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Sample records for 233u self-fueling regime

  1. Preserving high-purity 233U

    The MARC X Conference hosted a workshop for the scientific community to communicate needs for high-purity 233U and its by-products in order to preserve critical items otherwise slated for downblending and disposal. Currently, only small portions of the U.S. holdings of separated 233U are being preserved. However, many additional kilograms of 233U (>97 % pure) still are destined to be disposed, and it is unlikely that this material will ever be replaced due to a lack of operating production capability. Summaries of information conveyed at the workshop and feedback obtained from the scientific community are presented herein. (author)

  2. Benchmark testing of 233U evaluations

    In this paper we investigate the adequacy of available 233U cross-section data (ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3) for calculation of critical experiments. An ad hoc revised 233U evaluation is also tested and appears to give results which are improved relative to those obtained with either ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3 cross sections. Calculations of keff were performed for ten fast benchmarks and six thermal benchmarks using the three cross-section sets. Central reaction-rate-ratio calculations were also performed

  3. Repository criticality control for 233U using depleted uranium

    The US is evaluating methods for the disposition of excess weapons-usable 233U, including disposal in a repository. Isotopic dilution studies were undertaken to determine how much depleted uranium (DU) would need to be added to the 233U to minimize the potential for nuclear criticality in a repository. Numerical evaluations were conducted to determine the nuclear equivalence of different 235U enrichments to 233U isotopically diluted with DU containing 0.2 wt% 235U. A homogeneous system of silicon dioxide, water, 233U, and DU, in which the ratio of each component was varied, was used to determine the conditions of maximum nuclear reactivity. In terms of preventing nuclear criticality in a repository, there are three important limits from these calculations. 1. Criticality safe in any nonnuclear system: The required isotopic dilution to ensure criticality under all conditions, except in the presence of man-made nuclear materials (beryllium, etc.), is ≅1.0% 235U in 238U. The equivalent 233U enrichment level is 0.53 wt% 233U in DU. 2. Critically safe in natural systems: The lowest 235U enrichment found in a natural reactor at shutdown was approximately1.3%. French studies, based on the characteristics of natural uranium ore bodies, indicate that a minimum enrichment of approximately1.28% 235U is required for criticality. These data suggest that nuclear criticality from migrating uranium is not realistic unless the 235U enrichments exceed approximately1.3%, which is a result that is equivalent to 0.72% 233U in DU. 3. Criticality safety equivalent to light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF): The 233U can be diluted with DU so that the uranium criticality characteristics match SNF uranium. Whatever repository criticality controls are used for SNF can then be used for 233U. The average LWR SNF assay (after decay of plutonium isotopes to uranium isotopes) is 1.5% 235U equivalent in 238U. This is equivalent to diluting 233U to 0.81% in DU

  4. Experimental 233U nondestructive assay with a random driver

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) of 233U in quantities up to 15 grams containing 7 ppM 232U age 2 years was investigated with a random driver. A passive singles counting technique showed a reproducibility within 0.2% at the 95% confidence level. This technique would be applicable throughout a process in which all of the 233U had the same 232U content at the same age. Where the 232U content varies, determination of 233U fissile content would require active NDA. Active coincidence counting utilizing a 238Pu, Li neutron source and a plastic scintillator detector system showed a reproducibility limit within 15% at the 95% confidence limit. The active technique was found to be very dependent on the detector system resolving time in order to make proper random coincidence corrections associated with the high gamma activity from the 232U decay chain

  5. Testing of 233U evaluations with criticality benchmarks

    To validate and improve the quality of the complete set of evaluated nuclear reaction data for 233U, criticality benchmarks with fast, epithermal and thermal spectra from ICSBEP handbook were selected to test 233U evaluations from CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-Ⅶ.0, JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0. The effective multiplication factors keff of selected benchmarks were calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and compared with the benchmark values. The results were analyzed with trend against energy spectrum index and sensitivity analysis. In present validation, the underestimation of keff for benchmarks with thermal, epithermal or some of fast spectra is the main problem existed in the tested evaluations. From the view of thermal reactors design, the 233U evaluation from ENDF/B-Ⅶ.0 shows better performance than other file tested, but still overestimates the contribution of capture reaction in resonance region. (authors)

  6. Updated and revised neutron reaction data for 233U

    YU Bao-Sheng; CHEN Guo-Chang; ZHANG Hua; CAO Wen-Tian; TANG Guo-You; TAO Xi

    2013-01-01

    A complete set of n+233U neutron reaction data from 10-5 eV-20 MeV is updated and revised based on the evaluated experimental data and the feedback information of various benchmark tests.The main revised quantities are nubars,cross sections as well as angular distributions,etc.The benchmark tests indicate that the present evaluated data achieve very promising results.

  7. Thermal Stabilization of 233UO2, 233UO3, and 233U3O8

    This report identifies an appropriate thermal stabilization temperature for 233U oxides. The temperature is chosen principally on the basis of eliminating moisture and other residual volatiles. This report supports the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard for safe storage of 233U (DOE 2000), written as part of the response to Recommendation 97-1 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), addressing safe storage of 233U

  8. Isotopic dilution of 233U with depleted uranium for criticality safety in processing and disposal

    The disposal of excess 233U as waste is being considered. Because 233U is a fissile material, a key requirement for processing 233U to a final waste form and disposing of it is the avoidance of nuclear criticality. For many processing and disposal options, isotopic dilution is the most feasible and preferred option to avoid nuclear criticality. Isotopic dilution is dilution of fissile 233U with nonfissile 238U. The use of isotopic dilution removes any need to control nuclear criticality in process or disposal facilities through geometry or chemical composition. Isotopic dilution allows the use of existing waste management facilities that are not designed for significant quantities of fissile materials to be used for processing and disposing of 233U. The amount of isotopic dilution required to reduce criticality concerns to reasonable levels was determined in this study to be approximately 0.53 wt % 233U. The numerical calculations used to define this limit consisted of a homogeneous system of silicon dioxide (SiO2), water (H2O), 233U and depleted uranium (DU) in which the ratio of each component was varied to learn the conditions of maximum nuclear reactivity. About 188 parts of DU (0.2 wt % 235U) are required to dilute 1 part of 233U to this limit in a water-moderated system with no SiO2 present. Thus for the U.S. inventory of 233U, several hundred metric tons of DU would be required for isotopic dilution

  9. Separation and estimation of 229Th and 233U by alpha and gamma ray spectrometric technique

    The individual estimation of 233U and 229Th in a plancheted source made out of liquid sample were done by using an alpha and γ-ray spectrometric techniques. Estimation of 229Th in the plancheted source was done by γ-ray spectrometry and 233U by alpha spectrometry after subtracting the estimated amount of 229Th. In spite of the same alpha energy of 4.8 MeV, the individual estimation of 233U and 229Th based on present technique is superior to conventional techniques and important in the 232Th-233U fuel reprocessing cycle of AHWR and ADSs. The activity of 229Th was also radiochemically separated from its parent activity of 233U by using an ion exchange resin and the purity was checked by the above mentioned technique. (author)

  10. Performance analysis of 233U for fixed bed nuclear reactors

    Criticality and burn up behavior of the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) are investigated for the mixed fuel 233UO2/ThO2 as an alternative to low enriched 235UO2 fuel. CERMET fuel with a zirconium matrix and cladding has been used throughout the study. The main results of the study can be summarized as follows: Reactor criticality is already achieved by ∝2% 233UO2 with the mixed 233UO2/ThO2 fuel. At higher 233U fractions, reactor criticality rises rapidly and exceeds keff > 1.5 already by 9% 233UO2. With 100% 233UO2, start up criticality can reach keff = 2.0975. Time dependent reactor criticality keff and fuel burn up have been investigated for two different mixed fuel 233UO2/ThO2 compositions, namely: 4% 233UO2 + 96% ThO2 for a reactor power of 40 MWel (120 MWth) and 9% 233UO2 + 91% ThO2 for a reactor power of 70 MWel (210 MWth). Sufficient reactor criticality (keff > 1.06) for continuous operation without fuel change can be sustained during ∝ 5 and 12 years with 4% and 9% 233UO2 fractions in the mixed fuel, leading to burn ups of ∝ 36000 and > 105000 MWD/t, respectively. Thorium based fuel produces no prolific uranium. Plutonium production remains negligible. (orig.)

  11. Comparative studies on plutonium and 233U utilization in miniFUJI MSR

    Molten salt reactor (MSR) has many merits such as safety enhancement and capability to be used for hydrogen production. A comparative evaluation of plutonium and 233U utilization in miniFUJI MSR has been performed. Reactor grade plutonium (RGPu), weapon grade plutonium (WGPu), and super grade plutonium (SGPu) have been utilized in the present study. The reactors can obtain their criticality condition with the 233U concentration in the Th-233U fuel, RGPu concentration in Th-RGPu fuel, WGPu concentration in Th-WGPu fuel, and SGPu concentration in Th-SGPu fuel of 0.52%, 5.76%, 2.16%, and 1.96%, respectively. The Th-233U fuel results in the soft neutron spectra of miniFUJI reactor. The neutron spectra turn into harder with the enlarging of plutonium concentration in loaded fuel where Th-RGPu fuel gives the hardest neutron spectra. (author)

  12. Improved AHWR equilibrium core cluster for self sustenance in 233U

    Advance Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being designed with many advance features like negative coolant void reactivity, heat removal through natural circulation and other passive safety features. The AHWR is a 920 MWth, vertical pressure tube type thorium-based reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water and designed to maximise power production from thorium. The equilibrium fuel cycle is based on the conversion of naturally available thorium into fissile 233U, driven by plutonium as external fissile feed. The basic fuel cycle is based on the fact that the AHWR core should be self-sustaining in 233U. The self sustenance in 233U can be achieved by using two types of equilibrium core clusters. In this paper we have done a study where self sustenance in 233U can be achieved by using only single type of cluster. (author)

  13. Initial ORNL site assessment report on the storage of 233U

    The 233U storage facility at ORNL is Building 3019. The inventory stored in Building 3019 consists of 426.5 kg of 233U contained in 1,387.1 kg of total uranium. The inventory is primarily in the form of uranium oxides; however, uranium metal and other compounds are also stored. Over 99% of the inventory is contained in 1,007 packages stored in tube vaults within the facility. A tank of thorium nitrate solution, the P-24 Tank, contains 0.13 kg of 233U in ∼ 4,000 gal. of solution. The facility is receiving additional 233U for storage from the remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at ORNL. Consolidation of material from sites with small holdings is also adding to the 233U inventory. Additionally, small quantities (233U are in other research facilities at ORNL. A risk assessment process was chosen to evaluate the stored material and packages based on available package records. The risk scenario was considered the failure of a package (or a group of similar packages) in the Building 3019 inventory. The probability of such a failure depends on packaging factors such as the age and material of construction of the containers. The consequence of such a failure depends on the amount and form of the material within the packages. One thousand seven packages were categorized with this methodology resulting in 859 low-risk packages, 147 medium-risk packages, and 1 high-risk package. This initial assessment also documents the status of the evaluation of the Building 3019 and its systems for safe storage of 233U. The final assessment report for ORNL storage of 233U is scheduled for June 1999. The report will document the facility assessments, the specific package inspection plan, and the results of initial package inspections

  14. Interim assessment of the denatured 233U fuel cycle: feasibility and nonproliferation characteristics

    A fuel cycle that employs 233U denatured with 238U and mixed with thorium fertile material is examined with respect to its proliferation-resistance characteristics and its technical and economic feasibility. The rationale for considering the denatured 233U fuel cycle is presented, and the impact of the denatured fuel on the performance of Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Controlled Reactors, Gas-Cooled Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors, and Fast Breeder Reactors is discussed. The scope of the R, D and D programs to commercialize these reactors and their associated fuel cycles is also summarized and the resource requirements and economics of denatured 233U cycles are compared to those of the conventional Pu/U cycle. In addition, several nuclear power systems that employ denatured 233U fuel and are based on the energy center concept are evaluated. Under this concept, dispersed power reactors fueled with denatured or low-enriched uranium fuel are supported by secure energy centers in which sensitive activities of the nuclear cycle are performed. These activities include 233U production by Pu-fueled transmuters (thermal or fast reactors) and reprocessing. A summary chapter presents the most significant conclusions from the study and recommends areas for future work

  15. Interim assessment of the denatured /sup 233/U fuel cycle: feasibility and nonproliferation characteristics

    Abbott, L.S.; Bartine, D.E.; Burns, T.J. (eds.)

    1978-12-01

    A fuel cycle that employs /sup 233/U denatured with /sup 238/U and mixed with thorium fertile material is examined with respect to its proliferation-resistance characteristics and its technical and economic feasibility. The rationale for considering the denatured /sup 233/U fuel cycle is presented, and the impact of the denatured fuel on the performance of Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Controlled Reactors, Gas-Cooled Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors, and Fast Breeder Reactors is discussed. The scope of the R, D and D programs to commercialize these reactors and their associated fuel cycles is also summarized and the resource requirements and economics of denatured /sup 233/U cycles are compared to those of the conventional Pu/U cycle. In addition, several nuclear power systems that employ denatured /sup 233/U fuel and are based on the energy center concept are evaluated. Under this concept, dispersed power reactors fueled with denatured or low-enriched uranium fuel are supported by secure energy centers in which sensitive activities of the nuclear cycle are performed. These activities include /sup 233/U production by Pu-fueled transmuters (thermal or fast reactors) and reprocessing. A summary chapter presents the most significant conclusions from the study and recommends areas for future work.

  16. Comparison on decay process of explosive products for 233U and weapon-grade plutonium

    Comparison on the nuclear explosive products' radioactivity, biological hazard potential , energy deposition after nuclear explosion between the model of 233U and the model of weapon- grade plutonium was made. The detail analysis of the process of above physics quantities in the model of weapon-grade Plutonium was also given

  17. Radiological safety experience in the fabrication of alloy plate fuels bearing 233U/Pu

    The first incidence of 233U-bearing fuel fabrication in India was the production of aluminum-clad Al-233U alloy fuel for the Kamini research reactor. The reactor physics experiments for this fuel are now being carried out in the Purnima III critical assembly, where Al-Pu alloy plate fuels will also be used. Both types of fuels were fabricated in the radiometallurgy laboratories of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. The hazard potential of each step, evaluated from the site-specific radiological field data, is summarized. The parameters analyzed for this purpose include external and internal radiation hazards, contamination hazards, age of fuel material (i.e., time after separation), and experimental thermoluminescent detector exposure data. Gamma spectrometric data of the finished fuel plates were also analyzed for their utility in checking the material inventory. The collective dose equivalent from the fabrication operations for 12 subassemblies (9 bearing 233U and 3 bearing plutonium) was 67 mSv, arising from external exposures only. The internal exposure was nil. Fabrication of fuel plates constituted >60% of the total exposure. Fabrication of fuel subassemblies and quality control inspection at all the stages accounted for the remaining radiation exposure. Handling of 233U/Pu-bearing fuels is likely to increase in the years ahead in India. In this context, analysis of radiological field data has yielded useful guidelines for future work

  18. Final Oak Ridge National Laboratory Site Assessment Report on the Storage of 233U

    This assessment characterizes the 233U inventories and storage facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This assessment is a commitment in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP), ''Safe Storage of Uranium-233,'' in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 97-1

  19. Recovery of 233U from waste and minimization of modifier with supercritical fluid extraction

    The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method was used to remove 233U from a real time tissue paper waste generated in our laboratory and resulted in about 97% of extraction efficiency. Optimization of modifier flow rate was carried out to minimize the generation of secondary liquid waste, a significant endeavour in the context of large-scale waste treatment plant. (author)

  20. Breeding of 233U in the thorium-uranium fuel cycle in VVER reactors using heavy water

    Marshalkin, V. E.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for achieving optimal neutron kinetics and efficient isotope transmutation in the 233U-232Th oxide fuel of water-moderated reactors with variable water composition (D2O, H2O) that ensures breeding of the 233U and 235U isotopes. The method is comparatively simple to implement.

  1. Emerging new options for harnessing the Th-233U cycle in India

    The recent development of the concept of Fusion Breeders especially the invention of the Fission Suppressed Blanket, coupled with parallel rapid strides in fusion technology (particularly of Tokamaks) has given a welcome new boost to the prospects of harnessing the Th-233U cycle. Their studies show that even sub-Lawson Fusion Breeders which are net consumers of electrical energy will be good enough to give adequate growth rates of nuclear generating capacity, provided the fusion bred 233U is used in either fast or thermal breeders of thermal near-breeders having high conversion ratios (>0.98). The paper presents an overview of the main results of studies underway in these areas both at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay and the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam

  2. Final purification of 233U from thorium by Dowex 50x4 in Thorex process

    The 233U product obtained after a single cycle 5% tributyl phosphate/shell sol T extraction, scrubbing and stripping often contains significant amount of thorium as impurity. Further purification is normally carried out using ion exchange. The present paper summarises the results of the studies carried out to find out the various factors responsible for the extraordinary binding of thorium ion at the exchanger site while exploring the possibility of eluting total thorium using HNO3 alone

  3. Analysis of the BNL ThO2-233U exponential experiments

    The BNL ThO2--3 w/o 233U light-water-moderated exponential experiments were analyzed to evaluate (1) cross section library sets for 233U and 232Th, and (2) correlations with measured ThO2 resonance integral data. A total of six cross section library sets were evaluated, including ENDF/B-2 and ENDF/B-3 libraries for 232Th, ENDF/B-2 library for 233U, and ThO2 resonance integral correlations based on data by Weitman and Pettus, Hardy and Palowitch, and corrections to the latter data by Steen. A modified version of the LEOPARD code was used throughout this analysis. The principle results of this work are as follows: (1) The library set containing ENDF/B-2 data for 233U and ENDF/B-3 data for 232Th, together with ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on Steen's corrections to the Hardy and Palowitch data, yields the best agreement with measurements, giving an average k/sub eff/ of 0.9975 with a standard deviation of 0.0067 for the 21 analyzed configurations. (2) With respect to this ''best'' set, the ENDF/B-2 232Th data is less reactive than the corresponding ENDF/B-3 data by approximately 0.1 percent Δk. (3) The ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on data by Weitman and Pettus yields resonance integrals that are consistently higher than those produced by the correlation with Steen's values, even though the latter is normalized to an infinitely dilute resonance integral of 85.9 barns (0.5 ev cutoff), while the former is normalized to a corresponding value of 80 barns. Thus, with respect to the ''best'' set, the ThO2 resonance integral correlation based on the Weitman and Pettus data is less reactive by approximately 0.7 percent Δk

  4. Measurement and analysis of anti ν energy dependence for 233U, 238U, 239Pu

    The energy dependence of the average yield of prompt neutrons per fission (anti ν) for U233, U238 and Pu239 in the incident neutron energy range (Esub(n)) up to 5 MeV has been studied using an electrostatic accelerator. The recommended curves for anti ν (Esub(n)) has been obtained with the help of the polynomial least square method fitting. The resons of deviations from the linear dependence have been analysed

  5. Compilation of criticality data involving thorium or 233U and light water moderation

    Gore, B.F.

    1978-07-01

    The literature has been searched for criticality data for light water moderated systems which contain thorium or /sup 233/U, and data found are compiled herein. They are from critical experiments, extrapolations, and exponential experiments performed with homogeneous solutions and metal spheres of /sup 233/U; with lattices of fuel rods containing highly enriched /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ and /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/; and with arrays of cyclinders of /sup 233/U solutions. The extent of existing criticality data has been compared with that necessary to implement a thorium-based fuel cycle. No experiments have been performed with any solutions containing thorium. Neither do data exist for homogeneous /sup 233/U systems with H/U < 34, except for solid metal systems. Arrays of solution cylinders up to 3 x 3 x 3 have been studied. Data for solutions containing fixed or soluble poisons are very limited. All critical lattices using /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ fuels (LWBR program) were zoned radially, and in most cases axially also. Only lattice experiments using /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ fuels have been performed using a single fuel rod type. Critical lattices of /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ rods poisoned with boron have been measured, but only exponential experiments have been performed using boron-poisoned lattices of /sup 233/UO/sub 2/ - ThO/sub 2/ rods. No criticality data exist for denatured fuels (containing significant amounts of /sup 238/U) in either solution or lattice configurations.

  6. Core design options for high conversion BWRs operating in Th–233U fuel cycle

    Highlights: • BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th–233U fuel cycle. • Seed blanket optimization that includes assembly size array and axial dimensions. • Fully coupled MC with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. • Thermal-hydraulic analysis includes MCPR observation. -- Abstract: Several options of fuel assembly design are investigated for a BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th–233U fuel cycle. The designs rely on an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure consisting of a single axial fissile zone “sandwiched” between two fertile blanket zones, in order to improve fertile to fissile conversion ratio. The main objective of the study was to identify the most promising assembly design parameters, dimensions of fissile and fertile zones, for achieving net breeding of 233U. The design challenge, in this respect, is that the fuel breeding potential is at odds with axial power peaking and the core minimum critical power ratio (CPR), hence limiting the maximum achievable core power rating. Calculations were performed with the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. A single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries was modeled applying simplified restrictions on the maximum centerline fuel temperature and the CPR. It was found that axially heterogeneous fuel assembly design with a single fissile zone can potentially achieve net breeding, while matching conventional BWR core power rating under certain restrictions to the core loading pattern design

  7. Investigations on production of 233U using few pin thoria in existing PHWRs

    Thorium is not a fissile material and cannot be used to either start or sustain the chain reaction. Therefore, a reactor using thorium would also need either enriched uranium or plutonium to sustain the chain reaction until enough of the thorium has converted to fissile 233U. In order to retrieve and reprocess the irradiated fuel, the bundle is designed with few thoria pins and rest SEU pins. In the present study, different pin configurations of thoria in 19 and 37 element fuel clusters of Indian PHWRs have been considered. The lattice calculations have been done using the multi-group transport theory code CLUB. The variations of k∞ versus burn up are depicted in the paper. The production of 233U (considering also the decay of 233Pa into 233U) is also shown. Average discharge burn ups of the order 20 and 17 GWd/Te can be achieved with the use of thoria pins in 19 and 37 element fuel clusters respectively with appropriate bundle shift scheme. Derating of power is required during operation because of bundle power restrictions. It is found that 1 pin thoria configuration is preferable from the point of view of fuel requirements and power reduction consideration. Since 37 element fuel cluster used in 540 MWe PHWR fuel has large margins in bundle power, the restriction in power operation is much less than 19 element fuel cluster used in 220 MWe PHWR

  8. Criticality safety validation: Simple geometry, single unit {sup 233}U systems

    Putman, V.L.

    1997-06-01

    Typically used LMITCO criticality safety computational methods are evaluated for suitability when applied to INEEL {sup 233}U systems which reasonably can be modeled as simple-geometry, single-unit systems. Sixty-seven critical experiments of uranium highly enriched in {sup 233}U, including 57 aqueous solution, thermal-energy systems and 10 metal, fast-energy systems, were modeled. These experiments include 41 cylindrical and 26 spherical cores, and 41 reflected and 26 unreflected systems. No experiments were found for intermediate-neutron-energy ranges, or with interstitial non-hydrogenous materials typical of waste systems, mixed {sup 233}U and plutonium, or reflectors such as steel, lead, or concrete. No simple geometry experiments were found with cubic or annular cores, or approximating infinite sea systems. Calculations were performed with various tools and methodologies. Nine cross-section libraries, based on ENDF/B-IV, -V, or -VI.2, or on Hansen-Roach source data, were used with cross-section processing methods of MCNP or SCALE. The k{sub eff} calculations were performed with neutral-particle transport and Monte Carlo methods of criticality codes DANT, MCNP 4A, and KENO Va.

  9. Measurement of 233U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for some threshold reactions

    The 233U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for twelve threshold reactions were measured relative to the average cross section of 0.688 ± 0.040 mb for the 27Al(n,α)24Na reaction. The reference value was obtained by calculation using the energy dependent cross section in the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL) Dosimetry File and the Watt-type fission spectrum in ENDF/B-VI. General agreement was seen between the measured and the calculated fission-spectrum averaged cross sections. However, there exist discrepancies of more than 10% between the measured and the calculated average cross sections for the 24Mg(n,p)24Na, 47Ti(n,p)47Sc, and 64Zn(n,p)64Cu reactions. The tendencies in the calculated-to-measured ratios are similar to those for 235U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections the authors previously measured. The measured average cross sections were also applied for the spectrum adjustment of the 233U fission neutrons using the Neutron Unfolding Package Code (NEUPAC). The adjusted spectrum is close to the Watt-type fission spectrum of 233U within the uncertainties of the obtained spectrum, although there exist some fluctuations in the ratio spectrum of the adjusted to the Watt-type

  10. Update of 233U, 229-232Th and 230-233Pa Fission Data

    The influence of the 235U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) on modeling of integral benchmarks was estimated to be significant. For 233U(n,f) PFNS similar sensitivities could be envisaged. For the variety of Th/U fuels and systems, ranging from metal fast to deep thermal solutions, large positive/negative swings in calculated Keff can be expected. Th/U fuelled core criticality calculations would be sensitive to the modelled soft tail of fission neutrons or deficiency of hard tail fission neutrons, as revealed for U and Pu fuels. The deficiency of the 233U(nth,f) PFNS, adopted for the ENDF/B-VII.0. could be traced back to the 'propagation' of calculated 235U(nth,f) PFNS shape at En= 0.5 MeV. At higher energies, average energies of PFNS coincide only at ∼5 MeV, at other En the average energies and spectra shapes are drastically different. However, it might be argued that the response of the criticality benchmark calculations for the 233U thermal and fast systems would be similar to that observed for the PFNS of 239Pu. Our approach allowed to solve the longstanding problem of inconsistency of 235U integral data testing and differential prompt fission neutron spectra data, a similar approach may hold for 233U. Using modified PFNS, we may avoid arbitrary tweaking of neutron cross sections or neutron multiplicities for Th/U fuel-cycle related nuclides (233U, 229,230,231,232Th and 230,231,232,233Pa) to compensate the ill-defined shape of 233U PFNS. For metal fast benchmarks much would depend on the inelastic scattering cross section of 233U, which should be considered rather uncertain at the moment. The unrealistic evaluations of poorly investigated cross sections related to the Th/U fuel cycle could be excluded by consistent analysis of the available fission data base. The evaluation of 229,230,231,232Th(n,f) and 230,231,232,233Pa(n,f) cross sections could be supplemented by description of surrogate and ratio surrogate fission data, coming from

  11. Neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 240Pu

    Differential-neutron-emission cross sections of 232Th, 233U, 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 240Pu are measured between approx. = 1.0 and 3.5 MeV with the angle and magnitude detail needed to provide angle-integrated emission cross sections to approx. 232Th, 233U, 235U and 238U inelastic-scattering values, poor agreement is observed for 240Pu, and a serious discrepancy exists in the case of 239Pu

  12. The calculation of prompt fission neutron spectrum for 233U(n,f) reaction by the semi-empirical method

    Chen, Yong-Jing; Min, Jia; Liu, Ting-Jin; Shu, Neng-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    The prompt fission neutron spectra for neutron-induced fission of 233U for low energy neutrons (below 6 MeV) are calculated using the nuclear evaporation theory with a semi-empirical method, in which the partition of the total excitation energy between the fission fragments for the nth+233U fission reactions are determined with the available experimental and evaluation data. The calculated prompt fission neutron spectra agree well with the experimental data. The proportions of high- energy ou...

  13. Simultaneous measurement of the neutron capture and fission yields of {sup 233}U

    Berthoumieux, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.A.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.A.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    We have measured the neutron capture and fission cross section of {sup 233}U at the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV with high accuracy by using a high performance 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) as a detection device. The method, based on the shape analysis of the TAC energy response, allowing to disentangle between {gamma}'s originating from fission and capture will be presented as well as the first very preliminary results. (authors)

  14. Simultaneous measurement of the neutron capture and fission yields of 233U

    We have measured the neutron capture and fission cross section of 233U at the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV with high accuracy by using a high performance 4π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) as a detection device. The method, based on the shape analysis of the TAC energy response, allowing to disentangle between γ's originating from fission and capture will be presented as well as the first very preliminary results. (authors)

  15. Fabrication of zero power reactor fuel elements containing 233U3O8 powder

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, under contract with Argonne National Laboratory, completed the fabrication of 1743 fuel elements for use in their Zero Power Reactor. The contract also included recovery of 20 kg of 233U from rejected elements. This report describes the steps associated with conversion of purified uranyl nitrate (as solution) to U3O8 powder (suitable for fuel) and subsequent charging, sealing, decontamination, and testing of the fuel elements (packets) preparatory to shipment. The nuclear safety, radiation exposures, and quality assurance aspects of the program are discussed

  16. Shutdown margin for high conversion BWRs operating in Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle

    Shaposhnik, Y., E-mail: shaposhy@bgu.ac.il [NRCN – Nuclear Research Center Negev, POB 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shwageraus, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Elias, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City 32000, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. • Shutdown Margin in Th-RBWR design. • Fully coupled MC with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. • Thermal–hydraulic analysis includes MCPR observation. - Abstract: Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied core has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone “sandwiched” between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Implementation of alternative reactivity control materials, reducing axial leakage through non-uniform enrichment distribution, use of burnable poisons, reducing number of pins as well as increasing pin diameter are also shown to be incapable of meeting the SDM requirements. Instead, an alternative assembly design, based on Rod Cluster Control Assembly with absorber rods was investigated. This design matches the reference ABWR core power and has adequate shutdown margin. The new concept was modeled as a single three-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

  17. Assessment of the available 233U cross-section evaluations in the calculation of critical benchmark experiments

    In this report we investigate the adequacy of the available 233U cross-section data for calculation of experimental critical systems. The 233U evaluations provided in two evaluated nuclear data libraries, the U.S. Data Bank [ENDF/B (Evaluated Nuclear Data Files)] and the Japanese Data Bank [JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library)] are examined. Calculations were performed for six thermal and ten fast experimental critical systems using the Sn transport XSDRNPM code. To verify the performance of the 233U cross-section data for nuclear criticality safety application in which the neutron energy spectrum is predominantly in the epithermal energy range, calculations of four numerical benchmark systems with energy spectra in the intermediate energy range were done. These calculations serve only as an indication of the difference in calculated results that may be expected when the two 233U cross-section evaluations are used for problems with neutron spectra in the intermediate energy range. Additionally, comparisons of experimental and calculated central fission rate ratios were also made. The study has suggested that an ad hoc 233U evaluation based on the JENDL library provides better overall results for both fast and thermal experimental critical systems

  18. Assessment of the Available (Sup 233)U Cross Sections Evaluations in the Calculation of Critical Benchmark Experiments

    Leal, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    In this report we investigate the adequacy of the available {sup 233}U cross-section data for calculation of experimental critical systems. The {sup 233}U evaluations provided in two evaluated nuclear data libraries, the U. S. Data Bank [ENDF/B (Evaluated Nuclear Data Files)] and the Japanese Data Bank [JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library)] are examined. Calculations were performed for six thermal and ten fast experimental critical systems using the Sn transport XSDRNPM code. To verify the performance of the {sup 233}U cross-section data for nuclear criticality safety application in which the neutron energy spectrum is predominantly in the epithermal energy range, calculations of four numerical benchmark systems with energy spectra in the intermediate energy range were done. These calculations serve only as an indication of the difference in calculated results that may be expected when the two {sup 233}U cross-section evaluations are used for problems with neutron spectra in the intermediate energy range. Additionally, comparisons of experimental and calculated central fission rate ratios were also made. The study has suggested that an ad hoc {sup 233}U evaluation based on the JENDL library provides better overall results for both fast and thermal experimental critical systems.

  19. 233U mass yield measurements around and within the symmetry region with the ILL Lohengrin spectrometer

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Sage, C.; Bernard, D.; Blanc, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Litaize, O.; Mutti, P.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at the Lohengrin spectrometer of the ILL, with a special focus on the masses constituting the heavy peak. We will present in this paper our measurement of the very low fission yields in the symmetry mass region and the heavy mass wing of the distribution for 233U thermal neutron induced fission. The difficulty due to the strong contamination by other masses with much higher yields will be addressed in the form of a new analysis method featuring the required contaminant correction. The apparition of structures in the kinetic energy distributions and possible interpretations will be discussed, such as a possible evidence of fission modes.

  20. Shutdown Margin for High Conversion BWRs Operating in Th-233U Fuel Cycle

    Shaposhnik, Yaniv; Elias, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-233U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone sandwiched between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Instead, an alternative assembly design, also relying on heterogeneous fuel zoning, is proposed for achieving fissile inventory ratio (FIR) above unity, adequate SDM and meeting minimum CPR limit at thermal core output matching the ABWR power. The new concept was modeled as a single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupl...

  1. 233U mass yield measurements around and within the symmetry region with the ILL Lohengrin spectrometer

    Chebboubi A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of fission yields has a major impact on the characterization and understanding of the fission process and is mandatory for reactor applications. The LPSC in collaboration with ILL and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at the Lohengrin spectrometer of the ILL, with a special focus on the masses constituting the heavy peak. We will present in this paper our measurement of the very low fission yields in the symmetry mass region and the heavy mass wing of the distribution for 233U thermal neutron induced fission. The difficulty due to the strong contamination by other masses with much higher yields will be addressed in the form of a new analysis method featuring the required contaminant correction. The apparition of structures in the kinetic energy distributions and possible interpretations will be discussed, such as a possible evidence of fission modes.

  2. Batch extraction studies for the recovery of 233U from thoria irradiated in PHWR

    Batch equilibrium studies were carried out to optimise the extraction parameters for the recovery of 233U from thoria irradiated in PHWR. The thorium concentration and the acidity of the feed was adjusted to ca. 100 g/l and 4 M nitric acid respectively. The concentration of uranium was in the range of 1.4 g/L and it contained long lived fission product like 144Ce-144Pr, 134Cs, 137Cs, 106Ru-106Rh, 105Eu, 154Eu, 90Sr-90Y and 125Sb. 3% TBP in dodecane was used as the solvent. Four stages of batch extraction was followed by a single scrub stage of 4 M nitric acid. The scrubbed organic was stripped with 0.01 M HNO3 thrice. The stripped product was concentrated by evaporation and passed through a cation exchanger to remove the residual thorium. The results of the studies are discussed in detail. (author)

  3. 233U fuel production and 30-year utilization without reprocessing and refuelling using heavy water coolant

    This study examines the physics of a thorium fuel cycle based on generating the initial fissile (233U) fuel inventory in a Deuterium-Tritium fusion device and on operating a 600 MWth fission reactor. For both phases of the fuel cycle, the fuel form is an aqueous slurry consisting of thorium oxide micro-particles dispersed into heavy water. The slurry is the fuel carrier and the coolant. After 180 full power days in the fusion driven device, the fuel enrichment is 1.4%. The enrichments is defined as the ratio between the fissile actinides mass and the total actinides mass. After the removal of fission products, the 1.4% enriched slurry thorium-uranium fuel can be used for longer than 30 full power years in a 600 MWth critical reactor core, without adding any fissile material. The critical reactor has three zones: inner fissile, central fertile, and outer reflector. (author)

  4. Health physics experience during recovery of 233U from irradiated thorium rods

    Recovery of 233U from the irradiated thorium rods (46 numbers) received from Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) was carried out successfully at Reprocessing Development Laboratory (RDL), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR). The reprocessing was done in five stages viz., charging of fuel rods into charging flask, decladding, dissolution, solvent extraction and reconversion. The complete operation, being first of its kind, undertaken at the centre needed extensive health physics surveillance and supervision at each stage of the operation. The operational radiation protection methods followed and the experience gained during this initial campaign in area and personnel monitoring, air monitoring and contamination are discussed. The results of routine stack monitoring and analysis of waste generated in the process are given. Special operations like decommissioning of the glove box are highlighted. A brief description of unusual occurrences is also given. (author)

  5. Aerosols generated by 239PU and 233U droplets burning in air

    The inhalation hazards of radioactive aerosols produced by the explosive disruption and subsequent combustion of metallic plutonium in air are not adequately understood. Results of a study to determine whether uranium can be substituted for plutonium in such a situation in which experiments were performed under identical conditions with laser-ignited, single, freely falling droplets of 239Pu and 233U are reported. The total amounts of aerosol produced were studied quantitatively as a function of time during the combustion. Also, particle size distributions of selected aerosols were studied with aerodynamic particle separation techniques. Results showed that the ultimate quantity of aerosols, their final particle size distributions, and depositions as a function of time are not identical mainly because of the different vapor pressures of the metals, and the unlike degrees of violence of the explosions of the droplets

  6. Investigation of the fission yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of 233U

    As a stars, a survey of the different methods of investigations of the fission product yields and the experimental data status have been studied, showing advantages and shortcomings for the different approaches. An overview of the existing models for the fission product distributions has been as well intended. The main part of this thesis was the measurement of the independent yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of233U, never investigated before this work. The experiment has been carried out using the mass separator OSIRIS (Isotope Separator On-Line). Its integrated ion-source and its specific properties required an analysis of the delay-parameter and ionisation efficiency for each chemical species. On the other hand, this technique allows measurement of independent yields and cumulative yields for elements from Cu to Ba, covering most of the fission yield distribution. Thus, we measured about 180 independent yields from Zn (Z=30) to Sr (Z=38) in the mass range A=74-99 and from Pd (Z=46) to Ba (Z=56) in the mass range A=113-147, including many isomeric states. An additional experiment using direct γ-spectroscopy of aggregates of fission products was used to determine more than 50 cumulative yields of element with half-life from 15 min to a several days. All experimental data have been compared to estimates from a semi-empirical model, to calculated values and to evaluated values from the European library JEF 2.2. Furthermore, a study of both thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of 233U measured at Studsvik, the comparison of the OSIRIS and LOHENGRIN facilities and the trends in new data for the Reactors Physics have been discussed. (author)

  7. Breeding of 233U in the thorium–uranium fuel cycle in VVER reactors using heavy water

    A method is proposed for achieving optimal neutron kinetics and efficient isotope transmutation in the 233U–232Th oxide fuel of water-moderated reactors with variable water composition (D2O, H2O) that ensures breeding of the 233U and 235U isotopes. The method is comparatively simple to implement

  8. Breeding of {sup 233}U in the thorium–uranium fuel cycle in VVER reactors using heavy water

    Marshalkin, V. E., E-mail: marshalkin@vniief.ru; Povyshev, V. M. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A method is proposed for achieving optimal neutron kinetics and efficient isotope transmutation in the {sup 233}U–{sup 232}Th oxide fuel of water-moderated reactors with variable water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) that ensures breeding of the {sup 233}U and {sup 235}U isotopes. The method is comparatively simple to implement.

  9. Health physics surveillance during recovery of 233U from irradiated thorium rods at reprocessing development lab, IGCAR

    Second campaign for the recovery of 233U from the irradiated rods from CIRUS and DHRUVA reactors at BARC, was carried out successfully at Reprocessing Development Laboratory (RDL) at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR). Health physics surveillance was provided all through the operation. The operational radiation protection methods followed and the experience gained during the campaign are discussed in this paper. (author)

  10. Application of the SCALE TSUNAMI Tools for the Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations Involving 233U

    Mueller, Don [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    The Radiochemical Development Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been storing solid materials containing 233U for decades. Preparations are under way to process these materials into a form that is inherently safe from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. This will be accomplished by down-blending the {sup 233}U materials with depleted or natural uranium. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, a study has been performed using the SCALE sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools to demonstrate how these tools could be used to validate nuclear criticality safety calculations of selected process and storage configurations. ISOTEK nuclear criticality safety staff provided four models that are representative of the criticality safety calculations for which validation will be needed. The SCALE TSUNAMI-1D and TSUNAMI-3D sequences were used to generate energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles for each nuclide and reaction present in the four safety analysis models, also referred to as the applications, and in a large set of critical experiments. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was used together with the sensitivity profiles and the cross-section uncertainty data contained in the SCALE covariance data files to propagate the cross-section uncertainties ({Delta}{sigma}/{sigma}) to k{sub eff} uncertainties ({Delta}k/k) for each application model. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was also used to evaluate the similarity of each of the 672 critical experiments with each application. Results of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment are presented in this report. A total of 142 experiments were judged to be similar to application 1, and 68 experiments were judged to be similar to application 2. None of the 672 experiments were judged to be adequately similar to applications 3 and 4. Discussion of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment is provided for each of the four applications. Example upper subcritical limits (USLs) were

  11. Numbers of prompt neutrons per fission for U233, U235, Pu239, and Cf252

    An absolute measurement of #-v#, the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per fission, is being made for the spontaneous fission of Cf262. The relative values of #-v# are being measured for neutron-induced fission of U233, U235, and Pu239, and are being compared with the spontaneous fission #-v# of Cf252. Neutrons with energies between thermal and 15 MeV are used. Particular emphasis is put on studying the dependence of #-v# on the incident neutron energy. A fission counter containing the appropriate isotope is placed in the centre of a large cadmium-loade d liquid scintillator. Through the fissionable isotope is passed a collimated beam of neutrons. Fission events, identified by pulses from the fission counter, open an electronic gate between the large liquid scintillator and a scaler. Scintillator pulses due to capture in the scintillating solution of thermalized fission neutrons are counted during the gate. The fission neutrons are detected almost independently of energy and with very high efficiency. With this technique values of #-v# to an accuracy of 1 % are expected. (author)

  12. Measurement of neutron capture and fission cross sections of 233U in the resonance region

    Tsekhanovich I.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of studies concerning new fuel cycles and nuclear wastes incineration experimental data of the α ratio between capture and fission cross sections of 233U reactions play an important role in the Th/U cycle. The safety evaluation and the detailed performance assessment for the generation IV nuclear-energy system based on 232Th cycle strongly depend on this ratio. Since the current data are scarce and sometimes contradictory, new experimental studies are required. The measurement will take place at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA at Geel, designed to perform neutron cross section measurements with high incident neutron-energy resolution. A dedicated high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC as fission fragment detector and six C6D6 liquid scintilators sensitive to γ-rays and neutrons will be used. The method, based on the IC energy response study, allowing to distinguish between gammas originating from fission and capture, in the resonance region, will be presented.

  13. Measurements of neutron induced capture and fission reactions on $^{233}$ U (EAR1)

    The $^{233}$U plays the essential role of ssile nucleus in the Th-U fuel cycle, which has been proposed as a safer and cleaner alternative to the U-Pu fuel cycle. Considered the scarce data available to assess the capture cross section, a measurement was proposed and successfully performed at the n_TOF facility at CERN using the 4$\\pi$ Total Absorp- tion Calorimeter (TAC). The measurement was extremely dicult due to the need to accurately distinguish between capture and fission $\\gamma$-rays without any additional discrim-ination tool and the measured capture cross section showed a signicant disagreement in magnitude when compared with the ENDF/B-VII.1 library despite the agreement in shape. We propose a new measurement that is aimed at providing a higher level of dis-crimination between competing nuclear reactions, to extend the neutron energy range and to obtain more precise and accurate data, thus fullling the demands of the "NEA High Priority Nuclear Data Request List". The setup is envisaged as a combin...

  14. Thermoionic emission characteristics of uranium with application to its determination by MSID technique using 233U tracer

    Experimental details of the uranium determination in geological samples (50-1500 ppm range) by mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique (MSID) employing 233U tracer are presented. For this purpose the thermoionic emission characteristics of uranium in various filament arrangements like simple plane, filament boat, double, are studied and the most efficient one selected for the isotope dilution analysis. The various experimental procedures involved in the MSID like sample dissolution, chemical separation and mass spectrometric analysis are developed and optimised. The experimental results on the uranium determination by MSID with 233U tracer yielded precision and accuracy of 0,5% and 1% respectively. The importance of the sampling in the precise and accuracy determination of uranium in geological samples, where it is heterogeneously distributed, is discussed. (author)

  15. Qualification and initial characterization of a high-purity 233U spike for use in uranium analyses

    Several high-purity 233U items potentially useful as isotope dilution mass spectrometry standards for safeguards, non-proliferation, and nuclear forensics measurements are identified and rescued from downblending. By preserving the supply of 233U materials of different pedigree for use as source materials for certified reference materials (CRMs), it is ensured that the safeguards community has high quality uranium isotopic standards required for calibration of the analytical instruments. One of the items identified as a source material for a high-purity CRM is characterized for the uranium isotope-amount ratios using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Additional verification measurements on this material using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) are also performed. As a result, the comparison of the ICPMS uranium isotope-amount ratios with the TIMS data, with much smaller uncertainties, validated the ICPMS measurement practices. ICPMS is proposed for the initial screening of the purity of items in the rescue campaign

  16. Amster: a molten-salt reactor concept generating its own 233U and incinerating transuranium elements

    In the coming century, sustainable development of atomic energy will require the development of new types of reactors able to exceed the limits of the existing reactor types, be it in terms of optimum use of natural fuel resources, reduction in the production of long-lived radioactive waste, or economic competitiveness. Of the various candidates with the potential to meet these needs, molten-salt reactors are particularly attractive, in the light of the benefits they offer, arising from two fundamental features: - A liquid fuel does away with the constraints inherent in solid fuel, leading to a drastic simplification of the fuel cycle, in particular making in possible to carry out on-line pyrochemical reprocessing; - Thorium cycle and thermal spectrum breeding. The MSBR concept proposed by ORNL in the 1970's thus gave a breeding factor of 1.06, with a doubling time of about 25 years. However, given the tight neutron balance of the thorium cycle (the η of 233U is about 2.3), MSBR performance is only possible if there are strict constraints set on the in-line reprocessing unit: all the 233Pa must be removed from the core so that it can decay on the 233U in no more than about ten days (or at least 15 tonnes of salt to be extracted from the core daily), and the absorbing fission products, in particular the rare earths, must be extracted in about fifty days. With the AMSTER MSR concept, which we initially developed for incinerating transuranium elements, we looked to reduce the mass of salt to be reprocessed in order to minimise the size and complexity of the reprocessing unit coupled to the reactor, and the quantity of transuranium elements sent for disposal, as this is directly proportional to the mass of salt reprocessed for extraction of the fission products. Given that breeding was not an absolute necessity, because the reactor can be started by incinerating the transuranium elements from the spent fuel assemblies of current reactors, or if necessary by loading

  17. Cross sections and neutron yields for U233, U235 and Pu239 at 2200 m/sec

    The experimental information on the 2200 m/sec values for σabs, σf, α, ν and η for 233U , 235U and 23 been collected and discussed. The values will later be used in an evaluation of a 'best' set of data. In appendix the isotopic abundances of the uranium isotopes are discussed and also the alpha activities of the uranium isotopes and Pu-239

  18. Study of (n,p) and (n,α) cross-sections for 232Th, 231Pa, 233U isotopes

    The study of neutron induced reaction cross-sections in the charged particle emission in this energy region will help us to understand the energy dependence of activation cross-sections in detail, thereby providing a complete database that will lead to better understanding of mechanisms of the nuclear reactions. The present study describes nuclear model calculations of (n,p) and (n,α) reaction cross-sections for 232Th, 231Pa and 233U isotopes

  19. Neutronic optimization in high conversion Th-233U fuel assembly with simulated annealing

    This paper reports on fuel design optimization of a PWR operating in a self sustainable Th-233U fuel cycle. Monte Carlo simulated annealing method was used in order to identify the fuel assembly configuration with the most attractive breeding performance. In previous studies, it was shown that breeding may be achieved by employing heterogeneous Seed-Blanket fuel geometry. The arrangement of seed and blanket pins within the assemblies may be determined by varying the designed parameters based on basic reactor physics phenomena which affect breeding. However, the amount of free parameters may still prove to be prohibitively large in order to systematically explore the design space for optimal solution. Therefore, the Monte Carlo annealing algorithm for neutronic optimization is applied in order to identify the most favorable design. The objective of simulated annealing optimization is to find a set of design parameters, which maximizes some given performance function (such as relative period of net breeding) under specified constraints (such as fuel cycle length). The first objective of the study was to demonstrate that the simulated annealing optimization algorithm will lead to the same fuel pins arrangement as was obtained in the previous studies which used only basic physics phenomena as guidance for optimization. In the second part of this work, the simulated annealing method was used to optimize fuel pins arrangement in much larger fuel assembly, where the basic physics intuition does not yield clearly optimal configuration. The simulated annealing method was found to be very efficient in selecting the optimal design in both cases. In the future, this method will be used for optimization of fuel assembly design with larger number of free parameters in order to determine the most favorable trade-off between the breeding performance and core average power density. (authors)

  20. Investigation of tritium and 233U breeding in a fission-fusion hybrid reactor fuelling with ThO2

    In the world, thorium reserves are three times more than natural Uranium reserves. It is planned in the near future that nuclear reactors will use thorium as a fuel. Thorium is not a fissile isotope because it doesn't make fission with thermal neutrons so it could be converted to 233U isotope which has very high quality fission cross-section with thermal neutrons. 233U isotope can be used in present LWRs as an enrichment fuel. In the fusion reactors, tritium is the most important fossil fuel. Because tritium is not natural isotope, it has to be produced in the reactor. The purpose of this work is to investigate the tritium and 233U breeding in a fission-fusion hybrid reactor fuelling with ThO2 for Δt=10 days during a reactor operation period in five years. The neutronic analysis is performed on an experimental hybrid blanket geometry. In the center of the hybrid blanket, there is a line neutron source in a cylindrical cavity, which simulates the fusion plasma chamber where high energy neutrons (14.1 MeV) are produced. The conventional fusion reaction delivers the external neutron source for blankets following, 2D + 3T →? 4He (3.5 MeV) + n (14.1 MeV). (1) The fuel zone made up of natural-ThO2 fuel and it is cooled with different coolants. In this work, five different moderator materials, which are Li2BeF4, LiF-NaF-BeF2, Li20Sn80, natural Lithium and Li17Pb83, are used as coolants. The radial reflector, called tritium breeding zones, is made of different Lithium compounds and graphite in sandwich structure. In the work, eight different Lithium compounds were used as tritium breeders in the tritium breeding zones, which are Li3N, Li2O, Li2O2, Li2TiO3, Li4SiO3, Li2ZrO3, LiBr and LiH. Neutron transport calculations are conducted in spherical geometry with the help of SCALE4.4A SYSTEM by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with code CSAS and XSDRNPM, under consideration of unresolved and resolved resonances, in S8-P3 approximation with Gaussian quadratures using

  1. Fractional independent yields of 141La and 142La from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 233U

    The fractional independent yields of 141La and 142La from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 233U were found to be 0.026 +- 0.006 and 0.068 +- 0.010, respectively. These yields are consistent with charge distributions for which σ = 0.56 +- 0.02 and 0.52 +- 0.02, respectively. These results are in good agreement with similar yields measured for fission of 235U, but not with those from fission of 249Cf. (author)

  2. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA for {sup 233}U, {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Santos, G. Dos; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors have made use of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure the fission cross section of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range of 0.36 eV to {approximately} 700 keV. This paper reports integral data and average cross sections. In addition they measured the total neutron cross section of {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine, as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  3. Investigation of the fission yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U; Mesure de la distribution en masse et en charge des produits de la fission rapide de l'{sup 233}U

    Galy, J

    1999-09-01

    As a stars, a survey of the different methods of investigations of the fission product yields and the experimental data status have been studied, showing advantages and shortcomings for the different approaches. An overview of the existing models for the fission product distributions has been as well intended. The main part of this thesis was the measurement of the independent yields of the fast neutron-induced fission of{sup 233}U, never investigated before this work. The experiment has been carried out using the mass separator OSIRIS (Isotope Separator On-Line). Its integrated ion-source and its specific properties required an analysis of the delay-parameter and ionisation efficiency for each chemical species. On the other hand, this technique allows measurement of independent yields and cumulative yields for elements from Cu to Ba, covering most of the fission yield distribution. Thus, we measured about 180 independent yields from Zn (Z=30) to Sr (Z=38) in the mass range A=74-99 and from Pd (Z=46) to Ba (Z=56) in the mass range A=113-147, including many isomeric states. An additional experiment using direct {gamma}-spectroscopy of aggregates of fission products was used to determine more than 50 cumulative yields of element with half-life from 15 min to a several days. All experimental data have been compared to estimates from a semi-empirical model, to calculated values and to evaluated values from the European library JEF 2.2. Furthermore, a study of both thermal and fast neutron-induced fission of {sup 233}U measured at Studsvik, the comparison of the OSIRIS and LOHENGRIN facilities and the trends in new data for the Reactors Physics have been discussed. (author)

  4. Multiplicity and energy of neutrons from {sup 233}U(n{sub th},f) fission fragments

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Kimura, Itsuro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The correlation between fission fragments and prompt neutrons from the reaction {sup 233}U(n{sub th},f) was measured with improved accuracy. The results determined the neutron multiplicity and emission energy as a function of fragment mass and total kinetic energy. The average energy as a function of fragment mass followed a nearly symmetric distribution centered about the equal mass-split and formed a remarkable contrast with the saw-tooth distribution of the average neutron multiplicity. The neutron multiplicity from the specified fragment decreases linearly with total kinetic energy, and the slope of multiplicity with kinetic energy had the minimum value at about 130 u. The level density parameter versus mass determined from the neutron data showed a saw-tooth structure with the pronounced minimum at about 128 and generally followed the formula by Gilbert and Cameron, suggesting that the neutron emission process was very much affected by the shell-effect of the fission fragment. (author)

  5. Fission cross-section measurements on 233U and minor actinides at the CERN n-TOF facility

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of minor actinides have been measured at the white neutron source n-TOF at CERN, Geneva. The studied isotopes include 233U, interesting for Th/U based nuclear fuel cycles, 241,243Am and 245Cm, relevant for transmutation and waste reduction studies in new generation fast reactors (Gen-IV) or Accelerator Driven Systems. The measurements take advantage of the unique features of the n-TOF facility, namely the wide energy range, the high instantaneous neutron flux and the low background. Results for the involved isotopes are reported from ∼30 meV to around 1 MeV neutron energy. The measurements have been performed with a dedicated Fission Ionization Chamber (FIC), relative to the standard cross-section of the 235U fission reaction, measured simultaneously with the same detector. Results are here reported. (authors)

  6. Cost-based optimizations of power density and target-blanket modularity for {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U-based ADEP

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    A cost-based parametric systems model is developed for an Accelerator-Driven Energy Production (ADEP) system based on a {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycle and a molten-salt (LiF/BeF{sub 2}/ThF{sub 3}) fluid-fuel primary system. Simplified neutron-balance, accelerator, reactor-core, chemical-processing, and balance-of-plant models are combined parametrically with a simplified costing model. The main focus of this model is to examine trade offs related to fission power density, reactor-core modularity, {sup 233}U breeding rate, and fission product transmutation capacity.

  7. Basic characterization of 233U: Determination of age and 232U content using sector field ICP-MS, gamma spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    The possibility to determine the age, i.e. the time since the last chemical separation, of 233U was studied using two fundamentally different measurement techniques: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and gamma spectrometry. Moreover, the isotope ratio 232U/233U was measured using both alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry. For the two materials analysed, all measurement results were in agreement, i.e. consistent within the combined uncertainties. One of the materials was also measured using gamma spectrometry under field conditions. This measurement was also in agreement with the other results on this material

  8. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the 233U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium–uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D2O, H2O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the 233U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement

  9. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the 233U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    Marshalkin, V. E.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium-uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D2O, H2O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the 233U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  10. Measurement of the $^{233}$U neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Carrapiço, Carlos; Berthoumieux, Eric; Gonçalves, Isabel; Gunsing, Frank

    2012-12-12

    The Thorium-Uranium (Th-U) fuel cycle has been envisaged as an alternative to the Uranium-Plutonium (U-Pu) fuel cycle for electricity generation using nuclear power reactors. Indeed, thorium can be used as a nuclear fuel, and several studies and R&D programs seem to provide evidence on the sustainability of the Th-U fuel cycle, due to (i) the natural abundance of Thorium, (ii) the improved proliferation resistance offered by the Th-U fuel cycle relative to the U-Pu fuel cycle, (iii) the better neutronics performance of the Th-U fuel cycle throughout the whole neutron energy range compared to the U-Pu fuel cycle, (iv) the lower radiotoxicity of the generated spent fuel in reactors with Th-U fuel cycle and, consequently (v) better economics and public acceptance of the reactors operated using the Th-U fuel cycle compared to those using the U-Pu fuel cycle (prior to the Generation IV nuclear reactors). In a nuclear reactor operated using the Th-U fuel cycle, $^{233}$U is a key nuclide governing the neutr...

  11. Dissolution of unirradiated UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} doped with {sup 233}U under reducing conditions

    Ollila, K. [VTT Processes (Finland); Oversby, V.M. [VMO Konsult (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine an upper limit to the dissolution rate of UO{sub 2} under reducing conditions appropriate to those in a geologic repository for spent fuel disposal in Finland and Sweden. Test duration ranged from 52 to 140 days. The total amount of U recovered in each test was converted into a dissolution rate per year for the sample. The dissolution rate was then used to calculate an expected lifetime for the samples under the test conditions. The dissolution rate did not depend on the length of the testing period. Rather, the dissolution rate appeared to decrease as the samples were exposed to sequential testing periods. This indicates that the results are still influenced by transient effects such as high-energy surface sites, which implies that the dissolution rates measured are upper limits. The sample lifetimes calculated from the last two testing periods, which had a total of 269 days, ranged from 7 to 10 million years. There was no indication of an effect of alpha radiolysis on the dissolution rate results for samples with doping levels of 0, 5, and 10% {sup 233}U.

  12. Evaluation of the thermal-neutron constants for 233U, 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu

    A consistent set of best values of the 2200 meter/second neutron cross sections, Westcott g-factors, and fission neutron yields for 233U, 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu are presented. A least squares fitting program, LSF, is used to obtain the best fit and to estimate the sensitivity of these fissile parameters to the quoted uncertainties in experimental data. The half-lives of the uranium and plutonium nuclides have been evaluated and these have been used to reassess the significant experimental data. The latest revision of the spontaneous fission neutron yield anti nu, of 252Cf and the foil thickness corrections to the fission neutron yield ratios of fissile nuclei to 252Cf are included. These lead to greater consistency in the data used for anti nu (252Cf). Similarly, the 234U half-life as revised leads to improved consistency in the 235U fission cross section. Comparison is made with the values from ENDF/B-V and other evaluations

  13. Neutron-induced fission cross-section of {sup 233}U in the energy range 0.5

    Belloni, F.; Milazzo, P.M.; Abbondanno, U.; Fujii, K.; Moreau, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Calviani, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Legnaro (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Colonna, N.; Marrone, S.; Meaze, M.H.; Tagliente, G.; Terlizzi, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Bari (Italy); Mastinu, P.; Gramegna, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Legnaro (Italy); Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A. [CEA, Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alvarez, H.; Cano-Ott, D.; Duran, I.; Embid-Segura, M.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Paradela, C. [Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Guerrero, C.; Martinez, T.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Technologicas, Madrid (Spain); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J. [Univ. of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Dillmann, I.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Mosconi, M.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wisshak, K. [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology, Campus Nord, Karlsruhe (Germany); Badurek, G.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Pigni, M.T. [Technische Univ. Wien, Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Univ., Wien (Austria); Baumann, P.; David, S.; Kerveno, M.; Lukic, S.; Rudolf, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IReS, Strasbourg (France); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M. [Charles Univ., Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Capote, R. [NAPC/Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Univ. de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Tavora, L.; Vaz, P. [Inst. Tecnologico e Nuclear, Lisbon (Portugal)] [and others

    2011-01-15

    The neutron-induced fission cross-section of {sup 233}U has been measured at the CERN n-TOF facility relative to the standard fission cross-section of {sup 235}U between 0.5 and 20MeV. The experiment was performed with a fast ionization chamber for the detection of the fission fragments and to discriminate against {alpha} -particles from the natural radioactivity of the samples. The high instantaneous flux and the low background of the n-TOF facility result in data with uncertainties of {approx} 3%, which were found in good agreement with previous experiments. The high quality of the present results allows to improve the evaluation of the {sup 233}U (n,f) cross-section and, consequently, the design of energy systems based on the Th/U cycle. (orig.)

  14. Coulomb effects in isobaric cold fission from reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 252Cf(sf)

    Montoya, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    The Coulomb effect hypothesis, formerly used to interpret fluctuations in the curve of maximal total kinetic energy as a function of light fragment mass in reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f) and 239Pu(nth,f), is confirmed in high kinetic energy as well as in low excitation energy windows, respectively. Data from reactions 233U(nth,f), 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f) and 252Cf(sf) show that, between two isobaric fragmentations with similar Q-values, the more asymmetric charge split reaches the higher value of total kinetic energy. Moreover, in isobaric charge splits with different Q-values, similar preference for asymmetrical fragmentations is observed in low excitation energy windows.

  15. Neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233U in the energy range 0.5n< 20 MeV

    The neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233U has been measured at the CERN n-TOF facility relative to the standard fission cross-section of 235U between 0.5 and 20MeV. The experiment was performed with a fast ionization chamber for the detection of the fission fragments and to discriminate against α -particles from the natural radioactivity of the samples. The high instantaneous flux and the low background of the n-TOF facility result in data with uncertainties of ∼ 3%, which were found in good agreement with previous experiments. The high quality of the present results allows to improve the evaluation of the 233U (n,f) cross-section and, consequently, the design of energy systems based on the Th/U cycle. (orig.)

  16. Development of a method for recovery of 233U from thorium oxalate cake in reconversion step of reprocessing of irradiated thorium rods

    A method is developed for the selective leaching of 233U from a thorium oxalate cake. The leaching capacity of ammonium carbonate and nitric acid have been investigated, showing that (NH4)2CO3 leads to higher recovery. The maximum leaching efficiency is obtained using 0.5% ammonium carbonate, with a minimal thorium pick-up. A uranium recovery of 94% is obtained after three consecutive contact experiments in carbonate media, with minimal thorium uptake in the leachate. This process was applied to an actual plant stream, allowing the reduction of the 233U α-activity from 5.64 to 0.3 μCi/g of thorium oxalate cake. (author)

  17. Investigation of the prompt neutron emission mechanism in low energy fission of 235,233U(nth, f) and 252Cf(sf)

    Val’ski G.V.; Gagarski A.M.; Shcherbakov O.A.; Vorobyev A.S.; Petrov G.A.

    2010-01-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to measure prompt neutron angular and energy distributions from thermal neutron-induced fission of 235,233U in correlation with the fission fragments. These distributions have been analyzed with the assumption of neutron isotropic emission from accelerated fission fragments. The performed analysis demonstrates that all obtained results can be described within 5% accuracy using this assumption. This discrepancy is approximately constant and doesn’t de...

  18. Utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium with breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope in the VVER reactors using thorium and heavy water

    Marshalkin, V. E., E-mail: marshalkin@vniief.ru; Povyshev, V. M. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A method for joint utilization of non-weapons-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium in the thorium–uranium—plutonium oxide fuel of a water-moderated reactor with a varying water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) is proposed. The method is characterized by efficient breeding of the {sup 233}U isotope and safe reactor operation and is comparatively simple to implement.

  19. Monte Carlo analysis of direct measurements of the fission neutron yield per absorption by 233U and 235U of monochromatic neutrons

    Monte Carlo analysis of the measurements of Smith et al. of the number of fission neutrons produced per neutron absorbed, eta, for 2200 m/sec neutrons absorbed by 233U and 235U yields: eta2200233 = 2.2993 +- 0.0082 and eta2200235 = 2.0777 +- 0.0064. The standard deviations include Monte Carlo, cross section, and experimental uncertainties. The Monte Carlo analysis was confirmed by calculating measured quantities used by the experimentalists in determining eta2200

  20. Delayed Fission Gamma-ray Characteristics of Th-232 U-233 U-235 U-238 and Pu-239

    Lane, Taylor [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Delayed fission gamma-rays play an important role in determining the time dependent ioniz- ing dose for experiments in the central irradiation cavity of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Delayed gamma-rays are produced from both fission product decay and from acti- vation of materials in the core, such as cladding and support structures. Knowing both the delayed gamma-ray emission rate and the time-dependent gamma-ray energy spectrum is nec- essary in order to properly determine the dose contributions from delayed fission gamma-rays. This information is especially important when attempting to deconvolute the time-dependent neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray contribution to the response of a diamond photo-conducting diode (PCD) or fission chamber in time frames of milliseconds to seconds following a reactor pulse. This work focused on investigating delayed gamma-ray character- istics produced from fission products from thermal, fast, and high energy fission of Th-232, U-233, U-235, U-238, and Pu-239. This work uses a modified version of CINDER2008, a transmutation code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, to model time and energy dependent photon characteristics due to fission. This modified code adds the capability to track photon-induced transmutations, photo-fission, and the subsequent radiation caused by fission products due to photo-fission. The data is compared against previous work done with SNL- modified CINDER2008 [ 1 ] and experimental data [ 2 , 3 ] and other published literature, includ- ing ENDF/B-VII.1 [ 4 ]. The ability to produce a high-fidelity (7,428 group) energy-dependent photon fluence at various times post-fission can improve the delayed photon characterization for radiation effects tests at research reactors, as well as other applications.

  1. Measurement of neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U and {sup 245}Cm with the FIC detector at the CERN n-TOF facility

    Calviani, M.; Karadimos, D.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    A series of measurements of neutron induced fission cross section of various transuranic isotopes have been performed at the CERN n-TOF spallation neutron facility, in the energy range from thermal to nearly 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists in a fast ionization chamber (FIC), used as a fission fragment detector with a high efficiency. Good discrimination between alphas and fission fragments can be obtained with a simple amplitude threshold. In order to allow the monitoring of the neutron beam and to extract the n-TOF neutron flux, the well known cross section of the {sup 235}U(n,f) reaction, considered as a fission standard, has been used. Preliminary results for the cross section are shown for some selected isotopes such as {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U and {sup 245}Cm in the energy range from 0.050 eV to about 2 MeV. These results for {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U and {sup 245}Cm show results consistent with databases in the resonance region, with no normalization required for {sup 233}U. In the case of {sup 245}Cm, for the energy range between thermal and 20 eV, we obtained the first experimental data ever published, while showing a good agreement with previous data in the region above that value.

  2. Measurement of neutron induced fission of 235U, 233U and 245Cm with the FIC detector at the CERN n-TOF facility

    A series of measurements of neutron induced fission cross section of various transuranic isotopes have been performed at the CERN n-TOF spallation neutron facility, in the energy range from thermal to nearly 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists in a fast ionization chamber (FIC), used as a fission fragment detector with a high efficiency. Good discrimination between alphas and fission fragments can be obtained with a simple amplitude threshold. In order to allow the monitoring of the neutron beam and to extract the n-TOF neutron flux, the well known cross section of the 235U(n,f) reaction, considered as a fission standard, has been used. Preliminary results for the cross section are shown for some selected isotopes such as 235U, 233U and 245Cm in the energy range from 0.050 eV to about 2 MeV. These results for 235U, 233U and 245Cm show results consistent with databases in the resonance region, with no normalization required for 233U. In the case of 245Cm, for the energy range between thermal and 20 eV, we obtained the first experimental data ever published, while showing a good agreement with previous data in the region above that value.

  3. Track 8: health and radiological applications. Isotopes and radiation: general. 3. Extraction of 229Th from 233U for Medical Research Applications

    The use of 213Bi as an alpha emitter is being explored by the medical research community for treatment of a variety of cancers. An example is the protocol for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia developed by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. The humanized antibody HuM195 is used to target a surface protein on the cancer cell. Bismuth is linked to the antibody with a chelating agent. Because of the high linear energy transfer and short range of the emitted alpha particle, there is a high probability of killing the targeted cell without exposing other parts of the body to a large dose of radiation. Bismuth-213 is extracted as the decay product of 225Ac, which in turn is extracted as a decay product of 229Th. A limited supply of 229Th, itself a product of the decay of 233U, has been separated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). About 95 mCi was separated from waste materials remaining from the processing of 233U in the 1970's. An additional 15 mCi was separated directly from 233U in 1998. In June 2000, the secretary of energy announced a program to separate additional thorium to support Phase II human trials at Sloan-Kettering and growing research programs at other institutions. This paper describes a project that will extract an additional 70 mCi of 229Th from a 3.3-kg batch of 233U sent to ORNL by Mound Laboratories in 1996. This project requires a process and location that would support the sustained extraction of thorium from 233U. The flow-sheet used for the initial processing of uranium was adopted, with several modifications. The 233U is currently stored in the ORNL Radiochemical Development Facility (RDF). The adjacent Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL) was selected as the processing site because of the availability of both trained radiochemical staff and the type of hot cells suitable for processing uranium with increasingly high levels of 232U. Decay products from this isotope, especially 208Tl, add to the dose associated with

  4. Dissolution rates of unirradiated UO2, UO2 doped with 233U, and spent fuel under normal atmospheric conditions and under reducing conditions using an isotope dilution method

    The experimental results given in this report allow us to draw the following conclusions. 1) Tests using unirradiated fuel pellet materials from two different manufacturers gave very different dissolution rates under air atmosphere testing. Tests for fragments of pellets from different pellets made by the same manufacturer gave good agreement. This indicates that details of the manufacturing process have a large effect on the behavior of unirradiated UO2 in dissolution experiments. Care must be taken in interpreting differences in results obtained in different laboratories because the results may be affected by manufacturing effects. 2) Long-term tests under air atmosphere have begun to show the effects of precipitation. Further testing will be needed before the samples reach steady state. 3) Testing of unirradiated UO2 in systems containing an iron strip to produce reducing conditions gave [U] less than detection limits (235U added as spike was recovered, indicating that 90% of the spike had precipitated onto the solid sample or the iron strip. 9) Tests of UO2 pellet materials containing 233U to provide an alpha decay activity similar to that expected for spent fuel 3000 and 10,000 years after disposal showed that the pellet materials behaved as expected under air atmosphere conditions, showing that the manufacturing method was successful. 10) Early testing of the 233U-doped materials under reducing conditions showed relatively rapid (30 minute) dissolution of small amounts of U at the start of the puff test procedure. Results of analyses of an acidified fraction of the same solutions after 1 or 2 weeks holding indicate that the solutions were inhomogeneous, indicating the presence of colloidal material or small grains of solid. 11) Samples from the 233U-doped tests initially indicated dissolution of solid during the first week of testing, with some indication of more rapid dissolution of the material with the higher doping. 12) The second cycle of testing of the

  5. Evaluation of fission cross sections and covariances for {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Matsunobu, Hiroyuki [Data Engineering, Inc. (Japan); Murata, Toru [AITEL Corporation, Tokyo (JP)] [and others

    2000-02-01

    A simultaneous evaluation code SOK (Simultaneous evaluation on KALMAN) has been developed, which is a least-squares fitting program to absolute and relative measurements. The SOK code was employed to evaluate the fission cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu for the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.3. Procedures of the simultaneous evaluation and the experimental database of the fission cross sections are described. The fission cross sections obtained were compared with evaluated values given in JENDL-3.2 and ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  6. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 233U and 243Am in the energy range 0.5 Mev En 20 MeV @ n_TOF

    Belloni, F; Milazzo, P M; Calviani, M; Colonna, N; Mastinu, P; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Álvarez, H; Álvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; González-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mengoni, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vazl, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides have been recently measured at the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN in the frame of a research project involving isotopes relevant for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technologies. Fission fragments are detected by a gas counter with good discrimination between nuclear fission products and background events. Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 233U and 243Am were determined relative to 235U. The present paper reports the results obtained at neutron energies between 0.5 and 20 MeV.

  7. A 233U/236U/242Pu/244Pu spike for isotopic and isotope dilution analysis by mass spectrometry with internal calibration

    The Khlopin Radium Institute prepared on behalf of the IAEA a synthetic mixture of 233U, 236U, 242Pu and 244Pu isotopes. The isotopic composition and elemental concentration of uranium and plutonium were certified on the basis of analyses done by four laboratories of the IAEA Network, using mass spectrometry with internal standardization. The certified values for 233U/236U ratio and the 236U chemical concentration have a coefficient of variation of 0.05%. The latter is fixed by the uncertainty in the 235U/238U ratio of NBS500 used as internal standard. The coefficients of variation of the 244Pu/242Pu ratio and the 242Pu chemical concentration are respectively 0.10% and 0.16% and limited by the uncertainty in the 240Pu/239Pu ratio of NBS947. This four isotope mixture was used as an internal standard as well as a spike, to analyze 30 batches of LWR spent fuel solutions. The repeatability of the mass spectrometric measurements have a coefficient of variation of 0.025% for the uranium concentration, and of 0.039% for the plutonium concentration. The spiking and treatment errors had a coefficient of variation of 0.048%. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  8. The energy amplifier: A solid-phase, accelerator driven, sub critical Th/233 U breeder for nuclear energy production with minimal actinide waste

    We describe a hybrid system consisting of a medium current (1-10 mA), medium energy (1 GeV) proton accelerator feeding a subcritical assembly consisting of Thorium (or another fertile element) and a moderator medium (e.g. light water). Under conditions of moderate neutron flux (1014 ncm-2), we show by a computer simulation that a stable equilibrium evolves whereby the concentration of fissile 233U which is bred from Thorium is stable at about 1.3%. The 233U produces energy by fission and is continuously regenerated in-situ without resorting to any chemical separation. It is shown that the energy produced is several times larger than the energy required to power the proton accelerator, hence the name Energy Amplifier that we have chosen for that system. We have paid particular attention to the question of toxicity and show that this system will result in very small quantities of Plutonium and higher actinide waste. We also show the composition of actinides produced makes this system particularly resistant to nuclear weapons proliferation. This safe subcritical system is based on an abundant and inexpensive resource which is natural Thorium and can be built using present day technology

  9. Collective and single-particle excitations in the heavy deformable nuclei 234U, 233U, 231Th, 230Pa and 232Pa

    In this thesis five heavy deformed isotopes from the mass region A≥230, namely 234U, 233U, 231Th, 230Pa and 232Pa, were investigated by means of deuteron-induced neutron transfer reactions. The even-even isotope 234U has been studied with the 4π-γ-spectrometer MINIBALL at the Cologne Tandem accelerator. Excited nuclei in the isotope 234U were produced using the reaction 235U(d,t) at a beam energy of 11 MeV. The target thickness was 3.5 mg/cm2. The analysis of the γγ-coincidence data yielded a reinterpretation of the level scheme in 12 cases. Considering its decay characteristics, the 4+ state at an excitation energy of 1886.7 keV is a potential candidate for a two-phonon vibrational state. The isotopes 233U, 231Th, 230Pa and 232Pa were investigated at the Munich Q3D spectrometer. For each isotope an angular distribution with angles between 5 and 45 were measured. In all four cases the energy of the polarized deuteron beam (vector polarization of 80%) was 22 MeV. As targets 234U (160 μg/cm2), 230Th (140 μg/cm2) and 231Pa (140 μg/cm2) were used. The experimental angular distributions were compared to results of DWBA calculations. For the odd isotope 233U spin and parity for 33 states are assigned and in the other odd isotope 231Th 22 assignments are made. The excitation spectra of the two odd-odd isotopes 230Pa and 232Pa were investigated for the first time. For the isotope 230Pa 63 states below an excitation energy of 1.5 MeV are identified. Based on the new experimental data the Nilsson configuration of the ground state is either 1/2[530]p-5/2[633]n or 1/2[530]p+3/2[631]n. In addition 12 rotational bands are proposed and from this six values for the GM splitting energy are deduced as well as two new values for the Newby shift. In the other odd-odd isotope 232Pa 40 states below an excitation energy of 850 keV are observed and suggestions for the groundstate band and its GM partner are made. From this one GM splitting energy was determined.

  10. Study of the mass, isotopic and kinetic energy distributions of the 233U(nth, f) and 241Pu(nth, f) fission products measured at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer (ILL)

    Fission product yields are significant nuclear data for neutronic simulations. The purpose of this work is to improve fission yield knowledge for two fissile nuclei: 241Pu and 233U. Those are respectively involved in the uranium and thorium nuclear fuel cycle. The measurements are performed at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) located in Grenoble. The spectrometer is combined with an ionization chamber to measure mass yields of 241Pu and 233U and with a gamma spectrometry set-up to determine isotopic yields of 233U. A new analysis method of experimental data has been developed in order to control systematics and to reduce experimental biases. For the first time, the experimental variance-covariance matrix of our measured fission yields could be deduced. (author)

  11. Measurement of the generation ratio of 233U and the average radiation capture cross section of 232Th with 232ThO2 irradiated by fast neutrons

    Background: Thorium-Uranium cycle plays an important role in the future's power production technology. Nuclear data involved are urgently needed for engineering design and other purposes since there are obvious differences between the existing evaluated data. Macroscopic neutron integral experiment can be used as a good tool to survey the confusion. Purpose: Macroscopic neutron integral experiment based on radioactive method was carried out to measure the generation ratio of 233U nuclide and the average radiation capture cross section of 232Th while a ThO2 sample was irradiated by fast neutrons leakage from a fast critical facility. We expect that these data can be used as a reference for the research of Th-U cycle. Methods: Radiation capture reactions of 232Th nuclides occur when the nuclides are irradiated by neutrons. 233U nuclides will be generated after two cascade decays by emitting beta rays from the activation products, which are 233Th nuclides. The ThO2 sample was prepared as a slice of 20 mm×10 mm from 0.743 36-g ThO2 powders of 99.9% enriched. The neutron flux was measured by activation method which was 4.07x109 cm-2·s-1 at the sample's irradiation position while the facility worked at the power level of 180 watts. The leakage neutrons' energy distribution was calculated by MC method and it is very close to the fission spectrum with the averaged energy of 1.42 MeV. After irradiation and then a period of cooling time the gamma rays emitted from the sample were measured by an HPGe spectrometer which had been pre-calibrated. From these data the activity of 233Pa was calculated and then the generation ratio of 233U and the average radiation capture cross section of 232Th were calculated. The measured average radiation capture cross section was compared with the cross sections calculated based on the ENDFB-VH.1, CENDL-3.1, JENDL-4.0, BROND2.2 databases. Results: The measured generation ratio of 233U was 4.01×10-12 with an uncertainty of 6

  12. Measurement of Neutron Induced Fission of 235U, 233U and 245Cm with the FIC Detector at the CERN n()TOF Facility

    A series of measurements of neutron induced fission cross section of various TRU isotopes have been performed at the CERN n()TOF spallation neutron facility, in the energy range from thermal to nearly 250 MeV. The experimental apparatus consists in a fast ionization chamber (FIC), used as a fission fragment detector with a high efficiency. Good discrimination between alphas and fission fragments can be obtained with a simple amplitude threshold. In order to allow the monitoring of the neutron beam and to extract the n()TOF neutron flux, the well known cross section of the 235U(n,f) reaction, considered as a fission standard, has been used. Preliminary results for the cross section are shown for some selected isotopes such as 235U, 233U and 245Cm in the energy range from 0.050 eV to about 2 MeV.

  13. Determination of the extraction efficiency for $^{233}$U source $\\alpha$-recoil ions from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell

    von der Wense, Lars; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Thirolf, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Following the $\\alpha$ decay of $^{233}$U, $^{229}$Th recoil ions are shown to be extracted in a significant amount from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell. The produced recoil ions and subsequent daughter nuclei are mass purified with the help of a customized quadrupole mass spectrometer. The combined extraction and mass-purification efficiency for $^{229}$Th$^{3+}$ is determined via MCP-based measurements and via the direct detection of the $^{229}$Th $\\alpha$ decay. A large value of $(10\\pm2)$\\% for the combined extraction and mass-purification efficiency of $^{229}$Th$^{3+}$ is obtained at a mass resolution of about 1 u/e. In addition to $^{229}$Th, also other $\\alpha$-recoil ions of the $^{233,232}$U decay chains are addressed.

  14. Investigation of the prompt neutron emission mechanism in low energy fission of 235,233U(nth, f and 252Cf(sf

    Val’ski G.V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments has been performed to measure prompt neutron angular and energy distributions from thermal neutron-induced fission of 235,233U in correlation with the fission fragments. These distributions have been analyzed with the assumption of neutron isotropic emission from accelerated fission fragments. The performed analysis demonstrates that all obtained results can be described within 5% accuracy using this assumption. This discrepancy is approximately constant and doesn’t depend on fragment mass and the total kinetic energy (TKE. Some minor peculiarities of angular distribution may be interpreted as a result of anisotropy of the fission neutron angular distribution in the fragment center-of-mass system.

  15. Measurements of the yields of the light fission products from the reaction 233U(nsub(th),f) by a ionization chamber

    The aim of this thesis was to develop a new measuring apparature and measuring method which allows to study together with the mass separator 'Lohengrin' at the high flux reactor in Grenoble in realizable measurement times detailedly the unknown mass, nuclear charge, and energy distributions of the fission products resulting from the fission of 233U with thermal neutrons. First the yields and the energy distributions of the masses, thereafter the yields and the energy distributions of the isobaric nuclear charges of the light fission products in the mass range 79<=Asub(L)<=106 are measured. The measuring method for the determination of the mass yields consists of a energy measurement of the fission products separated in the mass separator by a ionization chamber. The isobaric nuclear charges and their yields are determined by the nuclear-charge-specific energy-loss method from the residual-energy spectra behind an absorber. (orig./HSI)

  16. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  17. Monte Carlo analysis of direct measurements of the thermal eta (.025 eV) for 233U and 235U (LWBR development program)

    Significant inconsistencies have been observed between measured values of eta and of ν, which are related by eta = ν/(1+α). In support of the LWBR program, manganese bath measurements of eta of 233U and 235U employing monoenergetic 0.025 eV neutrons were analyzed using Monte Carlo methods and ENDF-4 cross sections. The calculated (eta*/eta2200) ratios are essentially independent of the values assumed for eta2200. The standard deviation on our calculated values of eta includes Monte Carlo, cross section, and experimental uncertainties. The Monte Carlo analysis was confirmed by calculating measured quantities used by the experimentalists in their reduction of eta* to eta. (4 figures, 12 tables) (U.S.)

  18. Fission Cross-section Measurements of (233)U, (245)Cm and (241,243)Am at CERN n_TOF Facility

    Calviani, M; Andriamonje, S; Chiaveri, E; Vlachoudis, V; Colonna, N; Meaze, M H; Marrone, S; Tagliente, G; Terlizzi, R; Belloni, F; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Aerts, G; Berthoumieux, E; Dridi, W; Gunsing, F; Pancin, J; Perrot, L; Plukis, A; Alvarez, H; Duran, I; Paradela, C; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Cano-Ott, D; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Guerrero, C; Martinez, T; Villamarin, D; Vicente, M C; Andrzejewski, J; Marganiec, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Papachristodoulou, C; Patronis, N; Audouin, L; David, S; Ferrant, L; Isaev, S; Stephan, C; Tassan-Got, L; Badurek, G; Jericha, E; Leeb, H; Oberhummer, H; Pigni, M T; Baumann, P; Kerveno, M; Lukic, S; Rudolf, G; Becvar, F; Krticka, M; Calvino, F; Capote, R; Carrillo De Albornoz, A; Marques, L; Salgado, J; Tavora, L; Vaz, P; Cennini, P; Dahlfors, M; Ferrari, A; Gramegna, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Kadi, Y; Mastinu, P; Praena, J; Sarchiapone, L; Wendler, H; Chepel, V; Ferreira-Marques, R; Goncalves, I; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Neves, F; Cortes, G; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Couture, A; Cox, J; O'brien, S; Wiescher, M; Dillman, I; Heil, M; Kappeler, F; Mosconi, M; Plag, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wisshak, K; Dolfini, R; Rubbia, C; Domingo-Pardo, C; Tain, J L; Eleftheriadis, C; Savvidis, I; Frais-Koelbl, H; Griesmayer, E; Furman, W; Konovalov, V; Goverdovski, A; Ketlerov, V; Haas, B; Haight, R; Reifarth, R; Igashira, M; Koehler, P; Kossionides, E; Lampoudis, C; Lozano, M; Quesada, J; Massimi, C; Vannini, G; Mengoni, A; Oshima, M; Papadopoulos, C; Vlastou, R; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Plompen, A; Rullhusen, P; Rauscher, T; Rosetti, M; Ventura, A

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of minor actinides have been measured using the n_TOF white neutron source at CERN, Geneva, as part of a large experimental program aiming at collecting new data relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for the design of advanced reactor systems. The measurements at n_TOF take advantage of the innovative features of the n_TOF facility, namely the wide energy range, high instantaneous neutron flux and good energy resolution. Final results on the fission cross-section of 233U, 245Cm and 243Am from thermal to 20 MeV are here reported, together with preliminary results for 241Am. The measurement have been performed with a dedicated Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), a fission fragment detector with a very high efficiency, relative to the very well known cross-section of 235U, measured simultaneously with the same detector.

  19. Mass balance analysis of Th-233U based MSR (Molten-Salt Reactor) cycle (THORIMS-NES) transferred from present U-Pu based LWRs (Light Water Reactor)

    Nuclear power can play a substantial role in countering global warming. There are still unsolved problems such as safety, nuclear proliferation, radioactive-waste under using U-Pu system. Transition from U-Pu LWR (Light Water Reactor) system to Th-233U MSR (Molten-Salt Reactor) system has been analysed in view of the utilization of fissile in form of Pu fuel salt applying the simplified FREGAT process to the spent fuel of LWR. AMSB (Accelerator Molten-Salt Breeder) was also applied as a fissile producer. All fissile in spent fuel can be used by Th-U MSR system so as not to remain storage of spent fuel after retirement of LWR system. The maximum capacity of Th-U MSR system will reach to about 20 x 103 GWe. However storage of spent fuel will remain for the case of rapid growth of Th-U MSR system even though the maximum capacity is large enough. AMSB will start operation about 20 years after the beginning of Th-U MSR system but the timing can be greatly advanced with the scenario of LWR system. Th-U MSR system can be implemented by using the fissile material in spent fuel from LWRs. Detailed assessment of other materials, performance of facilities, strategies of non-proliferation will be needed for the future improvement.

  20. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of 233U doped UO2(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of 233U doped UO2(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H2 pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H2 pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO2, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10-6/yr - 10-8/yr with a recommended value of 4x10-7/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10-3 M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO2 and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB

  1. Fusion hybrids for generation of advanced (231Pa+232U+233U+234U)-fuel in closed (U-Pu-Th)-fuel cycle

    Technology of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF) is traditionally regarded as a practically inexhaustible energy source. However, development, mastering, broad deployment of fast breeder reactors and closure of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) can also extend fuel base of nuclear power industry (NPI) up to practically unlimited scales. Under these conditions, it seems reasonable to introduce into a circle of the CTF-related studies the works directed towards solving some principal problems which can appear in a large-scale NPI in closed NFC. The first challenge is a large scale of operations in NFC back-end that should be reduced by achieving substantially higher fuel burn-up in power nuclear reactors. The use of 231Pa-232Th-232U-233U fuel in light-water reactor (LWR) opens a possibility of principle to reach very high (about 30% HM) or even ultra-high fuel burn-up. The second challenge is a potential unauthorized proliferation of fissionable materials. As is known, a certain remarkable quantity of 232U being introduced into uranium fraction of nuclear fuel can produce a serious barrier against switching the fuel over to non-energy purposes. Involvement of hybrid thermonuclear reactors (HTR) into NPI structure can substantially facilitate resolving these problems. If HTR will be involved into NPI structure, then main HTR mission consists not in energy generation but in production of nuclear fuel with a certain isotope composition. The present paper analyzes some neutron-physical features in production of advanced nuclear fuels in thorium HTR blankets. The obtained results demonstrated that such a nuclear fuel may be characterized by very stable neutron-multiplying properties during full LWR operation cycle and by enhanced proliferation resistance too. The paper evaluates potential benefits from involvement of HTR with thorium blanket into the international closed NFC. (author)

  2. Expeditious method to determine uranium in the process control samples of chemical plant separating (233)U from thoria irradiated in power reactors.

    Kedari, C S; Kharwandikar, B K; Banerjee, K

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of U in the samples containing a significant proportion of (232)U and high concentration of Th is of great concern. Transmutation of Th in the nuclear power reactor produces a notable quantity of (232)U (half life 68.9 years) along with fissile isotope (233)U. The decay series of (232)U is initiated with (228)Th (half life 1.9 year) and it is followed by several short lived α emitting progenies, (224)Ra, (220)Rn, (216)Po, (212)Bi and (212)Po. Even at the smallest contamination of (228)Th in the sample, a very high pulse rate of α emission is obtained, which is to be counted for the radiometric determination of [U]. A commercially available anionic type of extractant Alamine®336 is used to obtain the selective extraction of U from other alpha active elements and fission products present in the sample. Experimental conditions of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) are optimized for obtaining maximum decontamination and recovery of U in the organic phase. The effect of some interfering ionic impurities in the sample on the process of separation is investigated. Depending on the level of the concentration of U in the samples, spectrophotometry or radiometry methods are adopted for its determination after separation by LLE. Under optimized experimental conditions, i.e. 5.5M HCl in the aqueous phase and 0.27M Alamin®336 in the organic phase, the recovery of U is about 100%, the decontamination factor with respect to Th is >2000 and the extraction of fission products like (90)Sr, (144)Ce and (134,137)Cs is negligible. The detection limit for [U] using α radiometry is 10mg/L, even in presence of >100g/L of Th in the sample. Accuracy and precision for the determination of U is also assessed. Reproducibility of results is within 5%. This method shows very good agreement with the results obtained by mass spectrometry. PMID:27591623

  3. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    Carbol, P. [Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Spahiu, K. (ed.) [and others

    2005-03-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H{sub 2} pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H{sub 2} pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO{sub 2}, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10{sup -6}/yr - 10{sup -8}/yr with a recommended value of 4x10{sup -7}/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10{sup -3} M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO{sub 2} and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB.

  4. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing 235U, 233U, and 232Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P.

    2012-02-01

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of 235U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving 233U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  5. Calculation of the fission cross section for 233U and the interpretation of fragment anisotropy and fine structure in anti νsub(p) and anti Esub(k)

    The fission cross section of 233U has been calculated using a new version of the statistical model and recent data for inelastic scattering levels and fission barrier parameters. The calculation accurately reproduces the experimental fission cross section. The calculated partial cross section for fission through different saddle point states (JKπ) has been used in the explanation of structure in average number of fission prompt neutrons anti νsub(p) and average total fission fragment kinetic energy anti Esub(k) and the energy dependence of the fission fragment anisotropy

  6. Measurement of the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of $^{233}$U, $^{237}$Np, $^{240,242}$Pu, $^{241,243}$Am and $^{245}$Cm with a Total Absorption Calorimeter at n_TOF

    Beer, H; Wiescher, M; Cox, J; Rapp, W; Embid, M; Dababneh, S

    2002-01-01

    Accurate and reliable neutron capture cross section data for actinides are necessary for the poper design, safety regulation and precise performance assessment of transmutation devices such as Fast Critical Reactors or Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The goal of this proposal is the measurement of the neutron capture cross sections of $^{233}$U, $^{237}$Np, $^{240,242}$Pu, $^{241,243}$Am and $^{245}$Cm at n_TOF with an accuracy of 5~\\%. $^{233}$U plays an essential role in the Th fuel cycle, which has been proposed as a safer and cleaner alternative to the U fuel cycle. The capture cross sections of $^{237}$Np,$^{240,242}$Pu, $^{241,243}$Am and $^{245}$Cm play a key role in the design and optimization of a strategy for the Nuclear Waste Transmutation. A high accuracy can be achieved at n_TOF in such measurements due to a combination of features unique in the world: high instantaneous neutron fluence and excellent energy resolution of the facility, innovative Data Acquisition System based on flash ADCs and t...

  7. Preliminary study of the α ratio measurement, ratio of the neutron capture cross section to the fission one for 233U, on the PEREN platform. Development and study of the experimental setup

    Producing nuclear energy in order to reduce anthropic CO2 emission and to meet high energy demand, implies three conditions to the nuclear plants of the IV. generation: safety improvements, radioactive waste minimization, and fuel breeding for a sustainable use of the resources. The Thorium fuel cycle used in Molten Salt Reactors seems promising. Many numerical studies based on probabilistic codes are carried out in order to analyse the behaviour of such reactors. Nevertheless, one of the most important parameters is badly known: the alpha ratio of 233U, ratio of the neutron capture cross section to fission one for 233U. This key-parameter is necessary to calculate the breeding ratio and thus, the deployment capacities of those reactors. This Ph-D thesis was intended to prepare a precise measurement of the alpha ratio of 233U between 1 eV and 10 keV. Preliminary measurements have been performed on the experimental platform PEREN. This experimental environment is composed of a lead slowing-down time spectrometer associated with an intense pulsed neutron generator. Capture and fission rates are measured thanks to eight scintillators with their photomultipliers, surrounding a fission chamber. A software analysis sets the coincidence rate between the scintillators. In order to understand perfectly the experimental setup, preliminary tests using a 235U fission chamber have been done. This experiment resulted in a very low signal to background ratio (1 %). The background coming from the scintillators themselves seriously handicapped the measurement. Another series of experiment has been done with scintillators 5 times thinner. Nevertheless, the signal to background ratio should still be increased to measure the capture of 235U. To make sure that the experimental setup has totally been understood, we made many comparisons between experimental results and simulations. Two simulation codes were mainly used: MCNP and GEANT4. We paid special attention to quantify the

  8. Développement d'un dispositif expérimental dédié à la mesure des sections efficaces de capture et de fission de l'233u dans le domaine des résonances résolues

    Companis, Iulia

    2013-01-01

    233 U est le noyau fissile produit dans le cycle du combustible 232 T h/233 U qui a été proposé comme une alternative plus sûre et plus propre du cycle 238 U/239 P u. La connaissance précise de la section efficace de capture de neutrons de cet isotope est requise avec une haute précision pour la conception et le développement de réacteurs utilisant ce cycle du combustible. Les deux seuls jeux de données expérimentales fiables pour la section efficace de capture de l'233 U montrent des écarts ...

  9. Preliminary study of the {alpha} ratio measurement, ratio of the neutron capture cross section to the fission one for {sup 233}U, on the PEREN platform. Development and study of the experimental setup; Etude preliminaire de la mesure du rapport {alpha}, rapport de la section efficace moyenne de capture sur celle de fission de l'{sup 233}U, sur la plateforme PEREN. Developpement et etude du dispositif experimental

    Cognet, M.A

    2007-12-15

    Producing nuclear energy in order to reduce anthropic CO{sub 2} emission and to meet high energy demand, implies three conditions to the nuclear plants of the IV. generation: safety improvements, radioactive waste minimization, and fuel breeding for a sustainable use of the resources. The Thorium fuel cycle used in Molten Salt Reactors seems promising. Many numerical studies based on probabilistic codes are carried out in order to analyse the behaviour of such reactors. Nevertheless, one of the most important parameters is badly known: the alpha ratio of {sup 233}U, ratio of the neutron capture cross section to fission one for {sup 233}U. This key-parameter is necessary to calculate the breeding ratio and thus, the deployment capacities of those reactors. This Ph-D thesis was intended to prepare a precise measurement of the alpha ratio of {sup 233}U between 1 eV and 10 keV. Preliminary measurements have been performed on the experimental platform PEREN. This experimental environment is composed of a lead slowing-down time spectrometer associated with an intense pulsed neutron generator. Capture and fission rates are measured thanks to eight scintillators with their photomultipliers, surrounding a fission chamber. A software analysis sets the coincidence rate between the scintillators. In order to understand perfectly the experimental setup, preliminary tests using a {sup 235}U fission chamber have been done. This experiment resulted in a very low signal to background ratio (1 %). The background coming from the scintillators themselves seriously handicapped the measurement. Another series of experiment has been done with scintillators 5 times thinner. Nevertheless, the signal to background ratio should still be increased to measure the capture of {sup 235}U. To make sure that the experimental setup has totally been understood, we made many comparisons between experimental results and simulations. Two simulation codes were mainly used: MCNP and GEANT4. We paid

  10. Concept of a demonstrational hybrid reactor—a tokamak with molten-salt blanket for {sup 233}U fuel production: 1. Concept of a stationary Tokamak as a neutron source

    Azizov, E. A.; Gladush, G. G., E-mail: gladush@triniti.ru; Dokuka, V. N.; Khayrutdinov, R. R. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation, Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    On the basis of current understanding of physical processes in tokamaks and taking into account engineering constraints, it is shown that a low-cost facility of a moderate size can be designed within the adopted concept. This facility makes it possible to achieve the power density of neutron flux which is of interest, in particular, for solving the problem of {sup 233}U fuel production from thorium. By using a molten-salt blanket, the important task of ensuring the safe operation of such a reactor in the case of possible coolant loss is accomplished. Moreover, in a hybrid reactor with the blanket based on liquid salts, the problem of periodic refueling that is difficult to perform in solid blankets can be solved.

  11. Concept of a demonstrational hybrid reactor—a tokamak with molten-salt blanket for 233U fuel production: 1. Concept of a stationary Tokamak as a neutron source

    Azizov, E. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Dokuka, V. N.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of current understanding of physical processes in tokamaks and taking into account engineering constraints, it is shown that a low-cost facility of a moderate size can be designed within the adopted concept. This facility makes it possible to achieve the power density of neutron flux which is of interest, in particular, for solving the problem of 233U fuel production from thorium. By using a molten-salt blanket, the important task of ensuring the safe operation of such a reactor in the case of possible coolant loss is accomplished. Moreover, in a hybrid reactor with the blanket based on liquid salts, the problem of periodic refueling that is difficult to perform in solid blankets can be solved.

  12. The fission cross sections of 230Th, 232Th, 233U, 234U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 239Pu and 242Pu relative 235U at 14.74 MeV neutron energy

    The measurement of the fission cross section ratios of nine isotopes relative to 235U at an average neutron energy of 14.74 MeV is described with particular attention to the determination of corrections and to sources of error. The results are compared to ENDF/B-V and to other measurements of the past decade. The ratio of the neutron induced fission cross section for these isotopes to the fission cross section for 235U are: 230Th - 0.290 +- 1.9%; 232Th - 0.191 +- 1.9%; 233U - 1.132 +- 0.7%; 234U - 0.998 +- 1.0%; 236U - 0.791 +- 1.1%; 238U - 0.587 +- 1.1%; 237Np - 1.060 +- 1.4%; 239Pu - 1.152 +- 1.1%; 242Pu - 0.967 +- 1.0%. 40 refs., 11 tabs., 9 figs

  13. Concept of a demonstrational hybrid reactor—a tokamak with molten-salt blanket for 233U fuel production: 1. Concept of a stationary Tokamak as a neutron source

    On the basis of current understanding of physical processes in tokamaks and taking into account engineering constraints, it is shown that a low-cost facility of a moderate size can be designed within the adopted concept. This facility makes it possible to achieve the power density of neutron flux which is of interest, in particular, for solving the problem of 233U fuel production from thorium. By using a molten-salt blanket, the important task of ensuring the safe operation of such a reactor in the case of possible coolant loss is accomplished. Moreover, in a hybrid reactor with the blanket based on liquid salts, the problem of periodic refueling that is difficult to perform in solid blankets can be solved

  14. Multilevel analysis of the 233U and 235U capture and fission cross-sections and statistical properties of the Kapur-Peierls-type resonance parameters for the S-wave cross-sections of the fissile isotopes

    At the 1966 Conference on Nuclear Data for Reactors, simultaneous measurements of the capture and fission cross-sections of 233U and 235U were presented. Those measurements have now been analysed with the multilevel formalism developed by Adler and Adler. To obtain consistent sets of resonance parameters the capture and fission data were least-square fitted simultaneously. This analysis was carried out to 60 eV for 233U and to 100 eV for 235U. The main purpose of this analysis was to provide a simple and precise analytical description of the very complex structure of the fission and capture cross-sections of 233U and 235U at low energy. Such an analytical description should be useful to calculate reaction rates in nuclear reactors and to compare experimental data taken with different energy resolutions or at different sample temperatures. For the low-energy resonances of 233U and 235U, the neutron width is always smaller, by at least two orders of magnitude, than the total width. Thus, the total cross-section, for those isotopes, can be approximated as the sum of the absorption cross-section and the potential scattering cross-section. Hence it is possible to compute the total cross-section from the resonance parameters obtained by fitting the fission and capture cross-sections. The total cross-section of 235U computed by this method is compared to the data from a transmission measurement done at Saclay, with the sample at 77 deg. K. The computed total cross-section of 233U is compared with transmission data obtained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Material Testing Reactor. Such comparisons between data obtained by different experimental techniques illustrate the internal consistency of the low-energy cross-sections of the two main uranium fissile isotopes. The physical interpretation of the resonance parameters is somewhat ambiguous, because such multilevel fits are by no means unique. This is particularly true for 233U since, for this nucleus, the

  15. Dissolution rates of unirradiated UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2} doped with {sup 233}U, and spent fuel under normal atmospheric conditions and under reducing conditions using an isotope dilution method

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Processes, Helsinki (Finland); Albinsson, Yngve [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Oversby, Virginia [VMO Konsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Cowper, Mark [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    additional meaningful data. 8) A test procedure that used several short exposures of the sample to solution - the puff test procedure - gave results that showed very little recovery of the spike solution at the end of the tests. Only 10% of the {sup 235}U added as spike was recovered, indicating that 90% of the spike had precipitated onto the solid sample or the iron strip. 9) Tests of UO{sub 2} pellet materials containing {sup 233}U to provide an alpha decay activity similar to that expected for spent fuel 3000 and 10,000 years after disposal showed that the pellet materials behaved as expected under air atmosphere conditions, showing that the manufacturing method was successful. 10) Early testing of the {sup 233}U-doped materials under reducing conditions showed relatively rapid (30 minute) dissolution of small amounts of U at the start of the puff test procedure. Results of analyses of an acidified fraction of the same solutions after 1 or 2 weeks holding indicate that the solutions were inhomogeneous, indicating the presence of colloidal material or small grains of solid. 11) Samples from the {sup 233}U-doped tests initially indicated dissolution of solid during the first week of testing, with some indication of more rapid dissolution of the material with the higher doping. 12) The second cycle of testing of the {sup 233}U-doped materials also showed dissolution occurring during the dilution stages of the puff test. The subsequent week of testing also showed small amounts of further dissolution, with hints that the doped samples were dissolving faster than the undoped samples. 13) At the end of 2 weeks of cycle 2 the remaining solution and solid was transferred to a new reaction vessel, the solution was made up to original volume, and a new dose of spike was added. The results of analyses of [U] and isotopic composition show that the measured U is that expected from dilution of the original solution plus adding the spike. 14) Samples taken during 2 weeks of testing of

  16. Etude des distributions en masse, charge nucléaire et énergie cinétique des produits de fission de l'233U(nth,f) et du 241Pu(nth,f) mesurées auprès du spectromètre de masse Lohengrin (ILL)

    Martin, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Les rendements des produits de fission font partie des données nucléaires sur lesquellesreposent les simulations neutroniques. L’objectif de cette thèse est d’apporter de nouvellesmesures de rendements de fission de deux noyaux fissiles : le 241Pu et l’233U. Ces noyauxappartiennent respectivement au cycle du combustible de l’uranium et à celui du thorium.Ces mesures ont été réalisées auprès du spectromètre de masse Lohengrin de l’InstitutLaue Langevin (ILL) à Grenoble. Le spectromètre est com...

  17. Macroeconomic regimes

    Baele, L.T.M.; Bekaert, G.R.J.; Cho, S.; Inghelbrecht, K.; Moreno, A.

    2015-01-01

    A New-Keynesian macro-model is estimated accommodating regime-switching behavior in monetary policy and macro-shocks. A key to our estimation strategy is the use of survey-based expectations for inflation and output. Output and inflation shocks shift to the low volatility regime around 1985 and 1990

  18. Estuary regime

    The primary aim of this research into estuary regime is to provide engineers with an improved method of predicting the long term evolutionary effects of major engineering changes in estuaries. Of specific interest to the Department of Trade and Industry's renewable energy R and D programme is the long term impact of tidal energy barrages on estuarine morphology. It is considered that the approach being taken is the most appropriate line to follow in terms of developing an applicable estuary regime predictive capability. As a consequence it is considered that any further regime model development should be complimentary to this approach. In addition to model development there is still an enormous amount of basic research required in examining sediment transport processes within the estuarine environment. Recently developed models for predicting the motion of fluidised mud on inter-tidal and sub-tidal banks, an important process within the estuarine sediment regime, requires specific field data calibration and validation. The impacts of wave action on sediment mobility on estuarine banks is a further area requiring field measurements. It is recommended that the opportunity be taken to obtain a set of measurements at a site following construction of major engineering works to provide data for future verification of a regime model. Possibilities exist, for example, on the Tees Estuary for such measurements. (author)

  19. Regime change?

    Following the 1998 nuclear tests in South Asia and later reinforced by revelations about North Korean and Iraqi nuclear activities, there has been growing concern about increasing proliferation dangers. At the same time, the prospects of radiological/nuclear terrorism are seen to be rising - since 9/11, concern over a proliferation/terrorism nexus has never been higher. In the face of this growing danger, there are urgent calls for stronger measures to strengthen the current international nuclear nonproliferation regime, including recommendations to place civilian processing of weapon-useable material under multinational control. As well, there are calls for entirely new tools, including military options. As proliferation and terrorism concerns grow, the regime is under pressure and there is a temptation to consider fundamental changes to the regime. In this context, this paper will address the following: Do we need to change the regime centered on the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)? What improvements could ensure it will be the foundation for the proliferation resistance and physical protection needed if nuclear power grows? What will make it a viable centerpiece of future nonproliferation and counterterrorism approaches?

  20. Competition Regime

    Danilo Icaza Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a review of the competition regime works of various authors, published under the auspices of the University of the Hemispheres and the Corporation for Studies and Publications. Analyzes the structure, the general concepts, case law taken for development. Includes comments on the usefulness of this work for the study of competition law and the contribution to the lawyers who want to practice in this branch of economic law.

  1. Competition Regime

    Danilo Icaza Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the competition regime works of various authors, published under the auspices of the University of the Hemispheres and the Corporation for Studies and Publications. Analyzes the structure, the general concepts, case law taken for development. Includes comments on the usefulness of this work for the study of competition law and the contribution to the lawyers who want to practice in this branch of economic law.

  2. Exchange Rate Regime Choice

    2006-01-01

    The choice of an adequate exchange rate regime proves to be a highly sensitive field within which the economic authorities present and confirm themselves. The advantages and disadvantages of fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes, which have been quite relativized from the conventional point of view, together with simultaneous, but not synchronised effects of structural and external factors, remain permanently questioned throughout a complex process of exchange rate regime decision making. ...

  3. Sustainable urban regime adjustments

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt; Jensen, Jens Stissing; Elle, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The endogenous agency that urban governments increasingly portray by making conscious and planned efforts to adjust the regimes they operate within is currently not well captured in transition studies. There is a need to acknowledge the ambiguity of regime enactment at the urban scale. This direc...

  4. Exchange rate regime choice

    Beker Emilija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of an adequate exchange rate regime proves to be a highly sensitive field within which the economic authorities present and confirm themselves. The advantages and disadvantages of fixed and flexible exchange rate regimes, which have been quite relativized from the conventional point of view, together with simultaneous, but not synchronized effects of structural and external factors, remain permanently questioned throughout a complex process of exchange rate regime decision making. The paper reflects the attempt of critical identification of the key exchange rate performances with emphasis on continuous non-uniformity and (uncertainty of shelf life of a relevant choice.

  5. World Nonproliferation Regime

    Ouyang Liping; Wu Xingzuo

    2007-01-01

    2006 witnessed an intense struggle between nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation. Iran's nuclear issue and North Korea's nuclear test have cast a deep shadow over the current international nonproliferation regime. The international contest for civil nuclear development became especially fierce as global energy prices went up. Such a situation , to some extent, accelerated the pace of nuclear proliferation. Furthermore, the existing international nonproliferation regime, based upon the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), was affected by loopholes, and the U.S. failed in its ambition to unite other forces to mend fences. The international community needs to come up with a comprehensive and long-term strategy to meet the demand for an effective future nonproliferation regime in a healthy nuclear order.

  6. Dimagrire in regime mediatico

    Boutaud, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    publication en italien : BOUTAUD Jean-Jacques, « Dimagrire in regime mediatico », Dietetica e semiotica. Regimi di Senso, a cura di Dario Mangano e Gianfranco Marrone, Mimesis Edizioni, Milano, 2013, p. 19-38 Il titolo può leggersi in molti modi. Per esempio: dietetica e semiotica sono due regimi di senso, uno alimentare e l'altro comunicativo, con pari dignità, dunque da paragonare fra loro. Oppure: grazie alla semiotica la dietetica appare, non più come un regime alimentare, ma come un r...

  7. Complex regimes of synchronization

    Yeldesbay, Azamat

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization is a fundamental phenomenon in nature. It can be considered as a general property of self-sustained oscillators to adjust their rhythm in the presence of an interaction. In this work we investigate complex regimes of synchronization phenomena by means of theoretical analysis, numerical modeling, as well as practical analysis of experimental data. As a subject of our investigation we consider chimera state, where due to spontaneous symmetry-breaking of an initially ho...

  8. Political Regimes and Economic Growth

    Carlos Pinho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Are political regimes drivers of economic growth? While political institutions are influenced by economic development, they are in turn a key determinant of the development process. This study builds in the Neoclassical Growth theory to identify the influence of political regimes on economic development through a panel data sample of 170 countries from 1960 to 2000. Results suggest that once fixed effects are considered, the positive relationship between income per capita and political regimes measured by different democracy variables disappears.

  9. MULTILATERAL DIPLOMACY AND INTERNATIONAL REGIMES

    BENEA Ciprian-Beniamin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of diplomacy can by divided in three main periods: one is that of occasional diplomacy peculiar to Middle Ages, while other belong to permane diplomacy, peculiar to modern times. But this one can be divided in two parts, too: one with a bilateral character, previos to 1st World War, and one with a multilateral character, manifested especially after the end on 1st World War. This third type is the focus of present paper. And it cannot be separated from the newly international constructs: international regimes, and international organizations. International instritutions the area where international regimes are belonging to – are legal constructs which provide the formal (and legal framework for continous negotiations. They are the most visible part of the new diplomacy – the one which has a permanent character, and it has an more open face. Anyway, the most important connection has to do with the international institutions, international regimes, and multilateral international negotiations. In the era of the new diplomacy, they all have a permanent character. International institutions help international negotiations carring on; while in their turn, they provide the base for international regimes’ creation, and especially for their evolution. The international regimes’ evolution is an inseparable part of a permanent international framework. And if there is missing a permanent international framework (international organization connected to a specific regime, this regime is a difuse one, its members have only informal relations among them, while they survey each other, looking at their behavior, but they don’t have a formal relationship among them, which could help them solving their future common interests, and protect them from their common fears. International regimes are very important in the era when evrithing touches, and influences everything. In the same time, the complexity of our present world can be successfully

  10. Suspended-Bed Reactor preliminary design, 233U--232Th cycle. Final report (revised)

    The preliminary design Suspended-Bed Reactor is described. Coated particles about 2 mm in diameter are used as the fuel. The coatings consist of three layers: (1) low density pyrolytic graphite, 70 μ thick, (2) silicon carbide pressure vessel, 30 μ thick, and (3) ZrC layer, 50 μ thick, to protect the pressure vessel from moisture and oxygen. The fuel kernel can be either uranium-thorium dicarbide or metal. The coated particles are suspended by helium gas (coolant) in a cluster of pressurized tubes. The upward flow of helium fluidizes the coated particles. As the flow rate increases, the bed of particles is lifted upward to the core section. The particles are restrained at the upper end of the core by a suitable screen. The overall particle density in the core is just enough for criticality condition. Should the helium flow cease, the bed in the core section will collapse, and the particles will flow downward into the section where the increased physical spacings among the tubes brings about a safe shutdown. By immersing this section of the tubes in a large graphite block to serve as a heat sink, dissipation of decay heat becomes manageable. This eliminates the need for emergency core cooling systems

  11. Critical dimensions of systems containing 235U, 239Pu, and 233U: 1986 Revision

    This report is primarily a compilation of critical data obtained from experiments performed in a number of laboratories during the period of 1945 through 1985. It supplements the Nuclear Safety Guide [Report TID-7016 (Rev. 2)] in presenting critical data on which recommendations of the Guide are based. It must be emphasized that this report gives critical data without safety factors, so it is no substitute for the Guide or for the related document, The American National Standard for Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors. Critical measurements with materials of interest in desired configurations yield information of greatest usefulness and accuracy. Where it is not feasible to obtain the desired critical data, for example, as a result of safety restrictions, subcritical data may be directly applicable, and in some cases may be extrapolated to approximate critical conditions. Critical conditions also may be approximated from the distribution of neutrons introduced into a subcritical assembly. These ''exponential experiments'' may be the only alternative where the quantity of material required is too great for a critical experiment. Calculated extensions of experimental data are included to show the nature of trends, not to substitute for results of experiments. They should be used with caution. A fundamental aim of this document is to illustrate relationships among critical data. The compilation and correlation of data for this purpose, from many measurements in a number of laboratories, require a certain amount of normalization or reduction to common terms. Frequently, for example, the effects of variations in geometry or density must be removed to show trends in data. The manner in which these alterations may be made is discussed in the early section Relations for Conversion to Standard Conditions. 195 refs

  12. 233U Breeding in a Modified Prometheus-L IFE Reactor

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    In this study. neutronic analysis of a hybrid version of the PROMETHEUS-LIFE reactor is investigated by using thorium fuels namely, ThN, ThC2 and ThF4. Calculations of neutronic data per DT fusion neutron are performed by using SCALE 4.3 Code. Despite a partial replacement of the tritium breeding zone by the fissile fuel breeding zone, tritium breeding remains still >

  13. Cloud regimes as phase transitions

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Hottovy, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Clouds are repeatedly identified as a leading source of uncertainty in future climate predictions. Of particular importance are stratocumulus clouds, which can appear as either (i) closed cells that reflect solar radiation back to space or (ii) open cells that allow solar radiation to reach the Earth's surface. Here we show that these clouds regimes -- open versus closed cells -- fit the paradigm of a phase transition. In addition, this paradigm characterizes pockets of open cells as the interface between the open- and closed-cell regimes, and it identifies shallow cumulus clouds as a regime of higher variability. This behavior can be understood using an idealized model for the dynamics of atmospheric water as a stochastic diffusion process. With this new conceptual viewpoint, ideas from statistical mechanics could potentially be used for understanding uncertainties related to clouds in the climate system and climate predictions.

  14. Friction Regimes in the Lubricants Solid-State Regime

    Schipper, D.J.; Maathuis, O.; Dowson, D.; Taylor, C.M.; Childs, T.H.C.; Dalmaz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Friction measurements were performed in the lubricant's solid-state regime to study the transition from full-film lubrication, in which the separation is maintained by a solidified lubricant, to mixed lubrication. Special attention is paid to the influence of temperature (inlet viscosity) and roughn

  15. The Choice of Monetary Regime

    Østrup, Finn

    comparisonbetween monetary regimes suggests that welfare is highest under nominalincome targeting where the nominal income target is determined to bring aboutprice stability.Keywords: Monetary regimes; fiscal policy; monetary non-neutrality.JEL classicification: E42, E61, E62.......The article examines how government spending is determined in a closedeconomy where the nominal wage is pre-set through contracts and the wage settershave perfect foresight regarding subsequent policy decisions. The monetaryregime affects government spending because: (i) with a pre-set nominal wage...

  16. On the regimes of premixing

    Angelini, S.; Theofanous, T.G.; Yuen, W.W. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

    1998-01-01

    The conditions of the MAGICO-2000 experiment are extended to more broadly investigate the regimes of premixing, and the corresponding internal structures of mixing zones. With the help of the data and numerical simulations using the computer code PM-ALPHA, we can distinguish extremes of behavior dominated by inertia and thermal effects - we name these the inertia and thermal regimes, respectively. This is an important distinction that should guide future experiments aimed at code verification in this area. Interesting intermediate behaviors are also delineated and discussed. (author)

  17. Nova Scotia's offshore royalty regime

    Oil production from the Hibernia project in Newfoundland's offshore began in December 1997. It is estimated that by 2010 some 30 per cent of Canada's light oil production and as much as 5-10 per cent of its natural gas production will originate from offshore Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. The current level of investment in east coast offshore petroleum developments is the result of the magnitude of discovered and undiscovered petroleum resources in the region. Advances in offshore petroleum technology also contributed to lower development costs. Another reason for increased investment has been an efficient and predictable regulatory environment and government policies. Nova Scotia's royalty regimes and the evolution of royalty regimes for the Sable Offshore Energy project were discussed. The Offshore Petroleum Royalty Act gives Nova Scotia the ability to establish a royalty regime through regulations, or to enter into royalty agreements on a project by project basis, or to use a mix of both agreement and regulation. The philosophy underlying Nova Scotia's royalty regime is to find the right balance between industry and government's share of project revenues

  18. Friction Regimes in the Lubricants Solid-State Regime

    Schipper, D.J.; Maathuis, O.; Dowson, D; Taylor, C.M.; Childs, T.H.C.; Dalmaz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Friction measurements were performed in the lubricant's solid-state regime to study the transition from full-film lubrication, in which the separation is maintained by a solidified lubricant, to mixed lubrication. Special attention is paid to the influence of temperature (inlet viscosity) and roughness on this transition. The friction measurements showed that in the lubricants solid-state region three lubrication modes can be distinguished: A) full-film lubrication; separation is maintained b...

  19. The Concept of Truth Regime

    Lorna Weir

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available “Truth regime” is a much used but little theorized concept, with the Foucauldian literature presupposing that truth in modernity is uniformly scientific/quasi-scientific and enhances power. I argue that the forms of truth characteristic of our present are wider than Foucault recognized, their relations to power more various, and their historicity more complex. The truth regime of advanced modernity is characterized by multiple, irreducible truth formulae that co-exist and sometimes vie for dominance. A truth formula stabilizes a network of elements: a relation between representation and presentation (words and things, truth and non-truth, and the place of the subject in discourse. Our contemporary truth regime comprises radically heterogeneous truthful knowledges – science, governance, religion/politics, and common culture – that have distinct histories and relations to power.

  20. The emerging climate change regime

    The emerging climate change regime--with the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) at its core--reflects the substantial uncertainties, high stakes and complicated politics of the greenhouse warming issue. The regime represents a hedging strategy. On the one hand, it treats climate change as a potentially serious problem, and in response, creates a long-term, evolutionary process to encourage further research, promote national planning, increase public awareness, and help create a sense of community among states. But it requires very little by way of substantive--and potentially costly--mitigation or adaptation measures. Although the FCCC parties have agreed to negotiate additional commitments, substantial progress is unlikely without further developments in science, technology, and public opinion. The FCCC encourages such developments, and is capable of evolution and growth, should the political will to take stronger international action emerge. 120 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Demystifying optimal dynamic treatment regimes.

    Moodie, Erica E M; Richardson, Thomas S; Stephens, David A

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic regime is a function that takes treatment and covariate history and baseline covariates as inputs and returns a decision to be made. Murphy (2003, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 65, 331-366) and Robins (2004, Proceedings of the Second Seattle Symposium on Biostatistics, 189-326) have proposed models and developed semiparametric methods for making inference about the optimal regime in a multi-interval trial that provide clear advantages over traditional parametric approaches. We show that Murphy's model is a special case of Robins's and that the methods are closely related but not equivalent. Interesting features of the methods are highlighted using the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and through simulation. PMID:17688497

  2. Disclosure regimes and corporate governance

    Wüstemann, Jens

    2004-01-01

    As there is a strong relationship of disclosure regimes and corporate governance the internationally varying distribution of information rights can be interpreted as a function of different systems of corporate governance. A disclosure system comprises all legally recognized information claims that a system of corporate governance or a financial system furnishes financial contracting parties with: Both public disclosure and disclosure via private information channels may serve value-relevant ...

  3. The EU Commission consultation regime

    Quittkat, Christine; Finke, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    "The present consultation regime of the European Commission is marked by the role the Commission assigns to non-governmental actors or civil society organisations (CSOs). The Commission's documents on its policy of consultation and cooperation with external non-governmental actors reveal that a reflective approach has emerged during the 1980s, referring to a more elaborate concept of 'good governance'. The gradual extension is most noticeable in the change of terminology, from ‘consultation’ ...

  4. Contrasting Monetary Regimes in Africa

    Patrick Honohan; Stephen A. O'Connell

    1997-01-01

    In post-independence sub-Saharan Africa, institutional arrangements for monetary policy have taken a variety of forms, although the historical evolution of many African financial systems has been similar. This paper identifies five different regimes and examines how they evolved over time. It focuses on how the alternative institutional arrangements have influenced the performance of monetary policy under fiscal pressure, and concludes that, although the trend appears to be toward more flexib...

  5. The International Climate Change Regime

    Yamin, Farhana; Depledge, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the increasing number of policy-makers, stakeholders, researchers, and other professionals working on climate change, this volume presents a detailed description and analysis of the international regime established in 1992 to combat the threat of global climate change. It provides a comprehensive accessible guide to a high-profile area of international law and politics, covering not only the obligations and rights of countries, but ongoing climate negotiations as well.

  6. Monetary regimes in open economies

    Korpos, A.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a two-country open economy framework for the analysis of strategic interactions among monetary authorities and wage bargaining institutions. From this perspective, the thesis investigates the economic consequences of replacing flexible and fixed exchange rate regimes with a monetary union, such as the European Economic and Monetary Union. It shows that fixing a currency creates a flatter Phillips curve and increases the aggressiveness of wage demands by labor unions. Comp...

  7. Exchange Rate Regimes and Location

    Ricci, Luca Antonio

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of fixed versus flexible exchange rate regimes on location choices of firms and on the degree of specialization of countries. In a two-country two-differentiated-good monetary model, demand, supply, and monetary shocks arise after wages are set and prices are optimally chosen. The exchange rate performs then an adjustment role for firms located in the country relatively specialized in the good they produce, but it constitutes a factor of disturbance for the...

  8. Visibility regimes in mediatized publicness

    Samuel Mateus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the relationship between politics, media and publicness, this paper ponders the consequences of visibility in the political field. Identifying some of its existing regimes, it will posit that today visibility plays an ambivalent function to politics: it can simultaneously operate as a synoptic monitoring and control of politicians; and at the same time it may stand as an opportunity to build a charismatic leadership. In fact, political visibilities are now negotiated between the boundaries of private and public realms, and they can take the form of a risk, or an opportunity to build on a charismatic leadership.

  9. Alberta oil sands royalty regime

    The long term objective of the Oil Sands Business Unit of Alberta Energy is to pave the way for Alberta's bitumen production to reach 3 million barrels per day by 2020. This presentation described the national government's role in resource development. It was emphasized that since the Crown is the owner of the oil sands resource, it would benefit by providing strategic leadership and by generating a larger royalty base. The oil sands fiscal regime was described with reference to generic royalty, risk sharing, investment, and project economics. Business rule principles were also outlined along with criteria for project expansions. Both upstream and downstream challenges and opportunities were listed. 4 figs

  10. Twentieth century monetary regimes in Canadian perspective

    Harley, C. Knick

    2001-01-01

    Three monetary regimes - the gold standard, a regime of 'socialism in many countries' and the post-Bretton Woods regime - and difficult transitions between them have shaped the economic history of the twentieth century. The regimes consisted of coherent sets of government policies and equally importantly, the publics expectations about policy and each made different decisions about which of the trilemma of policy goals - fixed exchange rates, domestic policy independence and integrated capita...

  11. Accommodating human values in the climate regime

    Cook, Rosalind; Tauschinsky, Eljalill

    2008-01-01

    The climate regime addresses one of the most important challenges facing humankind today. However, while the environmental and economic sides of the problem are well represented, it lacks the inclusion of social and human aspects. The human rights regime, in contrast, is a regime which has been esta

  12. Measuring the effectiveness of international environmental regimes

    Helm, C.; Sprinz, D.F.

    1999-05-01

    While past research has emphasized the importance of international regimes for international governance, systematic assessments of regime effects are missing. This article derives a standardized measurement concept for the effectiveness of international environmental regimes by developing an operational rational choice calculus to evaluate actual policy simultaneously against a non-regime counterfactual and a collective optimum. Subsequently, the empirical feasibility of the measurement instrument is demonstrated by way of two international treaties regulating transboundary air pollution in Europe. The results demonstrate that the regimes indeed show positive effects - but fall substantially short of the collective optima. (orig.)

  13. Regime Jumps in Electricity Prices

    Electricity prices are known to be very volatile and subject to frequent jumps due to system breakdown, demand shocks, and inelastic supply. As many international electricity markets are in some state of deregulation, more and more participants in these markets are exposed to these stylised facts. Appropriate pricing, portfolio, and risk management models should incorporate these facts. Authors have introduced stochastic jump processes to deal with the jumps, but we argue and show that this specification might lead to problems with identifying the true mean-reversion within the process. Instead, we propose using a regime jump model that disentangles mean-reversion from jump behaviour. This model resembles more closely the true price path of electricity prices

  14. Accommodating human values in the climate regime

    Rosalind Cook

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The climate regime addresses one of the most important challenges facing humankind today. However, while the environmental and economic sides of the problem are well represented, it lacks the inclusion of social and human aspects. The human rights regime, in contrast, is a regime which has been established precisely to implement human values. This article ex-plains the problems of climate change in terms of human values and argues that some proce-dures from the human rights regime offer possibilities for improvement. It is submitted that through the inclusion of human rights instruments, such as individual communication, pro-gressive realisation and authoritative interpretation, the inclusion of human values into the climate regime will be facilitated. This article presents these instruments and discusses their potential for inclusion in the climate regime.

  15. Propagation Regime of Iron Dust Flames

    Tang, Francois-David; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A flame propagating through an iron-dust mixture can propagate in two asymptotic regimes. When the characteristic time of heat transfer between particles is much smaller than the characteristic time of particle combustion, the flame propagates in the continuum regime where the heat released by reacting particles can be modelled as a space-averaged function. In contrast, when the characteristic time of heat transfer is much larger than the particle reaction time, the flame can no longer be treated as a continuum due to dominating effects associated with the discrete nature of the particle reaction. The discrete regime is characterized by weak dependence of the flame speed on the oxygen concentration compared to the continuum regime. The discrete regime is observed in flames propagating through an iron dust cloud within a gas mixture containing xenon, while the continuum regime is obtained when xenon is substituted with helium.

  16. US Forest Service LANDFIRE Historical Fire Regimes

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — Historical fire regimes, intervals, and vegetation conditions are mapped using the Vegetation Dynamics Development Tool (VDDT). These data support fire and...

  17. Crustal stress regime in Italy

    M. Cesaro

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a reliable map of the present-day stress field in Italy, needed to better understand the active tectonic processes and to contribute to the assessment of seismic hazard, in 1992 we started to collect and analyze new data from borehole breakouts in deep oil and geothermal wells and focal mechanisms of earthquakes (2.5 < M <5 occurred in Italy between 1988 and 1995. From about 200 deep wells and 300 focal mechanisms analyzed to date, we infer that: the internal (SW sector of the Northern Apenninic arc is extending with minimum compressional stress (Shmin oriented ? ENE, while the external front is thrusting over the Adriatic foreland (Shmin ? NW-SE. The entire Southern Apennine is extending in NE direction (from the Tyrrhenian margin to the Apulian foreland and compression (in the foredeep is no longer active at the outer (NE thrust front. Between these two arcs, an abrupt change in the tectonic regime is detected with directions of horizontal stress changing by as much as 90º in the external front, around latitude 430N. Along the Ionian side of the Calabrian arc the stress directions inferred from breakouts and focal mechanisms are scattered with a hint of rotation from N-S Shmin close to the Southern Apennines, to ~ E-W directions in the Messina Strait. In Sicily, a NW-SE direction of SHmax is evident in the Hyblean foreland, parallel to the direction of plate motion between Africa and Europe. A more complex pattern of stress directions is observed in the thrust belt zone, with rotations from the regional trend (NW í directed SHmax to NE oriented SHmax. A predominant NW direction of SHmax is also detected in mainland Sicily from earthquake focal mechanisms, but no well data are available in this region. In the northern part of Sicily (Aeolian Islands a ~N-S direction of SHmax is observed.

  18. Synergies between nonproliferation regimes: A pragmatic approach

    Full text: With the recent progress in establishing international nonproliferation regimes, the question of synergies between different verification and monitoring regimes is becoming more acute. Three multilateral and universal nonproliferation organisations covering safeguards on civil nuclear materials, nuclear testing, and chemical weapons are up and running. A regime on biological weapons is under negotiation. Several regional organisations concerned with monitoring nonproliferation commitments in the nuclear field are in place; others are being established. Past discussions on synergies between these regimes have suffered from being too far-reaching. These discussions often have not reflected adequately the political difficulties of cooperation between regimes with different membership, scope and institutional set-up. This paper takes a pragmatic look at exploiting synergies and identifies some potential and real overlaps in the work between different verification regimes. It argues for a bottom-up approach and identifies building blocks for collaboration between verification regimes. By realising such, more limited potential for cooperation, the ground could be prepared for exploiting other synergies between these regimes. (author)

  19. Capacitance densitometer for flow regime identification

    Shipp, Jr., Roy L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a capacitance densitometer for determining the flow regime of a two-phase flow system. A two-element capacitance densitometer is used in conjunction with a conventional single-beam gamma densitometer to unambiguously identify the prevailing flow regime and the average density of a flowing fluid.

  20. LOW DOSE MAGNESIUM SULPHATE REGIME FOR ECLAMPSIA

    Bangal V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pre- eclampsia is one of the commonest medical complications seen during pregnancy. It contributes significantly to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Dr.J.A.Pritchard in 1955, introduced magnesium sulphate for control of convulsions in eclampsia and is used worldwide. Considering the low body mass index of indian women, a low dose magnesium sulphate regime has been introduced by some authors. Present study was carried out at tertiary care centre in rural area. Fifty cases of eclampsia were randomly selected to find out the efficacy of low dose magnesium sulphate regime to control eclamptic convulsions. Maternal and perinatal outcome and magnesium toxicity were analyzed. It was observed that 86% cases responded to initial intravenous dose of 4 grams of 20% magnesium sulphate . Eight percent cases, who got recurrence of convulsion, were controlled by additional 2 grams of 20% magnesium sulphate. Six percent cases required shifting to standard Pritchard regime, as they did not respond to low dose magnesium sulphate regime. The average total dose of magnesium sulphate required for control of convulsions was 20 grams ie. 54.4% less than that of standard Pritchard regime. The maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality in the present study werecomparable to those of standard Pritchard regime. The study did not find a single case of magnesium related toxicity with low dose magnesium sulphate regime. Low dose magnesium sulphate regime was found to be safe and effective in eclampsia.

  1. Explaining the Transition Between Exchange Rate Regimes

    Masson, Paul; RUGE-MURCIA, Francisco J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the transition between exchange rate regimes using a Markov chain model with time-varying transition probabilities. The probabilities are parameterized as nonlinear functions of variables suggested by the currency crisis and optimal currency area literature. Results using annual data indicate that inflation, and to a lesser extent, output growth and trade openness help explain the exchange rate regime transition dynamics.

  2. LEGAL MATRIMONIAL REGIME IN B&H

    Boris Krešić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrimonial regime between spouses or between extramarital partners, and between parents and children is regulated by the Family Law Act of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation, hereinafter FLA B&HF (SG FBiH 35/05, 41/05, Family Law Act of the Republic of Srpska, hereinafter FLA RS (SG RS”54/02, 41/08 and the Family Law Act of Brčko District, hereinafter FLA BD (SG RS, 66/07. Legal rules used for the regulation of the matrimonial regime between spouses, as well as between spouses and third parties make matrimonial regime (Ponjavić, 2005, p. 361. Matrimonial regime between spouses in family legislation in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H is regulated in two following ways: as legal matrimonial regime and as contract matrimonial regime. Legal regime is the one which applies on spouses if not arranged otherwise prior to contracting marriage or during marriage. In this paper the author indicates the differences between the legal matrimonial regimes of the two entities as well as those between the entities and Brčko District of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  3. Strengthening the nuclear non-proliferation regime

    Although the nuclear non-proliferation regime has enjoyed considerable success, today the regime has never been under greater threat. Three states have challenged the objectives of the NPT, and there is a technology challenge - the spread of centrifuge enrichment technology and know-how. A major issue confronting the international community is, how to deal with a determined proliferator? Despite this gloomy scenario, however, the non-proliferation regime has considerable strengths - many of which can be developed further. The regime comprises complex interacting and mutually reinforcing elements. At its centre is the NPT - with IAEA safeguards as the Treaty's verification mechanism. Important complementary elements include: restraint in the supply and the acquisition of sensitive technologies; multilateral regimes such as the CTBT and proposed FMCT; various regional and bilateral regimes; the range of security and arms control arrangements outside the nuclear area (including other WMD regimes); and the development of proliferation-resistant technologies. Especially important are political incentives and sanctions in support of non-proliferation objectives. This paper outlines some of the key issues facing the non-proliferation regime

  4. Feasibility of a dual regime gyrotron

    The design concept of a 42/84 GHz, 500 kW, CW, dual-regime gyrotron for ECRH of plasma in an experimental Tokamak will be presented in this paper. Operation at 42 GHz is fundamental where as that in 84 GHz will be second harmonic so that a similar guidance system will be retained for dual regime operation. In this paper, the mode competition and mode selection procedures are presented for such a dual regime operation. Cold cavity design and self-consistent calculations will be carried out for power and efficiencies. (author)

  5. Framing of regimes and transition strategies

    Jensen, Jens Stissing

    2012-01-01

    This article suggests that transition strategies are always formulated in the context of specific representations of the regime and the challenges it faces. It is argued that the framing of a regime affects the envisioning of transition strategies. An analysis of the current development agenda for...... the housing construction sector in Denmark reveals the relevance and impacts of different regime framings. It is proposed that the ability to cope with framing issues as situated and political processes is at the core of the governance of transitions....

  6. The nuclear marketplace and the nonproliferation regime

    The development and acceptance of the international nonproliferation regime has been one of the most remarkable achievements of the postwar era. The nonproliferation regime has developed incrementally over time, often in spite of the inability of the two superpowers to come to grips with their own arms race. States otherwise zealous to protect their sovereignty have accepted international constraints on that same sovereignty where nuclear power is concerned. The challenge to the nonproliferation regime, then, is both serious and multifaceted. There is no single or overriding source of that regime's problems, nor is there a single solution. Rolling back the NNPA and ''letting the US nuclear industry compete'' make for a good slogan but will not change the seriousness of the nonproliferation challenge

  7. The Two Regimes of Postwar Shipping

    Iversen, Martin Jes; Tenold, Stig

    2014-01-01

    the bargaining that accompanied the shift from the national regime to the competitive regime. Specifically, we show that the new regime primarily accommodated the interests of private actors such as shipping companies, rather than the interests of the authorities and the trade unions.......The aim of this article is to illustrate the most important changes in the regulatory framework of the shipping sector from the 1960s to 2010, and to analyse the basis for, and effects of, these changes. In order to explain how the transformation has occurred, we use two traditional maritime...... nations—Denmark and Norway—as case studies. First, we introduce the two regimes of Danish and Norwegian shipping: ‘the national regime’ from the early 1960s to the mid-1970s; and ‘the competitive regime’, which was fully established by the middle of the 1990s and still persists. Then, we briefly sketch...

  8. FLOW REGIMES BELOW AERATORS FOR DISCHARGE TUNNELS

    MA Fei; WU Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    The flow regimes below an aerator influence directly the air entrainment and the cavitation damage control.Based on the theoretical considerations,the experiments of the aerator for a discharge tunnel were conducted,and the relationships between the flow regime and hydraulic and geometric parameters were investigated.The results showed that,there are two kinds of threshold values for the flow regime conversions.One is Fr1-2 standing for the conversion from the fully filled cavity to the partially filled cavity,and the other is Fr2-3 which shows the change from the partially filled cavity to the net air cavity.Two empirical expressions were obtained for the conversions of the flow regimes,which can be used in the designs of the aerators.

  9. Earth Regime Network Evolution Study (ERNESt)

    Menrad, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Speaker and Presenter at the Lincoln Laboratory Communications Workshop on April 5, 2016 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA. A visual presentation titled Earth Regimes Network Evolution Study (ERNESt).

  10. The international climate regime: towards consolidation collapse

    This article deals with the different modalities that exist to manage a problem of collective action in the field of climate negotiation. It uses two concepts of the International Political Economy (IPE): the concept of International Regime (IR) and the concept of Hegemony and / or Leadership. The course the international negotiation has taken between 1992 (Rio Convention) and march 2001 (the US rejection of the Kyoto Protocol of 1997) leads us, first, to question the conditions of existence as well as the viability of a non-hegemonic International Regime (Part One). Then, we discuss the perspectives for the 'post - Kyoto' era. After having examined the preferences of the three most active actors in the negotiation (USA, Europe, G77 + China) combined with the leadership capacities they possess, we identify three scenarios for the future: i) anarchy, ii) an international regime under the American hegemony, iii) an international regime under the European leadership (Part Two). (author)

  11. What is the economy of Ancien Regime?

    Jean-Yves Grenier

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the main features of the Ancien Regime economy and develop a “political economy” of European societies, particularly the French, during the central period of modernity (XVII-XVIII centuries

  12. Molecular motors in conservative and dissipative regimes

    Perez-Carrasco, R.; Sancho, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of a rotatory molecular motor under a conservative torque regime. We show that conservative and dissipative regimes present a different observable phenomenology. Our approach starts with a preliminary deterministic calculation of the motor cycle, which is complemented with stochastic simulations of a Langevin equation under a flashing ratchet potential. Finally, by using parameter values obtained from independent experimental information, our theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data of the F1-ATPase motor of the Bacillus PS3.

  13. Patent regimes and the commodification of knowledge

    Coriat, Benjamin; Weinstein, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the evolution of the intellectual property regime (IPR), and more precisely the patent regime, in the USA since the 19th century. To do so, we consider intellectual property laws within the context of wider changes in capitalism, focusing on two main historical phases: firstly, the period covering the formation and development of 'corporate capitalism' dominated by large corporations and then the new phase, which opened up in the 1980s, marked by the rise to power of finan...

  14. Regime shifts and inflation uncertainty in Peru

    Paúl Castillo; Alberto Humala; Vicente Tuesta

    2012-01-01

    The link between inflation and inflation uncertainty is evaluated using Peruvian data, in a context of changing monetary policies because of regime shifts. A Markov regime-switching heteroskedasticity model that includes unobserved components is used. The model shows how periods of high (low) inflation accompany periods of high (low) short- and long-run uncertainty in inflation. The results of the model also illustrate how, during the recent period of price stability in Peru, both permanent a...

  15. Inflation in the warm and cold regimes

    Berera, Arjun

    2006-01-01

    It is now understood that inflation dynamics comes in two forms, isentropic or cold inflation and nonisentropic or warm inflation. In the former, inflation occurs without radiation production, whereas in the latter both radiation production and inflation occur concurrently. Recent, detailed, quantum field theory calculations have shown that many generic inflation models, including hybrid inflation, which were believed only to have cold inflation regimes, in fact have regimes of both warm and ...

  16. Portfolio Selection with Jumps under Regime Switching

    Lin Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a continuous-time version of the mean-variance portfolio selection model with jumps under regime switching. The portfolio selection is proposed and analyzed for a market consisting of one bank account and multiple stocks. The random regime switching is assumed to be independent of the underlying Brownian motion and jump processes. A Markov chain modulated diffusion formulation is employed to model the problem.

  17. Forest damage and snow avalanche flow regime

    T. Feistl; Bebi, P.; M. Christen; Margreth, S.; Diefenbach, L.; P. Bartelt

    2015-01-01

    Snow avalanches break, uproot and overturn trees causing damage to forests. The extent of forest damage provides useful information on avalanche frequency and intensity. However, impact forces depend on avalanche flow regime. In this paper, we define avalanche loading cases representing four different avalanche flow regimes: powder, intermittent, dry and wet. Using a numerical model that simulates both powder and wet snow avalanches, we study documented events with forest ...

  18. Developmental Regimes in Africa synthesis report

    Booth, D.; Dietz, A.J.; Golooba-Mutebi, F.; Fuady, A.H.; Henley, D; Kelsall, T.; Leliveld, A.H.M.; Donge, van, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Many African countries have experienced sustained economic growth, but few have achieved the type of structural change, driven by rising productivity, that has transformed mass living standards in parts of Asia. In the Developmental Regimes in Africa Synthesis Report, editor David Booth examines how DRA research has shed new light on how developmental regimes might emerge and be sustained in Africa in the 21st century. He outlines a concept with defining features at three levels: policy conte...

  19. Improving the taxation regime for electric power

    In Norway, the present taxation regime for electric power is very complex. The power companies are currently charged with ordinary tax on profits, tax on economic rent, tax on natural resources and land tax. In addition there are the rules about licence fees, yield of power due to concession conditions, and reversion. The Norwegian Electricity Industry Association (EBL), assisted by a firm of lawyers, has proposed an improvement over the current taxation regime

  20. Regime Diagrams for K-Theory Dispersion

    Smith, Ronald B.

    2011-06-01

    In atmospheric dispersion, the "non-Gaussian" effects of gravitational settling, the vertical gradient in diffusivity and the surface deposition do not enter uniformly but rather break up parameter space into several discrete regimes. Here, we describe regime diagrams that are constructed for K-theory dispersion of effluent from a surface line source in unsheared inhomogeneous turbulence, using a previously derived Fourier-Hankel method. This K-theory formulation differs from the traditional one by keeping a non-zero diffusivity at the ground. This change allows for turbulent exchange between the canopy and the atmosphere and allows new natural length scales to emerge. The axes on the regime diagrams are non-dimensional distance defined as the ratio of downwind distance to the characteristic length scale for each effect. For each value of the ratio of settling speed to the K gradient, two to four regimes are found. Concentration formulae are given for each regime. The regime diagrams allow real dispersion problems to be categorized and the validity of end-state concentration formulae to be judged.

  1. Contribution to the study of 233U production with MOX-ThPu fuel in PWR reactor. Transition scenarios towards Th/233U iso-generating concepts in thermal spectrum. Development of the MURE fuel evolution code

    If nuclear power is to provide a significant fraction of the growing world energy demand, only through the breeding concept can the development of sustainable nuclear energy become a reality. The study of such a transition, from present-day nuclear technologies to future breeding concepts is therefore pertinent. Among these future concepts, those using the thorium cycle Th/U-233 in a thermal neutron spectrum are of particular interest; molten-salt type thermal reactors would allow for breeding while requiring comparatively low initial inventories of U-233. The upstream production of U-233 can be obtained through the use of thorium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel in present-day light water reactors. This work presents, firstly, the development of the MURE evolution code system, a C++ object-oriented code that allows the study, through Monte Carlo (M.C.) simulation, of nuclear reactors and the evolution of their fuel under neutron irradiation. The M.C. methods are well-suited for the study of any reactor, whether it'd be an existing reactor using a new kind of fuel or a future concept altogether, the simulation is only dependent on nuclear data. Exact and complex geometries can be simulated and continuous energy particle transport is performed. MURE is an interface with MCNP, the well-known and validated transport code, that allows, among other functionalities, to simulate constant power and constant reactivity evolutions. Secondly, the study of MOX ThPu fuel in a conventional light water reactor (REP) is presented; it explores different plutonium concentrations and isotopic qualities in order to evaluate their safety characteristics. Simulation of their evolution allows us to quantify the production of U-233 at the end of burnup. Last, different french scenarios validating a possible transition towards a park of thermal Th/U-233 breeders, are presented. In these scenarios, U-233 is produced in ThPu moxed light water reactors. (author)

  2. Fiscal Policy and Welfare under Different Exchange Rate Regimes

    Østrup, Finn

    regime in whichthe monetary authority optimises preferences which include an employment targetand an inflation target. As government spending affects the representativeindividual's utility, the choice of exchange rate regime has an impact on welfare.Keywords: exchange rate regimes; fiscal policy...

  3. Angular distribution and inertia parameters i Alpha-induced fission of 232Th, 233U, and 238U

    Rahimi Farhad M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the selected fission fragment angular distribution from alpha induced fission is made by using an exact theoretical expression. Theoretical anisotropics obtained with transition state modes are compared with their corresponding experimental values. The agreement between the calculated and experimental values is very good. The values of the statistical parameter K02 are used for calculation of the inertia parameters. The results indicate an increase in the moment of inertia.

  4. Co-processing, catalytic reduction and remote controlled oxalate precipitation - a new route for 233U/Th MOX

    Reprocessing and recycling of fissile and fertile nuclides together without their individual separation is considered to be one of the few proliferation resistant approaches for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. The present paper explores the possibility of reducing the uranium to U4+ catalytically using H2 gas, co-precipitating both Th and U as oxalate and final conversion to oxide

  5. Determination of the Hall Thruster Operating Regimes

    L. Dorf; V. Semenov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-04-09

    A quasi one-dimensional (1-D) steady-state model of the Hall thruster is presented. For the same discharge voltage two operating regimes are possible -- with and without the anode sheath. For given mass flow rate, magnetic field profile and discharge voltage a unique solution can be constructed, assuming that the thruster operates in one of the regimes. However, we show that for a given temperature profile the applied discharge voltage uniquely determines the operating regime: for discharge voltages greater than a certain value, the sheath disappears. That result is obtained over a wide range of incoming neutral velocities, channel lengths and widths, and cathode plane locations. It is also shown that a good correlation between the quasi 1-D model and experimental results can be achieved by selecting an appropriate electron mobility and temperature profile.

  6. Laser-Nucleus Interactions: The Quasiadiabatic Regime

    Pálffy, Adriana; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semi-quantitative study of the quasiadiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burnup and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  7. Fermi's golden rule beyond the Zeno regime

    Debierre, Vincent; Goessens, Isabelle; Brainis, Edouard; Durt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    We reconsider the problem of the spontaneous emission of light by an excited atomic state. We scrutinize the survival probability of this excited state for very short times, in the so-called Zeno regime, for which we show that the dynamics is dictated by a coherent, in-phase, response of the on-shell and off-shell vacuum modes. We also develop a perturbative approach in order to interpolate between different temporal regimes: the Zeno, golden rule (linear), and Wigner-Weisskopf (exponential) regimes. We compare results obtained with the E ̂.x ̂ and A ̂.p ̂ interaction Hamiltonians, using successively the dipole approximation and the exact coupling.

  8. Progress towards a global nuclear liability regime

    During its April 2014 meeting, the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy held a policy debate on 'Progress towards a Global Nuclear Liability Regime'. The Steering Committee heard presentations from several experts on nuclear liability issues. To prepare the delegates to the Steering Committee for the policy debate, the NEA Secretariat prepared a background note on the status of the nuclear liability regimes, as well as on current issues and challenges in implementing the regimes. This article is based on the background note and is intended to provide basic information on the relevant international conventions and an overview of recent developments to enhance the understanding of the legal framework in which policy-makers and practitioners are engaging to respond to the call for broader adherence to the international liability instruments. (authors)

  9. Stochastic dynamical models for ecological regime shifts

    Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Carstensen, Jacob; Madsen, Henrik; Andersen, Tom

    Ecosystems are influenced by a variety of known and unknown drivers. Unknown drivers should be modeled as noise and it is therefore important to analyze how noise influences the deterministic skeleton of system equations. The deterministic skeleton of stochastic dynamical models contains the...... physical and biological knowledge of the system, and nonlinearities introduced here can generate regime shifts or enhance the probability of regime shifts in the case of stochastic models, typically characterized by a threshold value for the known driver. A simple model for light competition between...... phytoplankton and benthic vegetation with feedback mechanisms is formulated, and it is demonstrated that bistability can occur for specific parameter settings. When stochastic input and stochastic propagation of the states are applied on the system regime shifts occur more frequently, and the threshold...

  10. Causas estruturais e consequências dos regimes internacionais: regimes como variáveis intervenientes

    Stephen D. Krasner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Os regimes internacionais são definidos como princípios, normas, regras e procedimentos de tomada de decisões ao redor dos quais as expectativas dos atores convergem em uma dada área-tema. Como ponto de partida, os regimes são conceituados como variáveis intervenientes, estando entre fatores causais básicos e os resultados e comportamentos relacionados. Há três visões a respeito da importância dos regimes: as orientações estruturais convencionais desvalorizam os regimes como sendo, na melhor das hipóteses, ineficazes; as orientações grocianas vêem os regimes como componentes íntimos do sistema internacional; as perspectivas estruturalistas modificadas vêem os regimes como significativos somente em certas condições restritas. Para os argumentos grociano e estruturalista modificado - que concordam com a visão de que os regimes podem influenciar resultados e comportamentos - , o desenvolvimento de regimes é visto como uma função de cinco variáveis causais básicas: auto-interesse egoísta; poder político; normas e princípios difusos; usos e costumes; conhecimento.

  11. Light focusing in the Anderson Regime

    Leonetti, Marco; Mafi, Arash; Conti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Anderson localization is a regime in which diffusion is inhibited and waves (also electromagnetic waves) get localized. Here we exploit adaptive optics to achieve focusing in disordered optical fibers in the Anderson regime. By wavefront shaping and optimization, we observe the generation of a propagation invariant beam, where light is trapped transversally by disorder, and show that Anderson localizations can be also excited by extended speckled beams. We demonstrate that disordered fibers allow a more efficient focusing action with respect to standard fibers in a way independent of their length, because of the propagation invariant features and cooperative action of transverse localizations.

  12. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime.

    Amet, F; Ke, C T; Borzenets, I V; Wang, J; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Deacon, R S; Yamamoto, M; Bomze, Y; Tarucha, S; Finkelstein, G

    2016-05-20

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing. PMID:27199424

  13. Supercurrent in the quantum Hall regime

    Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Borzenets, I. V.; Wang, J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Deacon, R. S.; Yamamoto, M.; Bomze, Y.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-05-01

    A promising route for creating topological states and excitations is to combine superconductivity and the quantum Hall (QH) effect. Despite this potential, signatures of superconductivity in the QH regime remain scarce, and a superconducting current through a QH weak link has been challenging to observe. We demonstrate the existence of a distinct supercurrent mechanism in encapsulated graphene samples contacted by superconducting electrodes, in magnetic fields as high as 2 tesla. The observation of a supercurrent in the QH regime marks an important step in the quest for exotic topological excitations, such as Majorana fermions and parafermions, which may find applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  14. The oil tax regime of Azerbaijan

    Anderson, Gerard

    1998-07-01

    Azerbaijan has a long history in the oil business and a chance of a spectacular future. To understand why the oil tax regime evolved into its present form and how it is likely to develop, it is necessary to know something of the country's history and the commercial environment. Consequently the presentation begins by discussing these items. It then outlines the Production Sharing Agreement regime in Azerbaijan and then deals with the Kazakh and Georgian Tax Codes, as these are likely to be the basis of a new general tax law in Azerbaijan from 1999. The presentation includes comments on the New Draft Tax Code of 1998.

  15. WELFARE REGIMES IN LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

    Melisa Campana-Alabarce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a characterization of Latin American and Caribbean Welfare regimes in historiographical perspective. Firstly, it makes a review of the emergence conditions of Welfare States in Western Europe and its core features, with particular emphasis on its role as a method to regulate inequalities in industrial capitalism. Dialoguing with it, then stops in the specific configurations that welfare regimes have taken in Latin America during the course of the twentieth century. Finally, it provides a map of its contemporary features and the major challenges that the States of the region face in his capacity as right guarantors for the future.

  16. High temperature regime of corium concrete interactions

    The high temperature regime of corium concrete interaction is examined from the point of view of its sensitivity to the completeness of reaction of the gaseous concrete decomposition products with the metallic components of the melt. A program based on the DECOMP modeling approach has been utilized for this purpose. For a corium/concrete heat transfer that is consistent with the erosion rates observed in the BETA experiments the primary effect of the extent of reaction completeness is on the duration of the high temperature regime. This implies a potentially important effect on the aerosols stripped out during this portion of the interaction

  17. Primary Qualification of Matrimonial Regime Notion

    Nadia Cerasela ANITEI

    2012-01-01

    By adopting Law no. 287 of July 17, 2009 on the Civil Code republished by Law no. 71/2011 the new Civil Code is subject to the modern legislations tendencies to create a triple balance in terms of property relations between spouses by means of the matrimonial property regimes established:1. between spouses: through the appearance of matrimonial agreements, which have led to the adoption of more flexible legal rules which allow spouses a certain freedom to choose the regime of patrimonial rela...

  18. Economic performance and North Korean regime legitimacy

    Moore, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines the sources of legitimacy for the North Korean regime in an effort to explain what role, if any, economic performance has played in keeping the Kim family in power. This thesis provides a historical look at the development of the North Korean regime from the beginning under Kim Il-sung to the current generation of rule under Kim Jong-un. The core argument of the thesis is broken into two major time periods, with the economic downturn of the early 1990s serving as the divi...

  19. Quaternary Faults and Stress Regime of Venezuela

    F.A. Audemard M.; A. Singer P.; J-P. Soulas

    2006-01-01

    Spatial configuration of Quaternary active tectonic features along the southern Caribbean plate boundary suggests that the region is subject to a compressive strike-slip (transpressional senso lato) regime, characterized by a NNW-SSE maximum horizontal stress (sH=s1) and/or an ENE-WSW minimum (s h=s3 or s2) horizontal stress. Stress inversion applied to fault-plane kinematic indicators measured essentially in Plio-Quaternary sedimentary rocks confirms this tectonic regime. Accordingly, this s...

  20. Optimal dividend distribution under Markov regime switching

    Z. Jiang; M. Pistorius

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the problem of optimal dividend distribution for a company in the presence of regime shifts. We consider a company whose cumulative net revenues evolve as a Brownian motion with positive drift that is modulated by a finite state Markov chain, and model the discount rate as a determini

  1. European welfare regimes: Political orientations versus poverty

    Josifidis Kosta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This inquiry analyzes how political orientations shape welfare states and labour market institutions when seeking to reduce poverty. In order to identify effects of these two key variables, we conduct a panel regression analysis that includes two poverty measures: poverty rates before and after social spending. This inquiry considers 14 EU countries, and in the period from 1995 to 2008, which are grouped according to welfare state regimes. We consider Social Democratic, Corporatist, Mediterranean and Liberal welfare state regimes. Panel regression results indicate that political orientation engenders no significant statistically measurable effects on poverty rates before social spending. Effects register, however, as significant when considering poverty rates after social spending. With respect to the first set of results, we advance two key explanations. First, we note a longer period of time is necessary in order to observe actual effects of political orientation on market generated poverty. Second, political parties with their respective programs do not register as influential enough to solve social problems related to income distribution when taken alone. Influences register as indirect and are expressed through changes in employment rates and social spending. The second set of results support the hypothesis that a selected political regime does indeed contribute to poverty reduction. In sum, political orientation and political regime does indeed affect poverty through welfare state institutions, as well as through labour market institutions.

  2. Early detection of ecosystem regime shifts

    Lindegren, Martin; Dakos, Vasilis; Groeger, Joachim P.; Gardmark, Anna; Kornilovs, Georgs; Otto, Saskia A.; Moellmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    methods may have limited utility in ecosystem-based management as they show no or weak potential for early-warning. We therefore propose a multiple method approach for early detection of ecosystem regime shifts in monitoring data that may be useful in informing timely management actions in the face of...

  3. A Comparative Typology of Pension Regimes

    Arjan Soede; Cok Vrooman

    2008-01-01

    This report presents an empirical typology of pension regimes in the European Union, the US, Canada, Australia and Norway. The categorisation is based on 34 quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the mandatory parts of the pension systems in these countries. The empirical analysis shows tha

  4. REGIME ALIMENTAR DE GIRINOS DE RÃ TOURO

    José Teixeira de Seixas Filho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We used 525 bullfrog tadpoles, distributed into 15 boxes with one tadpole per liter. The water was daily renewal (200%. The feeding regimes were constituted of five arrangements using seven commercial rations with levels of 22, 28, 32, 36, 40, 45 and 55% of crude protein (CP, supplied every 15 days. We used a random blocks design, subdivided plots with three replications. The subplots were constituted of five biometries: at the beginning of the experiment, at 15, 30, 45, and 60 days. The tadpoles submitted to feeding regime FR1, with 22, 32, 36, and 40% of CP, presented the highest consumption and the same performance as the others. Tadpoles that received FR5, with 40, 45, 45 and 50% of CP, presented greater weight, however, they showed smaller weight gain, greater consumption, conversion and mortality, indicating that this regime is expensive and not adequate for management. Feeding regimes FR2, with 28, 32, 36 and 40% of CP, and FR3, with 32, 36, 40 and 45% of CP, were more adjusted to this kind of management. Animals in all treatments showed higher performance that animals fed traditionally.

  5. Estimation in autoregressive models with Markov regime

    Ríos, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Luis

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we derive the consistency of the penalized likelihood method for the number state of the hidden Markov chain in autoregressive models with Markov regimen. Using a SAEM type algorithm to estimate the models parameters. We test the null hypothesis of hidden Markov Model against an autoregressive process with Markov regime.

  6. Quality Regimes in Agro-Food Industries

    Staricco, Juan Ignacio; Ponte, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine the transformative potential of changing quality regimes in agro-food industries through the analysis of whether Fair Trade wine in Argentina provides a meaningful economic alternative that goes beyond the impact it has on direct beneficiaries. The wine sector has a long...

  7. Radiative effects of global MODIS cloud regimes

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin; Kato, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    We update previously published Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global cloud regimes (CRs) using the latest MODIS cloud retrievals in the Collection 6 data set. We implement a slightly different derivation method, investigate the composition of the regimes, and then proceed to examine several aspects of CR radiative appearance with the aid of various radiative flux data sets. Our results clearly show that the CRs are radiatively distinct in terms of shortwave, longwave, and their combined (total) cloud radiative effect. We show that we can clearly distinguish regimes based on whether they radiatively cool or warm the atmosphere, and thanks to radiative heating profiles, to discern the vertical distribution of cooling and warming. Terra and Aqua comparisons provide information about the degree to which morning and afternoon occurrences of regimes affect the symmetry of CR radiative contribution. We examine how the radiative discrepancies among multiple irradiance data sets suffering from imperfect spatiotemporal matching depend on CR and whether they are therefore related to the complexity of cloud structure, its interpretation by different observational systems, and its subsequent representation in radiative transfer calculations.

  8. An emissions trading regime for Canada

    In 1998, over twelve papers were published on emissions trading regimes in Canada by the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE), a federal government agency whose members represent stakeholders as varied as business, environmental groups, academics, aboriginal groups and others. One of the recommendations that emerged was for the computer modelling of the possibilities that had been identified for a domestic trading regime in Canada for greenhouse gases. It is unclear whether the modelling was ever performed as the file was taken over by the Finance Department under the umbrella of a special emission trading table that examined Canada's commitment under the Kyoto Protocol. The author examined questions pertaining to whether a domestic trading regime is essential, and what its characteristics should be in case it was deemed essential or advisable to have one. The upstream versus downstream application was looked at, as well as grand-fathering versus auction. Provincial issues were then addressed, followed by meshing with a credit system. International systems were reviewed. Early action was discussed, whereby an emitter seeks credit for action taken toward reductions since the original reference year of 1990. The case of emitters having bought or sold permits since the original reference years will also want those trades recognized under a trading regime. The author indicated that it seems probable that an emission trading system will eventually be implemented and that a debate on the issue should be initiated early

  9. The global safety regime - Setting the stage

    Full text: The existing global safety regime has arisen from the exercise of sovereign authority, with an overlay of voluntary international cooperation from a network of international and regional organizations and intergovernmental agreements. This system has, in the main, served us well. For several reasons, the time is ripe to consider the desired shape of a future global safety regime and to take steps to achieve it. First, every nation's reliance on nuclear power is hostage to some extent to safety performance elsewhere in the world because of the effects on public attitudes and hence there is an interest in ensuring achievement of common standards. Second, the world is increasingly interdependent and the vendors of nuclear power plants seek to market their products throughout the globe. Efficiency would arise from the avoidance of needless differences in approach that require custom modifications from country to country. Finally, we have much to learn from each other and a common effort would strengthen us all. Such an effort might also serve to enhance public confidence. Some possible characteristics of such a regime can be identified. The regime should reflect a global consensus on the level of safety that should be achieved. There should be sufficient standardization of approach so that expertise and equipment can be used everywhere without significant modification. There should be efforts to ensure a fundamental commitment to safety and the encouragement of a safety culture. And there should be efforts to adopt more widely the best regulatory practices, recognizing that some modifications in approach may be necessary to reflect each nation's legal and social culture. At the same type, the regime should have the characteristics of flexibility, transparency, stability, practicality, and encouragement of competence. (author)

  10. The global safety regime - Setting the stage

    The existing global safety regime has arisen from the exercise of sovereign authority, with an overlay of voluntary international cooperation from a network of international and regional organizations and intergovernmental agreements. This system has, in the main, served us well. For several reasons, the time is ripe to consider the desired shape of a future global safety regime and to take steps to achieve it. First, every nation's reliance on nuclear power is hostage to some extent to safety performance elsewhere in the world because of the effects on public attitudes and hence there is an interest in ensuring achievement of common standards. Second, the world is increasingly interdependent and the vendors of nuclear power plants seek to market their products throughout the globe. Efficiency would arise from the avoidance of needless differences in approach that require custom modifications from country to country. Finally, we have much to learn from each other and a common effort would strengthen us all. Such an effort might also serve to enhance public confidence. Some possible characteristics of such a regime can be identified. The regime should reflect a global consensus on the level of safety that should be achieved. There should be sufficient standardization of approach so that expertise and equipment can be used everywhere without significant modification. There should be efforts to ensure a fundamental commitment to safety and the encouragement of a safety culture. And there should be efforts to adopt more widely the best regulatory practices, recognizing that some modifications in approach may be necessary to reflect each nation's legal and social culture. At the same type, the regime should have the characteristics of flexibility, transparency, stability, practicality, and encouragement of competence. (author)

  11. De facto and official exchange rate regimes in transition economies

    von Hagen, Jürgen; Zhou, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical investigation on the discrepancies between official exchange rate regimes and de facto exchange rate policies in transition economies. Since official and de facto regime choices are not independent of each other, we adopt a bivariate probit model to describe the joint determination of the two regime choices. After finding the important determinants of both regime choices, we use a univariate probit model to describe the determination of regime discrepancies. W...

  12. The Effect of Market Regimes on Style Allocation

    Ammann, Manuel; Verhofen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We analyse time-varying risk premia and the implications for portfolio choice. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, we estimate a multivariate regime-switching model for the Carhart (1997) four factor model. We find two clearly separable Regimes with different mean returns, volatilities and correlations. In the High-Variance Regime, only value stocks deliver a good performance, whereas in the Low-Variance Regime, the market portfolio and momentum stocks promise high returns. Regime-...

  13. Regime shifts in the anthropocene: drivers, risks, and resilience.

    Rocha, Juan Carlos; Peterson, Garry D; Biggs, Reinette

    2015-01-01

    Many ecosystems can experience regime shifts: surprising, large and persistent changes in the function and structure of ecosystems. Assessing whether continued global change will lead to further regime shifts, or has the potential to trigger cascading regime shifts has been a central question in global change policy. Addressing this issue has, however, been hampered by the focus of regime shift research on specific cases and types of regime shifts. To systematically assess the global risk of regime shifts we conducted a comparative analysis of 25 generic types of regime shifts across marine, terrestrial and polar systems; identifying their drivers, and impacts on ecosystem services. Our results show that the drivers of regime shifts are diverse and co-occur strongly, which suggests that continued global change can be expected to synchronously increase the risk of multiple regime shifts. Furthermore, many regime shift drivers are related to climate change and food production, whose links to the continued expansion of human activities makes them difficult to limit. Because many regime shifts can amplify the drivers of other regime shifts, continued global change can also be expected to increase the risk of cascading regime shifts. Nevertheless, the variety of scales at which regime shift drivers operate provides opportunities for reducing the risk of many types of regime shifts by addressing local or regional drivers, even in the absence of rapid reduction of global drivers. PMID:26267896

  14. Regimes de espaço

    Eric Landowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Space Regimes - Based on a general model of interaction, the present analysis attempts to account for the diversity of the ways space may be apprehended in lived experience. It leads to the definition of four configurations that correspond to as many regimes of relation with the environing world. The conventional space of the circulation of values takes the archetypical shape of the net (incarnated today by Internet. The operational space is that of our dealing with objects within a material environment seen as a tissue of stable and intelligible relations. The experienced space of bodies’ movement, to which one may give as an emblem the spiral, expresses the dynamics of sensitive relationships between the self and the other. The existential space is that of our presence in a universe without boundaries, which no one can properly represent oneself but that nonetheless haunts art and thought: its figure is the abyss.

  15. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime

    2008-01-01

    The key reasons that the present method cannot be used to solve the industrial multi- phase flow pattern recognition are clarified firstly. The prerequisite to realize the online recognition is proposed and recognition rules for partial flow pattern are obtained based on the massive experimental data. The standard templates for every flow regime feature are calculated with self-organization cluster algorithm. The multi-sensor data fusion method is proposed to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime with the pressure and differential pressure signals, which overcomes the severe influence of fluid flow velocity and the oil fraction on the recognition. The online recognition method is tested in the practice, which has less than 10 percent measurement error. The method takes advantages of high confidence, good fault tolerance and less requirement of single sensor performance.

  16. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime

    BAI BoFeng; ZHANG ShaoJun; ZHAO Liang; ZHANG XiMin; GUO LieJin

    2008-01-01

    The key reasons that the present method cannot be used to solve the industrial multi-phase flow pattern recognition are clarified firstly. The prerequisite to realize the online recognition is proposed and recognition rules for partial flow pattern are obtained based on the massive experimental data. The standard templates for every flow regime feature are calculated with self-organization cluster algorithm. The multi-sensor data fusion method is proposed to realize the online recognition of multiphase flow regime with the pressure and differential pressure signals, which overcomes the severe influence of fluid flow velocity and the oil fraction on the recognition. The online recognition method is tested in the practice, which has less than 10 percent measurement error. The method takes advantages of high confidence, good fault tolerance and less requirement of single sensor performance.

  17. Recent Activities on Global Nuclear Safety Regime

    Recently, rapid progress on the globalization of the nuclear safety issues is being made in IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its member states. With the globalization, the need for international cooperation among international bodies and member states continues to grow for resolving these universal nuclear safety issues. Furthermore, the importance of strengthening the global nuclear safety regime is emphasized through various means, such as efforts in application of IAEA safety standards to all nuclear installations in the world and in strengthening the code of conduct and the convention on nuclear safety. In this regards, it is important for us to keep up with the activities related with the global nuclear safety regime as an IAEA member state and a leading country in nuclear safety regulation

  18. Dominant takeover regimes for genetic algorithms

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a machine-based optimization routine which connects evolutionary learning to natural genetic laws. The present work addresses the problem of obtaining the dominant takeover regimes in the GA dynamics. Estimated GA run times are computed for slow and fast convergence in the limits of high and low fitness ratios. Using Euler's device for obtaining partial sums in closed forms, the result relaxes the previously held requirements for long time limits. Analytical solution reveal that appropriately accelerated regimes can mark the ascendancy of the most fit solution. In virtually all cases, the weak (logarithmic) dependence of convergence time on problem size demonstrates the potential for the GA to solve large N-P complete problems.

  19. Progress towards a global nuclear liability regime

    As the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant accident brought a renewed focus to the discussion of international nuclear liability regimes, and notably the administration of a liability system to compensate damages resulting from a nuclear accident, this article recalls the background on existing international nuclear liability conventions (original and revised Paris and Vienna conventions), briefly indicates the common principles reflected in the international nuclear liability conventions. The author outlines the challenges in achieving a global nuclear liability regime, reports and comments the Japanese experience in handling compensation issues in the wake of the Fukushima accident. He gives an overview of recent developments: IAEA action plan on nuclear safety, action of the International Expert Group on Nuclear Liability (INLEX), CSC or Convention on Supplementary Compensation

  20. Energy regime choices: nuclear or not?

    Elliott, David

    2006-01-01

    The energy system in industrialized countries is changing in what can be seen as an example of the technological regime change, reflecting a wider shift towards environmentally sustain-able technology which may impact on all sectors in the economy. In recent years, the emphasis in the UK's power generation system has increasingly been on smaller scale power plants, combined cycle gas turbine plants and wind farms of the order of 20-100 megawatts instead of giant gigawatt coal and nuclear p...

  1. Tax incentive regimes: models and research methods

    Sokolovska, Olena; Sokolovskyi, Dmytro

    2014-01-01

    Paper deals with problem of effectiveness of tax incentive regimes. Support of priority industries remains currently important for transition economies. At once, such countries more often than developed ones face the imperfection of tax incentive mechanisms. Notably, such problems are common to Ukrainian and Moldavian economies, where the legislative support or its implementation in the area of preferential taxation of innovative enterprises which contribute essentially to sustainable develop...

  2. Taxation, corruption and the exchange rate regime

    Hefeker, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyzes the relation between institutional quality, such as corruption, in a country and its monetary regime. It is shown that a credibly fixed exchange rate to a low inflation country, like a currency board, can reduce corruption and improve the fiscal system. A monetary union, however, has ambiguous effects. I find that that there is convergence between countries with regard to the level of corruption.

  3. Monetary policy regimes and the Nordic model

    Schewe, Theo

    2015-01-01

    In many contexts, the Nordic countries are regarded as a natural bloc of nations that have common political, cultural and economic characteristics. Open to globalisation, the small Nordic countries are exposed to strong global competition and cyclical influences. Therefore, the basis of the model may be to combine collective risk sharing and openness to globalisation. Studies of the Nordic model do not focus on the question whether the monetary policy regime is a constitutive element of the m...

  4. Law and Courts in Authoritarian Regimes

    Moustafa, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    "Once regarded as mere pawns of their regimes, courts in authoraitarian states are now the subject of considerable attention within the field of comparative judicial politics.  New research examines the ways in which law and courts are deployed as instruments of governance, how they structure state-society contention, and the circumstances in which courts are transformed into sites of active resistance.  This new body of research constitutes an emergent field of inquiry, while simul...

  5. Exchange Rate Regimes and International Business Cycles

    Theptida Sopraseuth

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of exchange rate regimes on international business cycles and focuses on the consequences of membership to the European Monetary System. The volatility puzzle uncovered by Baxter and Stockman [1989, Journal of Monetary Economics 23, 377–401] after assessing the consequences of the Bretton Woods system turns out to be a robust stylized fact: real and nominal exchange rates display a higher volatility under floating rates while the variability of macroeconom...

  6. Snowpack regimes of the Western United States

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Molotch, Noah P.

    2014-01-01

    Snow accumulation and melt patterns play a significant role in the water, energy, carbon, and nutrient cycles in the montane environments of the Western United States. Recent studies have illustrated that changes in the snow/rainfall apportionments and snow accumulation and melt patterns may occur as a consequence of changes in climate in the region. In order to understand how these changes may affect the snow regimes of the region, the current characteristics of the snow accumulation and mel...

  7. Financing welfare regimes: mapping heterogeneous revenue structures

    Gough, Ian; Abu-Sharkh, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    This article studies how the composition of public revenues in terms of sources (such as taxation, social insurance contributions, mineral rents, foreign aid) is associated with different welfare regimes and social policy outcomes. It is divided into two halves: a review of literature and research, and a cross-national data analysis. The first half reviews literature on the emergence of tax and revenue systems in the West, and on the relevance of these frameworks and findings to developing co...

  8. The Forex Regime and EMU Expansion

    Foreest, P.W.; de Vries, Casper

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that the choice of the foreign exchange regime is not of first order importance for achieving high output growth. It is argued that due to the forward looking nature of the foreign exchange market, exchange rate stability hinges on the current and anticipated coherency of monetary and fiscal policies. We demonstrate this empirically on a panel including potential EMU accession countries. By means of rank regression analysis we uncover the partial links across the ...

  9. Dynamic Regime of Ignition of Solid Propellant

    Zolotorev Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a dynamic regime of exposure of the radiant flux on the sample of gun-cotton. Obtained time the ignition of gun-cotton in the heating conditions of increasing heat flux in the range from 0.2 W/cm2 to 22 W/cm2. A comparison of the delay times of the ignition when heated variable and constant heat flux.

  10. Deuteron structure in the deep inelastic regime

    Canal, C A Garcìa; Vento, V

    2016-01-01

    We study nuclear effects on the deuteron in the deep inelastic regime using the newest available data analyzing their $Q^2$ dependence. We conclude that precise EMC ratios for large $Q^2$ (> 30, GeV$^2$) cannot be obtained without considering these nuclear effects. For this purpose we use a scheme which parametrizes these effects in a simple manner and compare our results with other recent proposals.

  11. Financial Fragility and the Exchange Rate Regime

    Chang, Roberto; Velasco, Andres

    1998-01-01

    We study financial fragility, exchange rate crises and monetary policy in an open economy model in which banks are maturity transformers as in Diamond-Dybvig. The banking system, the exchange rate regime, and central bank credit policy are seen as parts of a mechanism intended to maximize social welfare; if the mechanism fails, banking crises and speculative attacks become possible. We compare currency boards, fixed rate and flexible rates, with and without a lender of last resort. A currency...

  12. Tax compliance under tax regime changes

    Heinemann, Friedrich; Kocher, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the compliance effects of tax regime changes. According to the economic model of tax evasion, a tax reform should affect compliance through its impact on tax rates and incentives. Our findings demonstrate the importance of at least two further effects not covered by the traditional model: First, reform losers tend to evade more taxes after the reform. Second, a reform from a proportionate to a progressive system decreases compliance compared to a switch in the revers...

  13. APPLICABLE LAW PRINCIPLES FOR MATRIMONIAL PROPERTY REGIMES

    Andreea-Lorena CODREANU

    2014-01-01

    More and more often, marriages are concluded between people of different nationalities, which brings an extraneous dimension to the legal status and matrimonial property regime jurisdiction conflict. Many European states (among which Romania, through its new Civil Code) offer the advantage of clauses that could be used by any of the spouses, with regard to the applicable law. In case of divorce, consequences differ with the applicable law. Spouses who divorce and divide their assets based on ...

  14. Corruption in Privatization and Governance Regimes

    Maria Cristina Molinari

    2011-01-01

    We consider the choice to privatize the provision of a public good in a hierarchical model with three layers: a Central Government, a decentralized agency and a (private or public) manager. In a good governance regime the privatization can be devolved upon the decentralized agency while it cannot when the governance is bad. There are two types of information asymmetries: managers are privately informed of their efficiency in reducing costs (and quality) and only the decentralized agency knows...

  15. Marginal Mean Models for Dynamic Regimes

    Murphy, S A; Laan, M.J. van der; Robins, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic treatment regime is a list of rules for how the level of treatment will be tailored through time to an individual’s changing severity. In general, individuals who receive the highest level of treatment are the individuals with the greatest severity and need for treatment. Thus there is planned selection of the treatment dose. In addition to the planned selection mandated by the treatment rules, the use of staff judgment results in unplanned selection of the treatment level. Given ob...

  16. Nonlinear diffusion regimes in stochastic magnetic fields

    The transport of collisional particles in stochastic magnetic fields is studied using the decorrelation trajectory method. The nonlinear effect of magnetic line trapping is considered together with particle collisions. The running diffusion coefficient is determined for arbitrary values of the statistical parameters of the stochastic magnetic field and of the collisional velocity. New diffusion regimes are found in the conditions for which the trapping of magnetic field lines is effective. (author)

  17. Exchange Rate Regimes, Location, and Specialization

    Luca Antonio Ricci

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of fixed versus flexible exchange rates on firms' location choices and on countries' specialization patterns. In a two-country, twodifferentiated-goods monetary model, uncertainty arises after wages are set and prices are optimally chosen. The paper shows that countries are more specialized under flexible than fixed rates, which indicates that the pattern of specialization is not uniquely defined by trade models but also depends on the exchange rate regime....

  18. Supersonic free jet, molecular free regime

    The structure of the free jet emitted by a converging nozzle as obtained by the method of characteristics by Ashkenas and Sherman is described in details. In particular the dependence of the field variable by the distance from the nozzle is given. The transition from continuum to molecular free regime is then considered and the sudden freeze approximation is introduced. The processing of monoatomic and polyatomic gasses is also considered

  19. British Columbia's new coalbed methane royalty regime

    The British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines is promoting the development of the coalbed methane (CBM) industry in the province in order to make CBM a viable and competitive investment option for industry. It is establishing a regulatory and fiscal regime for CBM development. Issues of concern regarding CBM development include water production, gas production rates, well numbers, and marginal economics. The features of the CBM royalty regime include a new producer cost of service allowance, the creation of a CBM royalty tax bank to collect excess PCOS allowances, and a royalty tax credit for wells drilled by the end of February, 2004. The marginal well adjustment factor threshold has been raised from 180 mcf per day to 600 mcf per day for CBM only. It was noted that royalties will probably not be payable for several years following the first commercial well because royalties are very depending on capital and operating costs, local infrastructure and price. Royalty regimes cannot save CBM from low gas prices, poor resources or economics. 2 figs

  20. QCD in the delta-Regime

    Bietenholz, W; Gockeler, M; Horsley, R; Nakamura, Y; Pleiter, D; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Zanotti, J M

    2011-01-01

    The delta-regime of QCD is characterised by light quarks in a small spatial box, but a large extent in (Euclidean) time. In this setting a specific variant of chiral perturbation theory - the delta-expansion - applies, based on a quantum mechanical treatment of the quasi one-dimensional system. In particular, for vanishing quark masses one obtains a residual pion mass M_pi^R, which has been computed to the third order in the delta-expansion. A comparison with numerical measurements of this residual mass allows for a new determination of some Low Energy Constants, which appear in the chiral Lagrangian. We first review the attempts to simulate 2-flavour QCD directly in the delta-regime. This is very tedious, but results compatible with the predictions for M_pi^R have been obtained. Then we show that an extrapolation of pion masses measured in a larger volume towards the delta-regime leads to good agreement with the theoretical predictions. From those results, we also extract a value for the (controversial) sub-...

  1. QCD in the δ-Regime

    The (δ-regime of QCD is characterised by light quarks in a small spatial box, but a large extent in (Euclidean) time. In this setting a specific variant of chiral perturbation theory - the (δ-expansion - applies, based on a quantum mechanical treatment of the quasi one-dimensional system. In particular, for vanishing quark masses one obtains a residual pion mass MRπ, which has been computed to the third order in the δ-expansion. A comparison with numerical measurements of this residual mass allows for a new determination of some Low Energy Constants, which appear in the chiral Lagrangian. We first review the attempts to simulate 2-flavour QCD directly in the δ-regime. This is very tedious, but results compatible with the predictions for MRπ, have been obtained. Then we show that an extrapolation of pion masses measured in a larger volume towards the (δ-regime leads to good agreement with the theoretical predictions. From those results, we also extract a value for the (controversial) sub-leading Low Energy Constant l-bar3.

  2. The kinetic regime of the Vicsek model

    Chepizhko, A. A.; Kulinskii, V. L.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the dynamics of the system of self-propelling particles modeled via the Vicsek algorithm in continuum time limit. It is shown that the alignment process for the velocities can be subdivided into two regimes: "fast" kinetic and "slow" hydrodynamic ones. In fast kinetic regime the alignment of the particle velocity to the local neighborhood takes place with characteristic relaxation time. So, that the bigger regions arise with the velocity alignment. These regions align their velocities thus giving rise to hydrodynamic regime of the dynamics. We propose the mean-field-like approach in which we take into account the correlations between density and velocity. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the numerical simulations is given. The relation between Vicsek model in the zero velocity limit and the Kuramoto model is stated. The mean-field approach accounting for the dynamic change of the neighborhood is proposed. The nature of the discontinuity of the dependence of the order parameter in case of vectorial noise revealed in Gregorie and Chaite, Phys. Rev. Lett., 92, 025702 (2004) is discussed and the explanation of it is proposed.

  3. QCD in the δ-regime

    The δ-regime of QCD is characterised by light quarks in a small spatial box, but a large extent in (Euclidean) time. In this setting a specific variant of chiral perturbation theory - the δ-expansion - applies, based on a quantum mechanical treatment of the quasi onedimensional system. In particular, for vanishing quark masses one obtains a residual pion mass MRπ, which has been computed to the third order in the δ-expansion. A comparison with numerical measurements of this residual mass allows for a new determination of some Low Energy Constants, which appear in the chiral Lagrangian. We first review the attempts to simulate 2-flavour QCD directly in the δ-regime. This is very tedious, but results compatible with the predictions for MRπ have been obtained. Then we show that an extrapolation of pion masses measured in a larger volume towards the δ-regime leads to good agreement with the theoretical predictions. From those results, we also extract a value for the (controversial) sub-leading Low Energy Constant anti l3. (orig.)

  4. Primary Qualification of Matrimonial Regime Notion

    Nadia Cerasela ANITEI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available By adopting Law no. 287 of July 17, 2009 on the Civil Code republished by Law no. 71/2011 the new Civil Code is subject to the modern legislations tendencies to create a triple balance in terms of property relations between spouses by means of the matrimonial property regimes established:1. between spouses: through the appearance of matrimonial agreements, which have led to the adoption of more flexible legal rules which allow spouses a certain freedom to choose the regime of patrimonial relations between them;2. within the family: to protect the interests of the family, they resorted to mandatory rules providing for limitations and prohibitions (art.321-322 on the family home – a new notion in the Romanian law, art.316 on the acts of disposal seriously threatening family interests;3. between family and society-third parties: by establishing formal requirements of legal acts, including matrimonial agreements to be concluded by notarial act that must be given to publicity afterwards.Also, considering the fact that Romania is a member state of the European Union and that more and more Romanian people are living abroad or marry foreigners, we consider the harmonization of legislation in order to determine the law applicable to such relationships as a highly important requirement.Given these issues we will devote the present study: to primary qualification of the matrimonial regime notion.

  5. Constructing an interdisciplinary flow regime recommendation

    Bartholow, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally agreed that river rehabilitation most often relies on restoring a more natural flow regime, but credibly defining the desired regime can be problematic. I combined four distinct methods to develop and refine month-by-month and event-based flow recommendations to protect and partially restore the ecological integrity of the Cache la Poudre River through Fort Collins, Colorado. A statistical hydrologic approach was used to summarize the river's natural flow regime and set provisional monthly flow targets at levels that were historically exceeded 75% of the time. These preliminary monthly targets were supplemented using results from three Poudre-specific disciplinary studies. A substrate maintenance flow model was used to better define the high flows needed to flush accumulated sediment from the river's channel and help sustain the riparian zone in this snowmelt-dominated river. A hydraulic/habitat model and a water temperature model were both used to better define the minimum flows necessary to maintain a thriving cool water fishery. The result is a range of recommended monthly flows and daily flow guidance illustrating the advantage of combining a wide range of available disciplinary information, supplemented by judgment based on ecological principles and a general understanding of river ecosystems, in a highly altered, working river. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association.

  6. Interpolation between the epsilon and p regimes

    Aoki, Sinya

    2011-01-01

    We reconsider chiral perturbation theory in a finite volume and develop a new computational scheme which smoothly interpolates the conventional epsilon and p regimes. The counting rule is kept essentially the same as in the p expansion. The zero-momentum modes of Nambu-Goldstone bosons are, however, treated separately and partly integrated out to all orders as in the epsilon expansion. In this new scheme, the theory remains infra-red finite even in the chiral limit, while the chiral-logarithmic effects are kept present. We calculate the two-point function in the pseudoscalar channel and show that the correlator has a constant contribution in addition to the conventional hyperbolic cosine function of time t. This constant term rapidly disappears in the p regime but it is indispensable for a smooth convergence of the formula to the epsilon regime result. Our calculation is useful to precisely estimate the finite volume effects in lattice QCD simulations on the pion mass Mpi and kaon mass MK, as well as their de...

  7. JT-60U high performance regimes

    High performance regimes of JT-60U plasmas are presented with an emphasis upon the results from the use of a semi-closed pumped divertor with W-shaped geometry. Plasma performance in transient and quasi steady states has been significantly improved in reversed shear and high-β p regimes. The reversed shear regime elevated an equivalent QDTeq transiently up to 1.25(nD(0)τE Ti(0) = 8.6x1020m-3 · s · keV) in a reactor-relevant thermonuclear dominant regime. Long sustainment of enhanced confinement with internal transport barriers (ITBs) with a fully non-inductive current drive in a reversed shear discharge was successfully demonstrated with LH wave injection. Performance sustainment has been extended in the high-β p regime with a high triangularity achieving a long sustainment of plasma conditions equivalent to QDTeq ∼ 0.16(nD(0)τE Ti(0) ∼ 1.4x1020m-3 · s · keV) for ∼ 4.5 s with a large non-inductive current drive fraction of 60-70% of the plasma current. Thermal and particle transport analyses show significant reduction of thermal and particle diffusivities around ITB resulting in a strong Er shear in the ITB region. The W-shaped divertor is effective for He ash exhaust demonstrating steady exhaust capability of τHe*/τE ∼ 3 - 10 in support of ITER. Suppression of neutral back flow and chemical sputtering effect have been observed while MARFE onset density is rather decreased. Negative-ion based neutral beam injection (N-NBI) experiments have created a clear H-mode transition. Enhanced ionization cross-section due to multi-step ionization processes was confirmed as theoretically predicted. A current density profile driven by N-NBI is measured in a good agreement with theoretical prediction. N-NBI induced TAE modes characterized as persistent and bursting oscillations have been observed from a low hot beta of h > ∼ 0.1 - 0.2% without a significant loss of fast ions. (author)

  8. Refrigeration. Two-Phase Flow. Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop

    Knudsen, Hans-Jørgen Høgaard

    2002-01-01

    The note gives the basic definitions used in two-phase flow. Flow regimes and flow regimes map are introduced. The different contributions to the pressure drop are stated together with an imperical correlation from the litterature....

  9. Laboratory Exploration of Multiple Zonal Jet Regimes

    Smith, C. A.; Speer, K. G.; Griffiths, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The differentially heated, rotating annulus has classically been used to study wave interactions within a single, baroclinic jet. At high rotation rates, the baroclinic instability of the flow leads to a transition to a turbulent, eddy-dominated regime. In the presence of a topographic beta effect, the flow has been observed to produce multiple, meandering zonal jets that are qualitatively similar to those found in planetary atmospheres and in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Our study builds on previous annulus experiments [1] by making observations further within this new regime. We observe with PIV and other techniques how the structure of the flow responds to changes in various parameters such as tank geometry, gradient in the Coriolis parameter, rotation rate, and differential thermal forcing. By not employing the more typical direct forcing of small scales, but by applying a large scale forcing over the annulus gap width, this study allows the varying effects of eddy scale selection, enstrophy cascade, etc. to naturally generate flow that more closely resembles planetary atmospheres and the ACC. We seek nondimensional parameters that significantly control zonation in a real fluid. These observations will provide a metric for the comparison of various theoretical models for multiple zonal jet formation. Other properties of the jets, such as their migration, meandering, bifurcation, and merging, can also be observed in an idealized situation and compared to numerical simulations. Ultimately, this will aid the testing and development of sub-grid-scale parameterizations for the multiple zonal jet regime that remain robust in the face of multiple forcing parameters. [1] Wordsworth, R. D., Read, P. L., & Yamazaki, Y. H. (2008). Turbulence, waves, and jets in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment Physics of Fluids, 20(12), 126602.Streak photograph of suspended particles visualizing the flow representative of multiple zonal jets

  10. Privatised Keynesianism: An Unacknowledged Policy Regime

    Crouch, C.

    2009-01-01

    There have now been two successive policy regimes since the Second World War that have temporarily succeeded in reconciling the uncertainties and instabilities of a capitalist economy with democracy’s need for stability for people’s lives and capitalism’s own need for confident mass consumers. The first of these was the system of public demand management generally known as Keynesianism. The second was not, as has often been thought, a neo-liberal turn to pure markets, but a system of markets ...