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Sample records for 22q11 deletion syndrome

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    ... Seattle, Washington Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Disease InfoSearch: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Emory University School of Medicine Genetics Education Materials for School Success (GEMSS) MalaCards: chromosome 22q11. ...

  2. Shyness discriminates between children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Williams syndrome and predicts emergence of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    2014-01-01

    Background 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a common neurogenetic syndrome associated with high rates of psychosis. The aims of the present study were to identify the unique temperament traits that characterize children with 22q11.2DS compared to children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing (TD) controls, and to examine temperamental predictors of the emergence of psychosis in 22q11.2DS. Methods The temperament of 55 children with 22q11.2DS, 36 with WS, and 280 TD children was assessed using the Emotionality, Activity, Sociability (EAS) Temperament Survey, Parental Ratings. The presence of a psychotic disorder was evaluated in 49 children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS at baseline and again 5.43 ± 2.23 years after baseline temperament assessment. Results Children with 22q11.2DS scored higher on Shyness compared to WS and TD controls. Children with 22q11.2DS and WS scored higher on Emotionality and lower on Activity compared to TD controls. Shyness was more severe in older compared to younger children with 22q11.2DS. Baseline Shyness scores significantly predicted the later emergence of a psychotic disorder at follow-up, in children with 22q11.2DS. Conclusions Our results suggest that shyness is an early marker associated with the later emergence of psychosis in 22q11.2DS. PMID:24517288

  3. Cardiac Defects and Results of Cardiac Surgery in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Carotti, Adriano; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Gerardo; Saffirio, Claudia; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Marino, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Specific types and subtypes of cardiac defects have been described in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome as well as in other genetic syndromes. The conotruncal heart defects occurring in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome include tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic…

  4. Disrupted anatomic networks in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Schmitt, J Eric; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Cassidy, Amy; Souders, Margaret C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Gur, Ruben C; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is an uncommon genetic disorder with an increased risk of psychosis. Although the neural substrates of psychosis and schizophrenia are not well understood, aberrations in cortical networks represent intriguing potential mechanisms. Investigations of anatomic networks within 22q11DS are sparse. We investigated group differences in anatomic network structure in 48 individuals with 22q11DS and 370 typically developing controls by analyzing covariance patterns in cortical thickness among 68 regions of interest using graph theoretical models. Subjects with 22q11DS had less robust geographic organization relative to the control group, particularly in the occipital and parietal lobes. Multiple global graph theoretical statistics were decreased in 22q11DS. These results are consistent with prior studies demonstrating decreased connectivity in 22q11DS using other neuroimaging methodologies. PMID:27622139

  5. Prodromal Symptoms in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    Shapiro, DI; Cubells, JF; Ousley, OY; Rockers, K; Walker, EF

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Schizotypal Personality Disorder (SPD) are at increased risk for the development of psychosis based, respectively, on genetic or behavioral factors. Thus both groups would be expected to manifest heightened rates of the prodromal signs that typically precede psychosis. Although there are now standardized procedures for assessing prodromal symptoms, there has been little research on the manifestation of these symptoms in 22q11.2DS pati...

  6. 22q11 Deletion Syndrome and Multiple Complex Developmental Disorder: a case report

    V. Scandurra; M.R. Scordo; R. Canitano; E.I. de Bruin

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11 DS) is a multisystemic condition that may also include neuropsychiatric disorders. We present a case of a 15-year-old boy that was evaluated for social difficulties, and anxiety with the above genetic abnormality. Clinical features were rather complex as different ne

  7. Subtypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Associated with Behaviour and Neurofacial Morphology

    Sinderberry, Brooke; Brown, Scott; Hammond, Peter; Stevens, Angela F.; Schall, Ulrich; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) has a complex phenotype with more than 180 characteristics, including cardiac anomalies, cleft palate, intellectual disabilities, a typical facial morphology, and mental health problems. However, the variable phenotype makes it difficult to predict clinical outcome, such as the high prevalence of psychosis among…

  8. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  9. Movement Disorders and Other Motor Abnormalities in Adults With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse AMJ; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In addition to an increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, seizures, and early-onset Parkinson disease, the underlying brain dysfunction associated with 22q11.2DS may give rise to an increased vulnerability to multiple movement abnormalities, including those influenced by medications. Movement abnormalities may also be secondary to treatable endocrine diseases and congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities. We propose that movement abnormalities may be common in adults with 22q11.2DS and discuss the implications and challenges important to clinical practice. PMID:25684639

  10. 22q11 deletion syndrome: a review of the neuropsychiatric features and their neurobiological basis

    Squarcione C

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chiara Squarcione, Maria Chiara Torti, Fabio Di Fabio, Massimo Biondi Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is caused by an autosomal dominant microdeletion of chromosome 22 at the long arm (q 11.2 band. The 22q11DS is among the most clinically variable syndromes, with more than 180 features related with the deletion, and is associated with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders, accounting for up to 1%–2% of schizophrenia cases. In recent years, several genes located on chromosome 22q11 have been linked to schizophrenia, including those encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase and proline dehydrogenase, and the interaction between these and other candidate genes in the deleted region is an important area of research. It has been suggested that haploinsufficiency of some genes within the 22q11.2 region may contribute to the characteristic psychiatric phenotype and cognitive functioning of schizophrenia. Moreover, an extensive literature on neuroimaging shows reductions of the volumes of both gray and white matter, and these findings suggest that this reduction may be predictive of increased risk of prodromal psychotic symptoms in 22q11DS patients. Experimental and standardized cognitive assessments alongside neuroimaging may be important to identify one or more endophenotypes of schizophrenia, as well as a predictive prodrome that can be preventively treated during childhood and adolescence. In this review, we summarize recent data about the 22q11DS, in particular those addressing the neuropsychiatric and cognitive phenotypes associated with the deletion, underlining the recent advances in the studies about the genetic architecture of the syndrome. Keywords: 22q11 deletion syndrome, microdeletion, neuropsychiatric disorders, cognitive impairments

  11. Default mode network connectivity and reciprocal social behavior in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Schreiner, Matthew J.; Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Uddin, Lucina Q.; Chow, Carolyn; Congdon, Eliza; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a genetic mutation associated with disorders of cortical connectivity and social dysfunction. However, little is known about the functional connectivity (FC) of the resting brain in 22q11DS and its relationship with social behavior. A seed-based analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data was used to investigate FC associated with the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), in (26) youth with 22qDS and (51) demographically matched cont...

  12. Cognitive phenotype and psychiatric disorder in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A review.

    Biswas, Asit B; Furniss, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome syndrome (22q11DS), one of the most common human multiple anomaly syndromes, frequently includes intellectual disability (ID) together with high risk of diagnosis of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. Candidate cognitive endophenotypes include problems with retrieval of contextual information from memory and in executive control and focussing of attention. 22q11DS may offer a model of the relationship between ID and risk of psychiatric disorder. This paper reviews research on the relationship between the cognitive phenotype and the development of psychiatric disorders in 22q11DS. Aspects of cognitive function including verbal I.Q., visual memory, and executive function, are associated with mental health outcome in people with 22q11DS. This relationship may result from a common neurobiological basis for the cognitive difficulties and psychiatric disorders. Some of the cognitive difficulties experienced by people with 22q11DS, especially in attention, memory retrieval, and face processing, may, however, in themselves constitute risk factors for development of hallucinations and paranoid delusions. Future research into factors leading to psychiatric disorder in people with 22q11DS should include assessment of social and psychological factors including life events, symptoms associated with trauma, attachment, and self-esteem, which together with cognitive risk factors may mediate mental health outcome. PMID:26942704

  13. Exclusion of 22q11 deletion in Noonan syndrome with Tetralogy of Fallot

    Digilio, M.C.; Marino, B.; Giannotti, A. [Bambino Gesu Hospital, Rome (Italy); Dallapiccola, B. [Univ. of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)]|[Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)

    1996-04-24

    We read with interest the report of Robin et al. [1995] published in recent issue of the Journal. The authors described 6 patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) who underwent molecular evaluation for submicroscopic deletion of chromosome band 22q11. None of those patients presented with conotruncal heart defects. Evidence for 22q11 hemizygosity was demonstrated in only one patient. This patient had NS-like manifestations without clinical manifestations of DiGeorge (DG) or velo-cardio-facial (VCF) syndromes. The molecular results obtained in the other 5 patients led the authors to conclude that classical NS is not due to del(22)(q11), even if some patients with del(22)(q11) may present NS-like manifestations. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  14. How to diagnose the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: a case report

    Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Nakatani, Noriko; Kamino, Kouzin; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is caused by a microdeletion of chromosome 22. One third of all patients with 22q11.2 deletion develop schizophrenia-like symptoms. In general, the prevalence of 22q11.2 deletion in patients with schizophrenia is 1%–2%. The 22q11.2 deletion is one of the major known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. However, clinical differences in the phenotypes between patients with schizophrenia who are 22q11.2 deletion carriers and those who are not are still unknown. T...

  15. A patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: case report.

    Eryılmaz, Sema Kabataş; Baş, Firdevs; Satan, Ali; Darendeliler, Feyza; Bundak, Rüveyde; Günöz, Hülya; Saka, Nurçin

    2009-01-01

    22q11 deletion is one of the most frequently encountered genetic syndromes. The phenotypic spectrum shows a wide variability. We report a boy who presented at age 11.9 years with seizures due to hypocalcemia as a result of hypoparathyroidism. FISH analysis revealed a heterozygote deletion at 22q11.2. Positive findings for the syndrome were delayed speech development due to velofacial dysfunction, recurrent croup attacks in early childhood due to latent hypocalcemia and mild dysmorphic features. The findings of this patient indicate that 22q11 deletion syndrome may present with a wide spectrum of clinical findings and that this diagnosis needs to be considered even in patients of older ages presenting with hypocalcemia. PMID:21274400

  16. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Michaelovsky Elena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS is caused by hemizygous microdeletions on chromosome 22q11.2 with highly variable physical and neuropsychiatric manifestations. We explored the genotype-phenotype relationship in a relatively large 22q11.2DS cohort treated and monitored in our clinic using comprehensive clinical evaluation and detailed molecular characterization of the deletion. Methods Molecular analyses in 142 subjects with 22q11.2DS features were performed by FISH and MLPA methods. Participants underwent clinical assessment of physical symptoms and structured psychiatric and cognitive evaluation. Results Deletions were found in 110 individuals including one with an atypical nested distal deletion which was missed by the FISH test. Most subjects (88.2% carried the 3Mb typically deleted region and 11.8% carried 4 types of deletions differing in size and location. No statistically significant genotype-phenotype correlations were found between deletion type and clinical data although some differences in hypocalcemia and cardiovascular anomalies were noted. Analysis of the patient with the distal nested deletion suggested a redundancy of genes causing the physical and neuropsychiatric phenotype in 22q11.2DS and indicating that the psychiatric and cognitive trajectories may be governed by different genes. Conclusions MLPA is a useful and affordable molecular method combining accurate diagnosis and detailed deletion characterization. Variations in deletion type and clinical manifestations impede the detection of significant differences in samples of moderate size, but analysis of individuals with unique deletions may provide insight into the underlying biological mechanisms. Future genotype-phenotype studies should involve large multicenter collaborations employing uniform clinical standards and high-resolution molecular methods.

  17. The Development of Cognitive Control in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Heather M Shapiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS is caused by the most common human microdeletion, and it is associated with cognitive impairments across many domains. While impairments in cognitive control have been described in children with 22q11.2DS, the nature and development of these impairments are not clear. Children with 22q11.2DS and typically developing children (TD were tested on four well-validated tasks aimed at measuring specific foundational components of cognitive control: response inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and working memory. Molecular assays were also conducted in order to examine genotype of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, a gene located within the deleted region in 22q11.2DS and hypothesized to play a role in cognitive control. Mixed model regression analyses were used to examine group differences, as well as age-related effects on cognitive control component processes in a cross-sectional analysis. Regression models with COMT genotype were also conducted in order to examine potential effects of the different variants of the gene. Response inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and working memory were impaired in children with 22q11.2DS relative to TD children, even after accounting for global intellectual functioning (as measured by full-scale IQ. When compared with TD individuals, children with 22q11.2DS demonstrated atypical age-related patterns of response inhibition and cognitive flexibility. Both groups demonstrated typical age-related associations with working memory. The results of this cross-sectional analysis suggest a specific aberration in the development of systems mediating response inhibition in a sub-set of children with 22q11.2DS. It will be important to follow up with longitudinal analyses to directly examine these developmental trajectories, and correlate neurocognitive variables with clinical and adaptive outcome measures.

  18. The internet is parents' main source of information about psychiatric manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS)☆

    van den Bree, Marianne B.M.; Miller, Gregory; Mansell, Elizabeth; Thapar, Anita; Flinter, Frances; Owen, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    With advances in laboratory technology, an increasing number of potentially pathogenic CNVs is recognised. The phenotypic effects of some CNVs are well characterised, however, it remains unclear how much information reaches the parents of affected children and by what route. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (del22q11.2) is caused by the deletion of approximately 40 genes from the long arm of chromosome 22 and was first described in 1955 [1]. Our study reports the extent to which parents of an affected child are aware of the various manifestation of the condition and describes how they first learned about these potential problems. PMID:23707654

  19. Neuroimaging correlates of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: implications for schizophrenia research.

    Boot, E; van Amelsvoort, T A M J

    2012-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common known recurrent copy-number variant disorder. It is also the most common known genetic risk factor for schizophrenia. The greater homogeneity of subjects with schizophrenia in 22q11DS compared with schizophrenia in the wider non-deleted population may help to identify much needed information on neuroanatomical substrates, and neurochemical and neurofunctional mechanisms that may modulate the risk for schizophrenia. Identification of the underlying pathophysiology creates opportunities for developing genotype-specific, biology-based and targeted treatments to prevent, delay or minimize the severity of schizophrenia in both 22q11DS and the wider non-deleted population. This article reviews neuroimaging studies that focused on brain structure and function in this high-risk population, with particular attention to schizophrenia research. We also discuss the evidence on the role of candidate genes within the 22q11.2 region, with particular reference to catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and proline dehydrogenase (PRODH). PMID:23279171

  20. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  1. Domain specific attentional impairments in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of children with the disorder was compared in these tasks with a group of age-matched typically developing children. The children with DS22q11.2 demonstrat...

  2. Rare copy number variants and congenital heart defects in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Xie, Michael; Taylor, Deanne; Sheridan, Molly B.; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Simon, Tony J.; Roberts, Amy E.; Piotrowicz, Małgorzata; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Gothelf, Doron; Coleman, Karlene; Kates, Wendy R.; Devoto, Marcella; Zackai, Elaine; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S.; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS; MIM #192430; 188400) is the most common microdeletion syndrome. The phenotypic presentation of 22q11DS is highly variable; approximately 60–75 % of 22q11DS patients have been reported to have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or aortic arch defect. The etiology of the cardiac phenotypic variability is not currently known for the majority of patients. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region may modify the risk of being born with a CHD in this sensitized population. Rare CNV analysis was performed using Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0 data from 946 22q11DS subjects with CHDs (n = 607) or with normal cardiac anatomy (n = 339). Although there was no significant difference in the overall burden of rare CNVs, an overabundance of CNVs affecting cardiac-related genes was detected in 22q11DS individuals with CHDs. When the rare CNVs were examined with regard to gene interactions, specific cardiac networks, such as Wnt signaling, appear to be overrepresented in 22q11DS CHD cases but not 22q11DS controls with a normal heart. Collectively, these data suggest that CNVs outside the 22q11.2 region may contain genes that modify risk for CHDs in some 22q11DS patients. PMID:26742502

  3. Divergent Patterns of Social Cognition Performance in Autism and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS)

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Melville, Jessica L.; Rich, Dominique; Strutt, Paul A.; Cooper, Gavin; Loughland, Carmel M.; Schall, Ulrich; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disorders frequently report a range of social cognition deficits including difficulties identifying facial displays of emotion. This study examined the specificity of face emotion processing deficits in adolescents with either autism or 22q11DS compared to typically developing (TD) controls. Two tasks (face emotion…

  4. Multitasking Abilities in Adolescents With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Results From an Experimental Ecological Paradigm.

    Schneider, Maude; Eliez, Stephan; Birr, Julie; Menghetti, Sarah; Debbané, Martin; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with cognitive and functional impairments and increased risk for schizophrenia. We characterized multitasking abilities of adolescents with 22q11.2DS using an experimental naturalistic setting and examined whether multitasking impairments were associated with real-world functioning and negative symptoms. Thirty-nine adolescents (19 with 22q11.2DS and 20 controls) underwent the Multitasking Evaluation for Adolescents. Real-world functioning and clinical symptoms were assessed in participants with 22q11.2DS. Adolescents with 22q11.2DS performed poorly in the multitasking evaluation. Our data also suggest that multitasking abilities are related to adaptive functioning in the practical domain and negative symptoms. This study shows that adolescents with 22q11.2DS are characterized by multitasking impairments, which may be relevant for several aspects of the clinical phenotype. PMID:26914469

  5. Delayed diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in an adult Chinese lady

    SHEA Yat-fung; LEE Chi-ho; Harinder Gill; CHOW Wing-sun; LAM Yui-ming; LUK Ho-ming; LAM Stephen Tak-sum; CHU Leung-wing

    2012-01-01

    We report a 32 year-old Chinese lady with history of tetralogy of Fallot,presented to us with chest pain due to hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism.With her dysmorphic facial features and intellectual disability 22q11.2 deletion was suspected and confirmed by genetic study.Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome in adult patient with past medical history of congenital heart disease,facial dysmorphism,intellectual disability and primary hypoparathyroidism.

  6. Early-onset Parkinson's Disease Associated with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Oki, Mitsuaki; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Asayama, Shinya; Wate, Reika; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 43-year-old man with a 4-year history of resting tremor and akinesia. His resting tremor and rigidity were more prominent on the left side. He also presented retropulsion. His symptoms responded to the administration of levodopa. The patient also had a cleft lip and palate, cavum vergae, and hypoparathyroidism. A chromosome analysis disclosed a hemizygous deletion in 22q11.2, and he was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson's disease associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the patient lacked autonomic nerve dysfunction, and his cardiac uptake of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine was normal, indicating an underlying pathological mechanism that differed to that of sporadic Parkinson's disease. PMID:26831029

  7. Heart defects and other features of the 22q11 distal deletion syndrome

    Fagerberg, Christina Ringmann; Graakjaer, Jesper; Heinl, Ulrike D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Dreyer, Inken; Kirchhoff, Eva Maria; Rasmussen, Anders A; Lautrup, Charlotte K; Birkebæk, Niels; Sorensen, Keld

    2013-01-01

    22q11 distal deletions, and discuss the possible roles of haploinsufficiency of the MAPK1 gene. We find the most frequent features in 22q11 distal deletion to be developmental delay or learning disability, short stature, microcephalus, premature birth with low birth weight, and congenital heart...

  8. A case report of 22q11 deletion syndrome confirmed by array-CGH method

    Maryam Sedghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS is caused by a submicroscopic deletion on the long arm of chromosome 22 and affects approximately 1 in 4000 persons, making it the second most prevalent genetic syndrome after Down syndrome and the most common genetic syndrome associated with cleft palate. Most of the 22q11.2 deletion cases are new occurrences or sporadic; however, in about 10 % of families, the deletion is inherited and other family members are affected or at risk for passing this deletion to their children. This report describes a 1.5 years-old male child with clinical signs of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS presented with heart defect, soft cleft palate, developmental delay, acrocephaly, seizure, MRI abnormalities and descriptive facial feature, such as hypertelorism. Array-CGH test was done to confirm the diagnosis; the result revealed a 2.6 Mbp deletion in 22q11.2 chromosome that containing TBX1 and COMT genes. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency of TBX1 gene is probably a major contributor to some of the syndrome characteristic signs, such as heart defect. Because of developmental delay and dysmorphic facial feature were observed in the index′s mother and relatives, inherited autosomal dominant form of VCF is probable, and MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification test should be performed for parents to estimate the recurrent risk in next pregnancy.

  9. The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome as a Window into Complex Neuropsychiatric Disorders Over the Lifespan

    Jonas, Rachel K.; Montojo, Caroline A.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is rapidly accumulating that rare, recurrent copy number variants (CNVs) represent large effect risk factors for neuropsychiatric disorders. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS; Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS) or DiGeorge Syndrome) is the most common known contiguous gene deletion syndrome, and is associated with diverse neuropsychiatric disorders across the lifespan. One of the most intriguing aspects of the syndrome is the variability in clinical and cognitive presentation: child...

  10. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  11. Social Skills and Associated Psychopathology in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Implications for Interventions

    Shashi, V.; Veerapandiyan, A.; Schoch, K.; Kwapil, T.; Keshavan, M.; Ip, E.; Hooper, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although distinctive neuropsychological impairments have been delineated in children with chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), social skills and social cognition remain less well-characterised. Objective: To examine social skills and social cognition and their relationship with neuropsychological function/behaviour and…

  12. Speech and language abilities of children with the familial form of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Rakonjac Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS, which encompasses Shprintzen syndrome, DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome, is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans with an estimated incidence of approximately 1/4000 per live births. After Down syndrome, it is the second most common genetic syndrome associated with congenital heart malformations. The mode of inheritance of the 22q11.2DS is autosomal dominant. In approximately 72 - 94% of the cases the deletion has occurred de novo, while in 6 to 28% of patients deletion was inherited from a parent. As a part of a multidisciplinary study we examined the speech and language abilities of members of two families with inherited form of 22q11.2DS. The presence of 22q11.2 microdeletion was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In one family we detected 1.5 Mb 22q11.2 microdeletion, while in the other family we found 3Mb microdeletion. Patients from both families showed delays in cognitive, socio-emotional, speech and language development. Furthermore, we found considerable variability in the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2DS and the degree of speech-language pathology not only between different families with 22q11.2 deletion, but also among members of the same family. In addition, we detected no correlation between the phenotype and the size of 22q11.2 microdeletion.

  13. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with…

  14. Associations between prepulse inhibition and executive visual attention in children with the 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Sobin, C; Kiley-Brabeck, K; Karayiorgou, M

    2005-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndrome (DS) results in the loss of approximately 30 gene copies and is associated with possible physical anomalies, varied learning disabilities, and a specific cluster of neurocognitive deficits, including primary impairment in working memory, executive visual attention, and sensorimotor processing. Retrospective studies have suggested that children with 22q11DS are at 25 times greater risk of developing schizophrenia, thus specification of early brain network vulnerabil...

  15. An affected core drives network integration deficits of the structural connectome in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    František Váša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is a genetic disease known to lead to cerebral structural alterations, which we study using the framework of the macroscopic white-matter connectome. We create weighted connectomes of 44 patients with 22q11DS and 44 healthy controls using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, and perform a weighted graph theoretical analysis. After confirming global network integration deficits in 22q11DS (previously identified using binary connectomes, we identify the spatial distribution of regions responsible for global deficits. Next, we further characterize the dysconnectivity of the deficient regions in terms of sub-network properties, and investigate their relevance with respect to clinical profiles. We define the subset of regions with decreased nodal integration (evaluated using the closeness centrality measure as the affected core (A-core of the 22q11DS structural connectome. A-core regions are broadly bilaterally symmetric and consist of numerous network hubs — chiefly parietal and frontal cortical, as well as subcortical regions. Using a simulated lesion approach, we demonstrate that these core regions and their connections are particularly important to efficient network communication. Moreover, these regions are generally densely connected, but less so in 22q11DS. These specific disturbances are associated to a rerouting of shortest network paths that circumvent the A-core in 22q11DS, “de-centralizing” the network. Finally, the efficiency and mean connectivity strength of an orbito-frontal/cingulate circuit, included in the affected regions, correlate negatively with the extent of negative symptoms in 22q11DS patients, revealing the clinical relevance of present findings. The identified A-core overlaps numerous regions previously identified as affected in 22q11DS as well as in schizophrenia, which approximately 30–40% of 22q11DS patients develop.

  16. Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Are Impaired at Explicit, but Not Implicit, Discrimination of Local Forms Embedded in Global Structures

    Giersch, Anne; Glaser, Bronwyn; Pasca, Catherine; Chabloz, Mélanie; Debbané, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) are impaired at exploring visual information in space; however, not much is known about visual form discrimination in the syndrome. Thirty-five individuals with 22q11.2DS and 41 controls completed a form discrimination task with global forms made up of local elements. Affected individuals…

  17. Parental Communication and Experiences and Knowledge of Adolescent Siblings of Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Okashah, Rebecca; Schoch, Kelly; Hooper, Stephen R; Shashi, Vandana; Callanan, Nancy

    2015-10-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion in humans. There have been few studies assessing the impact of this condition on the family and no previous studies conducted on unaffected siblings of children with 22q11DS. The goal of this study was to determine the frequency, method, and content of information being communicated by parents to unaffected siblings about the condition and to assess unaffected siblings' knowledge of 22q11DS and perceptions of the impact of the condition on their affected sibling and themselves. Families were recruited from several 22q11DS educational and support organizations and asked to complete a single anonymous online survey. Families were eligible to participate if they had one child with 22q11DS and at least one unaffected child between the ages of 12 and 17. Survey questions were developed based on previous literature and authors' expertise with individuals with 22q11DS. Responses to quantitative and qualitative questions were analyzed to calculate frequencies and proportions and to extract themes, respectively. A total of 25 families (defined as a unit of at least one parent, one affected child, and at least one unaffected child) participated in the study. Parents shared genetic information less often as compared to behavioral and medical information. Siblings of children with 22q11DS had both positive and negative experiences in having a brother or sister with this condition. Genetic counselors can use the results of this study to develop anticipatory guidance for parents of children with 22q11DS in talking with their unaffected children about the condition. PMID:25540895

  18. Deficits in microRNA-mediated Cxcr4/Cxcl12 signaling in neurodevelopmental deficits in a 22q11 deletion syndrome mouse model.

    Toritsuka, Michihiro; Kimoto, Sohei; Muraki, Kazue; Landek-Salgado, Melissa A.; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Horiuchi, Yasue; Hiyama, Hideki; Tajinda, Katsunori; Keni, Ni; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Iwamoto, Takashi; Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Sawa, Akira; Tanigaki, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) frequently accompanies psychiatric conditions, some of which are classified as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the current diagnostic categorization. However, it remains elusive how the chromosomal microdeletion leads to the mental manifestation at the mechanistic level. Here we show that a 22q11DS mouse model with a deletion of 18 orthologous genes of human 22q11 (Df1/+ mice) has deficits in migration of cortical interneurons and hippocampal dentate pr...

  19. Relationship between Reaction Time, Fine Motor Control, and Visual-Spatial Perception on Vigilance and Visual-Motor Tasks in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Howley, Sarah A.; Prasad, Sarah E.; Pender, Niall P.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2012-01-01

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion disorder associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability and specific neurocognitive deficits, particularly in visual-motor and attentional abilities. Currently there is evidence that the visual-motor profile of 22q11DS is not entirely mediated by intellectual disability and…

  20. Association of the Family Environment with Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Allen, T. M.; Hersh, J.; Schoch, K.; Curtiss, K.; Hooper, S. R.; Shashi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are at risk for social-behavioural and neurocognitive sequelae throughout development. The current study examined the impact of family environmental characteristics on social-behavioural and cognitive outcomes in this paediatric population. Method: Guardians of children with 22q11DS…

  1. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  2. Evaluation of Potential Modifiers of the Cardiac Phenotype in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Deborah A.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna; Mei, Minghua; Zackai, Elaine; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion. METHODS Data from 343 subjects enrolled in a study of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were used to evaluate potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in this disorder. Subjects with and without cardiac malformations, and subjects with and without aortic arch anomalies were compared with respect to sex and race. In addition, in the subset of subjects from whom a DNA sample was available, genotypes for variants of four genes that are involved in the folate-homocysteine metabolic pathway and that have been implicated as risk factors for other birth defects were compared. Five variants in four genes were genotyped by heteroduplex or restriction digest assays. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used to evaluate the association between the cardiac phenotype and each potential modifier. RESULTS The cardiac phenotype observed in individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion was not significantly associated with either sex or race. The genetic variants that were evaluated also did not appear to be associated with the cardiovascular phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Variation in the cardiac phenotype observed between individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion does not appear to be related to sex, race, or five sequence variants in four folate-related genes that are located outside of the 22q11.2 region. PMID:18770859

  3. Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome and DiGeorge sequence with meningomyelocele and deletions of the 22q11 region

    Nickel, R.E.; Pillers, D.M.; Merkens, M.; Magenis, R.E.; Zonana, J. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Approximately 5% of children with neural tube defects (NTDs) have a congenital heart defect and/or cleft lip and palate. The cause of isolated meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, or cleft lip and palate has been largely thought to be multifactorial. However, chromosomal, teratogenic, and single gene causes of combinations of NTDs with congenital heart defects and/or cleft lip and palate have been reported. We report on 3 patients with meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, and 22q11 deletions. Two of the children had the clinical diagnosis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS); both have bifid uvula. The third child had DiGeorge sequence (DGS). The association of NTDs with 22q11 deletion has not been reported previously. An accurate diagnosis of the 22q11 deletion is critical as this micro-deletion and its associated clinical problems is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait due to the inheritance of the deletion-bearing chromosome. We recommend that all children with NTDs and congenital heart defects, with or without cleft palate, have cytogenetic and molecular studies performed to detect 22q11 deletions. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Mitochondrial Citrate Transporter-dependent Metabolic Signature in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Napoli, Eleonora; Tassone, Flora; Wong, Sarah; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Simon, Tony J; Song, Gyu; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2015-09-18

    The congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), characterized by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5-3 Mb on chromosome 22 at locus 11.2, is the most common microdeletion disorder (estimated prevalence of 1 in 4000) and the second risk factor for schizophrenia. Nine of ∼30 genes involved in 22qDS have the potential of disrupting mitochondrial metabolism (COMT, UFD1L, DGCR8, MRPL40, PRODH, SLC25A1, TXNRD2, T10, and ZDHHC8). Deficits in bioenergetics during early postnatal brain development could set the basis for a disrupted neuronal metabolism or synaptic signaling, partly explaining the higher incidence in developmental and behavioral deficits in these individuals. Here, we investigated whether mitochondrial outcomes and metabolites from 22qDS children segregated with the altered dosage of one or several of these mitochondrial genes contributing to 22qDS etiology and/or morbidity. Plasma metabolomics, lymphocytic mitochondrial outcomes, and epigenetics (histone H3 Lys-4 trimethylation and 5-methylcytosine) were evaluated in samples from 11 22qDS children and 13 age- and sex-matched neurotypically developing controls. Metabolite differences between 22qDS children and controls reflected a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (higher lactate/pyruvate ratios) accompanied by an increase in reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate (increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cholesterol, and fatty acids). Altered metabolism in 22qDS reflected a critical role for the haploinsufficiency of the mitochondrial citrate transporter SLC25A1, further enhanced by HIF-1α, MYC, and metabolite controls. This comprehensive profiling served to clarify the biochemistry of this disease underlying its broad, complex phenotype. PMID:26221035

  5. Confirmation that the conotruncal anomaly face syndrome is associated with a deletion within 22q11.2

    Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takao, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Misa; Kondo, Chisato; Ando, Masahiko; Momma, Kazuo; Imamura, Shin-ichiro [Heart Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Joh-o, Kunitaka [Welfare Pension Hospital, Kyushu (Japan); Ikeda, Kazuo [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan); Nishibatake, Makoto [Kagoshima Seikyo Hospital (Japan)

    1994-11-15

    The so-called {open_quotes}conotruncal anomaly face syndrome{close_quotes} (CTAFS) is characterized by a peculiar facial appearance associated with congenital heart disease (CHD), especially cardiac outflow tract defects such as tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), double outlet ring ventricle (DORV), and truncus arteriosus (TAC). CTAFS and the DiGeorge anomaly (DGA) have many similar phenotypic characteristics, suggesting that they share a common cause. In many cases DGA is known to be associated with monosomy for a region of chromosome 22q11.2. Fifty CTAFS patients and 10 DGA patients, 11 parents couples and 10 mothers of CTAFS patients, and 3 parents couples and 2 mothers of DGA patients were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using the N25 (D22S75) DGCR probe (Oncor). Monosomy for a region of 22q11.2 was found in 42 CTAFS, 9 DGA, 4 mothers, and 1 father who had CTAF without CHD. The remaining 8 CTAFS patients, 1 DGA patient and 1 mother who had questionable CTAF without CHD, showed no such chromosome abnormality. For the control, 60 patients who had CHD without CTAF or other know malformation syndromes were examined and had no deletion of 22q11.2. Therefore, we conclude that CTAFS is a part of the CATCH 22 syndrome; cardiac defects, abnormal faces, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia (CATCH) resulting from 22q11.2 deletions. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of Peripheral Blood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Reveals Functional Pathways Related to Psychosis and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Maria Jalbrzikowski; Maria T Lazaro; Fuying Gao; Alden Huang; Carolyn Chow; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Giovanni Coppola; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) represents one of the greatest known genetic risk factors for the development of psychotic illness, and is also associated with high rates of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) in childhood. We performed integrated genomic analyses of 22q11DS to identify genes and pathways related to specific phenotypes. Methods We used a high-resolution aCGH array to precisely characterize deletion breakpoints. Using peripheral blood, we examined differential exp...

  7. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  8. Social Cognition Dysfunction in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome): Relationship with Executive Functioning and Social Competence/Functioning

    Campbell, L. E.; McCabe, K. L.; Melville, J. L.; Strutt, P. A.; Schall, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Social difficulties are often noted among people with intellectual disabilities. Children and adults with 22q.11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have poorer social competence as well as poorer performance on measures of executive and social-cognitive skills compared with typically developing young people. However, the relationship…

  9. Congenital Heart Defects and Measures of Fetal Growth in Newborns with Down Syndrome or 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Matthiesen, Niels B; Agergaard, Peter; Henriksen, Tine B;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the association between congenital heart defects (CHD) and indices of fetal growth in Down and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes. STUDY DESIGN: We established 2 Danish nationwide cohorts of newborn singletons with either Down syndrome (n = 670) or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (n = 155...... syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were both associated with lower mean birth weight and head circumference z-scores. We found no association between CHD or CHD severity and indices of fetal growth. In Down syndrome, the association between any CHD and the mean difference in head circumference z...... measures in newborns with Down syndrome or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Thus, in certain subtypes of CHD, the contribution of genetic factors to prenatal growth impairment may be more important than circulatory disturbances....

  10. Deficits in Mental State Attributions in Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome)

    Ho, Jennifer S.; Radoeva, Petya D.; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Chow, Carolyn; Hopkins, Jessica; Tran, Wen-Ching; Mehta, Ami; Enrique, Nicole; Gilbert, Chelsea; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; Kates, Wendy R.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) results from a genetic mutation that increases risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We compared Theory of Mind (ToM) skills in 63 individuals with VCFS (25% with an ASD diagnosis) and 43 typically-developing controls, and investigated the relationship of ToM to reciprocal social behavior. We administered a video-based task to assess mentalizing at two sites (UCLA and SUNY Upstate Medical University). The videos depicted interac...

  11. Síndrome de deleção 22q11 e cardiopatias congênitas complexas 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and complex congenital heart defects

    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a frequência da síndrome de deleção 22q11 (SD22q11 entre pacientes portadores de cardiopatia congênita do tipo complexa. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi constituída por uma coorte prospectiva e consecutiva de pacientes com cardiopatia complexa em sua primeira hospitalização em uma unidade de tratamento intensivo cardiológica de um hospital pediátrico. Para cada paciente foi preenchida uma ficha de avaliação, com coleta de dados clínicos, e realizado o cariótipo de alta resolução e técnica de hibridização in situ fluorescente (FISH com pesquisa de microdeleção 22q11. Os defeitos cardíacos foram classificados por um cardiologista participante do estudo. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi composta de 66 pacientes. Quanto à análise cariotípica, alterações foram observadas em cinco pacientes (7,6%; contudo, nenhum deles apresentava deleção 22q11. A avaliação pela técnica de FISH pôde ser realizada com sucesso em 65 pacientes, sendo que a microdeleção 22q11 foi identificada em dois (3,1%. Dos 66 pacientes com defeitos complexos, 52 eram portadores de malformações do tipo conotruncal, sendo que em 51 a pesquisa para microdeleção 22q11 foi realizada. Os dois pacientes portadores da microdeleção 22q11 fizeram parte deste grupo, representando uma frequência de 3,9%. Eles apresentavam tetralogia de Fallot. CONCLUSÃO: A SD22q11 é uma anormalidade frequente entre pacientes com cardiopatias congênitas complexas e conotruncais. Variações da frequência da SD22q11 entre os estudos parecem estar associadas, principalmente, com a forma adotada para a seleção da amostra e às características da população em análise.OBJECTIVE: Investigate the frequency of 22q11 deletion syndrome among patients with complex congenital heart disease. METHODS: A prospective and consecutive cohort of patients with complex heart defects was evaluated in their first hospitalization at a cardiac intensive care unit of a pediatric

  12. Hippocampal volume reduction in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is associated with cognitive impairment

    Lee Aaron

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigations of individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2 have reported alterations in both brain anatomy and cognitive function. Neuroanatomical studies have reported multiple abnormalities including changes in both gray and white matter in the temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus. Separate investigations of cognitive abilities have established the prevalence of general intellectual impairment, although the actual extent to which a single individual is affected varies greatly within the population. The present study was designed to examine structures within the temporal lobe and assess their functional significance in terms of cognition in children with DS22q11.2. Method A total of 72 children (ages 7–14 years participated in the investigation: 36 children (19 female, 17 male tested FISH positive for chromosome 22q11.2 deletion (Mean age = 10 years 9 months, ± 2 yr 4 mo and 36 were age-matched typically developing controls (13 female, 23 male; Mean age = 10 years 6 months, ± 1 yr 11 mo. For each subject, a three-dimensional high-resolution (1 mm isotropic T1-weighted structural MRI was acquired. Neuroanatomical guidelines were used to define borders of the amygdala and hippocampus bilaterally and volumes were calculated based on manual tracings of the regions. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC was also administered. Results Volumetric reductions in total gray matter, white matter, and both the amygdala and hippocampus bilaterally were observed in children with DS22q11.2. Reductions in the left hippocampus were disproportionate to decreases in gray matter after statistically controlling for group differences in total gray matter, age, and data collection site. This specific reduction in hippocampal volume was significantly correlated with performance on standardized measures of intelligence, whereas the other neuroanatomical measures were not (gray

  13. Analysis of 22q11.2 deletions by FISH in a series of velocardiofacial syndrome patients

    Ravnan, J.B.; Golabi, M.; Lebo, R.V. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Deletions in chromosome 22 band q11.2 have been associated with velocardiofacial (VCF or Shprintzen) syndrome and the DiGeorge anomaly. A study of VCF patients evaluated at the UCSF Medical Center was undertaken to correlate disease phenotype with presence or absence of a deletion. Patients referred for this study had at least two of the following: dysmorphic facial features, frequent ear infections or hearing loss, palate abnormalities, thymic hypoplasia, hypocalcemia, congenital heart defect, hypotonia, and growth or language delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the DiGeorge critical region probe N25 was used to classify patients according to the presence or absence of a deletion in 22q11.2, and the results were compared to clinical characteristics. We have completed studies on 58 patients with features of VCF. Twenty-one patients (36%) were found to have a deletion in 22q11.2 by FISH. A retrospective study of archived slides from 14 patients originally studied only by prometaphase GTG banding found six patients had a deletion detected by FISH; of these, only two had a microscopically visible chromosome deletion. Our study of 11 sets of parents of children with the deletion found two clinically affected mothers with the deletion, including one with three of three children clinically affected. A few patients who did not fit the classical VCF description had a 22q11.2 deletion detected by FISH. These included one patient with both cleft lip and palate, and another with developmental delay and typical facial features but no cardiac or palate abnormalities. Both patients with the DiGeorge anomaly as part of VCF had the deletion. On the other hand, a number of patients diagnosed clinically with classical VCF did not have a detectable deletion. This raises the question whether they represent a subset of patients with a defect of 22q11.2 not detected by the N25 probe, or whether they represent a phenocopy of VCF.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH screening for the 22q11.2 deletion in patients with clinical features of velocardiofacial syndrome but without cardiac anomalies

    Paula Sandrin-Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, a condition associated with 22q11.2 deletions, is characterized by a typical facies, palatal anomalies, learning disabilities, behavioral disturbances and cardiac defects. We investigated the frequency of these chromosomal deletions in 16 individuals with VCFS features who presented no cardiac anomalies, one of the main characteristics of VCFS. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with the N25 (D22S75; 22q11.2 probe revealed deletions in ten individuals (62%. Therefore, even in the absence of cardiac anomalies testing for the 22q11.2 microdeletions in individuals showing other clinical features of this syndrome is recommended.

  15. A Case of Concurrent Miller-Dieker Syndrome (17p13.3 Deletion) and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Macmurdo, C

    2015-12-01

    Features of Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS, 17p13.3 deletion syndrome, LIS1-associated lissencephaly) include classic lissencephaly, microcephaly, cardiac malformations, growth restriction, and characteristic facial changes. Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome) are known to have congenital cardiac malformations (in particular conotruncal defects), palatal abnormalities (especially velopharyngeal insufficiency), hypocalcemia, immune deficiency, learning disabilities, and characteristic facial features. This case report describes phenotypic characteristics of a patient with extremely rare instance of having both MDS and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that is unique in the medical literature. Prognosis in this concurrent phenotype is poor with our patient suffering from several malformations seen in both conditions and expiring in the neonatal period. PMID:27617133

  16. No evidence for an effect of COMT Val158Met genotype on executive function in patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbané, Martin; Hinard, Christine; Morris, Michael Andréw; Dahoun, Sophie; Antonarakis, Stylianos; Eliez, Stéphan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies linking the catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) functional polymorphism to the specific phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have yielded inconsistent results. The goal of the present study was to replicate a recent finding that executive function is higher in individuals hemizygous for the Met allele. METHOD: Thirty-four children and young adults with a 22q11.2 microdeletion, hemizygous for the Val (N=14) or Met (N=20) polymorphism, were tested on me...

  17. Temporal Lobe Anatomy and Psychiatric Symptoms in Velocardiofacial Syndrome (22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Miller, Adam M.; Abdulsabur, Nuria; Antshel, Kevin M.; Conchelos, Jena; Fremont, Wanda; Roizen, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between mesial temporal lobe morphology, ratios of prefrontal cortex to amygdala and hippocampus volumes, and psychiatric symptomatology in children and adolescents with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). Method: Scores on behavioral rating scales and volumetric measures of the amygdala, hippocampus, and…

  18. Relationship between reaction time, fine motor control, and visual-spatial perception on vigilance and visual-motor tasks in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Howley, Sarah A

    2012-10-15

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) is a common microdeletion disorder associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability and specific neurocognitive deficits, particularly in visual-motor and attentional abilities. Currently there is evidence that the visual-motor profile of 22q11DS is not entirely mediated by intellectual disability and that these individuals have specific deficits in visual-motor integration. However, the extent to which attentional deficits, such as vigilance, influence impairments on visual motor tasks in 22q11DS is unclear. This study examines visual-motor abilities and reaction time using a range of standardised tests in 35 children with 22q11DS, 26 age-matched typically developing (TD) sibling controls and 17 low-IQ community controls. Statistically significant deficits were observed in the 22q11DS group compared to both low-IQ and TD control groups on a timed fine motor control and accuracy task. The 22q11DS group performed significantly better than the low-IQ control group on an untimed drawing task and were equivalent to the TD control group on point accuracy and simple reaction time tests. Results suggest that visual motor deficits in 22q11DS are primarily attributable to deficits in psychomotor speed which becomes apparent when tasks are timed versus untimed. Moreover, the integration of visual and motor information may be intact and, indeed, represent a relative strength in 22q11DS when there are no time constraints imposed. While this may have significant implications for cognitive remediation strategies for children with 22q11DS, the relationship between reaction time, visual reasoning, cognitive complexity, fine motor speed and accuracy, and graphomotor ability on visual-motor tasks is still unclear.

  19. A cross-sectional study of the development of volitional control of spatial attention in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Shapiro Heather M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS results from a 1.5- to 3-megabase deletion on the long arm of chromosome 22 and occurs in approximately 1 in 4000 live births. Previous studies indicate that children with 22q11.2DS are impaired on tasks involving spatial attention. However, the degree to which these impairments are due to volitionally generated (endogenous or reflexive (exogenous orienting of attention is unclear. Additionally, the efficacy of these component attention processes throughout child development in 22q11.2DS has yet to be examined. Methods Here we compared the performance of a wide age range (7 to 14 years of children with 22q11.2DS to typically developing (TD children on a comprehensive visual cueing paradigm to dissociate the contributions of endogenous and exogenous attentional impairments. Paired and two-sample t-tests were used to compare outcome measures within a group or between groups. Additionally, repeated measures regression models were fit to the data in order to examine effects of age on performance. Results We found that children with 22q11.2DS were impaired on a cueing task with an endogenous cue, but not on the same task with an exogenous cue. Additionally, it was younger children exclusively who were impaired on endogenous cueing when compared to age-matched TD children. Older children with 22q11.2DS performed comparably to age-matched TD peers on the endogenous cueing task. Conclusions These results suggest that endogenous but not exogenous orienting of attention is selectively impaired in children with 22q11.2DS. Additionally, the age effect on cueing in children with 22q11.2DS suggests a possible altered developmental trajectory of endogenous cueing.

  20. Transcriptome Profiling of Peripheral Blood in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Reveals Functional Pathways Related to Psychosis and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Maria Jalbrzikowski

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS represents one of the greatest known genetic risk factors for the development of psychotic illness, and is also associated with high rates of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD in childhood. We performed integrated genomic analyses of 22q11DS to identify genes and pathways related to specific phenotypes.We used a high-resolution aCGH array to precisely characterize deletion breakpoints. Using peripheral blood, we examined differential expression (DE and networks of co-expressed genes related to phenotypic variation within 22q11DS patients. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling was performed using Illumina Human HT-12 microarrays. Data mining techniques were used to validate our results against independent samples of both peripheral blood and brain tissue from idiopathic psychosis and ASD cases.Eighty-five percent of 22q11DS individuals (N = 39 carried the typical 3 Mb deletion, with significant variability in deletion characteristics in the remainder of the sample (N = 7. DE analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA identified expression changes related to psychotic symptoms in patients, including a module of co-expressed genes which was associated with psychosis in 22q11DS and involved in pathways associated with transcriptional regulation. This module was enriched for brain-expressed genes, was not related to antipsychotic medication use, and significantly overlapped with transcriptional changes in idiopathic schizophrenia. In 22q11DS-ASD, both DE and WGCNA analyses implicated dysregulation of immune response pathways. The ASD-associated module showed significant overlap with genes previously associated with idiopathic ASD.These findings further support the use of peripheral tissue in the study of major mutational models of diseases affecting the brain, and point towards specific pathways dysregulated in 22q11DS carriers with psychosis and ASD.

  1. A cross-sectional analysis of the development of response inhibition in children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Heather M Shapiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS is a neurogenetic disorder that is associated with cognitive impairments and significantly elevated risk for developing schizophrenia. While impairments in response inhibition are central to executive dysfunction in schizophrenia, the nature and development of such impairments in children with 22q11.2DS, a group at high risk for the disorder, are not clear. Here we used a classic Go/No-Go paradigm to quantify proactive (anticipatory stopping and reactive (actual stopping response inhibition in 47 children with 22q11.2DS and 36 typically developing (TD children, all ages 7-14. A cross-sectional design was used to examine age-related associations with response inhibition. When compared with TD individuals, children with 22q11.2DS demonstrated typical proactive response inhibition at all ages. By contrast, reactive response inhibition was impaired in children with 22q11.2DS relative to TD children. While older age predicted better reactive response inhibition in TD children, there was no age-related association with reactive response inhibition in children with 22q11.2DS. Closer examination of individual performance data revealed a wide range of performance abilities in older children with 22q11.2DS; some typical and others highly impaired. The results of this cross-sectional analysis suggest an impaired developmental trajectory of reactive response inhibition in some children with 22q11.2DS that might be related to atypical development of neuroanatomical systems underlying this cognitive process. As part of a larger study, this investigation might help identify risk factors for conversion to schizophrenia and lead to early diagnosis and preventive intervention.

  2. Enhanced Maternal Origin of the 22q11.2 Deletion in Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge Syndromes

    Delio, Maria; Guo, Tingwei; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M;

    2013-01-01

    to a ratio of 1.35 or a 35% increase in maternal compared to paternal origin (p = 0.000028). Among 1,892 probands with the de novo 22q11.2 deletion, the average maternal age at time of conception was 29.5, and this is similar to data for the general population in individual countries. Of interest, the female....... Although previous studies exist, each was of small size, and it remains to be determined whether there are parent-of-origin biases for the de novo 22q11.2 deletion. To address this question, we genotyped a total of 389 DNA samples from 22q11DS-affected families. A total of 219 (56%) individuals with 22q11......DS had maternal origin and 170 (44%) had paternal origin of the de novo deletion, which represents a statistically significant bias for maternal origin (p = 0.0151). Combined with many smaller, previous studies, 465 (57%) individuals had maternal origin and 345 (43%) had paternal origin, amounting...

  3. Whole-Genome Sequencing Suggests Schizophrenia Risk Mechanisms in Humans with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Merico, Daniele; Zarrei, Mehdi; Costain, Gregory; Ogura, Lucas; Alipanahi, Babak; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Butcher, Nancy J.; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Chow, Eva W. C.; Andrade, Danielle M.; Frey, Brendan J.; Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletions impart a high but incomplete risk for schizophrenia. Possible mechanisms include genome-wide effects of DGCR8 haploinsufficiency. In a proof-of-principle study to assess the power of this model, we used high-quality, whole-genome sequencing of nine individuals with 22q11.2 deletions and extreme phenotypes (schizophrenia, or no psychotic disorder at age >50 years). The schizophrenia group had a greater burden of rare, damaging variants impacting protein-coding neurofunctional genes, including genes involved in neuron projection (nominal P = 0.02, joint burden of three variant types). Variants in the intact 22q11.2 region were not major contributors. Restricting to genes affected by a DGCR8 mechanism tended to amplify between-group differences. Damaging variants in highly conserved long intergenic noncoding RNA genes also were enriched in the schizophrenia group (nominal P = 0.04). The findings support the 22q11.2 deletion model as a threshold-lowering first hit for schizophrenia risk. If applied to a larger and thus better-powered cohort, this appears to be a promising approach to identify genome-wide rare variants in coding and noncoding sequence that perturb gene networks relevant to idiopathic schizophrenia. Similarly designed studies exploiting genetic models may prove useful to help delineate the genetic architecture of other complex phenotypes. PMID:26384369

  4. Psychiatric Disorders and Intellectual Functioning throughout Development in Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    Green, Tamar; Gothelf, Doron; Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Frisch, Amos; Kotler, Moshe; Weizman, Abraham; Eliez, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is associated with cognitive deficits and high rates of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We report the data from two large cohorts of individuals with VCFS from Israel and Western Europe to characterize the neuropsychiatric phenotype from childhood to adulthood in a large sample.…

  5. The psychiatric and behavioural characteristics of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS): An Irish population study

    Prasad, S E

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a growingbody of evidence which indicates an unequivocal association between 22qllDS and schizophrenia. Deletion of 22qll is recognised as the third highest risk for the development of schizophrenia, with only a greater risk conferred by being the child of 2 parents with schizophrenia or the monozygotic co-twin of an affected individual. The challenge for clinicians and researchers is to identify early vulnerability traits, symptoms or disorders which may be associated with or predict a later emerging psychotic disorder, so that at risk individuals maybe identified, monitored and treated early to improve outcomes. Identification of these early traits or symptoms firstly requires detailed analysis of the behavioural phenotype in individuals with 22qllDS. The current study aims to define the prevalence and correlates of psychiatric disorders in a population cohort of individuals with 22qllDS in Ireland. The data gained from the study will provide the foundation for future longitudinal studies of risk factors of psychosis in 22qllDS. Methods: Forty-five individuals with 22qllDS (mean age = 14.6, SD 8.94) and 27 sibling controls (mean age = 12.2, SD 4.12) participated in the study. The rate of psychiatric and behavioural disorders was investigated through a range of semi-structured interviews and standardised questionnaires. This is the first study to use the Comprehensive Assessment of at Risk Mental State (CAARMS), a tool which has been designed to identify a possible prodromal state. Results: Individuals with 22qllDS had high rates of psychiatric disorders and had significant difficulties with social and school functioning (p < 0.0001) compared to sibling controls. The most frequently occurring were attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (29%, p = 0.001) and anxiety disorders (31%, p = 0.021). Eight individuals (18%) with 22qllDS exhibited subthreshold psychotic symptoms (mean age = 13, SD 2.8, range 7–16 years) and had significantly higher

  6. Deleção 22q11.2 em pacientes com defeito cardíaco conotruncal e fenótipo da síndrome da deleção 22q11.2 Deleción 22q11.2 en pacientes con defecto cardiaco conotruncal y fenotipo del síndrome de la deleción 22q11.2 22q11.2 deletion in patients with conotruncal heart defect and del22q syndrome phenotype

    Sintia Iole Nogueira Belangero

    2009-04-01

    índrome de la delación 22q11.2. MÉTODOS: Se estudiaron a 29 pacientes por medio de citogenética clásica, por hibridación in situ fluorescente (FISH y también por técnicas moleculares. RESULTADOS: El análisis citogenético por medio de bandeo G reveló cariotipo normal en todos los pacientes, con excepción de uno, que presentó cariotipo 47,XX,+idic(22(q11.2. Con la utilización de técnicas moleculares, se observó la deleción en el 25% de los pacientes, todos portadores del fenotipo del síndrome de la deleción 22q11.2. En ningún de los casos, la deleción se heredó de los padres. La frecuencia de la deleción 22q11.2 en el grupo de pacientes portadores del espectro clínico de este síndrome resultó mayor que en el grupo de pacientes con cardiopatía conotruncal aislada. CONCLUSIÓN: La investigación de la presencia de deleción y su correlación con los datos clínicos de los pacientes pueden auxiliar los pacientes y sus familias a tener un mejor aconsejamiento genético, así como un seguimiento clínico más adecuado.BACKGROUND: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the most frequent human microdeletion syndrome. The phenotype is highly variable, being characterized by conotruncal heart defect, facial dysmorphisms, velopharyngeal insufficiency, learning difficulties and mental retardation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency of deletion 22q11.2 in a Brazilian sample of individuals with isolated conotruncal heart defect and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome phenotype. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients were studied by classical cytogenetics, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, and by molecular techniques. RESULTS: Cytogenetic analysis by G-banding revealed a normal karyotype in all patients except one who presented a 47,XX,+idic(22(q11.2 karyotype. Using molecular techniques, a deletion was observed in 25% of the patients, all exhibiting a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome phenotype. In none of the cases the deletion was inherited from

  7. Performance on a computerized neurocognitive battery in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A comparison between US and Israeli cohorts.

    Yi, James J; Weinberger, Ronnie; Moore, Tyler M; Calkins, Monica E; Guri, Yael; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E; Gothelf, Doron; Gur, Ruben C

    2016-07-01

    Increasingly, the effects of copy number variation (CNV) in the genome on brain function and behaviors are recognized as means to elucidate pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Such studies require large samples and we characterized the neurocognitive profile of two cohorts of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), the most common CNV associated with schizophrenia, in an effort to harmonize phenotyping in multi-site global collaborations. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (PCNB) was administered to individuals with 22q11DS in Philadelphia (PHL; n=155, aged 12-40) and Tel Aviv (TLV; n=59, aged 12-36). We examined effect sizes of performance differences between the cohorts and confirmed the factor structure of PCNB performance efficiency in the combined sample based on data from a large comparison community sample. The cohorts performed comparably with notable deficits in executive function, episodic memory and social cognition domains that were previously associated with abnormal neuroimaging findings in 22q11DS. In mixed model analysis, while there was a main effect for site for accuracy (number of correct response) and speed (time to correct response) independently, there were no main site effects for standardized efficiency (average of accuracy and speed). The fit of a structural model was excellent indicating that PCNB tests were related to the targeted cognitive domains. Thus, our results provide preliminary support for the use of the PCNB as an efficient tool for neurocognitive assessment in international 22q11DS collaborations. PMID:27200494

  8. Self-Reported Speech Problems in Adolescents and Young Adults with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

    Spruijt, Nicole E.; Vorstman, Jacob AS; Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Speech problems are a common clinical feature of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The objectives of this study were to inventory the speech history and current self-reported speech rating of adolescents and young adults, and examine the possible variables influencing the current speech ratings, including cleft palate, surgery, speech and language therapy, intelligence quotient, and age at assessment. Methods In this cross-sectional cohort study, 50 adolescents and young adults with t...

  9. The effect of hypocalcemia in early childhood on autism-related social and communication skills in patients with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    Muldoon, Meghan; Ousley, Opal Y; Kobrynski, Lisa J; Patel, Sheena; Oster, Matthew E; Fernandez-Carriba, Samuel; Cubells, Joseph F; Coleman, Karlene; Pearce, Bradley D

    2015-09-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome (22qDS), also known as DiGeorge syndrome, is a copy number variant disorder that has a diverse clinical presentation including hypocalcaemia, learning disabilities, and psychiatric disorders. Many patients with 22q11DS present with signs that overlap with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) yet the possible physiological mechanisms that link 22q11DS with ASD are unknown. We hypothesized that early childhood hypocalcemia influences the neurobehavioral phenotype of 22q11DS. Drawing on a longitudinal cohort of 22q11DS patients, we abstracted albumin-adjusted serum calcium levels from 151 participants ranging in age from newborn to 19.5 years (mean 2.5 years). We then examined a subset of 20 infants and toddlers from this group for the association between the lowest calcium level on record and scores on the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales-Developmental Profile Infant-Toddler Checklist (CSBS-DP ITC). The mean (SD) age at calcium testing was 6.2 (8.5) months, whereas the mean (SD) age at the CSBS-DP ITC assessment was 14.7 (3.8) months. Lower calcium was associated with significantly greater impairment in the CSBS-DP ITC Social (p < 0.05), Speech (p < 0.01), and Symbolic domains (p < 0.05), in regression models adjusted for sex, age at blood draw, and age at the psychological assessment. Nevertheless, these findings are limited by the small sample size of children with combined data on calcium and CSBS-DP ITC, and hence will require replication in a larger cohort with longitudinal assessments. Considering the role of calcium regulation in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity, low calcium during early brain development could be a risk factor for adverse neurobehavioral outcomes. PMID:25267002

  10. Comparison of facial features of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) due to deletion 10p13-10pter with DGS due to 22q11 deletion

    Goodship, J.; Lynch, S.; Brown, J. [Univ. of Newcastle, Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital anomaly consisting of cardiac defects, aplasia or hypoplasia of the thymus and parathroid glands, and dysmorphic facial features. The majority of DGS cases have a submicroscopic deletion within chromosome 22q11. However there have been a number of reports of DGS in association with other chromosomal abnormalities including four cases with chromosome 10p deletions. We describe a further 10p deletion case and suggest that the facial features in children with DGS due to deletions of 10p are different from those associated with chromosome 22 deletions. The propositus was born at 39 weeks gestation to unrelated caucasian parents, birth weight 2580g (10th centile) and was noted to be dysmorphic and cyanosed shortly after birth. The main dysmorphic facial features were a broad nasal bridge with very short palpebral fissures. Echocardiography revealed a large subsortic VSD and overriding aorta. She had a low ionised calcium and low parathroid hormone level. T cell subsets and PHA response were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed duplex kidneys and on further investigation she was found to have reflux and raised plasma creatinine. She had an anteriorly placed anus. Her karyotype was 46,XX,-10,+der(10)t(3;10)(p23;p13)mat. The dysmorphic facial features in this baby are strikingly similar to those noted by Bridgeman and Butler in child with DGS as the result of a 10p deletion and distinct from the face seen in children with DiGeorge syndrome resulting from interstitial chromosome 22 deletions.

  11. COMT Val(158) met genotype and striatal D(2/3) receptor binding in adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    Boot, Erik

    2011-09-01

    Although catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity evidently affects dopamine function in prefrontal cortex, the contribution is assumed less significant in striatum. We studied whether a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene (Val(158) Met) influences striatal D(2\\/3) R binding ratios (D(2\\/3) R BP(ND) ) in 15 adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome and hemizygous for this gene, using single photon emission computed tomography and the selective D(2\\/3) radioligand [(123) I]IBZM. Met hemizygotes had significantly lower mean D(2\\/3) R BPND than Val hemizygotes. These preliminary data suggest that low COMT activity may affect dopamine levels in striatum in humans and this may have implications for understanding the contribution of COMT activity to psychiatric disorders.

  12. Upper limb malformations in chromosome 22q11 deletions

    Shalev, S.A.; Dar, H.; Barel, H.; Borochowitz, Z. [Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa (Israel)

    1996-03-29

    We read with interest the report of Cormier-Daire et al. in a recent issue of the journal, describing upper limb malformations in DiGeorge syndrome. We observed a family with this group of rare clinical expression of chromosome 22q11 deletions. The proposita was examined in our clinic when she was 4 years old. She was mildly mentally retarded. Clinical evaluation showed normal growth, long thin nose with squared tip, nasal speech, and abundant scalp hair and no cardiac anomalies. The girl was accompanied by her mother. Facial similarities were noted between the two. The mother reported to be treated with oral calcium due to hypoparathyroidism, diagnosed several years ago. Clinical evaluation showed wide flat face, short stature, mild mental retardation, slight hypertelorism, peculiar nose similar to her daughter`s, and nasal speech. No cardiac anomalies were found. Recently, a brother was born. Clinical examination documented large ventriculo-septal defect, retrognathia, narrow palpebral fissures, and long thin nose with squared tip. 1 ref.

  13. Developmental trajectories of fronto-executive functions in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A preliminary study

    Howley, S A

    2011-01-01

    22qll.2 deletion syndrome (22qllDS) is associated with borderline-mild intellectual disability and specific neurocognitive deficits, particularly in prefrontally-mediated executive functions (EF). There is evidence for white matter abnormalities in frontal cortical regions in 22qllDS, however little is known about the development of EF across the age range. Forty-eight individuals with 22qllDS were divided into 3 age groups: Child (7 male; n = 16; 6–11 years; M (SD) age = 8.4 (1.7); mean FSIQ = 72.9); Adolescent (7 male; n = 15; 12–15 years; M (SD) age = 13.1 (0.8); mean FSIQ = 68.0) and Adult (7 male; n = 17; 16–45 years; M (SD) age = 28.8 (11.5); mean FSIQ = 69.6). Forty healthy controls were also recruited and divided into the same 3 age groups: Child (6 male; 6–11 years, n = 12; M (SD) age = 9.3 (1.7); mean FSIQ = 99.1); Adolescent (6 male; 12–15 years; n = 12; M (SD) age = 13.2 (1.1); mean FSIQ = 100.9) and Adult (6 male; 16–45 years; n = 16; M (SD) age = 28.8 (9.4); mean FSIQ = 109). All participants completed standardised tests of a range of executive functions, specifically working memory, planning, problem-solving, strategy formation, cognitive flexibility and inhibition, and cross-sectional developmental trajectories of each function were constructed. No age-mediated improvements on EF tasks were observed in the 22qllDS groups, with the exception of verbal working memory. The control group exhibited significant age-mediated improvements in working memory, strategy formation and planning efficiency. These findings support the hypothesis that 22qllDS individuals experience atypical development of neuroanatomical regions and networks associated with EF in typical individuals. Future longitudinal work is required to examine intra-individual development of executive and non-executive cognitive processes.

  14. 22q11-deletionssyndrom

    Olesen, Charlotte; Agergaard, Peter; Boers, Maria;

    2010-01-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome (formerly named CATCH22, DiGeorge, Velo-Cardio-Facial, Caylor, Kinouchi and Shprintzen syndrome) occurs in approximately 1/2000 to 4000 children. The genetic lesion is remarkably uniform, occurring mainly as 3 or 1.5 MB deletions in the 22q11.2 region. However, the clinical...

  15. Síndrome con deleción 22q11 (Síndrome velocardiofacial, reporte de los primeros casos en Costa Rica con diagnóstico citogenético 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome, report of the first cases in Costa Rica with cytogenetic diagnosis

    Oscar Porras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome con deleción 22q11 es una enfermedad autosómica recesiva causada por una microdeleción 22q11.2. En este artículo se reportan los tres primeros casos del síndrome confirmados por citogenética en Costa Rica. El estudio de fluorescencia con hibridización in situ que demostró la microdeleción 22q11.2, se indicó por la sospecha clínica del síndrome, en 2 niños y una niña con malformaciones congénitas conotruncales de corazón. Dos de los casos se encuentran vivos a la fecha cuando se escribió este reporte y uno falleció en el postoperatorio inmediato de la cirugía para corregir la cardiopatía. Al inicio de los síntomas, en los tres casos se documentó falla para progresar y en dos se anotó dismorfismo en referencia a rasgos faciales anormales. En un caso se reportó paladar hendido y en otro pie, bott. A pesar de que la malformación congénita de corazón es el hallazgo clínico que con frecuencia induce al médico a pensar en este síndrome, los trastornos cognitivos y del comportamiento son las manifestaciones fenotípicas más frecuentes.The 22q11 deletion syndrome is an autosomic recessive disease caused by a 22q11 microdeletion. We report the first 3 cases of this syndrome in Costa Rica, confirmed by cytogenetics, in situ fluorescence hybridization showed the 22q11 microdeletion. Due to clinical suspicion it was requested in 2 boys and one girl with congenital conotruncal heart disease. As of today, 2 of the cases are alive and 1 died in the immediate postoperative period of corrective cardiac surgery. When their symptoms began, in the 3 cases failure to thrive was noted and in 2, dimorphism related to abnormal facial features. In 1 case, cleft palate was recorded and, pie bott in another. Although congenital heart disease is a clinical finding that frequently persuades physicians into thinking about this syndrome, the most common phenotypical signs are cognitive and behavioral disorders.

  16. Síndrome de deleção 22q11.2: importância da avaliação clínica e técnica de FISH 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: importance of clinical evaluation and FISH analysis

    Dayane Bohn Koshiyama

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 é considerada hoje uma das doenças genéticas mais frequentes em humanos. Caracteriza-se clinicamente por um espectro fenotípico bastante amplo, com mais de 180 achados já descritos, tanto físicos como comportamentais. Contudo, nenhum deles é patognomônico ou mesmo obrigatório, o que acaba dificultando o diagnóstico. Assim, o objetivo do presente estudo foi determinar a prevalência e as características clínicas de pacientes com microdeleção 22q11.2 em uma amostra selecionada de indivíduos com suspeita clínica de síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 e cariótipo normal. MÉTODOS: Uma amostra selecionada de 30 pacientes com suspeita clínica da síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 e cariótipo normal foi avaliada através da aplicação de um protocolo clínico padrão e análise citogenética por meio da técnica de hibridização in situ fluorescente. RESULTADOS: A microdeleção 22q11.2 foi identificada em três pacientes (10%, sendo esta prevalência similar a da maioria dos estudos descritos na literatura que oscila de 4% a 21%. Os pacientes com síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 do nosso trabalho se caracterizaram por um fenótipo variável, com poucos achados clínicos similares, o que foi concordante com a descrição da literatura. CONCLUSÃO: Nossos achados reforçam a ideia de que o diagnóstico clínico da síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 é difícil devido à sua grande variabilidade fenotípica. Assim, uma avaliação clínica detalhada associada a um teste sensível como a hibridização in situ fluorescente, são fundamentais para a identificação destes pacientes.OBJECTIVE: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome nowadays is considered one of the most often observed genetic diseases in humans. It is clinically characterized by a rather wide phenotypic spectrum, with more than 180 clinical features physical as well as behavioral, already described. However, none is pathognomonic or obligatory which

  17. Core Neuropsychological Characteristics of Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion

    Jacobson, C.; Shearer, J.; Habel, A.; Kane, F.; Tsakanikos, E.; Kravariti, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) confers high risk for intellectual disability and neuropsychological/academic impairment, although a minority of patients show average intelligence. Intellectual heterogeneity and the high prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses in earlier studies may have obscured the prototypical neuropsychological…

  18. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    Ashutosh Halder; Manish Jain; Amanpreet Kaur Kalsi

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were d...

  19. Deletions at 22q11.2 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a combined analysis of genome-wide association data

    Mok, K. Y.; Sheerin, U.; Simón-Sánchez, J.; Salaka, A.; Chester, L.; Escott-Price, V; Mantripragada, K.; Doherty, K M; Noyce, A. J.; Mencacci, N. E.; Lubbe, S. J.; International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC); Williams-Gray, C. H.; Barker, R. A.; Dijk, K.D. van

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Parkinson's disease has been reported in a small number of patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. In this study, we screened a series of large, independent Parkinson's disease case-control studies for deletions at 22q11.2. Methods We used data on deletions spanning the 22q11.2 locus from four independent case-control Parkinson's disease studies (UK Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2, Dutch Parkinson's Disease Genetics Consortium, US National Institute on ...

  20. Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion in monozygotic twins with discordant phenotype and deletion size

    Halder Ashutosh; Jain Manish; Chaudhary Isha; Varma Binuja

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We report on a pair of male monozygotic twins with 22q11.2 microdeletion, discordant phenotype and discordant deletion size. The second twin had findings suggestive of DiGeorge syndrome, while the first twin had milder anomalies without any cardiac malformation. The second twin had presented with intractable convulsion, cyanosis and cardiovascular failure in the fourth week of life and expired on the sixth week of life, whereas the first twin had some characteristic facial appearance...

  1. Frontonasal malformation with tetralogy of Fallot associated with a submicroscopic deletion of 22q11

    Stratton, R.F. [South Texas Genetics Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Payne, R.M. [Central Texas Genetics Center, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-03-31

    We report on a 14-month-old girl with bifid nasal tip and tetralogy of Fallot. Several similar patients have been described with CNS or eye abnormalities. Chromosome analysis with FISH, using Oncor DiGeorge probes, confirmed a submicroscopic deletion of 22q11. Many patients with Shprintzen (velo-cardio-facial) syndrome have a similar deletion with conotruncal cardiac defects and an abnormal nasal shape, suggesting that a gene in this area, possibly affecting neural crest cells, influences facial and other midline development. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Deleção 22q11.2 em pacientes com defeito cardíaco conotruncal e fenótipo da síndrome da deleção 22q11.2 Deleción 22q11.2 en pacientes con defecto cardiaco conotruncal y fenotipo del síndrome de la deleción 22q11.2 22q11.2 deletion in patients with conotruncal heart defect and del22q syndrome phenotype

    Sintia Iole Nogueira Belangero; Fernanda T.S. Bellucco; Leslie Domenici Kulikowski; Christofolini, Denise M; Mirlene C. S. P. Cernach; Maria Isabel Melaragno

    2009-01-01

    FUNDAMENTO: A síndrome da deleção 22q11.2 é a mais freqüente síndrome de microdeleção humana. O fenótipo é altamente variável e caracterizado por defeito cardíaco conotruncal, dismorfias faciais, insuficiência velofaríngea, dificuldade de aprendizagem e retardo mental. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a freqüência da deleção 22q11.2 em uma amostra brasileira de indivíduos portadores de cardiopatia conontrucal isolada e do fenótipo da síndrome da deleção 22q11.2. MÉTODOS: Vin...

  3. Deletions at 22q11.2 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a combined analysis of genome-wide association data

    Mok, Kin Y; Sheerin, Una; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Salaka, Afnan; Chester, Lucy; Escott-Price, Valentina; Mantripragada, Kiran; Doherty, Karen M; Noyce, Alastair J; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Lubbe, Steven J; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Barker, Roger A; van Dijk, Karin D; Berendse, Henk W; Heutink, Peter; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Cormier, Florence; Lesage, Suzanne; Brice, Alexis; Brockmann, Kathrin; Schulte, Claudia; Gasser, Thomas; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Morrison, Karen E; Clarke, Carl E; Sawcer, Stephen; Warner, Tom T; Lees, Andrew J; Morris, Huw R; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Abramov, Andrey Y; Plagnol, Vincent; Williams, Nigel M; Wood, Nicholas W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Parkinson's disease has been reported in a small number of patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. In this study, we screened a series of large, independent Parkinson's disease case-control studies for deletions at 22q11.2. Methods We used data on deletions spanning the 22q11.2 locus from four independent case-control Parkinson's disease studies (UK Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2, Dutch Parkinson's Disease Genetics Consortium, US National Institute on Aging, and International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium studies), which were independent of the original reports of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We did case-control association analysis to compare the proportion of 22q11.2 deletions found, using the Fisher's exact test for the independent case-control studies and the Mantel-Haenszel test for the meta-analyses. We retrieved clinical details of patients with Parkinson's disease who had 22q11.2 deletions from the medical records of these patients. Findings We included array-based copy number variation data from 9387 patients with Parkinson's disease and 13 863 controls. Eight patients with Parkinson's disease and none of the controls had 22q11.2 deletions (p=0·00082). In the 8451 patients for whom age at onset data were available, deletions at 22q11.2 were associated with Parkinson's disease age at onset (Mann-Whitney U test p=0·001). Age at onset of Parkinson's disease was lower in patients carrying a 22q11.2 deletion (median 37 years, 95% CI 32·0–55·5; mean 42·1 years [SD 11·9]) than in those who did not carry a deletion (median 61 years, 95% CI 60·5–61·0; mean 60·3 years [SD 12·8]). A 22q11.2 deletion was present in more patients with early-onset (p<0·0001) and late-onset Parkinson's disease (p=0·016) than in controls, and in more patients with early-onset than late-onset Parkinson's disease (p=0·005). Interpretation Clinicians should be alert to the possibility of 22q11.2 deletions in

  4. Velocardiofacial syndrome in father and daughter: What is the mechanism for the deletion 22(q11.2q11.2) in only the daughter?

    Magenis, R.E.; Gunter, K.; Toth-Fejel, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    E.G. had marked feeding difficulty noted at birth; the cause was determined to be a paralyzed palate. In 1992 chromosome studies were performed because of the provisional diagnosis of velocardiofacial syndrome, and a small interstitial deletion of chromosome 22 was found. Recently the family was seen in our Genetics Clinic. The father had unusual facial features shared by his daughter, a paralyzed upper lip and a history of repaired Tetralogy of Fallot. His chromosomes appeared normal. FISH studies were performed on the child`s peripheral blood using the ONCOR DiGeorge region probe (D22S75) and the deletion verified. However, the father`s chromosomes were not deleted for the ONCOR probe (D22S75) and probe DO832 sent to us by Peter Scambler. Skin cells were then obtained and no deletion was detected in a total of 66 cells examined using both probes. Several questions arise from these data: does the father have velocardiofacial syndrome? Does he have occult mosaicism? Does he have a molecular deletion not detected by the probes used? And was this deletion somehow {open_quotes}amplified{close_quotes} in his daughter?

  5. Congenital Heart Disease as a Warning Sign for the Diagnosis of the 22q11.2 Deletion

    Marcília S. Grassi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To alert for the diagnosis of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD. Objective: To describe the main CHDs, as well as phenotypic, metabolic and immunological findings in a series of 60 patients diagnosed with 22q11.2DS. Methods: The study included 60 patients with 22q11.2DS evaluated between 2007 and 2013 (M:F=1.3, age range 14 days to 20 years and 3 months at a pediatric reference center for primary immunodeficiencies. The diagnosis was established by detection of the 22q11.2 microdeletion using FISH (n = 18 and/or MLPA (n = 42, in association with clinical and laboratory information. Associated CHDs, progression of phenotypic facial features, hypocalcemia and immunological changes were analyzed. Results: CHDs were detected in 77% of the patients and the most frequent type was tetralogy of Fallot (38.3%. Surgical correction of CHD was performed in 34 patients. Craniofacial dysmorphisms were detected in 41 patients: elongated face (60% and/or elongated nose (53.3%, narrow palpebral fissure (50%, dysplastic, overfolded ears (48.3%, thin lips (41.6%, elongated fingers (38.3% and short stature (36.6%. Hypocalcemia was detected in 64.2% and decreased parathyroid hormone (PTH level in 25.9%. Decrease in total lymphocytes, CD4 and CD8 counts were present in 40%, 53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. Hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in one patient and decreased concentrations of immunoglobulin M (IgM in two other patients. Conclusion: Suspicion for 22q11.2DS should be raised in all patients with CHD associated with hypocalcemia and/or facial dysmorphisms, considering that many of these changes may evolve with age. The 22q11.2 microdeletion should be confirmed by molecular testing in all patients.

  6. Congenital Heart Disease as a Warning Sign for the Diagnosis of the 22q11.2 Deletion

    Grassi, Marcília S., E-mail: marcilia.grassi@hc.fm.usp.br; Jacob, Cristina M. A. [Instituto da Criança - HC-FMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kulikowski, Leslie D. [Departamento de Patologia da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pastorino, Antonio C. [Instituto da Criança - HC-FMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dutra, Roberta L. [Departamento de Patologia da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miura, Nana; Jatene, Marcelo B. [Instituto do Coração - HC-FMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pegler, Stephanie P.; Kim, Chong A.; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda [Instituto da Criança - HC-FMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    To alert for the diagnosis of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). To describe the main CHDs, as well as phenotypic, metabolic and immunological findings in a series of 60 patients diagnosed with 22q11.2DS. The study included 60 patients with 22q11.2DS evaluated between 2007 and 2013 (M:F=1.3, age range 14 days to 20 years and 3 months) at a pediatric reference center for primary immunodeficiencies. The diagnosis was established by detection of the 22q11.2 microdeletion using FISH (n = 18) and/or MLPA (n = 42), in association with clinical and laboratory information. Associated CHDs, progression of phenotypic facial features, hypocalcemia and immunological changes were analyzed. CHDs were detected in 77% of the patients and the most frequent type was tetralogy of Fallot (38.3%). Surgical correction of CHD was performed in 34 patients. Craniofacial dysmorphisms were detected in 41 patients: elongated face (60%) and/or elongated nose (53.3%), narrow palpebral fissure (50%), dysplastic, overfolded ears (48.3%), thin lips (41.6%), elongated fingers (38.3%) and short stature (36.6%). Hypocalcemia was detected in 64.2% and decreased parathyroid hormone (PTH) level in 25.9%. Decrease in total lymphocytes, CD4 and CD8 counts were present in 40%, 53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. Hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in one patient and decreased concentrations of immunoglobulin M (IgM) in two other patients. Suspicion for 22q11.2DS should be raised in all patients with CHD associated with hypocalcemia and/or facial dysmorphisms, considering that many of these changes may evolve with age. The 22q11.2 microdeletion should be confirmed by molecular testing in all patients.

  7. Congenital Heart Disease as a Warning Sign for the Diagnosis of the 22q11.2 Deletion

    To alert for the diagnosis of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). To describe the main CHDs, as well as phenotypic, metabolic and immunological findings in a series of 60 patients diagnosed with 22q11.2DS. The study included 60 patients with 22q11.2DS evaluated between 2007 and 2013 (M:F=1.3, age range 14 days to 20 years and 3 months) at a pediatric reference center for primary immunodeficiencies. The diagnosis was established by detection of the 22q11.2 microdeletion using FISH (n = 18) and/or MLPA (n = 42), in association with clinical and laboratory information. Associated CHDs, progression of phenotypic facial features, hypocalcemia and immunological changes were analyzed. CHDs were detected in 77% of the patients and the most frequent type was tetralogy of Fallot (38.3%). Surgical correction of CHD was performed in 34 patients. Craniofacial dysmorphisms were detected in 41 patients: elongated face (60%) and/or elongated nose (53.3%), narrow palpebral fissure (50%), dysplastic, overfolded ears (48.3%), thin lips (41.6%), elongated fingers (38.3%) and short stature (36.6%). Hypocalcemia was detected in 64.2% and decreased parathyroid hormone (PTH) level in 25.9%. Decrease in total lymphocytes, CD4 and CD8 counts were present in 40%, 53.3% and 33.3%, respectively. Hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in one patient and decreased concentrations of immunoglobulin M (IgM) in two other patients. Suspicion for 22q11.2DS should be raised in all patients with CHD associated with hypocalcemia and/or facial dysmorphisms, considering that many of these changes may evolve with age. The 22q11.2 microdeletion should be confirmed by molecular testing in all patients

  8. Low thymic output in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome measured by CCR9+CD45RA+ T cell counts and T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles

    Lima, K; Abrahamsen, Gitte Meldgaard; Foelling, I;

    2010-01-01

    -expression of CD3, CD45RA and CCR9 (r=0.84) as well as with the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subtypes. RTE-related T cell counts also paralleled age-related TREC reductions. CD45RA+ T cells correlated well with absolute counts of CD4+ (r=0.87) and CD8+ (r=0.75) RTE-related T cells. Apart from CD45RA- T cells, all T......Thymic hypoplasia is a frequent feature of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, but we know little about patients' age-related thymic output and long-term consequences for their immune system. We measured the expression of T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (TREC) and used flow cytometry for...... direct subtyping of recent thymic emigrant (RTE)-related T cells in 43 patients (aged 1-54 years; median 9 years) from all over Norway and in age-matched healthy controls. Thymic volumes were estimated by ultrasound in patients. TREC levels correlated well with RTE-related T cells defined by co...

  9. Síndrome con deleción 22q11 (Síndrome velocardiofacial), reporte de los primeros casos en Costa Rica con diagnóstico citogenético 22q11 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome), report of the first cases in Costa Rica with cytogenetic diagnosis

    Oscar Porras; Catalina Obando-Jiménez; Carlos Mas

    2011-01-01

    El síndrome con deleción 22q11 es una enfermedad autosómica recesiva causada por una microdeleción 22q11.2. En este artículo se reportan los tres primeros casos del síndrome confirmados por citogenética en Costa Rica. El estudio de fluorescencia con hibridización in situ que demostró la microdeleción 22q11.2, se indicó por la sospecha clínica del síndrome, en 2 niños y una niña con malformaciones congénitas conotruncales de corazón. Dos de los casos se encuentran vivos a la fecha cuando se es...

  10. Tetralogy of Fallot associated with deletion in the DiGeorge region of chromosome 22 (22q11)

    D`Angelo, J.A.; Pillers, D.M.; Jett, P.L. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ. Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Cardiac conotruncal defects, such as Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), are associated with DiGeorge syndrome which has been mapped to the q11 region of chromosome 22 and includes abnormalities of neural crest and branchial arch development. Patients with conotruncal defects and velo-cardio-facial syndrome may have defects in the 22q11 region but not show the complete DiGeorge phenotype consisting of cardiac, thymus, and parathyroid abnormalities. We report two neonates with TOF and small deletions in the DiGeorge region of chromosome 22 (46,XX,del(22)(q11.21q11.23) and 46,XY,del(22)(q11.2q11.2)) using both high-resolution cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The first patient is a female with TOF and a family history of congenital heart disease. The mother has pulmonic stenosis and a right-sided aortic arch, one brother has TOF, and a second brother has a large VSD. The patient had intrauterine growth retardation and had thrombocytopenia due to maternal IgG platelet-directed autoantibody. Lymphocyte populations, both T and B cells, were reduced in number but responded normally to stimulation. The findings were not attributed to a DiGeorge phenotype. Although she had transient neonatal hypocalcemia, her parathyroid hormone level was normal. The patient was not dysmorphic in the newborn period but her mother had features consistent with velo-cardio-facial syndrome. The second patient was a male with TOF who was not dysmorphic and had no other significant clinical findings and no family history of heart disease. Lymphocyte testing did not reveal a specific immunodeficiency. No significant postnatal hypocalcemia was noted. These cases illustrate that there is a wide spectrum of clinical features associated with defects of the 22q11 region. We recommend karyotype analysis, including FISH probes specific to the DiGeorge region, in any patient with conotruncal cardiac defects.

  11. Altered white matter microstructure is associated with social cognition and psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    Maria eJalbrzikowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome (22q11DS is a highly penetrant genetic mutation associated with a significantly increased risk for psychosis. Aberrant neurodevelopment may lead to inappropriate neural circuit formation and cerebral dysconnectivity in 22q11DS, which may contribute to symptom development. Here we examined: 1 differences between 22q11DS participants and typically developing controls in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measures within white matter tracts; 2 whether there is an altered age-related trajectory of white matter pathways in 22q11DS; and 3 relationships between DTI measures, social cognition task performance and positive symptoms of psychosis in 22q11DS and typically developing controls. Sixty-four direction diffusion weighted imaging data were acquired on 65 participants (36 22q11DS, 29 controls. We examined differences between 22q11DS vs. controls in measures of fractional anisotropy (FA, axial (AD and radial diffusivity (RD, using both a voxel-based and region of interest approach. Social cognition domains assessed were: Theory of Mind and emotion recognition. Positive symptoms were assessed using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Compared to typically developing controls, 22q11DS participants showed significantly lower AD and RD in multiple white matter tracts, with effects of greatest magnitude for AD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus. Additionally, 22q11DS participants failed to show typical age-associated changes in FA and RD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Higher AD in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and left uncinate fasciculus was associated with better social cognition in 22q11DS and controls. In contrast, greater severity of positive symptoms was associated with lower AD in bilateral regions of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in 22q11DS. White matter microstructure in tracts relevant to social cognition is disrupted in 22q11DS, and may contribute to

  12. Delineation of a recognizable phenotype for the recurrent LCR22-C to D/E atypical 22q11.2 deletion.

    Bengoa-Alonso, Amaya; Artigas-López, Mercè; Moreno-Igoa, María; Cattalli, Claudio; Hernández-Charro, Blanca; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria Antonia

    2016-06-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is typically caused by haploinsufficiency of a 3 Mb region that extends from LCR22-A until LCR22-D, while the recurrent recombination between any of the LCR22-D to H causes the 22q11.2 distal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe three patients with a de novo atypical ∼1.4 Mb 22q11.2 deletion that involves LCR22-C to a region beyond D (LCR22-C to D/E), encompassing the distal portion of the typical deleted region and the proximal portion of the distal deletion. We also review six previous published patients with the same rearrangement and compare their features with those found in patients with overlapping deletions. Patients with LCR22-C to D/E deletion present a recognizable phenotype characterized by facial dysmorphic features, high frequency of cardiac defects, including conotruncal defects, prematurity, growth restriction, microcephaly, and mild developmental delay. Genotype-phenotype analysis of the patients indicates that CRKL and MAPK1 genes play an important role as causative factors for the main clinical features of the syndrome. In particular, CRKL gene seems to be involved in the occurrence of conotruncal cardiac anomalies, mainly tetralogy of Fallot. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991864

  13. Social cognition in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: relevance to psychosis?

    Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Carter, Chelsea; Senturk, Damla; Chow, Carolyn; Hopkins, Jessica M; Green, Michael F; Galván, Adriana; Cannon, Tyrone D; Bearden, Carrie E

    2012-12-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) represents one of the largest known genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. Approximately 30% of individuals with 22qDS develop psychotic illness in adolescence or young adulthood. Given that deficits in social cognition are increasingly viewed as a central aspect of idiopathic schizophrenia, we sought to investigate abilities in this domain as a predictor of psychotic symptoms in 22qDS participants. We assessed multiple domains of social and non-social cognition in 22qDS youth to: 1) characterize performance across these domains in 22qDS, and identify whether 22qDS participants fail to show expected patterns of age-related improvements on these tasks; and 2) determine whether social cognition better predicts positive and negative symptoms than does non-social cognition. Task domains assessed were: emotion recognition and differentiation, Theory of Mind (ToM), verbal knowledge, visuospatial skills, working memory, and processing speed. Positive and negative symptoms were measured using scores obtained from the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS). 22qDS participants (N=31, mean age: 15.9) showed the largest impairment, relative to healthy controls (N=31, mean age: 15.6), on measures of ToM and processing speed. In contrast to controls, 22qDS participants did not show age-related improvements on measures of working memory and verbal knowledge. Notably, ToM performance was the best predictor of positive symptoms in 22qDS, accounting for 39% of the variance in symptom severity. Processing speed emerged as the best predictor of negative symptoms, accounting for 37% of the variance in symptoms. Given that ToM was a robust predictor of positive symptoms in our sample, these findings suggest that social cognition may be a valuable intermediate trait for predicting the development of psychosis. PMID:23122739

  14. The effects of gender and Catechol O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Val108/158Met polymorphism on emotion regulation in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome): a fMRI study

    Coman, Ioana L.; Gnirke, Matthew H.; Middleton, Frank A.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Fremont, Wanda; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Kates, Wendy R.

    2010-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a micro-deletion of over 40 genes at the q11.2 locus of chromosome 22 and is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. COMT, one of the genes located in the deleted region, has been considered as a major candidate gene for genetic susceptibility in psychiatric diseases. Its functional polymorphism Val108/158Met has been shown to affect prefrontal function and working memory and has been associated with emo...

  15. Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion may contain a locus for recessive early-onset Parkinson’s disease

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Ross, Owen A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that carriers of a hemizygous chromosome 22q11.2 deletion may be at increased risk of early-onset Parkinson’s disease. Herein, we propose a hypothesis that it is not the microdeletion per se that is responsible for the phenotype but rather a complete loss of function of a gene within the region due to the combination of the deletion and another mutation on the alternate allele. Thus we propose the deletion may be highlighting a novel locus for ...

  16. Partial Tetrasomy of Chromosome 22q11.1 Resulting from a Supernumerary Isodicentric Marker Chromosome in a Boy with Cat-eye Syndrome

    Ko, Jung Min; Kim, Jun Bum; Pai, Ki Soo; Yun, Jun-No; Park, Sang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11 region has been implicated in chromosomal rearrangements that result in altered gene dosage, leading to three different congenital malformation syndromes: DiGeorge syndrome, cat-eye syndrome (CES), and der(22) syndrome. Although DiGeorge syndrome is a common genomic disorder on 22q11, CES is quite rare, and there has been no report of Korean CES cases with molecular cytogenetic confirmation. In this study, we present the phenotypic and genetic characteristics of a 3-month-old boy wi...

  17. Jacobsen syndrome due to an unbalanced translocation between 11q23 and 22q11.2 identified at age 40 years.

    Takahashi, Ikuko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Sawada, Kenichi; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    A woman with psychomotor developmental delay, congenital glaucoma, and distinctive facial features, and a short neck was diagnosed with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) at age 40 years. A previously reported balanced translocation between chromosome 11 and 22 instead showed an unbalanced translocation by a microarray-based comparative hybridization analysis with the final karyotype of 46,XX,der(11)t(11;22)(q23.3;q11.21),del(22)(q11.21) dn. The breakpoint of chromosome 11 was determined to be at TECTA and not near the apolipoprotein gene cluster site or the fragile site (FRA11B), which are commonly seen in patients with t(11;22) and patients with typical 11q deletions, respectively. Although the phenotypic features of the patient, including psychomotor developmental delay, distinctive features, and mild thrombocytopenia, were consistent with JBS, congenital glaucoma, which is an uncommon finding of JBS, was the most prominent condition during her natural history. PMID:22139980

  18. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular outcomes in a series of 66 patients with Pierre Robin sequence and literature review: 22q11.2 deletion is less common than other chromosomal anomalies.

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-04-01

    Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is an important craniofacial anomaly that can be seen as an isolated finding or manifestation of multiple syndromes. 22q11.2 deletion and Stickler syndrome are cited as the two most common conditions associated with PRS, but their frequencies are debated. We performed a retrospective study of 66 patients with PRS and reviewed their genetic testing, diagnoses, and clinical findings. The case series is complemented by a comprehensive literature review of the nature and frequency of genetic diagnosis in PRS. In our cohort 65% of patients had associated anomalies; of these, a genetic diagnosis was established in 56%. Stickler syndrome was the most common diagnosis, comprising approximately 11% of all cases, followed by Treacher Collins syndrome (9%). The frequency of 22q11.2 deletion was 1.5%. Chromosome arrays, performed for 72% of idiopathic PRS with associated anomalies, revealed two cases of 18q22→qter deletion, a region not previously reported in association with PRS. A review of the cytogenetic anomalies identified in this population supports an association between the 4q33-qter, 17q24.3, 2q33.1, and 11q23 chromosomal loci and PRS. We found a low frequency of 22q11.2 deletion in PRS, suggesting it is less commonly implicated in this malformation. Our data also indicate a higher frequency of cytogenetic anomalies in PRS patients with associated anomalies, and a potential new link with the 18q22→qter locus. The present findings underscore the utility of chromosomal microarrays in cases of PRS with associated anomalies and suggest that delaying testing for apparently isolated cases should be considered. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756138

  19. Detecting 22q11.2 deletions by use of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on DNA from neonatal dried blood spot samples

    Sørensen, Karina M; Agergaard, Peter; Olesen, Charlotte; Andersen, Paal S; Larsen, Lars A; Ostergaard, John R; Schouten, Jan P; Christiansen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    of 22q11.2 deletions among certain manifestations, eg, congenital heart disease, on selected Danes, a multiplex ligation-dependant probe amplification (MLPA) analysis was designed. The analysis was planned to be performed on DNA extracted from dried blood spot samples (DBSS) obtained from Guthrie...... cards collected during neonatal screening programs. However, the DNA concentration necessary for a standard MLPA analysis (20 ng) could not be attained from DBSS, and a novel MLPA design was developed to permit for analysis on limited amounts of DNA (2 ng). A pilot study is reported here that validates...

  20. Secondary EWSR1 gene abnormalities in SMARCB1-deficient tumors with 22q11-12 regional deletions: Potential pitfalls in interpreting EWSR1 FISH results.

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-10-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218413

  1. Research progress on congenital heart disease 22q11.2 microdeletion%先天性心脏畸形22q11.2微缺失研究进展

    梁玥宏; 田卉; 任晨春

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a common chromosome microdeletion.Its clinical manifestation is complex, comprising congenital heart disease, dysmorphic facial, immunodeficiency, endocrine dysfunction and so on. Microdeletion of 22q11.2 is an important genetic etiology of congenital heart disease. A symmetric recombination of homologous low-copy-repeats(LCRs) in the deletion region causes the deletion of 22q11.2. This article reviewed clinical characteristics, genetic mechanism, key genes and current study methods of 22q11.2 microdeletion in CHD.%22q11.2微缺失是最常见的染色体微缺失疾病,它的临床表现复杂多样,可表现为心脏、颅面、四肢、免疫和内分泌等多系统的异常。22q11.2微缺失是先天性心脏病患者的重要遗传病因。22q11.2微缺失产生的机制是缺失区域内低拷贝重复序列之间的不对称重组。对22q11.2微缺失的临床表现、遗传机制、关键基因以及当前对先心病22q11.2微缺失的研究方法进行综述。

  2. Explaining the variable penetrance of CNVs: Parental intelligence modulates expression of intellectual impairment caused by the 22q11.2 deletion.

    Klaassen, Petra; Duijff, Sasja; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriëtte; Beemer, Frits; Sinnema, Gerben; Breetvelt, Elemi; Schappin, Renske; Vorstman, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    The role of rare genetic variants, in particular copy number variants (CNVs), in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders is becoming increasingly clear. While the list of these disorder-related CNVs continues to lengthen, it has also become clear that in nearly all genetic variants the proportion of carriers who express the associated phenotype is far from 100%. To understand this variable penetrance of CNVs it is important to realize that even the largest CNVs represent only a tiny fraction of the entire genome. Therefore, part of the mechanism underlying the variable penetrance of CNVs is likely the modulatory impact of the rest of the genome. In the present study we used the 22q11DS as a model to examine whether the observed penetrance of intellectual impairment-one of the main phenotypes associated with 22q11DS-is modulated by the intellectual level of their parents, for which we used the parents' highest level of education as a proxy. Our results, based on data observed in 171 children with 22q11DS in the age range of 5-15 years, showed a significant association between estimated parental cognitive level and intelligence in offspring (full scale, verbal and performance IQ), with the largest effect size for verbal IQ. These results suggest that possible mechanisms involved in the variable penetrance observed in CNVs include the impact of genetic background and/or environmental influences. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953189

  3. Localisation of the gene responsible for fechtner syndrome in a region <600 Kb on 22q11-q13.

    Cusano, R; Gangarossa, S; Forabosco, P; Caridi, G; Ghiggeri, G M; Russo, G; Iolascon, A; Ravazzolo, R; Seri, M

    2000-11-01

    Fechtner syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder which has been thought to be a variant of Alport syndrome. It is characterised by nephritis, sensorineural hearing loss and eye abnormalities, as well as by macrothrombocytopenia and polymorphonuclear inclusion bodies. Recently, the Fechtner syndrome has been mapped in a 5.5 Mb region on the long arm of chromosome 22 by linkage analysis in an extended Israeli family. We describe here the genetic refinement of the Fechtner critical interval to a region less than 600 Kb by linkage analysis performed in a large Italian pedigree. The presence of several recombination events allowed the disease gene to be localised between markers D22S278 and D22S426, in a region containing only two non-recombinant markers, D22S1173 and D22S283. This interval, spanning <600 Kb on genomic DNA, has been entirely sequenced and contains six known and three putative genes. PMID:11093280

  4. Association of tetralogy of Fallot with a distinct region of del22q11.2.

    Kessler-Icekson, Gania; Birk, Einat; Weintraub, Ari Y; Barhum, Yael; Kotlyar, Violetta; Schlesinger, Hadassa; Rockah, Rivka; Vidne, Bernardo A; Frisch, Amos

    2002-02-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) appear in greater frequency among relatives of patients and in individuals with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) or velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS). A majority of these patients and part of the apparently nonsyndromic CHD patients with conotruncal defects manifest hemizygous deletions within chromosome 22q11.2 (del22q11). We tested myocardial tissues of 31 CHD patients, 21 with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and 10 with a double-chamber right ventricle (DCRV). DNA isolated from tissues removed at corrective surgery was analyzed for homo- or heterozygosity of nine polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) markers along the 22q11.2 region. DNA from the blood of 45 healthy individuals represented the general population. Ten of the 21 TOF patients (48%) showed homozygosity for three or more consecutive markers, indicating deletions of various sizes. No such indication was found for DCRV patients. Heterozygosity for markers D22S1648, D22S941, and D22S944 was lower in the TOF group than in normal controls, defining a minimal critical region (MCR) for the deletion. Our findings support an association between TOF and hemizygosity in 22q11.2, suggesting a distinct region, between markers D22S1638 and COMT, that may harbor TOF susceptibility genes. PMID:11840485

  5. The Identification of Microdeletion and Reciprocal Microduplication in 22q11.2 Using High-Resolution CMA Technology

    Leite, Ana Julia Cunha; Pinto, Irene Plaza; Cunha, Damiana Mirian da Cruz e; Ribeiro, Cristiano Luiz; da Silva, Claudio Carlos; da Cruz, Aparecido Divino; Minasi, Lysa Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    The chromosome 22q11.2 region has long been implicated in genomic diseases. Some genomic regions exhibit numerous low copy repeats with high identity in which they provide increased genomic instability and mediate deletions and duplications in many disorders. DiGeorge Syndrome is the most common deletion syndrome and reciprocal duplications could be occurring in half of the frequency of microdeletions. We described five patients with phenotypic variability that carries deletions or reciprocal duplications at 22q11.2 detected by Chromosomal Microarray Analysis. The CytoScan HD technology was used to detect changes in the genome copy number variation of patients who had clinical indication to global developmental delay and a normal karyotype. We observed in our study three microdeletions and two microduplications in 22q11.2 region with variable intervals containing known genes and unstudied transcripts as well as the LCRs that are often flanking and within this genomic rearrangement. The identification of these variants is of particular interest because it may provide insight into genes or genomic regions that are crucial for specific phenotypic manifestations and are useful to assist in the quest for understanding the mechanisms subjacent to genomic deletions and duplications.

  6. 22q11.2欠失症候群における特徴的顔貌の検討 : 三次元レーザースキャナを用いて

    山村, 幸江; 高山, 幹子; 石井, 哲夫; 寺田, 伸一; YAMAMURA, Yukie; TAKAYAMA, Mikiko; ISHII, Tetsuo; TERADA, Shinichi

    2001-01-01

    The DiGeorge syndrome, velo-cardio-facial syndrome and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome have similar but variable phenotypes and share the deletion of 22q11.2. The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome includes the following facial appearance: widely spaced eyes, narrow eyelids, small mouth, prominent apex nasi, flat and widened nasal dorsum. A diagnosis of this syndrome may be made based solely on facial appearance. However, a more accurate and objective evaluation is necessary as facial appearance lar...

  7. Ocular findings associated with chromosome 22q11.2 duplication.

    Forbes, Brian J; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Wootton, Georgia; Dawson, Lindsay; Zackai, Elaine; Binenbaum, Gil

    2016-06-01

    We describe the ocular features of the chromosome 22q11.2 duplication syndrome and provide ophthalmologic examination recommendations for affected patients. The medical records of 19 children with chromosome 22q11.2 duplication who had undergone complete ophthalmological examination, including dilated fundus examination and cycloplegic refraction, were studied retrospectively. Over half of the children with 22q11.2 duplication syndrome were found to have visually significant ocular abnormalities, including 6 with strabismus, 2 with moderately high astigmatism requiring glasses, 1 with unilateral congenital cataract requiring surgery, 1 with optic disk drusen, 1 with bilateral megalocornea with normal eye pressures, 1 with nystagmus that resolved spontaneously, and 1 with delayed visual maturation. Because of the high incidence of conditions that could affect visual development, we recommend that children with 22q11.2 duplication syndrome have a complete ophthalmological examination on diagnosis and regular vision screenings by their primary care physician thereafter. PMID:27108843

  8. Three Patients With Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral Spectrum and Microdeletion 22q11.2

    Digilio, M. Cristina; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Heike, Carrie; Catania, Charles; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Marino, Bruno; Zackai, Elaine H.

    2009-01-01

    We report on three unrelated patients with the 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (del22q11) who have phenotypic anomalies compatible with oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS). Hemifacial microsomia, unilateral microtia, hearing loss, congenital heart/aortic arch arteries defects, and feeding difficulties were present in all three patients. Additional anomalies occasionally diagnosed included coloboma of the upper eyelid, microphthalmia, cerebral malformation, palatal anomalies, neonatal hypo...

  9. Complexity of a small non-protein coding sequence in chromosomal region 22q11.2: presence of specialized DNA secondary structures and RNA exon/intron motifs

    Delihas, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Background DiGeorge Syndrome is a genetic abnormality involving ~3 Mb deletion in human chromosome 22, termed 22q.11.2. To better understand the non-coding regions of 22q.11.2, a small 10,000 bp non-protein-coding sequence close to the DiGeorge Critical Region 6 gene (DGCR6) was chosen for analysis and functional entities as the homologous sequence in the chimpanzee genome could be aligned and used for comparisons. Methods The GenBank database provided genomic sequences. In silico computer pr...

  10. [Analysis of microdeletions in 22q11 in Colombian patients with congenital heart disease].

    Salazar, Marleny; Villalba, Guiovanny; Mateus, Heidi; Villegas, Victoria; Fonseca, Dora; Núñez, Federico; Caicedo, Víctor; Pachón, Sonia; Bernal, Jaime E

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac defects are the most frequent congenital malformations, with an incidence estimated between 4 and 12 per 1000 newborns. Their etiology is multifactorial and might be attributed to genetic predispositions and environmental factors. Since 1990 these types of pathologies have been associated with 22q11 microdeletion. In this study, the frequency of microdeletion 22q11 was determined in 61 patients with non-syndromic congenital heart disease. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and TUPLE1 and STR D10S2198 genes were amplified by multiplex PCR and visualized in agarose gels. Gene content was quantified by densitometry. Three patients were found with microdeletion 22q11, representing a 4.9% frequency. This microdeletion was associated with two cases of Tetralogy of Fallot and a third case with atrial septal defect (ASD). In conclusion, the frequency for microdeletion 22q11 in the population analyzed was 4.9%. The cases that presented Teratology of Fallot had a frequency for this microdeletion of 7.4% and for ASD of 11.1%. PMID:22523843

  11. Graph theory reveals dysconnected hubs in 22q11DS and altered nodal efficiency in patients with hallucinations

    Marie-Christine Ottet

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is postulated to be the prototypical dysconnection disorder, in which hallucinations are the core symptom. Due to high heterogeneity in methodology across studies and the clinical phenotype, it remains unclear whether the structural brain dysconnection is global or focal and if clinical symptoms result from this dysconnection. In the present work, we attempt to clarify this issue by studying a population considered as a homogeneous genetic sub-type of schizophrenia, namely the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS. Cerebral MRIs were acquired for 46 patients and 48 age and gender matched controls (aged 6 to 26, respectively mean age = 15.20 ± 4.53 and 15.28 ± 4.35 years old. Using the Connectome mapper pipeline (connectomics.org that combines structural and diffusion MRI, we created a whole brain network for each individual. The graph theory was used to quantify the global and local properties in the brain network organization for each participant. A global degree loss of 6% was found in patients’ network along with an increased Characteristic Path Length. After identifying and comparing hubs, a significant loss of degree in patients’ hubs was found in 58% of them. Based on Allen’s brain network model for hallucinations, we explored the association between local efficiency and symptom severity. Negative correlations were found in the Broca’s area (p<0.004, the Wernicke area (p<0.023 and a positive correlation was found in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC (p<0.014. In line with the dysconnection findings in schizophrenia, our results provide preliminary evidence for a targeted alteration in the brain network hubs’organisation in individuals with a genetic risk for schizophrenia. The study of specific disorganization in language, speech and thought regulation networks sharing similar network properties may help to understand their role in the hallucination mechanism.

  12. Searching for a Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene in the 22q11 Region

    LIN XIE; GUI-ZHI JU; SHU-ZHENG LIU; JIE-PING SHI; YA-QIN YU; JUN WEI

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate a genetic association for schizophrenia within chromosome 22q11 in a Chinese Han population. Methods The PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis was used to detect three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs165655 (A/G base change) and rs165815 (C/T base change) present in the ARVCF (armadillo repeat gene deletion in velocardiofacial syndrome) locus, and rs756656 (A/C base change) in the LOC128979 (expressed sequence tags, EST) locus, among 100 Chinese family trios consisting of fathers, mothers and affected offspring with schizophrenia. Genotype data were analyzed by using linkage disequilibrium (LD) methods including haplotype relative risk (HRR) analysis, transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) and haplotype transmission analysis. Results The genotype frequency distributions of three SNPs were all in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P>0.05). Both the HRR and the TDT analysis showed that rs165815 was associated with schizophrenia (χ2=6.447, df=1, P=0.011 and χ2=6.313, df=1, P=0.012, respectively), whereas the other two SNPs did not show any allelic association. The haplotype transmission analysis showed a biased transmission for the rs165655-rs165815 haplotype system (χ2=17.224, df=3, P=0.0006) and for the rs756656- rs165655-rs165815 hapoltype system (χ2=20.965, df=7, P=0.0038). Conclusion Either the ARVCF gene itself or a nearby locus may confer susceptibility to schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population.

  13. Prevalence of Psychiatric Morbidity and Behavioural Problems in 22q11.2DS: An Irish Population Study

    Prasad, Sarah E

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This population study examines the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity, behavioural difficulties, autistic and schizotypal features in a sample of individuals with 22q11.2DS and in their sibling controls. Methods: Forty-five individuals with 22q11.2DS and their 27 siblings were recruited and studied. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed by using the parent Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-P), Kiddie SADS-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADPL) (psychotic su...

  14. Novel Susceptibility Locus at 22q11 for Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes

    Wessman, Maija; Forsblom, Carol; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Söderlund, Jenny; Ilonen, Jorma; Sallinen, Riitta; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Parkkonen, Maija; Maxwell, Alexander P.; Tarnow, Lise; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and contributes to serious morbidity and mortality. So far only the 3q21–q25 region has repeatedly been indicated as a susceptibility region for DN. The aim of this study was to search for new DN susceptibility loci in Finnish, Danish and French T1D families. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide linkage study using 384 microsatellite markers. A total of 175 T1D families were studied, of which 94 originated from Finland, 46 from Denmark and 35 from France. The whole sample set consisted of 556 individuals including 42 sib-pairs concordant and 84 sib-pairs discordant for DN. Two-point and multi-point non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using the Analyze package and the MERLIN software. A novel DN locus on 22q11 was identified in the joint analysis of the Finnish, Danish and French families by genome-wide multipoint non-parametric linkage analysis using the Kong and Cox linear model (NPLpairs LOD score 3.58). Nominal or suggestive evidence of linkage to this locus was also detected when the three populations were analyzed separately. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found to six additional loci in the Finnish and French sample sets. Conclusions This study identified a novel DN locus at chromosome 22q11 with significant evidence of linkage to DN. Our results suggest that this locus may be of importance in European populations. In addition, this study supports previously indicated DN loci on 3q21–q25 and 19q13. PMID:21909410

  15. Novel susceptibility locus at 22q11 for diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Maija Wessman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic nephropathy (DN affects about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and contributes to serious morbidity and mortality. So far only the 3q21-q25 region has repeatedly been indicated as a susceptibility region for DN. The aim of this study was to search for new DN susceptibility loci in Finnish, Danish and French T1D families. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a genome-wide linkage study using 384 microsatellite markers. A total of 175 T1D families were studied, of which 94 originated from Finland, 46 from Denmark and 35 from France. The whole sample set consisted of 556 individuals including 42 sib-pairs concordant and 84 sib-pairs discordant for DN. Two-point and multi-point non-parametric linkage analyses were performed using the Analyze package and the MERLIN software. A novel DN locus on 22q11 was identified in the joint analysis of the Finnish, Danish and French families by genome-wide multipoint non-parametric linkage analysis using the Kong and Cox linear model (NPL(pairs LOD score 3.58. Nominal or suggestive evidence of linkage to this locus was also detected when the three populations were analyzed separately. Suggestive evidence of linkage was found to six additional loci in the Finnish and French sample sets. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified a novel DN locus at chromosome 22q11 with significant evidence of linkage to DN. Our results suggest that this locus may be of importance in European populations. In addition, this study supports previously indicated DN loci on 3q21-q25 and 19q13.

  16. 3p deletion syndrome.

    Kaur, Anupam; Khetarpal, S

    2013-08-01

    3p deletion is a rare cytogenetic finding. Here we describe a 3 months old male with congenital malformations. His karyotype revealed 3p deletion 46,XY,del(3)(p25-pter). The child had flexion deformity of wrist and elbow which has never been reported before. PMID:24036645

  17. El síndrome 22q11.2D S como un subtipo genético de esquizofrenia

    Cindy Katherin Huertas-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El síndrome de deleción 22q11.2 (22q11.2 DS se produce por microdeleciones del brazo largo del cromosoma 22 en la región q11.2. Después del síndrome de Down, es el segundo síndrome genético más común. En pacientes con esquizofrenia, el 22q11.2 DS tiene una prevalencia del 2%, mientras que en personas con esquizofrenia seleccionadas por características físicas específicas, aumenta un 32-53%. Objetivo: Describir las generalidades del 22q11.2 DS, sus características clínicas, los aspectos genético-moleculares y la frecuencia de la microdeleción de 22q11.2 en diferentes poblaciones. Métodos: Se hizo una revisión desde 1967 hasta 2013 en bases de datos de publicaciones científicas, orientada a recopilar artículos sobre el 22q11.2 DS y su relación con la esquizofrenia. Resultados: El 22q11.2 DS es una entidad genética que se asocia a un fenotipo variable relacionado con defectos congénitos en diferentes tejidos y órganos, así como a una alta frecuencia de trastornos psiquiátricos, particularmente la esquizofrenia. Se ha identificado alta prevalencia en grupos de personas con esquizofrenia seleccionadas por características sindrómicas comunes, como dificultades de aprendizaje, rasgos faciales típicos, anomalías palatales y defectos cardiacos congénitos. Las técnicas de FISH, qPCR, MLPA y, recientemente, aCGH y NGS se están usando para diagnosticar esta microdeleción. Conclusiones: En la práctica clínica es importante tener presente que las personas con 22q11.2 DS tienen alto riesgo de sufrir esquizofrenia, ya que la región 22q11.2 alberga genes candidatos relacionados con vulnerabilidad a esquizofrenia. Se considera que la concomitancia de esta enfermedad y 22q11.2 DS representa un subtipo genético de esquizofrenia. y métodos citogenéticos y moleculares para diagnosticar a este grupo de pacientes y optimizar un abordaje multidisciplinario en su seguimiento.

  18. How many breaks do we need to CATCH on 22q11?

    Dallapiccola, B.; Pizzuti, A.; Novelli, G. [Univ. of Rome, Rome (Italy)]|[Univ. of Milan (Italy)]|[CSS IRCCS Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)

    1996-07-01

    The major clinical manifestations of DiGeorge syndrome (DGS; MIM 188400), which reflect developmental abnormalities of the 3d and 4th pharyngeal pouch derivatives, include thymus- and parathyroid-gland aplasia or hypoplasia and conotruncal cardiac malformations. The additional dysmorphic facial features, such as hypertelorism, cleft lip and palate, bifid uvula, and small/low-set ears, which are also common, presumably reflect the same defect. The DGS phenotype has been associated with chromosome abnormalities and, sometimes, is the effect of teratogenic agents such as retinoic acid and alcohol. 53 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Deletion 22q13.3 syndrome

    Phelan Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The deletion 22q13.3 syndrome (deletion 22q13 syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome) is a chromosome microdeletion syndrome characterized by neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth, absent to severely delayed speech, and minor dysmorphic features. The deletion occurs with equal frequency in males and females and has been reported in mosaic and non-mosaic forms. Due to lack of clinical recognition and often insufficient laboratory testing, the syndr...

  20. Estudio de la psicopatología en una población de pacientes con microdeleción 22q11.2

    Robles Sánchez, Fuensanta

    2016-01-01

    El síndrome de deleción 22q11.2 (22q11.2 DS; OMIM # 188400) es un trastorno genético que puede presentar diversas malformaciones físicas, déficit cognitivo y trastornos psicopatológicos. Los objetivos del estudio han consistido en evaluar el nivel de inteligencia y los trastornos psiquiátricos de los pacientes con este síndrome en la etapa infanto-juvenil y determinar los factores genéticos, clínicos y sociodemográficos asociados. Hemos estudiado el perfil cognitivo y los trastornos psi...

  1. Complete nucleotide sequence of the gene for human heparin cofactor II and mapping to chromosomal band 22q11

    Herzog, R.; Lutz, S.; Blin, N. (Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (West Germany)); Marasa, J.C.; Blinder, M.A.; Tollefsen, D.M. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1991-02-05

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) is a 66-kDa plasma glycoprotein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of dermatan sulfate or heparin. Clones comprising the entire HCII gene were isolated from a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 {lambda} phage. The sequence of the gene was determined on both strands of DNA (15,849 bp) and included 1,749 bp of 5{prime}-flanking sequence, five exons, four introns, and 476 bp of DNA 3{prime} to the polyadenylation site. Ten complete and one partial Alu repeats were identified in the introns and 5{prime}-flanking region. The HCII gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 22 using rodent-human somatic cell hybrids, carrying only parts of human chromosome 22, and the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. With the cDNA probe HCII7.2, containing the entire coding region of the gene, the HCII gene was shown to be amplified 10-20-fold in K562 cells by Southern analysis and in situ hybridization. From these data, the authors concluded that the HCII gene is localized on the chromosomal band 22q11 proximal to the breakpoint cluster region (BCR). Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the amplified HCII gene in K562 cells maps at least 2 Mbp proximal to BCR-1. Furthermore, the HCII7.2 cDNA probe detected two frequent restriction fragment length polymorphisms with the restriction enzymes BamHI and Hind III.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of the gene for human heparin cofactor II and mapping to chromosomal band 22q11

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) is a 66-kDa plasma glycoprotein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of dermatan sulfate or heparin. Clones comprising the entire HCII gene were isolated from a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 λ phage. The sequence of the gene was determined on both strands of DNA (15,849 bp) and included 1,749 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, five exons, four introns, and 476 bp of DNA 3' to the polyadenylation site. Ten complete and one partial Alu repeats were identified in the introns and 5'-flanking region. The HCII gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 22 using rodent-human somatic cell hybrids, carrying only parts of human chromosome 22, and the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. With the cDNA probe HCII7.2, containing the entire coding region of the gene, the HCII gene was shown to be amplified 10-20-fold in K562 cells by Southern analysis and in situ hybridization. From these data, the authors concluded that the HCII gene is localized on the chromosomal band 22q11 proximal to the breakpoint cluster region (BCR). Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the amplified HCII gene in K562 cells maps at least 2 Mbp proximal to BCR-1. Furthermore, the HCII7.2 cDNA probe detected two frequent restriction fragment length polymorphisms with the restriction enzymes BamHI and Hind III

  3. MLPA analysis for a panel of syndromes with mental retardation reveals imbalances in 5.8% of patients with mental retardation and dysmorphic features, including duplications of the Sotos syndrome and Williams-Beuren syndrome regions

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Bryndorf, Thue;

    2007-01-01

    MLPA analysis for a panel of syndromes with mental retardation (MRS-MLPA) was used for investigation of 258 mentally retarded and dysmorphic patients with normal conventional karyotypes (P064 probe set, MRC-Holland, for detection of (micro)deletions associated with 1p36-deletion, Sotos, Williams......-Beuren, Prader-Willi, Angelman, Miller-Dieker, Smith-Magenis, and 22q11-deletion syndromes). Patients were initially referred for HR-CGH analysis and MRS-MLPA was performed retrospectively. MRS-MLPA analysis revealed imbalances in 15/258 patients (5.8%). Ten deletions were identified, including deletions of 1p36......, 5q35 (Sotos syndrome), 7q11 (Williams-Beuren syndrome), 17p11 (Smith-Magenis syndrome), 15q11 (Angelman syndrome) and 22q11. Duplications were detected in 5q35, 7q11, 17p13, 17p11 and 22q11. We reviewed another 170 patients referred specifically for MRS-MLPA analysis. Eighty of these patients were...

  4. The chromosome 9q subtelomere deletion syndrome

    Stewart, D.R.; Kleefstra, T.

    2007-01-01

    The chromosome 9q subtelomere deletion syndrome (9qSTDS) is among the first and most common clinically recognizable syndromes to arise from widespread testing by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of subtelomere deletions. There are about 50 reported cases worldwide. Affected individuals invar

  5. Interrupção do arco aórtico tipo B em uma paciente com síndrome de olho de gato Interrupción del arco aórtico tipo B en una paciente con síndrome del ojo de gato Interrupted aortic arch type B in A patient with cat eye syndrome

    Sintia Iole Nogueira Belangero

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos um caso de paciente com Síndrome do Olho de Gato (Cat Eye Syndrome-CES e interrupção do arco aórtico tipo B, um achado típico na síndrome da deleção 22q11.2. A análise cromossômica e a técnica de hibridização fluorescente in situ (FISH mostraram um cromossomo marcador isodicêntrico supranumerário com bi-satélite derivado do cromossomo 22. O segmento de 22pter a 22q11.2 no cromossomo supranumerário encontrado em nosso paciente não estava em sobreposição com a região deletada em pacientes com a síndrome da deleção 22q11.2. Entretanto, o achado de interrupção do arco aórtico tipo B não é usual na CES, mas é um defeito cardíaco freqüente na síndrome da deleção 22q11.Informamos un caso de paciente con Síndrome de Ojo de Gato (Cat Eye Syndrome-CES e Interrupción del Arco Aórtico tipo B, un hallazgo típico en el síndrome de la deleción 22q11.2. El análisis cromosómico y la técnica de hibridación in situ fluorescente (FISH mostraron un cromosoma marcador isodicéntrico supernumerario bisatelitado derivado del cromosoma 22. El segmento de 22pter a 22q11.2 en el cromosoma supernumerario encontrado en nuestro paciente no estaba en sobreposición con la región deletada en pacientes con el síndrome de la deleción 22q11.2. Con todo, el hallazgo de interrupción del arco aórtico tipo B no es usual en el CES, sino que es un defecto cardíaco frecuente en el síndrome de deleción 22q11.We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is

  6. MicroRNA Profiling of Neurons Generated Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Patients with Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder, and 22q11.2 Del.

    Dejian Zhao

    Full Text Available We are using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology to study neuropsychiatric disorders associated with 22q11.2 microdeletions (del, the most common known schizophrenia (SZ-associated genetic factor. Several genes in the region have been implicated; a promising candidate is DGCR8, which codes for a protein involved in microRNA (miRNA biogenesis. We carried out miRNA expression profiling (miRNA-seq on neurons generated from iPSCs derived from controls and SZ patients with 22q11.2 del. Using thresholds of p<0.01 for nominal significance and 1.5-fold differences in expression, 45 differentially expressed miRNAs were detected (13 lower in SZ and 32 higher. Of these, 6 were significantly down-regulated in patients after correcting for genome wide significance (FDR<0.05, including 4 miRNAs that map to the 22q11.2 del region. In addition, a nominally significant increase in the expression of several miRNAs was found in the 22q11.2 neurons that were previously found to be differentially expressed in autopsy samples and peripheral blood in SZ and autism spectrum disorders (e.g., miR-34, miR-4449, miR-146b-3p, and miR-23a-5p. Pathway and function analysis of predicted mRNA targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs showed enrichment for genes involved in neurological disease and psychological disorders for both up and down regulated miRNAs. Our findings suggest that: i. neurons with 22q11.2 del recapitulate the miRNA expression patterns expected of 22q11.2 haploinsufficiency, ii. differentially expressed miRNAs previously identified using autopsy samples and peripheral cells, both of which have significant methodological problems, are indeed disrupted in neuropsychiatric disorders and likely have an underlying genetic basis.

  7. Meta-analysis of two Chinese populations identifies an autoimmune disease risk allele in 22q11.21 as associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Yan ZHANG; Wang, Yong-Fei; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Liangdan; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Pan, Hai-Feng; Lau, Chak Sing; Chan, Tak Mao; Lee, Tsz Leung; Leung, Alexander Moon Ho; Mok, Chi Chiu; Zhang, Lu; Shen, Jiangshan Jane; Wong, Sik Nin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous disease with a diverse spectrum of clinical symptoms, ranging from skin rash to end-organ damage. 22q11.21 has been identified as a susceptibility region for several autoimmune diseases, including SLE. However, detailed information for SLE association and the underlying functional mechanism(s) is still lacking. Methods Through meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on Han Chinese populations, comprising a ...

  8. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    Jordan VK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Valerie K Jordan,1 Hitisha P Zaveri,2 Daryl A Scott1,2 1Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. Keywords: chromosome 1p36, chromosome deletion, 1p36 deletion syndrome, monosomy 1p36

  9. Deletion 22q13.3 syndrome

    Phelan Mary C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deletion 22q13.3 syndrome (deletion 22q13 syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome is a chromosome microdeletion syndrome characterized by neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth, absent to severely delayed speech, and minor dysmorphic features. The deletion occurs with equal frequency in males and females and has been reported in mosaic and non-mosaic forms. Due to lack of clinical recognition and often insufficient laboratory testing, the syndrome is under-diagnosed and its true incidence remains unknown. Common physical traits include long eye lashes, large or unusual ears, relatively large hands, dysplastic toenails, full brow, dolicocephaly, full cheeks, bulbous nose, and pointed chin. Behavior is autistic-like with decreased perception of pain and habitual chewing or mouthing. The loss of 22q13.3 can result from simple deletion, translocation, ring chromosome formation and less common structural changes affecting the long arm of chromosome 22, specifically the region containing the SHANK3 gene. The diagnosis of deletion 22q13 syndrome should be considered in all cases of hypotonia of unknown etiology and in individuals with absent speech. Although the deletion can sometimes be detected by high resolution chromosome analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is recommended for confirmation. Differential diagnosis includes syndromes associated with hypotonia, developmental delay, speech delay and/or autistic-like affect (Prader-Willi, Angelman, Williams, Smith-Magenis, Fragile X, Sotos, FG, trichorhinophalangeal and velocardiofacial syndromes, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy. Genetic counseling is recommended and parental laboratory studies should be considered to identify cryptic rearrangements and detect parental mosaicism. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered for future pregnancies in those families with inherited rearrangements

  10. DiGeorge syndrome associated with solitary median maxillary central incisor.

    Yang, Huai-Chih; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Huang, Li-Hsin; Chang, Yi-Chi; Wen, Da-Chin; Liang, Pei-Hsuan; Lin, Mao-Tsair

    2005-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by dysgenesis of the thymus and parathyroid glands, conotruncal cardiac anomalies, and other dysmorphic features. Although most patients have a common microscopic deletion in chromosome 22q11.2, marked clinical variability exists. A solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly which may be an isolated occurrence or associated with congenital nasal airway abnormalities or holoprosencephaly. We report a patient with DiGeorge syndrome who was diagnosed at nearly 1 month of age and was later found to have a solitary median central incisor. Initially, the patient presented with recurrent episodes of respiratory distress attributed to partial airway obstruction, one of the phenotypic features of SMMCI. A fluorescence in situ hybridization study showed a chromosome 22q11.2 deletion. PMID:16252847

  11. "FISHed" out the diagnosis: A case of DiGeorge syndrome.

    Bajaj, S; Thombare, T S; Tullu, M S; Agrawal, M

    2016-01-01

    Our patient presented with congenital heart disease (CHD: Tetralogy of Fallot), hypocalcemia, hypoparathyroidism, and facial dysmorphisms. Suspecting DiGeorge syndrome (DGS), a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for 22q11.2 deletion was made. The child had a hemizygous deletion in the 22q11.2 region, diagnostic of DGS. Unfortunately, the patient succumbed to the heart disease. DGS is the most common microdeletion syndrome, and probably underrecognized due to the varied manifestations. This case stresses the importance of a detailed physical examination and a high index of suspicion for diagnosing this genetic condition. Timely diagnosis can help manage and monitor these patients better and also offer prenatal diagnosis in the next pregnancy. PMID:26489877

  12. Limb anomalies in DiGeorge and CHARGE syndromes

    Prasad, C.; Quackenbush, E.J.; Whiteman, D.; Korf, B. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-01-20

    Limb anomalies are not common in the DiGeorge or CHARGE syndromes. We describe limb anomalies in two children, one with DiGeorge and the other with CHARGE syndrome. Our first patient had a bifid left thumb, Tetralogy of Fallot, absent thymus, right facial palsy, and a reduced number of T-cells. A deletion of 22q11 was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The second patient, with CHARGE syndrome, had asymmetric findings that included right fifth finger clinodactyly, camptodactyly, tibial hemimelia and dimpling, and severe club-foot. The expanded spectrum of the DiGeorge and CHARGE syndromes includes limb anomalies. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  14. Learning about Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ... have communication and social interaction problems such as autism. As adults, these individuals have an increased risk ... nidcd.nih.gov] From the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) 22q11.2 deletion ...

  15. Síndrome con deleción 22q11 (Síndrome velocardiofacial), reporte de los primeros casos en Costa Rica con diagnóstico citogenético

    Oscar Porras; Catalina Obando-Jiménez; Carlos Mas

    2011-01-01

    El síndrome con deleción 22q11 es una enfermedad autosómica recesiva causada por una microdeleción 22q11.2. En este artículo se reportan los tres primeros casos del síndrome confirmados por citogenética en Costa Rica. El estudio de fluorescencia con hibridización in situ que demostró la microdeleción 22q11.2, se indicó por la sospecha clínica del síndrome, en 2 niños y una niña con malformaciones congénitas conotruncales de corazón. Dos de los casos se encuentran vivos a la fecha cuando se es...

  16. Deletions and candidate genes in Williams syndrome

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemizygosity at the elastin locus (ELN) on chromosome 7q11.23 has recently been reported in several familial and sporadic cases of the developmental disorder, Williams syndrome (WS). Because the deletion is greater than the span of the ELN gene, a contiguous gene deletion syndrome has been suggested as the probable molecular basis for this condition. Thus far, neither the size of the deletion(s), nor other genes within it are known. We have analyzed samples from 27 sporadic WS patients by genotyping two multiallelic ELN intragenic polymorphisms, detectable by PCR amplification, and by Southern blotting for ELN gene dosage. Twenty four patients were hemizygous at the ELN locus while 3 showed no deletion or detectable rearrangement. Genotype studies on parental DNA were informative in 12 of the deletions. All 12 were due to de novo events, 8 in the maternal and 4 in the paternal chromosome. In an attempt to identify genes involved in WS we are also using a candidate gene approach. Delayed clearance of an exogenous calcium load with normal or slightly increased calcitonin levels in serum has been documented in WS patients suggesting a defective calcitonin action or calcium sensing function. The calcitonin receptor (CTR) gene is, therefore, a good candidate since CTR has a dual role as a hormonal receptor for calcitonin and an extracellular calcium sensor. We have mapped the CTR gene to chromosome 7q21.1 by PCR-SSCA of somatic cell hybrids and FISH analysis. Using two color FISH with probes for ELN and CTR, both loci are located on 7q at a distance of {approximately}10 Mb, CTR being telomeric. Our CTR probe does not detect any genomic abnormality by FISH or Southern blot in the patients` samples analyzed. We have identified a diallelic polymorphism in the CTR cDNA and are currently testing the hypothesis of an impaired CTR expression as responsible for some of the clinical features of WS by analysing the CTR transcripts by RT-PCR.

  17. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  18. Mutational Mechanisms of Williams-Beuren Syndrome Deletions

    Bayés, Mònica; Magano, Luis F.; Rivera, Núria; Flores, Raquel; A. Pérez Jurado, Luis

    2003-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a segmental aneusomy syndrome that results from a heterozygous deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23. Three large region-specific low-copy repeat elements (LCRs), composed of different blocks (A, B, and C), flank the WBS deletion interval and are thought to predispose to misalignment and unequal crossing-over, causing the deletions. In this study, we have determined the exact deletion size and LCR copy number in 74 patients with WBS, as well as precisely de...

  19. Gene deletion analysis of a Chinese boy with Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome

    麻宏伟; 姜俊; 王岳平; 王志超; 陈丽英; 松尾雅文

    2004-01-01

    @@ Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome, sometimes called complex glycerol kinase deficiency, is associated with variable size Xp21 deletions that usually include the glycerol kinase gene and span multiple Xp21 disease gene loci in the region. The order of the potentially affected loci are as follows:

  20. Birth of a child with Down syndrome in a family transmitting an unusual chromosome 22 arising from a translocation between chromosomes 21 and an inverted chromosome 22

    Aviv, H.A.; Desposito, F. [UMDNJ-NJ Medical School, Newark, NJ (United States); Lieber, C. [Hackensack Medical Center, NJ (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal analysis of a child with Down syndrome resulted in the identification of a family with an unusual translocation and in the definition of the translocation breakpoints. Studies were performed on the child, his siblings, mother, mother`s sister, and grandmother. All of the family members were carriers of the translocation. We performed G-banding, silver stain, C-banding, and hybridization with the following FISH probes (Oncor): {alpha}-satellite 13/21; {beta}-satellite, coatasome 21 and 22, and the probes for chromosome 22 at 22q11 (DiGeorge region) and 22q13.3 (control region). Using the banding techniques and probes, we characterized the karyotype as: 45,XX,-21,-22,+der(22),t(21;22)(22qter{r_arrow}22q11.2::22p13{r_arrow}22q11.2::21q11.2{r_arrow}21qter). The effect of deletion of 21q11.2 and the break of chromosome 22 in the DiGeorge region in this family is not clear. However, the presence of the translocation increases the risk of family members of conceiving children with Down syndrome.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: 18q deletion syndrome

    ... to severe, but some affected individuals have normal intelligence and development. Seizures, hyperactivity, aggression, and autistic behaviors ... into two types : individuals with deletions near the end of the long arm of chromosome 18 are ...

  2. Delineation of 14q32.3 deletion syndrome.

    Ortigas, A P; Stein, C K; Thomson, L L; Hoo, J J

    1997-01-01

    A patient with a 14q32.3 terminal band deletion and cat cry is reported. Review of four other 14q32.3 deletion cases suggests the possible presence of a recognisable 14q32.3 terminal deletion syndrome, which is characterised by (1) apparently postnatal onset of small head size in comparison to body size, (2) high forehead with lateral hypertrichosis, (3) epicanthic folds, (4) broad nasal bridge, (5) high arched palate, (6) single palmar crease, and (7) mild to moderate developmental delay. Al...

  3. Deletions of the elastin gene in Williams Syndrome

    Greenberg, F.; Nickerson, E.; McCaskill, C. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To investigate deletions in the elastin gene in patients with Williams Syndrome (WS), we screened 37 patients and their parents for deletions in the elastin gene by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using cosmid cELN272 containing the 5{prime} end of the elastin gene and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a primer pair which amplifies intron 17 in the elastin gene, producing a polymorphic amplification product. Thirty-two patients have been investigated by both the FISH and PCR techniques, one patient was studied only by PCR, and 4 patients were studied only by FISH. Overall, 34 of 37 patients (92%) were deleted for the elastin gene. Using the PCR marker, 14 patients were informative and 12 were shown to be deleted [maternal (n=5) and paternal (n=7)]. Using cosmid cELN272, 33 of 36 patients demonstrated a deletion of chromosome 7q11.23. In one family, both the mother and daughter were deleted due to an apparently de novo deletion arising in the mother. Three patients were not deleted using the elastin cosmid; 2 of these patients have classic WS. Another non-deleted patient has the typical facial features and hypercalcemia but normal intelligence. These three patients will be important in delineating the critical region(s) responsible for the facial features, hypercalcemia, mental retardation and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). There was not an absolute correlation between deletions in elastin and SVAS, although these individuals may be at risk for other cardiovascular complications such as hypertention. Since the majority of WS patients are deleted for a portion of the elastin gene, most likely this marker will be an important diagnostic tool, although more patients will need to be studied. Those patients who are not deleted but clinically have WS will be missed using only this one marker. Expansion of the critical region to other loci and identification of additional markers will be essential for identifying all patients with WS.

  4. Síndrome con deleción 22q11 (Síndrome velocardiofacial, reporte de los primeros casos en Costa Rica con diagnóstico citogenético

    Oscar Porras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome con deleción 22q11 es una enfermedad autosómica recesiva causada por una microdeleción 22q11.2. En este artículo se reportan los tres primeros casos del síndrome confirmados por citogenética en Costa Rica. El estudio de fluorescencia con hibridización in situ que demostró la microdeleción 22q11.2, se indicó por la sospecha clínica del síndrome, en 2 niños y una niña con malformaciones congénitas conotruncales de corazón. Dos de los casos se encuentran vivos a la fecha cuando se escribió este reporte y uno falleció en el postoperatorio inmediato de la cirugía para corregir la cardiopatía. Al inicio de los síntomas, en los tres casos se documentó falla para progresar y en dos se anotó dismorfismo en referencia a rasgos faciales anormales. En un caso se reportó paladar hendido y en otro pie, bott. A pesar de que la malformación congénita de corazón es el hallazgo clínico que con frecuencia induce al médico a pensar en este síndrome, los trastornos cognitivos y del comportamiento son las manifestaciones fenotípicas más frecuentes.

  5. Evidence for Involvement of GNB1L in Autism

    Chen, Ying-Zhang; Matsushita, Mark; Girirajan, Santhosh; Lisowski, Mark; Sun, Elizabeth; Sul, Youngmee; Bernier, Raphael; Estes, Annette; Dawson, Geraldine; Minshew, Nancy; Shellenberg, Gerard D; Evan E Eichler; Rieder, Mark J.; Deborah A Nickerson; Tsuang, Debby W.

    2011-01-01

    Structural variations in the chromosome 22q11.2 region mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination result in 22q11.2 deletion (del22q11.2) and 22q11.2 duplication (dup22q11.2) syndromes. The majority of del22q11.2 cases have facial and cardiac malformations, immunologic impairments, specific cognitive profile and increased risk for schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The phenotype of dup22q11.2 is frequently without physical features but includes the spectrum of neurocogni...

  6. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  7. DiGeorge syndrome with vertebral and rib dysplasia

    Puno-Cocuzza, C.; David, K.; Kogekar, N. [Brooklyn Hospital Center, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome results from defect in the development of the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches, and is characterized by conotruncal heart defects, aplasia or hypoplasia of thymus and parathyroid glands resulting in immune deficiency and hypocalcemia. Other associated abnormalities include renal, thyroid and diaphragmatic defects, oral clefting, etc. Etiologically, it is heterogeneous, with a microdeletion of 22q11 present in over 80% of cases. Our patient was born following a pregnancy complicated by insulin dependent gestational diabetes. There was truncus arteriosus type 2, absense of thymic shadow on CXR with severe deficiency of T cell function, and persistent hypocalcemia with low parathormone. Right kidney was absent. Dysplastic ribs including fused and bifid ribs were noted. Hypoplastic vertebrae and hemivertebrae were present through thoracic and lumbar regions. Chromosome analysis was normal, and metaphase FISH analysis with probe N25 representing locus D22S75 did not show any deletion of 22q11.2. The skeletal findings similar to these have not been previously reported in association with DiGeorge syndrome to our knowledge. Vertebral and rib abnormalities are known to occur with pregestational maternal diabetes. Maternal diabetes has also been suggested to be a possible etiology in a very small proportion of DiGeorge syndrome cases. It is possible that these findings occured together on account of gestational maternal diabetes in our case.

  8. The Danish 22q11 research initiative

    Schmock, Henriette; Vangkilde, Anders; Larsen, Kit Melissa;

    2015-01-01

    Background : Neurodevelopmental brain disorders such as schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are complex disorders with heterogeneous etiologies. Schizophrenia and autism are difficult to treat and often cause major individual suffering largely owing to our limited...

  9. Adults with genetic syndromes and cardiovascular abnormalities: Clinical history and management

    Lin, Angela E.; Basson, Craig T.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Magoulas, Pilar L.; McDermott, Deborah A.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; McPherson, Elspeth; Morris, Colleen A.; Noonan, Jacqueline; Nowak, Catherine; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Rope, Alan F.; Zackai, Elaine; Pober, Barbara R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities, especially structural congenital heart defects (CHDs), commonly occur in malformation syndromes and genetic disorders. Individuals with syndromes comprise a significant proportion of those affected with selected CHDs such as complete atrioventricular canal, interrupted arch type B, supravalvar aortic stenosis and pulmonary stenosis. As these individuals age, they contribute to the growing population of adults with special health care needs. Although most will require longterm cardiology followup, primary care providers, geneticists and other specialists should be aware of (1) the type and frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, (2) the range of clinical outcomes, and (3) guidelines for prospective management and treatment of potential complications. This article reviews fundamental genetic, cardiac, medical and reproductive issues associated with common genetic syndromes which are frequently associated with a cardiovascular abnormality. New data are also provided about the cardiac status of adults with a 22q11.2 deletion and with Down syndrome. PMID:18580689

  10. Novel features of 3q29 deletion syndrome: Results from the 3q29 registry

    Glassford, Megan R.; Jill A. Rosenfeld; Freedman, Alexa A.; Michael E Zwick; ,; Mulle, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent, typically de novo heterozygous 1.6 Mb deletion, but because incidence of the deletion is rare (1 in 30,000 births) the phenotype is not well described. To characterize the range of phenotypic manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome, we have developed an online registry (3q29deletion.org) for ascertainment of study subjects and phenotypic data collection via Internet‐based survey instruments. We report here on data collected during...

  11. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and ...

  12. BAC array CGH in patients with Velocardiofacial syndrome-like features reveals genomic aberrations on chromosome region 1q21.1

    Estivill Xavier

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion of the chromosome 22q11.2 region is the most common genetic aberration among patients with velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS but a subset of subjects do not show alterations of this chromosome region. Methods We analyzed 18 patients with VCFS-like features by comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH array and performed a face-to-face slide hybridization with two different arrays: a whole genome and a chromosome 22-specific BAC array. Putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH and MLPA assays. Results One patient carried a combination of rearrangements on 1q21.1, consisting in a microduplication of 212 kb and a close microdeletion of 1.15 Mb, previously reported in patients with variable phenotypes, including mental retardation, congenital heart defects (CHD and schizophrenia. While 326 control samples were negative for both 1q21.1 rearrangements, one of 73 patients carried the same 212-kb microduplication, reciprocal to TAR microdeletion syndrome. Also, we detected four copy number variants (CNVs inherited from one parent (a 744-kb duplication on 10q11.22; a 160 kb duplication and deletion on 22q11.21 in two cases; and a gain of 140 kb on 22q13.2, not present in control subjects, raising the potential role of these CNVs in the VCFS-like phenotype. Conclusions Our results confirmed aCGH as a successful strategy in order to characterize additional submicroscopic aberrations in patients with VCF-like features that fail to show alterations in 22q11.2 region. We report a 212-kb microduplication on 1q21.1, detected in two patients, which may contribute to CHD.

  13. Characterization of 14 novel deletions underlying Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: an update of the CREBBP deletion repertoire.

    Rusconi, Daniela; Negri, Gloria; Colapietro, Patrizia; Picinelli, Chiara; Milani, Donatella; Spena, Silvia; Magnani, Cinzia; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Sorasio, Lorena; Curtisova, Vaclava; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Prontera, Paolo; Stangoni, Gabriela; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Biamino, Elisa; Fischetto, Rita; Piccione, Maria; Gasparini, Paolo; Salviati, Leonardo; Selicorni, Angelo; Finelli, Palma; Larizza, Lidia; Gervasini, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare, clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by cognitive impairment and several multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is caused by almost private point mutations in the CREBBP (~55% of cases) and EP300 (~8%) genes. The CREBBP mutational spectrum is variegated and characterized by point mutations (30-50 %) and deletions (~10%). The latter are diverse in size and genomic position and remove either the whole CREBBP gene and its flanking regions or only an intragenic portion. Here, we report 14 novel CREBBP deletions ranging from single exons to the whole gene and flanking regions which were identified by applying complementary cytomolecular techniques: fluorescence in situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array comparative genome hybridization, to a large cohort of RSTS patients. Deletions involving CREBBP account for 23% of our detected CREBBP mutations, making an important contribution to the mutational spectrum. Genotype-phenotype correlations revealed that patients with CREBBP deletions extending beyond this gene did not always have a more severe phenotype than patients harboring CREBBP point mutations, suggesting that neighboring genes play only a limited role in the etiopathogenesis of CREBBP-centerd contiguous gene syndrome. Accordingly, the extent of the deletion is not predictive of the severity of the clinical phenotype. PMID:25805166

  14. A case of 3p deletion syndrome associated with cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

    Suzuki-Muromoto, Sato; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Sato, Hiroki; Sato, Yuko; Nakayama, Tojo; Kubota, Yuki; Kakisaka, Yosuke; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Md, Shigeo Kure

    2016-02-01

    We described clinical course of a 24-year-old woman with 3p deletion syndrome associated with cerebellar hemangioblastoma at the age of 16 years old. She presented dysmorphic facial features, growth retardation and severe psychomotor retardation associated with 3p deletion syndrome. We identified de novo 3p deletion encompassing p25 by using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, where causative gene of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease located. Surgical therapy for cerebellar hemangioblastoma was performed, and histological examination was consistent in cerebellar hemangioblastoma. She showed no other tumors associated VHL disease till 24 years old. This is the first case report of a patient with 3p deletion syndrome whose cerebellar hemangioblastoma may be associated with VHL disease. Repeat imaging studies were recommended for the patients with 3p deletion syndrome. PMID:26365017

  15. New recurrent deletions in the PPARgamma and TP53 genes are associated with childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    Silveira, Cássia G T; Oliveira, Fábio M; Valera, Elvis T; Ikoma, Maura R V; Borgonovo, Tamara; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Tone, Luiz G; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2009-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a rare hematological malignancy in children. It was performed FISH analysis in 19 pediatric MDS patients to investigate deletions involving the PPARgamma and TP53 genes. Significant losses in the PPARgamma gene and deletions in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 were...

  16. An Xp22 microdeletion associated with ocular albinism and ichthyosis: approximation of breakpoints and estimation of deletion size by using cloned DNA probes and flow cytometry.

    Schnur, R E; Trask, B J; van den Engh, G; Punnett, H H; Kistenmacher, M; Tomeo, M A; Naids, R E; Nussbaum, R L

    1989-11-01

    Ocular albinism of the Nettleship-Falls type (OA1) and X-linked ichthyosis (XI) due to steroid sulfatase (STS) deficiency are cosegregating in three cytogenetically normal half-brothers. The mother has patchy fundal hypopigmentation consistent with random X inactivation in an OA1 carrier. Additional phenotypic abnormalities that have been observed in other STS "deletion syndromes" are not present in this family. STS is entirely deleted on Southern blot in the affected males, but the loci MIC2X, DXS31, DXS143, DXS85, DXS43, DXS9, and DXS41 are not deleted. At least part of DXS278 is retained. Flow cytometric analysis of cultured lymphoblasts from one of the XI/OA1 males and his mother detected a deletion of about 3.5 million bp or about 2% of the X chromosome. Southern blot and RFLP analysis in the XI/OA1 family support the order tel-[STS-OA1-DXS278]-DXS9-DXS41-cen. An unrelated patient with the karyotype 46,X,t(X;Y) (p22;q11) retains the DXS143 locus on the derivative X chromosome but loses DXS278, suggesting that DXS278 is the more distal locus and is close to an XI/OA1 deletion boundary. If a contiguous gene deletion is responsible for the observed XI/OA1 phenotype, it localizes OA1 to the Xp22.3 region. PMID:2573275

  17. Partial USH2A deletions contribute to Usher syndrome in Denmark

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Kann, Erik; Albrechtsen, Anders; M. Mehrjouy, Mana; Bak, Mads; Tommerup, Niels; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jensen, Hanne; Møller, Lisbeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital hearing impairment, progressive visual loss owing to retinitis pigmentosa and in some cases vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome is divided into three subtypes, USH1, USH2 and USH3. Twelve loci and eleven genes have so...... deletions identified in USH2A. Our results suggest that USH2 is caused by USH2A exon deletions in a small fraction of the patients, whereas deletions or duplications in PCDH15 might be rare in Danish Usher patients.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 25 March 2015; doi:10...

  18. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality

    Sheth, Frenny J.; Datar, Chaitanya; Andrieux, Joris; Pandit, Anand; Nayak, Darshana; Rahman, Mizanur; Sheth, Jayesh J.

    2014-01-01

    Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11) del(11)(q24). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8–11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1) and 13.9–14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3–7.6 Mb duplication at 1...

  19. Risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers in EPCAM deletion-positive Lynch syndrome : a cohort study

    Kempers, Marlies J. E.; Kuiper, Roland P.; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Rahner, Nils; Schackert, Hans K.; Steinke, Verena; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Buettner, Reinhard; Verwiel, Eugene T. P.; van Krieken, J. Han; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Goossens, Monique; van der Post, Rachel S.; Niessen, Renee C.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Kluijt, Irma; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Leter, Edward M.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; Hes, Frederik J.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Nesselrooij, Bernadette P. M.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Eccles, Diana M.; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Stoffel, Elena M.; Culver, Julie O.; Palomares, Melanie R.; Graham, Tracy; Velsher, Lea; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Chan, Tsun L.; Leung, Suet Y.; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 mismatch-repair genes and leads to a high risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. We previously showed that constitutional 3' end deletions of EPCAM can cause Lynch syndrome through epigenetic silencing of MSH

  20. Association of codon 108/158 catechol-O-methyltransferase gene polymorphism with the psychiatric manifestations of velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    Lachman, H.M.; Papolos, D.F.; Veit, S. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-20

    Velo-cardio-facial-syndrome (VCFS) is a common congenital disorder associated with typical facial appearance, cleft palate, cardiac defects, and learning disabilities. The majority of patients have an interstitial deletion on chromosome 22q11. In addition to physical abnormalities, a variety of psychiatric illnesses have been reported in patients with VCFS, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The psychiatric manifestations of VCFS could be due to haploinsufficiency of a gene(s) within 22q11. One candidate that has been mapped to this region is catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). We recently identified a polymorphism in the COMT gene that leads to a valine{r_arrow}methionine substitution at amino acid 158 of the membrane-bound form of the enzyme. Homozygosity for COMT158{sup met} leads to a 3- to 4-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, compared with homozygotes for COMT158{sup met}. We now report that in a population of patients with VCFS, there is an apparent association between the low-activity allele, COMT158{sup met}, and the development of bipolar spectrum disorder, and in particular, a rapid-cycling form. 33 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Chromosomal deletion unmasking a recessive disease: 22q13 deletion syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy

    Bisgaard, A-M; Kirchhoff, M; Nielsen, J E; Kibaek, M; Lund, A; Schwartz, M; Christensen, E

    2008-01-01

    A deletion on one chromosome and a mutant allele on the other may cause an autosomal recessive disease. We report on two patients with mental retardation, dysmorphic features and low catalytic activity of arylsulfatase A. One patient had a pathogenic mutation in the arylsulfatase A gene (ARSA) and...

  2. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  3. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder. PMID:26774077

  4. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  5. Novel features of 3q29 deletion syndrome: Results from the 3q29 registry.

    Glassford, Megan R; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Freedman, Alexa A; Zwick, Michael E; Mulle, Jennifer G

    2016-04-01

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent, typically de novo heterozygous 1.6 Mb deletion, but because incidence of the deletion is rare (1 in 30,000 births) the phenotype is not well described. To characterize the range of phenotypic manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome, we have developed an online registry (3q29deletion.org) for ascertainment of study subjects and phenotypic data collection via Internet-based survey instruments. We report here on data collected during the first 18 months of registry operation, from 44 patients. This is the largest cohort of 3q29 deletion carriers ever assembled and surveyed in a systematic way. Our data reveal that 28% of registry participants report neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including anxiety disorder, panic attacks, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Other novel findings include a high prevalence (64%) of feeding problems in infancy and reduced weight at birth for 3q29 deletion carriers (average reduction 13.9 oz (394 g), adjusted for gestational age and sex, P = 6.5e-07). We further report on the frequency of heart defects, autism, recurrent ear infections, gastrointestinal phenotypes, and dental phenotypes, among others. We also report on the expected timing of delayed developmental milestones. This is the most comprehensive description of the 3q29 deletion phenotype to date. These results are clinically actionable toward improving patient care for 3q29 deletion carriers, and can guide the expectations of physicians and parents. These data also demonstrate the value of patient-reported outcomes to reveal the full phenotypic spectrum of rare genomic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26738761

  6. Strong correlation of elastin deletions, detected by FISH, with Williams syndrome: Evaluation of 235 patients

    Lowery, M.C.; Brothman, L.J.; Leonard, C.O. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is generally characterized by mental deficiency, gregarious personality, dysmorphic facies, supravalvular aortic stenosis, and idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. Patients with WS show allelic loss of elastin (ELN), exhibiting a submicroscopic deletion, at 7q11.23, detectable by FISH. Hemizygosity is likely the cause of vascular abnormalities in WS patients. A series of 235 patients was studied, and molecular cytogenetic deletions were seen in 96% of patients with classic WS. Patients included 195 solicited through the Williams Syndrome Association (WSA), plus 40 clinical cytogenetics cases referred by primary-care physicians. Photographs and medical records of most WSA subjects were reviewed, and patients were identified as {open_quotes}classic{open_quotes} (n = 114) or{open_quotes}uncertain{close_quotes} (n = 39). An additional 42 WSA patients were evaluated without clinical information. FISH was performed with biotinylated ELN cosmids on metaphase cells from immortalized lymphoblastoid lines from WSA patients and after high-resolution banding analysis on clinical referral patients. An alpha-satellite probe for chromosome 7 was included in hybridizations, as an internal control. Ninety-six percent of the patients with classic WS showed a deletion in one ELN allele; four of these did not show a deletion. Of the uncertain WS patients, only 3 of 39 showed a deletion. Of the 42 who were not classified phenotypically, because of lack of clinical information, 25 patients (60%) showed a deletion. Thirty-eight percent (15/40) of clinical cytogenetics cases showed an ELN deletion and no cytogenetic deletion by banded analysis. These results support the usefulness of FISH for the detection of elastin deletions as an initial diagnostic assay for WS. 14 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Schizophrenia in an Adult With 6p25 Deletion Syndrome

    Caluseriu, O; Mirza, G.; J. Ragoussis; Chow, E. W. C.; MacCrimmon, D.; Bassett, A S

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions at 6p25-p24 are rare findings in patients with developmental delay. There is limited information about the adult phenotype. We present a 36-year-old patient with schizophrenia, mild mental retardation, progressive hearing deficits, and characteristic facial features. Ocular (Axenfeld–Rieger anomaly) abnormalities were diagnosed in infancy; vision, however, has remained unimpaired. There were no other major congenital anomalies. Brain imaging showed only minor changes. Th...

  8. Neurobehavior and MRI in 22ql3.3 Deletion Syndrome

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromotor, sensory, language, communication and social development, and cerebral MRI and PET studies were performed in 8 children with 22ql3.3 deletion syndrome, at the National Institutes of Health, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, and other centers in Paris, France.

  9. 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome : Clinical and Molecular Analysis Using Array CGH

    Dhar, S. U.; del Gaudio, D.; German, J. R.; Peters, S. U.; Ou, Z.; Bader, P. I.; Berg, J. S.; Blazo, M.; Brown, C. W.; Graham, B. H.; Grebe, T. A.; Lalani, S.; Irons, M.; Sparagana, S.; Williams, M.; Phillips, J. A.; Beaudet, A. L.; Stankiewicz, P.; Patel, A.; Cheung, S. W.; Sahoo, T.

    2010-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome results from loss of terminal segments of varying sizes at 22qter. Few genotype phenotype correlations have been found but all patients have mental retardation and severe delay, or absence of, expressive speech. We carried out clinical and molecular characterization of

  10. Deletion of short arm of chromosome 18, Del(18p syndrome

    Prashant Babaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is a rare syndrome clinically presenting with variable mental retardation, growth retardation, low height, pectus excavatum, craniofacial malformations including long ear, ptosis, microcephaly and short neck. This case report presents with characteristic features along with rare feature of single nostril.

  11. Chronic granulomatous disease, the McLeod phenotype and the contiguous gene deletion syndrome-a review

    Watkins Casey E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD, a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, results in phagocyte functional defects and subsequent infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans. Deletions and missense, frameshift, or nonsense mutations in the gp91phox gene (also termed CYBB, located in the Xp21.1 region of the X chromosome, are associated with the most common form of CGD. When larger X-chromosomal deletions occur, including the XK gene deletion, a so-called "Contiguous Gene Deletion Syndrome" may result. The contiguous gene deletion syndrome is known to associate the Kell phenotype/McLeod syndrome with diseases such as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. These patients are often complicated and management requires special attention to the various facets of the syndrome.

  12. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome

    Kristen Dilzell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome.

  13. Genotype/phenotype correlation in women with nonmosaic X chromosome deletions and Turner syndrome

    Zinn, A.R. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human developmental disorder associated with the absence of the second sex chromosome (monosomy X). Cardinal features of the Turner phenotype include high intrauterine lethality, growth retardation, gonadal failure, and the variable presence of specific somatic abnormalities such as webbed neck, lymphedema, and skeletal abnormalities. Recent observations support the hypothesis that the phenotype associated with monosomy X results from haploid dosage of genes common the X and Y chromosomes that escape X-inactivation ({open_quotes}Turner genes{close_quotes}). Apart from a locus causing short stature that maps to the pseudoautosomal region on the distal short arm, the location of X-linked Turner genes is not known. Karyotype/phenotype correlations in women with partial X deletions have been inconsistent. However, previous studies have focused on sporadic sex chromosome aberrations and may have been confounded by occult mosaicism. In addition, mapping of deletions was limited by the resolution of cytogenetic techniques. I am reexamining genotype/phenotype correlations in partial X monosomy, focusing on a subset of cases in which mosaicism is highly unlikely (e.g., unbalanced X-autosome translocations, familial X deletions), and using molecular techniques to map deletions. I have collected eight cases of nonmosaic X deletions in women with varied manifestations of Turner syndrome. Cytogenetic data suggests that genes responsible for Turner anatomic abnormalities may lie within a critical region of the very proximal portion of the short arm (Xp11). Molecular characterization of the deletions is in progress. Methods include (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads from patient-derived cell lines, using cosmid probes that map to known locations on Xp, and (2) sequence tagged site (STS) content mapping of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted X chromosomes derived from these cell lines.

  14. Diagnostic yield by supplementing prenatal metaphase karyotyping with MLPA for microdeletion syndromes and subtelomere imbalances

    Kjaergaard, S; Sundberg, K; Jørgensen, F S;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess the relevance of using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for detection of selected microdeletion syndromes (22q11, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Miller-Dieker, Smith-Magenis, 1p-, Williams), the reciprocal microduplication syndrome...

  15. Diagnostic yield by supplementing prenatal metaphase karyotyping with MLPA for microdeletion syndromes and subtelomere imbalances

    Kjaergaard, S; Sundberg, K; Jørgensen, F S; Rohde, M D; Lind, A M; Gerdes, T; Tabor, A; Kirchhoff, M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess the relevance of using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for detection of selected microdeletion syndromes (22q11, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Miller-Dieker, Smith-Magenis, 1p-, Williams), the reciprocal microduplication syndromes...

  16. Okamoto syndrome in a girl of Caucasian origin.

    Markouri, Margharita; Karpathios, Themistokles; Dinopoulos, Argirios; Attilakos, Achilleas; Fretzayas, Andrew; Bakoula, Chryssa; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia

    2008-12-01

    We report the clinical and genetic evaluation of a 2-year-old Greek female with striking phenotypic similarities to the three previously published cases of Okamoto syndrome. The main features were characteristic facies, cleft palate, generalized hypotonia, severe developmental delay, congenital hydronephrosis, and congenital heart defects. Routine chromosome testing and whole-genome high-resolution comparative genetic hybridization analysis were negative for any gross numerical or structural chromosome aberrations and for microdeletions/duplications of more than 3 million base pairs respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for 22q11.2 deletion and DNA analysis of the protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type II gene were normal, thus excluding DiGeorge and Noonan syndromes. Our patient did not show most of the cardinal features of Schinzel-Giedion, otopalatodigital, and C-trigonocephaly syndromes. Moreover, in our patient some new malformations were identified: unilateral kidney hypoplasia and severe anal stenosis. The latter was considered as pertinent and is described here to establish a wider clinical spectrum of Okamoto syndrome. At the age of 3 years 6 months the child continues to show severe growth failure and significant global developmental delay. For the practising paediatrician it is prudent to bear Okamoto syndrome in mind, especially in children with learning disability and a pattern of dysmorphic features. PMID:19046188

  17. Neuropsychological function in a child with 18p deletion syndrome: a case report.

    Willoughby, Brian L; Favero, Marcus; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Braaten, Ellen B

    2014-09-01

    We report the neuropsychological profile of a 4-year-old boy with the rare 18p deletion syndrome. We used a battery of standardized tests to assess his development in intellect, language, visuomotor integration, academic readiness, socialization, and emotional and behavioral health. The results showed borderline intellectual function except for low average nonverbal reasoning skills. He had stronger receptive than expressive language skills, although both were well below his age group. He had impaired visuomotor integration and pre-academic skills such as letter identification. Emotional and behavioral findings indicated mild aggressiveness, anxiety, low frustration tolerance, and executive function weaknesses, especially at home. Interestingly, he showed social strengths, responding to joint attention and sharing enjoyment with his examiner. With its assessment of development in many domains, this case report is among the first to characterize the neuropsychological and psychiatric function of a young child with 18p deletion syndrome. We discuss the implications of our findings for clinical practice. PMID:25237747

  18. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  19. Deletion of 19q13 reveals clinical overlap with Dubowitz syndrome.

    Urquhart, Jill E; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Bowers, Naomi; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Newman, William G

    2015-12-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a presumed autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities: microcephaly, learning and developmental delay, growth failure, and a predisposition to allergies and eczema. There have been more than 150 individuals reported to have this diagnosis, but no unifying genetic alteration has been identified indicating genetic heterogeneity. We report on a pair of monozygotic twins diagnosed clinically with Dubowitz syndrome by Professor Dubowitz over 30 years ago and identified to have a de novo heterozygous 3.2-Mb deletion at 19q13.11q13.12. Exome sequencing did not identify either a putative pathogenic variant on the trans allele supporting recessive inheritance or any other causative sequence variants. Comparison of the phenotype in our cases shows considerable overlap with the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome, suggesting that a subset of individuals diagnosed with Dubowitz syndrome may be due to deletions at 19q13. Our finding further reinforces the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of Dubowitz syndrome. PMID:26377242

  20. Distal Deletion of Chromosome 11q Encompassing Jacobsen Syndrome without Platelet Abnormality.

    Sheth, Frenny J; Datar, Chaitanya; Andrieux, Joris; Pandit, Anand; Nayak, Darshana; Rahman, Mizanur; Sheth, Jayesh J

    2014-01-01

    Terminal 11q deletion, known as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS), is a rare genetic disorder associated with numerous dysmorphic features. We studied two cases with multiple congenital anomalies that were cytogenetically detected with deletions on 11q encompassing JBS region: 46,XX,der(11) del(11)(q24). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis confirmed partial deletion of 11.8-11.9 Mb at 11q24.1q25 (case 1) and 13.9-14 Mb deletion at 11q23.3q25 together with 7.3-7.6 Mb duplication at 12q24.32q24.33 (case 2). Dysmorphism because of the partial duplication of 12q was not overtly decipherable over the Jacobsen phenotype except for a triangular facial profile. Aberrant chromosome 11 was inherited from phenotypically normal father, carrier of balanced translocation 46,XY,t(11;12)(q23.3; q24.32). In the present study, both cases had phenotypes that were milder than the ones described in literature despite having large deletion size. Most prominent features in classical JBS is thrombocytopenia, which was absent in both these cases. Therefore, detailed functional analysis of terminal 11q region is warranted to elucidate etiology of JBS and their clinical presentation. PMID:25288895

  1. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases. PMID:22315192

  2. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  3. Diagnosis and fine localization of deletion region in Wolf Hirschhorn syndrome patients

    JI Tao-yun; David CHIA; WANG Jing-min; WU Ye; LI Jie; XIAO Jing; JIANG Yu-wu

    2010-01-01

    Background Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) results from the partial deletion of 4p. This study aimed to identify and fine map the chromosome deletion regions of Chinese children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome among the developmental delay/mental retardation (DD/MR) patients.Methods We analyzed the relationship of phenotype and genotype. Inclusion criteria were: moderate to severe DD/MR, no definite perinatal brain injury, and no trauma, toxication, hypoxia, infection of central nervous system; routine karyotyping was normal, no evidence of typical inherited metabolic disorder or specific neurodegenerative disorders from cranial neuro-imaging and blood/urinary metabolic diseases screening; no mutation of FMR1 in male patients, no typical clinical manifestation of Rett syndrome in female patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 assays were applied to accurately define the exact size of subtelomeric aberration region of four WHS patients.Results All four WHS patients presented with severe DD, hypotonia and microcephaly, failure to thrive, 3/4 patients with typical facial features and seizures, 2/4 patients with congenital heart defects and cleft lip/palate, 1/4 patients with other malformations. The length of the deletions ranged from 3.3 Mb to 9.8 Mb. Two of four patients had "classic" WHS, 1/4 patients had "mild"-to-"classic" WHS, and 1/4 patients had "mild" WHS.Conclusions WHS patients in China appear to be consistent with those previously reported. The prevalence of signs and symptoms, distribution of cases between "mild" and "classic" WHS, and the correlation between length of deletion and severity of disease of these patients were all similar to those of the patients from other populations.

  4. Deletion at chromosome 16p13. 3 as a cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: Clinical aspects

    Hennekam, R.C.M.; Tilanus, M.; Boogaard, M.J.H. van den (State Univ., Utrecht (Netherlands)); Hamel, B.C.J.; Voshart-van Heeren, H.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Beersum, S.E.C. van (University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Breuning, M.H. (Clinical Genetics Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-02-01

    In the accompanying paper, a chromosomal localization of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome by cytogenetic investigations with fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques at chromosome 16p13.3 is described. The authors investigated 19 of these patients and their parents (a) to ascertain the parental origin of the chromosome with the deletion in families where such a deletion was detected, (b) to disclose whether uniparental disomy plays a role in etiology, and (c) to compare clinical features in patients with a deletion to those in individuals in whom deletions were not detectable. Molecular studies showed a copy of chromosome 16 from each parent in all 19 patients. Uniparental disomy was also excluded for five other chromosome arms known to be imprinted in mice. None of the probes used for determining the origin of the deleted chromosome proved to be informative. The clinical features were essentially the same in patients with and without visible deletion, with a possible exception for the incidence of microcephaly, angulation of thumbs and halluces, and partial duplication of the halluces. A small deletion at 16p13.3 may be found in some patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Cytogenetically undetectable deletions, point mutations, mosaicism, heterogeneity, or phenocopy by a nongenetic cause are the most probable explanations for the absence of cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities in other patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. 26 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. PHF6 Deletions May Cause Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann Syndrome in Females.

    Berland, S; Alme, K; Brendehaug, A; Houge, G; Hovland, R

    2011-09-01

    In a 16-year-old girl with intellectual disability, irregular teeth, slight body asymmetry, and striated skin pigmentation, highly skewed X-inactivation increased the likelihood of an X-linked cause of her condition. Among these, prominent supraorbital ridges and hearing loss suggested a filaminopathy, but no filamin A mutation was found. The correct diagnosis, Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (BFLS, MIM#301900), was first made when a copy number array identified a de novo 15-kb deletion of the terminal 3 exons of the PHF6 gene. In retrospect, her phenotype resembled that of males with BFLS. Such deletions of PHF6 have not been reported previously. This might be because PHF6 mutations are rarely looked for in females since classical BFLS so far has been thought to be a male-specific syndrome, and large PHF6 deletions might be incompatible with male fetal survival. If this is the case, sporadic BFLS could be more frequent in females than in males. PMID:22190899

  6. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Genotype/phenotype Insights from Partial Deletion Patients

    AnnetteKarmiloff-Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying genotype-phenotype relations in human social cognition has been enhanced by the study of Williams syndrome (WS. Indeed, individuals with WS present with a particularly strong social drive, and researchers have sought to link deleted genes in the WS Critical Region (WSCR of chromosome 7q11.23 to this unusual social profile. In this paper, we provide details of two case studies of children with partial genetic deletions in the WSCR: an 11-year-old female with a deletion of 24 of the 28 WS genes, and a 14-year-old male who presents with the opposite profile, i.e. the deletion of only 4 genes at the telomeric end of the WSCR. We tested these two children on a large battery of standardised and experimental social perception and social cognition tasks - both implicit and explicit - as well as standardised social questionnaires and general psychometric measures. Our findings reveal a partial WS socio-cognitive profile in the female, contrasted with a more autistic-like profile in the male. We discuss the implications of these findings for genotype/phenotype relations, as well as the advantages and limitations of animal models and of case study approaches.

  7. Potential Novel Mechanism for Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: Deletion of a Distant Region Containing Regulatory Elements of PITX2

    Volkmann, Bethany A.; Zinkevich, Natalya S.; Mustonen, Aki; Schilter, Kala F.; Bosenko, Dmitry V.; Reis, Linda M.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Link, Brian A.; Semina, Elena V.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe an identification of conserved PITX2 enhancers located within a gene desert upstream of the gene and a deletion of this upstream region in a patient with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome with no disruption of the PTIX2 coding region. The data suggest a new mechanism of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  8. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome with deletions of FISH probe RT1 at 16p13.3: two UK patients.

    McGaughran, J M; Gaunt, L; Dore, J.; Petrij, F.; Dauwerse, H. G.; Donnai, D.

    1996-01-01

    We report two patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome out of a total of 16 tested who have a deletion of the region visualised by the cosmid probe RT1. These results further confirm this as a locus for Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

  9. Familial occurrence of the aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome with deletion 11p13-14.1.

    Yunis, J J; Ramsay, N K

    1980-06-01

    A report of a family with two half-brothers and a maternal aunt affected with the aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome is presented. The proband showed a deletion of most of band 11p13 and of subband 11p14.1 of one chromosome 11, and the proband's mother and an older brother, both phenotypically normal, showed a balanced chromosomal rearrangement. This family demonstrates that deletion of a small chromosome segment (11p13-14.1) is responsible for the aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome and, that in some cases, the syndrome can be familial. PMID:6246230

  10. Cognitive-behavioral characteristics and developmental trajectories in children with deletion 11qter (Jacobsen syndrome), and their relation to deletion size.

    Fisch, Gene S

    2015-01-01

    Subtelomeric deletions represent an important class of abnormalities to be considered when investigating genetic links to intellectual disability (ID). One subtelomeric deletion found on the long arm of chromosome 11q produces a characteristic phenotype that includes ID and is often referred to as Jacobsen syndrome (JBS). Previously, researchers found an inverse relationship between IQ and deletion size. While useful, IQ does not provide a comprehensive picture of the cognitive-behavioral strengths and weaknesses in JBS, nor does it reveal how the profiles evolve as these individuals age. One purpose of this study was to confirm the relationship between IQ or adaptive behavior (DQ) and deletion size. We also examined cognitive-behavioral profiles of children with JBS and the extent to which they changed over time. Initially, at T1, we examined 10 children, ages 5-20 years, diagnosed with JBS. Cognitive ability was assessed with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition). Adaptive behavoir was evaluated with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Eight children were reassessed 2 years later (T2). Results show a negative but non-significant correlation between IQ and deletion size. There was no statistically significant relationship between DQ and deletion size. As for our second aim, IQ and DQ scores were stable from T1 to T2. Cognitive profiles were not significantly different from T1 to T2. However, there were significant changes in adaptive behavior domain scores from T1 to T2. Lack of a significant relationship between cognitive-behavioral measures and deletion size, as well as changes in cognitive-behavioral profiles are discussed. PMID:25425441

  11. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by submicroscopic deletions within 16p13. 3

    Breuning, M.H.; Dauwerse, H.G.; Fugazza, G.; Saris, J.J.; Spruit, L.; Winjnen, H.; Beverstock, G.C.; Ommen, G.J.B. van (Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)); Tommerup, N. (John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark) Avd. for Medisinsk Genetikk, Oslo (Norway)); Hagen, C.B. van der (John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu (Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan)); Boogaard, M.J. van den; Pater, J.M. de; Hennekam, R.C.M. (Clinical Genetics Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Mariman, E.C.M.; Hamel, B.C.J. (University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Himmelbauer, H.; Frischauf, A.M. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund Laboratories, London (United Kingdom)); Stallings, R.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined complex of congenital malformations characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and big toes, and mental retardation. The breakpoint of two distinct reciprocal translocations occurring in patients with a clinical diagnosis of RTS was located to the same interval on chromosome 16, between the cosmids N2 and RT1, in band 16p13.3. By using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, the signal from RT1 was found to be missing from one chromosome 16 in 6 of 24 patients with RTS. The parents of five of these patients did not show a deletion of RT1, indicating a de novo rearrangement. RTS is caused by submicroscopic interstitial deletions within 16p13.3 in approximately 25% of the patients. The detection of microdeletions will allow the objective confirmation of the clinical diagnosis in new patients and provides an excellent tool for the isolation of the gene causally related to the syndrome. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome associated with a large BRCA1 intragenic deletion

    Li-Fraumeni (LFS) and Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes are associated to germline TP53 mutations, and are characterized by the development of central nervous system tumors, sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and other early-onset tumors. Due to the high frequency of breast cancer in LFS/LFL families, these syndromes clinically overlap with hereditary breast cancer (HBC). Germline point mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes are associated with high risk of breast cancer. Large rearrangements involving these genes are also implicated in the HBC phenotype. We have screened DNA copy number changes by MLPA on BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes in 23 breast cancer patients with a clinical diagnosis consistent with LFS/LFL; most of these families also met the clinical criteria for other HBC syndromes. We found no DNA copy number alterations in the BRCA2 and TP53 genes, but we detected in one patient a 36.4 Kb BRCA1 microdeletion, confirmed and further mapped by array-CGH, encompassing exons 9–19. Breakpoints sequencing analysis suggests that this rearrangement was mediated by flanking Alu sequences. This is the first description of a germline intragenic BRCA1 deletion in a breast cancer patient with a family history consistent with both LFL and HBC syndromes. Our results show that large rearrangements in these known cancer predisposition genes occur, but are not a frequent cause of cancer susceptibility

  13. Deletion at chromosome 16p13.3 as a cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: clinical aspects.

    Hennekam, R. C.; Tilanus, M; Hamel, B C; Voshart-van Heeren, H; Mariman, E.C.; van Beersum, S. E.; van den Boogaard, M. J.; Breuning, M H

    1993-01-01

    In the accompanying paper, a chromosomal localization of the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome by cytogenetic investigations with fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques at chromosome 16p13.3 is described. We investigated 19 of these patients and their parents (a) to ascertain the parental origin of the chromosome with the deletion in families where such a deletion was detected, (b) to disclose whether uniparental disomy plays a role in etiology, and (c) to compare clinical features in patients...

  14. Chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome

    Magoulas Pilar L

    2012-01-01

    involves a multi-disciplinary approach to care with the primary care physician and clinical geneticist playing a crucial role in providing appropriate screening, surveillance, and care for individuals with this syndrome. At the time of diagnosis, individuals should receive baseline echocardiograms, audiologic, ophthalmologic, and developmental assessments. Growth and feeding should be closely monitored. Other specialists that may be involved in the care of individuals with 15q24 deletion syndrome include immunology, endocrine, orthopedics, neurology, and urology. Chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome should be differentiated from other genetic syndromes, particularly velo-cardio-facial syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. These conditions share some phenotypic similarity to 15q24 deletion syndrome yet have characteristic features specific to each of them that allows the clinician to distinguish between them. Molecular genetic testing and/or aCGH will be able to diagnose these conditions in the majority of individuals. Disease name and synonyms Chromosome 15q24 deletion syndrome 15q24 deletion syndrome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome

  15. Deletion of TOP3β, a component of FMRP-containing mRNPs, contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders

    Suvisaari, Jaana; Brosi, Cornelia; Hennah, William; Leppä, Virpi; Torniainen, Minna; Ripatti, Samuli; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Plöttner, Oliver; Rehnström, Karola; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Varilo, Teppo; Tallila, Jonna; Kristiansson, Kati; Isohanni, Matti; Kaprio, Jaakko; Eriksson, Johan G.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Salomaa, Veikko; Hurles, Matthew; Stefansson, Hreinn; Peltonen, Leena; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Paunio, Tiina; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Daly, Mark J.; Fischer, Utz; Freimer, Nelson B.; Palotie, Aarno

    2014-01-01

    Implicating particular genes in the generation of complex brain and behavior phenotypes requires multiple lines of evidence. The rarity of most high impact genetic variants typically precludes the possibility of accruing statistical evidence that they are associated with a given trait. We show here that the enrichment of a rare Chromosome 22q11.22 deletion in a recently expanded Northern Finnish sub-isolate enables the detection of association between TOP3β and both schizophrenia and cognitive impairment. Biochemical analysis of TOP3β revealed that this topoisomerase is a component of cytosolic messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) and is catalytically active on RNA. The recruitment of TOP3β to mRNPs was independent of RNA cis-elements and was coupled to the co-recruitment of FMRP, the disease gene product in fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FXS). Thus, we uncover a novel role for TOP3β in mRNA metabolism and provide several lines of evidence implicating it in neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23912948

  16. 7q11.23 deletions in Williams syndrome arise as a consequence of unequal meiotic crossover

    Urban, Z.; Csiszar, K.; Boyd, C.D. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by mental retardation, a specific neurobehavioral profile, characteristic facies, infantile hypercalcemia, cardiovascular abnormalities, progressive joint limitation, hermas, and soft skin. Recent studies have shown that hemizygosity at the elastin (ELN) gene locus on chromosome 7q is associated with WS. Furthermore, two FISH studies using cosmid recombinants containing the 5{prime} or the 3{prime} end of the ELN gene revealed deletion of the entire ELN gene in 90%-96% of classical WS cases. However, the size of the 7q11.23 deletions and the mechanism by which these deletions arise are not known. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A coalescence of two syndromes in a girl with terminal deletion and inverted duplication of chromosome 5

    Krgovic, Danijela; Blatnik, Ana; Burmas, Ante; Zagorac, Andreja; Kokalj Vokac, Nadja

    2014-01-01

    Background Rearrangements involving chromosome 5p often result in two syndromes, Cri-du-chat (CdC) and Trisomy 5p, caused by a deletion and duplication, respectively. The 5p15.2 has been defined as a critical region for CdC syndrome; however, genotype-phenotype studies allowed isolation of particular characteristics such as speech delay, cat-like cry and mental retardation, caused by distinct deletions of 5p. A varied clinical outcome was also observed in patients with Trisomy 5p. Duplication...

  18. Molecular characterisation of the 22q13 deletion syndrome supports the role of haploinsufficiency of SHANK3/PROSAP2 in the major neurological symptoms

    Wilson, H.; Wong, A; Shaw, S.; Tse, W; Stapleton, G; Phelan, M; Hu, S.; Marshall, J; McDermid, H

    2003-01-01

    Methods: The 22q13 deletion syndrome (MIM 606232) is characterised by moderate to profound mental retardation, delay/absence of expressive speech, hypotonia, normal to accelerated growth, and mild dysmorphic features. We have determined the deletion size and parent of origin in 56 patients with this syndrome.

  19. Atypical Rett syndrome with selective FOXG1 deletion detected by comparative genomic hybridization: case report and review of literature

    Jacob, Francois Dominique; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Andersen, John; Bolduc, Francois V.

    2009-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by acquired microcephaly, communication dysfunction, psychomotor regression, seizures and stereotypical hand movements. Mutations in methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) are identified in most patients with classic Rett syndrome. Genetic studies in patients with a Rett variant have expanded the spectrum of underlying genetic etiologies. Recently, a deletion encompassing several genes in the long arm of chromosome 14 has been a...

  20. Detailed molecular and clinical investigation of a child with a partial deletion of chromosome 11 (Jacobsen syndrome)

    Peitsidis Panagiotis; Thomaidis Loretta; Papoulidis Ioannis; Louizou Eirini; Kefalas Konstantinos; Neroutsou Rosita; Orru Sandro; Manolakos Emmanouil; Sotiriou Sotirios; Kitsos George; Tsoplou Panagiota; Petersen Michael B; Metaxotou Aikaterini

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare chromosomal disorder leading to multiple physical and mental impairment. This syndrome is caused by a partial deletion of chromosome 11, especially subband 11q24.1 has been proven to be involved. Clinical cases may easily escape diagnosis, however pancytopenia or thrombocytopenia may be indicative for JBS. Results We report a 7.5 years old boy presenting with speech development delay, hearing impairment and abnormal platelet function. High...

  1. Arterial Hypertension in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome (7q11.23 Chromosomal Deletion

    Cristina de Sylos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 7-year-old male child diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome and arterial hypertension refractory to clinical treatment. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic study. Narrowing of the descending aorta and stenosis of the renal arteries were also diagnosed. Systemic vascular alterations caused by deletion of the elastin gene may occur early in individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome, leading to the clinical manifestation of systemic arterial hypertension refractory to drug treatment.

  2. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Emotion Regulation and Development in Children with Autism and 22q13 Deletion Syndrome: Evidence for Group Differences

    Glaser, Sarah E.; Shaw, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) abilities and developmental differences were investigated among 19 children with autism and 18 children with 22q13 Deletion Syndrome (a rare chromosomal disorder with certain autistic symptoms). The purpose of this study was to examine the phenotypic similarities between the two disorders. ER was measured by the Temperament…

  4. Neuro-behavioral profile and brain imaging study of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome in childhood

    Philippe, A.; Malan, V.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Natl Inst Hlth and Med Res, Paris (France); Philippe, A.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A. [HopNecker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Genet, Paris (France); Boddaert, N. [Natl Inst Hlth and Med Res, Mixed Unit Res 0205, Orsay (France); Vaivre-Douret, L.; Robel, L.; Golse, B. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Psychiat, Paris (France); Vaivre-Douret, L. [Univ Paris 10, Mixed Unit Res S0669, Univ Paris 05, Univ Paris 11, Paris 10 (France); Vaivre-Douret, L. [Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Obstet et Gynaecol, Paris (France); Danon-Boileau, L. [Natl Ctr Sci Res, Mixed Unit Res 7114, Paris (France); Heron, D. [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Assistance Publ HopParis, Dept Genet, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 606232) is a neuro-developmental disorder that includes hypotonia, severely impaired development of speech and language, autistic-like behavior, and minor dysmorphic features. Although the number of reported cases is increasing, the 22q13.3 deletion remains under-diagnosed because of failure in recognizing the clinical phenotype and detecting the 22qter deletion by routine chromosome analyses. Our goal is to contribute to the description of the neuro-behavioral phenotype and brain abnormalities of this micro-deletional syndrome. We assessed neuro-motor, sensory, language, communication, and social development and performed cerebral MRI and study of regional cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography in 8 children carrying the 22q13.3 deletion. Despite variability in expression and severity, the children shared a common developmental profile characterized by hypotonia, sleep disorders, and poor response to their environment in early infancy; expressive language deficit contrasting with emergence of social reciprocity from ages similar to 3 to 5 years; sensory processing dysfunction; and neuro-motor disorders. Brain MRI findings were normal or showed a thin or morphologically atypical corpus callosum. Positron emission tomography study detected a localized dysfunction of the left temporal polar lobe and amygdala hypoperfusion. The developmental course of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome belongs to pervasive developmental disorders but is distinct from autism. An improved description of the natural history of this syndrome should help in recognizing this largely under-diagnosed condition. (authors)

  5. Detection of deletions at 7q11.23 in Williams-Beuren syndrome by polymorphic markers

    Roberta Lelis Dutra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS; OMIM 194050 is caused by a hemizygous contiguous gene microdeletion at 7q11.23. Supravalvular aortic stenosis, mental retardation, overfriendliness, and ocular and renal abnormalities comprise typical symptoms in WBS. Although fluorescence in situ hybridization is widely used for diagnostic confirmation, microsatellite DNA markers are considered highly informative and easily manageable. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to test the microsatellite markers for the diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome, to determine the size and parental origin of microdeletion, compare the clinical characteristics between patients with different sizes of the deletion and parental origin. METHODS: We studied 97 patients with clinical diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome using five microsatellite markers: D7S1870, D7S489, D7S613, D7S2476 and D7S489_A. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Using five markers together, the result was informative in all patients. The most informative marker was D7S1870 (78.4%, followed by D7S613 (75.3%, D7S489 (70.1% and D7S2476 (62.9%. The microdeletion was present in 84 (86.6% patients and absent in 13 (13.4% patients. Maternal deletions were found in 52.4% of patients and paternal deletions in 47.6% of patients. The observed size of deletions was 1.55 Mb in 76/ 84 patients (90.5% and 1.84 Mb in 8/84 patients (9.5%. SVAS as well as ocular and urinary abnormalities were more frequent in the patients with a deletion. There were no clinical differences in relation to either the size or parental origin of the deletion. CONCLUSION: Using these five selected microsatellite markers was informative in all patients, thus can be considered an alternative method for molecular diagnosis in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  6. Neuro-behavioral profile and brain imaging study of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome in childhood

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 606232) is a neuro-developmental disorder that includes hypotonia, severely impaired development of speech and language, autistic-like behavior, and minor dysmorphic features. Although the number of reported cases is increasing, the 22q13.3 deletion remains under-diagnosed because of failure in recognizing the clinical phenotype and detecting the 22qter deletion by routine chromosome analyses. Our goal is to contribute to the description of the neuro-behavioral phenotype and brain abnormalities of this micro-deletional syndrome. We assessed neuro-motor, sensory, language, communication, and social development and performed cerebral MRI and study of regional cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography in 8 children carrying the 22q13.3 deletion. Despite variability in expression and severity, the children shared a common developmental profile characterized by hypotonia, sleep disorders, and poor response to their environment in early infancy; expressive language deficit contrasting with emergence of social reciprocity from ages similar to 3 to 5 years; sensory processing dysfunction; and neuro-motor disorders. Brain MRI findings were normal or showed a thin or morphologically atypical corpus callosum. Positron emission tomography study detected a localized dysfunction of the left temporal polar lobe and amygdala hypoperfusion. The developmental course of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome belongs to pervasive developmental disorders but is distinct from autism. An improved description of the natural history of this syndrome should help in recognizing this largely under-diagnosed condition. (authors)

  7. Monoallelic deletion of the microRNA biogenesis gene Dgcr8 produces deficits in the development of excitatory synaptic transmission in the prefrontal cortex

    Barker Alison J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal phenotypes associated with hemizygosity of individual genes within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome locus hold potential towards understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and autism. Included among these genes is Dgcr8, which encodes an RNA-binding protein required for microRNA biogenesis. Dgcr8 haploinsufficient mice (Dgcr8+/- have reduced expression of microRNAs in brain and display cognitive deficits, but how microRNA deficiency affects the development and function of neurons in the cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Results In this study, we show that Dgcr8+/- mice display reduced expression of a subset of microRNAs in the prefrontal cortex, a deficit that emerges over postnatal development. Layer V pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of Dgcr8+/- mice have altered electrical properties, decreased complexity of basal dendrites, and reduced excitatory synaptic transmission. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that precise microRNA expression is critical for the postnatal development of prefrontal cortical circuitry. Similar defects in neuronal maturation resulting from microRNA deficiency could represent endophenotypes of certain neuropsychiatric diseases of developmental onset.

  8. Molecular definition of the chromosome 7 deletion in Williams syndrome and parent-of-origin effects on growth

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with variable phenotypic expression associated, in most cases, with a hemizygous deletion of part of chromosomal band 7q11.23 that includes the elastin gene (ELN). We have investigated the frequency and size of the deletions, determined the parental origin, and correlated the molecular results with the clinical findings in 65 WS patients. Hemizygosity at the ELN locus was established by typing of two intragenic polymorphisms, quantitative Southern analysis, and/or FISH. Polymorphic markers covering the deletion and flanking regions were ordered by a combination of genetic and physical mapping. Genotyping of WS patients and available parents for 13 polymorphisms revealed that of 65 clinically defined WS patients, 61 (94%) had a deletion of the ELN locus and were also hemizygous (or non-informative) at loci D7S489B, D7S2476, D7S613, D7S2472, and D7S1870. None of the four patients without ELN deletion was hemizygous at any of the polymorphic loci studied. All patients were heterozygous (or noninformative) for centromeric (D7S1816, D7S1483, and D7S653) and telomeric (D7S489A, D7S675, and D7S669) flanking loci. The genetic distance between the most-centromeric deleted locus, D7S489B, and the most-telomeric one, D7S1870, is 2 cM. The breakpoints cluster at {approximately}1 cM to either side of ELN. In 39 families informative for parental origin, all deletions were de novo, and 18 were paternally and 21 maternally derived. Comparison of clinical data, collected in a standardized quantifiable format, revealed significantly more severe growth retardation and microcephaly in the maternal deletion group. An imprinted locus, silent on the paternal chromosome and contributing to statural growth, may be affected by the deletion. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Constitutional and somatic deletions of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Guenat, David; Quentin, Samuel; Rizzari, Carmelo; Lundin, Catarina; Coliva, Tiziana; Edery, Patrick; Fryssira, Helen; Bermont, Laurent; Ferrand, Christophe; Soulier, Jean; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report and investigate the genomic alterations of two novel cases of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a multisystem disorder caused by 7q11.23 hemizygous deletion. Additionally, we report the case of a child with NHL and a somatic 7q11.23 deletion. Although the WBS critical region has not yet been identified as a susceptibility locus in NHL, it harbors a number of genes involved in DNA repair. The high proportion of pediatric NHL reported in...

  10. Deletions of the elastin gene at 7q11.23 occur in {approximately}90% of patients with Williams syndrome

    Nickerson, E.; Greenberg, F.; McCaskill, C.; Shaffer, L.G. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Keating, M.T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States)

    1995-05-01

    To investigate the frequency of deletions of the elastin gene in patients with Williams syndrome (WS), we screened 44 patients by both FISH and PCR amplification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism. FISH was performed using cosmids containing either the 5{prime} or the 3{prime} end of the elastin gene. PCR analysis was performed on the patients and their parents with a (CA){sub n} repeat polymorphism found in intron 17 of the elastin locus. Of the 44 patients screened, 91% were shown to be deleted by FISH. Using the DNA polymorphism, both maternally (39%) and paternally (61%) derived deletions were found. Four patients were not deleted for elastin but have clinical features of WS. Since deletions of elastin cannot account for several features found in WS, these patients will be valuable in further delineation of the critical region responsible for the WS phenotype. Although PCR can be useful for determining the parental origin of the deletion, our results demonstrate that FISH analysis of the elastin locus provides a more rapid and informative test to confirm a clinical diagnosis of WS. The presence of two copies of the elastin locus in a patient does not, however, rule out WS as a diagnosis. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Detailed molecular and clinical investigation of a child with a partial deletion of chromosome 11 (Jacobsen syndrome

    Peitsidis Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jacobsen syndrome (JBS is a rare chromosomal disorder leading to multiple physical and mental impairment. This syndrome is caused by a partial deletion of chromosome 11, especially subband 11q24.1 has been proven to be involved. Clinical cases may easily escape diagnosis, however pancytopenia or thrombocytopenia may be indicative for JBS. Results We report a 7.5 years old boy presenting with speech development delay, hearing impairment and abnormal platelet function. High resolution SNP oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed a terminal deletion of 11.4 Mb in size, in the area 11q24.1-11qter. This specific deletion encompasses around 170 genes. Other molecular techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were used to confirm the array-result. Discussion Our results suggest that the identification and detailed analysis of similar patients with abnormal platelet function and otherwise mild clinical features will contribute to identification of more patients with 11q deletion and JBS.

  12. Investigation of deletions at 7q11.23 in 44 patients referred for Williams-Beuren syndrome, using FISH and four DNA polymorphisms

    Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Beck, B; Gyftodimou, J; Hørlyk, H; Liljenberg, U; Pedersen, W; Petersen, M B; Sand, A; Skovby, F; Stafanger, G; Zetterqvist, P; Tommerup, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a submicroscopic deletion of the elastin gene (ELN) at 7q11.23. The deletion encompasses closely linked DNA markers. We have investigated 44 patients referred for possible WS using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a P1 clone...

  13. Submicroscopic deletions at 16p13.3 in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: frequency and clinical manifestations in a North American population.

    Wallerstein, R; Anderson, C. E.; Hay, B; Gupta, P.; Gibas, L; Ansari, K; Cowchock, F S; Weinblatt, V; Reid, C; Levitas, A; Jackson, L

    1997-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well delineated multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterised by mental retardation, broad thumbs and toes, short stature, and specific facial features. The recent localisation of the disorder to 16p13.3 and subsequent identification of a submicroscopic deletion of this region in RTS patients led us to screen a large cohort of affected subjects using the RT1 probe. Among 64 patients with clinical evidence of RTS, seven (11%) had a deletion. Another pa...

  14. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Sureni V. Mullegama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5 is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention.

  15. CANPMR syndrome and chromosome 1p32-p31 deletion syndrome coexist in two related individuals affected by simultaneous haplo-insufficiency of CAMTA1 and NIFA genes

    Coci, Emanuele G.; Koehler, Udo; Liehr, Thomas; Stelzner, Armin; Fink, Christian; Langen, Hendrik; Riedel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia with mental retardation (CANPMR, OMIM 614756) and chromosome 1p32-p31 deletion syndrome (OMIM 613735) are two very rare inherited disorders, which are caused by mono-allelic deficiency (haplo-insufficiency) of calmodulin-binding transcription activator 1 (CAMTA1) and, respectively, nuclear factor 1 A (NFIA) genes. The yet reported patients affected by mono-allelic CAMTA1 dysfunction presented with neonatal hypotonia, delayed and ataxic gait, cerebe...

  16. Deletion 17p11.2 (Smith-Magenis syndrome) is relatively common among patients having mental retardation and myopia

    Finucane, B.; Jaeger, E.R. [Elwyn, Inc. PA (United States); Freitag, S.K. [Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We recently reported the finding of moderate to severe myopia in 6 of 10 patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). To investigate the prevalence of SMS among mentally retarded people having myopia, we surveyed a cohort of patients residing at a facility for individuals with mental retardation (MR). Of 547 institutionalized individuals with MR, 72 (13.2%) had moderate to high myopia defined as a visual acuity of minus 3 diopters or more. It should be noted that our institution does not specifically select for people with visual impairment; rather, the facility serves people with a primary diagnosis of MR. Sixty-five of 72 (90.3%) myopic individuals identified were available for cytogenetic analysis. Seventeen (26.2%) of these patients had trisomy 21. Down syndrome (DS) is well known to be associated with eye abnormalities, including myopia. Of 48 individuals with moderate to high myopia not having DS, 5 (10.4%) were shown to have deletions of 17p11.2. This is a high prevalence considering the relative rarity of SMS. By contrast, in a randomized sample of 48 patients without significant myopia at the same facility, we found no individuals with deletion 17p11.2. We conclude that the diagnosis of SMS should be considered in any non-Down syndrome individual having MR and myopia, and that ophthalmologists serving people with MR should be made aware of this deletion syndrome. Furthermore, our results suggest that significant numbers of people having SMS could be identified through selective institutional screening of patients having a combination of MR and moderate to severe myopia.

  17. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detection of an unknown large deletion of the CREB-binding protein gene in a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Calì, F; Failla, P; Chiavetta, V; Ragalmuto, A; Ruggeri, G; Schinocca, P; Schepis, C; Romano, V; Romano, C

    2013-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, psychomotor developmental delay, skeletal anomalies, peculiar facial morphology, and tumorigenesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB, also known as CREBBP or CBP) on chromosome 16p13.3 have been identified. In addition, some patients with low intelligence quotients and autistic features bear large deletions. Based on these observations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to search for large deletions affecting the CREBBP gene in a Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patient. We identified a novel heterozygote deletion removing five exons (exons 17-21), encoding the histone acetyltransferase domain. We propose the use of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification as a fast, accurate and cheap test for detecting large deletions in the CREBBP gene in the sub-group of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patients with low intelligence quotients and autistic features. PMID:23315884

  18. Cornelia de Lange syndrome caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24: comments on the article by Pereza et al. [2012].

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2015-06-01

    In the March issue of the Journal in 2012, we reported on a girl with Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at 8q23.3q24.13, encompassing the EXT1, but not the TRPS1 gene. Recent discoveries have shown that heterozygous intragenic mutations or contiguous gene deletions including the RAD21 gene, which is located downstream of the TRPS1 gene, are the cause of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4. Considering that the interstitial deletion in our patient included the RAD21 and 30 other RefSeq genes, we would like to suggest a revision of the diagnosis reported in our previous paper and compare our patient to other reported patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome-4 caused by heterozygous deletions of chromosome 8q24. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25899858

  19. Identification of the first intragenic deletion of the PITX2 gene causing an Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: case report

    Dufier Jean-Louis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS is characterized by bilateral congenital abnormalities of the anterior segment of the eye associated with abnormalities of the teeth, midface, and umbilicus. Most cases of ARS are caused by mutations in the genes encoding PITX2 or FOXC1. Here we describe a family affected by a severe form of ARS. Case presentation Two members of this family (father and daughter presented with typical ARS and developed severe glaucoma. The ocular phenotype was much more severe in the daughter than in the father. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI detected an aggressive form of meningioma in the father. There was no mutation in the PITX2 gene, determined by exon screening. We identified an intragenic deletion by quantitative genomic PCR analysis and characterized this deletion in detail. Conclusion Our findings implicate the first intragenic deletion of the PITX2 gene in the pathogenesis of a severe form of ARS in an affected family. This study stresses the importance of a systematic search for intragenic deletions in families affected by ARS and in sporadic cases for which no mutations in the exons or introns of PITX2 have been found. The molecular genetics of some ARS pedigrees should be re-examined with enzymes that can amplify medium and large genomic fragments.

  20. Constitutional and somatic deletions of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Guenat, David; Quentin, Samuel; Rizzari, Carmelo; Lundin, Catarina; Coliva, Tiziana; Edery, Patrick; Fryssira, Helen; Bermont, Laurent; Ferrand, Christophe; Soulier, Jean; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report and investigate the genomic alterations of two novel cases of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a multisystem disorder caused by 7q11.23 hemizygous deletion. Additionally, we report the case of a child with NHL and a somatic 7q11.23 deletion. Although the WBS critical region has not yet been identified as a susceptibility locus in NHL, it harbors a number of genes involved in DNA repair. The high proportion of pediatric NHL reported in WBS is intriguing. Therefore, the role of haploinsufficiency of genes located at 7q11.23 in lymphomagenesis deserves to be investigated. PMID:25388916

  1. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to a new frameshift deletion in exon 4 of the androgen receptor gene: Functional analysis of the mutant receptor

    Lobaccaro, J M; Lumbroso, S.; Poujol, Nicolas; Georget, V.; Brinkmann, Albert; Malpuech, Georges; Sultan, C.

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe studied the androgen receptor gene in a large kindred with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and negative receptor-binding activity, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing identified a 13 base pair deletion within exon 4. This was responsible for a predictive frameshift in the open reading frame and introduction of a premature stop codon at position 783 instead of 919. The deletion was reproduced in androgen receptor wildtype cDNA and tran...

  2. Extra Yq and partial monosomy 12p due to a Y;12 translocation in a boy with features of the 12p deletion syndrome.

    Orye, E; Craen, M.; Laureys, G; Coster, R.; Mele, B.

    1985-01-01

    A Y;12 translocation, resulting in extra Yq material and partial monosomy 12p, was found in a 7 1/2 year old boy. He showed growth and mental retardation and several of the congenital anomalies seen in the 12p deletion syndrome. LDHB activity, the gene for which is located at 12p12, was normal in serum, in accordance with the suspected 12p13 deletion in the patient.

  3. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of a family carrying two Xq21.1-21.3 interstitial deletions associated with syndromic hearing loss

    Iossa, Sandra; Costa, Valerio; Corvino, Virginia; Auletta, Gennaro; Barruffo, Luigi; Cappellani, Stefania; Ceglia, Carlo; Cennamo, Giovanni; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; D’Amico, Alessandra; Di Paolo, Nilde; Forte, Raimondo; Gasparini, Paolo; Laria, Carla; Lombardo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Sensorineural hearing impairment is a common pathological manifestation in patients affected by X-linked intellectual disability. A few cases of interstitial deletions at Xq21 with several different phenotypic characteristics have been described, but to date, a complete molecular characterization of the deletions harboring disease-causing genes is still missing. Thus, the aim of this study is to realize a detailed clinical and molecular analysis of a family affected by syndromic X-...

  4. Epilepsy is a possible feature in Williams-Beuren syndrome patients harboring typical deletions of the 7q11.23 critical region.

    Nicita, Francesco; Garone, Giacomo; Spalice, Alberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Kluger, Gerhard; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Pruna, Dario; Freri, Elena; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are rarely reported in Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS)--a contiguous-gene-deletion disorder caused by a 7q11.23 heterozygous deletion of 1.5-1.8 Mb--and no previous study evaluated electro-clinical features of epilepsy in this syndrome. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that atypical deletion (e.g., larger than 1.8 Mb) may be responsible for a more pronounced neurological phenotypes, especially including seizures. Our objectives are to describe the electro-clinical features in WBS and to correlate the epileptic phenotype with deletion of the 7q11.23 critical region. We evaluate the electro-clinical features in one case of distal 7q11.23 deletion syndrome and in eight epileptic WBS (eWBS) patients. Additionally, we compare the deletion size-and deleted genes-of four epileptic WBS (eWBS) with that of four non-epileptic WBS (neWBS) patients. Infantile spasms, focal (e.g., motor and dyscognitive with autonomic features) and generalized (e.g., tonic-clonic, tonic, clonic, myoclonic) seizures were encountered. Drug-resistance was observed in one patient. Neuroimaging discovered one case of focal cortical dysplasia, one case of fronto-temporal cortical atrophy and one case of periventricular nodular heterotopia. Comparison of deletion size between eWBS and neWBS patients did not reveal candidate genes potentially underlying epilepsy. This is the largest series describing electro-clinical features of epilepsy in WBS. In WBS, epilepsy should be considered both in case of typical and atypical deletions, which do not involve HIP1, YWHAG or MAGI2. PMID:26437767

  5. Chromosome Deletion of 14q32.33 Detected by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization in a Patient with Features of Dubowitz Syndrome

    Diana C. Darcy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4-year-old girl of Mexican origins with a clinical diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome who carries a de novo terminal deletion at the 14q32.33 locus identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Dubowitz syndrome is a rare condition characterized by a constellation of features including growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, micrognathia, eczema, telecanthus, blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, round-tipped nose, mild to moderate developmental delay, and high-pitched hoarse voice. This syndrome is thought to be autosomal recessive; however, the etiology has not been determined. This is the first report of this deletion in association with this phenotype; it is possible that this deletion may be causal for a Dubowitz phenocopy.

  6. Bicuspid aortic valve and aortic coarctation are linked to deletion of the X chromosome short arm in Turner syndrome

    Bondy, Carolyn; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Cheng, Clara; Olivieri, Laura; Rosing, Douglas R; Arai, Andrew E

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a cardinal feature of X chromosome monosomy, or Turner syndrome (TS). Haploinsufficiency for gene(s) located on Xp have been implicated in the short stature characteristic of the syndrome, but the chromosomal region related to the CHD phenotype has not been established. Design We used cardiac MRI to diagnose cardiovascular abnormalities in four non-mosaic karyotype groups based on 50-metaphase analyses: 45,X (n=152); 46,X,del(Xp) (n=15); 46,X,del(Xq) (n=4); and 46,X,i(Xq) (n=14) from peripheral blood cells. Results Bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) were found in 52/152 (34%) 45,X study subjects and aortic coarctation (COA) in 19/152 (12.5%). Isolated anomalous pulmonary veins (APV) were detected in 15/152 (10%) for the 45,X study group, and this defect was not correlated with the presence of BAV or COA. BAVs were present in 28.6% of subjects with Xp deletions and COA in 6.7%. APV were not found in subjects with Xp deletions. The most distal break associated with the BAV/COA trait was at cytologic band Xp11.4 and ChrX:41,500 000. One of 14 subjects (7%) with the 46,X,i(Xq) karyotype had a BAV and no cases of COA or APV were found in this group. No cardiovascular defects were found among four patients with Xq deletions. Conclusions The high prevalence of BAV and COA in subjects missing only the X chromosome short arm indicates that haploinsufficiency for Xp genes contributes to abnormal aortic valve and aortic arch development in TS. PMID:23825392

  7. Detection of Gene Deletions in Children with Chondrodysplasia Punctata, Ichthyosis, Kallmann Syndrome, and Ocular Albinism by FISH Studies

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contiguous gene syndrome (CGS is characterized by a series of clinical featuresresulting from interstitial or terminal deletions of various adjacentgenes. Several important genes have been identified in the Xp22.3 region tobe responsible for genetically heterogeneous diseases. In this study, fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH methods were used to detect the extent ofgene deletion related to the phenotypes of patients with Xp-CGS.Methods: The molecular cytogenetic statuses of 23 boys with at least 1 apparent featureof chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP, ichthyosis, Kallmann syndrome, ortype 1 ocular albinism and those of their family members were investigated.High-resolution banding and FISH studies were performed using the probesof steroid sulfatase (STS, KAL1 and OA1, to detect the deleted status onXp22.3 in these patients along with their mothers and/or sisters or maternalgrandmothers.Results: All of these boys had normal karyotypes. FISH study showed nullisomy in 9of the 23 male patients and hemizygosity in all female carriers in the geneson Xp22.3. The existence of 2 or more diseases in the same individual indicatesa CGS. In addition, a putative mental retardation-related gene onXp22.3 locus was considered to be located between X-linked CDP and STS.Conclusions: The use of FISH probes for the Xp22.3 region allowed us to identify XlinkedCGSs, especially in those patients with 2 or more distinct clinical entitiesor an obvious X-linked disorder.

  8. Delineation of 7q11.2 deletions associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome and mapping of a repetitive sequence to within and to either side of the common deletion

    Robinson, W.P.; Waslynka, J.; Wang, M.; Clark, S. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)]|[Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-05-15

    The majority of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) patients have been shown to have a microdeletion within 7q11.2 including the elastin gene locus. The extent of these deletions has, however, not been well characterized. Thirty-five deletion patients were tested for all polymorphic markers in the 7q11.2 region bounding ELN to define the extent of deletions associated with WBS. With only one exception, ELN, D7S1870, and one copy of the D7S489 locus (D7S489U) were always included in the deletions. One patient showed lack of maternal inheritance at D7S1870 and not at ELN or D7S489U. A product corresponding to D7S489U was amplified form YAC 743G6 and from the P1 clone RMC07P008, thereby localizing both to within the common deletion. The boundary of the deleted region on the proximal (centromeric) side is D7S653 and on the distal side is D7S675, neither of which were ever included in the deletion. One locus, D7S489L, was variably deleted in patients, indicating a minimum of two common breakpoints on the proximal side. At least one additional repeat amplified by D7S489 (D7S489M) was localized to a YAC contig mapping distal to the mologous to several cDNA clones in the GenBank database and contains an Alu sequence. It is possible that this and/or other repetitive sequences in this region could play a role in the mechanism of deletion. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Emergence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus deletion mutants: Correlation with the porcine antibody response to a hypervariable site in the ORF 3 structural glycoprotein

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Toft, P.; Grubbe, T.; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren; Storgaard, Torben

    2000-01-01

    By using porcine immune sera to select a library of phage-displayed random peptides. we identified an antigenic sequence (RKASLSTS) in the C-terminus of the ORF 3 structural glycoprotein of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Through the use of overlapping...... deletion mutants at this ORF 3/4 site. Phylogenetic analysis showed the presence of a highly accurate ORF 3 molecular clock, according to which deletion mutants and nondeleted viruses evolved at differing speeds. Furthermore, deletion mutants and nondeleted viruses evolved as separate lineages. These...... distinctions suggested that deletion mutants were a hitherto unrecognized subtype of European-type PRRSV. Currently, deletion mutants appear to be outcompeting nondeleted viruses in the field, highlighting the importance of the porcine antibody response against the minor structural glycoproteins of European...

  10. Alu-mediated deletion of SOX10 regulatory elements in Waardenburg syndrome type 4

    Bondurand, Nadége; Fouquet, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Lecerf, Laure; Loundon, Natalie; Goossens, Michel; Duriez, Benedicte; Labrune, Philippe; Pingault, Veronique

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a rare neural crest disorder defined by the combination of Waardenburg syndrome (sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects) and Hirschsprung disease (intestinal aganglionosis). Three genes are known to be involved in this syndrome, that is, EDN3 (endothelin-3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), and SOX10. However, 15–35% of WS4 remains unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes could be involved and/or that mutations within...

  11. Exon deletions of the EP300 and CREBBP genes in two children with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome detected by aCGH

    Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; J Dossett, Cherilyn; Walton, Carol S; E Cramer, Andrea; Eng, Patti A; Nowakowska, Beata A; Pursley, Amber N.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of an exon coverage microarray platform in detecting intragenic deletions: one in exons 24–27 of the EP300 gene and another in exons 27 and 28 of the CREBBP gene in two patients with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS). RSTS is a heterogeneous disorder in which ∼45–55% of cases result from deletion or mutations in the CREBBP gene and an unknown portion of cases result from gene changes in EP300. The first case is a 3-year-old female with an exonic deletion of the EP300...

  12. LIN7A depletion disrupts cerebral cortex development, contributing to intellectual disability in 12q21-deletion syndrome.

    Ayumi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Interstitial deletion of 12q21 has been reported in four cases, which share several common clinical features, including intellectual disability (ID, low-set ears, and minor cardiac abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis using the Agilent Human Genome CGH 180K array was performed with the genomic DNA from a two-year-old Japanese boy with these symptoms, as well as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Consequently, a 14 Mb deletion at 12q21.2-q21.33 (nt. 77 203 574-91 264 613 bp, which includes 72 genes, was detected. Of these, we focused on LIN7A, which encodes a scaffold protein that is important for synaptic function, as a possible responsible gene for ID, and we analyzed its role in cerebral cortex development. Western blotting analyses revealed that Lin-7A is expressed on embryonic day (E 13.5, and gradually increases in the mouse brain during the embryonic stage. Biochemical fractionation resulted in the enrichment of Lin-7A in the presynaptic fraction. Suppression of Lin-7A expression by RNAi, using in utero electroporation on E14.5, delayed neuronal migration on postnatal day (P 2, and Lin-7A-deficient neurons remained in the lower zone of the cortical plate and the intermediate zone. In addition, when Lin-7A was silenced in cortical neurons in one hemisphere, axonal growth in the contralateral hemisphere was delayed; development of these neurons was disrupted such that one half did not extend into the contralateral hemisphere after leaving the corpus callosum. Taken together, LIN7A is a candidate gene responsible for 12q21-deletion syndrome, and abnormal neuronal migration and interhemispheric axon development may contribute to ID and corpus callosum hypoplasia, respectively.

  13. Array-based FMR1 sequencing and deletion analysis in patients with a fragile X syndrome-like phenotype.

    Stephen C Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by loss of function mutations in the FMR1 gene. Trinucleotide CGG-repeat expansions, resulting in FMR1 gene silencing, are the most common mutations observed at this locus. Even though the repeat expansion mutation is a functional null mutation, few conventional mutations have been identified at this locus, largely due to the clinical laboratory focus on the repeat tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more thoroughly evaluate the frequency of conventional mutations in FXS-like patients, we used an array-based method to sequence FMR1 in 51 unrelated males exhibiting several features characteristic of FXS but with normal CGG-repeat tracts of FMR1. One patient was identified with a deletion in FMR1, but none of the patients were found to have other conventional mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that missense mutations in FMR1 are not a common cause of the FXS phenotype in patients who have normal-length CGG-repeat tracts. However, screening for small deletions of FMR1 may be of clinically utility.

  14. Ventricular tachycardia in a Brugada syndrome patient caused by a novel deletion in SCN5A

    Tfelt-Hansen, J; Jespersen, T; Hofman-Bang, J;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanism behind ventricular tachycardia in a patient with Brugada syndrome. Arrhythmias in patients with Brugada syndrome often occur during sleep. However, a 28-year-old man with no previously documented arrhythmia or syncope who...... experienced shortness of breath and chest pain during agitation is described. An electrocardiogram revealed monomorphic ventricular tachycardia; after he was converted to nodal rhythm, he spontaneously went into sinus rhythm, and showed classic Brugada changes with coved ST elevation in leads V(1) to V(2......-cell patch clamp experiments using human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with the mutated SCN5A, no current could be recorded. Hence, the results suggest that the patient suffered from haploinsufficiency of Na(v)1.5, and that this mutation was the cause of his Brugada syndrome....

  15. SNP array and phenotype correlation shows that FLI1 deletion per se is not responsible for thrombocytopenia development in Jacobsen syndrome.

    Trkova, Marie; Becvarova, Vera; Hynek, Martin; Hnykova, Lenka; Hlavova, Eva; Kreckova, Gabriela; Kulovany, Eduard; Cutka, David; Zatloukalova, Jitka; Markova, Kristyna; Sukova, Martina; Horacek, Jiri; Stejskal, David

    2012-10-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. We report on four prenatally diagnosed patients with JBS with variable prenatal and postnatal phenotypes and 11q deletions of varying sizes. Precise characterization of the deleted region in three patients was performed by SNP arrays. The severity of both the prenatal and postnatal phenotypes did not correlate with the size of the haploinsufficient region. Despite the large difference in the deletion size (nearly 6 Mb), both of the live-born patients had similar phenotypes corresponding to JBS. However, one of the most prominent features of JBS, thrombocytopenia, was only present in the live-born boy. The girl, who had a significantly longer deletion spanning all four genes suspected of being causative of JBS-related thrombocytopenia (FLI1, ETS1, NFRKB, and JAM3), did not manifest a platelet phenotype. Therefore, our findings do not support the traditional view of deletion size correlation in JBS or the causative role of FLI1, ETS1, NFRKB, and JAM3 deletion per se for the development of disease-related thrombocytopenia. PMID:22887642

  16. High frequency of BTG1 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with down syndrome

    Lundin, Catarina; Hjorth, Lars; Behrendtz, Mikael;

    2012-01-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children with Down syndrome (ML-DS and DS-ALL) have revealed significant differences in abnormality patterns between such cases and acute leukemias in general. Also, certain molecular genetic aberrations characterize DS...

  17. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Salem, Ikhlass Haj [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. {yields} We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). {yields} Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. {yields} The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  18. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    Highlights: → We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. → We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). → Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. → The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  19. Deletions at the SOX10 gene locus cause Waardenburg syndrome types 2 and 4.

    Bondurand, Nadège; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Stanchina, Laure; Collot, Nathalie; Baral, Viviane; Marlin, Sandrine; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Giurgea, Irina; Skopinski, Laurent; Reardon, William; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Echaieb, Anis; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn; Touraine, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    International audience Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1-WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also ca...

  20. UBE2A deficiency syndrome: a report of two unrelated cases with large Xq24 deletions encompassing UBE2A gene.

    Thunstrom, Sofia; Sodermark, Liv; Ivarsson, Liz; Samuelsson, Lena; Stefanova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Intragenic mutations of the UBE2A gene, as well as larger deletions of Xq24 encompassing UBE2A have in recent years been associated with a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability called UBE2A deficiency syndrome or X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento (OMIM#300860). Common clinical features in these patients include moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), heart defects, dysmorphic features such as high forehead, synophrys, prominent supraorbital ridges, almond-shaped and deep-set eyes, wide mouth, myxedematous appearance, hirsutism, onychodystrophy, and genital anomalies. This study investigates clinical and molecular data of two unrelated, affected males with chromosome Xq24 deletions encompassing UBE2A. Both have been followed from birth until two years of age. A review of the previously published patients with deletions encompassing UBE2A is provided. Besides the common features, the two boys show anomalies not previously described, such as retinal coloboma, esophageal atresia with esophageal fistula, long fingers, camptodactyly, clinodactyly, and long broad toes. Analyses of the phenotype-genotype correlations suggest considerable prevalence of heart defects in the group of patients with larger deletions of Xq24 in comparison to the patients having intragenic UBE2A mutations. However, further studies are needed in order to establish statistically reliable phenotype-genotype correlations of this syndrome. PMID:25287747

  1. Partial deletion of TCF4 in three generation family with non-syndromic intellectual disability, without features of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome.

    Kharbanda, Mira; Kannike, Kaja; Lampe, Anne; Berg, Jonathan; Timmusk, Tõnis; Sepp, Mari

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in TCF4 (basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor 4), a gene with complex organization and multiple transcription initiation sites, are usually associated with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). However, a translocation encompassing the 5' end of TCF4 and several point mutations have been linked to non-syndromic intellectual disability (NSID). Here we describe a family with autosomal dominantly inherited NSID in seven relatives with a partial deletion of TCF4, disrupting the 5' end of the gene, predicted to result in the reduction of the number of mRNAs that can be produced by alternative transcription initiation. Functional studies indicate that it leads to reduced levels of transcripts coding for TCF4 protein isoforms with a nuclear localization signal, which may be relevant to the phenotype. The findings in our family support the notion that the position of the mutation in TCF4 is relevant to the phenotype, with those mutations in the 5' region, cassette exons and regions not affecting the important functional domains being linked to NSID rather than PTHS. We suggest that screening for mutations in TCF4 could be considered in the investigation of NSID. PMID:27132474

  2. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by submicroscopic deletions within 16p13.3

    Breuning, Martijn H; Dauwerse, Hans G.; Fugazza, Gluseppina; Saris, Jasper J; Spruit, Lia; Wijnen, Herman; Tommerup, Niels; van der Hagen, C B; Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; van den Boogaard, Marie-Jose; de Pater, Joke M.; Mariman, Edwin C. M.; Hamel, Ben C J; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    1993-01-01

    The Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a well-defined complex of congenital malformations characterized by facial abnormalities, broad thumbs and big toes, and mental retardation. The breakpoint of two distinct reciprocal translocations occurring in patients with a clinical diagnosis of RTS was located to the same interval on chromosome 16, between the cosmids N2 and RT1, in band 16p13.3. By using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, the signal from RT1 was found to be missing from o...

  3. Disruption of the ProSAP2 Gene in a t(12;22)(q24.1;q13.3) Is Associated with the 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome

    Bonaglia, Maria Clara; Giorda, Roberto; Borgatti, Renato; Felisari, Giorgio; Gagliardi, Chiara; Selicorni, Angelo; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2001-01-01

    The terminal 22q13.3 deletion syndrome is characterized by severe expressive-language delay, mild mental retardation, hypotonia, joint laxity, dolichocephaly, and minor facial dysmorphisms. We identified a child with all the features of 22q13.3 deletion syndrome. The patient's karyotype showed a de novo balanced translocation between chromosomes 12 and 22, with the breakpoint in the 22q13.3 critical region of the 22q distal deletion syndrome [46, XY, t(12;22)(q24.1;q13.3)]. FISH investigation...

  4. A Williams syndrome patient with a familial t(6;7) translocation and deletion of the elastin gene

    Pober, B.R.; Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, T.L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Discovery of a {open_quotes}balanced{close_quotes} reciprocal translocation [46,XX,t(6;7)(q11.2;q11.23)] on routine amniocentesis prompted clinical and cytogenetic study of additional family members. The same t(6;7) translocation was found in the clincally normal father and in a sibling with Williams syndrome (WS). WS had been diagnosed previously according to clinical criteria including distinctive facial features, supravalvar aortic stenosis requiring surgical repair, dental abnormalties and developmental delay. A clinically normal female was delivered and the translocation was confirmed with a cord blood specimen. Hemizygosity for the gene, elastin, (which has been mapped to the chromosome 7 translocation breakpoint, 7q11.23, in this family) appears to be a cause of WS. We therefore investigated whether the t(6;7) in the phenotypically normal father represented more than a simple reciprocal translocation. FISH using a chromosome 7 specific library revealed no differences between the cytogenetically identical, yet phenotypically distinct, father and son. Hybridization with a cosmid MR127D4 containing elastin sequence showed that the WS patient was missing one allele from the derivative chromosome 7 whereas both his mother and father had two copies of the elastin gene. This family indicates that the de novo loss of one copy of the elastin gene produces the recognizable phenotype of Williams syndrome. Molecular characterization (with additional probes) of the extent of this de novo deletion near the translocation breakpoint is in progress. This information will be valuable for defining the WS-critical region and will lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis for WS.

  5. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: novel FLCN frameshift deletion in daughter and father with renal cell carcinomas.

    Näf, Ernst; Laubscher, Dominik; Hopfer, Helmut; Streit, Markus; Matyas, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of the FLCN gene causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal tumours. We identified a hitherto unreported pathogenic FLCN frameshift deletion c.563delT (p.Phe188Serfs*35) in a family of a 46-year-old woman presented with macrohematuria due to bilateral chromophobe renal carcinomas. A heritable renal cancer was suspected due to the bilaterality of the tumour and as the father of this woman had suffered from renal cancer. Initially, however, BHD was overlooked by the medical team despite the highly suggestive clinical presentation. We assume that BHD is underdiagnosed, at least partially, due to low awareness of this variable condition and to insufficient use of appropriate genetic testing. Our study indicates that BHD and FLCN testing should be routinely considered in patients with positive family or personal history of renal tumours. In addition, we demonstrate how patients and their families can play a driving role in initiating genetic diagnosis, presymptomatic testing of at-risk relatives, targeted disease management, and genetic counselling of rare diseases such as BHD. PMID:26342594

  6. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions.

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K; Cho, Megan T; Schnur, Rhonda E; Monaghan, Kristin G; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G M; de Vries, Bert B A; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R; van Haelst, Mieke M; van Gassen, Koen L I; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A James; Scott, Daryl A; Sherr, Elliott H

    2016-05-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions. PMID:27087320

  7. A deletion in FOXN1 is associated with a syndrome characterized by congenital hypotrichosis and short life expectancy in Birman cats.

    Marie Abitbol

    Full Text Available An autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by congenital hypotrichosis and short life expectancy has been described in the Birman cat breed (Felis silvestris catus. We hypothesized that a FOXN1 (forkhead box N1 loss-of-function allele, associated with the nude phenotype in humans, mice and rats, may account for the syndrome observed in Birman cats. To the best of our knowledge, spontaneous mutations in FOXN1 have never been described in non-human, non-rodent mammalian species. We identified a recessive c.1030_1033delCTGT deletion in FOXN1 in Birman cats. This 4-bp deletion was associated with the syndrome when present in two copies. Percentage of healthy carriers in our French panel of genotyped Birman cats was estimated to be 3.2%. The deletion led to a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 547 in the protein. In silico, the truncated FOXN1 protein was predicted to lack the activation domain and critical parts of the forkhead DNA binding domain, both involved in the interaction between FOXN1 and its targets, a mandatory step to promote normal hair and thymic epithelial development. Our results enlarge the panel of recessive FOXN1 loss-of-function alleles described in mammals. A DNA test is available; it will help owners avoid matings at risk and should prevent the dissemination of this morbid mutation in domestic felines.

  8. The gene for replication factor C subunit 2 (RFC2) is within the 7q11.23 Williams syndrome deletion

    Peoples, R.; Perez-Jurado, L.; Francke, U.; Yu-Ker Wang [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Kaplan, P. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with multiple system manifestations, including supraval var aortic stenosis (SVAS), peripheral pulmonic stenosis, connective tissue abnormalities, short stature, characteristic personality profile and cognitive deficits, and variable hypercalcemia in infancy. It is caused by heterozygosity for a chromosomal deletion of part of band 7q11.23 including the elastin locus (ELN). Since disruption of the ELN gene causes autosomal dominant SVAS, it is assumed that ELN haploinsufficiency is responsible for the cardiovascular features of WS. The deletion that extends from the ELN locus in both directions is {ge}200 kb in size, although estimates of {ge}2 Mb are suggested by high-resolution chromosome banding and physical mapping studies. We have searched for additional dosage-sensitive genes within the deletion that may be responsible for the noncardiovascular features. We report here that the gene for replication factor C subunit 2 (RFC2) maps within the WS deletion region and was found to be deleted in all of 18 WS patients studied. The protein product of RFC2 is part of a multimeric complex involved in DNA elongation during replication. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Submicroscopic deletions of 11q24-25 in individuals without Jacobsen syndrome: re-examination of the critical region by high-resolution array-CGH

    VanAllen Margot I

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jacobsen syndrome is a rare contiguous gene disorder that results from a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is typically characterized by intellectual disability, a variety of physical anomalies and a distinctive facial appearance. The 11q deletion has traditionally been identified by routine chromosome analysis. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH has offered new opportunities to identify and refine chromosomal abnormalities in regions known to be associated with clinical syndromes. Results Using the 1 Mb BAC array (Spectral Genomics, we screened 70 chromosomally normal children with idiopathic intellectual disability (ID and congenital abnormalities, and identified five cases with submicroscopic abnormalities believed to contribute to their phenotypes. Here, we provide detailed molecular cytogenetic descriptions and clinical presentation of two unrelated subjects with de novo submicroscopic deletions within chromosome bands 11q24-25. In subject 1 the chromosome rearrangement consisted of a 6.18 Mb deletion (from 128.25–134.43 Mb and an adjacent 5.04 Mb duplication (from 123.15–128.19 Mb, while in subject 2, a 4.74 Mb interstitial deletion was found (from 124.29–129.03 Mb. Higher resolution array analysis (385 K Nimblegen was used to refine all breakpoints. Deletions of the 11q24-25 region are known to be associated with Jacobsen syndrome (JBS: OMIM 147791. However, neither of the subjects had the typical features of JBS (trigonocephaly, platelet disorder, heart abnormalities. Both subjects had ID, dysmorphic features and additional phenotypic abnormalities: subject 1 had a kidney abnormality, bilateral preauricular pits, pectus excavatum, mild to moderate conductive hearing loss and behavioral concerns; subject 2 had macrocephaly, an abnormal MRI with delayed myelination, fifth finger shortening and squaring of all fingertips, and sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusion Two

  10. Whole-genome SNP association in the horse: identification of a deletion in myosin Va responsible for Lavender Foal Syndrome.

    Samantha A Brooks

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lavender Foal Syndrome (LFS is a lethal inherited disease of horses with a suspected autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. LFS has been primarily diagnosed in a subgroup of the Arabian breed, the Egyptian Arabian horse. The condition is characterized by multiple neurological abnormalities and a dilute coat color. Candidate genes based on comparative phenotypes in mice and humans include the ras-associated protein RAB27a (RAB27A and myosin Va (MYO5A. Here we report mapping of the locus responsible for LFS using a small set of 36 horses segregating for LFS. These horses were genotyped using a newly available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip containing 56,402 discriminatory elements. The whole genome scan identified an associated region containing these two functional candidate genes. Exon sequencing of the MYO5A gene from an affected foal revealed a single base deletion in exon 30 that changes the reading frame and introduces a premature stop codon. A PCR-based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP assay was designed and used to investigate the frequency of the mutant gene. All affected horses tested were homozygous for this mutation. Heterozygous carriers were detected in high frequency in families segregating for this trait, and the frequency of carriers in unrelated Egyptian Arabians was 10.3%. The mapping and discovery of the LFS mutation represents the first successful use of whole-genome SNP scanning in the horse for any trait. The RFLP assay can be used to assist breeders in avoiding carrier-to-carrier matings and thus in preventing the birth of affected foals.

  11. A large-scale survey of the novel 15q24 microdeletion syndrome in autism spectrum disorders identifies an atypical deletion that narrows the critical region

    McInnes L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome has been recently described as a recurrent, submicroscopic genomic imbalance found in individuals with intellectual disability, typical facial appearance, hypotonia, and digital and genital abnormalities. Gene dosage abnormalities, including copy number variations (CNVs, have been identified in a significant fraction of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. In this study we surveyed two ASD cohorts for 15q24 abnormalities to assess the frequency of genomic imbalances in this interval. Methods We screened 173 unrelated subjects with ASD from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 1336 subjects with ASD from 785 independent families registered with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE for CNVs across 15q24 using oligonucleotide arrays. Rearrangements were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR. Results Among the patients from Costa Rica, an atypical de novo deletion of 3.06 Mb in 15q23-q24.1 was detected in a boy with autism sharing many features with the other 13 subjects with the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome described to date. He exhibited intellectual disability, constant smiling, characteristic facial features (high anterior hairline, broad medial eyebrows, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, full lower lip and protuberant, posteriorly rotated ears, single palmar crease, toe syndactyly and congenital nystagmus. The deletion breakpoints are atypical and lie outside previously characterized low copy repeats (69,838-72,897 Mb. Genotyping data revealed that the deletion had occurred in the paternal chromosome. Among the AGRE families, no large 15q24 deletions were observed. Conclusions From the current and previous studies, deletions in the 15q24 region represent rare causes of ASDs with an estimated frequency of 0.1 to 0.2% in individuals ascertained for ASDs, although the proportion might be higher in sporadic cases. These rates compare with a

  12. Deletions of Yq11 associated with short stature and the Turner syndrome. Tentative mapping of a region associated with specific Turner stigmata to proximal interval 5.

    McElreavey, K.; Barbaux, S.; Vilain, E. [Immunogenetique Humaine 25 rue du Dr. Roux, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human phenotype, commonly associated with a 45,X karyotype. Mapping the Turner phenotype is difficult since hidden mosaicisms, partial monosomy and complex rearrangements are present in many affected individuals. In addition, attempts to map the genes involved to the X chromosome have failed to yield a consistent localisation. An alternative approach to map and identify Turner genes is to study XY individuals, with sex chromosome abnormalities, who present with or without characteristic Turner stigmata. We report the analysis of 4 individuals with terminal deletions of Yq. The individuals were azoospermic males without phenotypic abnormalities (2 cases) and azoospermic males presenting with a specific subset of Turner stigmata (2 cases). Breakpoints in each of the cytogenetically detectable Yq deletions were mapped by Southern analysis and Y chromosome-specific sequence tagged sites (STS). Correlation between the patients phenotypes and the extent of their deletion indicate a critical region associated with specific Turner stigmata (cubitus valgus, shield chest, short fourth metacarpals) and growth retardation at Yq at proximal interval 5. These data provide evidence that the somatic features of the Turner syndrome are most likely caused by haploinsufficiency of genes at several loci.

  13. Mapping Genetically Controlled Neural Circuits of Social Behavior and Visuo-Motor Integration by a Preliminary Examination of Atypical Deletions with Williams Syndrome

    Hoeft, Fumiko; Dai, Li; Haas, Brian W.; Sheau, Kristen; Mimura, Masaru; Mills, Debra; Galaburda, Albert; Bellugi, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    In this study of eight rare atypical deletion cases with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WS; also known as 7q11.23 deletion syndrome) consisting of three different patterns of deletions, compared to typical WS and typically developing (TD) individuals, we show preliminary evidence of dissociable genetic contributions to brain structure and human cognition. Univariate and multivariate pattern classification results of morphometric brain patterns complemented by behavior implicate a possible role for the chromosomal region that includes: 1) GTF2I/GTF2IRD1 in visuo-spatial/motor integration, intraparietal as well as overall gray matter structures, 2) the region spanning ABHD11 through RFC2 including LIMK1, in social cognition, in particular approachability, as well as orbitofrontal, amygdala and fusiform anatomy, and 3) the regions including STX1A, and/or CYLN2 in overall white matter structure. This knowledge contributes to our understanding of the role of genetics on human brain structure, cognition and pathophysiology of altered cognition in WS. The current study builds on ongoing research designed to characterize the impact of multiple genes, gene-gene interactions and changes in gene expression on the human brain. PMID:25105779

  14. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be 100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region

  15. Detection of deleted mitochondrial genomes in cytochrome-c oxidase-deficient muscle fibers of a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome

    Using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry, the authors studied a muscle biopsy sample from a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) who had a deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and partial deficiency of cytochrome-c oxidase. They sought a relationship between COX deficiency and abnormalities of mtDNA at the single-fiber level. COX deficiency clearly correlated with a decrease of normal mtDNA and, conversely, deleted mtDNA was more abundant in COX-deficient fibers, especially ragged-red fibers. The distribution of mtRNA has a similar pattern, suggesting that deleted mtDNA is transcribed. Immunocytochemistry showed that the nuclear DNA-encoded subunit IV of COX was present but that the mtDNA-encoded subunit II was markedly diminished in COX-deficient ragged-red fibers. Because the mtDNA deletion in this patient did not comprise the gene encoding COX subunit II, COX deficiency may have resulted from lack of translation of mtRNA encoding all three mtDNA-encoded subunits of COX

  16. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pasztor, L.M. [Children`s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  17. A 725 kb deletion at 22q13.1 chromosomal region including SOX10 gene in a boy with a neurologic variant of Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Siomou, Elisavet; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Petersen, Michael; Thomaidis, Loretta; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Orru, Sandro; Papoulidis, Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare (1/40,000) autosomal dominant disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four clinical subtypes (WS1-S4). Six genes have been identified to be associated with the different subtypes of WS, among which SOX10, which is localized within the region 22q13.1. Lately it has been suggested that whole SOX10 gene deletions can be encountered when testing for WS. In this study we report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a unique de novo 725 kb deletion within the 22q13.1 chromosomal region, including the SOX10 gene and presenting clinical features of a neurologic variant of WS2. PMID:22842075

  18. Deletion of 11q12.3-11q13.1 in a patient with intellectual disability and childhood facial features resembling Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Boyle, Martine Isabel; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Nazaryan, Lusine; Ravn, Kirstine; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Tümer, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Deletions within 11q12.3-11q13.1 are very rare and to date only two cases have been described in the literature. In this study we describe a 23-year-old male patient with intellectual disability, behavioral problems, dysmorphic features, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux and skeletal abnormalities....... Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS, OMIM #122470; #300590; #610759; #300882; #614701) was suggested as a differential diagnosis in childhood although he lacked some of the features typical for this disorder. He does not have a mutation in any of the five known CdLS genes (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8, RAD21...... spectrum disorder; and CDCA5, which is part of the cohesin pathway, as are all the five known CdLS genes. It is thereforepossible that deletion of CDCA5 may account for some of the CdLS like features of the present case....

  19. Deletion of the steroid-binding domain of the human androgen receptor gene in one family with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome

    The cloning of a cDNA for the human androgen receptor gene has resulted in the availability for cDNA probes that span various parts of the gene, including the entire steroid-binding domain and part of the DNA-binding domain, as well as part of the 5' region of the gene. The radiolabeled probes were used to screen for androgen receptor mutations on Southern blots prepared by restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from human subjects with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In this investigation, the authors considered only patients presenting complete AIS and with the androgen receptor (-) form as the most probably subjects to show a gene deletion. One subject from each of six unrelated families with the receptor (-) form of complete AIS and 10 normal subjects were studied. In the 10 normal subjects and in 5 of the 6 patients, identical DNA restriction fragment patterns were observed with EcoRI and BamHI. Analysis of other members of this family confirmed the apparent gene deletion. The data provide direct proof that complete AIS in some families can result from a deletion of the androgen receptor structural gene. However, other families do not demonstrate such a deletion, suggesting that point mutations may also result in the receptor (-) form of complete AIS, adding further to the genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome

  20. A 3.7 Mb Deletion Encompassing ZEB2 Causes a Novel Polled and Multisystemic Syndrome in the Progeny of a Somatic Mosaic Bull

    Capitan, Aurélien; Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Pinton, Alain; Marquant-Le Guienne, Brigitte; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Grohs, Cécile; Bouet, Stéphan; Clément, Laëtitia; Salas-Cortes, Laura; Venot, Eric; Chaffaux, Stéphane; Weiss, Bernard; Delpeuch, Arnaud; Noé, Guy; Rossignol, Marie-Noëlle; Barbey, Sarah; Dozias, Dominique; Cobo, Emilie; Barasc, Harmonie; Auguste, Aurélie; Pannetier, Maëlle; Deloche, Marie-Christine; Lhuilier, Emeline; Bouchez, Olivier; Esquerré, Diane; Salin, Gérald; Klopp, Christophe; Donnadieu, Cécile; Chantry-Darmon, Céline; Hayes, Hélène; Gallard, Yves; Ponsart, Claire; Boichard, Didier; Pailhoux, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Polled and Multisystemic Syndrome (PMS) is a novel developmental disorder occurring in the progeny of a single bull. Its clinical spectrum includes polledness (complete agenesis of horns), facial dysmorphism, growth delay, chronic diarrhea, premature ovarian failure, and variable neurological and cardiac anomalies. PMS is also characterized by a deviation of the sex-ratio, suggesting male lethality during pregnancy. Using Mendelian error mapping and whole-genome sequencing, we identified a 3.7 Mb deletion on the paternal bovine chromosome 2 encompassing ARHGAP15, GTDC1 and ZEB2 genes. We then produced control and affected 90-day old fetuses to characterize this syndrome by histological and expression analyses. Compared to wild type individuals, affected animals showed a decreased expression of the three deleted genes. Based on a comparison with human Mowat-Wilson syndrome, we suggest that deletion of ZEB2, is responsible for most of the effects of the mutation. Finally sperm-FISH, embryo genotyping and analysis of reproduction records confirmed somatic mosaicism in the founder bull and male-specific lethality during the first third of gestation. In conclusion, we identified a novel locus involved in bovid horn ontogenesis and suggest that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition plays a critical role in horn bud differentiation. We also provide new insights into the pathogenicity of ZEB2 loss of heterozygosity in bovine and humans and describe the first case of male-specific lethality associated with an autosomal locus in a non-murine mammalian species. This result sets PMS as a unique model to study sex-specific gene expression/regulation. PMID:23152852

  1. White-matter disease in 18q deletion (18q-) syndrome: magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicates demyelination or increased myelin turnover rather than dysmyelination

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic data (1H-MR spectroscopy) of patients with 18q deletion syndrome have not yet been reported. 1H-MR spectroscopy, performed in an affected 2-year-old girl with markedly delayed neuromotor development and typical supratentorial white-matter disease (WMD), showed an increase of choline and α-glutamate concentrations. Eight months later, simultaneously with clinical improvement, α-glutamate had normalised whereas choline remained slightly increased. Active demyelination or increased myelin turnover might contribute to the hitherto unexplained WMD of this rare disorder. (orig.)

  2. A submicroscopic deletion involving part of the CREBBP gene detected by array-CGH in a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Lai, Angeline H M; Brett, Maggie S; Chin, Wai-Hoe; Lim, Eileen C P; Ng, Jasmine S H; Tan, Ene-Choo

    2012-05-10

    We report a girl with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) who was found to have copy number loss on 16p13.3 by array-CGH. She has developmental delay and other features of RSTS including downslanting palpebral fissures, a prominent nose with the nasal septum extending below the alae nasi, broad thumbs and big toes, postaxial polydactyly of the right foot and constipation from birth. We report the junction sequence across the breakpoint region for a microdeletion in RSTS. The sequencing results also showed that the deletion was 81.4kb involving three genes DNASE 1, TRAP 1, and CREBBP. PMID:22426292

  3. Autism spectrum disorders and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors in Japanese patients with Prader–Willi syndrome: A comparison between maternal uniparental disomy and deletion cases

    Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ihara, Hiroshi; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Gito, Masao; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to compare maternal uniparental disomy 15 (mUPD) and a paternal deletion of 15q11-13 (DEL) of Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) in regard to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty-five Japanese individuals with PWS were recruited from a single recruitment center. The participants consisted of 22 children (aged from 6 to 12) and 23 adolescents (aged from 13 to 19). Six children and seven adolescents were confirmed as having mUPD. Sixteen children and 16 adolescents were confirmed as ...

  4. Novel susceptibility locus at 22q11 for diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    Wessman, Maija; Forsblom, Carol; Kaunisto, Mari A;

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) affects about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and contributes to serious morbidity and mortality. So far only the 3q21-q25 region has repeatedly been indicated as a susceptibility region for DN. The aim of this study was to search for new DN susceptibility loci...

  5. A novel mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with Pearson syndrome and neonatal diabetes mellitus provides insight into disease etiology, severity and progression.

    Chen, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Si-Yu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Dong; Dong, Chang-Hu; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a rare, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion disorder mainly affecting hematopoietic system and exocrine pancreas in early infancy, which is characterized by multi-organ involvement, variable manifestations and poor prognosis. Since the clinical complexity and uncertain outcome of PS, the ability to early diagnose and anticipate disease progression is of great clinical importance. We described a patient with severe anemia and hyperglycinemia at birth was diagnosed with neonatal diabetes mellitus, and later with PS. Genetic testing revealed that a novel mtDNA deletion existed in various non-invasive tissues from the patient. The disease course was monitored by mtDNA deletion heteroplasmy and mtDNA/nucleus DNA genome ratio in different tissues and at different time points, showing a potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Our findings suggest that for patient suspected for PS, it may be therapeutically important to first perform detailed mtDNA analysis on non-invasive tissues at the initial diagnosis and during disease progression. PMID:26016877

  6. Currarino Syndrome and HPE Microform Associated with a 2.7-Mb Deletion in 7q36.3 Excluding SHH Gene.

    Coutton, C; Poreau, B; Devillard, F; Durand, C; Odent, S; Rozel, C; Vieville, G; Amblard, F; Jouk, P-S; Satre, V

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common forebrain defect in humans. It results from incomplete midline cleavage of the prosencephalon and can be caused by environmental and genetic factors. HPE is usually described as a continuum of brain malformations from the most severe alobar HPE to the middle interhemispheric fusion variant or syntelencephaly. A microform of HPE is limited to craniofacial features such as congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis and single central maxillary incisor, without brain malformation. Among the heterogeneous causes of HPE, point mutations and deletions in the SHH gene at 7q36 have been identified as well as extremely rare chromosomal rearrangements in the long-range enhancers of this gene. Here, we report a boy with an HPE microform associated with a Currarino syndrome. Array CGH detected a de novo 2.7-Mb deletion in the 7q36.3 region including the MNX1 gene, usually responsible for the Currarino triad but excluding SHH, which is just outside the deletion. This new case provides further evidence of the importance of the SHH long-range enhancers in the HPE spectrum. PMID:24550762

  7. Dental developmental abnormalities in a patient with subtelomeric 7q36 deletion syndrome may confirm a novel role for the SHH gene.

    Linhares, Natália D; Svartman, Marta; Salgado, Mauro Ivan; Rodrigues, Tatiane C; da Costa, Silvia S; Rosenberg, Carla; Valadares, Eugênia R

    2014-12-01

    Studies in mice demonstrated that the Shh gene is crucial for normal development of both incisors and molars, causing a severe retardation in tooth growth, which leads to abnormal placement of the tooth in the jaw and disrupted tooth morphogenesis. In humans the SHH gene is located on chromosome 7q36. Defects in its protein or signaling pathway may cause holoprosencephaly spectrum, a disorder in which the developing forebrain fails to correctly separate into right and left hemispheres and that can be manifested in microforms such as single maxillary central incisor. A novel role for this gene in the developing human primary dentition was recently demonstrated. We report a 12-year old boy with a de novo 7q36.1-qter deletion characterized by high-resolution karyotyping, oligonucleotide aCGH and FISH. His phenotype includes intellectual disability, non-verbal communication, hypospadia, partial sacral agenesis and absence of coccyx, which are distinctive features of the syndrome and mainly correlated with the MNX1, HTR5A and EN2 genes. No microforms of holoprosencephaly spectrum were observed; but the patient had diastema and dental developmental abnormalities, such as conical, asymmetric and tapered inferior central incisors. The dental anomalies are reported herein for the first time in subtelomeric 7q36 deletion syndrome and may confirm clinically a novel role for the SHH gene in dental development. PMID:25606385

  8. Dental developmental abnormalities in a patient with subtelomeric 7q36 deletion syndrome may confirm a novel role for the SHH gene

    Natália D. Linhares

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies in mice demonstrated that the Shh gene is crucial for normal development of both incisors and molars, causing a severe retardation in tooth growth, which leads to abnormal placement of the tooth in the jaw and disrupted tooth morphogenesis. In humans the SHH gene is located on chromosome 7q36. Defects in its protein or signaling pathway may cause holoprosencephaly spectrum, a disorder in which the developing forebrain fails to correctly separate into right and left hemispheres and that can be manifested in microforms such as single maxillary central incisor. A novel role for this gene in the developing human primary dentition was recently demonstrated. We report a 12-year old boy with a de novo 7q36.1-qter deletion characterized by high-resolution karyotyping, oligonucleotide aCGH and FISH. His phenotype includes intellectual disability, non-verbal communication, hypospadia, partial sacral agenesis and absence of coccyx, which are distinctive features of the syndrome and mainly correlated with the MNX1, HTR5A and EN2 genes. No microforms of holoprosencephaly spectrum were observed; but the patient had diastema and dental developmental abnormalities, such as conical, asymmetric and tapered inferior central incisors. The dental anomalies are reported herein for the first time in subtelomeric 7q36 deletion syndrome and may confirm clinically a novel role for the SHH gene in dental development.

  9. The 15q13.3 deletion syndrome: Deficient α(7)-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Deutsch, Stephen I; Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Urbano, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has led to the identification of microdeletions of the proximal region of chromosome 15q between breakpoints (BP) 3 or BP4 and BP5 encompassing CHRNA7, the gene encoding the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) subunit. Phenotypic manifestations of persons with these microdeletions are variable and some heterozygous carriers are seemingly unaffected, consistent with their variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. Nonetheless, the 15q13.3 deletion syndrome is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including idiopathic generalized epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia. Haploinsufficient expression of CHRNA7 in this syndrome has highlighted important roles the α7nAChR plays in the developing brain and normal processes of attention, cognition, memory and behavior throughout life. Importantly, the existence of the 15q13.3 deletion syndrome contributes to an emerging literature supporting clinical trials therapeutically targeting the α7nAChR in disorders such as ASDs and schizophrenia, including the larger population of patients with no evidence of haploinsufficient expression of CHRNA7. Translational clinical trials will be facilitated by the existence of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the α7nAChR that act at sites on the receptor distinct from the orthosteric site that binds acetylcholine and choline, the receptor's endogenous ligands. PAMs lack intrinsic efficacy by themselves, but act where and when the endogenous ligands are released in response to relevant social and cognitive provocations to increase the likelihood they will result in α7nAChR ion channel activation. PMID:26257138

  10. A novel homozygous 10 nucleotide deletion in BBS10 causes Bardet-Biedl syndrome in a Pakistani family

    Agha, Z.; Iqbal, Z.; Azam, M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Qamar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder characterized by central obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, learning difficulties, rod-cone dystrophy and renal dysplasia. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome has a prevalence rate ranging from 1 in 100,000 to 1 in 160,000 births although there

  11. 16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome Mice Display Sensory and Ultrasonic Vocalization Deficits During Social Interactions.

    Yang, Mu; Mahrt, Elena J; Lewis, Freeman; Foley, Gillian; Portmann, Thomas; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E; Portfors, Christine V; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent deletions and duplications at chromosomal region 16p11.2 are variably associated with speech delay, autism spectrum disorder, developmental delay, schizophrenia, and cognitive impairments. Social communication deficits are a primary diagnostic symptom of autism. Here we investigated ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in young adult male 16p11.2 deletion mice during a novel three-phase male-female social interaction test that detects vocalizations emitted by a male in the presence of an estrous female, how the male changes its calling when the female is suddenly absent, and the extent to which calls resume when the female returns. Strikingly fewer vocalizations were detected in two independent cohorts of 16p11.2 heterozygous deletion males (+/-) during the first exposure to an unfamiliar estrous female, as compared to wildtype littermates (+/+). When the female was removed, +/+ emitted calls, but at a much lower level, whereas +/- males called minimally. Sensory and motor abnormalities were detected in +/-, including higher nociceptive thresholds, a complete absence of acoustic startle responses, and hearing loss in all +/- as confirmed by lack of auditory brainstem responses to frequencies between 8 and 100 kHz. Stereotyped circling and backflipping appeared in a small percentage of individuals, as previously reported. However, these sensory and motor phenotypes could not directly explain the low vocalizations in 16p11.2 deletion mice, since (a) +/- males displayed normal abilities to emit vocalizations when the female was subsequently reintroduced, and (b) +/- vocalized less than +/+ to social odor cues delivered on an inanimate cotton swab. Our findings support the concept that mouse USVs in social settings represent a response to social cues, and that 16p11.2 deletion mice are deficient in their initial USVs responses to novel social cues. PMID:25663600

  12. Familial co-segregation of Coffin-Lowry syndrome inherited from the mother and autosomal dominant Waardenburg type IV syndrome due to deletion of EDNRB inherited from the father.

    Loupe, Jacob; Sampath, Srirangan; Lacassie, Yves

    2014-10-01

    We report an African-American family that was identified after the proposita was referred for diagnostic evaluation at 4½ months with a history of Hirschsprung and dysmorphic features typical of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Family evaluation revealed that the father had heterochromidia irides and hypertelorism supporting the clinical diagnosis of WS; however, examination of the mother revealed characteristic facial and digital features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). Molecular testing of the mother identified a novel 2 bp deletion (c.865_866delCA) in codon 289 of RPS6KA3 leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation 5 codons downstream (NM_004586.2:p.Gln289ValfsX5). This deletion also was identified in the proposita and her three sisters with a clinical suspicion of CLS, all of whom as carriers for this X-linked disorder had very subtle manifestations. The molecular confirmation of WS type 4 (Shah-Waardenburg; WS4) was not as straightforward. To evaluate WS types 1-4, multiple sequential molecular tests were requested, including Sanger sequencing of all exons, and deletion/duplication analysis using MLPA for PAX3, MITF, SOX10, EDN3 and EDNRB. Although sequencing did not identify any disease causing variants, MLPA identified a heterozygous deletion of the entire EDNRB in the father. This deletion was also found in the proposita and the oldest child. Since the heterozygous deletion was the only change identified in EDNRB, this family represents one of the few cases of an autosomal dominant inheritance of WS4 involving the endothelin pathway. Altogether, clinical evaluation of the family revealed one child to be positive for WS4 and two positive for CLS, while two children were positive for both diseases simultaneously (including the proposita) while another pair test negative for either disease. This kinship is an example of the coincidence of two conditions co-segregating in one family, with variable phenotypes requiring molecular testing to

  13. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying...... current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online...

  14. Submicroscopic deletion of chromosome region 16p13.3 in a Japanese patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome

    Masuno, Mitsuo; Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Makita, Yoshio; Kuroki, Yoshikazu [Kanagawa Children`s Medical Center, Yokohama (Japan); Petrij, F.; Dauwerse, H.G.; Breuning, M.H. [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)

    1994-12-01

    In a series of 25 Japanese patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, we screened, by high-resolution GTG banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization of a cosmid probe (RT1, D16S237), for microdeletions associated with this syndrome. In one patient, a microdeletion was demonstrated by in situ hybridization, but none were detected by high-resolution banding. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Identification of genes from a 500-kb region at 7q11.23 that is commonly deleted in Williams syndrome patients

    Osborne, L.R.; Rommens, J.; Tsui, Lap-Chee [Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem developmental disorder caused by the deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23. Hemizygosity of the elastin (ELN) gene can account for the vascular and connective tissue abnormalities observed in WS patients, but the genes that contribute to features such as infantile hypercalcemia, dysmorphic facies, and mental retardation remain to be identified. In addition, the size of the genomic interval commonly deleted in WS patients has not been established. In this study we report the characterization of a 500-kb region that was determined to be deleted in our collection of WS patients. A detailed physical map consisting of cosmid, P1 artificial chromosomes, and yeast artificial chromosomes was constructed and used for gene isolation experiments. Using the techniques of direct cDNA selection and genomic DNA sequencing, a three known genes (ELN, LIMK1, and RFC2), a novel gene (WSCR1) with homology to RNA-binding proteins, a gene with homology to restin, and four other putative transcription units were identified. LIMK1 is a protein kinase with two repeats of the LIM/double zinc finger motif, and it is highly expressed in brain. RFC2 is the 40-kDa ATP-binding sub-unit of replication factor C, which is known to play a role in the elongation of DNA catalyzed by DNA polymerase {delta} and {epsilon}. LIMK1 and WSCR1 may be particularly relevant when explaining cognitive defects observed in WS patients. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Association of AADAC Deletion and Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome in a Large European Cohort

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Riff Jensen, Lars; Melchior, Linea; Debes, Nanette Mol; Groth, Camilla; Skov, Liselotte; Werge, Thomas; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Tarnok, Zsanett; Barta, Csaba; Nagy, Peter; Farkas, Luca; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Rizzo, Renata; Gulisano, Mariangela; Rujescu, Dan; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Tosato, Sarah; Nawaz, Muhammad Sulaman; Ingason, Andrés; Unnsteinsdottir, Unnur; Steinberg, Stacy; Ludvigsson, Pétur; Stefansson, Kari; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Paschou, Peristera; Cath, Danielle; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Müller-Vahl, Kirsten; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Pfundt, Rolph; Tümer, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic influence where copy number variations are suggested to play a role in disease pathogenesis. In a previous small-scale copy number variation study of a GTS cohort (n = 111), recurrent exon...

  17. Association between insertion/deletion polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: a meta-analysis

    Matsuda Akihisa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous meta-analysis reported a positive association between an insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE and the risk of acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we updated this meta-analysis and additionally assessed the association of this polymorphism with ALI/ARDS mortality. Methods We searched electronic databases through October 2011 for the terms “angiotensin-converting enzyme gene”, “acute lung injury”, and “acute respiratory distress syndrome,” and reviewed all studies that reported the relationship of the I/D polymorphism in ACE with ALI/ARDS in humans. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, comprising 532 ALI/ARDS patients, 3032 healthy controls, and 1432 patients without ALI/ARDS. We used three genetic models: the allele, dominant, and recessive models. Results The ACE I/D polymorphism was not associated with susceptibility to ALI/ARDS for any genetic model. However, the ACE I/D polymorphism was associated with the mortality risk of ALI/ARDS in Asian subjects ( Pallele Pdominant = 0.001, Precessive = 0.002. This finding remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions There is a possible association between the ACE I/D polymorphism genotype and the mortality risk of ALI/ARDS in Asians.

  18. High frequency of COH1 intragenic deletions and duplications detected by MLPA in patients with Cohen syndrome.

    Renieri, Alessandra; Parri, Veronica; Katzaki, Eleni; Uliana, Vera; Scionti, Francesca; Tita, Rossella; Longo, Ilaria; Boschloo, Renske; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Selicorni, Angelo; Brancati, Francesco; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Zelante, Leopoldo; Hamel, Christian P.; Sarda, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cohen syndrome is a rare clinically variable autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, postnatal microcephaly, facial dysmorphisms, ocular abnormalities, and intermittent neutropenia. Mutations in the COH1 gene have been found in patients from different ethnic origins. However, a high percentage of patients has only one or no mutated allele. In order to investigate whether COH1 copy number changes account for missed mutations, we used multiplex liga...

  19. Parental somatic and germ-line mosaicism for a multiexon deletion with unusual endpoints in a type III collagen (COL3Al) allele produces ehlers-danlos syndrome type IV in the heterozygous offspring

    McGookey Milewicz, D.; Witz, A.M.; Byers, P.H. (Univ of Washington, Seattle (United States)); Smith, A.C.M.; Manchester, D.K.; Waldstein, G. (Children' s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a dominantly inherited disorder that results from mutation in the type III collagen gene (COL3A1). The authors studied the structure of the COL3A1 gene of an individual with EDS type IV and that of her phenotypically normal parents. The proband was heterozygous for a 2-kb deletion in COL3A1, while her father was mosaic for the same deletion in somatic and germ cells. In fibroblasts from the father, approximately two-fifths of the COL3A1 alleles carried the deletion, but only 10% of the COL3A1 alleles in white blood cells were of the mutant species. The deletion in the mutant allele extended from intron 7 into intron 11. There was a 12-bp direct repeat in intron 7 and intron 11, the latter about 60 bp 5' to the junction. At the breakpoint there was a duplication of 10 bp from intron 11 separated by an insertion of 4 bp contained within the duplicated sequence. The father was mosaic for the deletion so that the gene rearrangement occurred during his early embryonic development prior to lineage allocation. These findings suggest that at least some of the deletions seen in human genes may occur during replication, rather than as a consequence of meiotic crossing-over, and that they thus have a risk for recurrence when observed de novo. 71 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in twins with a Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    Williamson, Sarah L; Ellaway, Carolyn J; Peters, Greg B; Pelka, Gregory J; Tam, Patrick P L; Christodoulou, John

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects females, is primarily caused by variants in MECP2. Variants in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 are usually associated with individuals who manifest distinct phenotypes that may overlap with RTT. Individuals with phenotypes suggestive of RTT are typically screened for variants in MECP2 and then subsequently the other genes dependent on the specific phenotype. Even with this screening strategy, there are individuals in whom no causative variant can be identified, suggesting that there are other novel genes that contribute to the RTT phenotype. Here we report a de novo deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in identical twins with a RTT-like phenotype. We also demonstrate the reduced expression of Ptpn4 in a Mecp2 null mouse model of RTT, as well as the activation of the PTPN4 promoter by MeCP2. Our findings suggest that PTPN4 should be considered for addition to the growing list of genes that warrant screening in individuals with a RTT-like phenotype. PMID:25424712

  1. Novel homozygous deletion of segmental KAL1 and entire STS cause Kallmann syndrome and X-linked ichthyosis in a Chinese family.

    Xu, H; Li, Z; Wang, T; Wang, S; Liu, J; Wang, D W

    2015-12-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterised by hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in association with anosmia or hyposmia. This condition affects 1 in 10 000 men and 1 in 50,000 women. Defects in seventeen genes including KAL1 gene contribute to the molecular basis of KS. We report the clinical characteristics, molecular causes and treatment outcome of two Chinese brothers with KS and X-linked ichthyosis. The phenotypes of the patients were characterised by bilateral cryptorchidism, unilateral renal agenesis in one patient but normal kidney development in another. The patients had low serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone levels and a blunt response to the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone stimulation test. After human chorionic gonadotrophin treatment, the serum testosterone levels were normalized, and the pubic hair, penis length and testicular volumes were greatly improved in both of the patients. The two affected siblings had the same novel deletion at Xp22.3 including exons 9-14 of KAL1 gene and entire STS gene. Our study broadens the mutation spectrum in the KAL1 gene associated with KS and facilitates the genetic diagnosis and counselling for KS. PMID:25597551

  2. Deletion of the Wolfram syndrome-related gene Wfs1 results in increased sensitivity to ethanol in female mice.

    Raud, Sirli; Reimets, Riin; Loomets, Maarja; Sütt, Silva; Altpere, Alina; Visnapuu, Tanel; Innos, Jürgen; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Volke, Vallo; Vasar, Eero

    2015-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome, induced by mutation in WFS1 gene, increases risk of developing mood disorders in humans. In mice, Wfs1 deficiency cause higher anxiety-like behaviour and increased response to anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam, a GABAA receptor agonist. As GABAergic system is also target for ethanol, we analysed its anxiolytic-like and sedative properties in Wfs1-deficient mice using elevated plus-maze test and tests measuring locomotor activity and coordination, respectively. Additionally loss of righting reflex test was conducted to study sedative/hypnotic properties of ethanol, ketamine and pentobarbital. To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ethanol in mice enzymatic colour test was used. Finally, gene expression of alpha subunits of GABAA receptors following ethanol treatment was studied by real-time-PCR. Compared to wild-types, Wfs1-deficient mice were more sensitive to ethanol-induced anxiolytic-like effect, but less responsive to impairment of motor coordination. Ethanol and pentobarbital, but not ketamine, caused longer duration of hypnosis in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of Gabra2 subunit at 30 minutes after ethanol injection was significantly increased in the frontal cortex of Wfs1-deficient mice as compared to respective vehicle-treated mice. For the temporal lobe, similar change in Gabra2 mRNA occurred at 60 minutes after ethanol treatment in Wfs1-deficient mice. No changes were detected in Gabra1 and Gabra3 mRNA following ethanol treatment. Taken together, increased anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol in Wfs1-deficient mice is probably related to altered Gabra2 gene expression. Increased anti-anxiety effect of GABAA receptor agonists in the present work and earlier studies (Luuk et al., 2009) further suggests importance of Wfs1 gene in the regulation of emotional behaviour. PMID:25725334

  3. Interstitial deletion of 6q25.2–q25.3: a novel microdeletion syndrome associated with microcephaly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features and hearing loss

    Nagamani, Sandesh Chakravarthy Sreenath; Erez, Ayelet; Eng, Christine; Ou, Zhishuo; Chinault, Craig; Workman, Laura; Coldwell, James; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of 6q are rare. We report a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of four patients with interstitial deletion involving 6q25. All of our patients presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features and hearing loss, whereas two of them had agenesis of the corpus callosum. We determined the size, extent and genomic content of the deletions using high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH), and found that a common segment span...

  4. An unusual N-terminal deletion of the laminin alpha3a isoform leads to the chronic granulation tissue disorder laryngo-onycho-cutaneous syndrome.

    McLean, W H Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Hamill, Kevin J; Whittock, Neil V; Coleman-Campbell, Carrie M; Mellerio, Jemima E; Ashton, Gabrielle S; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J H; Eady, Robin A J; Jamil, Tanvir; Phillips, Roderic J; Shabbir, S Ghulam; Haroon, Tahir S; Khurshid, Khawar; Moore, Jonathan E; Page, Brian; Darling, Jonathan; Atherton, David J; Van Steensel, Maurice A M; Munro, Colin S; Smith, Frances J D; McGrath, John A; Phillips, Rodney J

    2003-09-15

    Laryngo-onycho-cutaneous (LOC or Shabbir) syndrome (OMIM 245660) is an autosomal recessive epithelial disorder confined to the Punjabi Muslim population. The condition is characterized by cutaneous erosions, nail dystrophy and exuberant vascular granulation tissue in certain epithelia, especially conjunctiva and larynx. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping localized the gene to a 2 Mb region on chromosome 18q11.2 with an LOD score of 19.8 at theta=0. This region includes the laminin alpha3 gene (LAMA3), in which loss-of-expression mutations cause the lethal skin blistering disorder Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa. Detailed investigation showed that this gene possesses a further 38 exons (76 exons in total) spanning 318 kb of genomic DNA, and encodes three distinct proteins, designated laminin alpha3a, alpha3b1 and alpha3b2. The causative mutation in 15 families was a frameshift mutation 151insG predicting a stop codon 7 bp downstream in an exon that is specific to laminin alpha3a. This protein is secreted only by the basal keratinocytes of stratified epithelia, implying that LOC is caused by dysfunction of keratinocyte-mesenchymal communication. Surprisingly, the 151insG mutation does not result in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay due to rescue of the transcript by an alternative translation start site 6 exons downstream. The resultant N-terminal deletion of laminin alpha3a was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of secreted proteins from LOC keratinocytes. These studies show that the laminin alpha3a N-terminal domain is a key regulator of the granulation tissue response, with important implications not only in LOC but in a range of other clinical conditions associated with abnormal wound healing. PMID:12915477

  5. Lenalidomide for the Treatment of Low- or Intermediate-1-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Associated with Deletion 5q Cytogenetic Abnormality: An Evidence Review of the NICE Submission from Celgene.

    Blommestein, Hedwig M; Armstrong, Nigel; Ryder, Steve; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Noake, Caro; Riemsma, Rob; Kleijnen, Jos; Severens, Johan L; Al, Maiwenn J

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of lenalidomide (Celgene) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug for treating adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Erasmus University Rotterdam, was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper describes the company's submission, the ERG review, and the NICE's subsequent decisions. The ERG reviewed the evidence for clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, as submitted by the manufacturer to the NICE. The ERG searched for relevant additional evidence and validated the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the robustness of the cost-effectiveness results. Clinical effectiveness was obtained from a three-arm, European, randomized, phase III trial among red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent patients with low-/intermediate-1-risk del5q31 MDS. The primary endpoint was RBC independence for ≥26 weeks, and was reached by a higher proportion of patients in the lenalidomide 10 and 5 mg groups compared with placebo (56.1 and 42.6 vs 5.9 %, respectively; both p submitted a Patient Access Scheme (PAS) that provided lenalidomide free of charge for patients who remained on treatment after 26 cycles. This PAS improved the ICER to £25,300, although the AC considered the proportion of patients who received treatment beyond 26 cycles, and hence the ICER, to be uncertain. Nevertheless, the AC accepted a commitment from the manufacturer to publish, once available, data on the proportion of patients eligible for the PAS, and believed this provided reassurance that lenalidomide was a cost-effective treatment for low- or intermediate-1-risk MDS patients. PMID:26314282

  6. Autism spectrum disorders and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors in Japanese patients with Prader-Willi syndrome: a comparison between maternal uniparental disomy and deletion cases.

    Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ihara, Hiroshi; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Gito, Masao; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Toshiro

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to compare maternal uniparental disomy 15 (mUPD) and a paternal deletion of 15q11-13 (DEL) of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) in regard to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Forty-five Japanese individuals with PWS were recruited from a single recruitment center. The participants consisted of 22 children (aged from 6 to 12) and 23 adolescents (aged from 13 to 19). Six children and seven adolescents were confirmed as having mUPD. Sixteen children and 16 adolescents were confirmed as having DEL. Under blindness to the participants' genotypes, a single psychologist carried out behavioral and psychological assessments, including the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Pervasive Developmental Disorders Autism Society Japan Rating Scale (PARS), and ADHD-Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV). Two comparisons were made: one between mUPD and DEL children and another between mUPD and DEL adolescents. In children, no significant differences were found between mUPD and DEL participants in terms of autistic (PARS childhood, P = 0.657) and impulsive behaviors (ADHD-RS-IV hyperactive/impulsive, P = 0.275). In adolescents, mUPD patients showed significantly more autistic symptomatology (PARS adolescent, P = 0.027) and significantly more impulsive behavior (ADHD-RS-IV hyperactive/impulsive, P = 0.01) than DEL patients. Our findings about Japanese PWS patients were consistent with previous researches from western countries not focused on Asian patients, indicating that mUPD cases would be more prone to ASD than DEL cases, regardless of ethnoregional differences. In addition, our data suggested that the behavioral difference between mUPD and DEL cases in terms of autistic and impulsive symptoms tend to be unrecognizable in their childhood. PMID:24850752

  7. Chemotherapy refractory testicular germ cell tumor is associated with a variant in Armadillo Repeat gene deleted in Velco-Cardio-Facial syndrome (ARVCF

    ChunkitFung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is evidence that inherited genetic variation affects both testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT treatment outcome and risks of late-complications arising from cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Using a candidate gene approach, we examined associations of three genes involved in the cisplatin metabolism pathway, GSTP1, COMT, and TPMT, with TGCT outcome and cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Material and Methods: Our study population includes a subset of patients (n=137 from a genome-wide association study at the University of Pennsylvania that evaluates inherited genetic susceptibility to TGCT. All patients in our study had at least one course of cisplatin-based chemotherapy with at least one year of follow up. A total of 90 markers in GSTP1, COMT and TPMT and their adjacent genomic regions (± 20 kb were analyzed for associations with refractory TGCT after first course of chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, peripheral neuropathy, and ototoxicity. Results: After adjustment for multiple comparisons, one SNP, rs2073743, in the flanking region (± 20 kb of COMT was associated with refractory TGCT after initial chemotherapy. This SNP lies within the intron region of the Armadillo Repeat gene deleted in Velco-Cardio-Facial syndrome (ARVCF. The G allele of rs2073743 predisposed patients to refractory disease with a relative risk of 2.6 (95% CI 1.1, 6.3; P=0.03. Assuming recessive inheritance, patients with the GG genotype had 22.7 times higher risk (95% CI 3.3, 155.8; P=0.04 of developing refractory disease when compared to those with the GC or CC genotypes. We found no association of our candidate genes with peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity, PFS and OS. Discussion: This is the first study to suggest that germline genetic variants of ARVCF may affect TGCT outcome. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and should be validated in future studies.

  8. A method for accurate detection of genomic microdeletions using real-time quantitative PCR

    Bassett Anne S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR is a well-established method for quantifying levels of gene expression, but has not been routinely applied to the detection of constitutional copy number alterations of human genomic DNA. Microdeletions or microduplications of the human genome are associated with a variety of genetic disorders. Although, clinical laboratories routinely use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH to identify such cryptic genomic alterations, there remains a significant number of individuals in which constitutional genomic imbalance is suspected, based on clinical parameters, but cannot be readily detected using current cytogenetic techniques. Results In this study, a novel application for real-time qPCR is presented that can be used to reproducibly detect chromosomal microdeletions and microduplications. This approach was applied to DNA from a series of patient samples and controls to validate genomic copy number alteration at cytoband 22q11. The study group comprised 12 patients with clinical symptoms of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, 1 patient trisomic for 22q11 and 4 normal controls. 6 of the patients (group 1 had known hemizygous deletions, as detected by standard diagnostic FISH, whilst the remaining 6 patients (group 2 were classified as 22q11DS negative using the clinical FISH assay. Screening of the patients and controls with a set of 10 real time qPCR primers, spanning the 22q11.2-deleted region and flanking sequence, confirmed the FISH assay results for all patients with 100% concordance. Moreover, this qPCR enabled a refinement of the region of deletion at 22q11. Analysis of DNA from chromosome 22 trisomic sample demonstrated genomic duplication within 22q11. Conclusion In this paper we present a qPCR approach for the detection of chromosomal microdeletions and microduplications. The strategic use of in silico modelling for qPCR primer design to avoid regions of repetitive

  9. Interstitial deletion of 6q25.2–q25.3: a novel microdeletion syndrome associated with microcephaly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features and hearing loss

    Nagamani, Sandesh Chakravarthy Sreenath; Erez, Ayelet; Eng, Christine; Ou, Zhishuo; Chinault, Craig; Workman, Laura; Coldwell, James; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of 6q are rare. We report a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of four patients with interstitial deletion involving 6q25. All of our patients presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features and hearing loss, whereas two of them had agenesis of the corpus callosum. We determined the size, extent and genomic content of the deletions using high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH), and found that a common segment spanning 3.52 Mb within the 6q25.2–q25.3 region was deleted in all four cases. We hypothesize that a subset of genes in the commonly deleted region are dosage sensitive and that haploinsufficieny of these genes impairs normal development of the brain and hearing. PMID:19034313

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type IV: a multi-exon deletion in one of the two COL3A1 alleles affecting structure, stability, and processing of type III procollagen

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gugler, E.; Gitzelmann, R.; Steinmann, B.

    1988-05-05

    The authors have studied a patient with severe, dominantly inherited Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The results indicate that this patient carries a deletion of 3.3 kilobase pairs in the triple helical coding domain of one of the two alleles for the pro-..cap alpha..-chains of type III collagen (COL3A1). His cultured skin fibroblasts contain equal amounts of normal length mRNA and of mRNA shortened by approximately 600 bases, and synthesize both normal and shortened pro-..cap alpha..1(III)-chains. In procollagen molecules containing one or more shortened chains, a triple helix is formed with a length of only about 780 amino acids. The mutant procollagen molecules have decreased thermal stability, are less efficiently secreted, and are not processed as their normal counterpart. The deletion in this family is the first mutation to be described in COL3A1.

  11. Interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4.

    Ray, M; Evans, J.; Rockman-Greenberg, C; Wickstrom, D

    1984-01-01

    A 17 year old girl investigated for mental retardation and minor anomalies was found to have an interstitial deletion of 4p. Her clinical and cytogenetic findings are compared with previous reported case of interstitial 4p deletion and with terminal 4p--deletions (Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome).

  12. Maternal Cell free DNA based screening for fetal microdeletion and the importance of careful diagnostic follow up

    Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Peters, David; Saller, Devereux; Chu, Tianjiao; Clemens, Michelle; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) by next-generation sequencing of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal plasma is used to screen for common aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, in high risk pregnancies. NIPS can identify fetal genomic microdeletions, however sensitivity and specificity have not been systematically evaluated. Commercial companies have begun to offer expanded panels including screening for common microdeletion syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletion (DiGeorge syndrome) witho...

  13. Behavioral Abnormalities and Circuit Defects in the Basal Ganglia of a Mouse Model of 16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Thomas Portmann; Mu Yang; Rong Mao; Georgia Panagiotakos; Jacob Ellegood; Gul Dolen; Patrick L. Bader; Brad A. Grueter; Carleton Goold; Elaine Fisher; Katherine Clifford; Pavitra Rengarajan; David Kalikhman; Darren Loureiro; Nay L. Saw

    2014-01-01

    A deletion on human chromosome 16p11.2 is associated with autism spectrum disorders. We deleted the syntenic region on mouse chromosome 7F3. MRI and high-throughput single-cell transcriptomics revealed anatomical and cellular abnormalities, particularly in cortex and striatum of juvenile mutant mice (16p11+/−). We found elevated numbers of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) expressing the dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2+) and fewer dopamine-sensitive (Drd1+) neurons in deep layers of cortex. Ele...

  14. One case of chromosome 16 p11 . 2 deletion syndrome and literature review%16 p11.2缺失综合征1例并文献复习

    葛婷; 崔云; 肖咏梅; 陆燕芬; 张育才; 张婷

    2014-01-01

    Objective To enhance the understanding of clinical characteristics,diagnosis,follow-up and genetic testing of chromosome 16p11. 2 deletion syndrome. Methods The clinical manifestations,laboratory testing,diagnosis,follow-up,and genetic testing of one case with chromosome 16p11. 2 deletion syndrome were reviewed,analyzed and summarized. Meanwhile,relevant literatures of chromosome 16p11. 2 deletion syndrome were reviewed in this article. Results ①A 2-month-and-13-day boy with 20-day fever,cough,and diarrhea was admitted to our hospital. Deformity of six fingers in right palm and scoliosis was found. The total peripheral blood lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets were lower than the reference levels. Chest X-ray indicated that the sternum shape was abnormal and T9-T12 vertebral bodies were hemivertebrae deformity. The patient was improved with a hyperactive and exciting performance after anti-infection therapy. Follow up after releasing indicated that the count of peripheral blood lymphocytes was improved,however,WBC,N and CD4+ T cells remained low levels. The boy was diagnosed as epilepsy at 5 months old and improved after treatment with anti-epileptic drugs. A deletion of 0. 545 4 Mb in chromosome 16p11. 2 was identified by chromosome chip detection technology and confirmed by high-density oligonucleotide comparative genomic hybridization( CGH)Microarray. The genes located in this deleted region included SPN,QRRT,Cl6orf54,KIF22,MAZ,SEZ6L2,CDIPT,ASPHDl,KCTDl3, TMEM2l9,TAOK2,DOC2A,TBX6. The results of Chromosome chip detection were normal in his parents. Thus,this boy was finally diagnosed as chromosome 16p11. 2 deletion syndrome. ②1 387cases were reported by 95 published articles related with chromosome 16p11. 2 deletion syndrome,involving the nervous system(547,39. 7%),endocrine system(371,26. 9%),growth and skeletal abnormalities(84,6. 1%),urinary and digestive system(10,0. 7%),cardiovascular system(4,0. 3%),immune function(1,0. 07%). The different size of the

  15. 17q12 deletion and duplication syndrome in Denmark-A clinical cohort of 38 patients and review of the literature

    Rasmussen, Maria; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Graakjaer, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    deletions and 26 phenotyped patients with 17q12 duplications. The total cohort includes 19 index patients and 19 family members. We also reviewed the literature in order to further improve the basis for the counseling. We emphasize that renal disease, learning disability, behavioral abnormalities, epilepsy......, and duodenal atresia. Delayed language development, learning disability, kidney involvement, and eye dysmorphism and strabismus were the most consistently shared features among patients with 17q12 deletion. Patients with 17q12 duplications were characterized by an extremely wide phenotypic spectrum, including...... a variable degree of learning disabilities, delayed language development, delayed motor milestones, and a broad range of psychiatric and neurological features. This patient group also included adults achieving an academic degree. Assessing index patients and non-index patients separately, our observations...

  16. Prader-Willi syndrome - type 1 deletion, a consequence of an unbalanced translocation of chromosomes 13 and 15, easily to be mixed up with a Robertsonian translocation

    Sheth, Frenny; Liehr, Thomas; Shah, Krati; Sheth, Jayesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi syndrome, due to microdeletion of proximal 15q, is a well-known cause of syndromic obesity. Case characteristics A couple with history of repeated first trimester abortions had a son with balanced Robertsonian translocation of chromosomes 13 and 15 according to cytogenetic banding technique. Results Chromosomal analysis for the couple was performed. A balanced translocation involving BP1-BP3 region of proximal 15q was observed in the father. Discussion Investigations o...

  17. Severe Psychomotor Delay in a Severe Presentation of Cat-Eye Syndrome

    Guillaume Jedraszak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cat-eye syndrome is a rare genetic syndrome of chromosomal origin. Individuals with cat-eye syndrome are characterized by the presence of preauricular pits and/or tags, anal atresia, and iris coloboma. Many reported cases also presented with variable congenital anomalies and intellectual disability. Most patients diagnosed with CES carry a small supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome, resulting in partial tetrasomy of 22p-22q11.21. There are two types of small supernumerary marker chromosome, depending on the breakpoint site. In a very small proportion of cases, other cytogenetic anomalies are reportedly associated with the cat-eye syndrome phenotype. Here, we report a patient with cat-eye syndrome caused by a type 1 small supernumerary marker chromosome. The phenotype was atypical and included a severe developmental delay. The use of array comparative genomic hybridization ruled out the involvement of another chromosomal imbalance in the neurological phenotype. In the literature, only a few patients with cat-eye syndrome present with a severe developmental delay, and all of the latter carried an atypical partial trisomy 22 or an uncharacterized small supernumerary marker chromosome. Hence, this is the first report of a severe neurological phenotype in cat-eye syndrome with a typical type 1 small supernumerary marker chromosome. Our observation clearly complicates prognostic assessment, particularly when cat-eye syndrome is diagnosed prenatally.

  18. Behavioral Abnormalities and Circuit Defects in the Basal Ganglia of a Mouse Model of 16p11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Thomas Portmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A deletion on human chromosome 16p11.2 is associated with autism spectrum disorders. We deleted the syntenic region on mouse chromosome 7F3. MRI and high-throughput single-cell transcriptomics revealed anatomical and cellular abnormalities, particularly in cortex and striatum of juvenile mutant mice (16p11+/−. We found elevated numbers of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs expressing the dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2+ and fewer dopamine-sensitive (Drd1+ neurons in deep layers of cortex. Electrophysiological recordings of Drd2+ MSN revealed synaptic defects, suggesting abnormal basal ganglia circuitry function in 16p11+/− mice. This is further supported by behavioral experiments showing hyperactivity, circling, and deficits in movement control. Strikingly, 16p11+/− mice showed a complete lack of habituation reminiscent of what is observed in some autistic individuals. Our findings unveil a fundamental role of genes affected by the 16p11.2 deletion in establishing the basal ganglia circuitry and provide insights in the pathophysiology of autism.

  19. Behavioral signatures related to genetic disorders in autism

    Bruining, Hilgo; Eijkemans, Marinus JC; Kas, Martien JH; Curran, Sarah R; Vorstman, Jacob AS; Bolton, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well recognized to be genetically heterogeneous. It is assumed that the genetic risk factors give rise to a broad spectrum of indistinguishable behavioral presentations. Methods We tested this assumption by analyzing the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) symptom profiles in samples comprising six genetic disorders that carry an increased risk for ASD (22q11.2 deletion, Down’s syndrome, Prader-Willi, supernumerary marker chromosome 15, tub...

  20. Is COMT a Susceptibility Gene for Schizophrenia?

    Williams, Hywel J.; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) is a catabolic enzyme involved in the degradation of a number of bioactive molecules; of principal interest to psychiatry, these include dopamine. The enzyme is encoded by the COMT gene. COMT is located (along with 47 other genes) in a fragment of chromosome 22q11 which when deleted results in a complex syndrome, the psychiatric manifestations of which include schizophrenia and other psychoses. These 2 observations have placed COMT near the top of a rather...

  1. Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 Limits Adipose Tissue Fat Accumulation and Plays a Key Role in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome Phenotype

    Escande, Carlos; Nin, Veronica; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Chini, Claudia C. S.; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L.; Chini, Eduardo N.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is often regarded as the primary cause of metabolic syndrome. However, many lines of evidence suggest that obesity may develop as a protective mechanism against tissue damage during caloric surplus and that it is only when the maximum fat accumulation capacity is reached and fatty acid spill

  2. Drayer's syndrome of mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature and absent phalanges is caused by a recurrent deletion of chromosome 15(q26.2 -> qter)

    Rump, P.; Dijkhuizen, T.; Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; Lemmink, H. H.; Vos, Y. J.; Verheij, J. B. G. M.; van Ravenswaaij, C. M. A.

    2008-01-01

    We reevaluated a unique family with two sibs who had a presumed autosomal recessively inherited syndrome characterized by mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature and absent phalanges. This family was originally described by Drayer et al. in 1977. Using modern molecular techniques, we demonst

  3. Partial deletion 11q

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Tommerup, N; Sørensen, F B;

    1995-01-01

    We describe the cytogenetic findings and the dysmorphic features in a stillborn girl with a large de novo terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. The karyotype was 46,XX,del(11)(q21qter). By reviewing previous reports of deletion 11q, we found that cleft lip and palate are most...... frequently seen in proximal 11q deletions involving 11q21. Telomeric staining using the PRINS technique demonstrated normal telomeric sequences in the deleted chromosome 11....

  4. Exonic Deletions in AUTS2 Cause a Syndromic Form of Intellectual Disability and Suggest a Critical Role for the C Terminus

    Beunders, Gea; Voorhoeve, Els; Golzio, Christelle; Pardo, Luba M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Simonic, Ingrid; Lionel, Anath C.; Vergult, Sarah; Pyatt, Robert E.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; Nieuwint, Aggie; Weiss, Marjan M.; Rizzu, Patrizia; Verwer, Lucilla E.N.I.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements involving AUTS2 (7q11.22) are associated with autism and intellectual disability (ID), although evidence for causality is limited. By combining the results of diagnostic testing of 49,684 individuals, we identified 24 microdeletions that affect at least one exon of AUTS2, as well as one translocation and one inversion each with a breakpoint within the AUTS2 locus. Comparison of 17 well-characterized individuals enabled identification of a variable syndromic phenotype in...

  5. Conditional deletion of cytochrome p450 reductase in osteoprogenitor cells affects long bone and skull development in mice recapitulating antley-bixler syndrome: role of a redox enzyme in development.

    Satya P Panda

    Full Text Available NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR is the primary electron donor for cytochromes P450, dehydrocholesterol reductase, heme oxygenase, and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with specific mutations in POR exhibit severe developmental malformations including disordered steroidogenesis, sexual ambiguities and various bone defects, similar to those seen in patients with Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS. To probe the role of POR during bone development, we generated a conditional knockout mouse (CKO by cross breeding Por (lox/lox and Dermo1 Cre mice. CKO mice were smaller than their littermate controls and exhibited significant craniofacial and long bone abnormalities. Differential staining of the CKO mice skull bases shows premature fusion of the sphenooccipital and basioccipital-exoccipital synchondroses. Class III malocclusion was noted in adult knockout mice with an unusual overgrowth of the lower incisors. Shorter long bones were observed along with a reduction in the bone volume fraction, measured by microCT, in the Por-deleted mice compared to age- and sex-matched littermate controls. Concerted up- or down-regulation of proteins in the FGF signaling pathway observed by immunohistochemistry in the tibia samples of CKO mice compared to wild type controls shows a decrease in the FGF signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mouse model that recapitulates both skull and long bone defects upon Por deletion, offering an approach to study the sequelae of POR mutations. This unique model demonstrates that P450 metabolism in bone itself is potentially important for proper bone development, and that an apparent link exists between the POR and FGF signaling pathways, begging the question of how an oxidation-reduction flavoprotein affects developmental and cellular signaling processes.

  6. EPHA4 haploinsufficiency is responsible for the short stature of a patient with 2q35-q36.2 deletion and Waardenburg syndrome

    Li, Chuan; Chen, Rongyu; Fan, Xin; Luo, Jingsi; Qian, Jiale; Wang, Jin; Xie, Bobo; Shen, Yiping; Chen, Shaoke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), an auditory-pigmentary genetic disorder, is caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PAX3. Abnormal physical signs such as dystopia canthorum, patchy hypopigmentation and sensorineural hearing loss are common, but short stature is not associated with WS1. Case presentation: We reported a 4-year and 6 month-old boy with a rare combination of WS1 and severe short stature (83.5 cm (−5.8SD)). His facial features include dystopia canthorum...

  7. Deletions and rearrangements of the H19/IGF2 enhancer region in patients with Silver-Russell syndrome and growth retardation

    Grønskov, Karen; Poole, Rebecca L; Hahnemann, Johanne M D;

    2011-01-01

    downregulation of IGF2 and bi-allelic expression of H19. H19 and IGF2 are reciprocally imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15. The expression is regulated by the imprinted methylation of the ICR, which modulates the transcription of H19 and IGF2 facilitated by enhancers downstream of H19. A promoter element of IGF2......, IGF2P0, is differentially methylated equivalently to the H19-ICR, though in a small number of SRS cases this association is disrupted-that is, hypomethylation affects either H19-ICR or IGF2P0. Three pedigrees associated with hypomethylation of IGF2P0 in the probands are presented here, two with...... paternally derived deletions, and one with a balanced translocation of inferred paternal origin. They all have a breakpoint within the H19/IGF2 enhancer region. One proband has severe growth retardation, the others have SRS. This is the first report of paternally derived structural chromosomal mutations in...

  8. 9q22 Deletion - First Familial Case

    Yamamoto Toshiyuki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only 29 cases of constitutional 9q22 deletions have been published and all have been sporadic. Most associate with Gorlin syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, MIM #109400 due to haploinsufficiency of the PTCH1 gene (MIM *601309. Methods and Results We report two mentally retarded female siblings and their cognitively normal father, all carrying a similar 5.3 Mb microdeletion at 9q22.2q22.32, detected by array CGH (244 K. The deletion does not involve the PTCH1 gene, but instead 30 other gene,s including the ROR2 gene (MIM *602337 which causing both brachydactyly type 1 (MIM #113000 and Robinow syndrome (MIM #268310, and the immunologically active SYK gene (MIM *600085. The deletion in the father was de novo and FISH analysis of blood lymphocytes did not suggest mosaicism. All three patients share similar mild dysmorphic features with downslanting palpebral fissures, narrow, high bridged nose with small nares, long, deeply grooved philtrum, ears with broad helix and uplifted lobuli, and small toenails. All have significant dysarthria and suffer from continuous middle ear and upper respiratory infections. The father also has a funnel chest and unilateral hypoplastic kidney but the daughters have no malformations. Conclusions This is the first report of a familial constitutional 9q22 deletion and the first deletion studied by array-CGH which does not involve the PTCH1 gene. The phenotype and penetrance are variable and the deletion found in the cognitively normal normal father poses a challenge in genetic counseling.

  9. A De Novo Deletion in the Regulators of Complement Activation Cluster Producing a Hybrid Complement Factor H/Complement Factor H-Related 3 Gene in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    Challis, Rachel C; Araujo, Geisilaine S R; Wong, Edwin K S; Anderson, Holly E; Awan, Atif; Dorman, Anthony M; Waldron, Mary; Wilson, Valerie; Brocklebank, Vicky; Strain, Lisa; Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L; Marchbank, Kevin J; Goodship, Timothy H J; Kavanagh, David

    2016-06-01

    The regulators of complement activation cluster at chromosome 1q32 contains the complement factor H (CFH) and five complement factor H-related (CFHR) genes. This area of the genome arose from several large genomic duplications, and these low-copy repeats can cause genome instability in this region. Genomic disorders affecting these genes have been described in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, arising commonly through nonallelic homologous recombination. We describe a novel CFH/CFHR3 hybrid gene secondary to a de novo 6.3-kb deletion that arose through microhomology-mediated end joining rather than nonallelic homologous recombination. We confirmed a transcript from this hybrid gene and showed a secreted protein product that lacks the recognition domain of factor H and exhibits impaired cell surface complement regulation. The fact that the formation of this hybrid gene arose as a de novo event suggests that this cluster is a dynamic area of the genome in which additional genomic disorders may arise. PMID:26490391

  10. Deletion of the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase Cld1 rescues growth and life span defects in the tafazzin mutant: implications for Barth syndrome.

    Ye, Cunqi; Lou, Wenjia; Li, Yiran; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Vaz, Frédéric M; Chen, Shuliang; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) that is synthesized de novo is deacylated to monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), which is reacylated by tafazzin. Remodeled CL contains mostly unsaturated fatty acids. In eukaryotes, loss of tafazzin leads to growth and respiration defects, and in humans, this results in the life-threatening disorder Barth syndrome. Tafazzin deficiency causes a decrease in the CL/MLCL ratio and decreased unsaturated CL species. Which of these biochemical outcomes contributes to the physiological defects is not known. Yeast cells have a single CL-specific phospholipase, Cld1, that can be exploited to distinguish between these outcomes. The cld1Δ mutant has decreased unsaturated CL, but the CL/MLCL ratio is similar to that of wild type cells. We show that cld1Δ rescues growth, life span, and respiratory defects of the taz1Δ mutant. This suggests that defective growth and respiration in tafazzin-deficient cells are caused by the decreased CL/MLCL ratio and not by a deficiency in unsaturated CL. CLD1 expression is increased during respiratory growth and regulated by the heme activator protein transcriptional activation complex. Overexpression of CLD1 leads to decreased mitochondrial respiration and growth and instability of mitochondrial DNA. However, ATP concentrations are maintained by increasing glycolysis. We conclude that transcriptional regulation of Cld1-mediated deacylation of CL influences energy metabolism by modulating the relative contribution of glycolysis and respiration. PMID:24318983

  11. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  12. Quantum deletion: Beyond the no-deletion principle

    Suppose we are given two identical copies of an unknown quantum state and we wish to delete one copy from among the given two copies. The quantum no-deletion principle restricts us from perfectly deleting a copy but it does not prohibit us from deleting a copy approximately. Here we construct two types of a 'universal quantum deletion machine' which approximately deletes a copy such that the fidelity of deletion does not depend on the input state. The two types of universal quantum deletion machines are (1) a conventional deletion machine described by one unitary operator and (2) a modified deletion machine described by two unitary operators. Here it is shown that the modified deletion machine deletes a qubit with fidelity 3/4, which is the maximum limit for deleting an unknown quantum state. In addition to this we also show that the modified deletion machine retains the qubit in the first mode with average fidelity 0.77 (approx.) which is slightly greater than the fidelity of measurement for two given identical states, showing how precisely one can determine its state [S. Massar and S. Popescu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1259 (1995)]. We also show that the deletion machine itself is input state independent, i.e., the information is not hidden in the deleting machine, and hence we can delete the information completely from the deletion machine

  13. Effectiveness of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay used for detecting deletion of Prader-Willi syndrome%应用多重连接探针扩增法简便高效检测Prader-Willi综合征的基因缺失

    Hong SHAO; Va LIP; Bai-Lin WU

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hypotonia and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity in later infancy or early childhood. Patients with PWS are often too young to manifest sufficient features or have atypical findings, making genetic testing important to confirm the diagnosis of PWS. Approximately 99% of patients with PWS have a diagnostic abnormality in the parent-specific methylation imprint within the Prader-Willi critical region (PWCR) at chromosome 15q11.2-q12. Of them, 70% have a paternal deletion; 25% have a maternal uniparental disomy (UPD); and <5% have a mutation in the imprinting center. Methods: Current techniques can identify a diagnostic abnormality, such as paternal deletion or maternal UPD for most of patients with PWS, but they are labor-intensive and cost-expensive. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) is a novel, simple, and cost-effective technique for analysis of relative quantification in a single assay, which has recently been applied for the detection of genomic deletions, duplications, and amplifications in a variety of genes. Results: Six out of 20 patients referred for genetic diagnosis of PWS were found to have a deletion by MLPA, confirmed by FISH and DNA methylation analysis with 100% concordance. Conclusion: MLPA's high sensitivity and specificity for deletion detection is the same as FISH or Southern blot based analysis. Additional collaborative effort for developing and validating the complete MLPA-PWS assay, for not only detecting deletion but also identifying methylation abnormality, is on going.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    ... 4 . This chromosomal change is sometimes written as 4p-. The size of the deletion varies among affected ... Gene Review: Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: 4p partial monosomy syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Epilepsy These resources ...

  15. PAX3 gene deletion detected by microarray analysis in a girl with hearing loss

    Drozniewska, Malgorzata; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Deletions of the PAX3 gene have been rarely reported in the literature. Mutations of this gene are a common cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and 3. We report a 16 year old female presenting hearing loss and normal intellectual development, without major features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1, and without family history of the syndrome. Her phenotype, however, overlaps with features of craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome. Microarray analysis showed ~862 kb de novo deletion at 2q36.1 inclu...

  16. Epidemiology and Health-Related Quality of Life in Hypoparathyroidism in Norway

    Løvås, Kristian; Debowska, Aleksandra; Eriksen, Erik F.; Evang, Johan A.; Fossum, Christian; Fougner, Kristian J.; Holte, Synnøve E.; Lima, Kari; Moe, Ragnar B.; Myhre, Anne Grethe; Kemp, E. Helen; Nedrebø, Bjørn G.; Svartberg, Johan; Husebye, Eystein S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The epidemiology of hypoparathyroidism (HP) is largely unknown. We aimed to determine prevalence, etiologies, health related quality of life (HRQOL) and treatment pattern of HP. Methods: Patients with HP and 22q11 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome) were identified in electronic hospital registries. All identified patients were invited to participate in a survey. Among patients who responded, HRQOL was determined by Short Form 36 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Autoantibodies were measured and candidate genes (CaSR, AIRE, GATA3, and 22q11-deletion) were sequenced for classification of etiology. Results: We identified 522 patients (511 alive) and estimated overall prevalence at 102 per million divided among postsurgical HP (64 per million), nonsurgical HP (30 per million), and pseudo-HP (8 per million). Nonsurgical HP comprised autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (21%), autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (17%), DiGeorge/22q11 deletion syndrome (15%), idiopathic HP (44%), and others (4%). Among the 283 respondents (median age, 53 years [range, 9–89], 75% females), seven formerly classified as idiopathic were reclassified after genetic and immunological analyses, whereas 26 (37% of nonsurgical HP) remained idiopathic. Most were treated with vitamin D (94%) and calcium (70%), and 10 received PTH. HP patients scored significantly worse than the normative population on Short Form 36 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale; patients with postsurgical scored worse than those with nonsurgical HP and pseudo-HP, especially on physical health. Conclusions: We found higher prevalence of nonsurgical HP in Norway than reported elsewhere. Genetic testing and autoimmunity screening of idiopathic HP identified a specific cause in 21%. Further research is necessary to unravel the causes of idiopathic HP and to improve the reduced HRQOL reported by HP patients. PMID:27186861

  17. Action simulation in hallucination-prone adolescents

    Tarik eDahoun

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and empirical accounts suggest that impairments in self-other discrimination processes are likely to promote the expression of hallucinations. However, our understanding of such processes during adolescence is still at an early stage. The present study thus aims 1 to delineate the neural correlates sustaining mental simulation of actions involving self-performed actions (first-person perspective; 1PP and other-performed actions (third-person perspective; 3PP during adolescence 2 to identify atypical activation patterns during 1PP/3PP mental simulation of actions in hallucination-prone adolescents 3 to examine whether differential risk for schizophrenia (clinical vs genetic is also associated with differential impairments in the 1PP/3PP mental simulation of actions during adolescence. Twenty-two typically developing controls (Control group; 6 females, twelve hallucination-prone adolescents (AH group; 7 females and thirteen adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS group; 4 females were included in the study. During the fMRI task, subjects were presented with a cue (self-other priming cues indicating to perform the task using either a first person perspective (you-1PP or a third person perspective (friend-3PP and then they were asked to mentally simulate actions based on the type of cue. Our results indicated that atypical patterns of cerebral activation, particularly in the key areas of self-other distinction, were found in both groups at risk for auditory hallucinations (AH and 22q11.2DS. More precisely, adolescents in the AH and 22q11.2DS groups presented decreased activations in the parieto-occipital region BA19 during 3PP. This study characterizes the neural correlates of mental imagery for actions during adolescence, and suggests that a differential risk for hallucination-proneness (clinical vs. genetic is associated to similar patterns of atypical activations in key areas sustaining self-other discrimination

  18. Edit Distance with Block Deletions

    Dana Shapira; Storer, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Several variants of the edit distance problem with block deletions are considered. Polynomial time optimal algorithms are presented for the edit distance with block deletions allowing character insertions and character moves, but without block moves. We show that the edit distance with block moves and block deletions is NP-complete (Nondeterministic Polynomial time problems in which any given solution to such problem can be verified in polynomial time, and any NP problem can be converted into...

  19. Tetralogy of Fallot in monozygotic triplets

    Victorica, B.E.; Kumar, A.; Zori, R.T. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), like most other congenital heart defects, is considered to be of multifactorial inheritance. Occasional families with multiple affected members in one or more generations above been described. A stronger genetic influence in the causation of isolated TOF is also supported by recent demonstration of microdeletions in chromosome 22q11 region. Deletions in this region are also responsible for DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome as well as CHARGE association. We report a set of monozygotic triplets born to healthy parents at 35 weeks of gestation. There was no family history of congenital heart defects. All three had TOF with left aortic arch (documented by cardiac catheterization in 2 and echocardiography in all 3). The degree of right ventricular outflow obstruction varied from mild to complete atresia needing prostaglandin infusion and a subsequent Blalock-Taussig shunt in one. No features of DiGeorge syndrome or any other congenital defects were present. High resolution chromosome analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes of these infants revealed normal 46,XY male karyotype. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using probe D22S75, which maps to chromosome 22q11.2 did not detect any deletion. This pedigree suggests a de novo mutation causing TOF in all 3 monozygotic triplets. Although there is no deletion demonstrable in DiGeorge critical region, a smaller deletion or mutation in this region cannot be excluded.

  20. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of 19q12q13.1 deletions: a report of five patients.

    Chowdhury, Shimul; Bandholz, Anne M; Parkash, Sandhya; Dyack, Sarah; Rideout, Andrea L; Leppig, Kathleen A; Thiese, Heidi; Wheeler, Patricia G; Tsang, Marilyn; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Torchia, Beth S; Ellison, Jay W; Rosenfeld, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    A syndrome associated with 19q13.11 microdeletions has been proposed based on seven previous cases that displayed developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech disturbances, pre- and post-natal growth retardation, microcephaly, ectodermal dysplasia, and genital malformations in males. A 324-kb critical region was previously identified as the smallest region of overlap (SRO) for this syndrome. To further characterize this microdeletion syndrome, we present five patients with deletions within 19q12q13.12 identified using a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray. Patients 1 and 2 possess deletions overlapping the SRO, and Patients 3-5 have deletions proximal to the SRO. Patients 1 and 2 share significant phenotypic overlap with previously reported cases, providing further definition of the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome phenotype, including the first presentation of ectrodactyly in the syndrome. Patients 3-5, whose features include developmental delay, growth retardation, and feeding problems, support the presence of dosage-sensitive genes outside the SRO that may contribute to the abnormal phenotypes observed in this syndrome. Multiple genotype-phenotype correlations outside the SRO are explored, including further validation of the deletion of WTIP as a candidate for male hypospadias observed in this syndrome. We postulate that unique patient-specific deletions within 19q12q13.1 may explain the phenotypic variability observed in this emerging contiguous gene deletion syndrome. PMID:24243649

  1. A novel description of a syndrome consisting of 7q21.3 deletion including DYNC1I1 with preserved DLX5/6 without ectrodactyly: a case report

    Ramos-Zaldívar, Héctor M.; Martínez-Irías, Daniel G.; Espinoza-Moreno, Nelson A.; Napky-Rajo, José S.; Bueso-Aguilar, Tulio A.; Reyes-Perdomo, Karla G.; Montes-Gambarelli, Jimena A.; Euceda, Isis M.; Ponce-Barahona, Aldo F.; Gámez-Fernández, Carlos A.; Moncada-Arita, Wilberg A.; Palomo-Bermúdez, Victoria A.; Jiménez-Faraj, Julia E.; Hernández-Padilla, Amanda G.; Olivera, Denys A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chromosomal region 7q21.3 comprises approximately 5.2 mega base pairs that include genes DLX5/6, SHFM1, and DYNC1I1 associated with split hand/split foot malformation 1. So far, there are reports of eight families with deletion of DYNC1I1 and preserved DLX5/6 associated with ectrodactyly. From these families, only three patients did not present ectrodactyly and, unlike our patient, no other cases have been described as having craniofacial dysmorphology, mitral valve prolapse, kypho...

  2. A case of duplication of 13q32-->qter and deletion of 18p11.32-->pter with mild phenotype: Patau syndrome and duplications of 13q revisited.

    Helali, N; Iafolla, A K; Kahler, S G; Qumsiyeh, M B

    1996-01-01

    A mild clinical phenotype is described in a patient with duplication of 13q32-->qter and a small deletion of 18p11.32-->pter. The 8 year old white male presented with psychomotor retardation, tethered cord, soft, fleshy ears, and normal facial features except for thin lips. The karyotype was found to be 46, XY, der(18)t(13;18) (q32;p11.32) pat confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). A review of earlier studies showed that features of trisomy 13 are found in cases of duplicatio...

  3. Novel large-range mitochondrial DNA deletions and fatal multisystemic disorder with prominent hepatopathy

    Bianchi, Marzia; Rizza, Teresa; Verrigni, Daniela [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Martinelli, Diego [Division of Metabolism, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Tozzi, Giulia; Torraco, Alessandra; Piemonte, Fiorella [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Dionisi-Vici, Carlo [Division of Metabolism, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Nobili, Valerio [Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Francalanci, Paola; Boldrini, Renata; Callea, Francesco [Dept. Pathology, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Santorelli, Filippo Maria [UOC Neurogenetica e Malattie Neuromuscolari, Fondazione Stella Maris, Pisa (Italy); Bertini, Enrico [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); and others

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expanded array of mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pearson syndrome with prominent hepatopathy associated with single mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of deletions in fibroblasts and blood avoids muscle and liver biopsy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Look for mtDNA deletions before to study nuclear genes related to mtDNA depletion. -- Abstract: Hepatic involvement in mitochondrial cytopathies rarely manifests in adulthood, but is a common feature in children. Multiple OXPHOS enzyme defects in children with liver involvement are often associated with dramatically reduced amounts of mtDNA. We investigated two novel large scale deletions in two infants with a multisystem disorder and prominent hepatopathy. Amount of mtDNA deletions and protein content were measured in different post-mortem tissues. The highest levels of deleted mtDNA were in liver, kidney, pancreas of both patients. Moreover, mtDNA deletions were detected in cultured skin fibroblasts in both patients and in blood of one during life. Biochemical analysis showed impairment of mainly complex I enzyme activity. Patients manifesting multisystem disorders in childhood may harbour rare mtDNA deletions in multiple tissues. For these patients, less invasive blood specimens or cultured fibroblasts can be used for molecular diagnosis. Our data further expand the array of deletions in the mitochondrial genomes in association with liver failure. Thus analysis of mtDNA should be considered in the diagnosis of childhood-onset hepatopathies.

  4. Correlation between chromosome deletion and phenotypes in two cases of ring chromosome 6 syndrome%二例环6号染色体综合征病例染色体缺失片段及其与临床表型的关系

    付杰; 王松涛; 潘虹; 马京梅; 于丽; 杨慧霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the correlation between chromosome deletion and the phenotypes in cases of ring chromosome 6 syndrome.Methods Two cases of ring chromosome 6 syndrome persented to the Peking University First Hospital in 2013 were studied.Case 1 was a fetus diagnosed as having ring chromosome 6 with karyotype 46,XY,r (6) [14]/46,XY,r (6; 6) [1]/45,XY,-6[15] from a pregnant woman who received prenatal examination because of high risk found in serum screening for Down's syndrome at 21 +1 weeks of gestation.Case 2 was an eight-month-old female infant with growth retardation and congenital facial anomaly,whose karyotype was 46,XX,r (6) /47,XX,r (6) × 2/46,XX,r (6; 6) /45,XX,-6.Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization were used to detect the location of chromosome telomeric loss and its size,and the correlation between chromosome deletion and the phenotypes was analyzed by reviewing related literatures.Results Case 1 was confirmed to have short-arm terminal deletions on 6p25.3-25.2 (2.42 Mb) which mainly included DUSP22,IRF4,EXOC2,FOXC1,FOXF2 and FOXQ genes,and long-arm terminal deletions on 6q26-27 (7.84 Mb) mainly included PARK2,PACRG,LOC28596 and RPS6KA2 genes.Case 2 had short-arm terminal deletions on 6p25.3-25.1 (5.44 Mb) which included DUSP22,IRF4,EXOC2,FOXC1,FOXF2,FOXQ and SERPINB6 genes,and long-arm terminal deletions on 6q27 (0.16 Mb) which included PSMB1,TBP and PDCD2 genes.Except for the growth retardation,the common feature of "ring syndrome",in both cases,cerebellum hypoplasia was observed in case 1,and microcephaly and esotropia were observed in case 2.Conclusions The difference of phenotypes in patients with a ring chromosome 6 is closely associated with the location and size of the deletion in chromosome 6.%目的 探讨环6号染色体综合征病例染色体缺失片段和定位于其中的基因与临床表型的关系. 方法 2013年就诊于北京大学第一医院的2例环6号染色

  5. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    Vega, H; Trainer, A H; Gordillo, M;

    2010-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be truncating mu...

  6. ATLAS DQ2 DELETION SERVICE

    Oleynik, D; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V; Campana, S

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS DQ2 Deletion service is a sub system of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management (DDM) project DQ2. DDM DQ2 responsible for the replication, access and bookkeeping of ATLAS data across more than 130 distributed grid sites. It also enforces data management policies decided on by the collaboration and defined in the ATLAS computing model. Responsibility of ATLAS DQ2 Deletion service is serving deletion requests on the grid by interacting with grid middleware and the DQ2 catalogues. Furthermore, it also takes care of retry strategies, check-pointing transactions, load management and fault tolerance. In this talk special attention is paid to the technical details, which are used to achieve the high performance of service, accomplished without overloading either site storage, catalogues or other DQ2 components. Also specialty of database backend implementation will be described. Special section will be devote to the deletion monitoring service that allows operators a detailed view of the working system.

  7. ATLAS DQ2 Deletion Service

    OLEYNIK, D; The ATLAS collaboration; GARONNE, V; CAMPANA, S

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management project DQ2 is responsible for the replication, access and bookkeeping of ATLAS data across more than 100 distributed grid sites. It also enforces data management policies decided on by the collaboration and defined in the ATLAS computing model. The DQ2 deletion service is one of the most important DDM services. This distributed service interacts with 3rd party grid middleware and the DQ2 catalogs to serve data deletion requests on the grid. Furthermore, it also takes care of retry strategies, check-pointing transactions, load management and fault tolerance. In this paper special attention is paid to the technical details which are used to achieve the high performance of service (peaking at more than 4 millions files deleted per day), accomplished without overloading either site storage, catalogs or other DQ2 components. Special attention is also paid to the deletion monitoring service that allows operators a detailed view of the working system.

  8. Evidence for a distinct region causing a cat-like cry in patients with 5p deletions

    Gersh, M.; Goodart, S.A.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth, which is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on four families in which patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry, with normal to mildly delayed development. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by FISH using lambda phage and cosmic clones. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to a chromosomal region that is implicated with the facial features and severe mental and developmental delay in the cri-du-chat syndrome. DNA clones mapping in the chromosomal region associated with the cat-like cry feature will be useful diagnostic tools. They will allow for the distinction between 5p deletions that will result in the severe delay observed in most cri-du-chat syndrome patients and those deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature, which is associated with a better prognosis. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. What binds biosociality? The collective effervescence of the parent-led conference.

    Dimond, Rebecca; Bartlett, Andrew; Lewis, Jamie

    2015-02-01

    Questions of community are central to many research settings in the social sciences. Rabinow argued that, in the wake of the Human Genome Project, an increasingly important form of collectivity would be biosociality. Biosociality recognises a central role for biomedical knowledge in constructing genetic identities and producing and reproducing social relationships. Accordingly, it is often imagined as a new form of social solidarity. We draw on observations of parent-led conferences to explore the way in which biosociality is expressed at events organised around a particular genetic syndrome - 22q11 deletion syndrome. The parent-led conferences took place within the United Kingdom between 2007 and 2010 and were observed as part of a multi-sited ethnographic study. By bringing together a geographically dispersed group of people together within the same physical location, conferences offer an ideal platform to empirically examine sociality. Durkheim used the term collective effervescence to describe the collective expression of heightened emotion. We suggest that in the case of the 22q11 deletion syndrome activities discussed in this paper, collective effervescence is a mechanism through which individuals become a collective. We argue that parent-led conferences gather individuals in one location on the basis of common biological factors, but it is the shared emotional experience of being together that consolidates and renews the connection between members. PMID:25497725

  10. A novel mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome: a late-onset of the fatal cardiac conduction deficit and cardiomyopathy accompanying long-term rGH treatment

    Obara-Moszynska, Monika; Maceluch, Jaroslaw; Bobkowski, Waldemar; Baszko, Artur; Jaremba, Oskar; Krawczynski, Maciej R; Niedziela, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Background Kearns-Sayre Syndrome (KSS) is a multisystem disorder caused by a dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system within mitochondria. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements are a key molecular feature of this disease, which manifest a broad phenotypic spectrum. Case presentation Here, we present a boy with KSS whose symptoms included cardiac conduction deficit, cardiomyopathy and growth hormone (GH) deficiency. The patient showed typical symptoms for KSS from early childhood...

  11. Clinical applications of schizophrenia genetics: genetic diagnosis, risk, and counseling in the molecular era

    Costain G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Costain1,2, Anne S Bassett1–41Clinical Genetics Research Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 2Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disease with documented clinical and genetic heterogeneity, and evidence for neurodevelopmental origins. Driven by new genetic technologies and advances in molecular medicine, there has recently been concrete progress in understanding some of the specific genetic causes of this serious psychiatric illness. In particular, several large rare structural variants have been convincingly associated with schizophrenia, in targeted studies over two decades with respect to 22q11.2 microdeletions, and more recently in large-scale, genome-wide case-control studies. These advances promise to help many families afflicted with this disease. In this review, we critically appraise recent developments in the field of schizophrenia genetics through the lens of immediate clinical applicability. Much work remains in translating the recent surge of genetic research discoveries into the clinic. The epidemiology and basic genetic parameters (such as penetrance and expression of most genomic disorders associated with schizophrenia are not yet well characterized. To date, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is the only established genetic subtype of schizophrenia of proven clinical relevance. We use this well-established association as a model to chart the pathway for translating emerging genetic discoveries into clinical practice. We also propose new directions for research involving general genetic risk prediction and counseling in schizophrenia.Keywords: schizophrenia, genetics, 22q11 deletion syndrome, copy number variation, genetic counseling, genetic predisposition to disease

  12. Redefined genomic architecture in 15q24 directed by patient deletion/duplication breakpoint mapping

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Smolarek, Teresa A.; Walker, Martha E.; Schorry, Elizabeth K.; Immken, LaDonna L.; Patel, Gayle; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Lanpher, Brendan C; Ou, Zhishuo; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Scaglia, Fernando; Lupski, James R; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2009-01-01

    We report four new patients with a submicroscopic deletion in 15q24 manifesting developmental delay, short stature, hypotonia, digital abnormalities, joint laxity, genital abnormalities, and characteristic facial features. These clinical features are shared with six recently reported patients with a 15q24 microdeletion, supporting the notion that this is a recognizable syndrome. We describe a case of an ~2.6 Mb microduplication involving a portion of the minimal deletion critical region in a ...

  13. Amniotic Band Syndrome

    Shetty, Prathvi; Menezes, Leo Theobald; Tauro, Leo Francis; Diddigi, Kumar Arun

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome is an uncommon congenital disorder without any genetic or hereditary disposition. It involves fetal entrapment in strands of amniotic tissue and causes an array of deletions and deformations. Primary treatment is plastic and reconstructive surgery after birth with in utero fetal surgery also coming in vogue.

  14. Deletion of chromosome 21 in a girl with congenital hypothyroidism and mild mental retardation

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Anneren, G. [Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Sidenvall, R. [Central Hospital of Hudiksvall (Sweden)

    1996-08-23

    We report on a girl with a large interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 21 and with mild mental retardation, congenital hypothyroidism, and hyperopia. The deletion [del(21)(q11.1-q22.1)] extends molecularly from marker D21S215 to D21S213. The distal breakpoint is not clearly defined but is situated between markers D21S213 and IFNAR. This patient has the largest deletion of chromosome 21 known without having severe mental retardation or malformations. The deletion does not involve the {open_quotes}Down syndrome chromosome{close_quotes} region, the region of chromosome 21 which in trisomy causes most of the manifestations of Down syndrome. Apparently, the proximal part of the long arm of chromosome 21 does not include genes that are responsible for severe clinical effects in the event of either deletion or duplication, since several reported patients with either trisomy or deletion of this region have mild phenotypic abnormalities. Congenital hypothyroidism is much more common in Down syndrome than in the average population. Thus, the congenital hypothyroidism of the present patient might indicate that there is one or several genes on the proximal part of chromosome 21, which might be of importance for the thyroid function. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Integration-free T cell-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS) carrying an insertion-deletion complex mutation in the FOXC2 gene.

    Itoh, Munenari; Kawagoe, Shiho; Okano, Hirotaka James; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-05-01

    Expanded human T cells from a Japanese male with lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS) were used to generate integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by exogenous expression of four reprogramming factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, cMYC, KLF4, using Sendai virus vector (SeVdp). The authenticity of established iPSC line, LDS-iPSC8, was confirmed by the expression of stem cell markers and the differentiation capability into three germ layers. LDS-iPSC8 may be a useful cell resource for the establishment of in vitro LDS modeling and the study for vascular and lymph vessel development. PMID:27346194

  16. Williams-Beuren Syndrome with Brain Dysplasia

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators from Jichi and Yokohama City Universities, Japan, report a patient with the common Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) deletion in 7q11.23 who presented with severe cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  17. ATLAS DQ2 Deletion Service

    OLEYNIK, D; The ATLAS collaboration; GARONNE, V; CAMPANA, S

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management project DQ2 is responsible for the replication, access and bookkeeping of ATLAS data across more than 100 distributed grid sites. It also enforces data management policies decided on by the collaboration and defined in the ATLAS computing model. The DQ2 Deletion Service is one of the most important DDM services. This distributed service interacts with 3rd party grid middleware and the DQ2 catalogues to serve data deletion requests on the grid. Furthermore, it also takes care of retry strategies, check-pointing transactions, load management and fault tolerance. In this paper special attention is paid to the technical details which are used to achieve the high performance of service, accomplished without overloading either site storage, catalogues or other DQ2 components. Special attention is also paid to the deletion monitoring service that allows operators a detailed view of the working system.

  18. Rebalancing gene haploinsufficiency in vivo by targeting chromatin.

    Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Franzese, Monica; Liu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Zhen; Angelini, Claudia; Baldini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects eight out of 1,000 live births and is a major social and health-care burden. A common genetic cause of CHD is the 22q11.2 deletion, which is the basis of the homonymous deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), also known as DiGeorge syndrome. Most of its clinical spectrum is caused by haploinsufficiency of Tbx1, a gene encoding a T-box transcription factor. Here we show that Tbx1 positively regulates monomethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) through interaction with and recruitment of histone methyltransferases. Treatment of cells with tranylcypromine (TCP), an inhibitor of histone demethylases, rebalances the loss of H3K4me1 and rescues the expression of approximately one-third of the genes dysregulated by Tbx1 suppression. In Tbx1 mouse mutants, TCP treatment ameliorates substantially the cardiovascular phenotype. These data suggest that epigenetic drugs may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for rescue of gene haploinsufficiency phenotypes, including structural defects. PMID:27256596

  19. TUPLE1 gene deletions role in the pathogenesis of congenital heart disease%TUPLE1基因缺失在先天性心脏病发病机制中作用的研究

    孙晓燕; 王云英; 瓮占平; 吕慧玲; 吴晓峰; 纪向虹

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨TUPLE1基因缺失在先天性心脏病发病机制中的作用.方法 应用荧光原位杂交(FISH)技术,对36例经产前超声诊断为先天性心脏畸形胎儿的脐带血进行22q11微缺失的检测,同时对20例正常新生儿脐带血进行22q11微缺失的检测.结果 36例先天性心脏畸形脐血标本诊断为22q11微缺失的有17例,其中法洛氏四联症3例,其他14例,合并胎儿躯体变形及胎儿生长受限的14例,颈项半透明厚度增加3例;20例正常新生儿脐血标本未检测到22q11微缺失.综合型先天性心脏病16例,单一型先天性心脏病1例.男性胎儿9例,女性胎儿8例.结论 TUPLE1位点缺失是导致先天性心脏畸形的重要病因;22q11微缺失患者中的心血管畸形类型多样.%Objective: Discusses the TUPLE1 gene flaw in the congenital heart disease pathogenesis function. Methods; Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques on 36 cases of prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of congenital cardiac malformations in fetal umbilical cord blood for 22q11 micro - missing detection, while on 20 healthy neonate umbilical cord blood for 22q11 micro - missing detection. Results; 36 cases with congenital heart abnormalities diagnosis of 22q11 micro - cord blood specimens missing of 17 cases, 3 cases of tetralogy of fallot and 14 other cases, merging of fetal body deformation and 14 cases of fetal growth restriction , increase in neck translucent thickness 3 cases; 20 patients with 22q11 normal umbilical cord blood sample not detected micro - missing. Integrated type of congenital heart disease in 16 cases, a single type of congenital heart disease in 1 cases. Male fetuses in 9 cases, 8 cases of female fetuses. Conclusion; TUPLE1 point loss is the cause is important cause of congenital heart malformations; micro - missing in patients with 22q11 diverse types of cardiovascular malformations.

  20. PAX3 gene deletion detected by microarray analysis in a girl with hearing loss.

    Drozniewska, Malgorzata; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Deletions of the PAX3 gene have been rarely reported in the literature. Mutations of this gene are a common cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and 3. We report a 16 year old female presenting hearing loss and normal intellectual development, without major features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1, and without family history of the syndrome. Her phenotype, however, overlaps with features of craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome. Microarray analysis showed ~862 kb de novo deletion at 2q36.1 including PAX3. The above findings suggest that the rearrangement found in our patient appeared de novo and with high probability is a cause of her phenotype. PMID:24839464

  1. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    Al Mutair, Angham N; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam; Hussain, Khalid; Felimban, Naila; Al Shaikh, Adnan; Christesen, Henrik T

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Ampl.......CONCLUSIONSThe phenotype of homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence....

  2. SNPs and real-time quantitative PCR method for constitutional allelic copy number determination, the VPREB1 marker case

    Costa Elena; Donnangelo Anita; Carminati Mario; Valaperta Rea; Rusconi Daniela; de Filippis Tiziana; Passeri Elena; Frigerio Marcello; Persani Luca; Finelli Palma; Corbetta Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background 22q11.2 microdeletion is responsible for the DiGeorge Syndrome, characterized by heart defects, psychiatric disorders, endocrine and immune alterations and a 1 in 4000 live birth prevalence. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) approaches for allelic copy number determination have recently been investigated in 22q11.2 microdeletions detection. The qPCR method was performed for 22q11.2 microdeletions detection as a first-level screening approach in a genetically unknown series...

  3. Molecular and clinical characterization of patients with overlapping 10p deletions.

    Lindstrand, Anna; Malmgren, Helena; Verri, Annapia; Benetti, Elisa; Eriksson, Maud; Nordgren, Ann; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Golovleva, Irina; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Blennow, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Chromosome 10p terminal deletions have been associated with DiGeorge phenotype, and within the same genomic region haploinsufficiency of GATA3 causes the HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia). We have performed detailed molecular analysis of four patients with partial overlapping 10p deletions by using FISH-mapping, array-CGH, and custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array. All four patients had mental retardation and speech impairment and three of them showed variable signs of HDR syndrome. In addition, two patients had autistic behaviors and had similar dysmorphic features giving them a striking physical resemblance. A review of the literature identified 10 previously published cases with similar 10p deletions and reliable molecular or molecular cytogenetic mapping data. The combined information of present and previous cases suggests that partial deletions of 10p14-p15 represent a syndrome with a distinct and more severe phenotype than previously assumed. The main characteristics include severe mental retardation, language impairment, autistic behavior, and characteristic clinical features. A critical region involved in mental retardation and speech impairment is defined within 1.6 Mb in 10p15.3. In addition, deletion of 4.3 Mb within 10p14 is associated with autism and characteristic clinical findings. PMID:20425828

  4. 14q12 Microdeletion syndrome and congenital variant of Rett syndrome.

    Mencarelli, M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Katzaki, E.; Papa, F.T.; Cohen, M.; Pfundt, R.P.; Ariani, F.; Meloni, I.; Mari, F.; Renieri, A.

    2009-01-01

    Only two patients with 14q12 deletion have been reported to date. Here, we describe an additional patient with a similar deletion in order to improve the clinical delineation of this new microdeletion syndrome. The emerging phenotype is characterized by a Rett-like clinical course with an almost nor

  5. Seven gene deletions in seven days

    Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Lennen, Rebecca; Herrgard, Markus;

    2015-01-01

    enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains in...... deletion of multiple genes in several E. coli variants. The method enables deletion of up to seven genes in as little as seven days....

  6. 76 FR 22680 - Procurement List; Deletions

    2011-04-22

    ... INFORMATION: Deletions On 2/25/2011 (76 FR 10571), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  7. Breakpoint characterization of large deletions in EXT1 or EXT2 in 10 Multiple Osteochondromas families

    Szuhai Karoly

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteochondromas (cartilage-capped bone tumors are by far the most commonly treated of all primary benign bone tumors (50%. In 15% of cases, these tumors occur in the context of a hereditary syndrome called multiple osteochondromas (MO, an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder characterized by the formation of multiple cartilage-capped bone tumors at children's metaphyses. MO is caused by various mutations in EXT1 or EXT2, whereby large genomic deletions (single-or multi-exonic are responsible for up to 8% of MO-cases. Methods Here we report on the first molecular characterization of ten large EXT1- and EXT2-deletions in MO-patients. Deletions were initially indentified using MLPA or FISH analysis and were subsequently characterized using an MO-specific tiling path array, allele-specific PCR-amplification and sequencing analysis. Results Within the set of ten large deletions, the deleted regions ranged from 2.7 to 260 kb. One EXT2 exon 8 deletion was found to be recurrent. All breakpoints were located outside the coding exons of EXT1 and EXT2. Non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR mediated by Alu-sequences, microhomology mediated replication dependent recombination (MMRDR and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ were hypothesized as the causal mechanisms in different deletions. Conclusions Molecular characterization of EXT1- and EXT2-deletion breakpoints in MO-patients indicates that NAHR between Alu-sequences as well as NHEJ are causal and that the majority of these deletions are nonrecurring. These observations emphasize once more the huge genetic variability which is characteristic for MO. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing large genomic deletions in EXT1 and EXT2.

  8. Unbalanced three-way chromosomal translocation leading to deletion 18q and duplication 20p.

    Oegema, Renske; van Zutven, Laura J C M; van Hassel, Daniella A C M; Huijbregts, Guido C M; Hoogeboom, A Jeannette M

    2012-04-01

    In 1980, a case report on a boy with cleft palate, club feet, dysmorphic features, and developmental delay was published by Bijlsma as a possible distinct syndrome. This case is listed in the London Medical Databases version 1.0. We have reevaluated this patient at adult age. Using high resolution karyotyping and Affymetrix 250k SNP array analysis we identified an unbalanced three-way translocation with breakpoints at 17q22, 18q22.1, and 20p12.2 leading to deletion 18q and duplication 20p. Also, a 715 kb duplication in 1p34.2 and a 245 kb deletion at 1p21.1 were found. Mental retardation, cleft palate, and club feet have repeatedly been reported in deletion 18q patients and therefore we conclude that most of the patient's features can be explained by an 18q deletion. PMID:22406089

  9. Williams Syndrome with a “Twist”

    George Vartzelis; Lydia Kossiva; Despoina Maritsi

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition with multisystemic involvement, caused by a microscopic deletion in the chromosome band 7q11.23. We describe the first case of a toddler with Williams syndrome who developed Benign Paroxysmal Torticollis (BPT), a benign dystonic disorder of unknown aetiology.

  10. A novel 3q29 deletion associated with autism, intellectual disability, psychiatric disorders, and obesity.

    Biamino, Elisa; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Belligni, Elga Fabia; Keller, Roberto; Riberi, Evelise; Gandione, Marina; Calcia, Alessandro; Mancini, Cecilia; Giorgio, Elisa; Cavalieri, Simona; Pappi, Patrizia; Talarico, Flavia; Fea, Antonio M; De Rubeis, Silvia; Cirillo Silengo, Margherita; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Brusco, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). Often, individuals carrying the same pathogenic CNV display high clinical variability. By array-CGH analysis, we identified a novel familial 3q29 deletion (1.36 Mb), centromeric to the 3q29 deletion region, which manifests with variable expressivity. The deletion was identified in a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with ID/DD and autism and segregated in six family members, all affected by severe psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, major depression, anxiety disorder, and personality disorder. All individuals carrying the deletion were overweight or obese, and anomalies compatible with optic atrophy were observed in three out of four cases examined. Amongst the 10 genes encompassed by the deletion, the haploinsufficiency of Optic Atrophy 1 (OPA1), associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy, is likely responsible for the ophthalmological anomalies. We hypothesize that the haploinsufficiency of ATPase type 13A4 (ATP13A4) and/or Hairy/Enhancer of Split Drosophila homolog 1 (HES1) contribute to the neuropsychiatric phenotype, while HES1 deletion might underlie the overweight/obesity. In conclusion, we propose a novel contiguous gene syndrome due to a proximal 3q29 deletion variably associated with autism, ID/DD, psychiatric traits and overweight/obesity. PMID:26620927

  11. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…

  12. Deletion analysis of two tandemly arranged virulence genes in myxoma virus, M11L and myxoma growth factor.

    Opgenorth, A; Graham, K.; N. Nation; Strayer, D; McFadden, G

    1992-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYX) is a leporipoxvirus of rabbits that induces a lethal syndrome characterized by disseminated tumorlike lesions, generalized immunosuppression, and secondary gram-negative bacterial infection. A MYX deletion mutant (vMYX-GF- delta M11L) was constructed to remove the entire myxoma growth factor (MGF) coding sequence and that for the C-terminal five amino acids of the partially overlapping upstream gene, M11L. Unexpectedly, this deletion completely abrogates the capacity of MYX...

  13. Behavioral Profiles in Phelan-McDermid Syndrome: Focus on Mental Health

    Shaw, Steven R.; Rahman, Amira; Sharma, Akanksha

    2011-01-01

    Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disabilities syndrome associated with a deletion of chromosome 22 terminal band 13.3. The deletion is associated with severe intellectual disabilities, absent or delayed speech, behavior problems, and autism. The objective of this study was to provide a detailed…

  14. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome)

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 6 Final Diagnosis: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Congenital defects Background: Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or...

  15. Tbx1 regulates brain vascularization.

    Cioffi, Sara; Martucciello, Stefania; Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Bilio, Marchesa; Ferrentino, Rosa; Nusco, Edoardo; Illingworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX1 is the major gene involved in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Using mouse models of these diseases, we have previously shown that TBX1 activates VEGFR3 in endothelial cells (EC), and that this interaction is critical for the development of the lymphatic vasculature. In this study, we show that TBX1 regulates brain angiogenesis. Using loss-of-function genetics and molecular approaches, we show that TBX1 regulates the VEGFR3 and DLL4 genes in brain ECs. In mice, loss of TBX1 causes global brain vascular defects, comprising brain vessel hyperplasia, enhanced angiogenic sprouting and vessel network disorganization. This phenotype is recapitulated in EC-specific Tbx1 conditional mutants and in an EC-only 3-dimensional cell culture system (matrigel), indicating that the brain vascular phenotype is cell autonomous. Furthermore, EC-specific conditional Tbx1 mutants have poorly perfused brain vessels and brain hypoxia, indicating that the expanded vascular network is functionally impaired. In EC-matrigel cultures, a Notch1 agonist is able to partially rescue microtubule hyperbranching induced by TBX1 knockdown. Thus, we have identified a novel transcriptional regulator of angiogenesis that exerts its effect in brain by negatively regulating angiogenesis through the DLL4/Notch1-VEGFR3 regulatory axis. Given the similarity of the phenotypic consequences of TBX1 mutation in humans and mice, this unexpected role of TBX1 in murine brain vascularization should stimulate clinicians to search for brain microvascular anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients and to evaluate whether some of the anatomical and functional brain anomalies in patients may have a microvascular origin. PMID:23945394

  16. Association of copy number polymorphisms at the promoter and translated region of COMT with Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

    Higashiyama, Ryoko; Ohnuma, Tohru; Takebayashi, Yuto; Hanzawa, Ryo; Shibata, Nobuto; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Kushima, Itaru; Aleksic, Branko; Kondo, Kenji; Ikeda, Masashi; Hashimoto, Ryota; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Arai, Heii

    2016-04-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and genetic variations including single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) situated at 22q11.2 remains controversial. Here, the genetic relationship between COMT and Japanese patients with schizophrenia was investigated by examining whether the SNPs correlated with schizophrenia based on a common disease-common variant hypothesis. Additionally, 22q11.2DS were screened based on a common disease-rare variant hypothesis; low-frequency CNVs situated at two COMT promoters and exons were investigated based on the low-frequency variants with an intermediate effect; and positive findings from the first stage were reconfirmed using a second-stage replication study including a larger sample size. Eight SNPs and 10 CNVs were investigated using Taqman SNP and CNV quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method. For the first-stage analysis, 513 unrelated Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 705 healthy controls were examined. For the second-stage replication study, positive findings from the first stage were further investigated using a larger sample size, namely 1,854 patients with schizophrenia and 2,137 controls. The first-stage analysis showed significant associations among schizophrenia, intronic SNP rs165774, CNV6 situated at promoter 1, CNV8 at exon 6, and CNV9 at exon 7. The second-stage study showed that intronic SNP rs165774 (χ(2)  = 8.327, P = 0.0039), CNV6 (χ(2)  = 19.66, P = 0.00005), and CNV8 (χ(2)  = 16.57, P = 0.00025) were significantly associated with schizophrenia. Large and rare CNVs as well as low-frequency CNVs and relatively small CNVs, namely COMT, may be genetic risk factors for schizophrenia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26852906

  17. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 4p associated with mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria of the left temporal lobe

    Møller, R S; Hansen, C P; Jackson, G D;

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present a 38-year-old woman with an interstitial deletion of 4p15.1-15.3, mild mental retardation, epilepsy and polymicrogyria adjacent to an arachnoid cyst of the left temporal lobe. The deletion was ascertained through array-comparative genome hybridization screening of patients...... with epilepsy and brain malformations. To date, about 35 patients with cytogenetically visible deletions involving 4p15 and without Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome have been described, but the extent of the deletions has not been determined in the majority of these cases. The clinical manifestations of the...... patient described in this study were similar but not identical to the previously reported cases with 4p15 interstitial deletions. This finding indicates the presence of one or more genes involved in brain development and epilepsy in this chromosome region....

  18. Prenatal Diagnosis of WAGR Syndrome

    Berrin Tezcan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilm’s tumour, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 500,000 to 1 million. It is a contiguous gene syndrome due to deletion at chromosome 11p13 in a region containing WT1 and PAX6 genes. Children with WAGR syndrome mostly present in the newborn/infancy period with sporadic aniridia. The genotypic defects in WAGR syndrome have been well established. However, antenatal ultrasonographic presentation of this syndrome has never been reported. Prenatal diagnosis of this condition is possible in some cases with careful ultrasound examination of classical and nonclassical manifestations of this syndrome. The key point for this rare diagnosis was the decision to perform chromosomal microarray analysis after antenatal diagnosis of absent corpus callosum and absent cavum septum pellucidum, as this finding mandates search for potentially associated genetic disorders. We report a case of WAGR syndrome diagnosed prenatally at 29-week gestation. The diagnosis of the anomaly was based on two- and three-dimensional ultrasound as well as fetal MRI scan and microarray analysis. The ultrasonographic findings included borderline ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, and absent cavum septum pellucidum. Cytogenetic results from the amniotic fluid confirmed WAGR syndrome. Parental karyotype was normal, with no evidence of copy number change, deletion, or rearrangement of this region of chromosome 11.

  19. An unbalanced 5;22 translocation in a patient with features of VCFS: Confirmation by FISH of loss of the DGS/VCFS critical region

    Smith, J.J.; McGlothlin, J.C. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Lindsay, E.A. [Georgia Neurological Institute, Savannah, GA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A 14-month-old male with a history of ventricular septal defect (VSD) and cleft lip and palate (CL/P) was referred for evaluation because of growth retardation, developmental delay and hypotonia. The initial cytogenetic analysis was 45,XY,-5,-22,+der(5)t(5q:22q). Determination of breakpoints 5q35.3 and 22q11.2 were made on G-banded chromosomes with band lengths of over 550. However, with both regions being light G bands, it was difficult to tell if the break in 22 was proximal to or distal to the DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS) critical region. Since the patient had a VSD and CL/P, velocardiofacial syndrome and a deletion of the DGS/VCFS critical region was suspected. FISH analysis of the derivative chromosome was performed with a cocktail containing two probes (ONCOR), D22S75, which maps to the DGS/VCFS region in 22q11.2 and D22S39, which maps to 22q13.3 and is used as a control for the presence of chromosome 22. Three fluorescent signals were observed, two on the normal 22 and the third on the terminal end of the derivative 5 chromosome verifying the translocation of 22q to 5q. No signal was observed for D22S75 on the proximal part of the translocated segment, verifying a deletion of the DGS/VCFS region in a patient whose clinical evaluation is consistent with velocardiofacial syndrome. Experiments with additional probes are underway to determine the deletion boundaries.

  20. Clinical comparison of 10q26 overlapping deletions: delineating the critical region for urogenital anomalies.

    Vera-Carbonell, Ascensión; López-González, Vanesa; Bafalliu, Juan Antonio; Ballesta-Martínez, María J; Fernández, Asunción; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; López-Expósito, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    The 10q26 deletion syndrome is a clinically heterogeneous disorder. The most common phenotypic characteristics include pre- and/or postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, developmental delay/intellectual disability and a facial appearance consisting of a broad nasal bridge with a prominent nose, low-set malformed ears, strabismus, and a thin vermilion of the upper lip. In addition, limb and cardiac anomalies as well as urogenital anomalies are occasionally observed. In this report, we describe three unrelated females with 10q26 terminal deletions who shared clinical features of the syndrome, including urogenital defects. Cytogenetic studies showed an apparently de novo isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10, with breakpoints in 10q26.1, and subsequent oligo array-CGH analysis confirmed the terminal location and defined the size of the overlapping deletions as ∼ 13.46, ∼ 9.31 and ∼ 9.17 Mb. We compared the phenotypic characteristics of the present patients with others reported to have isolated deletions and we suggest that small 10q26.2 terminal deletions may be associated with growth retardation, developmental delay/intellectual disability, craniofacial features and external genital anomalies whereas longer terminal deletions affecting the 10q26.12 and/or 10q26.13 regions may be responsible for renal/urinary tract anomalies. We propose that the haploinsufficiency of one or several genes located in the 10q26.12-q26.13 region may contribute to the renal or urinary tract pathogenesis and we highlight the importance of FGFR2 and probably of CTBP2 as candidate genes. PMID:25655674

  1. Whole Xp Deletion in a Girl with Mental Retardation, Epilepsy, and Biochemical Features of OTC Deficiency

    Joost, K.; Tammur, P.; Teek, R.; Žilina, O.; Peters, M; Kreile, M.; Lace, B.; Žordania, R.; Talvik, I.; Õunap, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Females with a total or partial deletion of the short arm of the X chromosome have variable features of Turner syndrome, but mental retardation (MR) rarely occurs. The haploinsufficiency of deleted genes that escape X-inactivation may explain the occurrence of MR and autism. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle disorder and is inherited in an X-linked semi-dominant trait, and the OTC gene maps to Xp21. Methods: We report on a girl with MR, epil...

  2. Beals Syndrome

    ... Boards & Staff Annual Report & Financials Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of ...

  3. Familial deletion of 18p associated with Turner like clinical features

    Say, B.; Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Harris, S. [H.A. Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The authors report the first occurrence to our knowledge of a familial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 in a mother and daughter. The proband is an 18-year-old female referred for chromosomal analysis because of mental retardation and short stature. She is the only offspring. Her birth weight was 3 pounds 10 ounces (below 5th percentile). As a child, she had delayed milestones. Her IQ is 69 and she is in classes for the educable mentally handicapped. Her height is 145.6 cm and weight 38.7 kg (both below 5th percentile). Physical examination revealed a low nuchal hairline. She has myopia. Chromosome analysis from peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a 46,XX,del(18)(p11.21) karyotype. Since some of the same clinical features are also seen in the mother including short stature (157 cm), mental retardation, ocular problems like cataracts, exotropia and refractive error, chromosome analysis was performed which showed the same 46,XX,del(18)(p11.21) karyotype. A familial case like this has great implications in genetic counseling. Since the syndrome is not associated with sterility, the recurrence risk for the offspring is 50%. Patients with deletion (18p) syndrome are reported to have findings suggestive of Turner syndrome with varying degrees of mental retardation. We recommend that in patients with such clinical features associated with mental retardation, normal menstrual history and/or fertility, the possibility of deletion (18p) syndrome be considered.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: 16p11.2 deletion syndrome

    ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Autism Spectrum Disorder Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Speech and Communication Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    ... National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: Autism and Communication National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: Speech and Language Developmental Milestones Educational Resources (9 links) ...

  6. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic (FISH) diagnosis of Williams syndrome.

    Brewer, C. M.; Morrison, N; Tolmie, J L

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen children and adolescents with a firm clinical diagnosis of Williams syndrome were investigated with the chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique employing the elastin gene probe. In each case there was a fluorescent signal on one chromosome 7 homologue only, indicating elastin gene deletion. No deletion was demonstrated in another child in whom an earlier diagnosis of Williams syndrome was judged doubtful at review. Firm clinical diagnosis correlates with elastin...

  7. Williams-Beuren syndrome: Usual face, unusual heart

    Pablo Lapunzina; Natalia Marin Huarte; Luis García-Guereta

    2013-01-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WB-S) occurs in approximately 1/7500 live births. It is characterized by typical facial features, congenital heart defects and mild mental retardation. Around 75% - 80% of all patients have some kind of cardiovascular disorder being supravalvular aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis the most frequent. This syndrome is due to a contiguous gene deletion (1- to 2-megabase deletion on the long arm of chromosome 7), including the entire elastin gene and 20 additi...

  8. A novel Xq22.1 deletion in a male with multiple congenital abnormalities and respiratory failure.

    Cao, Yang; Aypar, Umut

    2016-05-01

    Here we report the first male case of a novel Xq22.1 deletion. An 8-week-old boy with multiple congenital abnormalities and respiratory failure was referred to the Mayo Clinic Cytogenetics laboratory for testing. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified a novel 1.1 Mb deletion at Xq22.1. A similar deletion has only been described once in the literature in a female patient and her mother; both have intellectual disability and dysmorphic facial features. In addition, the mother had a son who died at 15 days due to breathing failure. Recently, a mouse model revealed that a 0.35 Mb sub-region, containing 4 genes, is sufficient to cause majority of the Xq22.1 deletion phenotypes. The deleted intervals in our male patient and the female patients contain 15 common genes, including the four described in the 0.35 Mb sub-region. Male mice with deletion of the 0.35 Mb sub-region died perinatally from respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia, consistent with the breathing problem and potential neonatal fatality in male patients. The phenotypes of the mouse models and the patients are strikingly similar; therefore, the deletion of these five genes (ARMCX5, ARMCX5-GPRASP2, GPRASP1, GPRASP2, and BHLHB9) is likely responsible for the novel Xq22.1 deletion syndrome. PMID:26995686

  9. 78 FR 56679 - Procurement List; Deletions

    2013-09-13

    ... 8/2/2013 (78 FR 46927-46928), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  10. 13Q DELETIONS IN LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    HERMANSON, M; GRANDER, D; MERUP, M; WU, XS; HEYMAN, M; RASOOL, O; JULIUSSON, G; GAHRTON, G; DETLOFSSON, R; NIKIFOROVA, N; BUYS, C; SODERHALL, S; YANKOVSKY, N; ZABAROVSKY, E; EINHORN, S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that a candidate tumor suppressor gene resides telomeric of the RB1 gene at 13q14, a region that is commonly deleted in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). In this study, we have evaluated the frequency and minimal region of overlap for 13q deletions in malig

  11. Age-and gender-dependent obesity in individuals with 16p11.2 deletion

    Yongguo Yu; Haitao Zhu; David T. Miller; James F. Gusella; Orah S. Platt; Bai-Lin Wu; Yiping Shen

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent genomic imbalances at 16p11.2 are genetic risk factors of variable penetrance for developmental delay and autism.Recently,16p11.2 (chr16:29.5 Mb-30.1 Mb) deletion has also been detected in individuals with early-onset severe obesity.The penetrance of 16p11.2deletion as a genetic risk factor for obesity is unknown.We evaluated the growth and body mass characteristics of 28 individuals with 16p11.2(chr16:29.5 Mb-30.1 Mb) deletion originally ascertained for their developmental disorders by reviewing their medical records.We found that nine individuals could be classilied as obese and six as overweight.These individuals generally had early feeding and growth difficulties,and started to gain excessive weight around 5-6 years of age.Thirteen out of the 18 deletion carriers aged 5 years and older (72%) were overweight or obese,whereas only two of 10 deletion carriers (20%) younger than five were overweight or obese.Males exhibited more severe obesity than females.Thus,the obesity phenotype of 16p11.2 deletion carriers is of juvenile onset,exhibited an age.and gender-dependent penetrance.16p11.2 deletion appears to predispose individuals to juvenile onset obesity and in this case are similar to the well-described Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS).Early detection of this deletion will provide opportunity to prevent obesity.

  12. 3q27.3 microdeletional syndrome

    Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Poquet, Hélène;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the advent of array-CGH, numerous new microdeletional syndromes have been delineated while others remain to be described. Although 3q29 subtelomeric deletion is a well-described syndrome, there is no report on 3q interstitial deletions. METHODS: We report for the first time seven...... patients with interstitial deletions at the 3q27.3q28 locus gathered through the Decipher database, and suggest this locus as a new microdeletional syndrome. RESULTS: The patients shared a recognisable facial dysmorphism and marfanoid habitus, associated with psychosis and mild to severe intellectual...... disability (ID). Most of the patients had no delay in gross psychomotor acquisition, but had severe impaired communicative and adaptive skills. Two small regions of overlap were defined. The first one, located on the 3q27.3 locus and common to all patients, was associated with psychotic troubles and mood...

  13. Functional polymorphisms in PRODH are associated with risk and protection for schizophrenia and fronto-striatal structure and function.

    Lucas Kempf

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available PRODH, encoding proline oxidase (POX, has been associated with schizophrenia through linkage, association, and the 22q11 deletion syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome. Here, we show in a family-based sample that functional polymorphisms in PRODH are associated with schizophrenia, with protective and risk alleles having opposite effects on POX activity. Using a multimodal imaging genetics approach, we demonstrate that haplotypes constructed from these risk and protective functional polymorphisms have dissociable correlations with structure, function, and connectivity of striatum and prefrontal cortex, impacting critical circuitry implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Specifically, the schizophrenia risk haplotype was associated with decreased striatal volume and increased striatal-frontal functional connectivity, while the protective haplotype was associated with decreased striatal-frontal functional connectivity. Our findings suggest a role for functional genetic variation in POX on neostriatal-frontal circuits mediating risk and protection for schizophrenia.

  14. Neuropsychological profiles of patients with 2q37.3 deletion associated with developmental dyspraxia.

    Ogura, Kaeko; Takeshita, Kenzo; Arakawa, Chikako; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-01

    Patients with 2q37 deletions manifest brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR). Recent advances in human molecular research have revealed that alterations in the histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) are responsible for the clinical manifestations of BDMR. Here, we report two male patients with 2q37.3 deletions. One of the patients showed a typical BDMR phenotype, and HDAC4 was included in the deletion region. HDAC4 was preserved in the other patient, and he showed a normal intelligence level with the delayed learning of complex motor skills. Detailed neuropsychological examinations revealed similar neuropsychological profiles in these two patients (visuo-spatial dyspraxia) that suggested developmental dyspraxia. These observations suggested that some other candidate genes for neuronal development exist in the telomeric region of HDAC4. PMID:25329715

  15. Brief Report: Peculiar Evolution of Autistic Behaviors in Two Unrelated Children with Brachidactyly-Mental Retardation Syndrome

    Mazzone, Luigi; Vassena, Lia; Ruta, Liliana; Mugno, Diego; Galesi, Ornella; Fichera, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Brachidactyly-Mental Retardation (BDMR) Syndrome (MIM 600430) is associated with terminal deletions at chromosome 2q37 and a limited number of studies also reported an association between 2q37 [right arrow] qter deletion and autism. Herein we describe two cases of autism in unrelated children with BDMR Syndrome, showing physical, cognitive,…

  16. Microarray based analysis of an inherited terminal 3p26.3 deletion, containing only the CHL1 gene, from a normal father to his two affected children

    Lerone Margherita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background terminal deletions of the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 3 cause a rare contiguous gene disorder characterized by growth retardation, developmental delay, mental retardation, dysmorphisms, microcephaly and ptosis. The phenotype of individuals with deletions varies from normal to severe. It was suggested that a 1,5 Mb minimal terminal deletion including the two genes CRBN and CNTN4 is sufficient to cause the syndrome. In addition the CHL1 gene, mapping at 3p26.3 distally to CRBN and CNTN4, was proposed as candidate gene for a non specific mental retardation because of its high level of expression in the brain. Methods and Results we describe two affected siblings in which array-CGH analysis disclosed an identical discontinuous terminal 3p26.3 deletion spanning less than 1 Mb. The deletion was transmitted from their normal father and included only the CHL1 gene. The two brothers present microcephaly, light mental retardation, learning and language difficulties but not the typical phenotype manifestations described in 3p- syndrome. Conclusion a terminal 3p26.3 deletion including only the CHL1 gene is a very rare finding previously reported only in one family. The phenotype of the affected individuals in the two families is very similar and the deletion has been inherited from an apparently normal parent. As already described for others recurrent syndromes with variable phenotype, these findings are challenging in genetic counselling because of an evident variable penetrance.

  17. Characterization of a complex rearrangement involving duplication and deletion of 9p in an infant with craniofacial dysmorphism and cardiac anomalies

    Di Bartolo Daniel L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Partial duplication and partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 have each been reported in the literature as clinically recognizable syndromes. We present clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings on a five-week-old female infant with concomitant duplication and terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9. To our knowledge ten such cases have previously been reported. Conventional cytogenetic analysis identified additional material on chromosome 9 at band p23. FISH analysis aided in determining the additional material consisted of an inverted duplication with a terminal deletion of the short arm. Microarray analysis confirmed this interpretation and further characterized the abnormality as a duplication of about 32.7 Mb, from 9p23 to 9p11.2, and a terminal deletion of about 11.5 Mb, from 9p24.3 to 9p23. The infant displayed characteristic features of Duplication 9p Syndrome (hypotonia, bulbous nose, single transverse palmar crease, cranial anomalies, as well as features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome (flat nasal bridge, long philtrum, cardiac anomalies despite the deletion being distal to the reported critical region for this syndrome. This case suggests that there are genes or regulatory elements that lie outside of the reported critical region responsible for certain phenotypic features associated with Deletion 9p Syndrome. It also underscores the importance of utilizing array technology to precisely define abnormalities involving the short arm of 9p in order to further refine genotype/phenotype associations and to identify additional cases of duplication/deletion.

  18. Dystrophin gene deletions in South Indian Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    Mallikarjuna Rao G; Hussain T.; Geetha Devi N; Jain S; Chandak G; Ananda Raj M

    2003-01-01

    66 unrelated patients from Southern India with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) were studied for intragenic deletion in 18 exons and Pm region of the DMD gene using multiplex PCR. Of these 41 (62.1%) showed intragenic deletions. 78% of the deletions were located at the distal hotspot region (44-55 exons) and 22% of the deletions were located at the proximal region (exon 2-19). Exon 50 is most frequently deleted. Deletions in isolated cases were significantly more compare...

  19. 16p11.2 Deletion Mice Display Cognitive Deficits in Touchscreen Learning and Novelty Recognition Tasks

    Yang, Mu; Lewis, Freeman C.; Sarvi, Michael S.; Foley, Gillian M.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal 16p11.2 deletion syndrome frequently presents with intellectual disabilities, speech delays, and autism. Here we investigated the Dolmetsch line of 16p11.2 heterozygous (+/-) mice on a range of cognitive tasks with different neuroanatomical substrates. Robust novel object recognition deficits were replicated in two cohorts of 16p11.2…

  20. Multicolour FISH and quantitative PCR can detect submicroscopic deletions in holoprosencephaly patients with a normal karyotype

    Bendavid, C.; Haddad, B.R.; Griffin, A; Huizing, M; Dubourg, C; Gicquel, I.; Cavalli, L.R.; Pasquier, L.; Shanske, A L; Long, R.; Ouspenskaia, M.; Odent, S; Lacbawan, F; David, V.; Muenke, M

    2006-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common structural malformation of the developing forebrain. At birth, nearly 50% of children with HPE have cytogenetic anomalies. Approximately 20% of infants with normal chromosomes have sequence mutations in one of the four main HPE genes (SHH, ZIC2, SIX3, and TGIF). The other non‐syndromic forms of HPE may be due to environmental factors or mutations in other genes, or potentially due to submicroscopic deletions of HPE genes. We used two complementary as...

  1. Double deletion of melanocortin 4 receptors and SAPAP3 corrects compulsive behavior and obesity in mice

    Xu, Pin; Grueter, Brad A.; Britt, Jeremiah K; McDaniel, Latisha; Huntington, Paula J.; Hodge, Rachel; Tran, Stephanie; Mason, Brittany L.; Lee, Charlotte; Vong, Linh; Lowell, Bradford B.; Malenka, Robert C.; Lutter, Michael; Pieper, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Compulsive behavior is a debilitating clinical feature of many forms of neuropsychiatric disease, including Tourette syndrome, obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, eating disorders, and autism. Although several studies link striatal dysfunction to compulsivity, the pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Here, we show that both constitutive and induced genetic deletion of the gene encoding the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), as well as pharmacologic inhibition of MC4R signaling, normal...

  2. Refinement of the critical 2p25.3 deletion region

    De Rocker, Nina; Vergult, Sarah; Koolen, David;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 2p25.3 are associated with intellectual disability and/or central obesity. Although MYT1L is believed to be a critical gene responsible for intellectual disability, so far no unequivocal data have confirmed this hypothesis. METHODS: In this stu...... syndromal intellectual disability. Moreover, because 17 patients present with obesity/overweight, haploinsufficiency of MYT1L might predispose to weight problems with childhood onset.Genet Med 17 6, 460-466....

  3. Deletion of 4.4 Mb at 2q33.2q33.3 May Cause Growth Deficiency in a Patient with Mental Retardation, Facial Dysmorphic Features and Speech Delay.

    Papoulidis, Ioannis; Paspaliaris, Vassilis; Papageorgiou, Elena; Siomou, Elissavet; Dagklis, Themistoklis; Sotiriou, Sotirios; Thomaidis, Loretta; Manolakos, Emmanouil

    2015-01-01

    A patient with a rare interstitial deletion of chromosomal band 2q33.2q33.3 is described. The clinical features resembled the 2q33.1 microdeletion syndrome (Glass syndrome), including mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, high-arched narrow palate, growth deficiency, and speech delay. The chromosomal aberration was characterized by whole genome BAC aCGH. A comparison of the current patient and Glass syndrome features revealed that this case displayed a relatively mild phenotype. Overall, it is suggested that the deleted region of 2q33 causative for Glass syndrome may be larger than initially suggested. PMID:25925190

  4. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  5. 576 kb deletion in 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI is associated with limb malformation, congenital heart disease and epilepsy.

    Zhu, Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Jin-Fu; Yang, Yi-Feng; Tan, Zhi-Ping

    2013-10-10

    1p36 deletion (monosomy 1p36) is one of the most common terminal deletions observed in humans, characterized by special facial features, mental retardation, heart defects, development delay and epilepsy. Previously, we reported molecular findings in patients with limb, congenital heart disease (CHD) and other malformations with SNP-array. In a syndromic patient of the same cohort, we detected a small deletion of 1p36.33-p36.32 containing SKI (Sloan-Kettering Institute protooncoprotein). Recently, dominant mutations in SKI were identified to be correlated with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. Retrospective examination revealed this patient with limb malformations, CHD, epilepsy and mild development delay. Together with previous reports, our study suggests that the 1p36.33-1p36.32 deletion encompassing SKI may represents a previous undescribed microdeletion disorder. PMID:23892090

  6. 15q11-13缺失型Angelman综合征17例遗传学诊断及临床特点%Genetic and clinical study on 17 cases of Angelman syndrome with deletion of 15q11-13

    白晋丽; 宋昉; 邹丽萍; 杨欣英; 瞿宇晋; 王立文; 杨艳玲; 金煜伟; 王红

    2010-01-01

    目的 对临床诊断的Angelman综合征(AS)患儿进行遗传学诊断和临床特点分析.方法 利用MS-PCR、STR家系连锁分析和染色体核型分析,对17例临床诊断AS的患儿(其中男7例,女10例,年龄8个月~5岁)进行遗传学诊断.依据国际诊断标准,分析15q11-13缺失型AS患儿的相关表型特点.结果 (1)17例确诊为15q11-13缺失型AS.(2)患儿出生情况无明显异常.所有的患儿均有不同程度的运动和语言发育迟缓,以语言发育落后更为显著,并伴有特征性的快乐行为.(3)AS的经常性表现:癫癎(15例),异常脑电图(14例),发生率约80%~90%,只有35%的患儿(6例)存在小头畸形.(4)与AS较为关联的表现:平枕/枕骨凹陷(12例),下颌突出(10例),宽嘴和齿缝稀疏(13例),频繁流口水(8例),过多的嘴部动作(9例),肤色及发色浅淡(13例),运动时屈曲手臂(9例),睡眠障碍(9例)等,发生率47%~77%.>2岁年龄组患儿的AS相关性表现的发生率均高于≤2岁年龄组患儿.结论 联合应用MS-PCR、STR连锁分析和染色体核型分析,确诊17例患儿为15q11-13缺失型AS.我国15q11-13缺失型AS患儿的临床表现与国际诊断标准基本一致,惟小头畸形比率低于白种人,可能存在人种表型差异.随着年龄的增长AS相关性表现更为明显.%Objective Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder that maps to 15q11-13. The primary phenotypes are attributable to loss of expression of imprinted UBE3A gene within this region which can arise by means of a number of mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to make a genetic diagnosis and to analyze the clinical features in suspected patients with AS. Method A total of 17 cases were diagnosed clinically as AS including 7 males and 10 females. The age at the time of diagnosis ranged from 8 months to 5 years. Genetic diagnosis was made by methylation-specific PCR ( MS-PCR), linkage analysis by short tandem repeat (STR) and chromosome

  7. Characterization of large genomic deletions in the FBN1 gene using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification

    Lewis Tracey

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Connective tissue diseases characterized by aortic aneurysm, such as Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Ehlers Danlos syndrome type IV are heterogeneous and despite overlapping phenotypes, the natural history, clinical manifestations and interventional course for each diagnosis can be quite unique. The majority of mutations involved in the etiology of these disorders are missense and nonsense mutations. However, large deletions and duplications undetected by sequencing may be implicated in their pathogenesis, and may explain the apparent lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in a subset of patients. The objective of this study was to search for large pathogenic deletions and/or duplications in the FBN1, TGFβR1, and TGFβR2 genes using multiplex-ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA in patients with aortopathy, in whom no mutations in the FBN1, TGFβR1, and TGFβR2 genes were identified by sequencing. Methods The study included 14 patients from 11 unrelated families with aortic aneurysm. Of those, six patients (including 3 first-degree relatives, fulfilled the revised Ghent criteria for Marfan syndrome, and eight had predominantly aortic aneurysm/dilatation with variable skeletal and craniofacial involvement. MLPA for FBN1, TGFβR1, and TGFβR2 was carried out in all patients. A 385 K chromosome 15 specific array was used in two patients with a deletion of the entire FBN1 in order to define its size and boundaries. Results We identified two novel large deletions in the FBN1 gene in four patients of two unrelated families who met clinical diagnostic criteria for Marfan syndrome. One patient was found to have a FBN1 deletion encompassing exons 1-5. The other three patients had a 542 Kb deletion spanning the whole FBN1 gene and five additional genes (SLC24A5, MYEF2, CTXN2, SLC12A1, DUT in the chromosome 15. Conclusions Our findings expand the number of large FBN1 deletions, and emphasize the importance of

  8. Behavioral Features of Williams Beuren Syndrome Compared to Fragile X Syndrome and Subjects with Intellectual Disability without Defined Etiology

    Perez-Garcia, D.; Granero, R.; Gallastegui, F.; Perez-Jurado, L. A.; Brun-Gasca, C.

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a heterozygous deletion of 26-28 genes on chromosome band 7q11.23. During the past few years, researchers and clinicians have significantly contributed to define the phenotype of the syndrome, including its cognitive and behavioral aspects. However, it…

  9. Characterization of a complex rearrangement involving duplication and deletion of 9p in an infant with craniofacial dysmorphism and cardiac anomalies

    Di Bartolo Daniel L; El Naggar Mohamed; Owen Renius; Sahoo Trilochan; Gilbert Fred; Pulijaal Venkat R; Mathew Susan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Partial duplication and partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 have each been reported in the literature as clinically recognizable syndromes. We present clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular findings on a five-week-old female infant with concomitant duplication and terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9. To our knowledge ten such cases have previously been reported. Conventional cytogenetic analysis identified additional material on chromosome 9 at band p23. FI...

  10. 18p- syndrome: Presentation of two cases with alobar holoprosencenphaly

    Harry Mauricio Pachajoa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The syndrome by deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is an infrequent syndrome, and its phenotypical variability makes it difficult to recognize. Its most frequently observed clinical characteristics include mental retardation, growth retardation, craniofacial malformations, including long ears, microcephaly and short neck; other less frequent associated malformations include holoprosencephaly. Case report: We present two patients with deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18, one presented a de novo mutation and the other was produced by a balanced translocation 6p/18p of maternal origin. Both patients presented alobar holoprosencephaly and cebocephaly, low-frequency clinical characteristics in this syndrome. Discussion: alobar holoprosencephaly is a malformation appearing in 10% of patients with deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18; we review the probable physiopathology of holoprosencephaly in this syndrome.

  11. Cleft palate in Williams syndrome

    Domenico, Scopelliti; Orlando, Cipriani; Graziana, Fatone Flavia Maria; Papi, Piero; Giulia, Amodeo

    2013-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genomic neurodevelopmental disorder, estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 persons. It is caused by a deletion of the “elastin” gene on chromosome 7q11.23 and was described officially in 1961 by Williams, Barrat-Boyes, and Lowe. Cleft palate is not considered in the medical literature as a part of the multisystem disorders of the Williams syndrome but it was yet described. We present our experience of a patient who presents cleft palate among other congenital malformations. PMID:23662266

  12. Cleft palate in Williams syndrome

    Domenico, Scopelliti; Orlando, Cipriani; Graziana, Fatone Flavia Maria; Papi, Piero; Giulia, Amodeo

    2013-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genomic neurodevelopmental disorder, estimated to occur in approximately 1 in 10,000 persons. It is caused by a deletion of the “elastin” gene on chromosome 7q11.23 and was described officially in 1961 by Williams, Barrat-Boyes, and Lowe. Cleft palate is not considered in the medical literature as a part of the multisystem disorders of the Williams syndrome but it was yet described. We present our experience of a patient who presents cleft palate among othe...

  13. Lynch Syndrome: An Updated Review

    Rishabh Sehgal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is one of the most common cancer susceptibility syndromes. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have a 50%–70% lifetime risk of colorectal cancer, 40%–60% risk of endometrial cancer, and increased risks of several other malignancies. It is caused by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In a subset of patients, Lynch syndrome is caused by 3' end deletions of the EPCAM gene, which can lead to epigenetic silencing of the closely linked MSH2. Relying solely on age and family history based criteria inaccurately identifies eligibility for Lynch syndrome screening or testing in 25%–70% of cases. There has been a steady increase in Lynch syndrome tumor screening programs since 2000 and institutions are rapidly adopting a universal screening approach to identify the patients that would benefit from genetic counseling and germline testing. These include microsatellite instability testing and/or immunohistochemical testing to identify tumor mismatch repair deficiencies. However, universal screening is not standard across institutions. Furthermore, variation exists regarding the optimum method for tracking and disclosing results. In this review, we summarize traditional screening criteria for Lynch syndrome, and discuss universal screening methods. International guidelines are necessary to standardize Lynch syndrome high-risk clinics.

  14. A Physical Map, Including a BAC/PAC Clone Contig, of the Williams-Beuren Syndrome–Deletion Region at 7q11.23

    Peoples, Risa; Franke, Yvonne; Wang, Yu-Ker; Pérez-Jurado, Luis; Paperna, Tamar; Cisco, Michael; Francke, Uta

    2000-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a developmental disorder caused by haploinsufficiency for genes in a 2-cM region of chromosome band 7q11.23. With the exception of vascular stenoses due to deletion of the elastin gene, the various features of WBS have not yet been attributed to specific genes. Although ⩾16 genes have been identified within the WBS deletion, completion of a physical map of the region has been difficult because of the large duplicated regions flanking the deletion. We present ...

  15. Animal Models of Williams Syndrome

    Osborne, Lucy R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have generated a variety of mouse models in an attempt to dissect the contribution of individual genes to the complex phenotype associated with Williams syndrome (WS). The mouse genome is easily manipulated to produce animals that are copies of humans with genetic conditions, be it with null mutations, hypomorphic mutations, point mutations, or even large deletions encompassing many genes. The existing mouse models certainly seem to implicate hemizygosity for ELN,...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Potocki-Shaffer syndrome

    ... Romeike BF, Wuyts W. Proximal chromosome 11p contiguous gene deletion syndrome phenotype: case report and review of the literature. Clin Neuropathol. 2007 Jan-Feb;26(1):1-11. Review. Citation on PubMed Swarr DT, Bloom D, Lewis RA, Elenberg E, Friedman EM, Glotzbach C, Wissman ...

  17. Williams-Beuren Syndrome with Brain Dysplasia

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Jichi and Yokohama City Universities, Japan, report a patient with the common Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS deletion in 7q11.23 who presented with severe cerebral and cerebellar dysplasia and progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Structure-specific statistical mapping of white matter tracts.

    Yushkevich, Paul A; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony J; Gee, James C

    2008-06-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  19. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE 5Q- SYNDROME

    Andrea Pellagatti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The 5q- syndrome is the most distinct of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS and patients with this disorder have a deletion of chromosome 5q [del(5q] as the sole karyotypic abnormality. Several genes mapping to the commonly deleted region of the 5q- syndrome have been implicated in disease pathogenesis in recent years. Haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal gene RPS14 has been shown to cause the erythroid defect in the 5q- syndrome. Loss of the microRNA genes miR-145 and miR-146a has been associated with the thrombocytosis observed in 5q- syndrome patients. Haploinsufficiency of CSNK1A1 leads to hematopoietic stem cell expansion in mice and may play a role in the initial clonal expansion in patients with 5q- syndrome. Moreover, a subset of patients harbor mutation of the remaining CSNK1A1 allele. Mouse models of the 5q- syndrome, which recapitulate the key features of the human disease, indicate that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of this disorder. Importantly, activation of p53 has been demonstrated in the human 5q- syndrome. Recurrent TP53 mutations have been associated with an increased risk of disease evolution and with decreased response to the drug lenalidomide in del(5q MDS patients. Potential new therapeutic agents for del(5q MDS include the translation enhancer L-leucine.

  20. Cleft Lip/Palate, Short Stature, and Developmental Delay in a Boy with a 5.6-Mb Interstitial Deletion Involving 10p15.3p14

    Gamba, Bruno F.; Rosenberg, Carla; Costa, Silvia; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Ribeiro-Bicudo, Lucilene A.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosome interval 10p15.3p14 harbors about a dozen genes. This region has been implicated in a few well-known human phenotypes, namely HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, and renal dysplasia) and DGS2 (DiGeorge syndrome 2), but a number of variable phenotypes have also been reported. Cleft lip/palate seems to be a very unusual finding within the clinical spectrum of patients with this deletion. Here, we report a male child born with short stature, cleft lip/palate, and feeding problems who was found to have a 5.6-Mb deletion at 10p15.3p14. PMID:25852446

  1. Large Genomic Deletions in CACNA1A Cause Episodic Ataxia Type 2

    Jijun eWan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Episodic ataxia (EA syndromes are heritable diseases characterized by dramatic episodes of imbalance and incoordination. Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2, the most common and the best characterized subtype, is caused by mostly nonsense, splice site, small indel and sometimes missense mutations in CACNA1A. Direct sequencing of CACNA1A fails to identify mutations in some patients with EA2-like features, possibly due to incomplete interrogation of CACNA1A or defects in other EA genes not yet defined. Previous reports described genomic deletions between 4-40kb in EA2. In 47 subjects with EA (26 with EA2-like features who tested negative for mutations in the known EA genes, we used Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA to analyze CACNA1A for exonic copy number variations. Breakpoints were further defined by long-range PCR. We identified distinct multi-exonic deletions in three probands with classic EA2-like features: episodes of prolonged vertigo and ataxia triggered by stress and fatigue, interictal nystagmus, with onset during infancy or early childhood. The breakpoints in all three probands are located in Alu sequences, indicating errors in homologous recombination of Alu sequences as the underlying mechanism. The smallest deletion spanned exons 39 and 40, while the largest deletion spanned 200kb, missing all but the first three exons. One deletion involving exons 39 through 47 arose spontaneously. The search for mutations in CACNA1A appears most fruitful in EA patients with interictal nystagmus and onset early in life. The finding of large heterozygous deletions suggests haploinsufficiency as a possible pathomechanism of EA2.

  2. Frequent deletions of JARID2 in leukemic transformation of chronic myeloid malignancies.

    Puda, Ana; Milosevic, Jelena D; Berg, Tiina; Klampfl, Thorsten; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Gisslinger, Bettina; Rumi, Elisa; Pietra, Daniela; Malcovati, Luca; Elena, Chiara; Doubek, Michael; Steurer, Michael; Tosic, Natasa; Pavlovic, Sonja; Guglielmelli, Paola; Pieri, Lisa; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Gisslinger, Heinz; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have an inherent tendency to progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using high-resolution SNP microarrays, we studied a total of 517 MPN and MDS patients in different disease stages, including 77 AML cases with previous history of MPN (N = 46) or MDS (N = 31). Frequent chromosomal deletions of variable sizes were detected, allowing the mapping of putative tumor suppressor genes involved in the leukemic transformation process. We detected frequent deletions on the short arm of chromosome 6 (del6p). The common deleted region on 6p mapped to a 1.1-Mb region and contained only the JARID2 gene--member of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). When we compared the frequency of del6p between chronic and leukemic phase, we observed a strong association of del6p with leukemic transformation (P = 0.0033). Subsequently, analysis of deletion profiles of other PRC2 members revealed frequent losses of genes such as EZH2, AEBP2, and SUZ12; however, the deletions targeting these genes were large. We also identified two patients with homozygous losses of JARID2 and AEBP2. We observed frequent codeletion of AEBP2 and ETV6, and similarly, SUZ12 and NF1. Using next generation exome sequencing of 40 patients, we identified only one somatic mutation in the PRC2 complex member SUZ12. As the frequency of point mutations in PRC2 members was found to be low, deletions were the main type of lesions targeting PRC2 complex members. Our study suggests an essential role of the PRC2 complex in the leukemic transformation of chronic myeloid disorders. PMID:22190018

  3. Intersections of certain deleted digits sets

    Pedersen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    We consider some properties of the intersection of deleted digits Cantor sets with their translates. We investigate conditions on the set of digits such that, for any t between zero and the dimension of the deleted digits Cantor set itself, the set of translations such that the intersection has Hausdorff dimension equal to t is dense in the set F of translations such that the intersection is non-empty. We make some simple observations regarding properties of the set F, in particular, we characterize when F is an interval, in terms of conditions on the digit set.

  4. A 54 Mb 11qter duplication and 0.9 Mb 1q44 deletion in a child with laryngomalacia and agenesis of corpus callosum

    Lall Meena

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partial Trisomy 11q syndrome (or Duplication 11q has defined clinical features and is documented as a rare syndrome by National Organization of Rare Disorders (NORD. Deletion 1q44 (or Monosomy 1q44 is a well-defined syndrome, but there is controversy about the genes lying in 1q44 region, responsible for agenesis of the corpus callosum. We report a female child with the rare Partial Trisomy 11q syndrome and Deletion 1q44 syndrome. The genomic imbalance in the proband was used for molecular characterization of the critical genes in 1q44 region for agenesis of corpus callosum. Some genes in 11q14q25 may be responsible for laryngomalacia. Results We report a female child with dysmorphic features, microcephaly, growth retardation, seizures, acyanotic heart disease, and hand and foot deformities. She had agenesis of corpus callosum, laryngomalacia, anterior ectopic anus, esophageal reflux and respiratory distress. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1. Her karyotype was 46,XX,der(1t(1;11(q44;q14pat. The mother had a normal karyotype and the karyotype of the father was 46,XY,t(1;11(q44;q14. SNP array analysis showed that the proband had a 54 Mb duplication of 11q14q25 and a 0.9 Mb deletion of the submicroscopic subtelomeric 1q44 region. Fluorescence Insitu Hybridisation confirmed the duplication of 11qter and deletion of 1qter. Conclusion Laryngomalacia or obstruction of the upper airway is the outcome of increased dosage of some genes due to Partial Trisomy 11q Syndrome. In association with other phenotypic features, agenesis of corpus callosum appears to be a landmark phenotype for Deletion 1q44 syndrome, the critical genes lying proximal to SMYD3 in 1q44 region.

  5. High proportion of 22q13 deletions and SHANK3 mutations in Chinese patients with intellectual disability.

    Xiaohong Gong

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID is a heterogeneous disorder caused by chromosomal abnormalities, monogenic factors and environmental factors. 22q13 deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by severe ID. Although the frequency of 22q13 deletions in ID is unclear, it is believed to be largely underestimated. To address this issue, we used Affymetrix Human SNP 6.0 array to detect the 22q13 deletions in 234 Chinese unexplained ID patients and 103 controls. After the Quality Control (QC test of raw data, 22q13 deletions were found in four out of 230 cases (1.7%, while absent in parents of the cases and 101 controls. A review of genome-wide microarray studies in ID was performed and the frequency of 22q13 deletions from the literatures was 0.24%, much lower than our report. The overlapping region shared by all 4 cases encompasses the gene SHANK3. A heterozygous de novo nonsense mutation Y1015X of SHANK3 was identified in one ID patient. Cortical neurons were prepared from embryonic mice and were transfected with a control plasmid, shank3 wild-type (WT or mutant plasmids. Overexpression of the Y1015 mutant in neurons significantly affected neurite outgrowth compared with shank3 WT. These findings suggest that 22q13 deletions may be a more frequent cause for Chinese ID patients than previously thought, and the SHANK3 gene is involved in the neurite development.

  6. Joubert Syndrome

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Joubert Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Joubert Syndrome? Joubert syndrome is a rare brain malformation ...

  7. Marfan Syndrome

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  8. Some analogies between quantum cloning and quantum deleting

    We further verify the impossibility of deleting an arbitrary unknown quantum state, and also show it is impossible to delete two nonorthogonal quantum states as a consequence of unitarity of quantum mechanics. A quantum approximate (deterministic) deleting machine and a probabilistic (exact) deleting machine are constructed. The estimation for the global fidelity characterizing the efficiency of the quantum approximate deleting is given. We then demonstrate that unknown nonorthogonal states chosen from a set with their multiple copies can evolve into a linear superposition of multiple deletions and failure branches by a unitary process if and only if the states are linearly independent. It is notable that the proof for necessity is somewhat different from Pati's [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2849 (1999)]. Another deleting machine for the input states that are unnecessarily linearly independent is also presented. The bounds on the success probabilities of these deleting machines are derived. So we expound some preliminary analogies between quantum cloning and deleting

  9. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: A case demonstrated by a cytogenetic study

    Yamini S Pokale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case with a 4p terminal deletion, evidenced in GTG-banded chromosome study. Phenotypic signs described in the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome were found on clinical examination of our patient.

  10. Is 1p36 deletion associated with anterior body wall defects?

    Çöllü, Medis; Yüksel, Şirin; Şirin, Başak Kumbasar; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Alanay, Yasemin

    2016-07-01

    Epispadias and exstrophy of the cloaca, also known as OEIS complex (omphalocele, exstrophy, imperforate anus, spinal defects), respectively constitute the most benign and severe ends of the bladder exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC) spectrum. In 2009, El-Hattab et al. reported the first patient with OEIS complex associated with a chromosome 1p36 deletion. Here we report a second patient with 1p36 deletion who also has classic bladder exstrophy, supporting the possible role of genes in this region in the development of BEEC. The absence of omphalocele and imperforate anus in our patient places him toward classic bladder exstrophy while presence of spina bifida and the absence of coccyx suggest an overlap with OEIS complex. An additional differential diagnosis is the pentalogy of Cantrell in our patient as he also has a diaphragmatic hernia and an incomplete sternum. This is the second observation of a ventral midline birth defect in association with 1p36 deletion syndrome, following El-Hattab et al.'s report [2009]. The three genes (NOCL2, DVL1, and MMP23B) discussed as possible candidates are also among the deleted ones in our patient, supporting the possible role of these genes in BEEC spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27144803

  11. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  12. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  13. Deletion of GPIHBP1 causing severe chylomicronemia.

    Rios, Jonathan J; Shastry, Savitha; Jasso, Juan; Hauser, Natalie; Garg, Abhimanyu; Bensadoun, André; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2012-05-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a hydrolase that cleaves circulating triglycerides to release fatty acids to the surrounding tissues. The enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells and is transported to its site of action on the capillary endothelium by glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1). Inactivating mutations in LPL; in its cofactor, apolipoprotein (Apo) C2; or in GPIHBP1 cause severe hypertriglyceridemia. Here we describe an individual with complete deficiency of GPIHBP1. The proband was an Asian Indian boy who had severe chylomicronemia at 2 months of age. Array-based copy-number analysis of his genomic DNA revealed homozygosity for a 17.5-kb deletion that included GPIHBP1. A 44-year-old aunt with a history of hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis was also homozygous for the deletion. A bolus of intravenously administered heparin caused a rapid increase in circulating LPL and decreased plasma triglyceride levels in control individuals but not in two GPIHBP1-deficient patients. Thus, short-term treatment with heparin failed to attenuate the hypertriglyceridemia in patients with GPIHBP1 deficiency. The increasing resolution of copy number microarrays and their widespread adoption for routine cytogenetic analysis is likely to reveal a greater role for submicroscopic deletions in Mendelian conditions. We describe the first neonate with complete GPIHBP1 deficiency due to homozygosity for a deletion of GPIHBP1. PMID:22008945

  14. Sequence analysis of 17 NRXN1 deletions

    Hoeffding, Louise Kristine Enggaard; Hansen, Thomas; Ingason, Andrés;

    2014-01-01

    molecular mechanisms governing such genomic rearrangements may increase our understanding of disease pathology and evolutionary processes. Here we analyse 17 carriers of non-recurrent deletions in the NRXN1 gene, which have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, autism and...

  15. Union-Find with Constant Time Deletions

    Alstrup, Stephen; Thorup, Mikkel; Gørtz, Inge Li;

    2014-01-01

    operations performed, and α_M/N_(n) is a functional inverse of Ackermann’s function. They left open the question whether delete operations can be implemented more efficiently than find operations, for example, in o(log n) worst-case time. We resolve this open problem by presenting a relatively simple...

  16. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Mainardi Paola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin, moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males, congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1. To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require

  17. Insertion and deletion processes in recent human history.

    Per Sjödin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although insertions and deletions (indels account for a sizable portion of genetic changes within and among species, they have received little attention because they are difficult to type, are alignment dependent and their underlying mutational process is poorly understood. A fundamental question in this respect is whether insertions and deletions are governed by similar or different processes and, if so, what these differences are. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use published resequencing data from Seattle SNPs and NIEHS human polymorphism databases to construct a genomewide data set of short polymorphic insertions and deletions in the human genome (n = 6228. We contrast these patterns of polymorphism with insertions and deletions fixed in the same regions since the divergence of human and chimpanzee (n = 10,546. The macaque genome is used to resolve all indels into insertions and deletions. We find that the ratio of deletions to insertions is greater within humans than between human and chimpanzee. Deletions segregate at lower frequency in humans, providing evidence for deletions being under stronger purifying selection than insertions. The insertion and deletion rates correlate with several genomic features and we find evidence that both insertions and deletions are associated with point mutations. Finally, we find no evidence for a direct effect of the local recombination rate on the insertion and deletion rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data strongly suggest that deletions are more deleterious than insertions but that insertions and deletions are otherwise generally governed by the same genomic factors.

  18. Hearing loss, coloboma and left ventricular enlargement in a boy with an interstitial 10q26 deletion.

    Ramos, Maria; Wilkens, Alisha; Krantz, Ian D; Wu, Yaning

    2016-06-01

    Distal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10 with breakpoints mapped at 10q26 is a well-recognized contiguous genomic disorder. A wide spectrum of clinical findings is seen in affected individuals and the common clinical features include craniofacial dysmorphia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, cardiovascular defects, and urogenital malformations. We report herein on a male patient with a 5.5 Mb interstitial deletion of 10q26.11q2613 and compare his clinical presentation to previously reported cases. Apart from characteristic phenotypes seen in 10q26 deletion syndrome, he presents with colobomas and left ventricle enlargement. These are cardiovascular and ophthalmological findings that have not been described in prior cases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27125467

  19. A unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17)(q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Contiguous gene or microdeletion syndromes occurring on chromosome 17p include the Smith-Magenis and Miller-Dieker syndromes associated with interstitial deletions of 17p11.2 and 17p13.3, respectively. Other cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions on chromosome 17 are quite rare or unique. We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 [del(17)(q23.2q24.3)] who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. We have compared our patient`s phenotype and karyotype to two reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap. The most striking clinical features of this patient were severe intrauterine growth retardation, widespread skeletal malformations (split sutures, hypoplastic acetabulae and scapulae, vertebral anomalies, and digital hypoplasia), cutis verticis gyrata, dysmorphic facial features, and oropharyngeal malformations (absent uvula and submucous cleft palate). Mild congenital heart disease and anomalous optic nerves were also present. Parental karyotyps were normal. DNA from parents and patient has been collected and cell lines established on both parents. Genes which have been previously mapped to the region that is apparently deleted in this patient include: chorionic somatomammotropin A, growth hormone (normal), acid alpha-glucosidase, apolipoprotein H, and the alpha peptide of type 4 voltage gated sodium channel. As in other clinical cytogenetic syndromes, further descriptions of patients with similar or overlapping rearrangements in this region will be necessary to delineate genotype/phenotype correlations for chromosome 17.

  20. Kindler syndrome

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  1. Probabilistic deletion of copies of linearly independent quantum states

    We show that each of two copies of the nonorthogonal states randomly selected from a certain set S can be probabilistically deleted by a general unitary-reduction operation if and only if the states are linearly independent. We derive a tight bound on the best possible deleting efficiencies. These results for 2→1 probabilistic deleting are also generalized into the case of N→M deleting (N,M positive integers and N>M)

  2. The Molecular Dissection of Contiguous Gene Syndromes with a Focus on 4p16 Deletion Syndrome

    Hannes, Femke

    2011-01-01

    Genotype-phenotype correlations were initially used to identify the minimal region of overlap between differently sized rearrangements in association with a specific phenotypic feature. This approach enabled the molecular dissection of the disease. However, the detection of the genotype by low resolution cytogenetic techniques hampered accurate genotype-phenotype correlations and the search for causative genes. With the advent of micro-array technology, the genotypes were more easily obtained...

  3. 42 CFR 401.118 - Deletion of identifying details.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deletion of identifying details. 401.118 Section... Deletion of identifying details. When CMS publishes or otherwise makes available an opinion or order... identifying details will be deleted....

  4. Rac1 deletion causes thymic atrophy.

    Lukas Hunziker

    Full Text Available The thymic stroma supports T lymphocyte development and consists of an epithelium maintained by thymic epithelial progenitors. The molecular pathways that govern epithelial homeostasis are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deletion of Rac1 in Keratin 5/Keratin 14 expressing embryonic and adult thymic epithelial cells leads to loss of the thymic epithelial compartment. Rac1 deletion led to an increase in c-Myc expression and a generalized increase in apoptosis associated with a decrease in thymic epithelial proliferation. Our results suggest Rac1 maintains the epithelial population, and equilibrium between Rac1 and c-Myc may control proliferation, apoptosis and maturation of the thymic epithelial compartment. Understanding thymic epithelial maintenance is a step toward the dual goals of in vitro thymic epithelial cell culture and T cell differentiation, and the clinical repair of thymic damage from graft-versus-host-disease, chemotherapy or irradiation.

  5. Orbital deletion procedure and its applications

    莫亦荣; 林梦海; 吴玮; 张乾二

    1999-01-01

    The orbital deletion procedure is introduced, which is suited to quantitatively investigating the electronic delocalization effiect in earboeations and boranes. While the routine, ab initio molecular orbital methods can generate wavefunetions for real systems where all electrons are delocalized, the present orbital deletion procedure can generate wavefunctions for hypothetical reference molecules where electronic delocalization effect is deactivated. The latter wavefunetion normlly corresponds In the most stable resonance structure in terms of the resonance theory. By comparing and analyzing the delocalized and the localized wavefunetions, one can obtain a quantitative and instinct pieture to show how electronic deloealizalion inside a molecule affects the molecular structure, energy as well as other physical properties. Two examples are detailedly discussed. The first is related to the hypercoujugation of alkyl groups in carbocations and a comparison of the order of stability of carbocations is made, T

  6. Cryptic 13q34 and 4q35.2 Deletions in an Italian Family.

    Riccardi, Federica; Rivolta, Gianna F; Uliana, Vera; Grati, Francesca R; La Starza, Roberta; Marcato, Livia; Di Perna, Caterina; Quintavalle, Gabriele; Garavelli, Livia; Rosato, Simonetta; Sammarelli, Gabriella; Neri, Tauro M; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Martorana, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Variations of DNA sequences in the human genome range from large, microscopically visible chromosome anomalies to single nucleotide changes. Submicroscopic genomic copy number variations, i.e. chromosomal imbalances which are undetectable by conventional cytogenetic analysis, play an intriguing clinical role. In this study, we describe the clinical consequences of the concurrent presence of an interstitial deletion in 13q34 and a terminal deletion in 4q35.2 in an Italian family. The index patient, a 19-year-old male, as well as his 12-year-old sister are carriers of both deletions, one of maternal and the other of paternal origin. The phenotype includes language delay, multiorgan involvement and bleeding diathesis with mild deficiency of factors X and VII. In the sister, the concomitant presence of Noonan syndrome may partly explain the clinical symptoms. The deleted region on chromosome 13 involves several genes (ATP11A, MCF2L, F7, F10, PROZ, PCID2, CUL4A, and LAMP1); some of these seem to play a role in the proband's phenotype. The terminal deletion in 4q35.2 contains other OMIM genes (FRG1, FRG2 and DBET); moreover, the 4q region is reported as a susceptibility locus for Crohn's disease, diagnosed in the proband's father. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a family with these 2 submicroscopic copy number changes. We tried to relate the clinical phenotype of the proband and his family to the molecular function of the involved genes. PMID:26645620

  7. Deletion Diagnostics for Alternating Logistic Regressions

    Preisser, John S; By, Kunthel; Perin, Jamie; Qaqish, Bahjat F.

    2012-01-01

    Deletion diagnostics are introduced for the regression analysis of clustered binary outcomes estimated with alternating logistic regressions, an implementation of generalized estimating equations (GEE) that estimates regression coefficients in a marginal mean model and in a model for the intracluster association given by the log odds ratio. The diagnostics are developed within an estimating equations framework that recasts the estimating functions for association parameters based upon conditi...

  8. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) is present in hyaline membranes and modulates surface tension of surfactant

    Griese Matthias; Hartl Dominik; Weiss Christel; Gassler Nikolaus; Helmke Burkhard M; Renner Marcus; End Caroline; Müller Hanna; Hafner Mathias; Poustka Annemarie; Mollenhauer Jan; Poeschl Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein that binds various bacteria and is thought to participate in innate pulmonary host defense. We hypothesized that pulmonary DMBT1 could contribute to respiratory distress syndrome in neonates by modulating surfactant function. Methods DMBT1 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization in post-mortem lungs of preterm and full-term neonates with ...

  9. Secure Deletion of Data from SSD

    Akli Fundo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The deletion of data from storage is an important component on data security. The deletion of entire disc or special files is well-known on hard drives, but this is quite different on SSDs, because they have a different architecture inside, and the main problem is if they serve the same methods like hard drives for data deletion or erasing. The built-in operations are used to do this on SSDs. The purpose of this review is to analyses some methods which are proposed to erase data form SSDs and their results too, to see which of them offers the best choice. In general we will see that the techniques of erasing data from entire disc from hard drives can be used also on SSDs, but there’s a problem with bugs. On the other hand, we cannot use the same techniques of erasing a file from hard drives and SSDs. To make this possible, there are required changes in FTL layer, which is responsible for mapping between logic addresses and physical addresses.

  10. Barth syndrome

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  11. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Goldman Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109/L for more than six consecutive months associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to middle-aged patients, but may concern any age group. Male predominance (4–9:1 ratio has been reported in historic series but this is likely to reflect the quasi-exclusive male distribution of a sporadic hematopoietic stem cell mutation found in a recently characterized disease variant. Target-organ damage mediated by eosinophils is highly variable among patients, with involvement of skin, heart, lungs, and central and peripheral nervous systems in more than 50% of cases. Other frequently observed complications include hepato- and/or splenomegaly, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and coagulation disorders. Recent advances in underlying pathogenesis have established that hypereosinophilia may be due either to primitive involvement of myeloid cells, essentially due to occurrence of an interstitial chromosomal deletion on 4q12 leading to creation of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene (F/P+ variant, or to increased interleukin (IL-5 production by a clonally expanded T cell population (lymphocytic variant, most frequently characterized by a CD3-CD4+ phenotype. Diagnosis of HES relies on observation of persistent and marked hypereosinophilia responsible for target-organ damage, and exclusion of underlying causes of hypereosinophilia, including allergic and parasitic disorders, solid and hematological malignancies, Churg-Strauss disease, and HTLV infection. Once these criteria are fulfilled, further testing for eventual pathogenic classification is warranted using appropriate cytogenetic and functional approaches. Therapeutic

  12. Two male patients with ring Y : definition of an interval in Yq contributing to Turner syndrome

    Tzancheva, M; Kaneva, R; Kumanov, P; Williams, G; Tyler-Smith, C

    1999-01-01

    Turner syndrome is thought to result from the haploinsufficiency of genes on the sex chromosomes, but these genes have not been identified yet. We describe two males with deleted ring Y chromosomes, one (TS) with full Turner syndrome and one (DM) without. TS has short stature, skeletal anomalies, ly

  13. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    Jain, A.; Kumar, P.; Jindal, A; YK, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital DiaphragmaticHernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  14. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    A Jain

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital DiaphragmaticHernia (CDH occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  15. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a case of patau syndrome: a rare association.

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities. PMID:26034714

  16. Cushing's Syndrome

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  17. Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  18. Metabolic Syndrome

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  19. Asperger syndrome

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  20. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  1. Usher Syndrome

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  2. Turner Syndrome

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  3. Proteus Syndrome

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Definition Common Signs Diagnostic Criteria (I have ... NIH to go with this criteria) Glossary Videos Proteus Syndrome is a condition which involves atypical growth ...

  4. Obtaining a Planar Graph by Vertex Deletion

    Marx, Dániel; Schlotter, Ildikó

    2008-01-01

    In the k-Apex problem the task is to find at most k vertices whose deletion makes the given graph planar. The graphs for which there exists a solution form a minor closed class of graphs, hence by the deep results of Robertson and Seymour, there is an O(n^3) time algorithm for every fixed value of k. However, the proof is extremely complicated and the constants hidden by the big-O notation are huge. Here we give a much simpler algorithm for this problem with quadratic running time, by iterati...

  5. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? What are the ... Syndrome Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most ...

  6. Alagille syndrome.

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac ma...

  7. Detection of mitochondrial DNA deletion by a modified PCR method

    汪振诚; 王学敏; 缪明永; 章卫平; 焦炳华; 倪庆桂

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a simple and efficient method for detecting small populations of mitochondrial DNA deletion. Methods: Peripheral blood cell DNA was obtained from a victim who was accidently exposed to a 60Co radiation source 11 years ago. Using the DNA as template, PCR was performed to generate multiple products including true deletions and artifacts. The full length product was recovered and used as template of secondary PCR. The suspicious deletion product of mtDNA could be confirmed if it was only yielded by first PCR. Using either original primers or their nested primers, the suspicious deletion product was amplified and authenticated as true deletion product. The template was recovered and determined to be a deletion by sequencing directly. Results: A new mtDNA deletion, spanning 889 bp from nt11688 to nt12576, was detected in the peripheral blood cells of the victim. Conclusion: The new PCR-based method is more efficient in detecting small populations of mtDNA deletion than other routine methods. MtDNA deletion is found in the victim, suggesting there is relationship between the deletion and phenotypes of the disease.

  8. Secure Deletion on Log-structured File Systems

    Reardon, Joel; Capkun, Srdjan; Basin, David

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of secure data deletion on log-structured file systems. We focus on the YAFFS file system, widely used on Android smartphones. We show that these systems provide no temporal guarantees on data deletion and that deleted data still persists for nearly 44 hours with average phone use and indefinitely if the phone is not used after the deletion. Furthermore, we show that file overwriting and encryption, methods commonly used for secure deletion on block-structured file systems, do not ensure data deletion in log-structured file systems. We propose three mechanisms for secure deletion on log-structured file systems. Purging is a user-level mechanism that guarantees secure deletion at the cost of negligible device wear. Ballooning is a user-level mechanism that runs continuously and gives probabilistic improvements to secure deletion. Zero overwriting is a kernel-level mechanism that guarantees immediate secure deletion without device wear. We implement these mechanisms on Nexus One smartphon...

  9. Cushing Syndrome

    ... links Share this: Page Content What is Cushing’s syndrome? Cushing’s syndrome is a condition that occurs when the body’s ... medication or as a result of a tumor, Cushing’s syndrome can develop. Many factors influence whether this happens, ...

  10. Dumping Syndrome

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  11. Microdeletion and Microduplication Syndromes

    Mrasek, Kristin; Klein, Elisabeth; Mulatinho, Milene; Llerena, Juan C.; Hardekopf, David; Pekova, Sona; Bhatt, Samarth; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Liehr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of whole genome analysis based on array comparative genomic hybridization in diagnostics and research has led to a continuously growing number of microdeletion and microduplication syndromes (MMSs) connected to certain phenotypes. These MMSs also include increasing instances in which the critical region can be reciprocally deleted or duplicated. This review catalogues the currently known MMSs and the corresponding critical regions including phenotypic consequences. Besides the pathogenic pathways leading to such rearrangements, the different detection methods and their limitations are discussed. Finally, the databases available for distinguishing between reported benign or pathogenic copy number alterations are highlighted. Overall, a review of MMSs that previously were also denoted “genomic disorders” or “contiguous gene syndromes” is given. PMID:22396478

  12. Chromosomal abnormalities among children born with conotruncal cardiac defects

    Lammer, Edward J.; Chak, Jacqueline S.; Iovannisci, David M.; Schultz, Kathleen; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Yang, Wei; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Conotruncal heart defects comprise 25%-30% of non-syndromic congenital heart defects. This study describes the frequency of chromosome abnormalities and microdeletion 22q11 associated with conotruncal heart malformations. METHODS From a population base of 974,579 infants/fetuses delivered, 622 Californian infants/fetuses were ascertained with a defect of aortico-pulmonary septation. Infants whose primary cardiac defect was tetralogy of Fallot (n=296) or D-transposition of the great vessels (n=189) were screened for microdeletions of 22q11. RESULTS Fourteen (2.3%) of the 622 infants/fetuses had chromosomal abnormalities. Thirty infants, 10% of those whose primary defect was tetralogy of Fallot, had chromosome 22q11 microdeletions. Right aortic arch, abnormal branching patterns of the major arteries arising from the thoracic aorta, and pulmonary artery abnormalities were observed more frequently in these children. CONCLUSIONS We found an unusual number of infants with an extra sex chromosome and a conotruncal defect. Infants with tetralogy of Fallot due to 22q11 microdeletion showed more associated vascular anomalies than infants with tetralogy but no 22q11 microdeletion. Although these associated vascular anomalies provide clues as to which infants with tetralogy of Fallot are more likely to carry the microdeletion, the overall risk of 10% among all infants with tetralogy of Fallot warrants chromosome analysis and FISH testing routinely. PMID:19067405

  13. MEN1 Syndrome and Hibernoma: An Uncommonly Recognised Association?

    Venus Hedayati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MEN1 syndrome is known to classically result in parathyroid, pituitary, and pancreatic islet cell tumours. However, the potential association of MEN1 syndrome with hibernoma, a benign tumour with differentiation towards brown fat, is far less well known, despite their genetic profile both being linked to deletion of the MEN1 gene. Herein, we describe a case with its key radiological and pathological findings.

  14. Recurrent Achalasia in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    Pereza, Nina; Barbarić, Irena; Ostojić, Saša; Čače, Neven; Kapović, Miljenko

    2011-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multysistem genetic disorder caused by the 1.6Mb hemizygous deletion involving the elastin gene in the region q11.23 of chromosome 7. The phenotype of Williams-Beuren syndrome is extremelly variable but the most common findings include cardiovascular disease, distinctive facies, mental retardation, a specific congitive profile, endocrine abnormalities, growth retardation and connective tissue abnormalities. Although gastrointestinal difficulties are o...

  15. Molecular Genetics of Williams Syndrome: Windows into Human Biology

    Julie Korenberg

    2009-01-01

    Genetics is my favorite way of thinking: Williams syndrome seen through the eyes of a geneticist. Williams syndrome (WS) is the most compelling model in which to link the basis of human emotion and behavior to their biological origins. The explanatory power of human genetics in WS rests on the recent revolution in understanding the human genome but more specifically on the ability to link genetic with behavioral variation at high resolution. WS is due to the deletion of about 25 g...

  16. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Children with Williams syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of ~25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative strengths in concrete vocabulary and phonological processing (language skills strongly related to single-word reading) and relative weaknesses in relational concepts, receptive grammar...

  17. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  18. Hereditary renal adysplasia, pulmonary hypoplasia and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome: a case report

    Acién Maribel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary renal adysplasia is an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expression that is usually associated with malformative combinations (including Müllerian anomalies affecting different mesodermal organs such as the heart, lung, and urogenital system. Case report A case showing pulmonary hypoplasia, hip dysplasia, hereditary renal adysplasia, and Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome in adulthood is reported here. The i.v. pyelography showed right renal agenesis with a normal left kidney and ureter. Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging also showed right renal agenesis with multicystic embryonary remnants in the right hemipelvis probably corresponding to a dysgenetic kidney. An uretrocystoscopy showed absence of ectopic ureter and of the right hemitrigone. She was scheduled for a diagnostic laparoscopy and creation of a neovagina according to the McIndoe technique with a prosthesis and skin graft. Laparoscopy confirmed the absence of the uterus. On both sides, an elongated, solid, rudimentary uterine horn could be observed. Both ovaries were also elongated, located high in both abdominal flanks and somewhat dysgenetics. A conventional cytogenetic study revealed a normal female karyotype 46, XX at a level of 550 GTG bands. A CGH analysis was performed using a 244K oligoarray CGH detecting 11 copy number variants described as normal variants in the databases. The 17q12 and 22q11.21 microdeletions described in other MRKH patients were not present in this case. Four years after operation her evolution is normal, without symptoms and the neovagina is adequately functional. The geneticists have studied her family history and the pedigree of the family is shown. Conclusions We suggest that primary damage to the mesoderm (paraaxil, intermediate, and lateral caused by mutations in a yet unidentified gene is responsible for: 1 skeletal dysplasia, 2 inappropriate interactions between the bronchial

  19. Are there ethnic differences in deletions in the dystrophin gene?

    Banerjee, M.; Verma, I.C. [All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    1997-01-20

    We studied 160 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drawn from all parts of India, using multiplex PCR of 27 exons. Of these, 103 (64.4%) showed intragenic deletions. Most (69.7%) of the deletions involved exons 45-51. The phenotype of cases with deletion of single exons did not differ significantly from those with deletion of multiple exons. The distribution of deletions in studies from different countries was variable, but this was accounted for either by the small number of cases studied, or by fewer exons analyzed. It is concluded that there is likely to be no ethnic difference with respect to deletions in the DMD gene. 38 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Experimental analysis of oligonucleotide microarray design criteria to detect deletions by comparative genomic hybridization

    Moerman Donald G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is currently one of the most powerful techniques to measure DNA copy number in large genomes. In humans, microarray CGH is widely used to assess copy number variants in healthy individuals and copy number aberrations associated with various diseases, syndromes and disease susceptibility. In model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans the technique has been applied to detect mutations, primarily deletions, in strains of interest. Although various constraints on oligonucleotide properties have been suggested to minimize non-specific hybridization and improve the data quality, there have been few experimental validations for CGH experiments. For genomic regions where strict design filters would limit the coverage it would also be useful to quantify the expected loss in data quality associated with relaxed design criteria. Results We have quantified the effects of filtering various oligonucleotide properties by measuring the resolving power for detecting deletions in the human and C. elegans genomes using NimbleGen microarrays. Approximately twice as many oligonucleotides are typically required to be affected by a deletion in human DNA samples in order to achieve the same statistical confidence as one would observe for a deletion in C. elegans. Surprisingly, the ability to detect deletions strongly depends on the oligonucleotide 15-mer count, which is defined as the sum of the genomic frequency of all the constituent 15-mers within the oligonucleotide. A similarity level above 80% to non-target sequences over the length of the probe produces significant cross-hybridization. We recommend the use of a fairly large melting temperature window of up to 10°C, the elimination of repeat sequences, the elimination of homopolymers longer than 5 nucleotides, and a threshold of -1 kcal/mol on the oligonucleotide self-folding energy. We observed very little difference in data

  1. A deletion map of the WAGR region on chromosome 11.

    Gessler, M; Thomas, G H; Couillin, P; Junien, C; McGillivray, B C; Hayden, M; Jaschek, G.; Bruns, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) region has been assigned to chromosome 11p13 on the basis of overlapping constitutional deletions found in affected individuals. We have utilized 31 DNA probes which map to the WAGR deletion region, together with six reference loci and 13 WAGR-related deletions, to subdivide this area into 16 intervals. Specific intervals have been correlated with phenotypic features, leading to the identification of individual ...

  2. RNA-Editing with Combined Insertion and Deletion Preserves Regularity

    Vink, E.P.; Zantema, H.; Bosnacki, D.

    2013-01-01

    We consider two elementary forms of string rewriting called guided insertion/deletion and guided rewriting. The original strings are modified depending on the match with a given set of auxiliary strings, called guides. Guided insertion/deletion considers matching of a string and a guide with respect to a specific correspondence of strings. Guided rewriting considers matching of a string and a guide with respect to an equivalence relation on the alphabet. Guided insertion/deletion is inspired ...

  3. Analysis of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects.

    Almeamar, Hussein Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Ismail, Patimah; Nadkarni, Prashan; Fawzi, Nora

    2013-04-01

    Complete deletions in the AZF (a, b, and c) sub-regions of the Y-chromosome have been shown to contribute to unexplained male infertility. However, the role of partial AZFc deletions in male infertility remains to be verified. Three types of partial AZFc deletions have been identified. They are gr/gr, b1/b3, and b2/b3 deletions. A recent meta-analysis showed that ethnic and geographical factors might contribute to the association of partial AZFc deletions with male infertility. This study analyzed the association of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile males. Fifty two oligozoospermic infertile males and 63 fertile controls were recruited to this study. Screening for partial AZFc deletions was done using the two sequence-tagged sites approach (SY1291 and SY1191) which were analyzed using both the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis and the high resolution melt, HRM method. Gr/gr deletions were found in 11.53% of the cases and 9.52% of the controls (p = 0.725). A B2/b3 deletion was found in one of the cases (p = 0.269). No B1/b3 deletions were identified in this study. The results of HRM analysis were consistent with those obtained using the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis method. The HRM analysis was highly repeatable (95% limit of agreement was -0.0879 to 0.0871 for SY1191 melting temperature readings). In conclusion, our study showed that partial AZFc deletions were not associated with male infertility in Malaysian subjects. HRM analysis was a reliable, repeatable, fast, cost-effective, and semi-automated method which can be used for screening of partial AZFc deletions. PMID:23231020

  4. Nablus mask-like facial syndrome

    Allanson, Judith; Smith, Amanda; Hare, Heather; Albrecht, Beate; Bijlsma, Emilia; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Donti, Emilio; Fitzpatrick, David; Isidor, Bertrand; Lachlan, Katherine; Le Caignec, Cedric; Prontera, Paolo; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rogaia, Daniela; van Bon, Bregje; Aradhya, Swaroop; Crocker, Susan F; Jarinova, Olga; McGowan-Jordan, Jean; Boycott, Kym; Bulman, Dennis; Fagerberg, Christina

    Nablus mask-like facial syndrome (NMLFS) has many distinctive phenotypic features, particularly tight glistening skin with reduced facial expression, blepharophimosis, telecanthus, bulky nasal tip, abnormal external ear architecture, upswept frontal hairline, and sparse eyebrows. Over the last few...... heterozygous deletions significantly overlapping the region associated with NMLFS. Notably, while one mother and child were said to have mild tightening of facial skin, none of these individuals exhibited reduced facial expression or the classical facial phenotype of NMLFS. These findings indicate that...

  5. Mouse Models of Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    Osborne, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to dissect the contribution of individual genes to the complex and varied phenotype associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), researchers have turned to mouse models. The mouse genome is easily manipulated to produce animals that are genetic copies of humans with genetic conditions, be it with null mutations, hypomorphic mutations, point mutations or even large deletions encompassing many genes. Over the past few years, several mouse models knocking out genes f...

  6. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Palacios Verd??, Mar??a Gabriela, 1983-; Segura Puimedon, Maria, 1985-; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Campo Casanelles, Miguel del, 1966-; Campuzano Uceda, Mar??a Victoria; P??rez Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83???Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ???30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ???75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well a...

  7. Cross-Cultural Studies of Williams Syndrome

    C. Zitzer Comfort; U. Bellugi; Reilly, J.

    2009-01-01

    This work is concerned with ways in which children with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygous deletion in chromosome band 7q11.23, are affected by social experiences of markedly differing cultures: the United States and Japan in one study, and France, Italy as well as the United States in another study. WS presents a compelling model for this investigation because its genetic phenotype is well defined and results in an uneven cognitive...

  8. On fixed-parameter algorithms for Split Vertex Deletion

    CYGAN, Marek; Pilipczuk, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    In the Split Vertex Deletion problem, given a graph G and an integer k, we ask whether one can delete k vertices from the graph G to obtain a split graph (i.e., a graph, whose vertex set can be partitioned into two sets: one inducing a clique and the second one inducing an independent set). In this paper we study fixed-parameter algorithms for Split Vertex Deletion parameterized by k: we show that, up to a factor quasipolynomial in k and polynomial in n, the Split Vertex Deletion problem can ...

  9. Evidence that Rieger syndrome maps to 4q25 or 4q27.

    Vaux, C; Sheffield, L; Keith, C. G.; Voullaire, L

    1992-01-01

    We report a baby with the features of Rieger syndrome and a de novo interstitial deletion of 4q which includes band 4q26 and an adjoining GTL light band, either q25 or q27. Rieger syndrome is provisionally mapped to 4q23----q27 but band 4q26 has been excluded as a possible site, suggesting that Rieger syndrome must map to a band, either 4q25 or 4q27, adjoining 4q26.

  10. Genetically Dissecting Cortical Neurons Involved in Epilepsy in Angelman Syndrome.

    Santini, Emanuela; Klann, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Epilepsy in Angelman Syndrome is thought to originate from an imbalance between local excitatory-inhibitory circuits that results in a generalized hyperexcitability. In this issue of Neuron, Judson et al. (2016) demonstrate that selective maternal deletion of Ube3a in cortical GABAergic neurons causes circuit hyperexcitability, increased seizure severity, and EEG abnormalities. PMID:27054611

  11. Neurodevelopmental outcome in Angelman syndrome: Genotype-phenotype correlations

    Mertz, Line Granild Bie; Thaulov, Per; Trillingsgaard, Anegen;

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, lack of speech, and epileptic seizures. Previous studies have indicated that children with AS due to 15q11.2-q13 deletions have a more severe developmental delay and present more often...

  12. 18q-syndrome and extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma.

    Machin Valtueña, M; Garcia-Sagredo, J M; Muñoz Villa, A; Lozano Giménez, C; Aparicio Meix, J M

    1987-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies carried out in a boy with multiple congenital anomalies showed a partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 18. The child later developed an extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma. The possible association of the tumour with 18q- syndrome is discussed.

  13. Williams Syndrome: A Relationship between Genetics, Brain Morphology and Behaviour

    Fahim, C.; Yoon, U.; Nashaat, N. H.; Khalil, A. K.; El-Belbesy, M.; Mancini-Marie, A.; Evans, A. C.; Meguid, N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genetically Williams syndrome (WS) promises to provide essential insight into the pathophysiology of cortical development because its ~28 deleted genes are crucial for cortical neuronal migration and maturation. Phenotypically, WS is one of the most puzzling childhood neurodevelopmental disorders affecting most intellectual…

  14. How to write, delete, and drive skyrmions

    Skyrmions were originally proposed by British physicist Tony Skyrme in the 1960s as topological solitons to account for the stability of baryons in particle physics. Realization of skyrmions as vortex-like swirling spin textures was discovered in ferromagnets with chiral crystal symmetry, in which ferromagnetic-exchange interactions favoring parallel spin alignment and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions favoring rotational spin alignment strongly compete. Subsequent studies have revealed that skyrmions possess numerous advantageous properties for application to information carriers in high-density and low-energy-consuming magnetic memories and logic devices. These properties are: (1) topologically protected stability, (2) small nanometric size, (3) rather high transition temperatures, and (4) ultralow fields or electric currents to drive their motion. This article first introduces fundamental properties of skyrmions and skyrmionic materials and then presents recent attempts and ideas on writing, deleting, and driving skyrmions towards establishing their functions in memory devices. (author)

  15. Diagnosis and fine mapping of a deletion in distal 11q in two Chinese patients with developmental delay.

    Ji, Taoyun; Wu, Ye; Wang, Huifang; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Yuwu

    2010-08-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a haploinsufficiency syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is characterized by developmental delay (DD)/mental retardation (MR), physical growth retardation, facial dysmorphism, visceral malformations and thrombocytopenia. We report two JBS patients from China out of a total of 451 patients with unexplained DD/MR. The genotypes of these patients were compared with earlier reported patients in North America and Europe. Both patients presented with severe DD, microcephaly and facial dysmorphism; one patient had a low birth weight, congenital heart disease and structural brain abnormalities. Neither patient was thrombocytopenic at the time of diagnosis. The two deletions were 4.1 and 12.8 Mb. The 4.1 Mb deletion is the smallest of all pathogenic regions earlier reported in JBS. Therefore, the critical region underlying DD/MR might be located in the distal portion of the chromosomal segment within 4.1 Mb of the telomere. Candidate genes for DD/MR in this region include SNX19, THYN1, OPCML, NCAPD3 and NTM. One of the critical regions for craniofacial abnormalities may be within 130.3-134.4 Mb in chromosome 11q. Further analysis of Chinese JBS patients would elucidate the relation of phenotype to genotype further. PMID:20520618

  16. Urofacial syndrome

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  17. Waardenburg syndrome.

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are ho...

  18. Sweet Syndrome

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim; Kodakoğlu, Ramazan; Mat, Cem; Kaner, Gültekin; Arısoy, Nil

    1996-01-01

    Sweet syndrome is a vasculitis characterized with fever leucocytosis neutrophilia and dermal neutrophilic infiltration In children Sweet syndrome usually occurs with secondary to infection and in adults to malignancy We report a Sweet syndrome in a five years old girl with respiratory infections otitis dactylitis long lasting fever and cutaneous rash A neutrophilic dermal infiltration is noted in cutaneous biopsy These signs have disappeared with corticosteroid treatment In conclusion Sweet s...

  19. Revesz syndrome

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  20. Metabolic syndrome

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  1. Brugada syndrome

    Bockeria O.L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is characterized by sudden death associated with one of several ECG patterns including incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevation in the anterior precordial leads. According to the ECG patterns there are three types of Brugada syndrome. Brugada syndrome is genetically determined and has an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission in about 50% of familial cases. Nowadays implantation of cardioverter-defibrillator is the only proven method of sudden cardiac death prevention.

  2. Linguistic and Psychomotor Development in Children with Chromosome 14 Deletions

    Zampini, Laura; D'Odorico, Laura; Zanchi, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Neri, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The present study focussed on a specific type of rare genetic condition: chromosome 14 deletions. Children with this genetic condition often show developmental delays and brain and neurological problems, although the type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the deleted genetic material. The specific aim of the…

  3. 49 CFR 7.6 - Deletion of identifying detail.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deletion of identifying detail. 7.6 Section 7.6... To Be Made Public by DOT § 7.6 Deletion of identifying detail. Whenever it is determined to be necessary to prevent a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy, identifying details will be...

  4. 75 FR 27313 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    2010-05-14

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 3/12/2010 (75 FR 11863-11864) and 3/26/2010 (75 FR 14575-14576), the Committee for..., PA. ] Deletions On 3/5/2010 (75 FR 10223-10224) and 3/12/2010 (75 FR 11863-11864), the Committee for... products are deleted from the Procurement List: Products USB Flash Drive, Flip Style NSN:...

  5. Optimality Theory and Variable Word-Final Deletion in Faetar.

    Nagy, Naomi; Reynolds, Bill

    1997-01-01

    Examines a pattern of end-of-word deletion in Faetar, a Francoprovencal dialect spoken in southern Italy, and considers synchronic variants. The article uses the word "deletion" as a synchronic description of the fact that speakers do not always phonetically produce everything in the input form. Optimality Theory accounts for such variation by…

  6. Sheehan syndrome

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  7. What Is Down Syndrome?

    ... NDSS Home » Down Syndrome » What Is Down Syndrome? What Is Down Syndrome? In every cell in the ... chromosome 21 causes the characteristics of Down syndrome. What Causes Down Syndrome? Regardless of the type of ...

  8. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, ...

  9. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  10. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  11. Molecular mimicry and clonal deletion: A fresh look.

    Rose, Noel R

    2015-06-21

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous "black holes", in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease. PMID:25172771

  12. Role of DNA deletion length in mutation and cell survival

    A model is presented which is based on the assumption that malignant transformation, mutation, chromosome aberration, and reproductive death of cells are all manifestations of radiation induced deletions in the DNA of the cell, and that the size of the deletion in relation to the spacing of essential genes determines the consequences of that deletion. It is assumed that two independent types of potentially lethal lesions can result in DNA deletions, and that the relative numbers of these types of damage is dependent on radiation quality. The repair of the damage reduces the length of a deletion, but does not always eliminate it. The predictions of this model are in good agreement with a wide variety of experimental evidence. (author)

  13. Mowat-Wilson syndrome in a Moroccan consanguineous family

    Ratbi Ilham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mowat-Wilson syndrome is a mental retardation-multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a typical facies, developmental delay, epilepsy, and variable congenital malformations, including Hirschsprung disease, urogenital anomalies, congenital heart disease, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. This disorder is sporadic and is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of the ZFHX1B gene located in the 2q22 region. We report here the first Moroccan patient, born to consanguineous parents, with Mowat-Wilson syndrome, due to a de novo, unreported mutation of the ZFHX1B gene.

  14. Ku80-deleted cells are defective at base excision repair

    Li, Han [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain); Marple, Teresa [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ku80-deleted cells are hypersensitive to ROS and alkylating agents. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Ku70 or Lig4, have reduced BER capacity. • OGG1 rescues hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and paraquat in Ku80-mutant cells. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4, are defective at repairing AP sites. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4 or Brca2 exon 27, exhibit increased PAR. - Abstract: Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repairs these types of lesions. However, we show that deletion of another NHEJ protein, DNA ligase IV (Lig4), did not cause hypersensitivity to these agents. In addition, the ROS and alkylating agents did not induce γ-H2AX foci that are diagnostic of DSBs. Furthermore, deletion of Ku80, but not Lig4 or Ku70, reduced BER capacity. Ku80 deletion also impaired BER at the initial lesion recognition/strand scission step; thus, involvement of a DSB is unlikely. Therefore, our data suggests that Ku80 deletion impairs BER via a mechanism that does not repair DSBs.

  15. Y chromosome microdeletion in a case with Klinefelter's Syndrome.

    Samli, H; Samli, M M; Azgoz, A; Solak, M

    2006-01-01

    In male infertility, the frequency of genetic factors is high. Klinefelter's Syndrome is the most frequent sex chromosomal abnormality detected in male infertility. In this study we report a patient diagnosed with Klinefelter's Syndrome with a deletion of the Yq interval. The patient was 24-years old with primary infertility. Semen analyses carried out in triplicate indicated azoospermia. The plasma leutenizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were abnormally high and the testosterone level was lower than the usual range. Each of his testes had a volume of 3 cc. Peripheral blood karyotype analysis showed Klinefelter's Syndrome (47, XXY) pattern. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA was performed using the following primers; AZFa (sY81, sY82, sY84), AZFb (sY127, sY142, sY164, RBM1), AZFc (CDY, BPY, sY254, sY255, sY277), AZFd (sY152, sY145, sY153). Analysis revealed a single deletion of AZFa region (sY84). Deletion of the AZFa region may be an additional factor for absolute azoospermia in men with Klinefelter's Syndrome. For individuals with Klinefelter's Syndrome who plan to undergo assisted reproduction techniques, Y chromosome microdeletion screening can diagnostically be convenient. PMID:17028090

  16. Developmental Trajectories in Syndromes with Intellectual Disability, with a Focus on Wolf-Hirschhorn and Its Cognitive-Behavioral Profile

    Fisch, Gene S.; Carpenter, Nancy; Howard-Peebles, Patricia N.; Holden, Jeanette J. A.; Tarleton, Jack; Simensen, Richard; Battaglia, Agatino

    2012-01-01

    Few studies exist of developmental trajectories in children with intellectual disability, and none for those with subtelomeric deletions. We compared developmental trajectories of children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome to other genetic disorders. We recruited 106 children diagnosed with fragile X, Williams-Beuren syndrome, or Wolf-Hirschhorn…

  17. Turner Syndrome

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  18. Turner Syndrome

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  19. Tourette Syndrome.

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  20. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep;

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....