WorldWideScience

Sample records for 20-l continuously stirred

  1. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  2. Adaptive Controller Design for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    Prabhu, K; V. Murali Bhaskaran

    2014-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important issue in chemical process and a wide range of research in the area of chemical engineering. Temperature Control of CSTR has been an issue in the chemical control engineering since it has highly non-linear complex equations. This study presents problem of temperature control of CSTR with the adaptive Controller. The Simulation is done in MATLAB and result shows that adaptive controller is an efficient controller for temperature control of C...

  3. Feasibility of magnetic stirring for continuous actinide oxalate precipitation process

    Methodology in vogue for conversion of actinide nitrate to its oxide is through a batch oxalate precipitation in a long reactor with a propeller type stirrer inserted from the top of the reactor. Use of electromagnetic stirrer as an alternate for the propeller type stirrer will lower the cost as well as minimize down time due to maintenance. Since continuous precipitation process can be achieved with smaller reactors, a possibility of magnetic stirring during oxalate precipitation is explored. Results of initial batch experiments with cerium nitrate as a surrogate for actinide nitrate is presented here. (author)

  4. Kinetics of propionate conversion in anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactors

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Mladenovska, Zuzana; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2008-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of anaerobic propionate degradation by biomass from 7 continuously stirred tank reactors differing in temperature, hydraulic retention time and substrate composition were investigated. In substrate-depletion experiments (batch) the maximum propionate degradation rate, A......-m, was estimated. The results demonstrate that the rate of endogenous substrate (propionate) production should be taken into account when estimating kinetic parameters in biomass from manure-based anaerobic reactors.......(max), and the half saturation constant, K-m, were initially estimated by applying the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation. A(max) was in the range from 22.8 to 29.1 mu mol gVS(-1) h(-1) while K-m, was in the range from 0.46-0.95 mM. In general, A(max) gave a good reflection of the reactor performances. Secondly...

  5. Study on methane hydration process in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor

    The methane hydration process is investigated in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor. Liquid temperatures and reaction rates without stirrer are compared with those occurring with stirrer, while at the same time better stirring conditions of the methane hydration process are given by the experiments. Some basic data of fluid mechanics, for example, stirring Reynolds number, Froude number and stirrer power, are calculated during the methane hydration process, which can be applied to evaluate stirrer capacity and provide some basic data for a scaled up reactor. Based on experiment and calculations in this work, some conclusions are drawn. First, the stirrer has great influence on the methane hydration process. Batch stirring is helpful to improve the mass transfer and heat transfer performances of the methane hydration process. Second, induction time can be shortened effectively by use of the stirrer. Third, in this paper, the appropriate stirring velocity and stirring time were 320 rpm and 30 min, respectively, at 5.0 MPa, for which the storage capacity and reaction time were 159.1 V/V and 370 min, respectively. Under the condition of the on-flow state, the initial stirring Reynolds number of the fluid and the stirring power were 12,150 and 0.54 W, respectively. Fourth, some suggestions, for example, the use of another type of stirrer or some baffles, are proposed to accelerate the methane hydration process. Comparing with literature data, higher storage capacity and hydration rate are achieved in this work. Moreover, some fluid mechanics parameters are calculated, which can provide some references to engineering application

  6. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    2007-01-01

    An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT ) in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer

  7. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    ZHOU Shu-cai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer.

  8. Effect of tryptone and ammonia on the biogas process in continuously stirred tank reactors treating cattle manure

    Nielsen, Hanne Bjerg; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    Two themophilic continuously stirred tank reactors, R1 and Two thermophilic continuously stirred tank reactors, R1 and R2, were subject to pulses of tryptone and ammonia. R1 was operated at an ammonia-N concentration of 3.0 g l(-1) and R2 was operated at an ammonia-N concentration of 1.7 g l(-1)....

  9. Biological treatment of phenolic wastewater in an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor

    Firozjaee Taghizade Tahere

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (ACSTR with consortium of mixed culture was operated continuously for a period of 110 days. The experiments were performed with three different hydraulic retention times and by varying initial phenol concentrations between 100 to 1000 mg/L. A maximum phenol removal was observed at a hydraulic retention time (HRT of 4 days, with an organic loading rate (OLR of 170.86 mg/L.d. At this condition, phenol removal rate of 89% was achieved. In addition, the chemical oxygen demand (COD removal corresponds to phenol removal. Additional operating parameters such as pH, MLSS and biogas production rate of the effluents were also measured. The present study provides valuable information to design an anaerobic ACSTR reactor for the biodegradation of phenolic wastewater.

  10. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    Haiman Wang; Youpeng Qu; Da Li; Ambuchi, John J.; Weihua He; Xiangtong Zhou; Jia Liu; Yujie Feng

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank re...

  11. Immersion and invariance adaptive control of a class of continuous stirred tank reactors

    Gaiyan HONG; Xiangbin LIU; Hongye SU

    2015-01-01

    An immersion and invariance (I&I) manifold based adaptive control algorithm is presented for a class of continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) to realize performance-oriented control in this paper. The nonlinear contraction method is combined into the control law design to render the closed-loop CSTR system globally asymptotically stable, firstly. Then, the I&I method is used to form the adaptation law such that the off-the-manifold coordinate (the parameter estimation error) converges to zero using P-monotone property enforced by selecting tuning function in manifold. As a result, the state of the closed-loop CSTR converges to its desired value asymptotically. The simulation is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the presented algorithm.

  12. Continuously-stirred anaerobic digester to convert organic wastes into biogas: system setup and basic operation.

    Usack, Joseph G; Spirito, Catherine M; Angenent, Largus T

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a bioprocess that is commonly used to convert complex organic wastes into a useful biogas with methane as the energy carrier. Increasingly, AD is being used in industrial, agricultural, and municipal waste(water) treatment applications. The use of AD technology allows plant operators to reduce waste disposal costs and offset energy utility expenses. In addition to treating organic wastes, energy crops are being converted into the energy carrier methane. As the application of AD technology broadens for the treatment of new substrates and co-substrate mixtures, so does the demand for a reliable testing methodology at the pilot- and laboratory-scale. Anaerobic digestion systems have a variety of configurations, including the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), plug flow (PF), and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) configurations. The CSTR is frequently used in research due to its simplicity in design and operation, but also for its advantages in experimentation. Compared to other configurations, the CSTR provides greater uniformity of system parameters, such as temperature, mixing, chemical concentration, and substrate concentration. Ultimately, when designing a full-scale reactor, the optimum reactor configuration will depend on the character of a given substrate among many other nontechnical considerations. However, all configurations share fundamental design features and operating parameters that render the CSTR appropriate for most preliminary assessments. If researchers and engineers use an influent stream with relatively high concentrations of solids, then lab-scale bioreactor configurations cannot be fed continuously due to plugging problems of lab-scale pumps with solids or settling of solids in tubing. For that scenario with continuous mixing requirements, lab-scale bioreactors are fed periodically and we refer to such configurations as continuously stirred anaerobic digesters (CSADs). This article presents a general

  13. Solidification Structure of Continuous Casting Large Round Billets under Mold Electromagnetic Stirring

    Tao SUN; Feng YUE; Hua-jie WU; Chun GUO; Ying LI; Zhong-cun MA

    2016-01-01

    The solidification structure of a continuous casting large round billet was analyzed by a cellular-automaton-finite-element coupling model using the ProCAST software.The actual and simulated solidification structures were compared under mold electromagnetic stirring (MEMS)conditions (current of 300 A and frequency of 3 Hz).There-after,the solidification structures of the large round billet were investigated under different superheats,casting speeds,and secondary cooling intensities.Finally,the effect of the MEMS current on the solidification structures was obtained under fixed superheat,casting speed,secondary cooling intensity,and MEMS frequency.The model accurately simulated the actual solidification structures of any steel,regardless of its size and the parameters used in the continuous casting process.The ratio of the central equiaxed grain zone was found to increase with decreasing su-perheat,increasing casting speed,decreasing secondary cooling intensity,and increasing MEMS current.The grain size obviously decreased with decreasing superheat and increasing MEMS current but was less sensitive to the casting speed and secondary cooling intensity.

  14. Removal of phosphorus from aqueous solution by Posidonia oceanica fibers using continuous stirring tank reactor

    The present study aims to develop a new potentially low-cost, sustainable treatment approach to soluble inorganic phosphorus removal from synthetic solutions and secondary wastewater effluents in which a plant waste (Posidonia oceanica fiber: POF) is used for further agronomic benefit. Dynamic flow tests using a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were carried out to study the effect of initial concentration of phosphorus, amount of adsorbent, feeding flow rate and anions competition. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiency of phosphorus from synthetic solutions is about 80% for 10 g L-1 of POF. In addition, the variation of the initial concentration of phosphorus from 8 to 50 mg L-1 increased the adsorption capacity from 0.99 to 3.03 mg g-1. The use of secondary treated wastewater showed the presence of competition phenomenon between phosphorus and sulphate which could be overcoming with increasing the sorptive surface area and providing more adsorption sites when increasing the adsorbent dosage of POF. Compared with columns studies, this novel CSTR system showed more advantages for the removal of soluble phosphorus as a tertiary treatment of urban secondary effluents with more adsorption efficiency and capacity, in addition to the prospect use of saturated POF with nutriment as fertilizer and compost.

  15. Removal of phosphorus from aqueous solution by Posidonia oceanica fibers using continuous stirring tank reactor

    Wahab, Mohamed Ali, E-mail: waheb_med@yahoo.fr [University of Carthage, Water Research and Technologies Centre (CERTE), Wastewater Treatment and Recycling Laboratory, B.P. 273, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Hassine, Rafik Ben [International Environmental Green Technology (IGET) (Tunisia); Jellali, Salah, E-mail: salah.jallali@certe.rnrt.tn [University of Carthage, Water Research and Technologies Centre (CERTE), Wastewater Treatment and Recycling Laboratory, B.P. 273, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia)

    2011-05-15

    The present study aims to develop a new potentially low-cost, sustainable treatment approach to soluble inorganic phosphorus removal from synthetic solutions and secondary wastewater effluents in which a plant waste (Posidonia oceanica fiber: POF) is used for further agronomic benefit. Dynamic flow tests using a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were carried out to study the effect of initial concentration of phosphorus, amount of adsorbent, feeding flow rate and anions competition. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiency of phosphorus from synthetic solutions is about 80% for 10 g L{sup -1} of POF. In addition, the variation of the initial concentration of phosphorus from 8 to 50 mg L{sup -1} increased the adsorption capacity from 0.99 to 3.03 mg g{sup -1}. The use of secondary treated wastewater showed the presence of competition phenomenon between phosphorus and sulphate which could be overcoming with increasing the sorptive surface area and providing more adsorption sites when increasing the adsorbent dosage of POF. Compared with columns studies, this novel CSTR system showed more advantages for the removal of soluble phosphorus as a tertiary treatment of urban secondary effluents with more adsorption efficiency and capacity, in addition to the prospect use of saturated POF with nutriment as fertilizer and compost.

  16. Cassava Stillage Treatment by Thermophilic Anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zou, Zhonghai; Zhou, Qi

    2010-11-01

    This paper assesses the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) in the treatment of cassava stillage under various organic loading rates (OLRs) without suspended solids (SS) separation. The reactor was seeded with mesophilic anaerobic granular sludge, and the OLR increased by increments to 13.80 kg COD/m3/d (HRT 5d) over 80 days. Total COD removal efficiency remained stable at 90%, with biogas production at 18 L/d (60% methane). Increase in the OLR to 19.30 kg COD/m3/d (HRT 3d), however, led to a decrease in TCOD removal efficiency to 79% due to accumulation of suspended solids and incomplete degradation after shortened retention time. Reactor performance subsequently increased after OLR reduction. Alkalinity, VFA and pH levels were not significantly affected by OLR variation, indicating that no additional alkaline or pH adjustment is required. More than half of the SS in the cassava stillage could be digested in the process when HRT was 5 days, which demonstrated the suitability of anaerobic treatment of cassava stillage without SS separation.

  17. Bioleaching of an organic-rich polymetallic concentrate using stirred-tank technology

    Spolaore, Pauline; Joulian, Catherine; Gouin, Jérôme; Ibanez, A.; Augé, Thierry; Morin, Dominique; d'Hugues, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The bioleaching of a concentrate produced from a black shale ore in an industrial operation in Poland was assessed. Following preliminary batch culture tests, processing in continuous conditions was tested to determine the main specifications for the application of the stirred-tank technology to this organic-rich polymetallic concentrate. The experimental work was carried out in a laboratory-scale unit consisting of three stirred tanks (50 L or 20 L) using an acidophilic and moderate thermoph...

  18. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor

    Rujira Jitrwung; Viviane Yargeau

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh...

  19. A mathematical model for multiple hydrogeneration reactions in a continuous stirred three phase slurry reactor with an evaporating solvent

    Janssen, H.J.; Westerterp, K.R.; Vos, J.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of the catalytic hydorgenation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) in a mini-installation with a continuously operated stirred three-phase slurry reactor and an evaporating solvent is discussed. Some characteristic properties of the reactor system and the influence of the operating parameters on the performance of the reactor are illustrated. The experimental results are compared with the predictions based on a mathematical model of the reactor system. The results indicated that...

  20. The Reduced Rank of Ensemble Kalman Filter to Estimate the Temperature of Non Isothermal Continue Stirred Tank Reactor

    Erna Apriliani; Dieky Adzkiya; Arief Baihaqi

    2011-01-01

    Kalman filter is an algorithm to estimate the state variable of dynamical stochastic system. The square root ensemble Kalman filter is an modification of Kalman filter. The square root ensemble Kalman filter is proposed to keep the computational stability and reduce the computational time. In this paper we study the efficiency of the reduced rank ensemble Kalman filter. We apply this algorithm to the non isothermal continue stirred tank reactor problem. We decompose the covariance of the ense...

  1. Operational strategies for thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste in continuously stirred tank reactors

    Angelidaki, Irini; Cui, J.; Chen, X.;

    2006-01-01

    Three operational strategies to reduce inhibition due to ammonia during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SS-OFMSW) rich in proteins were investigated. Feed was prepared by diluting SS-OFMSW (ratio of 1:4) with tap water or reactor process...... water with or without stripping ammonia. Three continuously stirred tank reactors were operated at 55 degrees C with 11.4 gVS d(-1) loading rate and 15 d retention time. Total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) level in the reactor fed with recirculated water alone was spiked to 3.5 and 5.5 g-N l(-1) through...

  2. Cascade degradation of organic matters in brewery wastewater using a continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor and analysis of microbial communities

    Wang, Haiman; Qu, Youpeng; Li, Da; Ambuchi, John J.; He, Weihua; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia; Feng, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    A continuous stirred microbial electrochemical reactor (CSMER), comprising of a complete mixing zone (CMZ) and microbial electrochemical zone (MEZ), was used for brewery wastewater treatment. The system realized 75.4 ± 5.7% of TCOD and 64.9 ± 4.9% of TSS when fed with brewery wastewater concomitantly achieving an average maximum power density of 304 ± 31 m W m−2. Cascade utilization of organic matters made the CSMER remove a wider range of substrates compared with a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), in which process 79.1 ± 5.6% of soluble protein and 86.6 ± 2.2% of soluble carbohydrates were degraded by anaerobic digestion in the CMZ and short-chain volatile fatty acids were further decomposed and generated current in the MEZ. Co-existence of fermentative bacteria (Clostridium and Bacteroides, 19.7% and 5.0%), acetogenic bacteria (Syntrophobacter, 20.8%), methanogenic archaea (Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium, 40.3% and 38.4%) and exoelectrogens (Geobacter, 12.4%) as well as a clear spatial distribution and syntrophic interaction among them contributed to the cascade degradation process in CSMER. The CSMER shows great promise for practical wastewater treatment application due to high pre-hydrolysis and acidification rate, high energy recovery and low capital cost. PMID:27270788

  3. Problem Based Learning (PBL: Analysis of Continuous Stirred Tank Chemical Reactors with a Process Control Approach

    Regalado-Méndez Alejandro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on a project that integrates the curriculum such as thermodynamic, chemical reactorengineering, linear algebra, differential equations and computer programming. The purpose is thatstudents implement the most knowledge and tools to analyse the stirred tank chemical reactor as a simpledynamic system. When the students finished this practice they should have learned about analysis ofdynamic system through bifurcation analysis, hysteresis phenomena, find equilibrium points, stabilitytype, and phase portrait. Once the steps were accomplished, we concluded that the purpose wassatisfactorily reached with an increment in creative ability. The student showed a bigger interesting inthis practice, since they worked in group. The most important fact is that the percentage of failure amongstudents was 10%. Finally, using alternative teaching-learning process improves the Mexican systemeducation.

  4. Optimal conditions and operational parameters for conversion of Robusta coffee residues in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    Msambichaka, B.L.; Kivaisi, A.K.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This experiment studied the possibility of optimizing anaerobic degradation, developing microbial adaptation and establishing long term process stability in a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) running on Robusta coffee hulls as feed substrate. Decrease in lag phase and increase in methane production rate in batch culture experiment conducted before and after process stabilization of each operational phase in the CSTR clearly suggested that microbial adaptation to increasing coffee percentage composition was attained. Through gradual increase of coffee percentage composition, from 10% coffee, 2% VS, 20 days HRT and a 1 g VS/1/day loading rate to 80% coffee, 4.5% VS, 12 days HRT and a loading rate of 3 g VS/1/day the CSTR system was optimized at a maximum methane yield of 535 ml/g VS. Again it was possible to attain long term process stability at the above mentioned optimal operational parameters for a further 3 month period. (au)

  5. Numerical investigation of the influence of kinetics and shape factor on barium sulfate precipitation in a continuous stirred tank

    Zheng WANG; ZaiSha MAO; Chao YANG; Qinghua ZHANG; Jingcai CHENG

    2009-01-01

    The effect of kinetics and shape factor on barium sulfate precipitation in a continuous stirred tank has been investigated numerically through solving the standard momentum and mass transport equations in combination with the moment equations for crystal population balance. The numerical method was validated with the literature data. The simulated results include the distribution of the local supersaturation ratio in the reactor, the mean crystal size, and the coefficient of variation. The simulation results show that the value of shape factor used in the model affected greatly the mean crystal size and the moments of the crystal size distribution. The influence of the kinetic expressions on the simulation is also analyzed. It is important to investigate the relationship of the shape factor with the precipitator type and other operation conditions to obtain reliable simulation results and suitable kinetic equations of crystal nucleation and growth rates.

  6. Prediction of biomass-generated syngas using extents of major reactions in a continuous stirred-tank reactor

    Syngas, the main gasification product, is a well-known intermediate for making fuels, chemicals and power. The objective of this study was to develop and validate reaction kinetics-based gasification model using extents of major reactions in a CSTR (continuous stirred-tank reactor) to predict syngas composition and yield. The model was studied by varying biomass and air flowrates from 2.9 to 4.2 dry kg/h and 4.5–10 kg/h, respectively, with temperature from 801 to 907 °C. Results showed significant improvement in the predictions of syngas composition and yield, and gasification efficiency. The extents of gasification reactions indicated that at ERs (equivalence ratios) below 0.32, the water gas reaction contributed the most to the syngas CO and H2 yields. The char oxidation reaction was also the dominating reaction contributing to CO yield at ERs below 0.40. At ERs above 0.29, the Boudouard and methane oxidation reactions were the most dominating reactions contributing to the CO yield while the water gas shift reaction contributed to the H2 yield. The developed model corrected one of the key underlying assumptions that biomass decomposes into elemental forms (C, H, O, N and S), however, gasification temperature, carbon conversion efficiency and tar yield were assumed to be given. - Highlights: • Modeled gasification using extent of reaction in a continuous stirred-tank reactor. • Extents of major reactions during gasification were predicted. • Model greatly improved prediction of biomass-generated gas composition and yield. • Water gas, Boudouard and methane oxidation reactions contributed to CO production. • Water gas and water gas shift were the dominating reactions for H2 production

  7. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS ELECTROMAGNETIC STIRRING FOR MAKING RHEOLOGIC SEMI-SOLID SLURRY OF ZL112Y ALUMINUM ALLOY

    2008-01-01

    To realize the technology of fabricating the rheologic semi-solid slurry of ZL112Y aluminum alloy via continues electromagnetic stirring process, ANSYS software was used to simulate electromagnetic force field and fluid velocity field in the alloy melt in a crucible tube in three coils. In the first section of the paper, eletromagnetic force field and fluid velocity field caused by single coil were simulated. The result of this simulation gives an average velocity of 3.2 cm/s and it is called critical velocity because a fluid velocity over it will cause a fine and spherical structure of solid primary a in a semi-solid melt. And, from this result, a reasonable temperature of semi-solid of the alloy and an electrical current intensity were established. The electrical current intensity of the result of this simulation corresponded to the current intensity used in a practice experiment, in which the primary a was obviously refined and sphericized. Based on this simulation of single coil electromagnetic stirring, in the second section of the paper, eletromagnetic force field and fluid velocity field caused by three coils were simulated. The result of the simulation shows that, 1) there is a semi-solid zone of 32 mm from bottom of the crucible tube to the upper; 2) the electrical current intensities of three coils of 400 A, 600 A, and 400 A, which were set to top range, middle range and bottom range of the tube, respectively, were the optimum parameters of electromagnetic current intensity under the condition of this investigation; and 3) under effect of these electromagnetic current intensity, the fluid velocities of the melt in the tube were 6.3 cm/s in top range, 3.75 cm/s in middle range, and 3.9 cm/s in bottom range of it, respectively.

  8. Dynamic nonlinear feedback for temperature control of continuous stirred reactor with complex behavior

    Pablo A. López Pérez; Ricardo Aguilar‐López

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to present an alternative methodology for the design of a class of integral high order slidingmodecontroller applied to a class of continuous chemical reactor with complex behavior for temperature tracking purposes.The proposed design is based on the differential geometry framework, where the named reaching trajectory contains a highorder sliding mode term in order to diminish chattering. Considering that the proposed technique is model based, an observerbas...

  9. Fermentative hydrogen production from beet sugar factory wastewater treatment in a continuous stirred tank reactor using anaerobic mixed consortia

    Gefu ZHU; Chaoxiang LIU; Jianzheng LI; Nanqi REN; Lin LIU; Xu HUANG

    2013-01-01

    A low pH, ethanol-type fermentation process was evaluated for wastewater treatment and bio-hydrogen production from acidic beet sugar factory wastewater in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with an effective volume of 9.6 L by anaerobic mixed cultures in this present study. After inoculating with aerobic activated sludge and operating at organic loading rate (OLR) of 12 kgCOD·m-3·d-1, HRT of 8h, and temperature of 35℃ for 28 days, the CSTR achieved stable ethanol-type fermentation. When OLR was further increased to 18 kgCOD·m-3·d-1, on the 53rd day, ethanol-type fermentation dominant microflora was enhanced. The liquid fermentation products, including volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ethanol, stabilized at 1493mg·L-1 in the bioreactor. Effluent pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), and alkalinity ranged at 4.1-4.5, -250-(-290) mV, and 230-260mgCaCO3·L-1. The specific hydrogen production rate of anaerobic activated sludge was 0.1 L'gMLVSS-1· d-1 and the COD removal efficiency was 45%. The experimental results showed that the CSTR system had good operation stability and microbial activity, which led to high substrate conversion rate and hydrogen production ability.

  10. Application of a continuously stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-rich industrial wastewater effluents

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Aloui, Fathi [Laboratoire des Bioprocedes Environnementaux, Pole d' Excellence Regional AUF-LBPE, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, Universite de Sfax, BP 1117, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami, E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn [Laboratoire des Bioprocedes Environnementaux, Pole d' Excellence Regional AUF-LBPE, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, Universite de Sfax, BP 1117, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-05-15

    A continuously stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) was used to optimize feasible and reliable bioprocess system in order to treat hydrocarbon-rich industrial wastewaters. A successful bioremediation was developed by an efficient acclimatized microbial consortium. After an experimental period of 225 days, the process was shown to be highly efficient in decontaminating the wastewater. The performance of the bioaugmented reactor was demonstrated by the reduction of COD rates up to 95%. The residual total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) decreased from 320 mg TPH l{sup -1} to 8 mg TPH l{sup -1}. Analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) identified 26 hydrocarbons. The use of the mixed cultures demonstrated high degradation performance for hydrocarbons range n-alkanes (C10-C35). Six microbial isolates from the CSTR were characterized and species identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that 5 strains were closely related to Aeromonas punctata (Aeromonas caviae), Bacillus cereus, Ochrobactrum intermedium, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Rhodococcus sp. The 6th isolate was affiliated to genera Achromobacter. Besides, the treated wastewater could be considered as non toxic according to the phytotoxicity test since the germination index of Lepidium sativum ranged between 57 and 95%. The treatment provided satisfactory results and presents a feasible technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-rich wastewater from petrochemical industries and petroleum refineries.

  11. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor.

    Jitrwung, Rujira; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-01-01

    Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR). Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol) and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol. PMID:25970750

  12. Biohydrogen and Bioethanol Production from Biodiesel-Based Glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes in a Continuous Stir Tank Reactor

    Rujira Jitrwung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Crude glycerol from the biodiesel manufacturing process is being produced in increasing quantities due to the expanding number of biodiesel plants. It has been previously shown that, in batch mode, semi-anaerobic fermentation of crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes can produce biohydrogen and bioethanol simultaneously. The present study demonstrated the possible scaling-up of this process from small batches performed in small bottles to a 3.6-L continuous stir tank reactor (CSTR. Fresh feed rate, liquid recycling, pH, mixing speed, glycerol concentration, and waste recycling were optimized for biohydrogen and bioethanol production. Results confirmed that E. aerogenes uses small amounts of oxygen under semi-anaerobic conditions for growth before using oxygen from decomposable salts, mainly NH4NO3, under anaerobic condition to produce hydrogen and ethanol. The optimal conditions were determined to be 500 rpm, pH 6.4, 18.5 g/L crude glycerol (15 g/L glycerol and 33% liquid recycling for a fresh feed rate of 0.44 mL/min. Using these optimized conditions, the process ran at a lower media cost than previous studies, was stable after 7 days without further inoculation and resulted in yields of 0.86 mol H2/mol glycerol and 0.75 mol ethanol/mole glycerol.

  13. Reuse of drinking water treatment residuals in a continuous stirred tank reactor for phosphate removal from urban wastewater.

    Bai, Leilei; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhao, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    This work proposed a new approach of reusing drinking water treatment residuals (WTR) in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) to remove phosphate (P) from urban wastewater. The results revealed that the P removal efficiency of the WTR was more than 94% for urban wastewater, in the condition of initial P concentration (P0) of 10 mg L⁻¹, hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 h and WTR dosage (M0) of 10 g L⁻¹. The P mass transfer from the bulk to the solid-liquid interface in the CSTR system increased at lower P0, higher M0 and longer HRT. The P adsorption capacity of WTR from urban wastewater was comparable to that of the 201 × 4 resin and unaffected by ions competition. Moreover, WTR had a limited effect on the metals' (Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Mn and Ni) concentrations of the urban wastewater. Based on the principle of waste recycling, the reuse of WTR in CSTR is a promising alternative technology for P removal from urban wastewater. PMID:25176310

  14. Application of a continuously stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-rich industrial wastewater effluents

    A continuously stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) was used to optimize feasible and reliable bioprocess system in order to treat hydrocarbon-rich industrial wastewaters. A successful bioremediation was developed by an efficient acclimatized microbial consortium. After an experimental period of 225 days, the process was shown to be highly efficient in decontaminating the wastewater. The performance of the bioaugmented reactor was demonstrated by the reduction of COD rates up to 95%. The residual total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) decreased from 320 mg TPH l-1 to 8 mg TPH l-1. Analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) identified 26 hydrocarbons. The use of the mixed cultures demonstrated high degradation performance for hydrocarbons range n-alkanes (C10-C35). Six microbial isolates from the CSTR were characterized and species identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that 5 strains were closely related to Aeromonas punctata (Aeromonas caviae), Bacillus cereus, Ochrobactrum intermedium, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Rhodococcus sp. The 6th isolate was affiliated to genera Achromobacter. Besides, the treated wastewater could be considered as non toxic according to the phytotoxicity test since the germination index of Lepidium sativum ranged between 57 and 95%. The treatment provided satisfactory results and presents a feasible technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-rich wastewater from petrochemical industries and petroleum refineries.

  15. The Reduced Rank of Ensemble Kalman Filter to Estimate the Temperature of Non Isothermal Continue Stirred Tank Reactor

    Erna Apriliani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kalman filter is an algorithm to estimate the state variable of dynamical stochastic system. The square root ensemble Kalman filter is an modification of Kalman filter. The square root ensemble Kalman filter is proposed to keep the computational stability and reduce the computational time. In this paper we study the efficiency of the reduced rank ensemble Kalman filter. We apply this algorithm to the non isothermal continue stirred tank reactor problem. We decompose the covariance of the ensemble estimation by using the singular value decomposition (the SVD, and then we reduced the rank of the diagonal matrix of those singular values. We make a simulation by using Matlab program. We took some the number of ensemble such as 100, 200 and 500. We compared the computational time and the accuracy between the square root ensemble Kalman filter and the ensemble Kalman filter. The reduced rank ensemble Kalman filter can’t be applied in this problem because the dimension of state variable is too less.

  16. Conversion-space time profiles of stirred tank reactors continuously fed with reactants and catalyst under conditions of strong catalyst deactivation

    Flaschel, E.; Margot, A; Dohmen, M; Renken, A.

    1995-01-01

    Feeding continuously operated stirred tank reactors with reactants and homogeneous catalysts subject to inactivation will usually lead to a limited substrate conversion with increasing space time. However, it is shown that a max. of conversion may be obsd. under certain circumstances. Guided by exptl. evidence, the theor. background is discussed for identifying reaction systems for which such conversion maxima at distinct space times may be obtained. This phenomenon may be obsd. only if the c...

  17. The catalytic hydrogenation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene in a continuous stirred three-phase slurry reactor with an evaporting solvent

    Westerterp, K.R.; Janssen, H.J.; Kwast, van der, J.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of the catalytic hydorgenation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) in a mini-installation with a continuously operated stirred three-phase slurry reactor and an evaporating solvent is discussed. Some characteristic properties of the reactor system and the influence of the operating parameters on the performance of the reactor are illustrated. The experimental results are compared with the predictions based on a mathematical model of the reactor system. The results indicated that...

  18. Jet-Stirred Reactors

    Herbinet, Olivier; Guillaume, Dayma

    2013-01-01

    The jet-stirred reactor is a type of ideal continuously stirred-tank reactor which is well suited for gas phase kinetic studies. It is mainly used to study the oxidation and the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and oxygenated fuels. These studies consist in recording the evolution of the conversion of the reactants and of the mole fractions of reaction products as a function of different parameters such as reaction temperature, residence time, pressure and composition of the inlet gas. Gas chromatogr...

  19. A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams

    Dale, M.C.; Lei, Shuiwang; Zhou, Chongde

    1995-10-01

    An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continues, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculent yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrated ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CSRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

  20. Influence of pH, concentration and ionic strength during batch and flow-through continuous stirred reactor experiments of Sr2+-adsorption onto montmorillonite

    Sorption/desorption experiments in batch and continuous flow-through stirred reactor under different experimental conditions were carried out using montmorillonite (2+ amount desorbed at pH 4 is only half of the amount desorbed at pH 8, revealing that the retention of Sr2+ onto montmorillonite was enhanced at pH 4. The largest adsorption value was obtained at pH 8.0 ([KNO3] = 10-3 mol/L) with q m = 41.49 mg Sr2+/g from the Langmuir isotherm. The gradient of concentration acted as an increasing driving force since the amount of Sr2+ adsorbed increased as increasing of Sr2+ concentration during the flow-through experiments. (author)

  1. Continuous extraction of vanadium(V) and iron(III) with acetylacetone under high-speed stirring with Teflon phase separator

    A continuous extraction system consisting of a distillation flask, an extraction flask (Morton flask) containing a high speed stirrer and a Teflon phase separator was investigated. The utility of the system was examined by the separation and concentration of V(V) and Fe(III) with acetylacetone(AA). m-Xylene was selected as the extraction solvent because distillation took place at about 140degC. Fe(III) was easily extracted into the organic solvent with AA. On the other hand, V(V) was not extracted with AA without adding pentyl alcohol. Therefore, V(V) was extracted by the synergism between AA and pentyl alcohol. The effect of stirring speed was examined on the extractions of V(V) and Fe(III). The recommended procedure for the stepwise determination of V(V) and Fe(III) was as follows: A solvent mixture of m-xylene (15cm3) and AA (1cm3) was added to the sample solution (50cm3, pH 4) containing Fe(III) and V(V) in the Morton flask (200cm3) containing a stirring rod and a Teflon phase separator. The stirring speed was kept at 1800rpm. The rate of solvent-transport by the Peristaltic pump was regulated at 1.6cm3/min. The extraction was stopped after 30min and the distillation flask containing the concentrate for Fe(III) analysis was removed. The distillation flask in the extraction-apparatus was then exchanged and 1cm3 of pentyl alcohol and 0.5cm3 of AA were added to the extraction solvent in the Morton flask. Subsequently, 1cm3 of 8 mol dm-3 HCl solution was added in order to adjust the pH to 2.5. The extraction was then performed again. After 60min, the absorbance of the concentrated extract was measured at 449nm after dilution to 10cm3 with m-xylene. Similarly, the amount of Fe(III) in the previous flask was determined at 437nm. The metal ions were quantitatively extracted by the proposed method. The extractability of V(V) by this batch method was 63%. The determination ranges of V(V) and Fe(III) were 20-100 μg and 10-80 μg, respectively. (author)

  2. Anaerobic treatment of cassava stillage for hydrogen and methane production in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under high organic loading rate (OLR)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zou, Zhonghai; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qi [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education (Tongji University), UNEP-Tongji, Tongji University, Siping Road No. 1239, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shim, Hojae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau SAR 999078 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Anaerobic hydrogen and methane production from cassava stillage in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were investigated in this study. Results showed that the heat-pretreatment of inoculum did not enhance hydrogen yield compared to raw inoculum under mesophilic condition after continuous operation. However, the hydrogen yield increased from about 14 ml H{sub 2}/gVS under mesophilic condition to 69.6 ml H{sub 2}/gVS under thermophilic condition due to the decrease of propionate concentration and inhibition of homoacetogens. Therefore, temperature was demonstrated to be more important than pretreatment of inoculum to enhance the hydrogen production. Under high organic loading rate (OLR) (>10 gVS/(L.d)), the two-phase thermophilic CSTR for hydrogen and methane production was stable with hydrogen and methane yields of 56.6 mlH{sub 2}/gVS and 249 mlCH{sub 4}/gVS. The one-phase thermophilic CSTR for methane production failed due to the accumulation of both acetate and propionate, leading to the pH lower than 6. Instead of propionate alone, the accumulations of both acetate and propionate were found to be related to the breakdown of methane reactor. (author)

  3. Hydrolysis-acidogenesis of food waste in solid-liquid-separating continuous stirred tank reactor (SLS-CSTR) for volatile organic acid production.

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-01-01

    The use of conventional continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) can affect the methane (CH4) recovery in a two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW) due to carbon short circuiting in the hydrolysis-acidogenesis (Hy-Aci) stage. In this research, we have designed and tested a solid-liquid-separating CSTR (SLS-CSTR) for effective Hy-Aci of FW. The working conditions were pH 6 and 9 (SLS-CSTR-1 and -2, respectively); temperature-37°C; agitation-300rpm; and organic loading rate (OLR)-2gVSL(-1)day(-1). The volatile fatty acids (VFA), enzyme activities and bacterial population (by qPCR) were determined as test parameters. Results showed that the Hy-Aci of FW at pH 9 produced ∼35% excess VFA as compared to that at pH 6, with acetic and butyric acids as major precursors, which correlated with the high enzyme activities and low lactic acid bacteria. The design provided efficient solid-liquid separation there by improved the organic acid yields from FW. PMID:26512860

  4. Coupling of acrylic dyeing wastewater treatment by heterogeneous Fenton oxidation in a continuous stirred tank reactor with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor.

    Esteves, Bruno M; Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Boaventura, Rui A R; Maldonado-Hódar, F J; Madeira, Luís M

    2016-01-15

    This work deals with the treatment of a recalcitrant effluent, from the dyeing stage of acrylic fibres, by combination of the heterogeneous Fenton's process in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with biological degradation in a sequential batch reactor (SBR). Three different catalysts (a commercial Fe/ZSM-5 zeolite and two distinct Fe-containing activated carbons - ACs - prepared by wet impregnation of iron acetate and iron nitrate) were employed on the Fenton's process, and afterwards a parametric study was carried out to determine the effect of the main operating conditions, namely the hydrogen peroxide feed concentration, temperature and contact time. Under the best operating conditions found, using the activated carbon impregnated with iron nitrate, 62.7% of discolouration and 39.9% of total organic carbon (TOC) reduction were achieved, at steady-state. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the effluent's biodegradability was attained (BOD5:COD ratio increased from toxicity (from 92.1 to 94.0% of Vibrio fischeri inhibition down to 6.9-9.9%). This allowed the application of the subsequent biological degradation stage. The combination of the two processes provided a treated effluent that clearly complies with the legislated discharge limits. It was also found that the iron leaching from the three catalysts tested was very small in all runs, a crucial factor for the stability and long-term use of such materials. PMID:26513317

  5. Determination of direct photolysis rate constants and OH radical reactivity of representative odour compounds in brewery broth using a continuous flow-stirred photoreactor

    Jürgens, Marion; Jacob, Fritz; Ekici, Perihan; Friess, Albrecht; Parlar, Harun

    A method based on photolysis was developed for the appropriate treatment of organic pollutants in air exhausting from breweries upon wort decoction, and thereby causing smell nuisance. A continuous flow stirred photoreactor was built-up exclusively, allowing OH radicals to react with selected odorous compounds contained in exhaust vapours, such as: 2-methylpropanal, 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, n-hexanal, 2-methylbutyl isobutyrate, 2-undecanone, phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, limonene, linalool, humulene, dimethylsulphide, and dimethyltrisulphide. These substances were quantified in brewery broth before and after UV irradiation using high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). For odour analysis, high-resolution gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (HRGC-FID) coupled with sensory methods was used. Determined quantum yields of about 10 -3 for phenyl acetaldehyde, myrcene, and humulene pointed out that direct photolysis contributed to their decay. Quantum yields of below 10 -4 for the other substances indicated that UV irradiation did not contribute significantly to their degradation processes. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and Henry constants of organic compounds were also measured. Substances accompanied with low Henry constants converted rapidly, whereas those with higher ones, relatively slowly. Determined aroma values concluded that after UV-H 2O 2 treatment, only dimethylsulphide and myrcene remained as important odorous compounds, but in significantly reduced concentrations. The UV-H 2O 2 treatment of brewery broth has been proved effective to reduce smell-irritating substances formed upon wort decoction.

  6. Determination of Noncovalent Binding Using a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor as a Flow Injection Device Coupled to Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Santos, Inês C.; Waybright, Veronica B.; Fan, Hui; Ramirez, Sabra; Mesquita, Raquel B. R.; Rangel, António O. S. S.; Fryčák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A.

    2015-07-01

    Described is a new method based on the concept of controlled band dispersion, achieved by hyphenating flow injection analysis with ESI-MS for noncovalent binding determinations. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used as a FIA device for exponential dilution of an equimolar host-guest solution over time. The data obtained was treated for the noncovalent binding determination using an equimolar binding model. Dissociation constants between vancomycin and Ac-Lys(Ac)-Ala-Ala-OH peptide stereoisomers were determined using both the positive and negative ionization modes. The results obtained for Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- D-Ala- D-Ala (a model for a Gram-positive bacterial cell wall) binding were in reasonable agreement with literature values made by other mass spectrometry binding determination techniques. Also, the developed method allowed the determination of dissociation constants for vancomycin with Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- D-Ala- L-Ala, Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- L-Ala- D-Ala, and Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- L-Ala- L-Ala. Although some differences in measured binding affinities were noted using different ionization modes, the results of each determination were generally consistent. Differences are likely attributable to the influence of a pseudo-physiological ammonium acetate buffer solution on the formation of positively- and negatively-charged ionic complexes.

  7. Comparison of bioleaching of heavy metals from municipal sludge using indigenous sulfur and iron-oxidizing microorganisms: continuous stirred tank reactor studies.

    Pathak, Ashish; Kothari, Richa; Dastidar, M G; Sreekrishnan, T R; Kim, Dong J

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study was undertaken using indigenous sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms and iron-oxidizing microorganisms in separate 12 litre continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for solubilization of heavy metals from anaerobically digested sewage sludge. The CSTRs were operated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) ranging from 4 to 10 days using sewage sludge feed having near neutral pH. The pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and solubilization efficiency of metals were found to be highly dependent on HRT and an increase in HRT led to higher solubilization of metals in both the CSTRs. In both the CSTRs, the CSTR operated with sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms at an HRT of 8 days was found to be optimum in solubilizing 58% Cu, 52% Ni, 72% Zn and 43% Cu from the sludge. The nutrient value, nitrogen and phosphorus of bioleached sludge was also conserved (sequential extraction procedure suggested that most of the metals remaining in the bioleached sludge were in the more stable fractions (F3 and F4) and, therefore, can be safely apply as a fertilizer on land. PMID:24117088

  8. Recovery of resources for advanced life support space applications: effect of retention time on biodegradation of two crop residues in a fed-batch, continuous stirred tank reactor

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.; Cook, K.; Garland, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Bioreactor retention time is a key process variable that will influence costs that are relevant to long distance space travel or long duration space habitation. However. little is known about the effects of this parameter on the microbiological treatment options that are being proposed for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. Two bioreactor studies were designed to examine this variable. In the first one, six retention times ranging from 1.3 to 21.3 days--were run in duplicate, 81 working-volume continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) that were fed ALS wheat residues. Ash-free dry weight loss, carbon mineralization, soluble TOC reduction, changes in fiber content (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin), bacterial numbers, and mineral recoveries were monitored. At short retention times--1.33 days--biodegradation was poor (total: 16-20%, cellulose - 12%, hemicellulose - 28%) but soluble TOC was decreased by 75-80% and recovery of major crop inorganic nutrients was adequate, except for phosphorus. A high proportion of the total bacteria (ca. 83%) was actively respiring. At the longest retention time tested, 21.3 days, biodegradation was good (total: 55-60%, cellulose ca. 70%, hemicellulose - ca. 55%) and soluble TOC was decreased by 80%. Recovery of major nutrients, except phosphorus, remained adequate. A very low proportion of total bacteria was actively respiring (ca. 16%). The second bioreactor study used potato residue to determine if even shorter retention times could be used (range 0.25-2.0 days). Although overall biodegradation deteriorated, the degradation of soluble TOC continued to be ca. 75%. We conclude that if the goal of ALS bioprocessing is maximal degradation of crop residues, including cellulose, then retention times of 10 days or longer will be needed. If the goal is to provide inorganic nutrients with the smallest volume/weight bioreactor possible, then a retention time of 1 day (or less) is sufficient.

  9. Thermodynamic modeling of iron and trace metal solubility and speciation under sulfidic and ferruginous conditions in full scale continuous stirred tank biogas reactors

    Highlights: • Iron, sulfur, and trace metal speciation was studied in full scale biogas reactors. • Speciation of sulfur was dominated by FeS, thiol/organic sulfide, and zero-valent S. • The S:Fe molar ratio controls aqueous sulfide and indirectly trace metal speciation. • Zero-valent S formation was enhanced under ferruginous conditions. • Sulfide, polysulfide and organic ligands were shown to control metal solubility. - Abstract: We investigated the equilibrium chemistry and chemical speciation of S, Fe and metals (Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) in eight full scale Continuous Stirred Tank Biogas Reactors (CSTBR). Five reactors were digesting mixtures of different organic wastes (referred to as Co-Digester; CD) and three were digesting Sewage Sludge (SS). Iron was continuously added to the CD reactors to remove sulfide produced during anaerobic digestion and SS was rich in Fe, amended for phosphate removal in wastewater treatment plants prior to anaerobic digestion. As a consequence of different S:Fe molar ratios (0.3–2.8), ferruginous (Fe(II)-dominated) conditions prevailed in SS reactors and sulfidic (S(-II)-dominated) conditions in CD reactors. In all reactors, the chemical speciation of S, as determined by S K-edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure spectroscopy, was dominated by FeS(s). Reduced organic S forms, consisting of RSH (thiol) and RSR (organic sulfide), were the second most abundant S species. Zero-valent S (elemental S, polysulfides, and possible traces of pyrite) was detected in all reactors, ranging between 6% and 26% of total S, with the highest proportion formed under ferruginous conditions. Thermodynamic modeling suggested that Fe in the aqueous phase was dominated by Fe(II)-thiol complexes under sulfidic conditions (CD reactors) and by Fe(II)-phosphate complexes under ferruginous conditions (SS reactors). Thiols, representing organic functional groups, and sulfide complexes were the major aqueous species of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd

  10. Friction stir welding tool

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  11. Characterization of flow conditions in 2 L and 20 L wave bioreactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    Oncül, Alper A; Kalmbach, Andreas; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo; Thévenin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of flow conditions is of great importance to control cell growth and cell damage in animal cell culture because cell viability is influenced by the flow properties in bioreactors. Alternative reactor types like Wave Bioreactors have been proposed in recent years, leading to markedly different results in cell growth and product formation. An advantage of Wave Bioreactors is the disposability of the Polyethylenterephthalet-bags after one single use (fast setup of new production facilities). Another expected advantage is a lower shear stress compared to classical stirred-tank reactors, due to the gentle liquid motion in the rocking cellbag. This property would considerably reduce possible cell damage. The purpose of the present study is to investigate in a quantitative manner the key flow properties in Wave Bioreactors, both numerically and experimentally. To describe accurately flow conditions and shear stress in Wave Bioreactors using numerical simulations, it is necessary to compute the unsteady flow applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Corresponding computations for two reactor scales (2 L and 20 L cellbags) are presented using the CFD code ANSYS-FLUENT. To describe correctly the free liquid surface, the present simulations employ the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. Additionally, experimental measurements have been carried out to determine liquid level, flow velocity and liquid shear stress, which are used as a validation of the present CFD simulations. It is shown that the obtained flows stay in the laminar regime. Furthermore, the obtained shear stress levels are well below known threshold values leading to damage of animal cells. PMID:19918766

  12. A system of miniaturized stirred bioreactors for parallel continuous cultivation of yeast with online measurement of dissolved oxygen and off-gas.

    Klein, Tobias; Schneider, Konstantin; Heinzle, Elmar

    2013-02-01

    Chemostat cultivation is a powerful tool for physiological studies of microorganisms. We report the construction and application of a set of eight parallel small-scale bioreactors with a working volume of 10 mL for continuous cultivation. Hungate tubes were used as culture vessels connected to multichannel-peristaltic pumps for feeding fresh media and removal of culture broth and off-gas. Water saturated air is sucked into the bioreactors by applying negative pressure, and small stirrer bars inside the culture vessels allow sufficient mixing and oxygen transfer. Optical sensors are used for non-invasive online measurement of dissolved oxygen, which proved to be a powerful indicator of the physiological state of the cultures, particularly of steady-state conditions. Analysis of culture exhaust-gas by means of mass spectrometry enables balancing of carbon. The capacity of the developed small-scale bioreactor system was validated using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, focusing on the metabolic shift from respiratory to respiro-fermentative metabolism, as well as studies on consumption of different substrates such as glucose, fructose, and gluconate. In all cases, an almost completely closed carbon balance was obtained proving the reliability of the experimental setup. PMID:22887039

  13. Topological stirring of two-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensates

    We stir vortices into a trapped quasi two-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensate by moving three laser stirrers. We apply stirring protocols introduced by Boyland et al. (2000), that efficiently build in topological chaos in classical fluids and are classified as Pseudo-Anosov stirring protocols. These are compared to their inefficient mixing counterparts, finite-order stirring protocols. We investigate if inefficient stirring protocols result in a more clustered distribution of vortices. The efficiency with which vortices are 'mixed' or distributed in a condensate is important for investigating dynamics of continuously forced quantum turbulence and the existence of the inverse cascade in turbulent two-dimensional superfluids

  14. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  15. Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  16. Importance of reduced sulfur for the equilibrium chemistry and kinetics of Fe(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) supplemented to semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors fed with stillage

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics and kinetics of Fe, Co and Ni added to biogas reactors were studied. • Formation of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol aqueous complexes controlled the Fe solubility. • Cobalt solubility was controlled by processes independent of Co-sulfide interaction. • Iron added to the biogas reactors effected the Ni speciation and solubility. - Abstract: The objective of the present study was to assess major chemical reactions and chemical forms contributing to solubility and speciation of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) during anaerobic digestion of sulfur (S)-rich stillage in semi-continuous stirred tank biogas reactors (SCSTR). These metals are essential supplements for efficient and stable performance of stillage-fed SCSTR. In particular, the influence of reduced inorganic and organic S species on kinetics and thermodynamics of the metals and their partitioning between aqueous and solid phases were investigated. Solid phase S speciation was determined by use of S K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Results demonstrated that the solubility and speciation of supplemented Fe were controlled by precipitation of FeS(s) and formation of the aqueous complexes of Fe-sulfide and Fe-thiol. The relatively high solubility of Co (∼20% of total Co content) was attributed to the formation of compounds other than Co-sulfide and Co-thiol, presumably of microbial origin. Nickel had lower solubility than Co and its speciation was regulated by interactions with FeS(s) (e.g. co-precipitation, adsorption, and ion substitution) in addition to precipitation/dissolution of discrete NiS(s) phase and formation of aqueous Ni-sulfide complexes

  17. Modeling of induction stirred ladles

    Pal, Mayur

    2012-01-01

    Over the years numerous computational fluid dynamics models have been developed in order to study the fluid flow in gas and induction stirred ladles. These models are used to gain insight in the industrial processes used in ladle treatment of steel. A unified model of an induction stirred Ladle in two and three dimensions is presented. Induction stirring of molten steel is a coupled multi-physics phenomena involving electromagnetic and fluid flow. Models presented in this thesis gives a more ...

  18. Phase separation dynamics under stirring

    Lacasta Palacio, Ana María; Sancho, Jose Maria; Sagués Mestre, Francesc

    1995-01-01

    Phase separation dynamics in the presence of externally imposed stirring is stuidied. The stirring is assumed independent of the concentration and it is generated with a well-defined energy spectrum. The domain growth process is either favored or frozen depending on the intensity and correlation length of this advective flow. This behavior is explained by analytical arguments.

  19. Stirring by swimming bodies

    We consider the stirring of an inviscid fluid caused by the locomotion of bodies through it. The swimmers are approximated by non-interacting cylinders or spheres moving steadily along straight lines. We find the displacement of fluid particles caused by the nearby passage of a swimmer as a function of an impact parameter. We use this to compute the effective diffusion coefficient from the random walk of a fluid particle under the influence of a distribution of swimming bodies. We compare with the results of simulations. For typical sizes, densities and swimming velocities of schools of krill, the effective diffusivity in this model is five times the thermal diffusivity. However, we estimate that viscosity increases this value by two orders of magnitude.

  20. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  1. Phosphorus removal in aerated stirred tank reactor

    Ghigliazza, R.; Lodi, A.; Rovatti, M. [Inst. of Chemical and Process Engineering ``G.B. Bonino``, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1999-03-01

    The possibility to obtain biological phosphorus removal in strictly aerobic conditions has been investigated. Experiments, carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), show the feasibility to obtain phosphorus removal without the anaerobic phase. Reactor performance in terms of phosphorus abatement kept always higher then 65% depending on adopted sludge retention time (SRT). In fact increasing SRT from 5 days to 8 days phosphorus removal and reactor performance increase but overcoming this SRT value a decreasing in reactor efficiency was recorded. (orig.) With 6 figs., 3 tabs., 18 refs.

  2. Opel 2.0-l biturbo diesel engine with two-stage intercooling; 2,0-L-Biturbo-Dieselmotor von Opel mit Zweistufen-Ladeluftkuehlung

    Wartha, Jens; Westin, Fredrik; De Marco, Mirco [GM Powertrain Europe, Turin (Italy); Leu, Alexander [Adam Opel AG, Ruesselsheim (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Opel has developed a 2.0-l biturbo diesel engine that features two-stage charging, piezo injection technology and a closed-loop combustion system for low emissions and a good fuel economy. All these measures in combination with a first time applied two-stage intercooling lead to high power and torque density and allow a further improvement in transient response. (orig.)

  3. Stirring and biomass starter influences the anaerobic digestion of different substrates for biogas production

    Rojas, Christian; Fang, Sheng; Uhlenhut, Frank; Borchert, Axel; Stein, Ingo; Schlaak, Michael [Institut fuer Umwelttechnik EUTEC, Fachbereich Technik, Fachhochschule Emden/Leer, Emden (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Here, we present the results of lab-scale experiments conducted in a batch mode to determine the biogas yield of lipid-rich waste and corn silage under the effect of stirring. Further semi-continuous experiments were carried out for the lipid-rich waste with/without stirring. Additionally, it was analyzed how the starter used for the batch experiment influences the digestion process. The results showed a significant stirring effect on the anaerobic digestion only when seed sludge from a biogas plant was used as a starter. In this case, the experiments without stirring yielded only about 50% of the expected biogas for the investigated substrates. The addition of manure slurry to the batch reactor as part of the starter improved the biogas production. The more diluted media in the reactor allowed a better contact between the bacteria and the substrates making stirring not necessary. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Modelling of baffled stirred tanks

    Ahlstedt, H.; Lahtinen, M. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The three-dimensional flow field of a baffled stirred tank has been calculated using four different turbulence models. The tank is driven by a Rushton-type impeller. The boundary condition for the impeller region has been given as a source term or by calculating the impeller using the sliding mesh technique. Calculated values have been compared with measured data. (author)

  5. Friction Stir Welding: A Review

    Jain, Sumit; Gupta, Rajat; Singh, Arvinder; Sharma, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which a rotating tool is used to join the two metal parts. The rotating tool is inserted in between two metal parts and the frictional energy is used to join the metal. In this research paper a review has been presented on FSW. The previous literature has been discussed along with the future aspects included in the field of FSW.

  6. Modelling of friction stir welding

    Colegrove, Paul Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This thesis investigates the modelling of friction stir welding (FSW). FSW is a relatively new welding process where a rotating non-consumable tool is used to join two materials through high temperature deformation. The aim of the thesis is the development of a numerical model to improve process understanding and to assist in the design of new tools. The early part of the thesis describes the process, defines the modelling problem and describes why a computational fluid dynamics package (FLUE...

  7. Friction Stir Process Mapping Methodology

    Kooney, Alex; Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn; Smelser, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In FSW (friction stir welding), the weld process performance for a given weld joint configuration and tool setup is summarized on a 2-D plot of RPM vs. IPM. A process envelope is drawn within the map to identify the range of acceptable welds. The sweet spot is selected as the nominal weld schedule. The nominal weld schedule is characterized in the expected manufacturing environment. The nominal weld schedule in conjunction with process control ensures a consistent and predictable weld performance.

  8. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  9. Ozone absorption in a mechanically stirred reactor

    LJILJANA TAKIC

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ozone absorption in water was investigated in a mechanically stirred reactor, using both the semi-batch and continuous mode of operation. A model for the precise determination of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient in open tanks without the necessity of the measurement the ozone concentration in the outlet gas was developed. It was found that slow ozone reactions in the liquid phase, including the decomposition of ozone, can be regarded as one pseudo-first order reaction. Under the examined operating conditions, the liquid phase was completely mixed, while mixing in a gas phase can be described as plug flow. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient was found to vary with the square of the impeller speed.

  10. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Feng, Zhili [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lim, Yong Chae [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mahoney, Murray [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Larsen, Steve [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Steel, Russel [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fleck, Dale [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC), Houston, TX (United States); Babb, Jon [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States); Higgins, Paul [MegaStir Technologies LLC, Orem, UT (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  11. Biodenitrification of gaseous diffusion plant aqueous wastes: stirred bed reactor

    Approximately 30 kilograms of nitrates per day are discarded in the raffinates (acid wastes) of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's X-705 Uranium Recovery and Decontamination Facility. A biodenitrification process employing continuous-flow, stirred-bed reactors has been successfully used to remove nitrates from similar acid wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Laboratory studies have been made at Portsmouth to characterize the X-705 raffinates and to test the stirred-bed biodenitrification process on such raffinates. Raffinates which had been previously characterized were pumped through continuous-flow, stirred-bed, laboratory-scale reactors. Tests were conducted over a period of 146 days and involved variations in composition, mixing requirements, and the fate of several metal ions in the raffinates. Tests results show that 20 weight percent nitrates were reduced to a target nitrate effluent concentration of 100 μg/ml with a 99.64 percent efficiency. However, the average denitrification rate achieved was only 33% of that demonstrated with the Y-12 stirred-bed system. These low rates were probably due to the toxic effects of heavy metal ions on the denitrifying bacteria. Also, most of the uranium in the raffinate feed remained in the biomass and calcite, which collected in the reactor. This could cause criticality problems. For these reasons, it was decided not to make use of the stirred-bed bioreactor at Portsmouth. Instead, the biodenitrification installation now planned will use fluidized bed columns whose performance will be the subject of a subsequent report

  12. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  13. Læremiddelevaluering af web 2.0 læremidler

    Falkesgaard Slot, Marie; Gissel, Stig Toke

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet etablerer og afprøver et analyseapparat, der bidrager til at højne kvaliteten af de valg, som foretages af web 2.0-læremidler i danskfaget. I kapitlet fokuseres der på læremiddel evaluering af nogle af de funktioner, som typisk tilskrives web 2.0-værktøjerne, ligesom der gives eksempler på...

  14. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for...

  15. Friction Stir Processing of Cast Superalloys Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort examines the feasibility of an innovative fabrication technology incorporating sand casting and friction stir processing (FSP) for producing...

  16. The new 2.0 l TDI {sup registered} to fulfill American emission standards in Volkswagens new Passat; Der neue 2,0l TDI {sup registered} zur Erfuellung der amerikanischen Emissionsgesetze in Volkswagens neuem Passat

    Kahrstedt, Joern; Dorenkamp, Richard; Kuiken, Sander; Greiner, Michael; Kuehne, Ingo; Nigro, Giampaolo; Duesterdiek, Thorsten; Veldeten, Burkhard; Thoem, Norbert [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Volkswagen introduced the all-new Passat in 2011 at the Detroit Motor Show in the USA. It is a new midsize sedan designed exclusively for the American market and will be built at a completely new plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The second-generation 2.0l TDI {sup registered} engine familiar from Europe was extensively modified and further developed for the new Passat, in order to comply with the American BIN5/ULEV emission limits. For this purpose the engine's untreated emissions had to be lowered and, in combination with exhaust emission control by selective catalytic reduction (SCR), compliance with the emission limits throughout the car's operating life ensured. An effective measure for lowering the engine's untreated emissions has proved to be the low-pressure EGR system (LP EGR) [1] introduced on the first-generation 2.0l TDI {sup registered} BIN5 engine. In the course of ongoing development of the LP EGR system, work continued on reducing pressure losses in the system, and charge-air cooling was converted from air to water cooling. Water-cooled charge-air cooling enables intake pipe temperature control independent of ambient temperature, and due to the elimination of throttling and the associated reduction in volume improves road dynamics. Systematic elimination of throttling restrictions in the gas system, combined with improved turbocharging, led to a significant drop in fuel consumption and optimal road performance. As a means of stabilizing untreated emissions in the engine, cylinder-pressure control of combustion was carried-over from the first-generation 2.0l TDI BIN5 engine. Thanks to the closed-loop control of the indicated mean pressure and the centre of combustion with the pressure sensor integrated into the glow-plug, it was possible to minimize the influences of fluctuating fuel quality and component tolerances. The exhaust system was completely revised in order to achieve maximum NOX conversion in the SCR catalytic converter. The

  17. Comparaison between conventional and fast spin-echo STIR sequences

    Purpose: To evaluate the common characteristics and differences in contrast behavior of short-TI-inversion-recovery (STIR) and short-TI-inversion-recovery fast spinecho (TurboSTIR) sequences. Material and Methods: Phantoms doped with increasing doses of Gd-DTPA and a pork-fat phantom were used to evaluate the dependence of the STIR and TurboSTIR signals on the T1 relaxation time. Clinical TurboSTIR images were obtained from 30 patients with musculoskeletal abnormalities and compared to conventional STIR images in 15 cases and to postcontrast TurboSTIR images in another 15 cases. Results: In the phantom measurements, a significantly shorter inversion time (TI) was needed to achive fat suppression on TurboSTIR images, and, with an identical number of signal averages, contrast-to-noise ratios were lower on TurboSTIR images. These differences between STIR and TurboSTIR can be attributed to the contribution of stimulated echoes to overall TurboSTIR signal and can be compensated by a shorter TI and a higher number of signal averages for TurboSTIR, respectively. With these adaptations, clinical TurboSTIR and STIR images showed an identical contrast behavior with fat suppression and a high sensitivity to pathological lesions but TurboSTIR saved a significant amount of scan time and reduced some types of artifacts. Contrast uptake impaired lesion conspicuity on TurboSTIR images. Conclusion: TurboSTIR sequences should replace conventional STIR sequences and should be performed before contrast administration. (orig.)

  18. Studies of stirred jujube yogurt

    郑强强; 薛菊兰; 刘亚丽; 秦婷婷

    2014-01-01

    Jujube is a delicious sweet fruits, with the functions of anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-aging, reducing blood pressure, improving immunity and so on [1]. Yogurt is a kind of high nutritional value and special flavor drinks. Its protein is easily digested and absorbed, especial y calcium. In this experiment, dry jujube and fresh milk as the main material to obtain solidified yoghurt. Then researched how the amounts of solidified yoghurt, sugar, jujube slurry to effect the yogurt quality. The results showed that: the best proportion of stirred yogurt: jujube slurry 15%, sugar 4%and yoghurt85%.

  19. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  20. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  1. Stirring a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Damski, Bogdan [Instytut Fizyki Imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub [Instytut Fizyki Imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    2002-10-14

    By shining a tightly focused laser light on a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and moving the centre of the beam along a spiral path one may stir the BEC and create vortices. It is shown that one can induce rotation of the BEC in the direction opposite to the direction of stirring. (author)

  2. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  3. Effects of stirring on the bulk etch rate of CR-39 detector

    It is well established that the bulk etch rates for solid state nuclear track detectors are affected by the concentration and the temperature of the etchant. Recently, we found that the bulk etch rate for the LR 115 detector to be affected by stirring during etching. In the present work, the effects of stirring on the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 detector is investigated. One set of sample was etched under continuous stirring by a magnetic stirrer at 70 deg. C in a 6.25 N NaOH solution, while the other set of samples was etched without the magnetic stirrer. After etching, the bulk etch thickness was measured using Form Talysurf PGI (Taylor Hobson, Leicester, England). It was found that magnetic stirring did not affect the bulk etch of the CR-39 detector, which was in contrast to the results for the LR 115 detector

  4. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  5. Formation of nanograin in IF steels by friction stir processing

    Research highlights: → Friction stir processing of an IF steel resulted in the formation of a nanograin layer on the surface of IF sheet. → The results show that the FSP of IF steel resulted in the formation of a nanograin layer having 30-35 μm thickness with the nanograins of 50-125 nm. → More than three-fold increase in hardness was observed due to the formation of nanograins. - Abstract: An IF steel was subjected to friction stir processing using a carbide-tungsten pin with the diameter of 16 mm. The rotating speed of pin was 1600 rpm, whereas, the applied traverse speed was 31.5 mm/min. The specimens were water quenched immediately after the FSP. The microstructural evolutions were then characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the FSP of IF steel resulted in the formation of a 30-35 μm thick surface layer with the nanograins of 50-125 nm. There was a continuous decrease in the hardness from the nanograin surface layer towards the center of specimen. There was almost a three-fold increase in the hardness, reaching to 310 Hv pertaining to the nanograin stirred zone compared to the 100 Hv related to the base material. The restoration mechanisms responsible for the formation of nanograins are then discussed.

  6. Recent Developments in Friction Stir Welding of Al-alloys

    Çam, Gürel; Mistikoglu, Selcuk

    2014-06-01

    The diversity and never-ending desire for a better life standard result in a continuous development of the existing manufacturing technologies. In line with these developments in the existing production technologies the demand for more complex products increases, which also stimulates new approaches in production routes of such products, e.g., novel welding procedures. For instance, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology, developed for joining difficult-to-weld Al-alloys, has been implemented by industry in manufacturing of several products. There are also numerous attempts to apply this method to other materials beyond Al-alloys. However, the process has not yet been implemented by industry for joining these materials with the exception of some limited applications. The microstructures and mechanical properties of friction stir welded Al-alloys existing in the open literature will be discussed in detail in this review. The correlations between weld parameters used during FSW and the microstructures evolved in the weld region and thus mechanical properties of the joints produced will be highlighted. However, the modeling studies, material flow, texture formation and developments in tool design are out of the scope of this work as well as the other variants of this technology, such as friction stir spot welding (FSSW).

  7. Torque Control of Friction Stir Welding Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC and Vanderbilt University propose the innovation of torque control of friction stir welding (FSW) as a replacement to force control of...

  8. Investigation of Friction Stir Spot Welding Method

    MERT, Şenol; MERT, Sevda

    2013-01-01

    The Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) method is a derivative of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process, which is a new process that recently has received considerable attention from the automotive and other industries. In both methods, the joining mechanism is the same. However, there are several important differences between the applications. The most obvious difference FSSW than FSW that there is no translation of the tool in the vertical direction during the welding. The FSSW process cons...

  9. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  10. ISG20L1 is a p53 family target gene that modulates genotoxic stress-induced autophagy

    Johnson Kimberly N

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autophagy is characterized by the sequestration of cytoplasm and organelles into multimembrane vesicles and subsequent degradation by the cell's lysosomal system. It is linked to many physiological functions in human cells including stress response, protein degradation, organelle turnover, caspase-independent cell death and tumor suppression. Malignant transformation is frequently associated with deregulation of autophagy and several tumor suppressors can modulate autophagic processes. The tumor suppressor p53 can induce autophagy after metabolic or genotoxic stress through transcriptionally-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In this study we expand on the former mechanism by functionally characterizing a p53 family target gene, ISG20L1 under conditions of genotoxic stress. Results We identified a p53 target gene, ISG20L1, and show that transcription of the gene can be regulated by all three p53 family members (p53, p63, and p73. We generated an antibody to ISG20L1 and found that it localizes to the nucleolar and perinucleolar regions of the nucleus and its protein levels increase in a p53- and p73-dependent manner after various forms of genotoxic stress. When ectopically expressed in epithelial cancer-derived cell lines, ISG20L1 expression decreased clonogenic survival without a concomitant elevation in apoptosis and this effect was partially rescued in cells that were ATG5 deficient. Knockdown of ISG20L1 did not alter 5-FU induced apoptosis as assessed by PARP and caspase-3 cleavage, sub-G1 content, and DNA laddering. Thus, we investigated the role of ISG20L1 in autophagy, a process commonly associated with type II cell death, and found that ISG20L1 knockdown decreased levels of autophagic vacuoles and LC3-II after genotoxic stress as assessed by electron microscopy, biochemical, and immunohistochemical measurements of LC3-II. Conclusions Our identification of ISG20L1 as a p53 family target and discovery that modulation

  11. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  12. Microstructures of AZ91D alloy solidified during electromagnetic stirring

    MAO Wei-min; ZHEN Zi-sheng; CHEN Hong-tao

    2005-01-01

    With the help of an electromagnetic stirring device self-made and alloy melt quenching technology,the effect of electromagnetic stirring parameters on the microstructures of semi-solid AZ91D alloy was mainly studied at the stirring frequency of 200 Hz.The experimental results show that when the stirring power rises,the primary α-Mg rosettes in the semi-solid melt will bear stronger man-made temperature fluctuation and the root remelting effect of the dendritic arms is promoted so that the spherical primary α-Mg grains become much more and rounder.If the stirring frequency is 200 Hz,the ideal semi-solid microstructure of AZ91D magnesium alloy can be obtained when the stirring power is increased to 6.0 kW.If the stirring frequency is 200 Hz and the stirring power is 6.0 kW,it is found that the lower cooling rate is favorable for the spherical primary α-Mg grains to be developed during the electromagnetic stirring stage.If the AZ91D magnesium alloy billet prepared during electromagnetic stirring at the stirring frequency of 200 Hz and the stirring power of 6.0 kW is reheated to the solidus and liquidus temperature region,the primary α-Mg grain's shape will get more spherical,so it is very advantageous to the semi-solid thixoforming process.

  13. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloys

    FU Zhi-hong; HE Di-qiu; WANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    Friction stir welding(FSW), a new solid-state welding technology invited in the early 1990s,enables us weld aluminum alloys and titanium alloys etc. The processing of FSW, the microstructure in FSW alloysand the factors influencing weld quality are introduced. The complex factors affecting the properties are researched.

  14. On Electromagnetic Stirring of Molten Metals

    Doležel, Ivo; Šolín, Pavel; Zítka, M.; Ulrych, B.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2005), s. 35-51. ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/0047; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/05/0629 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : electromagnetic stirring * molten metal * induction heating Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing

    Lin, Zhi; Doering, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    We address the challenge of optimal incompressible stirring to mix an initially inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers. As a quantitative measure of mixing we adopt the $H^{-1}$ norm of the scalar fluctuation field, equivalent to the (square-root of the) variance of a low-pass filtered image of the tracer concentration field. First we establish that this is a useful gauge even in the absence of molecular diffusion: its vanishing as $t --> \\infty$ is evidence of the stirring flow's mixing properties in the sense of ergodic theory. Then we derive absolute limits on the total amount of mixing, as a function of time, on a periodic spatial domain with a prescribed instantaneous stirring energy or stirring power budget. We subsequently determine the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the decay of this mixing measure---when such a flow exists. When no such `steepest descent' flow exists (a possible but non-generic situation) we determine the flow that maximizes the growth rate of the $H^{-1}$ norm's de...

  16. Assessment Of Joints Using Friction Stir Welding And Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding Methods

    Lacki P.; Więckowski W.; Wieczorek P.

    2015-01-01

    FSW (Friction Stir Welding) and RFSSW (Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding) joints have been increasingly used in industrial practice. They successfully replace fusion-welded, riveted or resistance-welded joints. In the last two decades, dynamic development of this method has stimulated investigations of the fast methods for joint diagnostics. These methods should be non-destructive and easy to be used in technological processes. The methods of assessment of joint quality are expected to detect...

  17. Ferrous friction stir weld physical simulation

    Norton, Seth Jason

    2006-04-01

    Traditional fusion welding processes have several drawbacks associated with the melting and solidification of metal. Weld defects associated with the solidification of molten metal may act as initiation sites for cracks. Segregation of alloying elements during solidification may cause local changes in resistance to corrosion. The high amount of heat required to produce the molten metal in the weld can produce distortion from the intended position on cooling. The heat from the electric arc commonly used to melt metal in fusion welds may also produce metal fumes which are a potential health hazard. Friction stir welding is one application which has the potential to make full thickness welds in a single pass, while eliminating fume, reducing distortion, and eliminating solidification defects. Currently the friction stir welding process is used in the aerospace industry on aluminum alloys. Interest in the process by industries which rely on iron and its alloys for structural material is increasing. While friction stir welding has been shown to be feasible with iron alloys, the understanding of friction stir welding process effects on these materials is in its infancy. This project was aimed to better that understanding by developing a procedure for physical simulation of friction stir welding. Friction stir weld material tracer experiments utilizing stainless steel markers were conducted with plates of ingot iron and HSLA-65. Markers of 0.0625" diameter 308 stainless steel worked well for tracing the end position of material moved by the friction stir welding tool. The markers did not produce measurable increases in the loading of the tool in the direction of travel. Markers composed of 0.25" diameter 304 stainless steel did not perform as well as the smaller markers and produced increased loads on the friction stir welding tool. The smaller markers showed that material is moved in a curved path around the tool and deposited behind the tool. Material near the surface

  18. The new 2,0-l high performance four-cylinder motor from Mercedes-AMG; Der neue 2,0-L-Hochleistungs-Vierzylindermotor von Mercedes-AMG

    Gindele, Joerg; Ramsteiner, Thomas; Fischer, Juergen; Tschamon, Bertram [Mercedes-AMG GmbH, Affalterbach (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    To mark its entry into the compact class, Mercedes-AMG has developed a new 2.0-l four-cylinder gasoline engine based on the modular architecture of the Mercedes-Benz BlueDirect family of four-cylinder power units. Achieving the high power density of 133 kW/l required extensive modifications to be made, for example to the basic engine, air management, turbocharging and the exhaust system. (orig.)

  19. Enhancement of the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating low-strength wastewater through implementation of a variable stirring rate program

    Rodrigues J. A. D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on enhancement of the performance of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor with a six-vertical-blade-disk-turbine impeller, containing granulated biomass treating low-strength synthetic wastewater, through a study of the feasibility of implementing a variable stirring rate program. The reactor was operated at 30ºC and a six-hour cycle was used to treat approximately 2.0 L of the synthetic substrate with a chemical oxygen demand (COD of nearly 500 mg/L. Two different stirring rate program were implemented: a constant rate of 50 rpm and a variable rate consisting of 75 rpm for one hour, 50 rpm for four hours and 25 rpm for 0.5 hour. The last 0.5 hour of the cycle was used for the settling step. In both cases, a very short start-up period and unfiltered and filtered substrate removal efficiencies of 81% and 88%, respectively, were attained. However, use of the variable stirring rate enhanced efficiency of the reactor dynamics without impairing biomass morphology, thus resulting in a reduction in the total cycle time and a possible decrease in energy consumption. Additionally, a simplified model of the anaerobic metabolic activity, using apparent kinetic parameters, was proposed as a consecutive first-order kinetic model with substrate and total volatile acid residual concentrations in order to analyze how the variable stirring rate affects reactor performance.

  20. Friction stir processing on carbon steel

    Tarasov, Sergei Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Melnikov, Alexander G., E-mail: melnikov-ag@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, Valery E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    Friction stir processing of medium carbon steel samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. Samples have been machined from 40 and 40X steels. The tools have been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm and 3×3×1.5 mm tetrahedrons. The microstructure of stirred zone has been obtained using the smaller tool and consists of fine recrystallized 2-3 μm grains, whereas the larger tool has produced the 'onion-like' structures comprising hard quenched 'white' 500-600 MPa layers with 300-350 MPa interlayers of bainite needles. The mean values of wear intensity obtained after measuring the wear scar width were 0.02 mm/m and 0.001 mm/m for non-processed and processed samples, respectively.

  1. Friction stir processing on carbon steel

    Friction stir processing of medium carbon steel samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. Samples have been machined from 40 and 40X steels. The tools have been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm and 3×3×1.5 mm tetrahedrons. The microstructure of stirred zone has been obtained using the smaller tool and consists of fine recrystallized 2-3 μm grains, whereas the larger tool has produced the 'onion-like' structures comprising hard quenched 'white' 500-600 MPa layers with 300-350 MPa interlayers of bainite needles. The mean values of wear intensity obtained after measuring the wear scar width were 0.02 mm/m and 0.001 mm/m for non-processed and processed samples, respectively

  2. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    Feng, Xiuli, E-mail: feng.97@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Huijie, E-mail: liuhj@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lippold, John C., E-mail: lippold.1@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium θ precipitates from the base metal θ′ precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (∼ 1 μm) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable θ′ in the base metal transforms to equilibrium θ in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening.

  3. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium θ precipitates from the base metal θ′ precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (∼ 1 μm) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable θ′ in the base metal transforms to equilibrium θ in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Polymer Materials

    Bekir ÇEVİK

    2014-01-01

    Polymer materials are engineering materials used for various industrial fields. Polymer processing and fabrication techniques have developed with the advancement of technology. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) is a solid-state process in joining thermoplastic materials. In the present work, the polymeric material (Polyethylene) has been made to join by FSSW process. 3 mm thickness polyethylene materials were used in the experiments. Welding process was carried out by rotating 460 and 900 rpm...

  5. Fuel property effects in stirred combustors

    1980-01-01

    Soot formation in strongly backmixed combustion was investigated using the jet-stirred combustor (JSC). This device provided a combustion volume in which temperature and combustion were uniform. It simulated the recirculating characteristics of the gas turbine primary zone; it was in this zone where mixture conditions were sufficiently rich to produce soot. Results indicate that the JSC allows study of soot formation in an aerodynamic situation revelant to gas turbines.

  6. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  7. Ultrasonic stir welding process and apparatus

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding device provides a method and apparatus for elevating the temperature of a work piece utilizing at least one ultrasonic heater. Instead of relying on a rotating shoulder to provide heat to a workpiece an ultrasonic heater is utilized to provide ultrasonic energy to the workpiece. A rotating pin driven by a motor assembly performs the weld on the workpiece. A handheld version can be constructed as well as a fixedly mounted embodiment.

  8. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli; Giuseppe Casalino; Caterina Casavola; Vincenzo Moramarco

    2013-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the we...

  9. In-Space Friction Stir Welding Machine Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Longhurst Engineering, PLC, and Vanderbilt University propose an in-space friction stir welding (FSW) machine for joining complex structural aluminum components....

  10. Influence of vibrational treatment on thermomechanical response of material under conditions identical to friction stir welding

    Konovalenko, Ivan S., E-mail: ivkon@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Konovalenko, Igor S., E-mail: igkon@ispms.tsc.ru; Kolubaev, Evgeniy A., E-mail: eak@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Dmitriev, Andrey I., E-mail: dmitr@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G., E-mail: sp@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    A molecular dynamics model was constructed to describe material loading on the atomic scale by the mode identical to friction stir welding. It was shown that additional vibration applied to the tool during the loading mode provides specified intensity values and continuous thermomechanical action during welding. An increase in additional vibration intensity causes an increase both in the force acting on the workpiece from the rotating tool and in temperature within the welded area.

  11. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed. PMID:27062720

  12. Stir zone microstructure and strain rate during Al 7075-T6 friction stir spot welding

    Gerlich, A.; Avramovic-Cingara, G.; North, T. H.

    2006-09-01

    The factors determining the temperature, heating rate, microstructure, and strain rate in Al 7075-T6 friction stir spot welds are investigated. Stir zone microstructure was examined using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) microscopy, while the strain rate during spot welding was calculated by incorporating measured temperatures and the average subgrain dimensions in the Zener-Hollomon relation. The highest temperature during friction stir spot welding (527 °C) was observed in spot welds made using a tool rotational speed of 3000 rpm. The stir zone regions comprised fine-grained, equiaxed, fully recrystallized microstructures. The calculated strain rate in Al 7075-T6 spot welds decreased from 650 to about 20 s-1 when the tool rotational speed increased from 1000 to 3000 rpm. It is suggested that the decrease in strain rate results when tool slippage occurs when the welding parameter settings facilitate transient local melting during the spot welding operation. Transient local melting and tool slippage are produced when the welding parameters produce sufficiently high heating rates and temperatures during spot welding. However, transient local melting and tool slippage is not produced in Al 7075-T6 spot welds made using a rotational speed of 1000 rpm since the peak temperature is always less than 475 °C.

  13. Start-up of semi-continously operated and completely stirred dry fermentation pilot-scale biogas reactor

    Virkkunen, Elina

    2009-01-01

    In the year 2008, MTT Agrifood Research Finland built a pilot scale biogas reactor of 4.5 cubic meters situated in Sotkamo research station. The aim is to develop a completely stirred and semi-continuously operated biogas reactor that handles solid biomass.

  14. Friction Stir Weld Modeling at MSFC: Kinematics

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A "merry-go-round" computation model makes it easier to visualize how tracer experiments of varied sorts (chemical, shot, wire) are consistent with a "moving plug model" of flow around the friction stir welding pin-tool. The moving plug model comprises a twofold flow: 1. a primary rotation of a plug of metal with the tool, which moves metal around the tool by wiping it on and off the plug, and 2. a secondary, relatively slow circulation induced by the threads on the tool resembling a circular vortex ring around the tool.

  15. Modelling of friction stir spot welding

    Reilly, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is a solid-state welding process which is especially useful for joining precipitation-hardened aluminium alloys that undergo adverse property changes during fusion welding. It also has potential as an effective method for solid-state joining of dissimilar alloys. In FSSW, heat generation and plastic flow are strongly linked, and the scale of the process in time and space is such that it is difficult to separate and control the influence of all the relevant in...

  16. Friction Stir Welding of austenitic stainless steels

    C. Meran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Friction Stir Welding (FSW was applied austenitic stainless steels that is difficult to weld using FSW technique. Proper weld can be obtained by using appropriate welding parameter. In this paper, the effect of different tool rotational speeds, traverse speeds, compressive tool forces, and tool angles was investigated.Design/methodology/approach: The dimension of 3 mm x 75 mm x 150 mm two stainless steel plates were used and butt welded by FSW method using 7.5 kW vertical head milling machine. All welded test specimens were prepared perpendicular to the weld line in order to determine the mechanical properties and tested with 12 MPa/sec stress rate under stress control using a servo-hydraulic Instron 8801. Microstructure of the welding zone and macrograph of the heat affected zone was investigated by SEM.Findings: The average grain size in the SZ was between 3 and 7 μm, which is smaller than that in the BM. The average grain size in the HAZ was about 20 μm, which is half of that in the BM.Fine-grained microstructures are present the welded area. The dark bands observed in the weld zone were also detected the microstructure of the transition zone. Dark and narrow bands do not consist of pores or cavities. It was determined that these bands do not process an ultra fine-grained microstructure. They are Cr2O3 oxide layers which over the surface of stainless steels may have been ruptured during friction stir welding and may form bands inside the welding bead due to stirring.Research limitations/implications: The proper cooling system helps to prevent the stirrer tool from the deformation.Practical implications: The strength of the welded zone of AISI 304 stainless steel can be easily found by implementing welding design parameters and high quality joints can be obtained.Originality/value: This study was performed in the frame of the TUBITAK project no 106M504, „Friction Stir Weldability of Stainless Steels and Investigation of the

  17. Friction stir welding of single crystal aluminium

    Fonda, Richard Warren; Wert, John A.; Reynolds, A.P.;

    2007-01-01

    Friction stir welds were prepared in different orientations in an aluminium single crystal. The welds were quenched to preserve the microstructure surrounding the tool and then electron backscattered diffraction was used to reveal the generation of grain boundaries and the evolution of...... crystallographic texture around the tool in each weld. The extent of both dynamic recrystallisation and conventional recrystallisation varied considerably as a function of weld orientation. As the base plate begins to interact with the deformation field surrounding the tool, regions of the single crystal rotate to...

  18. Friction stir welding of 6061 aluminium alloy

    6061 AA (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance such as marine frames, pipelines, storage tanks, and aircraft components [1]. It is also used for the manufacturing of fuel elements in the nuclear research reactors. Compared to many of the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural alloys, friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded is not melted and recast [2]. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding traverse speed, and tool profile play a major role in deciding the weld quality. Several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld. The effect of the traverse speed on the global and local tensile properties of friction stir welded joints has been investigated in the 6061-T6 AA. The global tensile properties of the FSW joints were improved with increasing the traverse speed at constant rotation rate. It is found that the global tensile strength of the FSW joint is limited by the local tensile strength of the nearest region to the weld center at which the cross section is composed mainly of the HAZ. The effect of the initial butt surface on the formation of the zigzag line on the tensile properties of the welds was examined by using three types of welding samples differ in the preparation of the initial butt surface. The first type of samples welded without removing the oxide layer from the initial butt surface (uncleaned butt surfaces joint). In the second type of samples the oxide layer was removed from

  19. Microstructure Characteristics and Apparent Viscosity of Hypereutectic Al-24%Si Alloy Melt During Semi-solid State Stirring

    2001-01-01

    The microstructural evolution and apparent viscosity of hypereutectic Al-24%Si alloy during semi-solid state shearing were studied with a Searte type viscometer. When the alloy melt was continuously stirred from 720℃ to eutectic temperature, the primary Si crystals were gradually changed from elongated platelets to near-spherical shapes. It was found that some nondendritic  -phase formed when the melt was stirred below 585℃. The experiment showed that the semi-solid stirring had strong effect on inhibiting the anisotropic growth of Si crystals during solidification. The apparent viscosity of the alloy melt increased slowly with the decreasing of temperature before the formation of nondendritic  -phase, which caused the dramatic increase of apparent viscosity.

  20. Gas hold-up in stirred tank reactors

    Yawalkar, A.A.; Pangarkar, V.G.; Beenackers, A.A C M

    2002-01-01

    Based on a study of the gas hold-up data for stirred tank reactor generated in the present work and the data available in the literature for large stirred tank reactors (T = 0.57 m to 2.7 m) equipped with disc turbines and pitched blade downflow turbines a correlation is presented which reliably pre

  1. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Frederick, David Alan

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  2. Damage Tolerance Behavior of Friction Stir Welds in Aluminum Alloys

    McGill, Preston; Burkholder, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid state welding process used in the fabrication of various aerospace structures. Self-reacting and conventional friction stir welding are variations of the friction stir weld process employed in the fabrication of cryogenic propellant tanks which are classified as pressurized structure in many spaceflight vehicle architectures. In order to address damage tolerance behavior associated with friction stir welds in these safety critical structures, nondestructive inspection and proof testing may be required to screen hardware for mission critical defects. The efficacy of the nondestructive evaluation or the proof test is based on an assessment of the critical flaw size. Test data describing fracture behavior, residual strength capability, and cyclic mission life capability of friction stir welds at ambient and cryogenic temperatures have been generated and will be presented in this paper. Fracture behavior will include fracture toughness and tearing (R-curve) response of the friction stir welds. Residual strength behavior will include an evaluation of the effects of lack of penetration on conventional friction stir welds, the effects of internal defects (wormholes) on self-reacting friction stir welds, and an evaluation of the effects of fatigue cycled surface cracks on both conventional and selfreacting welds. Cyclic mission life capability will demonstrate the effects of surface crack defects on service load cycle capability. The fracture data will be used to evaluate nondestructive inspection and proof test requirements for the welds.

  3. Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report

    Sanella, M L

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

  4. Steady-shear viscosity of stirred yogurts with varying ropiness

    Marle, van M.E.; Ende, van den D.; Kruif, de C.G.; Mellema, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stirred yogurt was viewed as a concentrated dispersion of aggregates consisting of protein particles. The steady-shear behavior of three types of stirred yogurt with varying ropiness was investigated experimentally. To describe the shear-dependent viscosity, a microrheological model was used which w

  5. Friction Stir Welding Technology: Adapting NASA's Retractable Pin Tool

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    In late 1991, The Welding Institute (TWI), a British research and technology organization, invented and patented a welding process named Friction Stir Welding (FSW). Friction Stir Welding is a highly significant advancement in aluminum welding technology that can produce stronger, lighter, and more efficient welds than any previous process.

  6. Friction Stir Welding at MSFC: Kinematics

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 The Welding Institute of the United Kingdom patented the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process. In FSW a rotating pin-tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the faying surfaces together as it moves up the seam. By April 2000 the American Welding Society International Welding and Fabricating Exposition featured several exhibits of commercial FSW processes and the 81st Annual Convention devoted a technical session to the process. The FSW process is of interest to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as a means of avoiding hot-cracking problems presented by the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy, which is the primary constituent of the Lightweight Space Shuttle External Tank. The process has been under development at MSFC for External Tank applications since the early 1990's. Early development of the FSW process proceeded by cut-and-try empirical methods. A substantial and complex body of data resulted. A theoretical model was wanted to deal with the complexity and reduce the data to concepts serviceable for process diagnostics, optimization, parameter selection, etc. A first step in understanding the FSW process is to determine the kinematics, i.e., the flow field in the metal in the vicinity of the pin-tool. Given the kinematics, the dynamics, i.e., the forces, can be targeted. Given a completed model of the FSW process, attempts at rational design of tools and selection of process parameters can be made.

  7. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This method is a solid-state weld process capable of joining metallic alloys without melting. The weld workpieces to be joined by thermal stir welding (TSW) are drawn, by heavy forces, between containment plates past the TSW stir tool that then causes joining of the weld workpiece. TSW is similar to friction stir welding (FSW) in that material is heated into a plastic state (not melted) and stirred using a stir rod. The FSW pin tool is an integrated geometrical structure consisting of a large-diameter shoulder, and a smaller-diameter stir pin protruding from the shoulder. When the pin is plunged into a weld workpiece, the shoulder spins on the surface of the weld workpiece, thus inducing frictional heat into the part. The pin stirs the fraying surfaces of the weld joint, thus joining the weld workpiece into one structure. The shoulder and stir pin of the FSW pin tool must rotate together at a desired rotational speed. The induced frictional energy control and stir pin control of the pin tool cannot be de-coupled. The two work as one integrated unit. TSW, on the other hand, de-couples the heating and stirring of FSW, and allows for independent control of each process element. A uniquely designed induction coil heats the weld workpiece to a desired temperature, and once heated, the part moves into a stir rod whose RPM is also independently controlled. As the weld workpiece moves into the stir rod, the piece is positioned, or sandwiched, between upper and lower containment plates. The plate squeezes together, thus compressing the upper and lower surfaces of the weld workpiece. This compressive force, also called consolidation force, consolidates the plastic material within the weld nugget material as it is being stirred by the stir rod. The stir rod is positioned through the center of the top containment plate and protrudes midway through the opposite lower containment plate where it is mechanically captured. The upper and lower containment plates are separated by a

  8. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties in naturally aged 7050 and 7075 Al friction stir welds

    The microstructural and mechanical property evolution of friction stir welded 7050-T7651 and 7075-T651 Al alloys were examined as a function of room temperature (natural) aging for up to 67,920 h. During the range of aging times studied, transverse tensile strengths continuously increased, and are still increasing, with improvements of 24% and 29% measured for the 7050-T7651 and 7075-T651 Al alloy friction stir welds, respectively. Microstructural evolution within the weld nugget and heat-affected zone was evaluated with both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Formation of a high volume fraction of GP(II) zones produced a majority of the strength improvement within the weld nugget and HAZ regions. The rational for the microstructural changes are discussed in light of the mechanical properties.

  9. Orbital friction stir welding of aluminium pipes

    Friction stir welding (FSW) was originally developed for flat plates. This contribution shows how it can be applied to the welding of aluminium pipes. Pipes made of AlMG 3 (EN5754), AlMg 4.5Mn (EN5083) and AlMgSi 0.5 (EN6106) with dimensions of Da 600 and 520 x 10-8 mm were welded. The FSW orbital system comprises an annular cage with integrated FSW head, a hydraulic system, and a control unit. The welds were tested successfully according to EN 288. The mechanical and technical properties of the welds were somewhat better than with the TIG orbital process, and welding times were about 40 percent shorter

  10. Horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

  11. Friction stir welding of copper alloys

    Liu Shuhua; Liu Meng; Wang Deqing; Xu Zhenyue

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates,brass plates and copper/brass plates were friction stir welded with various parameters. Experimental results show that the microstructure of the weld is characterized by its much finer grains as contrasted with the coarse grains of parent materials and the heat-affected zones are very narrow. The microhardness of the copper weld is a little higher than that of parent plate. The microhardness of brass weld is about 25% higher than that of parent material. The tensile strength of copper joints increases with increasing welding speed in the test range. The range of parameters to obtain good welds for copper is much wider than that for brass. When different materials were welded, the position of copper plate before welding affected the quality of FSW joints. If the copper plate was put on the advancing side of weld, the good quality of weld could be got under proper parameters.

  12. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  13. Textures in Single-Crystal Aluminum Friction Stir Spot Welds

    Shibayanagi, Toshiya; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Kashihara, Keizo; North, Thomas H.

    2009-04-01

    The present article examines the textural features produced during friction stir spot welding of single-crystal aluminum sheet. The crystal has the {111} plane perpendicular to the normal direction (ND) of the sheet, and the leftFriction stir spot welding was carried out using a rotation speed of 1500 rpm and a dwell time of 2 seconds, and completed spot welds were characterized using a combination of optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The EBSD measurements indicate there are no significant changes in orientation in locations more than 840 μm from the stir-zone extremity. The orientation distribution in the thermomechanically-affected zone (TMAZ) region conformed with the {110}⊥ND orientation within 580 μm of the stir-zone extremity. In the location immediately adjacent to the stir-zone extremity, there was a deviation from the {110}//ND orientation due to a combination of compressive loading perpendicular to the stir-zone boundary and shear loading in the direction of tool rotation. It is suggested a {111}⊥ND texture in the stir zone is associated with material flow imposed by the thread on the rotating pin.

  14. Fundamentals of friction stir spot welding

    Badarinarayan, Harsha

    The recent spike in energy costs has been a major contributor to propel the use of light weight alloys in the transportation industry. In particular, the automotive industry sees benefit in using light weight alloys to increase fuel efficiency and enhance performance. In this context, light weight design by replacing steel with Al and/or Mg alloys have been considered as promising initiatives. The joining of structures made of light weight alloys is therefore very important and calls for more attention. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) is an evolving technique that offers several advantages over conventional joining processes. The fundamentals aspects of FSSW are systematically studied in this dissertation. The effects and influence of process inputs (weld parameters and tool geometry) on the process output (weld geometry and static strength) is studied. A Design of Experiments (DoE) is carried out to identify the effect of each process parameter on weld strength. It is found that the tool geometry, and in particular the pin profile has a significant role in determining the weld geometry (hook, stir zone size etc.) which in turn influences the failure mode and weld strength. A novel triangular pin tool geometry is proposed that suppresses the hook formation and produces welds with twice the static strength as those produced with conventional cylindrical pin tools. An experimental and numerical approach is undertaken to understand the effect of pin geometry on the material flow and failure mechanism of spot welds. In addition, key practical issues have been addressed such as quantification of tool life and a methodology to control tool plunge depth during welding. Finally, by implementing the findings of this dissertation, FSSW is successfully performed on a closure panel assembly for an automotive application.

  15. Applications of Friction Stir Processing during Engraving of Soft Materials

    V. Kočović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing has extensive application in many technological operations. Application area of friction stir processing can be extended to the processing of non-metallic materials, such as wood. The paper examines the friction stir processing contact between a specially designed hard and temperature-resistant rotating tool and workpiece which is made of wood. Interval of speed slip and temperature level under which the combustion occurs and carbonization layer of soft material was determined. The results of the research can be applied in technological process of wood engraving operations which may have significant technological and aesthetic effects.

  16. Friction stir processing on high carbon steel U12

    Tarasov, S. Yu., E-mail: tsy@ispms.ru; Rubtsov, V. E., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Melnikov, A. G., E-mail: melnikov-ag@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Friction stir processing (FSP) of high carbon steel (U12) samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. The FSP tool has been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm. The microstructural characterization of obtained stir zone and heat affected zone has been carried out. Microhardness at the level of 700 MPa has been obtained in the stir zone with microstructure consisting of large grains and cementitte network. This high-level of microhardness is explained by bainitic reaction developing from decarburization of austenitic grains during cementite network formation.

  17. Friction stir processing on high carbon steel U12

    Friction stir processing (FSP) of high carbon steel (U12) samples has been carried out using a milling machine and tools made of cemented tungsten carbide. The FSP tool has been made in the shape of 5×5×1.5 mm. The microstructural characterization of obtained stir zone and heat affected zone has been carried out. Microhardness at the level of 700 MPa has been obtained in the stir zone with microstructure consisting of large grains and cementitte network. This high-level of microhardness is explained by bainitic reaction developing from decarburization of austenitic grains during cementite network formation

  18. Stir frit microextraction: an approach for the determination of volatile compounds in water by headspace-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Roldán-Pijuán, M; Alcudia-León, M C; Lucena, R; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2012-08-17

    In this article, a novel extraction approach, called stir frit microextraction (SFME), is presented. The new approach combines the extractive capability of a commercial polyethylene frit (20 μm of pore size) with the stirring in the same device. The proposed extraction procedure allows the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene isomers and styrene (BTEX-S) in water samples. The analytes are extracted on the frit, previously conditioned with methanol, under continuous magnetic stirring. Once the extraction is performed, the frit is transferred to a headspace vial where the volatile compounds are desorbed from the frit (90 °C, 30 min) in a headspace module and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Headspace conditions (time and temperature) as well as extraction conditions (ionic strength, type of stirring, extraction time, stirring rate and sample volume) have been systematically evaluated. The method was characterized on the basis of its linearity, sensitivity and precision. Limits of detection were in the range from 18 ng/L (o-xylene) to 65 ng/L (benzene). The repeatability of the proposed method, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) varied between 3.8% (toluene) and 8.2% (m- and p-xylene). The recovery study carried out in different water samples provided an average recovery of 94%, which demonstrated the applicability of the stir frit microextraction for the analytical problem selected in this article. PMID:22771255

  19. Friction-Stir-Welded and Spin-Formed End Domes for Cryogenic Tanks

    Hales, S. J.; Tayon, W. A.; Domack, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Manufacturing of single-piece end domes for cryogenic tanks employing spin forming of tailored, friction-stir-welded blanks of Al-Li alloy 2195 plate offers cost and reliability benefits. The introduction of plastic deformation into a friction stir weld is a unique feature of the proposed manufacturing route. This investigation addressed abnormal grain growth [AGG] within the friction stir weldments during postfabrication processing of a prototype dome. The phenomenon of AGG was observed during the solution heat treatment [SHT] phase of T8 tempering and is a major concern for meeting specifications. Such abrupt microstructural transitions can be detrimental to notch-sensitive mechanical properties, such as ductility and/or fracture toughness. If the issue of AGG cannot be resolved, then the acceptance of this approach as a viable manufacturing route may be in jeopardy. The innovative approach adopted in this investigation was the insertion of a stand-alone, Intermediate Annealing Treatment [IAT] between the spin forming and T8 processing operations. A simple, recovery annealing step was deemed to be the most readily-scalable solution when fabricating thin-walled, ellipsoidal domes. The research effort culminated in the development of an effective IAT, which resulted in a significant decrease in AGG following SHT. The processing philosophy adopted in designing the IAT is outlined and the microstructural reasons for success are discussed. The analytical results presented are consistent with promoting continuous grain growth during the IAT, thereby suppressing AGG during the SHT.

  20. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  1. STIR applied to the evaluation of dermatologic lesions

    This paper reports on the evaluation of dermatologic disorders using the short-inversion time-inversion-recovery (STIR) technique. The series included 20 cases, including five cavernous hemangiomas, three lymphangiomas, three melanomas, and nine others. Pulse sequences for STIR were TR/IR/TE = 1,500/100/30--40 (repetition time/inversion-recovery time/echo time, msec) 0.5 and 0.6 T) and TR/IR/TE = 1,500--2,000/200/22 (1.5 T). The images were evaluated for the extent and nature of the lesions. In all cases, STIR was valuable in discriminating lesions from subcutaneous fat tissues; in all cases of cavernous hemangioma and lymphangioma (in which lesions were shown by areas of high intensity) and in children (in whom Gd-DTPA studies were not applicable). Two melanomas were isointense in STIR as well as in T1- and T2-weighted images

  2. Reconstruction of Clear-PEM data with STIR

    Martins, M V; Rodrigues, P; Trindade, A; Oliveira, N; Correia, M; Cordeiro, H; Ferreira, N C; Varela, J; Almeida, P

    2006-01-01

    The Clear-PEM scanner is a device based on planar detectors that is currently under development within the Crystal Clear Collaboration, at CERN. The basis for 3D image reconstruction in Clear-PEM is the software for tomographic image reconstruction (STIR). STIR is an open source object-oriented library that efficiently deals with the 3D positron emission tomography data sets. This library was originally designed for the traditional cylindrical scanners. In order to make its use compatible with planar scanner data, new functionalities were introduced into the library's framework. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations of the Clear-PEM scanner acquisitions were used as input for image reconstruction with the 3D OSEM algorithm available in STIR. The results presented indicate that dual plate PEM data can be accurately reconstructed using the enhanced STIR framework.

  3. Growth and Removal of Inclusions During Ladle Stirring

    Söder, Mats

    2001-01-01

    The growth and removal of inclusions in stirred ladles hasbeen studied. First, the importance of different growthmechanisms suggested in the literature were studied. Simulationresults from a fundamental model of an induction-stirred ladlehave been used as input in the calculations. Based on thegrowth calculations it was concluded that four of the growthmechanisms need not to be considered since they contribute solittle: i) diffusion of oxygen and aluminum to the inclusionsurface, ii) diffusio...

  4. STIRRED FLUIDIZED-BED DRYER OF REGENERATED ION EXCHANGER PARTICLES

    Michal Pěnička; Pavel Hoffman; Ivan Fořt

    2014-01-01

    This article describes intensification of the fluidized-bed drying process for regenerated spherical-shape ion exchanger particles in the batch mode, achieved by a mechanical stirrer in the fluidized bed layer of the dried particles. The effect of the mechanical stirring system on the drying process was examined. Calculations as well as results of comparison measurements provide evidence of a favourable effect of stirring on the total drying time as compared to the initial unstirred system. T...

  5. Vortex Nucleation in a Stirred Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Raman, C.; Abo-Shaeer, J. R.; Vogels, J. M.; Xu, K.; Ketterle, W.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the nucleation of vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate stirred by a laser beam. We observed the vortex cores using time-of-flight absorption imaging. By varying the size of the stirrer, we observed either discrete resonances or a broad response as a function of the frequency of the stirrer's motion. Stirring beams small compared to the condensate size generated vortices below the critical rotation frequency for the nucleation of surface modes, suggesting a local mechanism of gene...

  6. The effect of mechanical stirring on horizontal convection

    R. Tailleux; Rouleau, L

    2010-01-01

    An important experimental result, as yet poorly understood, is that mechanical stirring can significantly enhance the strength of horizontal convection. A contentious issue is whether this necessarily implies that the mechanical stirring replaces the buoyancy forcing as the main source of energy driving the observed overturning circulation, as has been suggested for the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). In this paper, rigorous energetics considerations and idealized numerica...

  7. Fatigue Strength of Friction Stir Welded Joints in Aluminium

    Ericsson, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Solid state Friction stir welding (FSW) is of major interest in the welding of aluminium since it improves the joint properties. Many applications where Al-alloys are used are subject to varying load conditions, making fatigue failure a critical issue. In the scope of this thesis, the fatigue performance of friction stir welded AlMgSi-alloy 6082 has been investigated. Static and dynamic properties of different joint configurations and welds produced with varying process parameters have been d...

  8. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant

  9. STIR sequences in NMR imaging of the optic nerve

    Orbital fat surrounding the optic nerve causes considerable difficulties in NMR imaging due to its high image intensity and the chemical shift artefact. We have investigated the ability of inversion recovery sequences with short inversion times (STIR sequences) to suppress fat signals in imaging the optic nerve. We have also compared the contrast attainable with STIR sequences with that obtainable from other sequences. Measurements were made on 4 normal controls and 5 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to obtain typical values of relaxation times and proton densities for orbital fat, cerebral white matter and MS lesions. The fat T1 measurements were used to predict an appropriate inversion time for the STIR sequence and estimate how much residual fat signal might be expected as a result of natural variations in fat T1. STIR sequences can be used to suppress the signal from orbital fat with little residual signal. Measurements from white matter and MS lesions were used to predict the contrast between normal and pathological tissues that is attainable with STIR sequences. STIR contrast compares favourably with that obtainable form other sequences. (orig.)

  10. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  11. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  12. Topological optimisation of rod-stirring devices

    Finn, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    There are many industrial situations where rods are used to stir a fluid, or where rods repeatedly stretch a material such as bread dough or taffy. The goal in these applications is to stretch either material lines (in a fluid) or the material itself (for dough or taffy) as rapidly as possible. The growth rate of material lines is conveniently given by the topological entropy of the rod motion. We discuss the problem of optimising such rod devices from a topological viewpoint. We express rod motions in terms of generators of the braid group, and assign a cost based on the minimum number of generators needed to write the braid. We show that for one cost function -- the topological entropy per generator -- the optimal growth rate is the logarithm of the golden ratio. For a more realistic cost function,involving the topological entropy per operation where rods are allowed to move together, the optimal growth rate is the logarithm of the silver ratio, $1+\\sqrt{2}$. We show how to construct devices that realise th...

  13. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-07-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  14. Effect of Thermal History on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Prepared by Friction Stir Processing

    Fang Chai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hot-rolled AZ31 (Mg-2.57Al-0.84Zn-0.32Mn, in mass percentage magnesium alloy is subjected to friction stir processing in air (normal friction stir processing, NFSP and under water (submerged friction stir processing, SFSP. Thermal history of the two FSP procedures is measured, and its effect on microstructures and mechanical properties of the experimental materials is investigated. Compared with NFSP, the peak temperature during SFSP is lower and the duration time at a high temperature is shorter due to the enhanced cooling effect of water. Consequently, SFSP results in further grain refinement, and the average grain size of the NFSP and SFSP specimens in the stir zone (SZ are 2.9 μm and 1.3 μm, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM examinations confirm that grain refinement is attributed to continuous dynamic recrystallization both for NFSP and SFSP. The average Vickers hardness in the SZ of the NFSP and SFSP AZ31 magnesium alloy are 76 HV and 87 HV. Furthermore, the ultimate tensile strength and the elongation of the SFSP specimen increase from 191 MPa and 31.3% in the NFSP specimen to 210 MPa and 50.5%, respectively. Both the NFSP and SFSP alloys fail through ductile fracture, but the dimples are much more obvious in the SFSP alloy.

  15. Assessment Of Joints Using Friction Stir Welding And Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding Methods

    Lacki P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available FSW (Friction Stir Welding and RFSSW (Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding joints have been increasingly used in industrial practice. They successfully replace fusion-welded, riveted or resistance-welded joints. In the last two decades, dynamic development of this method has stimulated investigations of the fast methods for joint diagnostics. These methods should be non-destructive and easy to be used in technological processes. The methods of assessment of joint quality are expected to detect discontinuities in the structures welded using FSW and FSSW methods. Reliable detection of flaws would substantially extend the range of applications of FSW joints across many sectors of industry, including aviation. The investigations carried out in this paper allowed for characterization of defects present in FSW and RFSSW joints. Causes of these defects were also stressed. An overview of the methodologies for assessment of joint quality was presented. Results of assessment of the quality of joints made of 2024T6 aluminium sheet metal using FSW and RFSSW method were presented.

  16. Analysis and Comparison of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum Alloy

    Sabina Luisa Campanelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW is a combination in which the FSW is the dominant welding process and the laser pre-heats the weld. In this work FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 6 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in butt joint configuration. LAFSW is studied firstly to demonstrate the weldability of aluminum alloy using that technique. Secondly, process parameters, such as laser power and temperature gradient are investigated in order to evaluate changes in microstructure, micro-hardness, residual stress, and tensile properties. Once the possibility to achieve sound weld using LAFSW is demonstrated, it will be possible to explore the benefits for tool wear, higher welding speeds, and lower clamping force.

  17. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  18. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis - exclusion by means of turbo-STIR sequence?; Akute haematogene Osteomyelitis - Ausschluss mit Turbo-STIR-Sequenz?

    Wunsch, R.; Darge, K.; Rohrschneider, W.; Zieger, B.; Troeger, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Paediatrische Radiologie

    2001-05-01

    The timely diagnosis and early initiation of antibiotic therapy determine the clinical course of an acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. Consequently, a fast and efficient MRI examination protocol is crucial. We retrospectively evaluated various MR sequences used in the examination of 8 children having osteomyelitis. The examinations were conducted using a 0.5 T MR machine. All patients had a high signal intensity of the lesion in the IR sequence with fat suppression (turbo-STIR). An acute osteomyelitis can be excluded in the absence of signal intensity increase in the turbo-STIR sequence without the necessity of having to perform additional sequences. (orig.) [German] Eine schnelle effiziente Diagnostik ist bei der Frage nach einer akuten haematogenen Osteomyelitis besonders wichtig, da der klinische Verlauf vorwiegend durch eine fruehzeitige Diagnose und einen baldmoeglichen Behandlungsbeginn bestimmt wird. Um den Stellenwert der Sequenzen einer magnetresonanztomographischen Untersuchung zu ermitteln, evaluierten wir in einer retrospektiven Studie die Bilder von 8 Kindern mit akuter juveniler Osteomyelitis, welche eine Untersuchung an einem 0,5-Tesla-Geraet erhalten hatten. Auf allen Bildern zeigte sich eine Intensitaetserhoehung in der Turbo-STIR-Sequenz, in 7 von 8 Faellen war ein Kontrastmittelenhancement in einer T1-gewichteten Sequenz mit Fettunterdrueckung nachweisbar. Die Turbo-STIR-Sequenz stellte sich als sensitivste Sequenz heraus. Ist in der Turbo-STIR-Sequenz kein hyperintenses Signal zu erkennen, kann eine akute Osteomyelitis ohne Durchfuehrung weiterer Sequenzen ausgeschlossen werden. (orig.)

  19. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...... parameters to control friction stir welding, the influence of the rotational speed of the tool was investigated. Three different rotational speeds (500 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1500 rpm, respectively) were applied. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated with reflected light microscopy, scanning...... electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lap-shear tensile tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds....

  20. Wet gringing of zeolite in stirred media mill

    Mucsi, G.; Bohács, K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study the results of systematic experimental series are presented with the specific goal of optimizing the zeolite nanoparticles' production using a wet stirred media mill. The diameter of the grinding media as well as the rotor velocity were varied in the experiments. Particle size distribution and "outer" specific surface area of the ground samples were measured by a laser particle size analyser. Additionally, BET, XRD and FT-IR analyses were performed for the characterization of the "total" specific surface area as well as the crystalline and material structure, respectively. Based on the results of the laboratory experiments it was found that wet stirred media milling provided significant reductions in the particle size of zeolite. Furthermore, the crystallinity of the samples also decreased, so not only the physical but the mineralogical characteristics of zeolite can be controlled by stirred media milling.

  1. A Brief Introduction to the Theory of Friction Stir Welding

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and is already an important welding process for the aerospace industry, where welds of optimal quality are demanded. The structure of welds determines weld properties. The structure of friction stir welds is determined by the flow field in the weld metal in the vicinity of the weld tool. A simple kinematic model of the FSW flow field developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, which enables the basic features of FSW microstructure to be understood and related to weld process parameters and tool design, is explained.

  2. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  3. Mechanistic Models of Friction Stir Welding

    Stewart, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a welding process developed at The Welding Institute (TWI) in England. The method uses very large strain plastic deformation of the material to join two pieces of metal together. The material is deformed using a tool which is forced between the two pieces which rotates causing a bond. Beyond this, very little is actually known although many people working in the field are willing to speculate on the detailed mechanisms involved. Some measurements made using sacrificial thermocouples at the weld joint indicate that the maximum temperature during the weld process is on the order of 370C - well below the melting temperature of the material. However, at this temperature, the material properties are highly temperature dependent, and the yield stress is approximately an order of magnitude less at this temperature than it is at room temperature. As expected, there are many interpretations of the physical mechanisms occurring during the weld process. Although there is very little published concerned with FSW, some of the anecdotal theories will be described. One describes the primary mechanism as frictional heating at the front of the tool caused by slip between the tool and the material. At elevated temperatures, the weld material becomes soft and deforms around the tool but not essentially altered by the tool rotation, similar to an extrusion. As the material meets again at the rear of the tool, the temperatures and pressures are sufficient to cause the material to bond. All other structures seen are secondary and unimportant. Another theory examined last summer at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was that there was no slip between the tool and the material resulting in a rotating mass of plastic weld material traveling at a variety of angular velocities - the greatest at the tool surface diminishing to zero at the outer edge of the plastic mass surrounding the tool. This conceptual model was followed by simplified calculations which

  4. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  5. Seam-Tracking for Friction Stir Welded Lap Joints

    Fleming, Paul A.; Hendricks, Christopher E.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, D. M.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Lammlein, David H.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents a method for automatic seam-tracking in friction stir welding (FSW) of lap joints. In this method, tracking is accomplished by weaving the FSW tool back-and-forth perpendicular to the direction of travel during welding and monitoring force and torque signals. Research demonstrates the ability of this method to automatically track weld seam positions. Additionally, tensile and S-bend test result comparisons demonstrate that weaving most likely does not reduce weld quality. Finally, benefits of this weave-based method to FSW of lap joints are discussed and methods for incorporating it into existing friction stir welding control algorithms (such as axial load control) are examined.

  6. STIRRED FLUIDIZED-BED DRYER OF REGENERATED ION EXCHANGER PARTICLES

    Michal Pěnička

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes intensification of the fluidized-bed drying process for regenerated spherical-shape ion exchanger particles in the batch mode, achieved by a mechanical stirrer in the fluidized bed layer of the dried particles. The effect of the mechanical stirring system on the drying process was examined. Calculations as well as results of comparison measurements provide evidence of a favourable effect of stirring on the total drying time as compared to the initial unstirred system. The regenerated ion exchanger particles pass to the fluid state in a shorter time and the ultimate total drying time is thus more than 60% shorter.

  7. Vortex excitation in a stirred toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate

    Yakimenko, A. I.; Isaieva, K. O.; Vilchinskii, S. I.; Ostrovskaya, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the recent experiment [Wright et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 063633 (2013)], we investigate formation of vortices in an annular BEC stirred by a narrow blue-detuned optical beam. In the framework of a two-dimensional mean field model, we study the dissipative dynamics of the condensate with parameters matched to the experimental conditions. Vortex-antivortex pairs appear near the center of the stirrer in the bulk of the condensate for slow motion of the stirring beam. When the barrier ...

  8. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  9. Oxygen Absorption into Stirred Emulsions of n-Alkanes

    Thanh Hai Ngo; Adrian Schumpe

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of pure oxygen into aqueous emulsions of n-heptane, n-dodecane, and n-hexadecane, respectively, has been studied at 0 to 100% oil volume fraction in a stirred tank at the stirring speed of 1000 min−1. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient, , was evaluated from the pressure decrease under isochoric and isothermal (298.2 K) conditions. The O/W emulsions of both n-dodecane and n-hexadecane show a maximum at 1-2% oil fraction as reported in several previous studies. Much...

  10. The effect of mechanical stirring on buoyancy-driven circulations

    Tailleux, Remi; Rouleau, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the energetics of mechanically-stirred horizontal convection for a Boussinesq fluid yields the formula: G(APE) = \\gamma_{mixing} G(KE) + (1+\\gamma_{mixing}) W_{r,laminar} where G(APE) and G(KE) are the work rate done by the buoyancy and mechanical forcing respectively, \\gamma_{mixing} is the mixing efficiency, and W_{r,laminar} is the background rate of increase in gravitational potential energy due to molecular diffusion. The formula shows that mechanical stirring...

  11. Friction Stir Welding of Al 5052 with Al 6061 Alloys

    Kumbhar, N. T.; Bhanumurthy, K.

    2012-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW), a solid-state joining technique, is being extensively used in similar as well as dissimilar joining of Al, Mg, Cu, Ti, and their alloys. In the present study, friction stir welding of two aluminium alloys—AA6061 and AA5052—was carried out at various combinations of tool rotation speeds and tool traverse speeds. The transverse cross-section of the weld was used for optical as well as electron microscopy observations. The microstructural studies were used to get an ...

  12. Interfacial and Mechanical Behavior of AA5456 Filling Friction-Stir-Welded Lap Joints Using Similar and Dissimilar Pins

    Behmand, Saleh Alaei; Mirsalehi, Seyyed Ehsan; Omidvar, Hamid; Safarkhanian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-06-01

    In this article, filling friction stir welding (FFSW) of the remaining exit holes of AA5456 alloy friction-stir-welded lap joints was studied. For this purpose, the influences of different rotating speeds, holding times, and pin materials, AA5456 and AA2024, on the metallurgical structure and joint strength were investigated. The observations showed that defect-free lap joints are successfully obtainable by this method using similar and dissimilar consumable pins. The results indicated that the higher rotating speed and holding time adversely affect the weld performance. The best result was achieved for 30 seconds holding time, 500 rpm rotating speed, and AA2024 consumable pin. In this condition, a lap shear strength of 10 pct higher than that of the nonfilled joint, equivalent to about 94 pct of the original defect-free FSW joint, was obtained, whereas the GTAW filled joint showed only approximately 87 pct of the continuous FSW joint strength.

  13. Numeric simulations of a liquid metal model of a bloom caster under the effect of rotary electromagnetic stirring

    Barna, M.; Javurek, M.; Willers, B.; Eckert, S.; Reiter, J.

    2016-07-01

    At the voestalpine Stahl Donawitz GmbH the continuous casting of round steel blooms is commonly supported by electromagnetically induced stirring of the liquid steel flow. A number of beneficial effects are attributed to electromagnetic stirring in the mould region (M-EMS), e.g. the enhanced transition from columnar to equiaxed solidification, the homogenization of the liquid steel flow or the reduction of surface and subsurface defects. Although the positive effects of M-EMS can be seen on the blooms (e.g. in etchings), the link between electromagnetic stirring of the steel melt and the quality of the solidified bloom is not sufficiently understood. Theoretical considerations are often limited to general cases and their results are therefore not directly applicable to real continuous casting geometries. On the other hand, plant measurements can only be performed to a limited extent due to the harsh conditions and other restrictions (e.g. safety regulations). In this work an alternative approach is used to investigate the steel flow in a round bloom caster under the influence of M-EMS. In a 1:3 scale Perspex model of a round bloom strand, measurements of the flow under the influence of a rotating magnetic field can be conducted. These measurements provide a validation benchmark for the numeric simulations. A numeric model of the before mentioned 1:3 scale model is implemented, encompassing the strand, the submerged entry nozzle as well as the M-EMS device. In the modelling approach, the bidirectional coupling between liquid steel flow and the electromagnetic field/forces has to be considered because otherwise the resulting tangential velocities will be overestimated. With the validated modelling approach, simulations of real casting machines can then be conducted, stirring parameter influences can be shown and conclusions for the real casting process can be drawn.

  14. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    Fleming, Paul; Lammlein, David; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, Don Mitchell; Strauss, Alvin M.; Delapp, David; Hartman, Daniel A.

    2010-12-14

    A friction stir system for processing at least a first workpiece includes a spindle actuator coupled to a rotary tool comprising a rotating member for contacting and processing the first workpiece. A detection system is provided for obtaining information related to a lateral alignment of the rotating member. The detection system comprises at least one sensor for measuring a force experienced by the rotary tool or a parameter related to the force experienced by the rotary tool during processing, wherein the sensor provides sensor signals. A signal processing system is coupled to receive and analyze the sensor signals and determine a lateral alignment of the rotating member relative to a selected lateral position, a selected path, or a direction to decrease a lateral distance relative to the selected lateral position or selected path. In one embodiment, the friction stir system can be embodied as a closed loop tracking system, such as a robot-based tracked friction stir welding (FSW) or friction stir processing (FSP) system.

  15. The effect of mechanical stirring on buoyancy-driven circulations

    Tailleux, Remi

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the energetics of mechanically-stirred horizontal convection for a Boussinesq fluid yields the formula: G(APE) = \\gamma_{mixing} G(KE) + (1+\\gamma_{mixing}) W_{r,laminar} where G(APE) and G(KE) are the work rate done by the buoyancy and mechanical forcing respectively, \\gamma_{mixing} is the mixing efficiency, and W_{r,laminar} is the background rate of increase in gravitational potential energy due to molecular diffusion. The formula shows that mechanical stirring can easily induce a very strong buoyancy-driven overturning cell (meaning a large G(APE)) even for a relatively low mixing efficiency, whereas this is only possible in absence of mechanical stirring if \\gamma_{mixing} >> 1. Moreover, the buoyancy-driven overturning becomes mechanically controlled when $\\gamma_{mixing} G(KE) >> (1+\\gamma_{mixing}) W_{r,laminar}$. This result explains why the buoyancy-driven overturning cell in the laboratory experiments by \\cite{Whitehead2008} is amplified by the lateral motions of a stir...

  16. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibilit...

  17. Artificial Neural Network Model for Friction Stir Processing

    Syed Muhammed Fahd

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir processing (FSP is an effective means of refining grain size of aluminum alloys. An artificial neural network model (ANN is made for predicting the grain size of alloys which are processed by FSP. The simulated results from the model show how grain size varies with the process parameters.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Laminar Flow Field in a Stirred Tank

    范茏; 王卫京; 杨超; 毛在砂

    2004-01-01

    Stirred tanks are used extensively in process industry and one of the most commonly used impellers in stirred tanks is the R.ushton disk turbine. Surprisingly few data are available regarding flow and mixing in stirred-tank reactors with Rushton turbine in the laminar regime, in particular the laminar flow in baffled tanks.In this paper, the laminar flow field in a baffled tank stirred by a standard R.ushton turbine is simulated with the improved inner-outer iterative method. The non-inertial coordinate system is used for the impeller region, which is in turn used as the boundary conditions for iteration. It is found that the simulation results are in good agreement with previous experiments. In addition, the flow number and impeller power number calculated from the simulated flow field are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. This numerical method allows prediction of flow structure requiring no experimental data as the boundary conditions and has the potential of being used to scale-up and design of related process equipment.

  19. TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING

    Hovanski, Yuri

    2009-05-06

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  20. Optimization of Device for Induction Stirring of Molten Steel

    Doležel, Ivo; Dvořák, P.; Mach, M.; Ulrych, B.

    Warsaw: Warsaw University of Technology, 2004, s. 105-108. ISBN 83-85940-26-X. [International Conference on Fundamentals of Electrotechnics and Circuit Theory /27./. Gliwice-Niedzica (PL), 26.05.2004-29.05.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/03/0047 Keywords : induction stirring * molten metals * electromagnetic field Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Electromagnetic Stirring of Molten Metal in Induction Crucible Furnace

    Barglik, J.; Doležel, Ivo; Škopek, M.; Ulrych, B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2002), s. 229-242. ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B084; GA MŠk ME 542 Grant ostatní: PSC(PL) BK/RM3/405/01 Keywords : Electromagnetic stirring * molten metal * induction heating Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  2. MR imaging in shoulder trauma. Value of STIR images

    Purpose: To determine the adequacy of MR standard protocols by analyzing conventional T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences, and to evaluate the usefulness of additional fat-suppressed (STIR) images in shoulder trauma. Material and Methods: Paracoronal T1-weighted, T2-weighted SE, and STIR images were obtained on a 0.5 T superconductive system in 25 patients with shoulder trauma. In a separate evaluation of T1/T2 images and a combined evaluation of T1/T2 SE- and STIR images, we compared the number of patients with evidence of Hill-Sachs lesions, bone bruises, and/or rotator-cuff lesions. Results: Compared to the combined evaluation of T1/T2 and STIR images, the separate evaluation of T1/T2 SE images revealed identical results for rotator-cuff lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions, but different results for the bone bruises in the area of the major tubercle. Conclusion: Occult fractures of the major tubercle, indicated by areas of bone bruising, might be missed with MR using conventional SE images. We recommend the use of additional paracoronal fat-suppressed sequences in patients with clinically suspected lesions and equivocal findings on plain radiographs and on standard SE sequences. (orig.)

  3. Imaging myocardial carcinoid with T2-STIR CMR

    Baker Christopher; Schiavone William A; Prasad Sanjay K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We used T2-STIR (Short Tau Inversion Recovery) cardiovascular magnetic resonance to demonstrate carcinoid tumor metastases to the heart and liver in a 64-year-old woman with a biopsy-proven ileal carcinoid tumor who was referred because of an abnormal echocardiogram.

  4. StirMark Benchmark: audio watermarking attacks based on lossy compression

    Steinebach, Martin; Lang, Andreas; Dittmann, Jana

    2002-04-01

    StirMark Benchmark is a well-known evaluation tool for watermarking robustness. Additional attacks are added to it continuously. To enable application based evaluation, in our paper we address attacks against audio watermarks based on lossy audio compression algorithms to be included in the test environment. We discuss the effect of different lossy compression algorithms like MPEG-2 audio Layer 3, Ogg or VQF on a selection of audio test data. Our focus is on changes regarding the basic characteristics of the audio data like spectrum or average power and on removal of embedded watermarks. Furthermore we compare results of different watermarking algorithms and show that lossy compression is still a challenge for most of them. There are two strategies for adding evaluation of robustness against lossy compression to StirMark Benchmark: (a) use of existing free compression algorithms (b) implementation of a generic lossy compression simulation. We discuss how such a model can be implemented based on the results of our tests. This method is less complex, as no real psycho acoustic model has to be applied. Our model can be used for audio watermarking evaluation of numerous application fields. As an example, we describe its importance for e-commerce applications with watermarking security.

  5. Submerged culture of phellinus linteus in a stirred tank fermenter and an airlift fermenter

    Choi, Keun Ho; Lee, Chang Woo [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Hanbat National University, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In this study, to choose a suitable bioreactor type for the mass culture of Phellinus linteus mycelium, we cultured phellinus linteus mycelium using a stirred tank fermenter and an airlift fermenter and compared the performances of the two fermenters. The effects of aeration rate and agitation speed on the culture of Phellinus linteus mycelium were also investigated in the ranges of 1-4L/min, 200-300 rpm, respectively. For the Batch submerged culture, the dry weight of mycelium, pH, and dissolved oxygen concentration changed in four steps, respectively. But the periods of same steps were not consistent with each other. With an increase in aeration rate, the final dry weight of mycelium, dissolved oxygen concentration and pH value until the third step of pH change were increased. As the time increased, the concentration of glucose decreased. However, the effects of aeration rate and agitation speed on the variation of glucose concentration were negligible. The maximum final dry weight of mycelium was obtained when agitation speed was 300 rpm. The dissolved oxygen concentration was increased with agitation speed. The dry weight of mycelium and dissolved oxygen concentration in the continuous stirred tank fermenter were larger than them those in the airlift fermenter. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Vitrification of simulated radioactive Rocky Flats plutonium containing ash residue with a Stir Melter System

    A demonstration trial has been completed in which a simulated Rocky Flats ash consisting of an industrial fly-ash material doped with cerium oxide was vitrified in an alloy tank Stir-Melter trademark System. The cerium oxide served as a substitute for plutonium oxide present in the actual Rocky Flats residue stream. The glass developed falls within the SiO2 + Al2O3/ΣAlkali/B2O3 system. The glass batch contained approximately 40 wt% of ash, the ash was modified to contain ∼ 5 wt% CeO2 to simulate plutonium chemistry in the glass. The ash simulant was mixed with water and fed to the Stir-Melter as a slurry with a 60 wt% water to 40 wt% solids ratio. Glass melting temperature was maintained at approximately 1,050 C during the melting trials. Melting rates as functions of impeller speed and slurry feed rate were determined. An optimal melting rate was established through a series of evolutionary variations of the control variables' settings. The optimal melting rate condition was used for a continuous six hour steady state run of the vitrification system. Glass mass flow rates of the melter were measured and correlated with the slurry feed mass flow. Melter off-gas was sampled for particulate and volatile species over a period of four hours during the steady state run. Glass composition and durability studies were run on samples collected during the steady state run

  7. Vitrification of simulated radioactive Rocky Flats plutonium containing waste ash with a stir-melter system

    A demonstration trial has been completed in which a simulated Rocky Flats ash consisting of an industrial fly-ash material doped with cerium oxide was vitrified in an alloy tank Stir-Melter trademark System. The cerium oxide served as a substitute for plutonium oxide present in the actual Rocky Flats waste stream. The glass developed falls within the SiO2 +Al2O3 / ΣAlkali / B2O3 System. The glass batch contained approximately 40 wt % of ash, the ash was modified to contain ∼5 wt % CeO2 to simulate plutonium chemistry in the glass. The ash simulant was mixed with water and fed to the Stir-Melter as a slurry with a 60 wt % water to 40 wt % solids ratio. Glass melting temperature was maintained at approximately 1050 degrees C during the melting trials. Melting rates as functions of impeller speed and slurry feed rate were determined. An optimal melting rate was established through a series of evolutionary variations of the control variables' settings. The optimal melting rate condition was used for a continuous six hour steady state run of the vitrification system. Glass mass flow rates out of the melter were measured and correlated with the slurry feed mass flow. Melter off-gas was sampled for particulate and volatile species over a period of four hours during the steady state run. Glass composition and durability studies were run on samples collected during the steady state run

  8. Uniform and reproducible stirring in a microbioreactor

    Bolic, Andrijana; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Rottwitt, Karsten;

    role in achieving successful cultivations by promoting uniform process conditions and – for aerobic cultivations – a high oxygen transfer rate. In this contribution, the development of a suitable, reliable and reproducible stirrer in a microbioreactor for batch and continuous cultivation of S...

  9. FRICTION STIR LAP WELDING OF ALUMINUM - POLYMER USING SCRIBE TECHNOLOGY

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2015-02-16

    Friction Stir Scribe (FSS) technology is a relatively new variant of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) which enables lap joining of dissimilar material with very different melting points and different high temperature flow behaviors. The cutter scribe attached at the tip of FSW tool pin effectively cuts the high melting point material such that a mechanically interlocking feature is created between the dissimilar materials. The geometric shape of this interlocking feature determines the shear strength attained by the lap joint. This work presents first use of scribe technology in joining polymers to aluminum alloy. Details of the several runs of scribe welding performed in lap joining of ~3.175mm thick polymers including HDPE, filled and unfilled Nylon 66 to 2mm thick AA5182 are presented. The effect of scribe geometry and length on weld interlocking features is presented along with lap shear strength evaluations.

  10. Numerical optimisation of friction stir welding: review of future challenges

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, the combination of increasingly more advanced numerical simulation software with high computational power has resulted in models for friction stir welding (FSW), which have improved the understanding of the determining physical phenomena behind the process substantially....... This has made optimisation of certain process parameters possible and has in turn led to better performing friction stir welded products, thus contributing to a general increase in the popularity of the process and its applications. However, most of these optimisation studies do not go well beyond...... manual iterations or limited automation. The present paper thus attempts to give a brief overview of some of the successful autonomous optimisation applications of FSW in combination with what determines the state of the art in the field. Finally, this is followed by a discussion of some of the trends...

  11. MRI of lymphedema using short-TI-IR (STIR)

    Fujii, Koichi; Ishida, Osamu; Mabuchi, Norihisa; Shindou, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Hiroyasu; Kumano, Machiko; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ohkuma, Moriya (Kinki Univ., Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-01-01

    Thirty four cases with lymphedema of the extremities were examined with MRI at 0.5 tesla. On T1-weighted image, the enlarged subcutaneous tissue and the subcutaneous trabecular structures were seen in all cases. Moreover, the trabecular structures in the enlarged subcutaneous tissue showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted image in all cases. Additionally, in 12 of 15 cases examined by Short-TI-IR (STIR) image, the trabecular structures and fluid collections in the subcutaneous tissue were shown more definitely in high signal intensity than by T2-weighted image. We consider MRI using STIR is to be useful in the evaluation of edematous disease. (author).

  12. Simulation on Gas Injection Refining Process with Mechanical Stirring

    Zhang Ting’an

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the new method of in-situ desulfurization with gas injection and mechanical stirring, the effect of bubble dispersion and disintegration of three type impellers are numerically simulated by commercial CFD software Ansys Fluent 12.0. Numerical simulations of three-dimensional multiphase turbulence in gas injection and mechanical stirring are performed by adopting unsteady SM method coupled with Eulerian multiphase model and two-phase turbulence model. The information of gas-liquid fluid flow, velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and the power consumption are investigated and the results show that the SSB impeller can make bubbles get best dispersion and disintegration,and its power consumption is lower than VB impeller. The disk on the impeller blades can weaken the swirl flow in the upper zone of the impeller. Therefore, the bubble residence time is extended, and the bubble dispersing zone is also increased.

  13. CFD simulation of particle suspension in a stirred tank

    Nana Qi; Hu Zhang; Kai Zhang; Gang Xu; Yongping Yang

    2013-01-01

    Particle suspension characteristics are predicted computationally in a stirred tank driven by a Smith turbine.In order to verify the hydrodynamic model and numerical method,the predicted power number and flow pattern are compared with designed values and simulated results from the literature,respectively.The effects of particle density,particle diameter,liquid viscosity and initial solid loading on particle suspension behavior are investigated by using the Eulerian-Eulerian two-fluid model and the standard k-ε turbulence model.The results indicate that solid concentration distribution depends on the flow field in the stirred tank.Higher particle density or larger particle size results in less homogenous distribution of solid particles in the tank.Increasing initial solid loading has an adverse impact on the homogeneous suspension of solid particles in a low-viscosity liquid,whilst more uniform particle distribution is found in a high-viscositv liauid.

  14. Structural response of superaustenitic stainless steel to friction stir welding

    Highlights: → Grain structure evolution was mainly governed by discontinuous recrystallization. → The recrystallization was static in nature and occurred during weld cooling cycle. → Material flow was mainly induced by the tool shoulder. → The texture was a superposition of {1 1 1} and {h k l} partial simple-shear fibers. - Abstract: Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to study grain structure development and texture evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of a low stacking fault energy material, S31254 superaustenitic stainless steel. Formation of the final stir zone (SZ) microstructure was deduced to be primarily governed by discontinuous recrystallization occurring during the FSW cooling cycle. The textural pattern formed in the SZ was interpreted in the terms of {1 1 1} and {h k l} partial simple shear fiber textures.

  15. Effects of electromagnetic stirring on microstructures of solidified aluminum alloys

    时海芳; 张伟强

    2003-01-01

    Al-20%Cu, Al-33%Cu and Al-7%Si alloys were solidified with electromagnetic stirring(EMS). The fluid flow induced by electromagnetic stirring leads to the increases of the lamellar spacing of Al-CuAl2 and Al-Si eutectics and the secondary dendritic arm spacing. Rod-like eutectic structure plus pro-eutectic α(Al) are observed in Al-Cu eutectic alloy when the agitating voltage is increased over 130 V, and in the hypoeutectic alloys, globular grains of proeutectic α(Al) grains may form when the magnetic field is strong enough. The Si flakes in the Al-Si eutectic are also coarsened by applying forced flow during solidification, which is always related to the depression of their branching in the growth by the forced convection.

  16. Knowledge based process development of bobbin tool friction stir welding

    Hilgert, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Over the last twenty years Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has proven to be a very promising new joining technique. Especially high strength aluminium alloys can be welded with large advantages as compared to conventional fusion welding processes. For some joint configurations and desired applications bobbin tool welding is a process variant that can circumvent limitations arising from the high process forces in conventional tool FSW. As bobbin tools are highly mechanically loaded, in-depth under...

  17. Material flow visualization in Friction Stir Welding via particle tracing

    Dialami Shabandarech, Narges; Chiumenti, Michèle; Cervera Ruiz, Miguel; Agelet de Saracibar Bosch, Carlos; Ponthot, Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the modeling of the material flow in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processes using particle tracing method. For the computation of particle trajectories, three accurate and computationally efficient integration methods are implemented within a FE model for FSW process: the Backward Euler with Sub-stepping (BES), the 4-th order Runge-Kutta (RK4) and the Back and Forth Error Compensation and Correction (BFECC) methods. Firstly, their performance is compared by solving the Zal...

  18. CFD SIMULATION OF A STIRRED DISHED BOTTOM VESSEL

    Petr Vlček; Jan Skočilas; Tomáš Jirout

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with simulation of the fluid flow in a stirred curved-bottom vessel equipped with three curved blade impellers. The power number and the impeller flow rate number are dimensionless characteristics of the system determined from simulation results and compared with relevant experimental data or data from the literature. The model of the system was created in the conventional Gambit and Fluent program. The system is solved for two designs — for an unbaffled vessel, and for a baf...

  19. CFD simulation of solids suspension in stirred tanks: Review

    Ochieng Aoyi; Onyango Mrice S.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical reactions are carried out using stirred tanks, and the efficiency of such systems depends on the quality of mixing, which has been a subject of research for many years. For solid-liquid mixing, traditionally the research efforts were geared towards determining mixing features such as off-bottom solid suspension using experimental techniques. In a few studies that focused on the determination of solids concentration distribution, some methods that have been used have not be...

  20. Feasibility of underwater friction stir welding of HY-80 steel

    Stewart, William Chad

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the feasibility of underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of high-strength; quench and temper low carbon steels that are susceptible to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC). The specific benefits of underwater FSW would be weld repairs of ship and submarine control surfaces and hulls without the need for drydocking and extensive environmental control procedures. A single tool of polycrystallin...

  1. Feasibility of underwater friction stir welding of hardenable alloy steel

    Overfield, Norman E.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The objective of this thesis is to determine whether friction stir welding (FSW) is a feasible welding process for steels in an underwater environment. Specific benefits would be underwater weld repairs on steel alloy piping systems and/or structures, and crack repairs on control surfaces of submarines without the need for strict environment controls or in the submarine's case, for drydocking. A single tool made of polycrystaline cub...

  2. Simulation of Stir Casting Process Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    M. V. S. Pavan Kumar; M. V. Sekhar Babu

    2015-01-01

    Stir casting process is one of the methods to produce Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs). But the Particle Distribution of Non-Homogenous material is the greatest problem facing now days to produce MMCs. The present simulations were conducted how the speed of the stirrer effects the Particle Distribution of NonHomogenous material. The Simulations were performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics. In this experiment Copper is used as Semi Solid Metal (SSM) and Silicon-Carbide is used a...

  3. Mammalian cell retention devices for stirred perfusion bioreactors

    Woodside, Steven M.; Bowen, Bruce D.; Piret, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Within the spectrum of current applications for cell culture technologies, efficient large-scale mammalian cell production processes are typically carried out in stirred fed-batch or perfusion bioreactors. The specific aspects of each individual process that can be considered when determining the method of choice are presented. A major challenge for perfusion reactor design and operation is the reliability of the cell retention device. Current retention systems include cross-flow membrane fil...

  4. Manufacturing of Aluminum Composite Material Using Stir Casting Process

    Jokhio, Muhammad Hayat; Panhwer, Muhammad Ibrahim; Unar, Mukhtiar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient information is ava...

  5. Manufacturing of Aluminum Composite Material Using Stir Casting Process

    Muhammad Hayat Jokhio; Muhammad Ibrahim Panhwar; Mukhtiar Ali Unar

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing of aluminum alloy based casting composite materials via stir casting is one of the prominent and economical route for development and processing of metal matrix composites materials. Properties of these materials depend upon many processing parameters and selection of matrix and reinforcements. Literature reveals that most of the researchers are using 2, 6 and 7xxx aluminum matrix reinforced with SiC particles for high strength properties whereas, insufficient inf...

  6. The Stirred Tank Reactor Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell

    Benziger, Jay; Chia, E.; Karnas, E.; Moxley, J.; Teuscher, C.; Kevrekidis, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors (STR); the gas phase in each reactor compartment was well mixed. The characteristic times for reactant flow, gas phase diffusion and reaction were chosen so that the gas compositions at both the anode and cathode are uniform. The STR PEM fuel cell is one-dimensional; the only spatial gradients are transverse to the membrane. The S...

  7. Friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    M. Bušić; Kožuh, Z.; D. Klobčar; Samardžić, I.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and f...

  8. Diffusion-controlled wear of steel friction stir welding tools used on aluminum alloys

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Kalashnikov, K. N.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The worn surfaces of steel instruments used for friction stir welding on AMg5M aluminum alloy have been examined. An adhesion transfer layer resulted on the steel tool surface from welding the aluminum-magnesium alloy. Diffusion between this layer and steel base metal resulted in formation of an intermetallic Fe-Al layer (IMC). The hardness of the IMC has been measured using a nanohardness tester. It was found that the IMC layers maximum hardness changed from 998 to 1698 HV. The continuous IMC layers may serve as a wear-resistant coating, however, the IMC were also found in the shape of spikes directed into the tool's body, which created conditions for wear particle formation by fracture.

  9. Microstructure evolution and texture development in a friction stir-processed AISI D2 tool steel

    Yasavol, N.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Vieira, M. T.; Jafarian, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    Crystallographic texture developments during friction stir processing (FSP) of AISI D2 tool were studied with respect to grain sizes in different tool rotation rates. Comparison of the grain sizes in various rotation rates confirmed that grain refinement occurred progressively in higher rotation rates by severe plastic deformation. It was found that the predominant mechanism during FSP should be dynamic recovery (DRV) happened concurrently with continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX) caused by particle-stimulated nucleation (PSN). The developed shear texture relates to the ideal shear textures of D1 and D2 in bcc metals. The prevalence of highly dense arrangement of close-packed planes of bcc and the lowest Taylor factor showed the lowest compressive residual stress which is responsible for better mechanical properties compared with the grain-precipitate refinement.

  10. Recrystallization Phenomena During Friction Stir Processing of Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    Rao, A. G.; Ravi, K. R.; Ramakrishnarao, B.; Deshmukh, V. P.; Sharma, A.; Prabhu, N.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2013-03-01

    Microstructural evolution and related dynamic recrystallization phenomena were investigated in overlapping multipass friction stir processing (FSP) of hypereutectic Al-30 pct Si alloy. FSP resulted in the elimination of porosities along with the refinement of primary silicon particles and alpha aluminum grains. These alpha aluminum grains predominantly exhibit high angle boundaries with various degrees of recovered substructure and dislocation densities. The substructure and grain formation during FSP take place primarily by annihilation and reorganization of dislocations in the grain interior and at low angle grain boundary. During multipass overlap FSP, small second phase particles were observed to form, which are accountable for pinning the grain boundaries and thus restricting their growth. During the multipass overlap FSP, the microstructure undergoes continuous dynamic recrystallization by formation of the subgrain boundary and subgrain growth to the grain structure comprising of mostly high angle grain boundaries.

  11. Non-invasive online detection of microbial lysine formation in stirred tank bioreactors by using calorespirometry.

    Regestein, Lars; Maskow, Thomas; Tack, Andreas; Knabben, Ingo; Wunderlich, Martin; Lerchner, Johannes; Büchs, Jochen

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive methods for online monitoring of biotechnological processes without compromising the integrity of the reactor system are very important to generate continuous data. Even though calorimetry has been used in conventional biochemical analysis for decades, it has not yet been specifically applied for online detection of product formation at technical scale. Thus, this article demonstrates a calorespirometric method for online detection of microbial lysine formation in stirred tank bioreactors. The respective heat generation of two bacterial strains, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 (wild-type) and C. glutamicum DM1730 (lysine producer), was compared with the O2 -consumption in order to determine whether lysine was formed. As validation of the proposed calorespirometric method, the online results agreed well with the offline measured data. This study has proven that calorespirometry is a viable non-invasive technique to detect product formation at any time point. PMID:23280310

  12. Macro-instability: a chaotic flow component in stirred tanks.

    Hasal, Pavel; Jahoda, Milan; Fort, Ivan

    2008-02-13

    Chaotic features of the macro-instability (MI) of flow patterns in stirred tanks are studied in this paper. Datasets obtained by measuring the axial component of the fluid velocity and the tangential force affecting the baffles are used. Two geometrically identical, flat-bottomed cylindrical mixing tanks (diameter of 0.3m) stirred with either pitched blade turbine impellers or Rushton turbine impeller are used in the experiments, and water and aqueous glycerol solutions are used as the working liquids. First, the presence of the MI component in the data is examined by spectral analysis. Then, the MI components are identified in the data using the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) technique. The attractors of the macro-instability are reconstructed using either the POD eigenmodes or a method of delays and finally the attractor invariants are evaluated. The dependence of the correlation dimension and maximum Lyapunov exponent on the vessel operational conditions is determined together with their distribution within the tank. No significant spatial variability of the correlation dimension value is observed. Its value is strongly influenced by impeller speed and by the vessel-impeller geometry. More profound spatial distribution is displayed by the maximum Lyapunov exponent taking distinctly positive values. These two invariants, therefore, can be used to locate distinctive regions with qualitatively different MI dynamics within the stirred tank. PMID:17673415

  13. Effects of Friction Stir Welding Speed on AA2195 alloy

    Lee Ho-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of friction stir welding (FSW to aerospace has grown rapidly due to the high efficiency and environmental friendly nature of the process. FSW is achieved by plastic flow of frictionally heated material in solid state and offers many advantages of avoiding hot cracking and limiting component distortion. Recently low density, high modulus and high strength AA2195 are used as substitute for conventional aluminum alloys since the weight saving is critical in aerospace applications. One of the problems for this alloy is weld metal porosity formation leading to hot cracking. Combination of FSW and AA2195 provides synergy effect to improve mechanical properties and weight saving of aerospace structure such as cryogenic fuel tanks for launch systems. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of friction stir welding speed on mechanical and microstructural properties of AA2195. The friction stir welded materials were joined with four different tool rotation speeds (350~800 rpm and five welding speeds (120~360 mm/min, which are the two prime welding parameters in this process.

  14. New Materials Design Through Friction Stir Processing Techniques

    Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.; Shivpuri, R.

    2007-04-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has reached a large interest in the scientific community and in the last years also in the industrial environment, due to the advantages of such solid state welding process with respect to the classic ones. The complex material flow occurring during the process plays a fundamental role in such solid state welding process, since it determines dramatic changes in the material microstructure of the so called weld nugget, which affects the effectiveness of the joints. What is more, Friction Stir Processing (FSP) is mainly being considered for producing high-strain-rate-superplastic (HSRS) microstructure in commercial aluminum alloys. The aim of the present research is the development of a locally composite material through the Friction Stir Processing (FSP) of two AA7075-T6 blanks and a different material insert. The results of a preliminary experimental campaign, carried out at the varying of the additional material placed at the sheets interface under different conditions, are presented. Micro and macro observation of the such obtained joints permitted to investigate the effects of such process on the overall joint performance.

  15. Thermo-Mechanical Processing in Friction Stir Welds

    Schneider, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is a solid-phase joining, or welding process that was invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute (TWI). The process is potentially capable of joining a wide variety of aluminum alloys that are traditionally difficult to fusion weld. The friction stir welding (FSW) process produces welds by moving a non-consumable rotating pin tool along a seam between work pieces that are firmly clamped to an anvil. At the start of the process, the rotating pin is plunged into the material to a pre-determined load. The required heat is produced by a combination of frictional and deformation heating. The shape of the tool shoulder and supporting anvil promotes a high hydrostatic pressure along the joint line as the tool shears and literally stirs the metal together. To produce a defect free weld, process variables (RPM, transverse speed, and downward force) and tool pin design must be chosen carefully. An accurate model of the material flow during the process is necessary to guide process variable selection. At MSFC a plastic slip line model of the process has been synthesized based on macroscopic images of the resulting weld material. Although this model appears to have captured the main features of the process, material specific interactions are not understood. The objective of the present research was to develop a basic understanding of the evolution of the microstructure to be able to relate it to the deformation process variables of strain, strain rate, and temperature.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  18. Continuous wok-frying of vegetables:

    Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    , such as heat flux, contact surface area, frying temperature and type of raw material is discussed. Part of the water content of the raw vegetables evaporates during the process; this keeps down the product temperature through an evaporation-cooling mechanism, resulting in an improved texture. This......A new process for continuous stir-frying in industrial scale has been developed for producing convenience high-quality vegetables. The understanding of the dynamics of heat and mass transfer during stir-frying is crucial for up-scaling and controlling the process. The effect of different factors...... removal of loosely bound water from the vegetables allows the products to be frozen and re-heated without drip loss, and it is also an advantage when using them as ingredients in composite foods, such as pâtés. Examples developed by a professional chef indicate that he saved up to half of the cooking time...

  19. CFD simulation of flow patterns in unbaffled stirred tank with CD-6 impeller

    Devi Tamphasana Thiyam; Kumar Bimlesh

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the flow in stirred vessels can be useful for a wide number of industrial applications. There is a wealth of numerical simulations of stirring vessels with standard impeller such as Rushton turbine and pitch blade turbine. Here, a CFD study has been performed to observe the spatial variations (angular, axial and radial) of hydrodynamics (velocity and turbulence field) in unbaffled stirred tank with Concave-bladed Disc turbine (CD-6) impeller. Three speeds (N=296, 638 &...

  20. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding and Its Optimization Using Taguchi Method

    Prof. Mohd Abbas1; , Neha mehani2; Atishey Mittal*

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we are approaching to the feasibility of underwater friction stir welding of aluminum alloy which widely has the various applications where strength to density ratio plays a crucial role such as in marine, aircraft and automobile industries. The problems associated with joining of parts through conventional welding method is overcome by use of friction stir welding process yet the friction stir welding encloses the problems such as rapid tool wear especially duri...

  1. CFD simulation of flow patterns in unbaffled stirred tank with CD-6 impeller

    Devi Tamphasana Thiyam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the flow in stirred vessels can be useful for a wide number of industrial applications. There is a wealth of numerical simulations of stirring vessels with standard impeller such as Rushton turbine and pitch blade turbine. Here, a CFD study has been performed to observe the spatial variations (angular, axial and radial of hydrodynamics (velocity and turbulence field in unbaffled stirred tank with Concave-bladed Disc turbine (CD-6 impeller. Three speeds (N=296, 638 & 844.6 rpm have been considered for this study. The angular variations of hydrodynamics of stirred tank were found very less as compared to axial and radial variations.

  2. Amidase-catalyzed production of nicotinic acid in batch and continuous stirred membrane reactors

    Cantarella, M.; Cantarella, L.; Gallifuoco, A.; Intellini, R.; Kaplan, Ondřej; Spera, A.; Martínková, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2008), s. 222-229. ISSN 0141-0229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC D25.002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : amidase * nicotinic acid bioproduction * temperature dependence Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.375, year: 2008

  3. Laser beam welding and friction stir welding of 6013-T6 aluminium alloy sheet

    Butt welds of 1.6 mm thick 6013-T6 sheet were produced using laser beam welding and friction stir welding processes. Employing the former joining technique, filler powders of the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si were used. Microstructure, hardness profiles, tensile properties and the corrosion behaviour of the welds in the as-welded condition were investigated. The hardness in the weld zone was lower compared to that of the base material in the peak-aged temper. Hardness minima were measured in the fusion zone and in the thermomechanically affected zone for laser beam welded and friction stir welded joints, respectively. Metallographic and fractographic examinations revealed pores in the fusion zone of the laser beam welds. Porosity was higher in welds made using the filler alloy Al-5%Mg than using the filler metal Al-12%Si. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the β'' (Mg2Si) hardening precipitates were dissolved in the weld zone due to the heat input of the joining processes. Joint efficiencies achieved for laser beam welds depended upon the filler powders, being about 60 and 80% using the alloys Al-5%Mg and Al-12%Si, respectively. Strength of the friction stir weld approached over 80% of the ultimate tensile strength of the 6013-T6 base material. Fracture occurred in the region of hardness minima unless defects in the weld zone led to premature failure. The heat input during welding did not cause a degradation of the corrosion behaviour of the welds, as found in continuous immersion tests in an aqueous chloride-peroxide solution. In contrast to the 6013-T6 parent material, the weld zone was not sensitive to intergranular corrosion. Alternate immersion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution indicated high stress corrosion cracking resistance of the joints. For laser beam welded sheet, the weld zone of alternately immersed specimens suffered severe degradation by pitting and intergranular corrosion, which may be associated with galvanic coupling of filler metal and

  4. Hybrid Friction Stir Welding of High-carbon Steel

    Don-Hyun Choi; Seung-Boo Jung; Chang-Yong Lee; Byung-Wook Ahn; Jung-Hyun Choi; Yun-Mo Yeon; Keun Song; Seung-Gab Hong; Won-Bae Lee; Ki-Bong Kang

    2011-01-01

    A high-carbon steel joint, SK5 (0.84 wt% C), was successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW), both without and with a gas torch, in order to control the cooling rate during welding. After welding, the weld zone comprised gray and black regions, corresponding to microstructural variation: a martensite structure and a duplex structure of ferrite and cementite, respectively. The volume fraction of the martensite structure and the Vickers hardness in the welds were decreased with the using of the gas torch, which was related with the lower cooling rate.

  5. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Young Bum; Noh, Sang Hoon; Jang, Jin Sung; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  6. Friction Stir Processing of ODS and FM Steels

    In ODS steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and martensite, and the oxide

  7. Stirring N-body systems 2: Avoiding convergence

    Barber, Jeremy A; Hansen, Steen H

    2013-01-01

    We study the evolution of the phase-space of collisionless N-body systems under repeated stirrings or perturbations, which has been shown to lead to a convergence towards a limited solution group, in accordance with Hansen et al 2010, that is independent of the initial system and environmental conditions. We address, and dismiss, concerns that such convergent behaviour was due to collapse through radial orbit instability. We further examine the effects of radial velocity kicks in rigid potential and isotropic velocity kicks. There are no energy exchanges in these two recipes of kicks. We find that these kicks do not lead to the attractor.

  8. Stirring N-body systems: Universality of end states

    Barber, Jeremy A; Wu, Xufen; Hansen, Steen H

    2012-01-01

    We study the evolution of the phase-space of collisionless N-body systems under repeated stirrings or perturbations. We find convergence towards a limited solution group, in accordance with Hansen 2010, that is independent of the initial system and environmental conditions, paying particular attention to the assumed gravitational paradigm (Newtonian and MOND). We examine the effects of changes to the perturbation scheme and in doing so identify a large group of perturbations featuring radial orbit instability (ROI) which always lead to convergence. The attractor is thus found to be a robust and reproducible effect under a variety of circumstances.

  9. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  10. Friction Stir Processing of Aluminium-Silicon Alloys

    Chun Yip Chan

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Processing (FSP) has the potential for locally enhancing the properties of Al-Si alloy castings, for demanding applications within the automotive industry. In this thesis, the effect of FSP has been examined on three different cast Al-Si alloys:i) A Hypoeutectic Al-8.9wt%Si Alloyii) A Hypereutectic Al-12.1wt%Si Alloyiii) A Hypereutectic Al-12.1wt%Si-2.4wt%Ni AlloyThe influence of different processing parameters has been investigated at a fundamental level. Image analysis of part...

  11. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  12. Developing Friction Stir Welding Process Model for ICME Application

    Yang, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A framework for developing a product involving manufacturing processes was developed with integrated computational materials engineering approach. The key component in the framework is a process modeling tool which includes a thermal model, a microstructure model, a thermo-mechanical, and a property model. Using friction stir welding (FSW) process as an example, development of the process modeling tool was introduced in detail. The thermal model and the microstructure model of FSW of steels were validated with the experiment data. The model can predict reasonable temperature and hardness distributions as observed in the experiment. The model was applied to predict residual stress and joint strength of a pipe girth weld.

  13. Friction stir welding (FSW of aluminium foam sandwich panels

    M. Bušić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the influence of welding speed and tool tilt angle upon the mechanical properties at the friction stir welding of aluminium foam sandwich panels. Double side welding was used for producing butt welds of aluminium sandwich panels applying insertion of extruded aluminium profile. Such insertion provided lower pressure of the tool upon the aluminium panels, providing also sufficient volume of the material required for the weldment formation. Ultimate tensile strength and flexural strength for three-point bending test have been determined for samples taken from the welded joints. Results have confirmed anticipated effects of independent variables.

  14. Fatigue Crack Growth in Peened Friction Stir Welds

    Forth, Scott C.; Hatamleh, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding induces residual stresses that accelerates fatigue crack growth in the weld nugget. Shot peening over the weld had little effect on growth rate. Laser peening over the weld retarded the growth rate: Final crack growth rate was comparable to the base, un-welded material. Crack tunneling evident from residual compressive stresses. 2195-T8 fracture surfaces were highly textured. Texturing makes comparisons difficult as the material system is affecting the data as much as the processing. Material usage becoming more common in space applications requiring additional work to develop useful datasets for damage tolerance analyses.

  15. Colosed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Ppart Qualification Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes...

  16. Closed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Part Qualification Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes...

  17. Effects of Laser Peening, and Shot Peening, on Friction Stir Welding

    Hatamleh, Omar; Hackel, Lloyd; Rankin, Jon; Truong, Chanh; Walter, Matt

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the effects of laser peening and shot peening on friction stir welding is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Friction Stir Welding (FSW); 3) Microstructure; 4) Laser & Shot Peening; 5) Residual Stresses; 6) Tensile Behavior; 7) Fatigue Life & Surface Roughness; 8) Crack Growth; and 9) Benefits.

  18. EFFECT OF BAKELITE INTERLAYER POWDER ON FRICTION STIR SPOT WELDING OF THERMOPLASTIC POLYMERS

    Bekir ÇEVİK

    2014-01-01

    In this study, effect of bakelite interlayer powder on friction stir spot welding of polyethylene materials were investigated. 3 mm thick polyethylene materials were used in the experiments. 900 rpm rotational speed, 70, 100 and 130 seconds stirring time and 60 second waiting time were selected for the welding processes. Tensile-shear tests were applied on welded specimens and mechanical performances were determined

  19. 7 CFR 58.711 - Cheddar, colby, washed or soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese.

    2010-01-01

    ... stirred curd cheese. 58.711 Section 58.711 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... soaked curd, granular or stirred curd cheese. Cheese, used in the manufacture of pasteurized process cheese products should possess a pleasing and desirable taste and odor consistent with the age of...

  20. Multi-Criteria Optimization in Friction Stir Welding Using a Thermal Model with Prescribed Material Flow

    Tutum, Cem Celal; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an innovative solid-state joining process providing products with superior mechanical properties. It utilizes a rotating tool being submerged into the joint line and traversed while stirring the two pieces of metal together to form the weld. The temperature distribu...

  1. Friction Stir Weld Restart+Reweld Repair Allowables

    Clifton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    A friction stir weld (FSW) repair method has been developed and successfully implemented on Al 2195 plate material for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank (ET). The method includes restarting the friction stir weld in the termination hole of the original weld followed by two reweld passes. Room temperature and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties exceeded minimum FSW design strength and compared well with the development data. Simulated service test results also compared closely to historical data for initial FSW, confirming no change to the critical flaw size or inspection requirements for the repaired weld. Testing of VPPA fusion/FSW intersection weld specimens exhibited acceptable strength and exceeded the minimum design value. Porosity, when present at the intersection was on the root side toe of the fusion weld, the "worst case" being 0.7 inch long. While such porosity may be removed by sanding, this "worst case" porosity condition was tested "as is" and demonstrated that porosity did not negatively affect the strength of the intersection weld. Large, 15-inch "wide panels" FSW repair welds were tested to demonstrate strength and evaluate residual stresses using photo stress analysis. All results exceeded design minimums, and photo stress analysis showed no significant stress gradients due to the presence of the restart and multi-pass FSW repair weld.

  2. Friction stir welding of nuclear grade dissimilar steels

    SA508 Class 3 low alloy Mn-Mo-Ni steel is a reactor pressure vessel material, widely used in the world. In the reactors, fuel is arranged in a row of fuel pins and linked with portable control rods. The fuel is in a SA 508 steel container through which water is pumped at a high pressure into reactor vessel via cold lag pipeline. The water to act as both a coolant and a moderator. After absorbing the heat from the core of reactor, pressurised water is passed on a steam generator, via hot lag pipeline. Both hot lag and cold lag pipe lines are made of SS 304 LN steel. These both steels are generally welded by common arc welding process which may causes carbon migration, thermal stress, metallurgical deterioration, residual stress, etc. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a new solid state welding process develop by TWI in 1991 (UK) which generally removed all type of solidification problem. In this study Friction stir welding is performed for welding of SA 508 and SS 304 LN dissimilar steels. Defect free sound weld were produced having strength more than the SS 304 LN steel and toughness more than the SA 508. Microstructure and hardness represents the formation of martensite formation in weld nugget. (author)

  3. Mixing Study in an Unbaffled Stirred Precipitator Using LES Modelling

    Murielle Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the CFD modelling of a reactor operating in the nuclear industry using LES approach. The reactor consists of an unbaffled stirred tank reactor in which plutonium precipitation reactions are carried out. The flow generated in such a precipitator is complex and there is very little information available in the literature about unbaffled reactors stirred with magnetic rod. That is why a hydrodynamic modelling has been developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD in order to get accurate description of mixing phenomena inside the precipitator and therefore to be able to predict the solid particle properties. Due to the strong turbulence anisotropy, the turbulence transport simulation is achieved by a large eddy simulation (LES approach which gives unsteady solutions. The numerical simulations are performed in 3D using the Trio_U code developed at the Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique. The predictive performances of the modelling are analysed through a mixing phenomena study. Both experimental and numerical studies are performed. This work shows how hydrodynamics inside the reactor can have a noticeable effect on the precipitate properties and how LES modelling is a very effective tool for the process control.

  4. ZnS thin film deposited with chemical bath deposition process directed by different stirring speeds

    In this combined film thickness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and optical properties study, we explore the effects of different stirring speeds on the growth and optical properties of ZnS film deposited by CBD method. From the disclosed changes of thickness of ZnS film, we conclude that film thickness is independent of the stirring speeds in the heterogeneous process (deposition time less than 40 min), but increases with the stirring speeds and/or deposition time increasing in the homogeneous process. Grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the study of optical properties disclosed that the ZnS films grown with different stirring speeds show partially crystallized film and exhibit good transmittance (70-88% in the visible region), but the stirring speeds cannot give much effects on the structure and optical properties in the homogeneous process.

  5. Stir-bar supported micro-solid-phase extraction for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in serum samples.

    Sajid, Muhammad; Basheer, Chanbasha

    2016-07-15

    In present work, a new configuration of micro-solid phase extraction was introduced and termed as stir-bar supported micro-solid-phase extraction (SB-μ-SPE). A tiny stir-bar was packed inside the porous polypropylene membrane along with sorbent material and the edges of membrane sheet were heat sealed to secure the contents. The packing of stir-bar inside the μ-SPE device does not allow the device to stick with the wall or any corner of the sample vial during extraction, which is, however, a frequent observation in routine μ-SPE. Moreover, it enhances effective surface area of the sorbent exposed to sample solution through continuous agitation (motion and rotation). It also completely immerses the SB-μ-SPE device in the sample solution even for non-polar sorbents. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were selected as model compounds and the method performance was evaluated in human serum samples. After extraction, samples were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The factors that affect extraction efficiency of SB-μ-SPE were optimized. Under optimum conditions, a good linearity (0.1-100ngmL(-1)) with coefficients of determinations ranging from 0.9868 to 0.9992 was obtained. Limits of detections were ranged between 0.003 and 0.047ngmL(-1). Acceptable values for inter-day (3.2-9.1%) and intra-day (3.1-7.2%) relative standard deviations were obtained. The optimized method was successfully applied to determine the concentration of PCB congeners in human serum samples. PMID:27291862

  6. Fractal Continuation

    Barnsley, Michael F.; Vince, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A fractal function is a function whose graph is the attractor of an iterated function system. This paper generalizes analytic continuation of an analytic function to continuation of a fractal function.

  7. In-syringe-stirring: a novel approach for magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Suárez, Ruth; Solich, Petr; Cerdà, Víctor

    2013-07-25

    For the first time, the use of a magnetic stirrer within the syringe of an automated syringe pump and the resulting possible analytical applications are described. A simple instrumentation following roughly the one from sequential injection analyzer systems is used in combination with an adaptor, which is placed onto the barrel of a glass syringe. Swirling around the longitudinal axis of the syringe and holding two strong neodymium magnets, it causes a rotating magnetic field and serves as driver for a magnetic stirring bar placed inside of the syringe. In a first study it was shown that this approach leads to a sealed but also automatically adaptable reaction vessel, the syringe, in which rapid and homogeneous mixing of sample with the required reagents within short time can be carried out. In a second study in-a-syringe magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MSA-DLLME) was demonstrated by the application of the analyzer system to fluorimetric determination of aluminum in seawater samples using lumogallion. A linear working range up to 1.1 μmol L(-1) and a limit of detection of 6.1 nmol L(-1) were found. An average recovery of 106.0% was achieved for coastal seawaters with a reproducibility of 4.4%. The procedure lasted 210 s including syringe cleaning and only 150 μL of hexanol and 4.1 mL of sample were required. PMID:23845481

  8. Preparation of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matrix Composites by Using Stir Process

    V.Chandramohan*,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Generally aluminiums are used for various applications in industrial sectors and home based products. Metal matrix composites (MMCs possess significantly improved properties including high specific strength, specific modulus, damping capacity and good wear resistance compared to unreinforced alloys. The objective of the project is to fabricate Al356/Fly ash, Graphite& Boron Carbide metal matrix composite by using stir process and study the properties of the fabricated composite. Co-continuous alumina/aluminium composite materials with excellent physical and mechanical properties offer great potentials for lightweight, wear resistant, and high-temperature applications. Composite materials prepared from a liquid-phase displacement reaction present a unique microstructure in which each phase is a continuous network penetrated by the network of the other constituent. There has been an increasing interest in composites containing low density and low cost reinforcements. Among various discontinuous dispersions used, fly ash is one of the most inexpensive and low density reinforcement available in large quantities as solid waste by-product during combustion of coal in thermal power plants. Hence, composites with fly ash as reinforcement are likely to overcome the cost barrier for wide spread applications in automotive and small engine applications.

  9. Friction Stir Spot Welding of 6061 Aluminum-to-Copper

    Heideman, Robert J.

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) between 1.5mm thick 6061 Al on top and 1.5mm thick Cu at bottom was conducted. First, weld parameters and the weld macrostructure that were necessary to form good quality welds, as determined using lap shear weld strength, were identified. Tool rotation speed and tool pin length are key variables that control weld strength. To obtain high quality strong welds, a Cu ring extruded upward from the lower Cu sheet into the upper 6061 Al-sheet, which promoted bonding and interlocking between the sheets, and an Al-rich stir zone between Cu ring and weld keyhole were both necessary. Second, a technique where the tool remained in the sample after FSSW helped determine the material flow that takes place during high quality weld formation and the functions of the welding tool features. The tool threads cause 6061 Al from the upper sheet to move downward into the region near the threads. The tool shoulder causes a counter flow movement of 6061 Al that results in the formation of the Al-rich stir zone and also causes the upward extrusion of the lower Cu sheet. This technique also identified that a Cu-rich material forms on the tool tip, that this material sheds and rebuilds during subsequent welds, and that this material can form large Cu-rich particles that can completely fill the tool threads, impede proper material flow and lead to a low strength, poor quality weld. Third, to further understand welding parameters, weld temperatures, torque, and vertical forces were measured. Temperature data was collected using a tool holder that permitted wireless thermocouple data collection. Through these measurements, rotational plunge weld energy was recognized as important in determining if a quality weld formed, and weld plunge rate was identified as the welding parameter that significantly impacted rotational weld plunge energy. The final phase of research was to improve weld quality consistency. Through repetitive trials with a single tool

  10. Microstructural and superplastic characteristics of friction stir processed aluminum alloys

    Charit, Indrajit

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is an adapted version of friction stir welding (FSW), which was invented at The Welding Institute (TWI), 1991. It is a promising solid state processing tool for microstructural modification at localized scale. Dynamic recrystallization occurs during FSP resulting in fine grained microstructure. The main goal of this research was to establish microstructure/superplasticity relationships in FSP aluminum alloys. Different aluminum alloys (5083 Al, 2024 Al, and Al-8.9Zn-2.6Mg-0.09Sc) were friction stir processed for investigating the effect of alloy chemistry on resulting superplasticity. Tool rotation rate and traverse speeds were controlled as the prime FSP parameters to produce different microstructures. In another study, lap joints of 7475 Al plates were also studied to explore the possibility of developing FSW/superplastic forming route. Microstructures were evaluated using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical properties were evaluated using tensile testing. FSP 2024 Al (3.9 mum grain size) exhibited an optimum ductility of 525% at a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 and 430°C. Grain boundary sliding mechanism was found to be the dominant mode of deformation in this alloy. In 5083 Al alloy, it was found that changing the process parameters, grain sizes in the range of 3.5--8.5 mum grain size could be obtained. Material processed with colder processing parameters showed a decrease in ductility due to microstructural instability, and followed solute drag dislocation glide mechanism. On the other hand, materials processed with hotter parameter combinations showed mode of deformation related to grain boundary sliding mechanism. FSP of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Sc alloy resulted in ultrafine grains (0.68 mum) with attractive combination of high strain rate and low temperature superplasticity. This also demonstrated that superplastic microstructures could be