nuclear magnetic resonance. 2.

    Reinders, J.E.A.; As, van H.; Schaafsma, T.J.; Sheriff, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to investigate the effects of changes in root temperature, of changes in the area of root in contact with culture solution and of day/night rhythm on the water balance of a cucumber and a gherkin plant. Results are discussed in terms of water potential, flow

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of point defects in aluminium and copper

    The principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for the determination of electrical field gradients on successive nuclei shells around a point defect are given. Results in copper and aluminium containing specific impurities or monovacancies are discussed. Measurements in electron irradiated copper show unambiguously that monovacancies migrate during stage III. (author)

  18. Interest of nuclear magnetic. Resonance imaging for the study of vascular lesions of the Thalamus

    The study of vascular lesions of the thalamus using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging has provided two kinds of important informations: precise topographical demarcation on saggital sections and very sensitive detection of small ischemic areas better than with computerized tomography. Particular attention is paid to NMR capabilities to increase the quality of correlation between clinical and radiological data. 4 cases are presented

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance of iron-57 nuclei in local fields in yttrium and iron garnets

    We have demonstrated the nuclear resonance of 57Fe nuclei in the local field of each of the two magnetic sub-lattices of yttrium and iron garnets. The resonance frequencies and the relaxation times have been measured as a function of the temperature. (author)

  20. Experimental implementation of heat-bath algorithmic cooling using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Baugh, Jonathan; Moussa, Osama; Ryan, Colm A.; Nayak, Ashwin; Laflamme, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    We report here the experimental realization of multi-step cooling of a quantum system via heat-bath algorithmic cooling. The experiment was carried out using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of a solid-state ensemble three-qubit system.

  1. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO2 adsorption performance. Highlights: ► Location of extraframework Sr2+ or Ba2+ cations was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR. ► Level of Sr2+ or Ba2+ ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. ► Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. ► Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO2 adsorbents.

  2. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation of Adiabatic Cooling and Nuclear Magnetism

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Viertiö, H. E.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1988-01-01

    antiferromagnetic phase in the external-field–temperature plane exhibits sections of both first- and second-order transitions separated by a tricritical point. Particular attention is paid to the isentropes of the phase diagram, which correspond to the thermodynamic paths of constant entropy followed in...... constant-temperature or constant-magnetic-field quenches into the antiferromagnetic phase is found at late times to obey the classical Allen-Cahn growth law. The qualitative features of isentropic quenches and the nonequilibrium ordering phenomena during controlled heating treatments at constant rate are...

  4. Magnetic Lenz lenses increase the limit-of-detection in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Spengler, Nils; Meissner, Markus V; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    A high NMR detection sensitivity is indispensable when dealing with mass and volume-limited samples, or whenever a high spatial resolution is required. The use of miniaturised RF coils is a proven way to increase sensitivity, but may be impractical and is not applicable to every experimental situation. We present the use of magnetic lenses, denoted as Lenz lenses due to their working principle, to focus the magnetic flux of a macroscopic RF coil into a smaller volume and thereby locally enhance the sensitivity of the NMR experiment - at the expense of the total sensitive volume. Besides focusing, such lenses facilitate re-guiding or re-shaping of magnetic fields much like optical lenses do with light beams. For the first time we experimentally demonstrate the use of Lenz lenses in magnetic resonance and provide a compact mathematical description of the working principle. Through simulations we show that optimal arrangements can be found.

  5. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance on selected lithium based compounds

    Rudisch, Christian

    2013-11-26

    This thesis presents the NMR measurements on the single crystals LiMnPO{sub 4} and Li{sub 0.9}FeAs. Therefore, the thesis is divided into two separated sections. The first part reports on the competitive next generation cathode material LiMnPO{sub 4} with a stable reversible capacity up to 145 mAh/g and a rather flat discharge voltage curve at 4.1 V. For the basic understanding of the material the magnetic properties have been investigated by a Li and P NMR study in the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase. LiMnPO{sub 4} shows a strong anisotropy of the dipolar hyperfine coupling due to the strong local magnetic moments at the Mn site. The corresponding dipole tensor of the Li- and P-nuclei is fully determined by orientation and temperature dependent NMR experiments and compared to the calculated values from crystal structure data. Deviations of the experimentally determined values from the theoretical ones are discussed in terms of Mn disorder which could have an impact on the mobility of the Li ions. The disorder is corroborated by diffuse X-ray diffraction experiments which indicate a shift of the heavy elements in the lattice, namely the Mn atoms. Furthermore, the spin arrangement in the relative strong field of 7.0494 T in the antiferromagnetic state is understood by the NMR measurements. In order to obtain parameters of the Li ion diffusion in LiMnPO{sub 4} measurements of the spin lattice relaxation rate were performed. Due to the strong dipolar coupling between the Li-nuclei and the magnetic moments at the Mn site it is difficult to extract parameters which can characterize the diffusive behavior of the Li ions. The second section reports on the AC/DC susceptibility and NMR/NQR studies on Li deficit samples labeled as Li{sub 0.9}FeAs. LiFeAs belongs to the family of the superconducting Pnictides which are discovered in 2008 by H. Hosono et al. In recent studies the stoichiometric compound reveals triplet superconductivity below T{sub c}-18 K which

  7. Development of nuclear magnetic resonance tomography technology - TORM

    The development of hardware and software necessary to implement the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques is described. The major subjects were the construction of an aquisition and control system which allowed the operation of a pulsed Fourier NMR spectrometer as a NMR Tomograph; further it was oriented the developing of a NMR spectrometer whose parameters could be easily reconfigured by the controlling system. As a result a sofisticated equipment which allows, more than the proposed, working with high resolution spectroscopic techniques and spectroscopy in solids, was obtained. Since the basic techniques employed in NMR and CT Tomographs are well known, a great emphasis was also given on the understanding of the image reconstruction techniques that constitutes today the frontier of research in this area. The results obtained with the system described here are considered good, comparable to the results from commercial units developed in cooperation with imaging groups located in universities abroad. (author)

  8. Nuclear dipolar magnetism around one microkelvin in calciumhydroxide

    This thesis is devoted to a study of dipolar magnetism of the proton spins in Ca(OH)2. First, cooling techniques are described. The energy of different spin configurations are calculated in the Weiss-field approximation. Crystallographic characteristics of Ca(OH)2 are described, as well as a method to produce monocrystals and a method for crystal doping using 1.5 MeV electron beams. It is shown that the polarization mechanism of the proton spins in Ca(OH)2 doped with O2- centra is the 'Solid Effect'. Susceptibility measurements are presented as a function of the polarization. Results imply that both at positive and at negative temperatures state ordering sets in, characterized by a plateau in the susceptibility. (Auth/G.J.P.)

  9. Magnetic separation - Advanced nanotechnology for future nuclear fuel recycle

    The unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as their extremely small size and high surface area to volume ratio, provide better kinetics for the adsorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions. In this work, we demonstrated the separation of minor actinides using complex conjugates of MNPs with diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) chelator. The sorption results show the strong affinity of DTPA towards Am (III) and Pu (IV) by extracting 97% and 80% of actinides, respectively. It is shown that the extraction process is highly dependent on the pH of the solution. If these long-term heat generating actinides can be efficiently removed from the used fuel raffinates, the volume of material that can be placed in a given amount of repository space can be significantly increased. (authors)

  10. Nuclear Fusion: half a century of magnetic confinement research

    This book is written by physicists, whose distinguished carrers span most of the past half-century of fusion research. The book might be described as a scientific history. In giving a physicist's view of of fusion history, the authors are careful to document their souces, with twenty seven pages of references. They outline the roots of nuclear energy and plasma physics leading to the classification of fusion research and its declassification in 1958 in Geneva. Continuing from the profusion ideas disclosed at that time, they deal in succeding chapters with open systems, pulsed toroidal configurations and other alternatives, stellarators, and tokamaks. The concluding chapter, which is remarkably up to date, discusses the steps to a fusion reactor and th ehistory and status of ITER

  11. Nuclear Fusion: half a century of magnetic confinement research

    Hutchinson, I.H

    2002-08-01

    This book is written by physicists, whose distinguished carrers span most of the past half-century of fusion research. The book might be described as a scientific history. In giving a physicist's view of of fusion history, the authors are careful to document their souces, with twenty seven pages of references. They outline the roots of nuclear energy and plasma physics leading to the classification of fusion research and its declassification in 1958 in Geneva. Continuing from the profusion ideas disclosed at that time, they deal in succeding chapters with open systems, pulsed toroidal configurations and other alternatives, stellarators, and tokamaks. The concluding chapter, which is remarkably up to date, discusses the steps to a fusion reactor and th ehistory and status of ITER.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing Using Liquid Crystal Solvents

    Yannoni, C S; Vandersypen, L M K; Miller, D C; Kubinec, M G; Chuang, I L; Yannoni, Costantino S.; Sherwood, Mark H.; Vandersypen, Lieven M.K.; Miller, Dolores C.; Kubinec, Mark G.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid crystals offer several advantages as solvents for molecules used for NMR quantum computing (NMRQC). The dipolar coupling between nuclear spins manifest in the NMR spectra of molecules oriented by a liquid crystal permits a significant increase in clock frequency, while short spin-lattice relaxation times permit fast recycling of algorithms, and save time in calibration and signal-enhancement experiments. Furthermore, the use of liquid crystal solvents offers scalability in the form of an expanded library of spin-bearing molecules suitable for NMRQC. These ideas are demonstrated with the successful execution of a 2-qubit Grover search using a molecule ($^{13}$C$^{1}$HCl$_3$) oriented in a liquid crystal and a clock speed eight times greater than in an isotropic solvent. Perhaps more importantly, five times as many logic operations can be executed within the coherence time using the liquid crystal solvent.

  13. Fabrication and Magnetic Properties of Co-Doped TiO2 Powders Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    GE Shi-Hui; WANG Xin-Wei; KOU Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Xue-Yun; XI Li; ZUO Ya-Lu; YANG Xiao-Lin; ZHAO Yu-Xuan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Co0.04 Ti0.96 O2 powders are fabricated by sol-gel method. The structure and magnetic properties are investigated under different annealing conditions systematically with emphasis on the influence of oxygen pressure. Pure anatase structure was acquired for all the samples annealed at 450 ℃ for one hour. The samples annealed in air exhibit evident room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) with a small magnetic moment of 0.029μB per Co atom and coercivity Hc of 26 Oe, while the samples annealed in vacuum have strong RTFM with a larger magnetic moment of 1.18 μB per Co atom and Hc of 430 Oe. The zero-field spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 59 Co is obtained to prove the existence of Co clusters in the latter samples, implying that the Co clusters are responsible for the strong RTFM in the samples annealed in vacuum. No Co cluster could be observed using both XPS and NMR techniques in the samples annealed in air, implying that the RTFM found in these samples is intrinsic.

  14. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:17328593

  15. What can nuclear magnetic moments reveal about the microscopic nature of tunnelling systems in glasses?

    More than thirty years ago anomalies in glasses at low temperatures were successfully explained by introducing atomic tunnelling systems (TS), described by the phenomenological standard tunnelling model. However, the universal behaviour of glasses prevented the experimental investigation of the microscopic nature of these TSs. Recently, unexpected magnetic field effects of the dielectric constant and of the two pulse polarisation echo amplitude, observed in non-magnetic glasses, turned out to be a proper experimental tool to investigate the microscopics of TSs. The echo experiments, done on glycerol and deuterated glycerol, prove that the interaction of nuclear quadrupole moments with local electric field gradients as well as interacting nuclear magnetic dipoles cause the observed magnetic field effects. Interestingly, the magnitude of the echo amplitude variations in magnetic fields is governed by the motion of the TSs. We present the measured effects together with numerical calculations based on the mentioned interactions which enable us to derive details of the TS's microscopic motions in glycerol. These calculations were done without considering dissipative processes acting at finite temperatures and, therefore, are strictly valid only at T=0. An analysis of the measured echo decay at different temperatures suggests that this quantum behaviour is observed, on the time scale of our measurements, at temperatures below 5mK.

  16. Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance of 3He-B superfluid

    Experiments which contribute to a better understanding of the 3He superfluid in the B phase are reported: a/ The first direct determinations of the gap parameter at zero temperature are given and the longitudinal N.M.R. frequency signal is measured for various pressures. b/ These experiments show a new saturation phenomenon in the ringing signal decay time Tsub(R)(T) at low temperatures. c/ Under conditions of slight non-linearity the excitation of 3He-B longitudinal N.M.R. gives rise to a special system wherein the ringing signal decay is all the faster as the excitation is stronger. A so-called ''memory'' time is measured distinctly longer than the ringing time measured under quasi-linear excitation conditions. It was found that the ringing signal decay, at first exponential for weak excitations γH1 approximately 7 10-3 Ωsub(L), becomes quasi-linear when the excitation is about γH1 approximately 10-2Ωsub(L). This abnormal behaviour cannot be explained by thermal effects related to N.M.R. excitation nor by inhomogeneity effects of the excitation magnetic field. Our interpretation is that excitations γH1 approximately 10-2 Ωsub(L) cause structural defects in the orientation of the vector n which are found to disappear according to an exponential law in times of around 10 ms

  17. Resolution and sensitivity of high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The arrival of very high field magnets and cryogenic circuitries, and the development of relaxation-optimized pulse sequences have added powerful tools for increasing sensitivity and resolution in NMR studies of biomacromolecules. The potential of these advances is not fully realized in practice, however, since current experimental protocols do not permit sufficient data sampling for optimal resolution in the indirect dimensions. Here we analyze quantitatively how increasing resolution in indirect dimensions affects the S/N ratio and compare this with currently used sampling routines. Optimal resolution would require sampling up to ∼3R2-1, and the S/N reaches a maximum at ∼1.2R2-1. Currently used data acquisition protocols rarely sample beyond 0.4R2-1, and extending evolution times would result in prohibitively long experiments. We show that a general solution to this problem is to use non-uniform sampling, where only a small subset of data points in the indirect sampling space are measured, and possibly different numbers of transients are collected for different evolution times. Coupled with modern methods of spectrum analysis, this strategy delivers substantially improved resolution and/or reduced measuring times compared to uniform sampling, without compromising sensitivity. Higher resolution in the indirect dimensions will facilitate the use of automated assignment programs

  18. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene

  19. Nuclear-spin lattice relaxation and magnetic-ion spin fluctuations in Heisenberg antiferromagnets below TN

    Engelsberg, M.; Albino O. de Aguiar, J.

    1985-04-01

    The results of measurements on the magnetic field and temperature dependences of the 19F nuclear-spin lattice relaxation time T1 in KNiF3 for TKNiF3. Some similarities in the behavior of both systems suggest that a common mechanism may be responsible for spin-lattice relaxation in either case. We discuss the possibility that this mechanism may involve a diffusive mode below TN with a central peak in the relevant magnetic-ion spin correlation function.

  20. Generation of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields during large- scale chemical and nuclear explosions

    Adushkin, V.V. [Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Dynamics of the Geospheres; Dubinya, V.A.; Karaseva, V.A.; Soloviev, S.P.; Surkov, V.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We discuss the main parameters of the electric field in the surface layer of the atmosphere and the results of the investigations of the natural electric field variations. Experimental investigations of the electromagnetic field for explosions in air are presented. Electromagnetic signals generated by underground nuclear and chemical explosions are discussed and explosions for 1976--1991 are listed. Long term anomalies of the earth`s electromagnetic field in the vicinity of underground explosions were also investigated. Study of the phenomenon of the irreversible shock magnetization showed that in the zone nearest to the explosion the quasistatic magnetic field decreases in inverse proportion to the distance.

  1. Electromagnetic Properties of Inner Double Walled Carbon Nanotubes Investigated by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    M. Bouhrara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  2. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Bouhrara, M.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  3. 43. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications. Cracow. Abstracts

    42 Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications, held on 1-2 December 2010 in Cracow (Poland), was devoted to the development of different magnetic resonance techniques and application of such techniques as crucial part of the studies. The Report contains 58 short descriptions of the contributions submitted by the participants of the Seminar. They cover all areas of the NMR application in major branches of basic chemistry, structural biology, medicine and materials science. Also recent results of the quantum chemical calculations of the NMR parameters are presented.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance of external protons using continuous dynamical decoupling with shallow NV centers

    de Las Casas, Charles; Ohno, Kenichi; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-03-01

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a paramagnetic defect with excellent spin properties that can reside within a few nanometers of the diamond surface, enabling atomic-scale magnetic resonance sensing of external nuclear spins. Here we use rotating frame longitudinal spin relaxation (T1ρ) based sensing schemes, known as Continuous Dynamical Decoupling (CDD), to detect external nuclear spins with shallow NV centers (Tesla. The increased sensitivity of this method relative to pulsed dynamical decoupling techniques demonstrates the benefits of CDD for sensing with very shallow NV centers. This work was supported by DARPA, AFOSR, and the DIAMANT program.

  5. Energy Moment Method Applied to Nuclear Quadrupole Splitting of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Lines

    Frank, V

    1962-01-01

    Expressions giving the sum of the energy values, raised to the second and third power, for a nucleus interacting with a static magnetic field and a static electric field gradient are derived. Several applications of this method for obtaining the values of the components of the electric field...

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in urologic diseases, 1

    NMR imaging was performed in 12 cases (10 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 2 cases of angiomyolipoma) and compared with computed tomography. The NMR imager, Toshiba model MRT 15 A with magnet of 1500 gauss, was used and images were produced in transverse, coronal and sagittal directions with different repetition times, delay times and echo times. The characteristic images associated with renal tumors were demonstrated. The renal contour was usually sharp at normal side and easily distinguished from perinephric fat which appeared white. The cortex and medullary pyramids were distinguished in excellent images. The lumen of aorta, cava and renal vessels appeared black, because flowing blood allowed little or no signal to be detected within the imaged plane. The images of vessels were valuable to diagnose the tumor embolus. Signal intensity of renal cell carcinoma was lower than the renal parenchyma and the intensity of the big angiomyolipoma was strong like fatty tissue and valuable to distinguish from renal cell carcinoma. In general, it had been shown that the Tl relaxation time of malignant tumor was longer than the corresponding normal tissue, but the renal Tl value was not examined in the series, because the measurement of Tl value did not show good reproducibility. The coronal section of NMR images gave the most valuable information in the case which had tumors in the upper or lower pole of the kidney. In this study, CT demonstrated superior resolution to NMR, but NMR was advantageous in terms of coronal and sagittal images and the information about blood flow. The ability of NMR imaging to distinguish solid from cystic renal lesions appeared almost similar to CT. While much more clinical experience is necessary before the exact role of NMR imaging in renal tumors is known, its future appears very bright. (author)

  7. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments for nuclear structure research on exotic nuclei

    Neyens, G

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in current nuclear physics research is to investigate the properties of so-called 'exotic nuclei' and of 'exotic nuclear structures'. Exotic nuclei are nuclei with a proton-to-neutron ratio that is very different from the proton-to-neutron ratio in stable nuclei (a technical term related to this ratio is the 'isospin'). We define exotic nuclear structures as excitation modes of nuclei that have a very different structure than the structure (or shape) of the nuclear ground state. By putting the nucleons in a nucleus to extreme conditions of isospin and excitation energy one can investigate details of one of the four basic forces in nature: the strong force which binds the nucleons together to form a bound nucleus. While the basic properties of the strong nucleon-nucleon interaction are known from investigating the properties of nuclei near the 'valley of stability', recent developments in the study of exotic nuclei have demonstrated that specific properties of the strong interaction, such...

  8. Homometallic and Heterometallic Antiferromagnetic Rings: Magnetic Properties Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Casadei, Cecilia [Univ. of Pavia (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to investigate the local magnetic properties of homometallic Cr8 antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring and the changes occurring by replacing one Cr3+ ion with diamagnetic Cd2+ (Cr7Cd) and with Ni2+ (Cr7Ni). In the heterometallic ring a redistribution of the local magnetic moment is expected in the low temperature ground state. We have investigated those changes by both 53Cr-NMR and 19F-NMR. We have determined the order of magnitude of the transferred hyperfine coupling constant 19F - M+ where M+ = Cr3+, Ni2+ in the different rings. This latter result gives useful information about the overlapping of the electronic wavefunctions involved in the coordinative bond.

  9. Simulation of general three-body interactions in a nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer

    2008-01-01

    Three-body interaction plays an important role in many-body physics,and quantum computer is efficient in simulating many-body interactions. We have experimentally demonstrated the general three-body interactions in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance computer we implemented general forms of three-body interactions including σ 1x σ z2 σ x3 and σ 1x σ z2 σ y3 . The results show good agreement between theory and experiment. We have also given a concise and practical formula for a general n-body interaction in terms of one-and two-body interactions.

  10. Measurement of conductivity and permittivity on samples sealed in nuclear magnetic resonance tubes

    We present a broadband impedance spectroscopy instrument designed to measure conductivity and/or permittivity for samples that are sealed in glass tubes, such as the standard 5 mm tubes used for nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. The calibrations and corrections required to extract the dielectric properties of the sample itself are outlined. It is demonstrated that good estimates of the value of dc-conductivity can be obtained even without correcting for the effects of glass or air on the overall impedance. The approach is validated by comparing data obtained from samples sealed in nuclear magnetic resonance tubes with those from standard dielectric cells, using glycerol and butylmethylimidazolium-hexafluorophosphate as respective examples of a molecular and an ionic liquid. This instrument and approach may prove useful for other studies of permittivity and conductivity where contact to the metal electrodes or to the ambient atmosphere needs to be avoided

  11. Observation of nuclear magnetic order in solid 3He

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg;

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of T dp/dT have been made along the He3 melting curve near an anomaly at Ts=1.17 mK. It is found that the solid-He3 entropy decreases by 80% in an interval of 100 μK at Ts. This is attributed to onset of nuclear magnetic order.......Measurements of T dp/dT have been made along the He3 melting curve near an anomaly at Ts=1.17 mK. It is found that the solid-He3 entropy decreases by 80% in an interval of 100 μK at Ts. This is attributed to onset of nuclear magnetic order....

  12. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  13. Application of electronic paramagnetic, nuclear magnetic, γ-nuclear magnetic resonance, and defibrillation in experimental biology and medecine

    Piruzyan, L. A.

    2005-08-01

    Nowadays an attention is paid to pathbreaking approaches to the therapy of different pathologies with EPR, NMR and NGR dialysis and mechanisms of physical factors influence in prophylactics and therapy of a number of diseases. Any pathology is evidently begins its development in atomic-molecular levels earlier then any morphologic alterations in tissues can be detected. We have studied the alterations of FR content in liver, spleen and brain in hypoxia and hyperoxia conditions. Under hypoxia and hyperoxia the FR concentrations are equal in all organs and tissues. However this ratio is different for some forms of leucosis. For different leucosis types gas mixtures the most adequate for the current pathology should be developed. Then we represent the method of biologic objects treatment with the energy of super-high frequency field (SIT) and the instrument for its performance. The study of magnetic heterogeneity of biologic systems proposes the new approach and a set of methods for medical and scientific purpose. Application of combined with chemotherapy extraction of anionic and cationic radicals from bloodstream using EPRD, NMRD and NGRD influence and also the single ions separate extraction using NGRD are able to detect and perhaps to cure their appearance in a period before neoformation. These studies should be carried out experimentally and clinically.

  14. Tissue-Specific Metabolic Profile Study of Moringa oleifera L. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Mahmud, Iqbal; Chowdhury, Kamal; Boroujerdi, Arezue

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera, an important multipurpose crop, is rich in various phytochemicals: flavonoids, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and carotenes. The purpose of this study was to profile the groups of metabolites in leaf and stem tissues of M. oleifera. Various sugars, amino acids, and organic acid derivatives were found in all of the M. oleifera tissues with different profiles/peak intensities depending on the tissue. 1D proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied for collecting metab...

  15. Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance study of transport properties of fluid catalytic cracking catalysts

    Kortunov, P.; Vasenkov, S.; Kärger, J.; Fé Elía, M.; Perez, M.; Stöcker, M.; Papadopoulos, G. K.; Theodorou, D.; Drescher, B.; McElhiney, G.; Bernauer, B.; Krystl, V.; Kočiřík, Milan; Zikánová, Arlette; Jirglová, Hana; Berger, C.; Gläser, R.; Weitkamp, J.; Hansen, E. W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2005), s. 233-237. ISSN 0730-725X Grant ostatní: TROCAT project - European Community(DE) G5RD-CT-2001-00520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : pulsed-field gradient * nuclear magnetic resonance * fluid catalytic cracking catalyst Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.361, year: 2005

  16. Implementation of the perfect state transfer speeded up by three- spin interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Zhang, J; Suter, D; Peng, Xinhua; Suter, Dieter; Zhang, Jingfu

    2005-01-01

    The speed of perfect state transfer (PST) can be increased by the three- spin interactions in the spin XY chain. By decomposing the evolution of the spin XY chain with three- spin interactions into a series of single- spin rotations and the J- coupling evolutions between the neighboring spins, we simulate such a chain and implement the stepped-up PST using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computer.

  17. Cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Celda-Muñoz, Bernardo; Esteve-Moya, Vicent; Sancho-Bielsa, Francisco; Villa Sanz, Rosa; Fernández Ledesma, Luis José; Berganzo Ruiz, Javier

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques, in which the culture microchamber is encapsulated and housed inside a chip. The microchamber and the device are easy for the user to handle, allowing same to be handled or repositioned without requiring complex mounting operations. In addition, the invention allows cultures to be studied for long periods, great...

  18. Quantitation of Amoxicillin in Urine by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Application to Five Cases

    Elise Champeil

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In this paper, we propose a procedure for the analysis and quantification of amoxicillin in urine with minimum pre-treatment of the samples using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Five clinical samples were analyzed and amoxicillin was detected and quantified in each case. Material and Method: Samples of urine from amoxicillin users were collected in accordance with an IRB-approved protocol. Donors were asked to record the day of urine collection, the length of treatment and...

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a tool for on-line catalytic reaction monitoring

    Buljubasich, Lisandro

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has become a well-established method in many different areas of research. The scope of the disciplines involved is extremely broad ad is still expanding, encompassing chemical, petrochemical, biological and medical research, plant physiology, aerospace engineering, process engineering, industrial food processing, materials and polymer sciences. But the power of NMR, lies in its ability to combine and extend the available techniques for a more thorough solution...

  20. 19-Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift variability in trifluoroacetyl species

    Sloop, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Joseph C SloopSchool of Science and Technology, Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, GA, USAAbstract: This review examines the variability of chemical shifts observed in 19-fluorine (19F) nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the trifluoroacetyl (TFA) functional group. The range of 19F chemical shifts reported spectra for the TFA group varies generally from −85 to −67 ppm relative to CFCl3. The literature revealed several factors that impact chemical shifts of the TFA...

  1. Exhibition of the periodicity of Quantum Fourier Transformation in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable capability of quantum Fourier transformation (QFT) to extract the periodicity of a given periodic function has been exhibited by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Two separate sets of experiments were performed. In a full QFT, the periodicity were validated with state tomography and fidelity measurements. For a simplified QFT, the three-qubit pseudo-pure state was created by introducting an additional observer spin, and the spectra recorded on the observer spin...

  2. An interferometric complementarity experiment in a bulk Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ensemble

    Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2002-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated the interferometric complementarity, which relates the distinguishability $D$ quantifying the amount of which-way (WW) information to the fringe visibility $V$ characterizing the wave feature of a quantum entity, in a bulk ensemble by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. We primarily concern on the intermediate cases: partial fringe visibility and incomplete WW information. We propose a quantitative measure of $D$ by an alternative geometric strateg...

  3. Preparation of pseudo-pure states by line-selective pulses in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Gao, Keli; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Maili

    2000-01-01

    A new method of preparing the pseudo-pure state of a spin system for quantum computation in liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was put forward and demonstrated experimentally. Applying appropriately connected line-selective pulses simultaneously and a field gradient pulse techniques we acquired straightforwardly all pseudo-pure states for two qubits in a single experiment much efficiently. The signal intensity with the pseudo-pure state prepared in this way is the same as that of tempora...

  4. Proceedings of the 37. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications

    37. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications is Cyclically organised forum for discussing the actual problems, achievements and perspectives of methodology and interpretation of NMR. At presenting edition the problems of NMR imaging in medicine diagnostics, studies of biologically important organic molecules as well as inorganic compounds being interesting for microelectronics and catalysis have been especially emphasized. The progress in computerized simulation for NMR spectra interpretation has been also performed in numerous presentations

  5. Biosynthetic pathways in Methanospirillum hungatei as determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Ekiel, I; Smith, I C; Sprott, G D

    1983-01-01

    The main metabolic pathways in Methanospirillum hungatei GP1 were followed by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, with 13C-labeled acetate and CO2 as carbon sources. The labeling patterns found in carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleosides were consistent with the formation of pyruvate from acetate and CO2 as the first step in biosynthesis. Carbohydrates are formed by the glucogenic pathway, and no scrambling of label was observed, indicating that the oxidative or reductive pentose...

  6. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of intact friend leukemia cells: phosphorylcholine increase during differentiation

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance of intact Friend leukemia cells was used to analyze their erythroid-like differentiation. The technique, which requires only 108 to 109 cells and approximately 2 minutes for acquisition of each spectrum, demonstrated the occurrence of many signal changes during differentiation. With cell extracts, 64 signals were assigned to 12 amino acids and 19 other intermediary metabolites, and a dramatic signal change was attributed to a fourfrease in cytoplasmic phosphorylcholines

  7. H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic study in patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy

    Dabos, Konstantinos John; Parkinson, John Andrew; Sadler, Ian Howard; Plevris, John Nicholas; Hayes, Peter Clive

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify plasma metabolites used as biomarkers in order to distinguish cirrhotics from controls and encephalopathics. METHODS: A clinical study involving stable cirrhotic patients with and without overt hepatic encephalopathy was designed. A control group of healthy volunteers was used. Plasma from those patients was analysed using 1H - nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We used the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill sequence to process the sample spectra at ambient probe temperature. We...

  8. Optimal grouping for a nuclear magnetic resonance scanner by means of an open queueing model

    VANDAELE, Nico; VAN NIEUWENHUYSE, Inneke; Cupers, S

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how a nuclear magnetic resonance scanner can be managed more efficiently, simultaneously improving patient comfort (in terms of total time spent in the system) and increasing availability in case of emergency calls. By means of a superposition approach, all relevant data on the arrival and service process of different patient types are transformed into a general single server, single class queueing model. The objective function consists of the weighted average patient...

  9. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR) - A new method for exploration of ground water and aquifer properties

    U. Yaramanci

    2000-01-01

    The Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR) method is a fairly new technique in geophysics to assess ground water, i.e. existence, amount and productibility by measurements at the surface. The NMR technique used in medicine, physics and lately in borehole geophysics was adopted for surface measurements in the early eighties, and commercial equipment for measurements has been available since the mid nineties. The SNMR method has been tested at sites in Northern Germany with Quaternary sand a...

  10. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of erythrocyte extracts in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Extracts freshly prepared from erythrocytes of patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy, their unaffected siblings, and normal control subjects were examined with both 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A moderate variability was found in the relative amounts of various nonphosphorylated compounds among patients and control subjects; however, no significant differences were found between the groups. As for the phosphorylated compounds, the sum of ADP+ATP was found significantly elevated in the myotonic muscular dystrophy patients

  11. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    Antonio Sacco; Gino Vonghia; Francesco Giannico; Daniela Sacco; Vincenzo di Martino; Anna Caputi Jambrenghi; Maria Antonietta Brescia

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS), for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes ...

  12. Instruments and Domains of Knowledge: The Case of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, 1956-1969

    Roberts, Jody Alan

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, I traced the development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy through the pages of the Journal of Organic Chemistry (JOC) from the year 1956 to 1969 to understand how organic chemists and Varian Associates?the makers of the first commercial NMR spectrometers?negotiated the identity of the NMR spectrometer. The work of the organic chemists was examined through their publications in the JOC. Examining the abstracts from the JOC between the years 1956 and 1969 devel...

  13. Theory and applications of maps on SO(3) in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Theoretical approaches and experimental work in the design of multiple pulse sequences in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are the subjects of this dissertation. Sequences of discrete pulses which reproduce the nominal effect of single pulses, but over substantially broader, narrower, or more selective ranges of transition frequencies, radiofrequency field amplitudes, and spin-spin couplings than the single pulses they replace, are developed and demonstrated. 107 refs., 86 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy

    We propose a nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two-qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1 K. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. Solid-State Nuclear Spin Quantum Computer Based on Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Berman, G P; Hammel, P C; Tsifrinovich, V I

    1999-01-01

    We propose a nuclear spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two- qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1K.

  16. Magnetic moments in present relativistic nuclear theories: a mean-field problem

    We show that the magnetic moments of LS closed shell nuclei plus or minus one nucleon derived from non-relativistic Hartree-Fock mean-fields are as bad as those obtained in relativistic approaches of nuclear structure. Deviations with respect to more complete results in both cases are ascribed to the mean-field approximation which neglects some degrees of freedom in the nucleus description. 18 refs

  17. Updating of nuclear magnetic resonance installation on the basis of IBM PC computers

    Updating of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers TESLA BS-567 and BRUKER SXP-100 is carried out by means of the application of the multifunctional extension plate ACL-812 PG and IBM PC. This extension plate consists of the 16-channel analog multiplexer, the 12-digit ADC, the timer and the logic access circuits for DMA and IRQ. The software consists of the control program working in the operation system MS DOS

  18. Studies of phospholipid hydration by high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Zhou, Z.; Sayer, B G; Hughes, D. W.; Stark, R E; Epand, R M

    1999-01-01

    A sample preparation method using spherical glass ampoules has been used to achieve 1.5-Hz resolution in 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of aqueous multilamellar dispersions of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), serving to differentiate between slowly exchanging interlamellar and bulk water and to reveal new molecular-level information about hydration phenomena in these model biolo...

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structural Studies of Membrane Proteins in Micelles and Bilayers

    Gong, Xiao-Min; Franzin, Carla M.; Thai, Khang; Yu, Jinghua; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy enables determination of membrane protein structures in lipid environments, such as micelles and bilayers. This chapter outlines the steps for membrane-protein structure determination using solution NMR with micelle samples, and solid-state NMR with oriented lipid-bilayer samples. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from γ and CHIF, two membrane pr...

  20. Thermal transition of ribonuclease a observed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    The thermal transition of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) was investigated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Significant resonance overlap in the large native protein limits accurate assignments in the 1H NMR spectrum. This study proposes extending the investigation of large proteins by dynamic analysis. Comparison of the traditional method and the correlation coefficient method suggests successful application of spectrum image analysis in dynamic protein studies by NMR

  1. S100 lathe bed pulse generator applied to pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance

    The project and construction of four channel pulse generator in the S100 standard plate and its control software for microcomputer are described. The microcomputer has total control on the pulse generator, which has seven programable parameters, defining the position of four pulses and the width for the three first ones. This pulse generator is controlled by a software developed in c language, and is used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiences. (M.C.K.)

  2. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  3. Nuclear shape and magnetic moments in the sodium and cesium region from laserspectroscopy

    The authors present some results from extended investigation of alcali isotopes by an optical experiment on neutral atoms. From the isotope shift and hyperfine structure of the main resonance lines (D-lines) of these atoms direct information on nuclear shape and magnetic properties has been obtained for long strings of isotopes. The investigation is based on a method of non-optical detection of laser excitation of an atomic beam combined with intense production techniques for radioactive isotopes. (orig./AH)

  4. Nuclear magnetic moments and the spin-orbit current in the relativistic mean field theory

    The Dirac magnetic moments in the relativistic mean field theory are affected not only by the effective mass, but also by the spin-orbit current related to the spin-orbit force through the continuity equation. Previous arguments on the cancellation of the effective-mass effect in nuclear matter are not simply applied to finite nuclei to obtain the Schmidt values. Effects of the spin-orbit current on (e, e') response functions are also mentioned. (orig.)

  5. Theory and applications of maps on SO(3) in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Cho, H.M.

    1987-02-01

    Theoretical approaches and experimental work in the design of multiple pulse sequences in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are the subjects of this dissertation. Sequences of discrete pulses which reproduce the nominal effect of single pulses, but over substantially broader, narrower, or more selective ranges of transition frequencies, radiofrequency field amplitudes, and spin-spin couplings than the single pulses they replace, are developed and demonstrated. 107 refs., 86 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of diffusivity and diffusion mechanisms of hydrogen in tantalum

    Solubility and diffusivity of protons in the α-phase of Ta are deduced from the nuclear magnetization and the dipolar spin-lattice relaxation rate of hydrogen. Over the entire temperature range investigated (120 K to 450 K), protons are found to diffuse by incoherent tunnelling processes, with negligible contributions from classical over-barrier jumps. The comparison with macroscopic diffusivity measurements (Gorski effect) shows that jumps between nearest-neighbour tetrahedral interstices dominate. (orig.)

  7. Citrate and Sugar Cofermentation in Leuconostoc oenos, a (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    Ramos, A.; Santos, H.

    1996-01-01

    (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate citrate-glucose cometabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the wine lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc oenos. The use of isotopically enriched substrates allowed us to identify and quantify in the end products the carbon atoms derived from each of the substrates supplied; furthermore, it was possible to differentiate between products derived from the metabolism of endogenous carbon reserves and those derived from exte...

  8. Advantages and disadvantages of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a hyphenated technique

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria

    2003-11-14

    A general overview of the advancements and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hyphenated with other analytical techniques is given from a practical point of view. Details on the advantages and disadvantages of the hyphenation of NMR with liquid chromatography as LC-NMR and also with mass spectrometry as LC-MS-NMR are demonstrated with two examples. Current developments of NMR with other analytical separation techniques, especially with capillary liquid chromatography (capLC) are discussed.

  9. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUNFLOWER AND RAPESEED LECITHIN

    Lisovaya E. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative assessment and peculiarities of nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics of rapeseed and sunflower lecithin. It was established, that lecithin’s nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics, namely, protons’ spin-spin relaxation time and amplitudes of nuclear magnetic relaxation signals of lecithin components, depend on content of oil’s fat acids and phospholipids, contained in the lecithin. Comparative assessment of protons’ spin-spin relaxation time of rapeseed and sunflower lecithin components showed, that for their identification protons’ spin-spin relaxation time of the lecithin’ first component at 40°C and 60°C temperature, when differences in values of protons’ spin-spin relaxation time of the sunflower and rapeseed lecithin’ first component are most obvious, should be used as an analytical parameter. Comparative assessment of amplitudes of proton’s NMR signals of sunflower and rapeseed lecithin components showed, that relations, established earlier for sunflower lecithin between mass share of phospholipids (substances insoluble in acetone and the sum of amplitudes of proton’s NMR signals of the third and fourth components, cannot be applied to rapeseed lecithin; that is for the development of an express method for determination of mass share of substances insoluble in acetone (phospholipids in rapeseed lecithin, it is necessary to carry out additional research with the purpose of clarifying the mentioned relations

  10. NMR absolute shielding scale and nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb.

    Adrjan, Bożena; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Jackowski, Karol; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth; Antušek, Andrej; Jaszuński, Michał

    2016-06-28

    An absolute shielding scale is proposed for (207)Pb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is based on ab initio calculations performed on an isolated tetramethyllead Pb(CH3)4 molecule and the assignment of the experimental resonance frequency from the gas-phase NMR spectra of Pb(CH3)4, extrapolated to zero density of the buffer gas to obtain the result for an isolated molecule. The computed (207)Pb shielding constant is 10 790 ppm for the isolated molecule, leading to a shielding of 10799.7 ppm for liquid Pb(CH3)4 which is the accepted reference standard for (207)Pb NMR spectra. The new experimental and theoretical data are used to determine μ((207)Pb), the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb, by applying the standard relationship between NMR frequencies, shielding constants and nuclear moments of two nuclei in the same external magnetic field. Using the gas-phase (207)Pb and (reference) proton results and the theoretical value of the Pb shielding in Pb(CH3)4, we find μ((207)Pb) = 0.59064 μN. The analysis of new experimental and theoretical data obtained for the Pb(2+) ion in water solutions provides similar values of μ((207)Pb), in the range of 0.59000-0.59131 μN. PMID:27265668

  11. Measurement of irradiation damage in nuclear pressure vessel steels by magnetic properties change

    The magnetic properties of specimens of A533B nuclear pressure vessel grade steel have been examined in the as-received condition and after neutron irradiation to various fluence levels up to 1018 cm-2 (energy greater than 0.1 MeV) in the University of Illinois Advanced TRIGA reactor core. The effect of some heat treatments was also investigated. The magnetic properties were measured by an hysteresis curve tracing method using a miniature transformer which incorporated the specimens in its core. Changes in magnetic remanence and hysteresis energy loss were correlated with neutron fluence in the case of irradiated specimens, and with microhardness measurements in the case of heat treated specimens. The relationship between the observed changes and irradiation embrittlement is discussed

  12. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  13. Study of the 23Na EFG (Electrostatic Field Gradient) tensor on single crystals of Na2S.9H2O by wideline NMR

    The quadrupole coupling constant |e2qQ/n| if 23Na has been determined by measuring single crystals of Na2S.9H2O at room temperature. A value of 687.5 +- 1.2 kHz was found. The asymmetry parameter eta = (qsub(x'x') - qsub(y'y')) / qsub(z'z') of the efg-tensor is zero, there is axial symmetry. The principle axis of the efg-tensor runs parallel to the main crystallographic axis c, the value of the main component of the efg-tensor in c-direction is 171.875 +- 0.6 kHz. The longitudinal relaxation time T1 has been evaluated as 1.8 s. On this account, the mean distance between two Na-atoms has been determined by measuring the splitting of the central line due to dipole-dipole interaction. The Na-Na distance was found with 0.36 +- 0.007 nm. This value is in good agreement with results from neutron diffraction studies. It was not possible to determine direction and length of hydrogen bonds by NMR-results. A method of growing single crystals of Na2S.9H2O of demanded size and purity has been described. Constructional details and technical data of a self-made wideline-NMR-spectrometer are added in an appendix. (Author)

  14. Electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding in some small molecules

    Ferraro, M. B.; Caputo, M. C.; Pagola, G. I.; Lazzeretti, P.

    2008-01-01

    Computational procedures, based on (i) the Ramsey common origin approach and (ii) the continuous transformation of the origin of the quantum mechanical current density-diamagnetic zero (CTOCD-DZ), were applied at the Hartree-Fock level to determine electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules in the presence of a nonuniform electric field with a uniform gradient. The quadrupole polarizabilities depend on the origin of the coordinate system, but values of the magnetic field induced at a reference nucleus, determined via the CTOCD-DZ approach, are origin independent for any calculations relying on the algebraic approximation, irrespective of size and quality of the (gaugeless) basis set employed. On the other hand, theoretical estimates of the induced magnetic field obtained by single-origin methods are translationally invariant only in the limit of complete basis sets. Calculations of electric quadrupole polarizabilities of nuclear magnetic shielding are reported for H2, HF, H2O, NH3, and CH4 molecules.

  15. A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope for Micron-scale Liquids

    Giraldo, Felipe; Paster, Jeremy W.; Tennant, Daniel M.; Markert, John T.

    2015-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) probe for the analysis of liquid and soft matter samples. This NRMFM probe uses a magnet-on-cantilever geometry and is equipped with dual x- y- z piezoelectric motion stages, for micron-step coarse positioning and sub-nanometer fine positioning of both the laser interferometer and the sample with respect to the cantilever, permitting three-dimensional scanning-mode detection of nuclear magnetism. The probe keeps the cantilever detector in high vacuum, maintaining a high Q, while the local NMR properties of nearby aqueous samples in glass microtubes are measured. The entire probe head fits in either a 3.5-cm bore magnet or in an electromagnet with a similarly small gap. We plan to demonstrate the ability to scan and distinguish microscale NMR properties using a copper sulfate solution with concentrations in the 2-20 millimolar range, thus providing dynamical imaging of regions with differing longitudinal relaxation times, T1. This concentration range will permit us to compare the conventional saturation-recovery pulse sequence with a more efficient single-pulse detection, possible when T1 is comparable to or less than the duration of the modified cyclic-adiabatic-inversion pulse.

  16. Heterometallic Cu(II)-Dy(III) Clusters of Different Nuclearities with Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Cosquer, Goulven; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Yamashita, Masahiro; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-01-19

    The synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of two heterometallic Cu(II)-Dy(III) clusters are reported. The first structural motif displays a pentanuclear Cu(II)4Dy(III) core, while the second one reveals a nonanuclear Cu(II)6Dy(III)3 core. We employed o-vanillin-based Schiff base ligands combining o-vanillin with 3-amino-1-propanol, H2vap, (2-[(3-hydroxy-propylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol), and 2-aminoethanol, H2vae, (2-[(3-hydroxy-ethylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol). The differing nuclearities of the two clusters stem from the choice of imino alcohol arm in the Schiff bases, H2vap and H2vae. This work is aimed at broadening the diversity of Cu(II)-Dy(III) clusters and to perceive the consequence of changing the length of the alcohol arm on the nuclearity of the cluster, providing valuable insight into promising future synthetic directions. The underlying topological entity of the pentanuclear Cu4Dy cluster is reported for the first time. The investigation of magnetic behaviors of 1 and 2 below 2 K reveals slow magnetic relaxation with a significant influence coming from the variation of the alcohol arm affecting the nature of magnetic interactions. PMID:26702645

  17. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    Suter, J. D.; Ramuhalli, P.; McCloy, J. S.; Xu, K.; Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R.

    2015-03-01

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the "state of health" of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  18. The study of proton transfer reactions and their application to nuclear level counting via the reactions 23Na, 28Si, 32S(d,n)

    This work was undertaken with two major objectives. The first objective was to resolve the discrepancies in the existing spectroscopic factors for the levels of 24Mg and to use this nucleus to test the suitability of (d,n) reactions for level counting. The second objective was to study proton transfer to unbound states in 29P and 33Cl within the framework of the standard DWBA formalism by using the form factors of the bound isobaric analog states of these nuclei. The time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer was used to measure differential cross sections and neutron energies for the three reactions studied in this work. The energy levels of 24Mg were studied at seven incident energies (2.5-9.0 MeV) with an energy resolution of 12-125 keV at both forward and back angles at each incident energy. Out of 157 levels taken from compilations, 124 of them were observed. This study has also resulted in the proposal of 24 additional new levels in 24Mg. These results show that the (d,n) reaction may be used for level counting

  19. NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC MINI-RELAXOMETER FOR LIQUID AND VISCOUS MEDIA CONTROL

    V. V. Davydov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new method for registration of nuclear magnetic resonance signal of small volume liquid and viscous media being studied (0.5 ml in a weak magnetic field (0.06 –0.08 T, and measuring of longitudinal T1 and transverse T2 relaxation constants. A new construction of NMR mini-relaxometer magnetic system is developed for registration of NMR signal. The nonuniformity of a magnetic field in a pole where registration coil is located is 0,410–3 sm–1 (the induction is В0 = 0.079 T. An electrical circuit of autodyne receiver (weak fluctuations generator has been developed with usage of low noise differential amplifier and NMR signal operating and control scheme (based on microcontroller STM32 for measuring of relaxation constants of liquid and viscous media in automatic operating mode. New technical decisions made it possible to improve relaxometer response time and dynamic range of measurements for relaxation constants T1 and T2 in comparison with small sized nuclear-magnetic spectrometer developed by the authors earlier (with accuracy characteristics conservation. The developed schemes for self-tuning of registration frequency, generating amplitude of magnetic field H1 in registration coil, and amplitude and frequency of modulating field provide measuring of T1 and T2 with error less than 0.5 % and signal to noise ratio about 1.2 in temperature range from 3 to 400 C. A new construction of mini-relaxometer reduced the weight of the device to 4 kg (with independent supply unit and increased transportability and operating convenience.

  20. Experimental investigations on the splitting of coherent population trapping resonances by the nuclear magnetic moment

    Full text: Coherent population trapping (CPT) is a resonance phenomenon due to a quantum mechanical interference effect within an atomic system. The resonantly driven atomic level population is being trapped into a superpositional dark state, yielding the atomic medium transparent for the exciting electromagnetic fields. The observation of this effect requires a special electronic structure (Λ-System) and suitable lifetimes which can be found e.g. in alkali atoms. In the experiments transitions are excited by a bi-chromatic laser radiation within the manifold of the D1-line of 87Rb . If a magnetic field is applied, a dark resonance spectrum of several Zeeman components appears as a result of the sublevel structure of the D1-line. An additional splitting of CPT resonances is observable by virtue of a lifted degeneracy with respect to the nuclear magnetic moment even before the Paschen-Pack regime is reached. We present experimental investigations on the behavior of the CPT resonances split by the nuclear magnetic moment under different external magnetic fields, laser polarizations and laser intensities. We focus our considerations on a special type of the Λ-System formation. In this case the center of gravity of the pair of split CPT resonances (called pseudoresonance) is sensitive to external magnetic fields only to second order in the magnetic field strength. The short term frequency stability of this pseudoresonance approaches the level of 10-14/ √τ making this standard as a good candidate for applications in compact atomic clocks used e.g. in GPS receivers and satellites. (author)

  1. Set-up for irradiation of nuclear photo-emulsions in magnetic field with induction up to 100 T

    A set-up for irradiation of nuclear photo-emulsions in high magnetic field is described. It is installed at the JINR synchrotron channel of relativistic nuclei extraction. Main characteristics of the set-up module and the magnetic field obtained in the first methodical experiment on the irradiation of nuclear emulsions with the dimensions of 1.5x1x10cm by 6 GeV/c relativistic protons are presented. 6 refs.; 2 figs

  2. Effect of the Wood-Saxon nuclear distribution on the chiral magnetic field in Relativistic Heavy-ion Collisions

    Mo, Yu-Jun; Shi, Ya-Fei

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the QCD vacuum with nonzero winding number $Q_w$ during relativistic heavy-ion collisions breaks the parity and charge-parity symmetry. A new kind of field configuration can separate charge in the presence of a background magnetic field-the "chiral magnetic effect". The strong magnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the noncentral nuclear-nuclear collision. Basing on the theory of Kharzeev,Mclerran and Warringa, we use the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to replace that of the uniform distribution to improve the magnetic field calculation method of the noncentral collision. The chiral magnetic field distribution at LHC(Large Hadron Collider) energy regions are predicted. We also consider the contributions to the magnetic field of the total charge given by the produced quarks.

  3. Small-scale instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance of porous media

    The investigation of fluids confined to porous media is the oldest topic of investigation with small-scale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instruments, as such instruments are mobile and can be moved to the site of the object, such as the borehole of an oil well. While the analysis was originally restricted by the inferior homogeneity of the employed magnets to relaxation measurements, today, portable magnets are available for all types of NMR measurements concerning relaxometry, imaging and spectroscopy in two types of geometries. These geometries refer to closed magnets that surround the sample and open magnets, which are brought close to the object for measurement. The current state of the art of portable, small-scale NMR instruments is reviewed and recent applications of such instruments are featured. These include the porosity analysis and description of diesel particulate filters, the determination of the moisture content in walls from gray concrete, new approaches to analyze the pore space and moisture migration in soil, and the constitutional analysis of the mortar base of ancient wall paintings.

  4. Small-scale instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance of porous media

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Dabrowski, Martin; Danieli, Ernesto; Haber, Agnes; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Olaru, Alexandra; Perlo, Juan; Sucre, Oscar [Institute of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, D-542056 Aachen (Germany); Evertz, Loribeth, E-mail: bluemich@mc.rwth-aachen.de [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Montana State University, PO Box 173800, Bozeman, MT 59717-3800 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The investigation of fluids confined to porous media is the oldest topic of investigation with small-scale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instruments, as such instruments are mobile and can be moved to the site of the object, such as the borehole of an oil well. While the analysis was originally restricted by the inferior homogeneity of the employed magnets to relaxation measurements, today, portable magnets are available for all types of NMR measurements concerning relaxometry, imaging and spectroscopy in two types of geometries. These geometries refer to closed magnets that surround the sample and open magnets, which are brought close to the object for measurement. The current state of the art of portable, small-scale NMR instruments is reviewed and recent applications of such instruments are featured. These include the porosity analysis and description of diesel particulate filters, the determination of the moisture content in walls from gray concrete, new approaches to analyze the pore space and moisture migration in soil, and the constitutional analysis of the mortar base of ancient wall paintings.

  5. Small-scale instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance of porous media

    Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Dabrowski, Martin; Danieli, Ernesto; Evertz, Loribeth; Haber, Agnes; Van Landeghem, Maxime; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Olaru, Alexandra; Perlo, Juan; Sucre, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of fluids confined to porous media is the oldest topic of investigation with small-scale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instruments, as such instruments are mobile and can be moved to the site of the object, such as the borehole of an oil well. While the analysis was originally restricted by the inferior homogeneity of the employed magnets to relaxation measurements, today, portable magnets are available for all types of NMR measurements concerning relaxometry, imaging and spectroscopy in two types of geometries. These geometries refer to closed magnets that surround the sample and open magnets, which are brought close to the object for measurement. The current state of the art of portable, small-scale NMR instruments is reviewed and recent applications of such instruments are featured. These include the porosity analysis and description of diesel particulate filters, the determination of the moisture content in walls from gray concrete, new approaches to analyze the pore space and moisture migration in soil, and the constitutional analysis of the mortar base of ancient wall paintings.

  6. Nanomagnetism of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles and Application in Spent Nuclear Fuel Separation

    Tarsem Singh, Maninder Kaur

    This dissertation presents the study on novel core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with unique magnetic properties. Understanding the fundamental physics of antiferromagnetic - ferromagnetic interactions is essential to apply in different applications. Chromium (Cr) doped and undoped core-shell iron/iron-oxide NPs have been synthesized using cluster deposition system and studied with respect to their nanostructures, morphologies, sizes, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The room-temperature magnetic properties of Fe based NPs shows the strong dependence of intra/inter-particle interaction on NP size. The Cr-doped Fe NP shows the origin of sigma-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at.%) unlike others reported at high Cr content and interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction. A theoretical model of watermelon is constructed based on the experimental results and core-shell NP system in order to explain the physics of exchange interaction in Cr-doped Fe particles. The magnetic nanoparticle---chelator separation nanotechnology is investigated for spent nuclear fuel recycling and is reported 97% and 80% of extraction for Am(III) and Pu(IV) actinides respectively. If the long-term heat generating actinides such as Am(III) can be efficiently removed from the used fuel raffinates, the volume of material that can be placed in a given amount of repository space can be significantly increased. As it is a simple, versatile, compact, and cost efficient process that minimizes secondary waste and improves storage performance.

  7. Abstracts of Works Presented at 32 All-Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Application

    The report consist of abstracts of works Presented at 32 All-Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Application which has been organized at the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Cracow, Poland from 1st to 2nd December of 1999. The report covers wide range of NMR problems as measuring methods, its application in biology, medicine and solid state studies

  8. Electromagnetic conductivity and magnetic surveys for characterization of an abandoned nuclear reactor facility

    Electromagnetic conductivity and total field magnetic surveys were conducted over a 14 acre portion of a site used during the Manhattan Project for nuclear research and plutonium production. While the facility was decommissioned and abandoned in 1953, there is presently some concern related to the potential for movement of radioactively contaminated ground water and sediments through high permeability underground features, such as tunnels or pipes. In addition, a number of underground storage tanks were left in place when the site was abandoned. The objectives of the surveys were to enhance the available data base related to the locations of underground features. The electromagnetic results clearly defined the presence of steam lines, water mains, electrical utility lines, building foundations, underground storage tanks, and a tunnel. The magnetic results were ineffective in detecting elongated subsurface features and provided relatively poor definition of building foundations. However, the magnetic results did detect disposal areas and reactor remains that were poorly defined by the electromagnetic data. The differences in the two data sets demonstrate the need for both electromagnetic and magnetic surveys in site characterization studies. Thirteen of the excavated anomalies were associated with buried utility features that could serve as high permeability conduits for ground water or sediment movement. The deepest of these was a 6 inch water main at a depth of 6 feet. The remainder of the utilities were at depths of 4 feet or less. Three of the anomalies resulted from underground storage tanks that ranged in size from 1000 gallons to 5000 gallons. Seven of the anomalies resulted from general waste disposal areas. The use of historical documentation combined with electromagnetic and magnetic surveys provided a cost effective method for baseline characterization of the complex underground features associated with a nuclear reactor facility

  9. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials. The first technique is a tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) which detects bulk changes in the dynamic susceptibility, chi = dM/dH. The capability of TDR to operate at low temperatures (less than 100 mK) and high fields (up to 65 T in pulsed fields) was critical for investigations of the antiferromagnetically correlated magnetic molecules Cr12Cu2 and Cr12 Ln4 (Ln = Y, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb), and the superconductor SrFe2(As1--xPx) 2 (x = 0.35). Investigations of Cr12Cu 2 and Cr12Ln4 demonstrates the first implementation of TDR to experimentally investigate the lowlying energy spectra of magnetic molecules in pulsed magnetic fields. Zeeman splitting of the quantum spin states results in transitions between field-dependent ground state energy levels observed as peaks in dM/dH at 600 mK, and demonstrate good agreement with theoretical calculations using a isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. Increasing temperature to 2.5 K, TDR reveals a rich spectrum of frequency-dependent level crossings from thermally populated excited states which cannot be observed by conventional static magnetometry techniques. The last study presented uses TDR in pulsed fields to determine the temperature-dependent upper-critical field Hc2 to investigate the effects of columnar defects arising from heavy ion irradiation of SrFe2(As 1--xPx)2. Results suggest irradiation uniformly suppresses Tc and Hc2, and does not introduce additional features on H c2(T) and the shapes of the anisotropic Hc2 curves indicates a nodal superconducting gap. The second technique is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which yields site specific magnetic and electronic information arising from hyperfine interactions for select magnetic nuclei. NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation measurements are reported

  10. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance in osteoporosis evaluation; Aplicacoes de ressonancia magnetica nuclear na avaliacao de osteoporose

    Giannoni, Ricardo A., E-mail: giannoni@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Montrazi, Elton T.; Bonagamba, Tito J., E-mail: elton.montrazi@gmail.com, E-mail: tito@ifsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cesar, Reinaldo, E-mail: reinaldofisica@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    In this work, initially ceramic samples of known porosity were used. These ceramic samples were saturated with water. The nuclear magnetic resonance signal due to relaxation processes that the hydrogen nucleus water contained in the pores of this ceramic material was measured. Then these samples were subjected to a process of drying and measures successively. As the water contained in pores greater evaporates the intensity of signal decreases and shows the sign because of the smaller pores. The analysis of this drying process gives a qualitative assessment of the pore size of the material. In a second step, bones of animals of unknown porosity underwent the same methodology for evaluating osteoporosis. Also a sample of human vertebra in a unique manner, with the same purpose was measured. Combined with other techniques is a quantitative evaluation of the possible porosity.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  12. Theory of damped quantum rotation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. III. Nuclear permutation symmetry of the line shape equation.

    Szymański, S

    2009-12-28

    The damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory describes manifestations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the coherent and stochastic dynamics of N-fold molecular rotors composed of indistinguishable particles. The standard jump model is only a limiting case of the DQR approach; outside this limit, the stochastic motions of such rotors have no kinematic description. In this paper, completing the previous two of this series, consequences of nuclear permutation symmetry for the properties of the DQR line shape equation are considered. The systems addressed are planar rotors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons' rings, occurring inside of molecular crystals oriented in the magnetic field. Under such conditions, oddfold rotors can have nontrivial permutation symmetries only for peculiar orientations while evenfold ones always retain their intrinsic symmetry element, which is rotation by 180 degrees about the N-fold axis; in specific orientations the latter can gain two additional symmetry elements. It is shown that the symmetry selection rules applicable to the classical rate processes in fluids, once recognized as having two diverse aspects, macroscopic and microscopic, are also rigorously valid for the DQR processes in the solid state. However, formal justification of these rules is different because the DQR equation is based on the Pauli principle, which is ignored in the jump model. For objects like the benzene ring, exploitation of these rules in simulations of spectra using the DQR equation can be of critical significance for the feasibility of the calculations. Examples of such calculations for the proton system of the benzene ring in a general orientation are provided. It is also shown that, because of the intrinsic symmetries of the evenfold rotors, many of the DQR processes, which such rotors can undergo, are unobservable in NMR spectra. PMID:20059076

  13. Magnetic moments of nuclei near Z=40, 50 and 82 measured by nuclear orientation

    Magnetic moments of ground and isomeric states by static nuclear orientation at low temperature are measured. The following nuclei, standing near Z=40, 50 and 82, 87Y, 93 Mosup(m), 93-94Tc, 110Insup(m) 106Agsup(m), 189-191Pt have been studied. Results are compared with single particle predictions for (1g9/2) and (3p3/2) orbitals of the shell model, corrected for mesonic and core-polarization effects. A number of multipole mixing ratios of transitions in the daughter nuclei have been determined. Experiments have been done with the first top loading, rapid access 3He-4He dilution refrigator. This feature enlarges the field of the method to shorter lifetimes nuclei. Formal development of nuclear orientation coefficients are also presented with both, a randomly oriented electric quadrupole interaction and a polarized magnetic dipole interaction, acting in the oriented state. The numerical results are put in a table for all spins from I=1 to 8, a wide range of temperature and ratio of quadrupole to dipole interactions strenghts values. These calculations enable to get electric quadrupole moments of long lived nuclei from low temperature nuclear orientation in non-cubic polycristalline samples

  14. Probing the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot via full counting statistics

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through a quantum dot weakly coupled to two ferromagnetic leads, in which an effective nuclear-spin magnetic field originating from the configuration of nuclear spins is considered. We demonstrate that the quantum coherence between the two singly-occupied eigenstates and the spin polarization of two ferromagnetic leads play an important role in the formation of super-Poissonian noise. In particular, the orientation and magnitude of the effective field have a significant influence on the variations of the values of high-order cumulants, and the variations of the skewness and kurtosis values are more sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective field than the shot noise. Thus, the high-order cumulants of transport current can be used to qualitatively extract information on the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single quantum dot. - Highlights: • The effective nuclear-spin magnetic field gives rise to the off-diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix of single QD. • The off-diagonal elements of reduced density matrix of the QD have a significant impact on the high-order current cumulants. • The high-order current cumulants are sensitive to the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field. • The FCS can be used to detect the orientation and magnitude of the effective nuclear-spin magnetic field in a single QD

  15. Magnetic properties of copper cluster-spins in BaCuO2+x (x = 0 and 0.14), investigated by magnetization and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    To clarify the combined magnetic behaviour of BaCuO2+x, which contains in the body-centred-cubic unit cell two Cu18O24 spherical clusters, eight Cu6O12 ring clusters, and six CuO4 lone units, we made measurements of magnetization, 63,65Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) near 6 T, and pure quadrupole resonance (PQR) in zero field on samples with well-defined oxygen contents x = 0 and 0.14. Quantitative analyses of Curie-Weiss-like susceptibility data for BaCuO2.00 indicate that Cu spins within the Cu6 clusters go into a ferromagnetically (FM) ordered ground state with a maximum spin Sr = 3 below ∼ 100 K, and those within the Cu18 clusters into an FM-like ground state below ∼ 20 K with net spin Ss ∼ 5 that is less than the maximum possible spin Ss = 9. For BaCuO2.14 the Cu spins within the Cu6 clusters go into an FM ordered ground state at a lower temperature of ∼ 30 K, and these clusters exhibit no signature of long-range magnetic ordering down to 2 K. The NMR spectra for BaCuO2.00 observed below ∼ 12 K have a trapezoidal structure that is known to be a characteristic of long-range magnetic ordering, and is consistent with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the Cu6 clusters below TN = 15 K predicted previously. On the other hand, the spectrum for BaCuO2.14 observed in a temperature range between 1.2 and ∼ 50 K has an electric quadrupole-split powder pattern structure. This provides microscopic evidence that there is no long-range magnetic ordering in BaCuO2.14. The addition of 0.14 moles of oxygen atoms results in a large suppression of some magnetic entities. We find, however, some anomalies in the NMR and PQR data for BaCuO2.14 near ∼ 10 K, which could be associated with short-range ordering of the paramagnetic Cu18 clusters

  16. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  17. Cosmic rays and the magnetic field in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC253 III. Helical magnetic fields in the nuclear outflow

    Heesen, Volker; Beck, Rainer; Krause, Marita; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fields are a good tracer for gas compression by shock waves, which can be caused by interaction of star-formation driven outflows from individual star formation sites as described in the chimney model. We study the magnetic field structure in the central part of the nuclear starburst galaxy NGC 253 with spatial resolutions between 40 and 150 pc to detect any filamentary emission associated with the nuclear outflow. New VLA observations at 3 cm with 7.5" resolution were combined with ...

  18. Spatio-temporal anomalous diffusion in heterogeneous media by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Palombo, M.; Gabrielli, A.; De Santis, S.; Cametti, C.; Ruocco, G.; Capuani, S.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we describe nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of water diffusion in highly confined and heterogeneous colloidal systems using an anomalous diffusion model. For the first time, temporal and spatial fractional exponents, α and μ, introduced within the framework of continuous time random walk, are simultaneously measured by pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR technique in samples of micro-beads dispersed in aqueous solution. In order to mimic media with low and high level of disorder, mono-dispersed and poly-dispersed samples are used. We find that the exponent α depends on the disorder degree of the system. Conversely, the exponent μ depends on both bead sizes and magnetic susceptibility differences within samples. The new procedure proposed here may be a useful tool to probe porous materials and microstructural features of biological tissue.

  19. Ceramic materials for primary loop magnetic flowmeters at nuclear power plants

    Nunn, Stephen D.; Holcomb, David E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Chung, Chong Eun; Moon, Byung Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Miller, Don W. [The Ohio State University, Ohio (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Light-water cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs) use primary coolant flow measurements in their reactor thermal power determination. As such, flow measurements are important from both safety and power production perspectives. Flowmeter uncertainty thus remains a significant concern to safe and efficient NPP operation. Magnetic flowmeters are the most commonly deployed modern flowmeter and are most applicable to situations requiring high accuracy measurement of high velocity liquid flows in large pipes-a situation that closely matches NPP primary flow. They have not previously been applied to NPPs because of the environmental sensitivity of currently available component materials. The technical focus of this project was on developing, fabricating, and then assessing the environmental survivability of the ruggedized components required to apply magnetic flowmeter technology to primary coolant loops of NPPs.

  20. Ceramic materials for primary loop magnetic flowmeters at nuclear power plants

    Light-water cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs) use primary coolant flow measurements in their reactor thermal power determination. As such, flow measurements are important from both safety and power production perspectives. Flowmeter uncertainty thus remains a significant concern to safe and efficient NPP operation. Magnetic flowmeters are the most commonly deployed modern flowmeter and are most applicable to situations requiring high accuracy measurement of high velocity liquid flows in large pipes-a situation that closely matches NPP primary flow. They have not previously been applied to NPPs because of the environmental sensitivity of currently available component materials. The technical focus of this project was on developing, fabricating, and then assessing the environmental survivability of the ruggedized components required to apply magnetic flowmeter technology to primary coolant loops of NPPs

  1. Water leaching of high and ultra high performance concrete: a nuclear magnetic resonance study

    Porteneuve, Ch.; Zanni, H. [Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, Lab. de Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, UMR 7636, 75 - Paris (France); Korb, J.P.; Petit, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, Lab. de Physique de la Matiere Condenses, UMR 7643 du CNRS, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2001-11-01

    The consequences in terms of microstructure and texture of a prolonged contact between concrete and a continuous flow of mineral water have been investigated here by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) because of its non-invasiveness and sensitivity to local environment. In particular, we evidence the dissolution of residual anhydrous cement, which leads to the further precipitation of hydrates occurring over 12 months of leaching tests in High Performance Concrete (HPC) and Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC). The study of the longitudinal relaxation of proton magnetization shows that the difference of pore size distribution between these two types of concrete remains mostly in the number of capillary pores. Its evolution with the time of water leaching up to the end of our experiment is not significant. (authors)

  2. Device for measurement of power and shape of radio frequency pulses in nuclear magnetic resonance

    A design of an instrument to measure the power and shape of radio frequency (RF) pulses operating in a broad frequency range is described. The device is capable of measuring the pulse power up to 500 W of both CW and extremely short (∼1 μs) RF pulses of arbitrary period. The pulse envelope can be observed on a logarithmic scale on a corresponding instrument output using an inexpensive storage oscilloscope. The instrument consists of a coaxial measurement head, the RF processing circuits and an AD conversion and display unit. The whole device is based on widely available integrated circuits; thus, good reproducibility and adaptability of the design is ensured. Since the construction is intended to be used in particular (but not solely) in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we found it useful to provide a demonstration of two typical usage scenarios. Other application fields may comprise magnetic resonance imaging, radar and laser technology, power amplifier testing, etc. (technical design note)

  3. Contributed Review: Nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general

  4. Remote detection of oil spilled under ice and snow using nuclear magnetic resonance

    The technical challenge of detecting oil that has been accidentally spilled under ice and snow was discussed with particular reference to the tools used to characterize the molecular composition of liquids and solids. One such tool is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which works by releasing electromagnetic energy. The NMR signals from oil and water can be differentiated based on the inherent differences in the NMR signal responses from different fluid types. The method can also use the Earth's magnetic field as the static magnetic field and thereby eliminate the complexity and cost of generating an independent magnetic field for remotely detecting fluids below a surface. This study examined the feasibility of altering existing surface-based instruments and placing them in a helicopter for aerial monitoring. The goal of this research was to develop a tool for remote detection of oil under ice in a marine environment, or for detection of oil under snow on land using an inexpensive tool that can quickly inspect large areas. The proposed tool and technique produces a direct hydrocarbon signal that may not have interference from ice and snow. 9 refs., 6 figs

  5. Contributed Review: Nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T

    Mitchell, Jonathan, E-mail: JMitchell16@slb.com; Fordham, Edmund J. [Schlumberger Gould Research, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0EL (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  6. Antisymmetric Couplings Enable Direct Observation of Chirality in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    King, Jonathan P; Blanchard, John W

    2016-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that a term in the nuclear spin Hamiltonian, the antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling, is fundamentally connected to molecular chirality. We propose and simulate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment to observe this interaction and differentiate between enantiomers without adding any additional chiral agent to the sample. The antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling may be observed in the presence of molecular orientation by an external electric field. The opposite parity of the antisymmetric coupling tensor and the molecular electric dipole moment yields a sign change of the observed coupling between enantiomers. We show how this sign change influences the phase of the NMR spectrum and may be used to discriminate between enantiomers.

  7. Substitution effect in nuclear magnetic resonance of C-13: α methoxicyclohexanones

    Eletronic and steric interactions between the carbonyl and methoxyl groups in α-methoxicyclohexanones by H-1 and C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (n.m.r) is studied. Interpretation of H-1 n.m.r measurements based on the carbonyl group anisotropy is made. The asigment of spectral lines to specific nuclear by Lanthanide Shift Reagent Experiments is confirmed. Interpretation of C-13 n.m.r. spectra with respect to molecular effects and emphirical relationships associated with the substituent was analysed. The C-13 chemical shift asignment by comparison with results of partially (SFORD) and fully decompled spectra and also by relating the measured chemical shift with values cited in the literature for similar compounds are made. A qualitative study using I.R. spectroscopy in attempt to evaluate the predominance of one the conformers of the studied compounds in solutions of n-hexan and chloroform is made. (M.J.C.)

  8. Quantum Computation Based on Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Ding, S; Ye, C; Zhan, M S; Zhu, X; Gao, K; Sun, X; Mao, X A; Liu, M; Ding, Shangwu; Dowell, Charles A. Mc; Ye, Chaohui; Zhan, Mingsheng; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Sun, Xianping; Mao, Xi-An; Liu, Maili

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is shown to be a promising technique for implementing quantum computing. The theory underlying the principles of quantum computing with nuclear spin systems undergoing MAS is formulated in the framework of formalized quantum Floquet theory. The procedures for realizing state labeling, state transformation and coherence selection in Floquet space are given. It suggests that by this method, the largest number of qubits can easily surpass that achievable with other techniques. Unlike other modalities proposed for quantum computing, this method enables one to adjust the dimension of the working state space, meaning the number of qubits can be readily varied. The universality of quantum computing in Floquet space with solid state NMR is discussed and a demonstrative experimental implementation of Grover's search is given.

  9. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav;

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic effects on the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe2 system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular...... leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second...... obtained for d and ?s in Xe2. For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other...

  10. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry. PMID:25303164

  11. The atomic electric dipole moment induced by the nuclear electric dipole moment; the magnetic moment effect

    Porsev, S G; Flambaum, V V

    2010-01-01

    We have considered a mechanism for inducing a time-reversal violating electric dipole moment (EDM) in atoms through the interaction of a nuclear EDM (d_N) with the hyperfine interaction, the "magnetic moment effect". We have derived the operator for this interaction and presented analytical formulas for the matrix elements between atomic states. Induced EDMs in the diamagnetic atoms 129Xe, 171Yb, 199Hg, 211Rn, and 225Ra have been calculated numerically. From the experimental limits on the atomic EDMs of 129Xe and 199Hg, we have placed the following constraints on the nuclear EDMs, |d_N(129Xe)|< 1.1 * 10^{-21} |e|cm and |d_N(199Hg)|< 2.8 * 10^{-24} |e|cm.

  12. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance study of the complexation of calcium by taurine

    13C Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, 1J/sub c-c/ scalar coupling constants, spin-lattice relaxation times, and nuclear Overhauser effects were determined for taurine-[1, 2 13C] and a taurine-[1 13C] and taurine-[2 13C] mixture in the presence and absence of calcium. Comparison of taurine titration shifts to values for related compounds reveals some unusual electronic properties of the taurine molecule. Stability constants of 1:1 calcium complexes with taurine zwitterions and anions, as well as their 13C chemical shifts, were obtained by least squares analysis of titration curves measured in the presence of calcium. The stability constants of calcium-taurine complexes were significantly lower than previous values and led to estimates that only approximately one percent of intracellular calcium of mammalian myocardial cells would exist in a taurine complex

  13. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  14. Experimental study of quantum simulation for quantum chemistry with a nuclear magnetic resonance simulator.

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Boruo; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-10-13

    Quantum computers have been proved to be able to mimic quantum systems efficiently in polynomial time. Quantum chemistry problems, such as static molecular energy calculations and dynamical chemical reaction simulations, become very intractable on classical computers with scaling up of the system. Therefore, quantum simulation is a feasible and effective approach to tackle quantum chemistry problems. Proof-of-principle experiments have been implemented on the calculation of the hydrogen molecular energies and one-dimensional chemical isomerization reaction dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance systems. We conclude that quantum simulation will surpass classical computers for quantum chemistry in the near future. PMID:22946038

  15. Validity of the electrical model representation of the effects of nuclear magnetic resonance (1961)

    When studying the behaviour of a magnetic resonance transducer formed by the association of an electrical network and of a set of nuclear spins, it is possible to bring about a representation that is analytically equivalent by means of an entirely electrical model, available for transients as well as steady-state. A detailed study of the validity conditions justifies its use in most cases. Also proposed is a linearity criterion of Bloch's equations in transient state that is simply the prolongation of the well-known condition of non-saturation in the steady-state. (author)

  16. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosynthetic routes of natural products

    During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies. (author)

  17. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs) are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation

  18. A survey on quantitative analysis of organic compounds by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is known as a powerful analytical technique, which is used to determine the structure of small and macro organic compounds. In recent years, 1H NMR is being recognized more and more as a quantitative analytical method, which is based on the principle where the area under a 1H NMR signal peak in solution state is proportional to the number of nuclei contributing to the peak. In this report, the basic concepts, developmental history and current state of the quantitative 1H NMR (qNMR) method are described. Furthermore, future prospect of the qNMR method is presented. (author)

  19. Effect of magnetic quadrupole lens alignment on a nuclear microprobe resolution

    Kolinko, S. V.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The paper reports the research trends in developing probe-forming systems with high demagnification and analysis factors that limit a nuclear microprobe resolution. Parasitic aberrations caused by tilts and offsets of magnetic quadrupoles are studied in terms of their effect on probe parameters on a target. The most common arrangements of probe-forming systems such as a triplet and "Russian quadruplet" with separated geometry are considered. The accuracy prerequisites for the positioning of the quadrupoles are defined, and practical guidelines for alignment of probe-forming systems with high demagnification factors are suggested.

  20. An interferometric complementarity experiment in a bulk nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble

    Peng Xinhua [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhu Xiwen [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Fang Ximing [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng Mang [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liu Maili [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Gao Kelin [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2003-03-14

    We have experimentally demonstrated the interferometric complementarity, which relates the distinguishability D quantifying the amount of which-way (WW) information to the fringe visibility V characterizing the wave feature of a quantum entity, in a bulk ensemble by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. We are primarily concerned about the intermediate cases: partial fringe visibility and incomplete WW information. We propose a quantitative measure of D by an alternative geometric strategy and investigate the relation between D and entanglement. By measuring D and V independently, it turns out that the duality relation D{sup 2} + V{sup 2} = 1 holds for pure quantum states of the markers.

  1. Increase of the assistancial productivity of the nuclear magnetic resonance equipment TOMIKON BMT 1100

    In the present work a revision of the physical parameters which take part in the obtained of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is carried put. Image is obtained introducing changes on them given in the disminution of the matrix size from 256 x 256 to 128 pixels with the corresponding disminution of FOV in dependence of the analized region, showing theoretical and practically its great importance of the number of possible examination with the resulting augment of the productivity of the method and the possibility to carried out studies on little cooperative patients mantaining an adequate quality and diagnostic information of the images

  2. Clinical value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) for the evaluaton of patients with stroke

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) is capable of identifying many more pathologic vascular lesions than CT and may shed more insight into the underlying pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease. This is a preliminary report on the evaluation with NMRI of some aspects of non-hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease over the past 2 and a half years. It is divided into three major categories for presentation although they are not mutually exclusive. (1) TIA and RIND; (2) Bilateral extracranial carotid occlusive disease; (3) Cerebral infarction, evolution, emboli and watershed. 48 refs.; 13 figs.; 4 tabs

  3. Nuclear process and the heaviest chemical elements in the magnetic stars

    Full text : In the base of investigate isotopic shifts in the lines it was obtained that several lanthanides (rare earths) and actinides (Thand U) is present in the atmosphere of magnetic chemical peculiar stars. Isotopic shifts in the lines of the heavy elements in MCP stars point to the fact it is observed mainly the products of rapid neutron capture. Isotopic shifts in the lines of the heavy elements in MCP stars and it is known that large majority chemically elements may be generated by the nuclear reactions, in particular in a stars

  4. Mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance image of a multilayer system at normal pressure

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a new microscopy technique that combines the spin selective detection of nuclear or electron spin resonance with the high spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy. In this letter we present MRFM measurements on a three-layer system in the micron range. We detected the one-dimensional distribution of proton spins in a sample that consisted of two-ammonium sulphate layers and an intermediate layer of sodium chloride. The experiments were done at room temperature and normal pressure, in contrast to earlier MRFM measurements that have been carried out in vacuum at room temperature or low temperatures. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the mediastinum and hili: early impressions of its efficacy

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of the mediastinum and/or hili were obtained in 22 of 25 patients selected on the basis of an abnormal CT scan. All patients had proven disease; 19 malignant and four benign processes were studied successfully. The high contrast resolution of NMR in the mediastinum allowed clear definition of disease in all cases. In six, NMR showed a greater extent of disease than CT. The ability of NMR to perform sagittal and coronal images also aided in disease analysis. In this preliminary study, NMR proved to be as useful as CT, or more so, in the evaluation of malignant disease of the hili and mediastinum

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance structural studies of membrane proteins in micelles and bilayers.

    Gong, Xiao-Min; Franzin, Carla M; Thai, Khang; Yu, Jinghua; Marassi, Francesca M

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy enables determination of membrane protein structures in lipid environments, such as micelles and bilayers. This chapter outlines the steps for membrane-protein structure determination using solution NMR with micelle samples, and solid-state NMR with oriented lipid-bilayer samples. The methods for protein expression and purification, sample preparation, and NMR experiments are described and illustrated with examples from gamma and CHIF, two membrane proteins that function as regulatory subunits of the Na+- and K+-ATPase. PMID:17951757

  7. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  8. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations. PMID:26372719

  9. Stability of succinylcholine solutions stored at room temperature studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Adnet, Frederic; Moyec, Laurence Le; Smith, Charles E.; Galinski, Michel; Jabre, Patricia; Lapostolle, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    The effect of storage temperature on the stability of two succinylcholine chloride solutions (20 and 50 mg/ml) was evaluated. Molecular composition was analysed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At room temperature, the degradation rate constant was 1.2%/month for the 20 mg/ml solution and 2.1%/month for the 50 mg/ml solution. The corresponding monthly degradation rates for the two solutions were 0.18% and 0.30% when stored at 4°C, and 5.4% and 8.1% when stored at 37°C. If a 10% ...

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of sulfate reorientations in LiNaSO4

    A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the sulfate ion reorientations in β-LiNaSO4 has been carried out. The influence of the SO4 reorientational jumps on the quadrupolar interactions of 7Li nuclei was investigated by a jump reorientational model, which has not previously been applied to sulfates. The activation energy required for the SO4 reorientations was found to be 0.19 eV. It was also revealed that the SO4 reorientational disorder should be associated with a small anomaly of a heat capacity at around 600 K, which was previously observed experimentally. (paper)

  11. Atomic force microscopy-coupled microcoils for cellular-scale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Maleki, Teimour; Ziaie, Babak; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-04-01

    We present the coupling of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies to enable topographical, mechanical, and chemical profiling of biological samples. Here, we fabricate and perform proof-of-concept testing of radiofrequency planar microcoils on commercial AFM cantilevers. The sensitive region of the coil was estimated to cover an approximate volume of 19.4 × 103 μm3 (19.4 pl). Functionality of the spectroscopic module of the prototype device is illustrated through the detection of 1Η resonance in deionized water. The acquired spectra depict combined NMR capability with AFM that may ultimately enable biophysical and biochemical studies at the single cell level.

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization-magnetic resonance imaging at low ESR irradiation frequency for ascorbyl free radicals

    Shinji Ito; Fuminori Hyodo

    2016-01-01

    Highly water-soluble ubiquinone-0 (CoQ0) reacts with ascorbate monoanion (Asc) to mediate the production of ascorbyl free radicals (AFR). Using aqueous reaction mixture of CoQ0 and Asc, we obtained positively enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-magnetic resonance (MR) images of the AFR at low frequency (ranging from 515 to 530 MHz) of electron spin resonance (ESR) irradiation. The shape of the determined DNP spectrum was similar to ESR absorption spectra with doublet spectral peaks. T...

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of sulfate reorientations in LiNaSO4

    Shakhovoy, R. A.; Rakhmatullin, A.; Deschamps, M.; Sarou-Kanian, V.; Bessada, C.

    2016-05-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the sulfate ion reorientations in β-LiNaSO4 has been carried out. The influence of the SO4 reorientational jumps on the quadrupolar interactions of 7Li nuclei was investigated by a jump reorientational model, which has not previously been applied to sulfates. The activation energy required for the SO4 reorientations was found to be 0.19 eV. It was also revealed that the SO4 reorientational disorder should be associated with a small anomaly of a heat capacity at around 600 K, which was previously observed experimentally.

  14. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  15. Two-state kinetics character ized by image analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become an important tool in modern biological research. NMR spectra image analysis can be used to analyze the kinetics of biomacromolecular conformational changes.The relationship between the image parameters and the protein dynamics was investigated by using a small globular protein ω-conotoxin SO3 (ω-CTX SO3). The physical meanings of the image parameters were characterized from the results. Comparison of the data from the traditional integral area of specific resonance peaks method and the NMR image analysis method showed the advantages of using NMR spectra image analysis for kinetic analysis of two-state processes monitored by 1D proton NMR.

  16. Recent Advances in Computational Methods for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data Processing

    Gao, Xin

    2013-01-11

    Although three-dimensional protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a computationally costly and tedious process that would benefit from advanced computational techniques, it has not garnered much research attention from specialists in bioinformatics and computational biology. In this paper, we review recent advances in computational methods for NMR protein structure determination. We summarize the advantages of and bottlenecks in the existing methods and outline some open problems in the field. We also discuss current trends in NMR technology development and suggest directions for research on future computational methods for NMR.

  17. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Junichi; Fukuchi, Masashi; Kaji, Hironori, E-mail: kaji@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hirata, Shuzo; Jung, Heo Hyo; Adachi, Chihaya [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyusyu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hirata, Osamu; Shibano, Yuki [Nissan Chemical Industries, LTD, 722-1 Tsuboi, Funabashi 274-8507 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs) are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  18. Qualitative characterization of free polyamines in ethyleneamines epoxide hardeners by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The qualitative characterization of two commercial ethyneamines epoxide hardeners marketed by ACROS (U.S.A.) was carried out by using carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The products were triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). TETA had four components, the most important one being triethylenetetramine, an ethyleneamine of lineal structure, in a concentration of 60 mol%. Another component had ramified structure, while the other two exhibited recurrent structures of the piperazina type. TEPA had five components with similar structures. The major component was tetraethylenepentamine in an approximate concentration of 55 mol%. These results agree with the composition of similar products marketed by Dow Chemical Company, namely DEH 24 and DEH 26, respectively. (author)

  19. Geometric optimal control of the contrast imaging problem in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Bonnard, B; Glaser, S J; Lapert, M; Sugny, D; Zhang, Y

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to introduce the tools to analyze the contrast imaging problem in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Optimal trajectories can be selected among extremal solutions of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle applied to this Mayer type optimal problem. Such trajectories are associated to the question of extremizing the transfer time. Hence the optimal problem is reduced to the analysis of the Hamiltonian dynamics related to singular extremals and their optimality status. This is illustrated by using the examples of cerebrospinal fluid / water and grey / white matter of cerebrum.

  20. An interferometric complementarity experiment in a bulk nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble

    We have experimentally demonstrated the interferometric complementarity, which relates the distinguishability D quantifying the amount of which-way (WW) information to the fringe visibility V characterizing the wave feature of a quantum entity, in a bulk ensemble by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. We are primarily concerned about the intermediate cases: partial fringe visibility and incomplete WW information. We propose a quantitative measure of D by an alternative geometric strategy and investigate the relation between D and entanglement. By measuring D and V independently, it turns out that the duality relation D2 + V2 = 1 holds for pure quantum states of the markers

  1. Efficient dynamic nuclear polarization of phosphorus in silicon in strong magnetic fields and at low temperatures

    Järvinen, J.; Ahokas, J.; Sheludyakov, S.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Zvezdov, D.; Fujii, Y.; Mitsudo, S.; Mizusaki, T.; Gwak, M.; Lee, SangGap; Lee, Soonchil; Vlasenko, L.

    2014-12-01

    Efficient manipulation of nuclear spins is important for utilizing them as qubits for quantum computing. In this work we report record high polarizations of 31P and 29Si nuclear spins in P-doped silicon in a strong magnetic field (4.6 T) and at temperatures below 1 K. We reached 31P nuclear polarization values exceeding 98 % after 20 min of pumping the high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) line with a very small microwave power of 0.4 μ W . We evaluate that the ratio of the hyperfine-state populations increases by three orders of magnitude after 2 hours of pumping, and an extremely pure nuclear spin state can be created, with less than 0.01 ppb impurities. A negative dynamic nuclear polarization has been observed by pumping the low-field ESR line of 31P followed by the flip-flip cross relaxation, the transition which is fully forbidden for isolated donors. We estimate that while pumping the ESR transitions of 31P also the nuclei of 29Si get polarized, and polarization exceeding 60 % has been obtained. We performed measurements of relaxation rates of flip-flop and flip-flip transitions which turned out to be nearly temperature independent. Temperature dependence of the 31P nuclear relaxation was studied down to 0.75 K, below which the relaxation time became too long to be measured. We found that the polarization evolution under pumping and during relaxation deviates substantially from a simple exponential function of time. We suggest that the nonexponential polarization dynamics of 31P donors is mediated by the orientation of 29Si nuclei, which affect the transition probabilities of the forbidden cross-relaxation processes.

  2. Medical applications of stable isotopes: mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance

    This report summarizes the content of the Symposium entitled Medical Applications of Stable Isotopes, co-sponsored by the American College of Nuclear Physicians and the U.S. Department of Energy and held on January 25, 1982, in Tucson, Arizon. Within the overall framework of clinical biochemistry and clinical pharmacokinetics, the two technologies of mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance were reviewed and analyzed in terms of their potential in the area of medical applications of stable isotopes. It was observed that nuclear medicine could perhaps be more accurately redefined as diagnostic imaging and functional measurement, utilizing both the traditional unstable (radioactive) isotopes and stable isotopes. This seems appropriate and perhaps necessary because nuclear medicine scientists and physicians have crossed traditional professional lines, promptly adapted to new technologies, stimulated the clinical application of computer techniques, justified and utilized complex and expensive instrumentation, and are quite experienced in the physical and mathematical basis of isotope (stable and unstable) preparation, handling, and use in in vivo clinical applications

  3. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  4. Relativistic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters in a Gaussian basis representation

    The calculation of NMR parameters from relativistic quantum theory in a Gaussian basis expansion requires some care. While in the absence of a magnetic field the expansion in a kinetically balanced basis converges for the wave function in the mean and for the energy with any desired accuracy, this is not necessarily the case for magnetic properties. The results for the magnetizability or the nuclear magnetic shielding are not even correct in the nonrelativistic limit (nrl) if one expands the original Dirac equation in a kinetically balanced Gaussian basis. This defect disappears if one starts from the unitary transformed Dirac equation as suggested by Kutzelnigg [Phys. Rev. A 67, 032109 (2003)]. However, a new difficulty can arise instead if one applies the transformation in the presence of the magnetic field of a point nucleus. If one decomposes certain contributions, the individual terms may diverge, although their sum is regular. A controlled cancellation may become difficult and numerical instabilities can arise. Various ways exist to avoid these singularities and at the same time get the correct nrl. There are essentially three approaches intermediate between the transformed and the untransformed formulation, namely, the bispinor decomposition, the decomposition of the lower component, and the hybrid unitary transformation partially at operator and partially at matrix level. All three possibilities were first considered by Xiao et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 214101 (2007)] in a different context and in a different nomenclature. Their analysis and classification in a more general context are given here for the first time. Use of an extended balanced basis has no advantages and has other drawbacks and is not competitive, while the use of a restricted magnetic balance basis can be justified.

  5. Application of 1H and 23Na magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy to define the HRBC up-taking of MRI contrast agents

    Calabi, Luisella; Paleari, Lino; Biondi, Luca; Linati, Laura; De Miranda, Mario; Ghelli, Stefano

    2003-09-01

    The up-take of Gd(III) complexes of BOPTA, DTPA, DOTA, EDTP, HPDO3A, and DOTP in HRBC has been evaluated by measuring the lanthanide induced shift (LIS) produced by the corresponding dysprosium complexes (DC) on the MAS-NMR resonances of water protons and free sodium ions. These complexes are important in their use as MRI contrast agents (MRI-CA) in diagnostics. 1H and 23Na MAS-NMR spectra of HRBC suspension, collected at 9.395 T, show only one signal due to extra- and intra-cellular water (or sodium). In MAS spectra, the presence of DC in a cellular compartment produces the LIS of only the nuclei (water proton or sodium) in that cellular compartment and this LIS can be related to the DC concentrations (by the experimental curves of LIS vs. DC concentrations) collected in the physiological solution. To obtain correct results about LIS, the use of MAS technique is mandatory, because it guarantees the only the nuclei staying in the same cellular compartment where the LC is present show the LIS. In all the cases considered, the addition of the DC to HRBC (100% hematocrit) produced a shift of only the extra-cellular water (or sodium) signal and the gradient of concentration ( GC) between extra- and intra-cellular compartments resulted greater than 100:1, when calculated by means of sodium signals. These high values of GC are direct proofs that none of the tested dysprosium complexes crosses the HRBC membrane. Since the DC are iso-structural to the gadolinium complexes the corresponding gadolinium ones (MRI-CA) do not cross the HRBC membrane and, consequently, they are not up-taken in HRBC. The GC values calculated by means of water proton signals resulted much lower than those obtained by sodium signals. This proves that the choice of the isotope is a crucial step in order to use this method in the best way. In fact, GC value depends on the lowest detectable LIS which, in turn, depends on the nature of the LC (lanthanide complex) and the observed isotopes.

  6. Magnetic hexadecapole gamma transitions and neutrino-nuclear responses in medium heavy nuclei

    Jokiniemi, Lotta; Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino-nuclear responses in the form of squares of nuclear matrix elements,NMEs, are crucial for studies of neutrino-induced processes in nuclei. In this work we investigate magnetic hexadecapole (M4) NMEs in medium-heavy nuclei. The experimentally derived NMEs, $M_{\\rm EXP}$(M4), deduced from observed M4 $\\gamma $ transition half-lives are compared with the single-quasiparticle (QP) NMEs, $M_{\\rm QP}$(M4), and the microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model (MQPM) NMEs $M_{\\rm MQPM}$(M4). The experimentally driven M4 NMEs are found to be reduced by a coefficient $k \\approx 0.29 $ with respect to $M_{\\rm QP}$(M4) and by $k \\approx 0.33$ with respect to $M_{\\rm MQPM}$(M4). The M4 NMEs are reduced a little by the quasiparticle-phonon correlations of the MQPM wave functions but mainly by other nucleonic and non-nucleonic correlations which are not explicitly included in the MQPM. The found reduction rates are of the same order of magnitude as those for magnetic quadrupole $\\gamma $ transitions and Gamow-Teller (GT)...

  7. Sunflower oil ozonation. Following of the reaction by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the technique of Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance can be used for the pursuit of the reaction between the ozone and the unsaturated fatty acids. It's carried out the sunflower oil ozonization to different applied dose of ozone and the index of peroxides and the concentration of aldehydes are determined. The main reaction products were identified by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR 1 H). The intensities of the signs were used to follow the advance of the reaction between the ozone and the sunflower oil. It is was carried out until obtaining an index of peroxides of 1 202 mmol-equiv/kg. The intensities of the signs of the olefinic protons diminish with a gradual increment in the dose of applied ozone, but without ending up disappearing completely. The ozonides of Criegee obtained to applied dose of ozone of 107,1 mg/g were approximately bigger 7,4 times that those obtained at the beginning from the reaction to applied dose of ozone of 15,3 mg/g. The aldehydes protons were observed as a sign of weak intensity in all the spectra. The signs belonging to the olenifics protons of the hydroperoxides in d = 5,55 ppm increases with the increment of the applied dose of ozone. You concludes that to higher applied dose of ozone, haggler is the advance of the ozonization reaction, what belongs together with a bigger formation of oxygenated compounds

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Moments: Their Measurement and Tabulation as Accessible Data

    Stone, N. J., E-mail: n.stone@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The most recent tabulations of nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments have been prepared and published by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA, Vienna [N. J. Stone, Report No. INDC(NDS)-0650 (2013); Report No. INDC(NDS)-0658 (2014)]. The first of these is a table of recommended quadrupole moments for all isotopes in which all experimental results are made consistent with a limited number of adopted standards for each element; the second is a combined listing of all measurements of both moments. Both tables cover all isotopes and energy levels. In this paper, the considerations relevant to the preparation of both tables are described, together with observations as to the importance and (where appropriate) application of necessary corrections to achieve the “best” values. Some discussion of experimental methods is included with emphasis on their precision. The aim of the published quadrupole moment table is to provide a standard reference in which the value given for each moment is the best available and for which full provenance is given. A table of recommended magnetic dipole moments is in preparation, with the same objective in view.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Dipole and Electric Quadrupole Moments: Their Measurement and Tabulation as Accessible Data

    The most recent tabulations of nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments have been prepared and published by the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA, Vienna [N. J. Stone, Report No. INDC(NDS)-0650 (2013); Report No. INDC(NDS)-0658 (2014)]. The first of these is a table of recommended quadrupole moments for all isotopes in which all experimental results are made consistent with a limited number of adopted standards for each element; the second is a combined listing of all measurements of both moments. Both tables cover all isotopes and energy levels. In this paper, the considerations relevant to the preparation of both tables are described, together with observations as to the importance and (where appropriate) application of necessary corrections to achieve the “best” values. Some discussion of experimental methods is included with emphasis on their precision. The aim of the published quadrupole moment table is to provide a standard reference in which the value given for each moment is the best available and for which full provenance is given. A table of recommended magnetic dipole moments is in preparation, with the same objective in view

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Project at the Medical University of South Carolina

    Lacy, Eric R.

    2008-04-25

    Department of Energy funds were used to support the development of a Center for Marine Structural Biology at the Marine Resources Center at Ft. Johnson in Charleston, South Carolina. The Ft. Johnson site is home to five institutions in a unique state/federal/academic partnership whose member institutions include the National Ocean Service (NOS), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), the SC Department of Natural Resources, and the College of Charleston. The Center for Marine Structural Biology sits adjacent to the newly completed Hollings Marine Laboratory and houses a 700 and 800 MHz nuclear magnetic resource instruments. The completed center is operational and meets it goal to provide state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance capabilities to resolve the molecular structures of compounds that have direct relevance to human health, including marine-derived biotoxins that are tested against cancer cell lines through collaborative studies with researchers at the Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC. Funds from the DOE assisted, in part, with the purchase of NMR probes and ancillary equipment for the 800 MHz NMR instrument. In addition, developmental funds was used to support the visit of an Scientific Advisory Board and for the NMR Planning Team to visit currently operational high field NMR facilities to guide their choice of instrumentation and design of the building.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: A review

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole. - Highlights: • Organic aerosol composition by 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. • NMR fingerprints of specific sources, types and sizes of organic aerosol. • Source reconciliation and apportionment using NMR spectroscopy. • Research priorities towards understanding organic aerosol composition and origin. - This review presents the recent advances on the characterization of organic aerosol composition using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  12. Future of nuclear medicine - impact of new radiopharmaceuticals and of alternative methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance

    Nuclear medicine (NM) is returning to its origin by studying more and more metabolic signals using new positron or single photon emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Much of the success that has been achieved by PET is now being transferred to SPECT-techniques. In contrast to static planar scans the changing tissue concentration of radiotracers can now be quantified. In this respect radioimmunodetection using monoclonal antibodies has a tremendous future. It is quite probable that sup(99m)Tc will continue to be the principle radionuclide. Especially radiopharmaceuticals for 'hot spot'-imaging will be important in the near future, for example radioactively labelled blood cells. NM has a unique contribution to offer to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its emphasis on physiologic as well as anatomic imaging parameters. NM can interact with the new revolutionizing technology of NMR in two ways: NM can help to understand NMR and NMR can help to identify regions of interest to be studied by NM. For example, we cannot see metabolic processes of the brain in NMR which are seen by biological radiotracers such as dopamin receptors in NM. However, there is no doubt, that NMR will also have a negative impact on NM. The potential value of NMR for in vivo biochemical analysis seems to be tremendous. The additional information gained by NMR about metabolic processes may well change our entire understanding of health and disease. The advantage that NM procedures can be performed on an outpatient basis will apply to NMR as well. NM and NMR will be complementary modalities in the future. (orig.)

  13. Measurements of nuclear polarization and nuclear magnetic moment of 170Tm in 170Tm:SrF2 by optical pumping

    Significant nuclear polarization of unstable 170Tm in Tm2+:SrF2 was for the first time achieved with β-ray radiation detected optical pumping in solids, providing a new powerful method to measure magnetic moments of unstable nuclei. (author)

  14. MOA: Magnetic Field Oscillating Amplified Thruster and its Application for Nuclear Electric and Thermal Propulsion

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfven waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Alfven waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfven waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. (authors)

  15. Effects of magnetic fields on the nuclear burning propagation and the Type Ia SNe runaway

    Hristov, Boyan; Collins, David C.; Hoeflich, Peter; Weatherford, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The consistency of Type Ia SNe allows for simple descriptions of the phenomena founded on basic physics and yet no theory is able to explain the observations entirely. In particular we are addressing an outstanding problem with current 3D simulations, in which Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities bring too much burned material to the outer layers thus mixing iron group elements towards the surface but those are not observed. Additionally light curves are reproduced well only in spherically symmetric explosions, while they break down when instabilities are present. We attempt to explain these discrepancies by introducing magnetic fields, which affects the rate of growth of unstable modes. Specifically it increases the growth rate of modes parallel to itself and suppress the transverse modes. This reduces the mixing in two possible ways: stronger burning causes faster pre-expansion, then plumes rise with the similar speed as the surrounding material is expanding; and RT instabilities are suppressed so much that they don't rise at all. Our preliminary models run in a rectangular domain inside a C/O white dwarf (WD) extending 120km along the stellar radius and is about 15km on the side. External magnetic fields between 1e4G and 1e9G are superimposed at various angles to the WD radius. A simple two-species nuclear network is employed in the form of fuel-product (C/O -> 56Ni). The front propagation is modeled as diffusion of the burned fraction of the C/O fuel. All simulations were done with Enzo - a 3D AMR MHD code for astrophysical and cosmological imulations, which was enhanced with additional physics for the nuclear burning. Future work will extend to full star simulations and more complex nuclear networks.

  16. A solid state nuclear magnetic resonance study of industrial inorganic pigments

    Dajda, N

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to look at a number of colourful ceramic pigment systems, most of which are sold commercially in large quantities. Doped zircon (ZrSiO sub 4) pigments were examined using sup 1 sup 9 F, sup 2 sup 3 Na, sup 2 sup 9 Si, sup 5 sup 1 V and sup 9 sup 1 Zr NMR. In these systems, paramagnetic species are incorporated into the sample in small quantities creating the colourful pigment. The impurity dopants in the systems studied either dope directly into lattice sites in the zircon, or form an extra chemical phase. NMR was able to distinguish between these two doping mechanisms in a number of doped zircon pigments. Most spectra showed effects which were due to the magnetic influence of paramagnetic colouring species, and the strength of the interaction depended on the magnetic moment of the ion containing the unpaired electron. In the case of vanadium doped zircon, the moment was small enough that it allowed extra contact shifted peaks to be resolved in the spectra which indica...

  17. Nuclear medicine techniques and magnetic resonance imaging in coronary artery disease

    Primary modalities for non-invasive imaging of coronary artery disease (CAD) and related disorders include nuclear medicine techniques and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Nuclear medicine has contributed greatly to the diagnosis of CAD and the assessment of the extent of functional abnormalities. Tallium-201 has a long history as a perfusion agent and is currently also used to study myocardial viability. Developments in radiopharmaceutical chemistry has provided us with 99mTc-labelled agents with better counting statistics and qualities for SPECT-imaging. Other radiopharmaceuticals allow insight in metabolic disorders, hypoxia and disturbance of the adrenergic system of the myocardium. MRI has many unique applications is cardiovascular diseases. this imaging technique provides excellent structural information and, during ECG triggering, fine display of left ventricular function. Current development using intravascular contrast agents will soon lead to the possibility to the evaluate myocardial perfusion. Improved techniques to evaluate coronary artery anatomy and flow are currently under clinical study. Although cardiac MRI is an exciting new tool with great potential for the diagnosis of CAD it is presently not considered a valid alternative for nuclear medicine imaging techniques. Important developments in the next lustrum may change this view

  18. Diamond nitrogen vacancy electronic and nuclear spin-state anti-crossings under weak transverse magnetic fields

    Clevenson, Hannah; Chen, Edward; Dolde, Florian; Teale, Carson; Englund, Dirk; Braje, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    We report on detailed studies of electronic and nuclear spin states in the diamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) center under moderate transverse magnetic fields. We numerically predict and experimentally verify a previously unobserved NV ground state hyperfine anti-crossing occurring at magnetic bias fields as low as tens of Gauss - two orders of magnitude lower than previously reported hyperfine anti-crossings at ~ 510 G and ~ 1000 G axial magnetic fields. We then discuss how this regime can be optimized for magnetometry and other sensing applications and propose a method for how the nitrogen-vacancy ground state Hamiltonian can be manipulated by small transverse magnetic fields to polarize the nuclear spin state. Acknowlegement: The Lincoln Laboratory portion of this work is sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract #FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  19. A Neutron Diffraction Study of the Nuclear and Magnetic Structure of MnNb2O6

    Nielsen, Oliver Vindex; Lebech, Bente; Krebs Larsen, F.;

    1976-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was made of the nuclear and the magnetic structure of MnNb2O6 single crystals. The thirteen nuclear parameters (space group Pbcn) were determined from 304 reflections at room temperature. The antiferromagnetic structure (Neel temperature=4.4K), determined at 1.2K, is a...... superposition of G- and A-type structures of the form 0.90 Gx+0.34 Gy+0.28 Az. The corresponding magnetic space group is P2'1/c....

  20. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnet...

  1. An Algol Program for the Refinement of Nuclear and Magnetic Structures by the Profile Method. RCN Report

    A structure refinement method is described which does not use integrated neutron power intensities, single or overlapping, but employs directly the profile intensities obtained from stepscanning measurements of the power diagram. Nuclear as well as magnetic structures can be refined, the latter only when their magnetic unit cell is equal to or a multiple of the nuclear cell. The least squares refinement procedure allows, with a simple code, the introduction of linear or quadratic constraints between the parameters. The complete text of the Algol 60 program is given with a description of the format of the input tape. A test sample is included at the end of the report. (author)

  2. 40. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications. Cracow, 3-4 December 2007. Abstracts

    The Report comprises abstracts of 59 communications presented during the 40. Polish Seminar on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Its Applications, held on December 3-4, 2007 in Cracow (PL). They cover a variety of research fields, including magnetic resonance imaging in vivo, applications of NMR spectroscopy to medical diagnosis, studies on molecular properties of different materials as well as quantum chemical calculations of NMR parameters

  3. Nuclear-magnetic-resonance characterization of the defect migrating during stage III in electron-irradiated copper

    Nuclear quadrupolar couplings around monovacancies created by electron irradiation in copper have been measured by the nuclear-magnetic-resonance field-cycling technique. The corresponding quadrupolar transitions disappear completely after the annealing stage III of the residual resistivity, while 17% of the initial resistivity increase remains. Consequently, this experiment shows unambiguously that all the monovacancies are annihilated or agglomerate during stage III and rules out the model in which split interstitials migrate during stage III and monovacancies during stage IV

  4. Rationale for the combination of nuclear medicine with magnetic resonance for pre-clinical imaging.

    Wagenaar, Douglas J; Kapusta, Maciej; Li, Junqiang; Patt, Bradley E

    2006-08-01

    Multi-modality combinations of SPECT/CT and PET/CT have proven to be highly successful in the clinic and small animal SPECT/CT and PET/CT are becoming the norm in the research and drug development setting. However, the use of ionizing radiation from a high-resolution CT scanner is undesirable in any setting and particularly in small animal imaging (SAI), in laboratory experiments where it can result in radiation doses of sufficient magnitude that the experimental results can be influenced by the organism's response to radiation. The alternative use of magnetic resonance (MR) would offer a high-resolution, non-ionizing method for anatomical imaging of laboratory animals. MR brings considerably more than its 3D anatomical capability, especially regarding the imaging of laboratory animals. Dynamic MR imaging techniques can facilitate studies of perfusion, oxygenation, and diffusion amongst others. Further, MR spectroscopy can provide images that can be related to the concentration of endogenous molecules in vivo. MR imaging of injected contrast agents extends MR into the domain of molecular imaging. In combination with nuclear medicine (NM) SPECT and PET modalities in small animal imaging, MR would facilitate studies of dynamic processes such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. However, the detectors for nearly all PET and SPECT systems are still based on vacuum tube technology, namely: photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) in which the signal is generated by transporting electrons over a substantial distance within an evacuated glass tube, making them inoperable in even small magnetic fields. Thus the combination of SPECT or PET with MR has not been practical until the recent availability of semiconductor detectors such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD's) for PET and CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for SPECT coupled with the availability of high-density low noise ASIC electronics to read out the semiconductor detectors. The strong advantage of these

  5. Selection and Evaluation of Magnetic Flowmeter Liner Material for Nuclear Power Plants

    Chung, Chong Eun; Moon, Byung Soo; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Yong Kyun; Hong, Seok Boong; Kim, Jung Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Holcomb, E. David; Nunn, D. Stephen [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (Uruguay)

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are licensed to operate at power levels up to a specified thermal power rating. Safety analyses and evaluations are performed at conditions selected to account for uncertainties in determining thermal power. The NRC in Regulatory Guide 1.49, Rev. 1, December 1973 provides guidance regarding the amount of margin needed to account for uncertainties. Guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.49 recommends that analyses and evaluations be made by assuming the thermal power is equal to 1.02 times the licensed thermal power. The reason that analyses should be performed at two percent above the licensed thermal power is to allow for possible instrument errors. A 1% error in a primary loop flow can result in a 1% reduction in the unit net load if the error is in the high direction. In order to avoid errors in the low direction (and exceeding the licensed plant thermal power) a margin is built into the control system. Improved accuracy of the primary flow measurement allows for a reduction of this margin. EPRI has reported that the typical power plant primary flow measurement errors are 3{approx}5%. Primary loop flow measurements are used to determine the core heat rate in PWRs and as such are a basic safety indication. These measurements are conventionally made using flowmeters based on the differential pressure. Differential pressure based on flowmeters have significant, fundamental accuracy limitations as well as having failure modes difficult to diagnose while in service. Magnetic flowmeters offer a potential solution to these limitations. Magnetic flowmeters are highly accurate, respond linearly, and are obstructionless (no fouling; consume no pumping power). Also, the transmitter for magnetic flowmeters can be located remotely (up to hundreds of feet) from the point of the measurement, thus reducing the environmental exposure. The major limitation to the immediate application of magnetic flowmeters to nuclear power plants is the radiation

  6. Selection and Evaluation of Magnetic Flowmeter Liner Material for Nuclear Power Plants

    Nuclear power plants are licensed to operate at power levels up to a specified thermal power rating. Safety analyses and evaluations are performed at conditions selected to account for uncertainties in determining thermal power. The NRC in Regulatory Guide 1.49, Rev. 1, December 1973 provides guidance regarding the amount of margin needed to account for uncertainties. Guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.49 recommends that analyses and evaluations be made by assuming the thermal power is equal to 1.02 times the licensed thermal power. The reason that analyses should be performed at two percent above the licensed thermal power is to allow for possible instrument errors. A 1% error in a primary loop flow can result in a 1% reduction in the unit net load if the error is in the high direction. In order to avoid errors in the low direction (and exceeding the licensed plant thermal power) a margin is built into the control system. Improved accuracy of the primary flow measurement allows for a reduction of this margin. EPRI has reported that the typical power plant primary flow measurement errors are 3∼5%. Primary loop flow measurements are used to determine the core heat rate in PWRs and as such are a basic safety indication. These measurements are conventionally made using flowmeters based on the differential pressure. Differential pressure based on flowmeters have significant, fundamental accuracy limitations as well as having failure modes difficult to diagnose while in service. Magnetic flowmeters offer a potential solution to these limitations. Magnetic flowmeters are highly accurate, respond linearly, and are obstructionless (no fouling; consume no pumping power). Also, the transmitter for magnetic flowmeters can be located remotely (up to hundreds of feet) from the point of the measurement, thus reducing the environmental exposure. The major limitation to the immediate application of magnetic flowmeters to nuclear power plants is the radiation sensitivity of

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID [Super-conducting QUantum Interference Device] preamplifiers

    Sensitive radio-frequency (rf) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Interface Devices (SQUIDS) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6 +- 0.5 dB and 1.7 +- 0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of ''nuclear spin noise'', the emission of photons by 35Cl nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large rf pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 /times/ 1016 nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing 35Cl nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in 119Sn nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 1018 nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in 195Pt nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss. 23 refs., 11 figs

  8. Cosmic rays and the magnetic field in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC253 III. Helical magnetic fields in the nuclear outflow

    Heesen, Volker; Krause, Marita; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fields are a good tracer for gas compression by shock waves, which can be caused by interaction of star-formation driven outflows from individual star formation sites as described in the chimney model. We study the magnetic field structure in the central part of the nuclear starburst galaxy NGC 253 with spatial resolutions between 40 and 150 pc to detect any filamentary emission associated with the nuclear outflow. New VLA observations at 3 cm with 7.5" resolution were combined with archive data at 20 and 6 cm. We find filamentary radio continuum emission in a geometrical distribution that we interpret as the boundary of the northwestern nuclear outflow cone. The scaleheight of the continuum emission is 150+/-20 pc, regardless of the observing frequency. The equipartition magnetic field strength is 46+/-10 microG for the total field and 21+/-5 microG for the regular field in the filaments. The ordered magnetic field is aligned along the filaments, in agreement with amplification due to compression. T...

  9. Pade-Froissart exact signal-noise separation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Belkic, Dzevad; Belkic, Karen, E-mail: Dzevad.Belkic@ki.se [Karolinska Institute, PO Box 260, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-06-28

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is one of the key methods for studying the structure of matter on different levels (sub-nuclear, nuclear, atomic, molecular, cellular, etc). Its overall success critically depends upon reliable mathematical analysis and interpretation of the studied data. This is especially aided by parametric signal processing with the ensuing data quantification, which can yield the abundance or concentrations of the constituents in the examined matter. The sought reliability of signal processing rests upon the possibility of an accurate solution of the quantification problem alongside the unambiguous separation of true from false information in the spectrally analysed data. We presently demonstrate that the fast Pade transform (FPT), as the unique ratio of two polynomials for a given Maclaurin series, can yield exact signal-noise separation for a synthesized free induction decay curve built from 25 molecules. This is achieved by using the concept of Froissart doublets or pole-zero cancellations. Unphysical/spurious (noise or noise-like) resonances have coincident or near-coincident poles and zeros. They possess either zero- or near-zero-valued amplitudes. Such spectral structures never converge due to their instability against even the smallest perturbations. By contrast, upon convergence of the FPT, physical/genuine resonances are identified by their persistent stability against external perturbations, such as signal truncation or addition of random noise, etc. In practice, the computation is carried out by gradually and systematically increasing the common degree of the Pade numerator and denominator polynomials in the diagonal FPT. As this degree changes, the reconstructed parameters and spectra fluctuate until stabilization occurs. The polynomial degree at which this full stabilization is achieved represents the sought exact number of resonances. An illustrative set of results is reported in this work to show the exact separation of

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  11. CP-violating effect of the Th nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment: accurate many-body study of ThO.

    Skripnikov, L V; Petrov, A N; Titov, A V; Flambaum, V V

    2014-12-31

    Investigations of CP violation in the hadron sector may be done using measurements in the ThO molecule. Recent measurements in this molecule improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Another time-reversal (T) and parity (P)-violating effect in 229ThO is induced by the nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. We perform nuclear and molecular calculations to express this effect in terms of the strength constants of T, P-odd nuclear forces, neutron EDM, QCD vacuum angle θ, quark EDM, and chromo-EDM. PMID:25615324

  12. 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance of topological insulator Bi2Se3

    Georgieva, Nataliya M.; Rybicki, Damian; Guehne, Robin; Williams, Grant V. M.; Chong, Shen V.; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Garate, Ion; Haase, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Topological insulators constitute a new class of materials with an energy gap in the bulk and peculiar metallic states on the surface. We report on new features resulting from the bulk electronic structure, based on a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of 77Se on Bi2Se3 and Cu0.15Bi2Se3 single crystals. First, we find two resonance lines and show that they originate from the two inequivalent Se lattice sites. Second, we observe unusual field-independent linewidths and attribute them to an unexpectedly strong internuclear coupling mediated by bulk electrons. In order to support this interpretation, we present a model calculation of the indirect internuclear coupling and show that the Bloembergen-Rowland coupling is much stronger than the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida coupling. Our results call for a revision of earlier NMR studies and add information concerning the bulk electronic properties.

  13. High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: From Chemical Structure to Food Authenticity

    Mannina, L.; Segre, A.

    2002-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique able to give us a relevant contribution in food analysis. In this review, some practical aspects of this technique (sample preparation, acquisition time, relaxation delay, etc) as well as some methods of spectral assignment of the spectra (2D and 1D selective technique) are reported. Some examples of NMR quantitative analyses are reported. In particular, the results relative to the NMR study of olive oils are discussed, among these: the comparison between conventional analyses and the NMR analysis in the olive oil characterization; the NMR determination of minor components such as squalene, cyclo-arthenol and chlorophyll in olive oil; the panel test and its relationship with NMR data: the geographical characterization of olive oils. (Author) 26 refs.

  14. The nuclear magnetic resonance in endocrinology. Spectroscopy and imaging, present and future

    The first part, after a brief historical reminder, gives an oversimplified and non rigorous approach to the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) phenomenon; this physical introduction leads the clinician to know the essential about the spectral and imaging techniques in NMR, just to understand what is done... The second part of this paper shows some medical applications of these two aspects of NMR, with help of some examples, taken from the literature, according to what is concerned with endocrinology. Pure bio chemical applications (enzymology), or those concerning isolated (and perfused) organs, or living animals, and even human beings, are numerous and complementary, and there is no doubt that the applications of NMR technologies to medicine will know a promising future

  15. Hydrogen in YBa2Cu3Ox: a neutron spectroscopy and a nuclear magnetic resonance study

    The high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3Ox absorbs considerable amounts of hydrogen if it is kept at elevated temperatures in a hydrogen gas atmosphere. In parallel neutron spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, we studied the vibrational spectra and the spin lattice relaxation time of the protons in YBa2Cu3Ox samples that were doped with hydrogen due to the absorption of hydrogen gas. Both, the vibrational spectra and the spin lattice relaxation time are a sensitive probe for the local environment of the protons. We carried out analogous measurements on samples with a similar proton concentration due to the uptake of water vapour. These experiments demonstrated a totally different local environment of the protons. This fact is a strong indication that the protons absorbed from the hydrogen gas atmosphere did not react with the oxygen of the sample under formation of molecular water. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative study of diet reversal in rat galactosemic cataract via nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times

    The diet-reversal phenomenon in rat galactosemic cataract seems similar to the cataract reversal caused by aldose-reductase (AR) inhibitors. In previous studies, we reported this phenomenon morphologically and biochemically, and described a new method of evaluating cataractous changes via proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) relaxation times (T1, T2). In the present study, we fed 25% galactose chow to SD-strain male rats (body weight 50 g) for 1 or 2 weeks, changed the galactose chow to a normal diet (diet reversal), and then measured relaxation times (T1, T2) over time. The results showed that 1H-NMR relaxation times were useful in evaluating the healing of galactosemic cataract after diet reversal. Thus, 1H-NMR may be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of AR inhibitors. (author)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of erythrocyte membranes in chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    Morariu, V V; Petrov, L

    1986-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the apparent water diffusional exchange through erythrocyte membranes in cases of policitemia vera, chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis was measured by using a nuclear magnetic resonance method in the presence of Mn2+. The thermal transition shifted to lower temperatures in all cases, regardless of the stage of the disease, suggesting a structural alteration of the membrane. The shift of transition indirectly suggests a lower penetration of the erythrocytes by Mn2+. The water exchange time at 37 degrees C also increased, mainly in the blast crisis; it seems to have a prognostic value of some clinical interest. No simple correlation of the water exchange and the following clinical investigations was observed: the white count, the percentage of promyelocites and myeloblasts, the sedimentation rate of blood, the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes, the total concentration of proteins, albumin and immunoglobulins, respectively, in plasma. PMID:3742482

  18. Preparation of pseudo-pure states by line-selective pulses in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Feng, M; Gao, K; Yang, X; Liu, M; Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Gao, Keli; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Maili

    2000-01-01

    A new method of preparing the pseudo-pure state of a spin system for quantum computation in liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was put forward and demonstrated experimentally. Applying appropriately connected line-selective pulses simultaneously and a field gradient pulse techniques we acquired straightforwardly all pseudo-pure states for two qubits in a single experiment much efficiently. The signal intensity with the pseudo-pure state prepared in this way is the same as that of temporal averaging. Our method is suitable for the system with arbitrary numbers of qubits. As an example of application, a highly structured search algorithm -- Hogg's algorithm was also performed on the pseudo-pure state $\\mid 00>$ prepared by our method.

  19. An interferometric complementarity experiment in a bulk Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ensemble

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Feng, M; Liu, M; Gao, K; Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2003-01-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated the interferometric complementarity, which relates the distinguishability $D$ quantifying the amount of which-way (WW) information stored to the fringe visibility $V$ characterizing the wave feature of a quantum entity, in a bulk ensemble by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques. Besides the two extremes considered by Bohr, we primarily concern on the intermediate cases: partial fringe visibility and incomplete WW information. Instead of the general method, we exploit the geometrical explanation to obtain the distinguishability $D$ more visually. Also, we investigate the relation between the distinguishability $D$ and the amount of entanglement $E$. With measuring $D$ and $V$ independently, it turns out that the duality relation $D^{2}+V^{2}\\leq 1$ holds.

  20. Exhibition of the periodicity of Quantum Fourier Transformation in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Feng, M; Yang, X; Liu, M; Gao, K; Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2002-01-01

    The remarkable capability of quantum Fourier transformation (QFT) to extract the periodicity of a given periodic function has been exhibited by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Two separate sets of experiments were performed. In a full QFT, the periodicity were validated with state tomography and fidelity measurements. For a simplified QFT, the three-qubit pseudo-pure state was created by introducting an additional observer spin, and the spectra recorded on the observer spin showed intuitively the power of QFT\\ to find the periodicity. Experimentally realizing the QFT provides a critical step to implement the renowned Shor's quantum factoring algorithm and many other algorithms. Moveover, it can be applied to the study of quantum chaos and other quantum information processing.