WorldWideScience

Sample records for 2-encoded type iii

  1. Functional dissection of translocon proteins of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2-encoded type III secretion system

    Hensel Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type III secretion systems (T3SS are essential virulence factors of most Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. T3SS deliver effector proteins directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic target cells and for this function, the insertion of a subset of T3SS proteins into the target cell membrane is important. These proteins form hetero-oligomeric pores acting as translocon for the delivery of effector proteins. Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen that uses the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2-encoded T3SS to manipulate host cells in order to survive and proliferate within the Salmonella-containing vacuole of host cells. Previous work showed that SPI2-encoded SseB, SseC and SseD act to form the translocon of the SPI2-T3SS. Results Here we investigated the structural requirements of SseB and SseD to form a functional translocon. Based on bioinformatic predictions, deletional analyses of SseB and SseD were performed and the effect on secretion by the T3SS, formation of a translocon, translocation of effector proteins and intracellular replication was investigated. Our data showed that both SseB and SseD are very sensitive towards alterations of the primary structure of the proteins. Although proteins encoded by mutant alleles were still secreted, we observed that all mutations resulted in a loss of function of the SPI2-T3SS. Conclusion These observations indicate that translocon proteins of the SPI2-T3SS are highly evolved towards the formation of multi-subunit complex in the host cell membrane. Structural alterations are not tolerated and abrogate translocon function.

  2. Changes in cellular microRNA expression induced by porcine circovirus type 2-encoded proteins.

    Hong, Jae-Sang; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Choi, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jun-Seong; Na, Dokyun; Chun, Taehoon; Lee, Young Sik

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, which leads to serious economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. While the molecular basis of PCV2 replication and pathogenicity remains elusive, it is increasingly apparent that the microRNA (miRNA) pathway plays a key role in controlling virus-host interactions, in addition to a wide range of cellular processes. Here, we employed Solexa deep sequencing technology to determine which cellular miRNAs were differentially regulated after expression of each of three PCV2-encoded open reading frames (ORFs) in porcine kidney epithelial (PK15) cells. We identified 51 ORF1-regulated miRNAs, 74 ORF2-regulated miRNAs, and 32 ORF3-regulated miRNAs that differed in abundance compared to the control. Gene ontology analysis of the putative targets of these miRNAs identified transcriptional regulation as the most significantly enriched biological process, while KEGG pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment for several pathways including MAPK signaling, which is activated during PCV2 infection. Among the potential target genes of ORF-regulated miRNAs, two genes encoding proteins that are known to interact with PCV2-encoded proteins, zinc finger protein 265 (ZNF265) and regulator of G protein signaling 16 (RGS16), were selected for further analysis. We provide evidence that ZNF265 and RGS16 are direct targets of miR-139-5p and let-7e, respectively, which are both down-regulated by ORF2. Our data will initiate further studies to elucidate the roles of ORF-regulated cellular miRNAs in PCV2-host interactions. PMID:25885539

  3. Changes in cellular microRNA expression induced by porcine circovirus type 2-encoded proteins

    Hong, Jae-Sang; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Choi, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jun-Seong; Na, Dokyun; Chun, Taehoon; Lee, Young Sik

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, which leads to serious economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. While the molecular basis of PCV2 replication and pathogenicity remains elusive, it is increasingly apparent that the microRNA (miRNA) pathway plays a key role in controlling virus-host interactions, in addition to a wide range of cellular processes. Here, we employed Solexa deep sequencing technology to determine ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type III

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions mucopolysaccharidosis type III mucopolysaccharidosis type III Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III), also known as Sanfilippo ...

  5. Glycosaminoglycans and mucopolysaccharidosis type III.

    Jakobkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Ciminska, Magdalena; Kloska, Anna; Malinowska, Marcelina; Piotrowska, Ewa; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III), or Sanfilippo syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disease in which heparan sulfate is accumulated in lysosomes, as well as outside of cells, as the primary storage material. This disease is a complex of four conditions caused by dysfunctions of one of genes coding for lysosomal enzymes involved in degradation of heparan sulfate: SGSH (coding for heparan N-sulfatase) - causing MPS IIIA, NAGLU (coding for alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase) - causing MPS IIIB, HGSNAT (coding for acetyl CoA alpha-glucosaminide acetyltransferase) - causing MPS IIIC), and GNS (coding for N-acetylglucosamine-6-sulfatase) - causing MPS IIID. The primary storage is responsible for some disease symptoms, but other arise as a result of secondary storage, including glycosphingolipids, and subsequent processes, like oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Central nervous system is predominantly affected in all subtypes of MPS III. Heparan sulfate and its derivatives are the most commonly used biomarkers for diagnosis and prediction procedures. Currently, there is no therapy for Sanfilippo syndrome, however, clinical trials are ongoing for enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy and substrate reduction therapy (particularly gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy). PMID:27100513

  6. Radioimmunological determination of procollagen (type III) and procollagen peptide (type III)

    The detection of antigens circulating in the blood enables the early recognition of fibrotic processes e.g. liver cirrhosis and hepatitis. One thus uses an anti procollagen (type III) labelled with iodine 125 by the chloramine-T method, or an anti-procollagen peptide (type III) serum which is brought together with a sample of unknown contents. The separation of the antigen-antibody complex is carried out by means of a highly specific antiserum. The procollagen peptide (type III) is produced from calf skin of a foetus or from human aszites fluid. (DG)

  7. Decay time of type III solar bursts

    Sixty-four Type III bursts that drifted to frequencies below 600 kHz between March 1968 and February 1970 were analyzed. Decay times were measured and combined with published data ranging up to about 200 MHz. By fitting power functions to the computed and observed decay times, and using the local plasma hypothesis, it was found that the ratio rho of computed to observed values varies with radiocentric radial distance according to a power function rho = 3r0.7. (U.S.)

  8. Mouse protection assay for group B streptococcus type III.

    Fleming, D O

    1982-01-01

    The mucin model for group B Streptococcus (GBS) type III was used to assay the protective effect of sera against a type III challenge in mice. Hyperimmune rabbit sera, prepared by the Lancefield method against the laboratory reference strain (SS620) and a clinical isolate (M732), protected against a lethal challenge with either strain of GBS type III. Absorption of the sera with either of these type III strains removed the protective effect. Neither normal rabbit sera nor heterologous antiser...

  9. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  10. Type III Societies (Apparently) Do Not Exist

    Lacki, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Whether technological societies remain small and planet-bound like our own, or ultimately span across galaxies is an open question in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. Societies that engineer on a galactic scale are classified as Type III on Kardashev's scale. I argue that Type III societies can take the form of blackboxes, entire galaxies veiled in an opaque screen. A blackbox has a temperature that is just above that of the cosmic microwave background. The screen can be made from artificial dust pervading the galaxy. I show that there is enough material in galaxies to build blackboxes if the dust is fashioned into dipole antennas. The thermal emission of a blackbox makes it a bright microwave source. I examine the Planck Catalog of Compact Sources to constrain the abundance of blackboxes. None of the 100 GHz sources has the spectrum expected of a blackbox. The null result rules out shrouded galaxy clusters out to z ~ 1 and shrouded Milky Ways out to (comoving) 700 Mpc. The reach of th...

  11. Noise level and MPEG-2 encoder statistics

    Lee, Jungwoo

    1997-01-01

    Most software in the movie and broadcasting industries are still in analog film or tape format, which typically contains random noise that originated from film, CCD camera, and tape recording. The performance of the MPEG-2 encoder may be significantly degraded by the noise. It is also affected by the scene type that includes spatial and temporal activity. The statistical property of noise originating from camera and tape player is analyzed and the models for the two types of noise are developed. The relationship between the noise, the scene type, and encoder statistics of a number of MPEG-2 parameters such as motion vector magnitude, prediction error, and quant scale are discussed. This analysis is intended to be a tool for designing robust MPEG encoding algorithms such as preprocessing and rate control.

  12. Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage*

    Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Weis, Mary Ann; Kim, Lammy S.; Eyre, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The collagen framework of hyaline cartilages, including articular cartilage, consists largely of type II collagen that matures from a cross-linked heteropolymeric fibril template of types II, IX, and XI collagens. In the articular cartilages of adult joints, type III collagen makes an appearance in varying amounts superimposed on the original collagen fibril network. In a study to understand better the structural role of type III collagen in cartilage, we find that type III collagen molecules...

  13. Type III apical transportation of root canal

    Shiv P Mantri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural accidents leading to complications such as canal transportation have been ascribed to inapt cleaning and shaping concepts. Canal transportation is an undesirable deviation from the natural canal path. Herewith a case of apical transportation of root canal resulting in endodontic retreatment failure and its management is presented. A healthy 21-year-old young male presented discomfort and swelling associated with painful endodontically retreated maxillary incisor. Radiograph revealed periradicular radiolucency involving underfilled 11 and overfilled 12. Insufficiently obturated 11 exhibited apical transportation of canal. This type III transportation was treated by periradicular surgery and repair using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Comfortable asymptomatic patient presented uneventful healing at third and fourth month recall visits. A decrease in the size of radiolucency in radiograph supported the clinical finding. In the present case, MTA is useful in repairing the transportation defect. The result of these procedures is predictable and successful.

  14. Autism Symptoms Related to Tyrosinemia Type III: A Case Report

    Ayşegül Yolga Tahiroğlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The published literature on tyrosinemia type III consists of only a few case reports. In this report, we present a patient with tyrosinemia type III, autism, and mental retardation. This patient’s speech improved and his autistic symptoms lessened on a tyrosine-restricted diet, although his mental retardation remained unchanged. This is the first published report of a patient with tyrosinemia type III and autism. This observation is significant due to the paucity of published information about tyrosinemia type III. Turk Jem 2008; 12: 55-6

  15. The expression of type III hyperlipoproteinemia: Involvement of lipolysis genes

    Henneman, P.; Sman-de Beer, F. van der; Moghaddam, P.H.; Huijts, P.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Duijn, C.M. van; Havekes, L.M.; Frants, R.R.; Dijk, K.W. van; Smelt, A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) is mainly found in homozygous apolipoprotein (APO) E2 (R158C) carriers. Genetic factors contributing to the expression of type III HLP were investigated in 113 hyper- and 52 normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, by testing for polymorphisms in APOC3, APOA5, HL (hepatic li

  16. Assessment of Sleep in Children with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    Mahon, Louise Victoria; Lomax, Michelle; Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Hare, Dougal Julian; Wraith, James Ed; Jones, Simon; Bigger, Brian; Langford-Smith, Kia; Canal, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III), yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7–10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep ...

  17. Cognitive development in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo syndrome)

    Colland Vivian; Grootenhuis Martha; Marchal Jan; Valstar Marlies J; Wijburg Frits A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the degradation of heparan sulfate. MPS III is characterized by progressive mental deterioration resulting in severe dementia. A number of potentially disease-modifying therapies are studied. As preservation of cognitive function is the ultimate goal of treatment, assessment of cognitive development will be essential in orde...

  18. Extrapyramidal Symptoms and Medication Use in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    Tchan, Michel C.; Sillence, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: We report the case of a 16-year-old male with Mucopolysaccharidosis III type A (Sanfilippo syndrome) who was commenced on risperidone for behaviour management. He rapidly developed extrapyramidal symptoms that have not resolved. Method: The medication histories of 20 patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis III seen at a Lysosomal Storage…

  19. Relevance of the type III error in epidemiological maps

    Heinzl Harald

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A type III error arises from a two-sided test, when one side is erroneously favoured although the true effect actually resides on the other side. The relevance of this grave error in decision-making is studied for epidemiological maps. Results Theoretical considerations confirm that a type III error may be large for regions with small numbers of expected cases even when no spatial smoothing has been performed. A simulation study based on infant mortality data in Austria reveals that spatial smoothing may additionally increase the risk of type III errors. Conclusions The occurrence of a type III error should be taken into account when interpreting results presented in epidemiological maps, particularly with regard to sparsely populated regions and spatial smoothing.

  20. Type III factors with unique Cartan decomposition

    Houdayer, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    We prove that for any free ergodic nonsingular nonamenable action \\Gamma\\ \\actson (X,\\mu) of all \\Gamma\\ in a large class of groups including all hyperbolic groups, the associated group measure space factor $L^\\infty(X) \\rtimes \\Gamma$ has L^\\infty(X) as its unique Cartan subalgebra, up to unitary conjugacy. This generalizes the probability measure preserving case that was established in [PV12]. We also prove primeness and indecomposability results for such crossed products, for the corresponding orbit equivalence relations and for arbitrary amalgamated free products $M_1 *_B M_2$ over a subalgebra B of type I.

  1. Sanfilippo disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type III): Early diagnosis and treatment

    Wijburg, F.A.; Ruijter, de, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are severe, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defective lysosomal degradation glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The subsequent progressive accumulation of GAGs in cells and tissues in MPS patients results in extensive, severe and progressive disease, generally limiting quality of life and life expectancy. Sanfilippo disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type III, MPS III) is one of the 7 MPSs and is characterized by storage of the GAG heparan sulfate (HS), primarily leadin...

  2. Guarding the frontiers: the biology of type III interferons

    Wack, Andreas; Terczynska-Dyla, Ewa; Hartmann, Rune

    2015-01-01

    healthy mucosal surfaces through immune protection, without the significant immune-related pathogenic risk associated with type I IFN responses. Type III IFNs also target the human liver, with dual effects: they induce an antiviral state in hepatocytes, but specific IFN-λ4 action impairs the clearance of...

  3. Multiple Gastric Carcinomas Associated with Potter Type III Cystic Disease

    Kenji Mimatsu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of multiple gastric carcinomas associated with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver, mesenterium and kidney. A 65-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to polycystic kidneys and under hemodialysis treatment 3 times a week for 2 years was admitted to our hospital because of anemia. He stated that his sister had suffered from polycystic kidney disease. Gastrointestinal fiberscopy showed two lesions in the lesser curvature in the lower portion of the stomach, and histopathological analysis of the gastric tumor biopsies revealed that one of the tumors was a papillary adenocarcinoma and the other a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected in the stomach mucosa. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed polycystic lesions in the liver, mesenterium and both kidneys. These imaging findings and family history suggested that the patient suffered from multiple gastric carcinomas associated with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver, mesenterium and kidney. Reports on the association of malignant neoplasm with Potter type III cystic disease are extremely rare. Especially, no case of the association of gastric carcinoma with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver and kidney has been described previously. This is a first report of the association of gastric carcinoma with Potter type III cystic disease. We also review reports of other malignant neoplasms associated with polycystic disease.

  4. A review of solar type III radio bursts

    Solar type III radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool in the understanding of solar accelerated electron beams. They are a signature of propagating beams of nonthermal electrons in the solar atmosphere and the solar system. Consequently, they provide information on electron acceleration and transport, and the conditions of the background ambient plasma they travel through. We review the observational properties of type III bursts with an emphasis on recent results and how each property can help identify attributes of electron beams and the ambient background plasma. We also review some of the theoretical aspects of type III radio bursts and cover a number of numerical efforts that simulate electron beam transport through the solar corona and the heliosphere. (mini-volume: solar radiophysics — recent results on observations and theories: invited reviews)

  5. Assessment of sleep in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type III.

    Louise Victoria Mahon

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III, yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7-10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep diary. Actigraphic data revealed that children with MPS III had significantly longer sleep onset latencies and greater daytime sleep compared to controls, but night-time sleep duration did not differ between groups. In the MPS III group, sleep efficiency declined, and sleep onset latency increased, with age. Questionnaire responses showed that MPS III patients had significantly more sleep difficulties in all domains compared to controls. Melatonin concentrations showed an alteration in the circadian system in MPS III, which suggests that treatment for sleep problems should attempt to synchronise the sleep-wake cycle to a more regular pattern. Actigraphy was tolerated by children and this monitoring device can be recommended as a measure of treatment success in research and clinical practice.

  6. Assessment of Sleep in Children with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    Mahon, Louise Victoria; Lomax, Michelle; Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Hare, Dougal Julian; Wraith, James Ed; Jones, Simon; Bigger, Brian; Langford-Smith, Kia; Canal, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III), yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7–10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep diary. Actigraphic data revealed that children with MPS III had significantly longer sleep onset latencies and greater daytime sleep compared to controls, but night-time sleep duration did not differ between groups. In the MPS III group, sleep efficiency declined, and sleep onset latency increased, with age. Questionnaire responses showed that MPS III patients had significantly more sleep difficulties in all domains compared to controls. Melatonin concentrations showed an alteration in the circadian system in MPS III, which suggests that treatment for sleep problems should attempt to synchronise the sleep-wake cycle to a more regular pattern. Actigraphy was tolerated by children and this monitoring device can be recommended as a measure of treatment success in research and clinical practice. PMID:24504123

  7. Osteogenesis imperfecta (lethal) bones contain types III and V collagens.

    Pope, F. M.; Nicholls, A. C.; Eggleton, C; Narcissi, P; Hey, E N; Parkin, J M

    1980-01-01

    Lethal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI-L) and normal fetal bones contain types I and V collagen with relatively more type V in OI-L bones. The latter, unlike normal fetal bone, also contain some type III collagen. Such altered collagen ratios could directly produce the bony fragility and radiotranslucency of OI-L bones. Since this is an inherited osteoporosis similar alterations in acquired osteoporoses are also possible.

  8. The general solution of Bianchi type III vacuum cosmology

    Christodoulakis, T.; Terzis, Petros A.

    2007-02-01

    The second-order ordinary differential equation which describes the unknown part of the solution space of some vacuum Bianchi cosmologies is completely integrated for type III, thus obtaining the general solution to Einstein's field equations for this case, with the aid of the sixth Painlevé transcendent PVI. For particular representations of PVI we obtain the known Kinnersley two-parameter spacetime and a solution of Euclidean signature. The imposition of the spacetime generalization of a 'hidden' symmetry of the generic type III spatial slice enables us to retrieve the two-parameter subfamily without considering the Painlevé transcendent.

  9. Exploiting the Biosynthetic Potential of Type III Polyketide Synthases.

    Lim, Yan Ping; Go, Maybelle K; Yew, Wen Shan

    2016-01-01

    Polyketides are structurally and functionally diverse secondary metabolites that are biosynthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs) using acyl-CoA precursors. Recent studies in the engineering and structural characterization of PKSs have facilitated the use of target enzymes as biocatalysts to produce novel functionally optimized polyketides. These compounds may serve as potential drug leads. This review summarizes the insights gained from research on type III PKSs, from the discovery of chalcone synthase in plants to novel PKSs in bacteria and fungi. To date, at least 15 families of type III PKSs have been characterized, highlighting the utility of PKSs in the development of natural product libraries for therapeutic development. PMID:27338328

  10. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  11. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    Tan, Baolin; Karlicky, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reported 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at frequency of 0.80 - 7.60 GHz during 1994 - 2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequency in range of 1.08 - 3.42 GHz and frequency gap 10 - 1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (f_{x}), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to f_{x}, while the frequency gap is independent to f_{x}. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequency, longer lifetime, wider frequency gap, and slower frequency drift than that occurring in postflare phase....

  12. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  13. A tiny event producing an interplanetary type III burst

    Alissandrakis, C E; Patsourakos, S; Kontogeorgos, A; Tsitsipis, P

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which small scale energy release events in the low corona gave rise to strong interplanetary (IP) type III bursts. We analyze observations of three tiny events, detected by the Nan\\c cay Radio Heliograph (NRH), two of which produced IP type IIIs. We took advantage of the NRH positioning information and of the high cadence of AIA/SDO data to identify the associated EUV emissions. We measured positions and time profiles of the metric and EUV sources. We found that the EUV events that produced IP type IIIs were located near a coronal hole boundary, while the one that did not was located in a closed magnetic field region. In all three cases tiny flaring loops were involved, without any associated mass eruption. In the best observed case the radio emission at the highest frequency (435 MHz) was displaced by ~55" with respect to the small flaring loop. The metric type III emission shows a complex structure in space and in time, indicative of multiple electron beams, despite the l...

  14. The position and polarization of Type III solar bursts

    Dulk, G. A.; Suzuki, S.

    1980-01-01

    The position and polarization of Type III solar bursts in the range of 24-220 MHz are studied, with emphasis on the bursts continuing to frequencies lower than 24 MHz. Consideration is given to the statistics of burst polarization, the relation between polarization and source position, and brightness temperature, flux densities, and source sizes.

  15. Cognitive development in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo syndrome

    Colland Vivian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the degradation of heparan sulfate. MPS III is characterized by progressive mental deterioration resulting in severe dementia. A number of potentially disease-modifying therapies are studied. As preservation of cognitive function is the ultimate goal of treatment, assessment of cognitive development will be essential in order to evaluate treatment efficacy. However, no large scale studies on cognitive levels in MPS III patients, using formal psychometric tests, have been reported. Methods We aimed to assess cognitive development in all 73 living patients with MPS III in the Netherlands. Results Cognitive development could be assessed in 69 patients. In 39 of them developmental level was estimated > 3 months and formal psychometric testing was attempted. A remarkable variation in the intellectual disability was detected. Conclusions Despite special challenges encountered, testing failed in only three patients. The observed broad variation in intellectual disability, should be taken into account when designing therapeutic trials.

  16. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    Winter, L. M.; Ledbetter, K.

    2015-08-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010 to 2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric–hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak \\gt 10 MeV flux above 15 protons cm‑2 s‑1 sr‑1 are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the radio properties are the type III burst intensity and duration. Further, a logistic regression analysis with the radio-derived principal component (dominated by the type III and type II radio burst intensity and type III duration) obtains SEP predictions approaching the human forecaster rates, with a false alarm rate of 22%, a probability of detection of 62%, and with 85% of the classifications correct. Therefore, type III radio bursts that occur along with a DH type II burst are shown to be an important diagnostic that can be used to forecast SEP events.

  17. TYPE III EXCITABILITY, SLOPE SENSITIVITY AND COINCIDENCE DETECTION.

    Meng, Xiangying; Huguet, Gemma; Rinzel, John

    2012-08-01

    Some neurons in the nervous system do not show repetitive firing for steady currents. For time-varying inputs, they fire once if the input rise is fast enough. This property of phasic firing is known as Type III excitability. Type III excitability has been observed in neurons in the auditory brainstem (MSO), which show strong phase-locking and accurate coincidence detection. In this paper, we consider a Hodgkin-Huxley type model (RM03) that is widely-used for phasic MSO neurons and we compare it with a modification of it, showing tonic behavior. We provide insight into the temporal processing of these neuron models by means of developing and analyzing two reduced models that reproduce qualitatively the properties of the exemplar ones. The geometric and mathematical analysis of the reduced models allows us to detect and quantify relevant features for the temporal computation such as nearness to threshold and a temporal integration window. Our results underscore the importance of Type III excitability for precise coincidence detection. PMID:23667306

  18. The radioimmunoassay for type III procollagen peptide. A technical note

    We have studied the immunoreactivity of human sera and synovial fluids in a radioimmunoassay which utilizes an anti-bovine procollagen type III antiserum and the bovine type III procollagen peptide as standard and tracer. We have noticed a complete cross section reaction between bovine col 1-3 and human synovial fluid, which thus contains substance(s) having the same antigenic determinant(s) as col 1-3. On the contrary, we have demonstrated non parallelism between col 1-3 and human serum, whether the serum was obtained from normal subjects or patients suffering from various diseases. These results suggest that immunoreactive substances related to col 1-3 and detected in sera are at least partially different from those detected in synovial fluids

  19. Identification of Novel Type III Effectors Using Latent Dirichlet Allocation

    Yang Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the six secretion systems identified in Gram-negative bacteria, the type III secretion system (T3SS plays important roles in the disease development of pathogens. T3SS has attracted a great deal of research interests. However, the secretion mechanism has not been fully understood yet. Especially, the identification of effectors (secreted proteins is an important and challenging task. This paper adopts machine learning methods to identify type III secreted effectors (T3SEs. We extract features from amino acid sequences and conduct feature reduction based on latent semantic information by using latent Dirichlet allocation model. The experimental results on Pseudomonas syringae data set demonstrate the good performance of the new methods.

  20. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, whic...

  1. Discovery of Hubble's Law: an Example of Type III Error

    Belenkiy, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Recently much attention has been paid to the discovery of Hubble's law: the linear relation between the rate of recession of the distant galaxies and distance to them. Though we now mention several names associated with this law instead of one, the motivation of each remains somewhat obscure. As it is turns out, two major contributors arrived at their discoveries from erroneous reasoning, thus making a case for a Type III error. It appears that G. Lemaitre (1927) theoretically derived Hubble'...

  2. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /ΣIj (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of ∼2° and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from ∼ – 100° to ∼100°. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  3. Multiple Gastric Carcinomas Associated with Potter Type III Cystic Disease

    Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kano, Hisao; Kida, Kazutoshi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kuboi, Youichi; Amano, Sadao

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of multiple gastric carcinomas associated with Potter type III cystic disease of the liver, mesenterium and kidney. A 65-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to polycystic kidneys and under hemodialysis treatment 3 times a week for 2 years was admitted to our hospital because of anemia. He stated that his sister had suffered from polycystic kidney disease. Gastrointestinal fiberscopy showed two lesions in the lesser curvature in the lower portion of the stomach, and hi...

  4. Assembly and function of type III secretory systems.

    Cornelis, G R; Van Gijsegem, F

    2000-01-01

    Type III secretion systems allow Yersinia spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Bordetella spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli adhering at the surface of a eukaryotic cell to inject bacterial proteins across the two bacterial membranes and the eukaryotic cell membrane to destroy or subvert the target cell. These systems consist of a secretion apparatus, made of approximately 25 proteins, and an array of proteins released by this apparatus. Some of these released proteins are "effectors," which are delivered into the cytosol of the target cell, whereas the others are "translocators," which help the effectors to cross the membrane of the eukaryotic cell. Most of the effectors act on the cytoskeleton or on intracellular-signaling cascades. A protein injected by the enteropathogenic E. coli serves as a membrane receptor for the docking of the bacterium itself at the surface of the cell. Type III secretion systems also occur in plant pathogens where they are involved both in causing disease in susceptible hosts and in eliciting the so-called hypersensitive response in resistant or nonhost plants. They consist of 15-20 Hrp proteins building a secretion apparatus and two groups of effectors: harpins and avirulence proteins. Harpins are presumably secreted in the extracellular compartment, whereas avirulence proteins are thought to be targeted into plant cells. Although a coherent picture is clearly emerging, basic questions remain to be answered. In particular, little is known about how the type III apparatus fits together to deliver proteins in animal cells. It is even more mysterious for plant cells where a thick wall has to be crossed. In spite of these haunting questions, type III secretion appears as a fascinating trans-kingdom communication device. PMID:11018143

  5. Achieving type I, II, and III heterojunctions using functionalized MXene.

    Lee, Youngbin; Hwang, Yubin; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, type I, II, and III heterostructures are constructed with the same base material using three representative functionalized monolayer scandium carbides (Sc2CF2, Sc2C(OH)2, and Sc2CO2) by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. In contrast to general bilayer heterosystems composed of two-dimensional semiconductors, type I and III heterojunctions are obtained in one Sc2CF2/Sc2CO2 system and the remains of the functionalized Sc2C heterostructures, respectively. It is noteworthy that the same monolayer Sc2CF2 and Sc2CO2 constituents lead to dissimilar heterostructure types in the two Sc2CF2/Sc2CO2 systems by modifying the stacking interface. In addition, in the two Sc2CF2/Sc2CO2 systems, remarkable changes in the heterojunction type are induced by a strain, and two distinct type-II heterostructures are generated where one layer with the conduction band minimum state and the other layer including the valence band maximum level are different. The present work suggests an attractive direction to obtain all heterostructure types with the same base material for novel nanodevices in various fields such as photonics, electronics, and optoelectronics using only the two monolayer components Sc2CF2 and Sc2CO2. PMID:25791222

  6. A Probable Short Decimetric Type I-like Noise Storm: Associated with Type III Bursts?

    Rui-Xiang Xie; Min Wang; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    A rare Type I-like noise storm was observed with the solar radio spectrometers (1.0-2.0 GHz and 2.60-3.8 GHz) at National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) on September 23, 1998. We concentrate on checking the Type I-like noise storm occurred in the decay phase of a Type IV radio burst. This noise storm consists of many Type I bursts and isolated Type III or Type III pair bursts.It has a bandwidth of ≤ 0.5 GHz. The duration of each Type I burst is of the order of 100-300ms. The total duration is greater than 11 minutes. The circular polarization degree of the components of Type I and associated Type III bursts are about 40%-100% and almost 100%, respectively, which is greater than that of the background continuum (nearly the precision of our instrument). This short decimetric Type I-like storm may be another kind or the extension of the kind of metric Type I storm, and may possess the duality of metric and decimetric radio emission. It may be in favor of an earlier emission mechanism of the fundamental plasma radiation due to the coalescence of Langmuir waves with low-frequency waves.

  7. Radiative Type III Seesaw Model and its collider phenomenology

    von der Pahlen, Federico; Palacio, Guillermo; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the present bounds of a scotogenic model, the Radiative Type III Seesaw (RSIII), in which an additional scalar doublet and at least two fermion triplets of $SU(2)_L$ are added to the Standard Model (SM). In the RSIII the new physics (NP) sector is odd under an exact global $Z_2$ symmetry. This symmetry guaranties that the lightest NP neutral particle is stable, providing a natural dark matter (DM) candidate, and leads to naturally suppressed neutrino masses generated by a one-loop ...

  8. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at fpe, 2fpe and 3 fpe (fpe is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts

  9. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases.

    Pandith, Shahzad A; Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P; Shah, Manzoor A; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2016-08-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  10. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    Axelrod Felicia B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating. Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III, which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  11. Monitoring Burr Type III Software Quality Using SPC

    Smitha Chowdary. Ch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of software in satisfying its functional requirements successfully is measured as software reliability, making it one of the most important characteristics of software quality. Improving software processes employed during the software development life cycle is essential to produce reliable software systems of assured quality. Software Reliability Growth Models (SRGMs aid software engineers and managers in tracking and measuring the growth in reliability as software is being developed for quality assurance. Software quality is improved by continuously monitoring and controlling the software process. Statistical Process Control (SPC is the application of statistical methods on software process data presented graphically to quickly and easily identify anomalies that enable the developer to address software failures. In this paper we proposed a SPC mechanism of control charts for time domain data using Burr Type III based on Non Homogenous Poisson Process (NHPP and parameters are estimated by Maximum likelihood Estimation (MLE method.

  12. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith;

    2013-01-01

    Myopathic symptoms in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa (GSD IIIa) are generally ascribed to the muscle wasting that these patients suffer in adult life, but an inability to debranch glycogen likely also has an impact on muscle energy metabolism. We hypothesized that patients with GSD IIIa can...... experience exercise intolerance due to insufficient carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. Six patients aged 17-36-years were studied. We determined VO 2peak (peak oxygen consumption), the response to forearm exercise, and the metabolic and cardiovascular responses to cycle exercise at 70% of VO 2peak...... capacity was significantly reduced, and our results indicate that this was due to a block in muscle glycogenolytic capacity. Our findings suggest that the general classification of GSD III as a glycogenosis characterized by fixed symptoms related to muscle wasting should be modified to include dynamic...

  13. Discovery of Hubble's Law: an Example of Type III Error

    Belenkiy, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Recently much attention has been paid to the discovery of Hubble's law: the linear relation between the rate of recession of the distant galaxies and distance to them. Though we now mention several names associated with this law instead of one, the motivation of each remains somewhat obscure. As it is turns out, two major contributors arrived at their discoveries from erroneous reasoning, thus making a case for a Type III error. It appears that G. Lemaitre (1927) theoretically derived Hubble's Law due to his choice of the wrong scenario of the Universe's evolution. E. Hubble (1929) tested the linearity law not based on Lemaitre's non-static model, but rather a cumbersome extension of de Sitter's static theory proposed by H. Weyl (1923) and L. Silberstein (1924).

  14. Directivity of low frequency solar type III radio bursts

    The occurrence rate of type III solar bursts in the frequency range 4.9 MHz to 30 kHz is analyzed as a function of burst intensity and burst arrival direction. It is found that (a) the occurrence rate of bursts falls off with increasing flux, S, according to the power law Ssup(-1.5), and (b) the distribution of burst arrival directions at each frequency shows a significantly larger number of bursts observed west of the Earth-Sun line than east of it. This western excess in occurrence rate appears to be correlated with the direction of the average interplanetary magnetic field, and is interpreted as beaming of the observed burst radiation along the magnetic field direction. (Auth.)

  15. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    Winter, L M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010-2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric-hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak > 10 MeV flux above 15 pfu are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the ra...

  16. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Fujioka Shinsuke; Sundal Christina; Wszolek Zbigniew K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA) Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and...

  17. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (HAE type III).

    Riedl, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), also known as HAE type III, is a familial condition only clinically recognized within the past three decades. Similar to HAE from C1-INH deficiency (HAE types I and II), affected individuals experience unpredictable angioedema episodes of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and airway. Unique clinical features of HAE with normal C1-INH include the predominance of affected women, frequent exacerbation by estrogen, and a prominence of angioedema that involves the face and oropharynx. The underlying pathophysiology of HAE with normal C1-INH is poorly understood, but indirect evidence points to contact pathway dysregulation with bradykinin-mediated angioedema. Currently, evaluation is complicated by a lack of confirmatory laboratory testing such that clinical criteria must often be used to make the diagnosis of HAE with normal C1-INH. Factor XII mutations have been identified in only a minority of persons affected by HAE with normal C1-INH, limiting the utility of such analysis. To date, no controlled clinical studies have examined the efficacy of therapeutic agents for HAE with normal C1-INH, although published evidence supports frequent clinical benefit with medications shown effective in HAE due to C1-INH deficiency. PMID:24565612

  18. Antiviral Type I and Type III Interferon Responses in the Central Nervous System

    Thomas Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS harbors highly differentiated cells, such as neurons that are essential to coordinate the functions of complex organisms. This organ is partly protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB from toxic substances and pathogens carried in the bloodstream. Yet, neurotropic viruses can reach the CNS either by crossing the BBB after viremia, or by exploiting motile infected cells as Trojan horses, or by using axonal transport. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs are cytokines that are critical to control early steps of viral infections. Deficiencies in the IFN pathway have been associated with fatal viral encephalitis both in humans and mice. Therefore, the IFN system provides an essential protection of the CNS against viral infections. Yet, basal activity of the IFN system appears to be low within the CNS, likely owing to the toxicity of IFN to this organ. Moreover, after viral infection, neurons and oligodendrocytes were reported to be relatively poor IFN producers and appear to keep some susceptibility to neurotropic viruses, even in the presence of IFN. This review addresses some trends and recent developments concerning the role of type I and type III IFNs in: i preventing neuroinvasion and infection of CNS cells; ii the identity of IFN-producing cells in the CNS; iii the antiviral activity of ISGs; and iv the activity of viral proteins of neurotropic viruses that target the IFN pathway.

  19. Harnessing type I and type III CRISPR-Cas systems for genome editing

    Li, Yingjun; Pan, Saifu; Zhang, Yan;

    2016-01-01

    -CRISPR array and a donor DNA containing a non-target sequence. Transformation of a pGE plasmid would yield two alternative fates to transformed cells: wild-type cells are to be targeted for chromosomal DNA degradation, leading to cell death, whereas those carrying the mutant gene would survive the cell killing...... and selectively retained as transformants. Using this strategy, different types of mutation were generated, including deletion, insertion and point mutations. We envision this method is readily applicable to different bacteria and archaea that carry an active CRISPR-Cas system of DNA interference provided...... report on harnessing a Type I or Type III system for genome editing. Here, a method was developed to repurpose both CRISPR-Cas systems for genetic manipulation in Sulfolobus islandicus, a thermophilic archaeon. A novel type of genome-editing plasmid (pGE) was constructed, carrying an artificial mini...

  20. Synthesis of type III collagen by fibroblasts from the embryonic chick cornea

    1980-01-01

    Synthesis of collagen types I, II, III, and IV in cells from the embryonic chick cornea was studied using specific antibodies and immunofluorescence. Synthesis of radioactively labeled collagen types I and III was followed by fluorographic detection of cyanogen bromide peptides on polyacrylamide slab gels and by carboxymethylcellulose chromatography followed by disc gel electrophoresis. Type III collagen had been detected previously by indirect immunofluorescence in the corneal epithelial cel...

  1. Cre Reporter System To Monitor the Translocation of Type III Secreted Proteins into Host Cells

    Briones, Gabriel; Hofreuter, Dirk; Galán, Jorge E.

    2006-01-01

    Central to the study of type III secretion systems is the availability of reporter systems to monitor bacterial protein translocation into host cells. We report here the development of a bacteriophage P1 Cre recombinase-based system to monitor the translocation of bacterial proteins into mammalian cells. Bacteriophage P1 Cre recombinase fused to the secretion and translocation signals of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium of the type III secreted protein SopE was secreted in a type III s...

  2. Functional Activation of the Flagellar Type III Secretion Export Apparatus.

    Andrew M Phillips

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are assembled sequentially from the inside-out with morphogenetic checkpoints that enforce the temporal order of subunit addition. Here we show that flagellar basal bodies fail to proceed to hook assembly at high frequency in the absence of the monotopic protein SwrB of Bacillus subtilis. Genetic suppressor analysis indicates that SwrB activates the flagellar type III secretion export apparatus by the membrane protein FliP. Furthermore, mutants defective in the flagellar C-ring phenocopy the absence of SwrB for reduced hook frequency and C-ring defects may be bypassed either by SwrB overexpression or by a gain-of-function allele in the polymerization domain of FliG. We conclude that SwrB enhances the probability that the flagellar basal body adopts a conformation proficient for secretion to ensure that rod and hook subunits are not secreted in the absence of a suitable platform on which to polymerize.

  3. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Type III Secretion System

    Lingling Gu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant pathogens have presented increasing challenges to the discovery and development of new antibacterial agents. The type III secretion system (T3SS, existing in bacterial chromosomes or plasmids, is one of the most complicated protein secretion systems. T3SSs of animal and plant pathogens possess many highly conserved main structural components comprised of about 20 proteins. Many Gram-negative bacteria carry T3SS as a major virulence determinant, and using the T3SS, the bacteria secrete and inject effector proteins into target host cells, triggering disease symptoms. Therefore, T3SS has emerged as an attractive target for antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, many T3SS-targeting small-molecule inhibitors have been discovered; these inhibitors prevent the bacteria from injecting effector proteins and from causing pathophysiology in host cells. Targeting the virulence of Gram-negative pathogens, rather than their survival, is an innovative and promising approach that may greatly reduce selection pressures on pathogens to develop drug-resistant mutations. This article summarizes recent progress in the search for promising small-molecule T3SS inhibitors that target the secretion and translocation of bacterial effector proteins.

  4. Polarization and position measurements of Type III bursts

    Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.; Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The positional and polarization characteristics of Type III bursts in the range 24-220 MHz as measured by the Culgoora radioheliograph, spectrograph and spectropolarimeter are reported. The study includes 997 bursts which are of two classes: fundamental-harmonic (F-H) pairs and 'structureless' bursts with no visible F-H structure, and concentrates on the polarization of the bursts and the variation of polarization from centre to limb. The observed centre-to-limb decrease in polarization approximately follows a cosine law. This decrease is not as predicted by simple theory but is consistent with other observations which imply that open field lines from an active region diverge strongly. The observed o-mode polarization of harmonic radiation implies that the wave vectors of Langmuir waves are always parallel, within about 20 deg, to the magnetic field, while the constancy of H polarization with frequency implies that the ratio of gyromagnetic to plasma frequency, the Alfven speed and the plasma beta are constant with height on the open field lines above an active region. Finally, it is inferred that some factor, in addition to the magnetic field strength, controls the polarization of F radiation.

  5. Radiative Type III Seesaw Model and its collider phenomenology

    von der Pahlen, Federico; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the present bounds of a scotogenic model, the Radiative Type III Seesaw (RSIII), in which an additional scalar doublet and at least two fermion triplets of $SU(2)_L$ are added to the Standard Model (SM). In the RSIII the new physics (NP) sector is odd under an exact global $Z_2$ symmetry. This symmetry guaranties that the lightest NP neutral particle is stable, providing a natural dark matter (DM) candidate, and leads to naturally suppressed neutrino masses generated by a one-loop realization of an effective Weinberg operator. We focus on the region with the highest sensitivity in present and future LHC searches, with light scalar DM and at least one NP fermion triplet at the sub-TeV scale. This region allows for significant production cross-sections of NP fermion pairs at the LHC. We reinterpret a set of searches for supersymmetric particles at the LHC obtained using the package CheckMATE, to set limits on our model as a function of the masses of the NP particles and their Yukawa interactions. The...

  6. A Possible Anticancer Agent, Type III Interferon, Activates Cell Death Pathways and Produces Antitumor Effects

    Masatoshi Tagawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently identified interleukin-28 and -29 belong to a novel type III interferon (IFN family, which could have distinct biological properties from type I and II IFNs. Type I IFNs, IFN-α/β, have been clinically applied for treating a certain kind of malignancies for over 30 years, but a wide range of the adverse effects hampered the further clinical applications. Type III IFNs, IFN-λs, have similar signaling pathways as IFN-α/β and inhibits proliferation of tumor cells through cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Restricted patterns of type III IFN receptor expression in contrast to ubiquitously expressed IFN-α/β receptors suggest that type III IFNs have limited cytotoxicity to normal cells and can be a possible anticancer agent. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge on the IFN-λs-mediated tumor cell death and discuss the functional difference between type I and III IFNs.

  7. Cerebrolysin Ameloriates Cognitive Deficits in Type III Diabetic Rats.

    Georgy, Gehan S; Nassar, Noha N; Mansour, Hanaa A; Abdallah, Dalaal M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrolysin (CBL), a mixture of several active peptide fragments and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is currently used in the management of cognitive alterations in patients with dementia. Since Cognitive decline as well as increased dementia are strongly associated with diabetes and previous studies addressed the protective effect of BDNF in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes; hence this work aimed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of CBL in modulating the complications of hyperglycaemia experimentally induced by streptozotocin (STZ) on the rat brain hippocampus. To this end, male adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into (i) vehicle- (ii) CBL- and (iii) STZ diabetic-control as well as (iv) STZ+CBL groups. Diabetes was confirmed by hyperglycemia and elevated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c%), which were associated by weight loss, elevated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and decreased insulin growth factor (IGF)-1β in the serum. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia caused learning and memory impairments that corroborated degenerative changes, neuronal loss and expression of caspase (Casp)-3 in the hippocampal area of STZ-diabetic rats. Behavioral deficits were associated by decreased hippocampal glutamate (GLU), glycine, serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine. Moreover, diabetic rats showed an increase in hippocampal nitric oxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances versus decreased non-protein sulfhydryls. Though CBL did not affect STZ-induced hyperglycemia, it partly improved body weight as well as HbA1c%. Such effects were associated by enhancement in both learning and memory as well as apparent normal cellularity in CA1and CA3 areas and reduced Casp-3 expression. CBL improved serum TNF-α and IGF-1β, GLU and 5-HT as well as hampering oxidative biomarkers. In conclusion, CBL possesses neuroprotection against diabetes-associated cerebral neurodegeneration and cognitive decline via anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and

  8. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses.

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-02-26

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  9. Cerebrolysin Ameloriates Cognitive Deficits in Type III Diabetic Rats.

    Gehan S Georgy

    Full Text Available Cerebrolysin (CBL, a mixture of several active peptide fragments and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, is currently used in the management of cognitive alterations in patients with dementia. Since Cognitive decline as well as increased dementia are strongly associated with diabetes and previous studies addressed the protective effect of BDNF in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes; hence this work aimed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of CBL in modulating the complications of hyperglycaemia experimentally induced by streptozotocin (STZ on the rat brain hippocampus. To this end, male adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into (i vehicle- (ii CBL- and (iii STZ diabetic-control as well as (iv STZ+CBL groups. Diabetes was confirmed by hyperglycemia and elevated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c%, which were associated by weight loss, elevated tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and decreased insulin growth factor (IGF-1β in the serum. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia caused learning and memory impairments that corroborated degenerative changes, neuronal loss and expression of caspase (Casp-3 in the hippocampal area of STZ-diabetic rats. Behavioral deficits were associated by decreased hippocampal glutamate (GLU, glycine, serotonin (5-HT and dopamine. Moreover, diabetic rats showed an increase in hippocampal nitric oxide and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances versus decreased non-protein sulfhydryls. Though CBL did not affect STZ-induced hyperglycemia, it partly improved body weight as well as HbA1c%. Such effects were associated by enhancement in both learning and memory as well as apparent normal cellularity in CA1and CA3 areas and reduced Casp-3 expression. CBL improved serum TNF-α and IGF-1β, GLU and 5-HT as well as hampering oxidative biomarkers. In conclusion, CBL possesses neuroprotection against diabetes-associated cerebral neurodegeneration and cognitive decline via anti

  10. A note on tilted Bianchi type VIh models: the type III bifurcation

    Coley, A. A.; Hervik, S.

    2008-10-01

    In this note we complete the analysis of Hervik, van den Hoogen, Lim and Coley (2007 Class. Quantum Grav. 24 3859) of the late-time behaviour of tilted perfect fluid Bianchi type III models. We consider models with dust, and perfect fluids stiffer than dust, and eludicate the late-time behaviour by studying the centre manifold which dominates the behaviour of the model at late times. In the dust case, this centre manifold is three-dimensional and can be considered a double bifurcation as the two parameters (h and γ) of the type VIh model are varied. We therefore complete the analysis of the late-time behaviour of tilted ever-expanding Bianchi models of types I VIII.

  11. Antiviral activity of bovine type III interferon against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Interferons (IFN) are the first line of defense against viral infections. Recently a new family of IFNs, type III, has been identified in humans, mice, swine and chickens. Here we report the identification and characterization of a member of the bovine type III IFN family, boIFN-lambda3, also known...

  12. Identification of a major GpVI-binding locus in human type III collagen

    Jarvis, Gavin E.; Raynal, Nicolas; Langford, Jonathan P.; Onley, David J.; Andrews, Allen; Smethurst, Peter A; Farndale, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the adhesion of human and murine platelets, and of recombinant human and murine GpVI ectodomains, to synthetic triple-helical collagen-like peptides. These included 57 peptides derived from the sequence of human type III collagen and 9 peptides derived from the cyanogen bromide fragment of bovine type III collagen, α1(III)CB4. We have identified several peptides that interact with GpVI, in particular a peptide designated III-30 with the sequence GAOGLRGGAGPOGPEGGKGAAGPOGPO. B...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type III

    ... GSDIIIa is the most common form of GSDIII, accounting for about 85 percent of all cases. GSDIIIb ... III ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  14. Specific cleavage of human type III and IV collagens by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase.

    Heck, L W; Morihara, K; McRae, W B; Miller, E J

    1986-01-01

    Purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaved human type III and IV collagens with the formation of specific cleavage products. Furthermore, type I collagen appeared to be slowly cleaved by both P. aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease. These cleavage fragments from type III and IV collagens were separated from the intact collagen chains by SDS polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis run under reducing conditions, and they were detected by their characteristic Coomassie blue staini...

  15. Arnold-Chiari Malformation Type III With Meningoencephalocele: A Case Report

    Jeong, Dae Ho; Kim, Chang Hwan.; Kim, Myeong Ok; Chung, Hyung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Han Young

    2014-01-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation type III (CM III) is an extremely rare anomaly with poor prognosis. An encephalocele with brain anomalies as seen in CM II, and herniation of posterior fossa contents like the cerebellum are found in CM III. The female infant was a twin, born at 33 weeks, weighing 1.7 kg with a huge hydrocele on the craniocervical junction. After operations were performed, she was referred to the department of rehabilitation medicine for poor motor development, swallowing dysfunctio...

  16. Effects of overinflation on procollagen type III expression in experimental acute lung injury

    de Carvalho, Maria-Eudóxia Pilotto; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Meireles, Sibele Inácio; Reis, Luiz Fernando Lima; Martins, Milton Arruda; Deheinzelin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In acute lung injury (ALI), elevation of procollagen type III (PC III) occurs early and has an adverse impact on outcome. We examined whether different high-inflation strategies of mechanical ventilation (MV) in oleic acid (OA) ALI alter regional expression of PC III. Methods We designed an experimental, randomized, and controlled protocol in which rats were allocated to two control groups (no injury, recruited [alveolar recruitment maneuver after tracheotomy without MV; n = 4 ra...

  17. [Prophylactic use of icatibant before tracheal intubation of a patient with hereditary angioedema type III. (A literature review of perioperative management of patients with hereditary angioedema type III)].

    Iturri Clavero, F; González Uriarte, A; Tamayo Medel, G; Gamboa Setién, P M

    2014-01-01

    Type III hereditary angioedema is a rare familial disorder that has recently been described as a separate condition. Triggers for episodes of angioedema include surgery, dental procedures, and tracheal intubation maneuvers. Since episodes affecting the upper airway are potentially life-threatening, prophylactic treatment is recommended in these situations. The use of icatibant (Firazyr(®)), for prevention of angioedema prior to tracheal intubation, is reported in a patient with type iii hereditary angioedema. A literature review on the anesthetic management of this condition was conducted. PMID:24931134

  18. T3_MM: A Markov Model Effectively Classifies Bacterial Type III Secretion Signals

    Yejun Wang; Ming'an Sun; Hongxia Bao; Aaron P. White

    2013-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) play important roles in the interaction between gram-negative bacteria and their hosts. T3SSs function by translocating a group of bacterial effector proteins into the host cytoplasm. The details of specific type III secretion process are yet to be clarified. This research focused on comparing the amino acid composition within the N-terminal 100 amino acids from type III secretion (T3S) signal sequences or non-T3S proteins, specifically whether e...

  19. Second harmonic generation microscopy differentiates collagen type I and type III in COPD

    Suzuki, Masaru; Kayra, Damian; Elliott, W. Mark; Hogg, James C.; Abraham, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The structural remodeling of extracellular matrix proteins in peripheral lung region is an important feature in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multiphoton microscopy is capable of inducing specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal from non-centrosymmetric structural proteins such as fibrillar collagens. In this study, SHG microscopy was used to examine structural remodeling of the fibrillar collagens in human lungs undergoing emphysematous destruction (n=2). The SHG signals originating from these diseased lung thin sections from base to apex (n=16) were captured simultaneously in both forward and backward directions. We found that the SHG images detected in the forward direction showed well-developed and well-structured thick collagen fibers while the SHG images detected in the backward direction showed striking different morphological features which included the diffused pattern of forward detected structures plus other forms of collagen structures. Comparison of these images with the wellestablished immunohistochemical staining indicated that the structures detected in the forward direction are primarily the thick collagen type I fibers and the structures identified in the backward direction are diffusive structures of forward detected collagen type I plus collagen type III. In conclusion, we here demonstrate the feasibility of SHG microscopy in differentiating fibrillar collagen subtypes and understanding their remodeling in diseased lung tissues.

  20. Critical behavior of the Lyapunov exponent in type-III intermittency

    Alvarez-Llamoza, O. [Departamento de Fisica, FACYT, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela); Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Grupo de Caos y Sistemas Complejos, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5251, Merida (Venezuela)], E-mail: llamoza@ula.ve; Cosenza, M.G. [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Grupo de Caos y Sistemas Complejos, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5251, Merida (Venezuela); Ponce, G.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Honduras (Honduras); Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Pedagogica Nacional Francisco Morazan, Tegucigalpa (Honduras)

    2008-04-15

    The critical behavior of the Lyapunov exponent near the transition to robust chaos via type-III intermittency is determined for a family of one-dimensional singular maps. Critical boundaries separating the region of robust chaos from the region where stable fixed points exist are calculated on the parameter space of the system. A critical exponent {beta} expressing the scaling of the Lyapunov exponent is calculated along the critical curve corresponding to the type-III intermittent transition to chaos. It is found that {beta} varies on the interval 0 {<=} {beta} < 1/2 as a function of the order of the singularity of the map. This contrasts with earlier predictions for the scaling behavior of the Lyapunov exponent in type-III intermittency. The variation of the critical exponent {beta} implies a continuous change in the nature of the transition to chaos via type-III intermittency, from a second-order, continuous transition to a first-order, discontinuous transition.

  1. Impassable YscP Substrates and Their Impact on the Yersinia enterocolitica Type III Secretion Pathway▿

    Riordan, Kelly E.; Sorg, Joseph A.; Berube, Bryan J.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Yersinia type III machines secrete protein substrates across the bacterial envelope and, following assembly of their secretion needles, transport effector Yops into host cells. According to their destination during type III secretion, early, middle, and late secretion substrates can be distinguished; however, the signals and mechanisms whereby these proteins are recognized and transported by the secretion machine are not understood. Here, we examine several hybrids between secretion substrate...

  2. Expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III during the development of the peripheral nervous system

    Liang-liang Huang; Zhong-yang Liu; Jing-hui Huang; Zhuo-jing Luo

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 type III is a key regulator in Schwann cell proliferation, committing to a myelinating fate and regulating myelin sheath thickness. However, the expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in the peripheral nervous system during developmental periods (such as the premyelinating stage, myelinating stage and postmyelinating stage) has rarely been studied. In this study, dorsal root ganglia were isolated from rats between postnatal day 1 and postnatal day 56. The expression pattern ...

  3. Effect of type III group B streptococcal capsular polysaccharide on invasion of respiratory epithelial cells.

    Hulse, M L; Smith, S; Chi, E Y; Pham, A; Rubens, C E

    1993-01-01

    Group B streptococcal (GBS) capsular polysaccharide is an important virulence factor, and its role in invasion of cultured respiratory epithelial cells was investigated. A type III GBS clinical isolate, COH1, and asialo and unencapsulated isogenic transposon capsule mutants of it were compared in an in vitro invasion assay. The results demonstrated that capsule attenuated the invasion process. Invasion was not affected when the A549 epithelial cells were preincubated with purified type III GB...

  4. Gemfibrozil in the treatment of resistant familial hypercholesterolaemia and type III hyperlipoproteinaemia.

    Houlston, R; Quiney, J; Watts, G F; Lewis, B.

    1988-01-01

    The efficacy of gemfibrozil in the treatment of resistant familial hypercholesterolaemia and type III hyperlipoproteinaemia was evaluated in 26 individuals over a mean period of 16 months. In the untreated state both disorders are associated with a high frequency of coronary heart disease. In the former, gemfibrozil with a bile acid sequestrant reduced plasma cholesterol by 32%, an incremental decrease of 17% compared with sequestrant therapy alone. In type III, plasma cholesterol was reduced...

  5. Immunogenicity in animals of a polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine against type III group B Streptococcus.

    Wessels, M R; Paoletti, L C; Kasper, D L; DiFabio, J L; Michon, F; Holme, K; Jennings, H J

    1990-01-01

    The native capsular polysaccharide of type III group B Streptococcus elicits a specific antibody response in only 60% of nonimmune human subjects. To enhance the immunogenicity of this polysaccharide, we coupled the type III polysaccharide to tetanus toxoid. Prior to coupling, aldehyde groups were introduced on the polysaccharide by controlled periodate oxidation, resulting in the conversion of 25% of the sialic acid residues of the polysaccharide to residues of the 8-carbon analogue of siali...

  6. OPA3, mutated in 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, encodes two transcripts targeted primarily to mitochondria

    Huizing, Marjan; Dorward, Heidi; Ly, Lien;

    2010-01-01

    3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type III (3-MGCA type III), caused by recessive mutations in the 2-exon gene OPA3, is characterized by early-onset bilateral optic atrophy, later-onset extrapyramidal dysfunction, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. Her...... in the mitochondrion rather than the peroxisome and implicate loss of OPA3A rather than gain of OPA3B in disease etiology....

  7. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of NRG1 type III dediates postnatal peripheral myelination

    Fleck, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) type III is a growth factor on the surface of neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). It is required for initial myelination of nerves by Schwann cells after birth and for remyelination after injury. Neuregulin-1 type III is activated by cleavage (shedding) in its extracellular juxtamembrane region generating a membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) that contains a bioactive epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain. This domain signals to neighboring Schwann cel...

  8. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems

  9. Structural and biochemical characterization of SrcA, a multi-cargo type III secretion chaperone in Salmonella required for pathogenic association with a host.

    Colin A Cooper

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2 is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 A revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2 and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  10. Expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III during the development of the peripheral nervous system

    Liang-liang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin-1 type III is a key regulator in Schwann cell proliferation, committing to a myelinating fate and regulating myelin sheath thickness. However, the expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in the peripheral nervous system during developmental periods (such as the premyelinating stage, myelinating stage and postmyelinating stage has rarely been studied. In this study, dorsal root ganglia were isolated from rats between postnatal day 1 and postnatal day 56. The expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in dorsal root ganglia neurons at various developmental stages were compared by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot assay and immunofluorescent staining. The expression of neuregulin-1 type III mRNA reached its peak at postnatal day 3 and then stabilized at a relative high expression level from postnatal day 3 to postnatal day 56. The expression of neuregulin-1 type III protein increased gradually from postnatal day 1, reached a peak at postnatal day 28, and then decreased at postnatal day 56. Immunofluorescent staining results showed a similar tendency to western blot assay results. Experimental findings indicate that the expression of neuregulin-1 type III in rat dorsal root ganglion was increased during the premyelinating (from postnatal day 2 to postnatal day 5 and myelinating stage (from postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 10, but remained at a high level in the postmyelinating stage (after postnatal day 10.

  11. Expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III during the development of the peripheral nervous system

    Liang-liang Huang; Zhong-yang Liu; Jing-hui Huang; Zhuo-jing Luo

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 type III is a key regulator in Schwann cell proliferation, committing to a myelinat-ing fate and regulating myelin sheath thickness. However, the expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in the peripheral nervous system during developmental periods (such as the premyelin-ating stage, myelinating stage and postmyelinating stage) has rarely been studied. In this study, dorsal root ganglia were isolated from rats between postnatal day 1 and postnatal day 56. The expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in dorsal root ganglia neurons at various develop-mental stages were compared by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot assay and immunolfuorescent staining. The expression of neuregulin-1 type III mRNA reached its peak at postnatal day 3 and then stabilized at a relative high expression level from postnatal day 3 to postnatal day 56. The expression of neuregulin-1 type III protein increased gradually from postnatal day 1, reached a peak at postnatal day 28, and then decreased at postnatal day 56. Immunolfuorescent staining results showed a similar tendency to western blot assay results. Experimental findings indicate that the expression of neuregulin-1 type III in rat dorsal root ganglion was increased during the premyelinating (from postnatal day 2 to postnatal day 5) and myelinating stage (from postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 10), but remained at a high level in the postmyelinating stage (after postnatal day 10).

  12. Expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III during the development of the peripheral nervous system.

    Huang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Zhong-Yang; Huang, Jing-Hui; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 type III is a key regulator in Schwann cell proliferation, committing to a myelinating fate and regulating myelin sheath thickness. However, the expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in the peripheral nervous system during developmental periods (such as the premyelinating stage, myelinating stage and postmyelinating stage) has rarely been studied. In this study, dorsal root ganglia were isolated from rats between postnatal day 1 and postnatal day 56. The expression pattern of neuregulin-1 type III in dorsal root ganglia neurons at various developmental stages were compared by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot assay and immunofluorescent staining. The expression of neuregulin-1 type III mRNA reached its peak at postnatal day 3 and then stabilized at a relative high expression level from postnatal day 3 to postnatal day 56. The expression of neuregulin-1 type III protein increased gradually from postnatal day 1, reached a peak at postnatal day 28, and then decreased at postnatal day 56. Immunofluorescent staining results showed a similar tendency to western blot assay results. Experimental findings indicate that the expression of neuregulin-1 type III in rat dorsal root ganglion was increased during the premyelinating (from postnatal day 2 to postnatal day 5) and myelinating stage (from postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 10), but remained at a high level in the postmyelinating stage (after postnatal day 10). PMID:25788922

  13. Increased activity of coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) causes hereditary angioedema type III.

    Cichon, Sven; Martin, Ludovic; Hennies, Hans Christian; Müller, Felicitas; Van Driessche, Karen; Karpushova, Anna; Stevens, Wim; Colombo, Roberto; Renné, Thomas; Drouet, Christian; Bork, Konrad; Nöthen, Markus M

    2006-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is characterized clinically by recurrent acute skin swelling, abdominal pain, and potentially life-threatening laryngeal edema. Three forms of HAE have been described. The classic forms, HAE types I and II, occur as a consequence of mutations in the C1-inhibitor gene. In contrast to HAE types I and II, HAE type III has been observed exclusively in women, where it appears to be correlated with conditions of high estrogen levels--for example, pregnancy or the use of oral contraceptives. A recent report proposed two missense mutations (c.1032C-->A and c.1032C-->G) in F12, the gene encoding human coagulation factor XII (FXII, or Hageman factor) as a possible cause of HAE type III. Here, we report the occurrence of the c.1032C-->A (p.Thr328Lys) mutation in an HAE type III-affected family of French origin. Investigation of the F12 gene in a large German family did not reveal a coding mutation. Haplotype analysis with use of microsatellite markers is compatible with locus heterogeneity in HAE type III. To shed more light on the pathogenic relevance of the HAE type III-associated p.Thr328Lys mutation, we compared FXII activity and plasma levels in patients carrying the mutation with that of healthy control individuals. Our data strongly suggest that p.Thr328Lys is a gain-of-function mutation that markedly increases FXII amidolytic activity but that does not alter FXII plasma levels. We conclude that enhanced FXII enzymatic plasma activity in female mutation carriers leads to enhanced kinin production, which results in angioedema. Transcription of F12 is positively regulated by estrogens, which may explain why only women are affected with HAE type III. The results of our study represent an important step toward an understanding of the molecular processes involved in HAE type III and provide diagnostic and possibly new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:17186468

  14. Rotational velocities of A-type stars. III. Velocity distributions

    Royer, F.; Zorec, J.; Gómez, A. E.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:A sample of v sin i of B9 to F2-type main sequence single stars has been built from highly homogeneous {v sin i} parameters determined for a large sample cleansed of objects presenting the Am and Ap phenomenon as well as of all known binaries. The aim is to study the distributions of rotational velocities in the mass range of A-type stars for normal single objects. Methods: Robust statistical methods are used to rectify the {v sin i} distributions for the projection effect and the error distribution. The equatorial velocity distributions are obtained for about 1100 stars divided in six groups defined by the spectral type, under the assumption of randomly orientated rotational axes. Results: We show that late B and early A-type main-sequence stars have genuine bimodal distributions of true equatorial rotational velocities probably due to angular momentum loss and redistribution that the star underwent before reaching the main sequence. A striking lack of slow rotators is noticed among intermediate and late A-type stars. Full Table [see full text] is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/463/671 Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Solar noise storms - The polarization of storm Type III and related bursts

    Dulk, G. A.; Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    The spectral and polarization characteristics of 19 noise storms that occurred during 1976-1982 are reported. All components of the storms - Type I bursts and continuum, storm Type III bursts, and fine structures such as reverse drift pairs - are found to have the same sense of circular polarization. While the degree of polarization p of Type I bursts and continuum is generally greater than or approximately equal to 0.5, that of storm Type III bursts is almost always less than 0.5. Two set of storm Type III bursts stand out: one with less than or approximately equal to 0.2 and another with greater than or approximately equal to 0.3. Because these sets respectively have degrees of polarization so similar to those of fundamental (F) the harmonic (H) components of non-storm F - H pairs, it is deduced that storm Type III bursts are due sometimes to fundamental plasma radiation and sometimes to harmonic. However, F - H pairs are extremely rare among storm Type III bursts.

  16. Accumulation of properly folded human type III procollagen molecules in specific intracellular membranous compartments in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    Keizer-Gunnink, [No Value; Vuorela, A; Myllyharju, J; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Kivirikko, KI; Veenhuis, M; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kivirikko, Kari I.

    2000-01-01

    It was recently reported that co-expression of the proal(III) chain of human type III procollagen with the subunits of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase in Pichia pastoris produces fully hydroxylated and properly folded recombinant type III procollagen molecules (Vuorela, A., Myllyharju, J., Nissi, R., Pihlajaniemi, T., Kivirikko, K.I., 1997. Assembly of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase and type III collagen in the yeast Pichia pastoris: formation of a stable enzyme tetramer requires coexpression with col...

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF COLLAGENS TYPE-I, TYPE-III AND TYPE-V IN THE PANCREAS OF RAT, DOG, PIG AND MAN

    VANDEIJNEN, JHM; VANSUYLICHEM, PTR; WOLTERS, GHJ; VANSCHILFGAARDE, R

    1994-01-01

    The presence of collagens type I, type III and type V was determined immunohistochemically in pancreatic tissue of rat, pig, dog and man. The reaction to anti-collagen type I is weak (pig, dog) or moderate (rat, man) in the peri-insular region and in the lobar, lobular and acinar septa, whereas the

  18. The extracellular matrix of Gadus morhua muscle contains types III, V, VI and IV collagens in addition to type I

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Lawson, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal microscopy and immuno‐histochemistry were used to examine collagens in the extracellular matrix of cod Gadus morhua swimming muscle. In addition to the well known presence of type I fibrous collagen, types III and VI were also found in the myocommata and the endomysium. The beaded collagen......, type VI, was found in the endomysium and the network forming collagen, type IV, was found in the basement membrane. This is the first report of type V collagen in cod muscle and of types II, IV and VI in the muscle of a teleost....

  19. Cerebrolysin Ameloriates Cognitive Deficits in Type III Diabetic Rats

    Georgy, Gehan S.; Nassar, Noha N.; Mansour, Hanaa A.; Dalaal M. Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrolysin (CBL), a mixture of several active peptide fragments and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is currently used in the management of cognitive alterations in patients with dementia. Since Cognitive decline as well as increased dementia are strongly associated with diabetes and previous studies addressed the protective effect of BDNF in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes; hence this work aimed to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect...

  20. Application of radioimmunoassay with goat procollagen type III reagent in rat hepatic fibrosis models

    Objective: To explore the usefulness of radioimmunoassay with goat procollagen type III (gPC III) reagent for evaluation of degree of hepatic fibrosis in rat models. Methods: Rat hepatic fibrosis models were established by daily inhalation of carbon tetrachloride gas or immunization with pig serum injection two times per week for the whole experiment period. Two model animals (one from each group) were sacrificed weekly for six weeks, taking blood samples for RIA with PC III reagent and liver specimens for histologic examination of the degree fibrosis. Blood samples for RIA were also drawn from all surviving animals weekly. Results: Significant elevation of serum PC III levels could be noted at as early as d8 in the CCl4 group and d15 in the pig serum group with steady increase up to the end of experiment (d36). Degree of hepatic fibrosis also correspondingly progressed. Correlation tendency between degree of fibrosis and serum PC III levels was significant in both groups. Conclusion: Measurement of rat model serum PC III concentration by RIA with PC III reagent is very sensitive and more ideal than that with human PC III reagent

  1. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  2. OPA3, mutated in 3-methylglutaconic aciduria type III, encodes two transcripts targeted primarily to mitochondria

    Huizing, Marjan; Dorward, Heidi; Ly, Lien; Klootwijk, Enriko; Kleta, Robert; Skovby, Flemming; Pei, Wuhong; Feldman, Benjamin; Gahl, William A; Anikster, Yair

    2010-01-01

    3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type III (3-MGCA type III), caused by recessive mutations in the 2-exon gene OPA3, is characterized by early-onset bilateral optic atrophy, later-onset extrapyramidal dysfunction, and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid and 3-methylglutaric acid. Here...... we report the identification of a novel third OPA3 coding exon, the apparent product of a segmental duplication event, resulting in two gene transcripts, OPA3A and OPA3B. OPA3A deficiency (as in optic atrophy type 3) causes up-regulation of OPA3B. OPA3 protein function remains unknown, but it...

  3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measurement of antibody to type III group B streptococci.

    Polin, R.A.; Douglas, S D; Kasper, D L; Baker, C J

    1982-01-01

    Neonates at risk for fulminant type III, group B streptococcal (III GBS) infection are those who lack antibody to the capsular polysaccharide. A newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with a standard radioactive antigen-binding assay (RABA) for quantitation of III GBS antibody in human sera. Although there was a significant correlation between the ELISA and RABA (r = 0.81; P less than 0.001) in general, the ELISA detected antibody both to core and native antige...

  4. Accumulation of properly folded human type III procollagen molecules in specific intracellular membranous compartments in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    Keizer-Gunnink, [No Value; Vuorela, A; Myllyharju, J; Pihlajaniemi, T; Kivirikko, KI; Veenhuis, M; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kivirikko, Kari I.

    2000-01-01

    It was recently reported that co-expression of the proal(III) chain of human type III procollagen with the subunits of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase in Pichia pastoris produces fully hydroxylated and properly folded recombinant type III procollagen molecules (Vuorela, A., Myllyharju, J., Nissi, R., Pih

  5. Structural Properties of Group B Streptococcal Type III Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccines That Influence Immunogenicity and Efficacy

    Wessels, Michael R.; Paoletti, Lawrence C.; Guttormsen, Hilde-Kari; Michon, Francis; D’Ambra, Anello J.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines are influenced by three variables: (i) molecular size of the conjugate, (ii) molecular size of the polysaccharide used for conjugation, and (iii) extent of polysaccharide-to-protein cross-linking. Type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide was linked by reductive amination at multiple sites to tetanus toxoid to create a polysaccharide-protein conjuga...

  6. Increased Levels of Type I and III Collagen and Hyaluronan in Scleroderma Skin

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Heickendorff, Lene; L, Risteli;

    1997-01-01

    The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and hyaluronan (HA) were measured in plasma and suction blister fluid from 13 systemic sclerosis patients and 11 healthy volunteers. Suction blisters and skin biopsies were...

  7. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency fp to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both fp and 2 fp radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in fp than 2 fp emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 fp radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 fp radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  8. Are type III radio aurorae directly excited by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves?

    In 1981, a network of three 50-MHz radar transmitters and two receivers were operated in the CW mode on the Canadian prairies. The echoes obtained from coherent ionospheric backscatter were divided into segments of 205 ms such that their FFT spectra yielded frequency resolution of 4.9 Hz. The spectra were subsequently averaged over 10 s. Type III spectra (narrow spectra with sub ion-acoustic Doppler shifts) were observed (often simultaneously) on radar links whose wave vector components perpendicular to the geomagnetic field were almost identical while their components parallel to the field were significantly different. From a statistical analysis of more than 300 type III spectra it is inferred that these are in general unlikely to arise from electrostatic ion cyclotron waves directly excited by an essentially linear process. Doppler shifts around 55 Hz were much more frequently observed than around 30 Hz, the occurrence of type III spectra increased with increasing magnetic aspect angle (deviation of the scatter wave vector from perpendicular to the geomagnetic field), and the mean Doppler shifts of type III spectra simultaneously on different radar links went through a minimum for aspect angles between 4 degree and 7 degree (depending on the assumed backscatter height). These three results disagree with theoretical expectations. The spectral width the type III echoes decreased linearly with magnetic aspect by about 2 Hz/deg

  9. Type III IFN receptor expression and functional characterisation in the pteropid bat, Pteropus alecto.

    Peng Zhou

    Full Text Available Bats are rich reservoir hosts for a variety of viruses, many of which are capable of spillover to other susceptible mammals with lethal consequences. The ability of bats to remain asymptomatic to viral infection may be due to the rapid control of viral replication very early in the immune response through innate antiviral mechanisms. Type I and III interferons (IFNs represent the first line of defence against viral infection in mammals, with both families of IFNs present in pteropid bats. To obtain further insight into the type III IFN system in bats, we describe the characterization of the type III IFN receptor (IFNλR in the black flying fox, P. alecto with the characterization of IFNλR1 and IL10R2 genes that make up the type III IFN receptor complex. The bat IFNλR complex has a wide tissue distribution and at the cellular level, both epithelial and immune cells are responsive to IFN-λ treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the bat IFNλR1 chain acts as a functional receptor. To our knowledge, this report represents the first description of an IFN receptor in any species of bat. The responsiveness of bat cells to IFN-λ support a role for the type III IFN system by epithelial and immune cells in bats.

  10. Type III polyketide synthase repertoire in Zingiberaceae: computational insights into the sequence, structure and evolution.

    Mallika, Vijayanathan; Aiswarya, Girija; Gincy, Paily Thottathil; Remakanthan, Appukuttan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    Zingiberaceae or 'ginger family' is the largest family in the order 'Zingiberales' with more than 1300 species in 52 genera, which are mostly distributed throughout Asia, tropical Africa and the native regions of America with their maximum diversity in Southeast Asia. Many of the members are important spice, medicinal or ornamental plants including ginger, turmeric, cardamom and kaempferia. These plants are distinguished for the highly valuable metabolic products, which are synthesised through phenylpropanoid pathway, where type III polyketide synthase is the key enzyme. In our present study, we used sequence, structural and evolutionary approaches to scrutinise the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) repertoire encoded in the Zingiberaceae family. Highly conserved amino acid residues in the sequence alignment and phylogram suggested strong relationships between the type III PKS members of Zingiberaceae. Sequence and structural level investigation of type III PKSs showed a small number of variations in the substrate binding pocket, leading to functional divergence among these PKS members. Molecular evolutionary studies indicate that type III PKSs within Zingiberaceae evolved under strong purifying selection pressure, and positive selections were rarely detected in the family. Structural modelling and protein-small molecule interaction studies on Zingiber officinale PKS 'a representative from Zingiberaceae' suggested that the protein is comparatively stable without much disorder and exhibited wide substrate acceptance. PMID:27138283

  11. Twenty-Two-Year Follow-up of Pronation External Rotation Type III-IV (OTA Type C) Ankle Fractures: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Donken, C.C.M.A.; Verhofstad, M.H.J.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : Long-term evaluation protocolled treatment of pronation external rotation (PER) type III-IV (OTA type C) ankle fractures. DESIGN: : Level III retrospective cohort study. SETTING: : Level I trauma center. PATIENTS: : A consecutive series of 98 patients with PER III-IV ankle fractures bet

  12. Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type III: a review of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    Fujioka Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia (ADCA Type III is a type of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA classically characterized by pure cerebellar ataxia and occasionally by non-cerebellar signs such as pyramidal signs, ophthalmoplegia, and tremor. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in adulthood; however, a minority of patients develop clinical features in adolescence. The incidence of ADCA Type III is unknown. ADCA Type III consists of six subtypes, SCA5, SCA6, SCA11, SCA26, SCA30, and SCA31. The subtype SCA6 is the most common. These subtypes are associated with four causative genes and two loci. The severity of symptoms and age of onset can vary between each SCA subtype and even between families with the same subtype. SCA5 and SCA11 are caused by specific gene mutations such as missense, inframe deletions, and frameshift insertions or deletions. SCA6 is caused by trinucleotide CAG repeat expansions encoding large uninterrupted glutamine tracts. SCA31 is caused by repeat expansions that fall outside of the protein-coding region of the disease gene. Currently, there are no specific gene mutations associated with SCA26 or SCA30, though there is a confirmed locus for each subtype. This disease is mainly diagnosed via genetic testing; however, differential diagnoses include pure cerebellar ataxia and non-cerebellar features in addition to ataxia. Although not fatal, ADCA Type III may cause dysphagia and falls, which reduce the quality of life of the patients and may in turn shorten the lifespan. The therapy for ADCA Type III is supportive and includes occupational and speech modalities. There is no cure for ADCA Type III, but a number of recent studies have highlighted novel therapies, which bring hope for future curative treatments.

  13. An important role for type III interferon (IFN-lambda/IL-28) in TLR-induced antiviral activity

    Ank, Nina; Iversen, Marie B; Bartholdy, Christina;

    2008-01-01

    Type III IFNs (IFN-lambda/IL-28/29) are cytokines with type I IFN-like antiviral activities, which remain poorly characterized. We herein show that most cell types expressed both types I and III IFNs after TLR stimulation or virus infection, whereas the ability of cells to respond to IFN-lambda w...

  14. Laparoscopic Treatment of Type III Mirizzi Syndrome by T-Tube Drainage

    Yetışır, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer; Polat, Yılmaz; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Aygar, Muhittin; Ciftciler, A. Erdinc; Parlak, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an impacted stone in the cystic duct or Hartmann's pouch that mechanically obstructs the common bile duct. We would like to report laparoscopic treatment of type III MS. A 75-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain and jaundice. The patient was accepted as MS type III according to radiological imaging and intraoperative view. Laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy, extraction of impacted stone by opening anterior surface of dilated cystic duct and choledochus, and repair of this opening by using the remaining part of gallbladder over the T-tube drainage were performed in a patient with type III MS. Application of reinforcement suture over stump was done in light of the checking with oliclinomel N4 injection trough the T-tube. At the 18-month follow-up, he was symptom-free with normal liver function tests. PMID:27293947

  15. Estimation of Group B Streptococcus Type III Polysaccharide-Specific Antibody Concentrations in Human Sera Is Antigen Dependent

    Bhushan, Reva; Anthony, Bascom F.; Frasch, Carl E.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against group B streptococcus (GBS) type III polysaccharide (PS) has been correlated with protection against GBS disease. The GBS type III PS is structurally similar to the pneumococcal type 14 PS, differing only in the presence of sialic acid residues. Four different preparations of GBS type III PS were evaluated for their specificity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): free PS, free PS mixed with methylated human serum albumin (mHS...

  16. Conservative Management of Type III Dens in Dente Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    K Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens in dente, also known as dens invaginatus, dilated composite odontoma, or deep foramen caecum, is a developmental malformation that usually affects maxillary incisor teeth, particularly lateral incisors. It may occur in teeth anywhere within the jaws, other locations are comparatively rare. It can occur within both the crown and the root, although crown invaginations are more common. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is very helpful in endodontic diagnosis of complex anatomic variations. In this case we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and endodontic management of a Type III dens in dente (Oehler′s Type III.

  17. Solar longitude dependence of some characteristics of type III radio bursts from metric to hectometric wavelengths

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    Using the observed data for metric and hectometric type III radio bursts, the dependence of burst characteristics on the solar longitude has been examined over a wide frequency range. It is found that there exists and east-west asymmetry for the extension of metric type III bursts into the hectometric wavelength range. In particular, hectometric bursts are rarely observed for solar flares associated with metric bursts east of 60 E solar longitude. Furthermore, for east longitudes, the low-frequency radio observations show a large dispersion in drift time interval.

  18. Coxsackievirus counters the host innate immune response by blocking type III interferon expression.

    Lind, Katharina; Svedin, Emma; Domsgen, Erna; Kapell, Sebastian; Laitinen, Olli; Moll, Markus; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-06-01

    Type I IFNs play an important role in the immune response to enterovirus infections. Their importance is underscored by observations showing that many enteroviruses including coxsackie B viruses (CVBs) have developed strategies to block type I IFN production. Recent studies have highlighted a role for the type III IFNs (also called IFNλs) in reducing permissiveness to infections with enteric viruses including coxsackievirus. However, whether or not CVBs have measures to evade the effects of type III IFNs remains unknown. By combining virus infection studies and different modes of administrating the dsRNA mimic poly I : C, we discovered that CVBs target both TLR3- and MDA5/RIG-I-mediated type III IFN expression. Consistent with this, the cellular protein expression levels of the signal transduction proteins TRIF and IPS1 were reduced and no hyperphosphorylation of IRF-3 was observed following infection with the virus. Notably, decreased expression of full-length TRIF and IPS1 and the appearance of cleavage products was observed upon both CVB3 infection and in cellular protein extracts incubated with recombinant 2Apro, indicating an important role for the viral protease in subverting the cellular immune system. Collectively, our study reveals that CVBs block the expression of type III IFNs, and that this is achieved by a similar mechanism as the virus uses to block type I IFN production. We also demonstrate that the virus blocks several intracellular viral recognition pathways of importance for both type I and III IFN production. The simultaneous targeting of numerous arms of the host immune response may be required for successful viral replication and dissemination. PMID:26935471

  19. Effect of Immobilization on Insoluble Collagen Concentration and Type I and Type III Collagen Isoforms of Rat Soleus Muscle

    Hibino, Itaru; Okita, Minoru; Inoue, Takayuki; Banno, Yasuhiro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Immobilization is often associated with decreased muscle elasticity. This condition is known as muscle contracture; however, the mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism governing muscle contracture in rat soleus muscle by identifying changes in ankle joint mobility, insoluble collagen concentration and type I and type III collagen isoforms following 1- and 3-week immobilizations. Following a 1-week immobilization, range of motion (ROM) of dorsiflexion...

  20. Type III interferon gene expression in response to influenza virus infection in chicken and duck embryonic fibroblasts.

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zou, Tingting; Hu, Xiaotong; Jin, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Type III interferons (IFN-λs) comprise a group of newly identified antiviral cytokines that are functionally similar to type I IFNs and elicit first-line antiviral responses. Recently, type III IFNs were identified in several species; however, little information is available about type III IFNs in ducks. We compared the expression of type III IFNs and their receptor in chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs) and duck embryonic fibroblasts (DEFs) in response to influenza virus infection. The results showed that the expression of type III IFNs was upregulated in both DEFs and CEFs following infection with H1N1 influenza virus or treatment with poly (I:C), and expression levels were significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs (IL-28Rα) was also upregulated following infection with H1N1 virus or treatment with poly (I:C) and was significantly higher in CEFs than in DEFs at each time point. The expression of the receptor for type III IFNs occurred from 8 hpi and remained at similar levels until 36 hpi in CEFs, but the expression level was elevated from 36 hpi in DEFs. These findings revealed the existence of distinct expression patterns for type III IFNs in chickens and ducks in response to influenza virus infection. The provided data are fundamentally useful in furthering our understanding of type III IFNs and innate antiviral responses in different species. PMID:26598110

  1. Biosynthesis of Dictyostelium discoideum differentiation-inducing factor by a hybrid type I fatty acid-type III polyketide synthase.

    Austin, Michael B; Saito, Tamao; Bowman, Marianne E; Haydock, Stephen; Kato, Atsushi; Moore, Bradley S; Kay, Robert R; Noel, Joseph P

    2006-09-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are well known to modulate formation of distinct communal cell types from identical Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas, but DIF biosynthesis remains obscure. We report complimentary in vivo and in vitro experiments identifying one of two approximately 3,000-residue D. discoideum proteins, termed 'steely', as responsible for biosynthesis of the DIF acylphloroglucinol scaffold. Steely proteins possess six catalytic domains homologous to metazoan type I fatty acid synthases (FASs) but feature an iterative type III polyketide synthase (PKS) in place of the expected FAS C-terminal thioesterase used to off load fatty acid products. This new domain arrangement likely facilitates covalent transfer of steely N-terminal acyl products directly to the C-terminal type III PKS active sites, which catalyze both iterative polyketide extension and cyclization. The crystal structure of a steely C-terminal domain confirms conservation of the homodimeric type III PKS fold. These findings suggest new bioengineering strategies for expanding the scope of fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. PMID:16906151

  2. A bacterial type III effector family uses the papain-like hydrolytic activity to arrest the host cell cycle

    Yao, Qing; Cui, Jixin; Zhu, Yongqun; Wang, Guolun; Hu, Liyan; Long, Chengzu; Cao, Ran; Liu, Xinqi; Huang, Niu; Chen, She; Liu, LiPing; Shao, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria deliver effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus to modulate the host function. We identify a family of proteins, homologous to the type III effector Cif from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, in pathogens including Yersinia, Photorhabdus, and Burkholderia that contain functional type III secretion systems. Like Cif, this family of proteins is capable of arresting the host cell cycle at G2/M. Structure of one of the family members, Cif ho...

  3. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp

    Ruwandeepika, HA Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first...

  4. Inhibition of type III radio emissions due to the interaction between two electron beams: Observations and simulations

    Briand, C; Henri, P.; Hoang, S

    2014-01-01

    We report the peculiar interaction of two type III bursts observed in the solar wind. As electronbeams propagating on the same magnetic field lines cross, a spectacular depletion of the type III radioemission is observed. We combine observations from the WAVES experiment on board the STEREO missiontogether with kinetic plasma simulations to study the extinction of type III radio emission resulting fromthe interaction between two electron beams. The remote observations enable to follow the ele...

  5. Perfect simulation and moment properties for the Matérn type III process

    Møller, Jesper; Huber, Mark L.; Wolpert, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    In a seminal work, Bertil Matérn introduced several types of processes for modeling repulsive point processes. In this paper an algorithm is presented for the perfect simulation of the Matérn III process within a bounded window in , fully accounting for edge effects. A simple upper bound on the...

  6. On the speed and acceleration of electron beams triggering interplanetary type III radio bursts

    Krupar, Vratislav; Soucek, Jan; Santolik, Ondrej; Maksimovic, Milan; Kruparova, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    Type III radio bursts are intense radio emissions triggered by beams of energetic electrons often associated with solar flares. These exciter beams propagate outwards from the Sun along an open magnetic field line in the corona and in the interplanetary (IP) medium. We performed a statistical survey of 29 simple and isolated IP type III bursts observed by STEREO/Waves instruments between January 2013 and September 2014. We investigated their time-frequency profiles in order to derive the speed and acceleration of exciter electron beams. We show these beams noticeably decelerate in the IP medium. Obtained speeds range from $\\sim$ 0.02c up to $\\sim$ 0.35c depending on initial assumptions. It corresponds to electron energies between tens of eV and hundreds of keV, and in order to explain the characteristic energies or speeds of type III electrons ($\\sim 0.1$c) observed simultaneously with Langmuir waves at 1 au, the emission of type III bursts near the peak should be predominately at double plasma frequency. Der...

  7. A bacterial pathogen uses distinct type III secretion systems to alternate between host kingdoms

    Plant and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), the causative agent of Stewart’s bacterial wilt and...

  8. Anomalous Statistics for Type-III Intermittency in a 1D Map

    J., Laugesen; Carlsson, N.; Mosekilde, Erik;

    1997-01-01

    The statistics for the distribution of laminar phases in type-III intermittency is examined for a symmetric bimodal map. Due to a strongly nonuniform reinjection process, characteristic deviations from normal statistics are observed. There is an enhancement of relatively long laminar phases...

  9. On the prolongation structures of Petrov type III vacuum spacetime equations

    Ifidon, E. O.

    2009-01-01

    The universal covering symmetry algebra of the Robinson-Trautman equations of Petrov Type III is shown to include the infinite-dimensional affine Kac-Moody algebra A_1 as a prolongation algebra. This algebra has slower growth than the contragradient algebra K_2 obtained previously for this equation.

  10. Cloning and characterization of type III iodothyronine deiodinase from the fish Oreochromis niloticus

    J.P. Sanders; S. van der Geyten; E. Kaptein (Ellen); V.M. Darras (Veerle); E.R. Kuhn; J.L. Leonard; T.J. Visser (Ton)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractType III iodothyronine deiodinase (D3) catalyzes the inner ring deiodination (IRD) of T4 and T3 to the inactive metabolites rT3 and 3,3'-diiodothyronine (3,3'-T2), respectively. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of complementary DNA (cDNA) co

  11. IpaD is localized at the tip of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion apparatus

    Sani, Musa; Botteaux, Anne; Parsot, Claude; Sansonetti, Philippe; Boekema, Egbert J.; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2007-01-01

    Type III secretion (T3S) systems are used by numerous Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria to inject virulence proteins into animal and plant host cells. The core of the T3S apparatus, known as the needle complex, is composed of a basal body transversing both bacterial membranes and a needle protruding

  12. Bartter syndrome Type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation

    Westland, R.; Hack, W.W.; Horst, H.J. van der; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; Hagen, J.M. van; Valk, P. van der; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Heuvel, L.P. van den; Wijk, J.A. van

    2012-01-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 year

  13. Decameter Type III Bursts with Changing Frequency Drift-Rate Signs

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Denis, L.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss properties of type III bursts that change the sign of their drift rate from negative to positive and vice versa. Moreover, these bursts may change the sign of their drift rates more than once. These particular type III bursts were observed simultaneously by the radio telescopes UTR-2 ( Ukrainian T-shaped Radio telescope, Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 ( Ukrainian Radio telescope of the Academy of Sciences, Poltava, Ukraine), and by the NDA ( Nançay Decametric Array, Nancay, France) in the frequency range 8 - 41 MHz. The negative drift rates of these bursts are similar to those of previously reported decameter type III bursts and vary from -0.7 MHz s-1 to -1.7 MHz s-1, but their positive drift rates vary in a wider range from 0.44 MHz s-1 to 6 MHz s-1. Unlike inverted U-bursts, the tracks of these type III bursts have C- or inverted C-shapes.

  14. Mutualistic co-evolution of type III effector genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Jeffrey A Kimbrel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved.

  15. Numerical simulations of the type III migration:I. Disc model and convergence tests

    Pepliński, A.; Artymowicz, P.; Mellema, G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the fast (type III) migration regime of high-mass protoplanets orbiting in protoplanetary disks. This type of migration is dominated by corotational torques. We study the details of flow structure in the planet's vicinity, the dependence of migration rate on the adopted disc model, and the numerical convergence of models (independence of certain numerical parameters such as gravitational softening). We use two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with adaptive mesh refinement...

  16. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III in South Africa: Psychosocial challenges.

    Stephen, L X G; Roberts, T; Van Hayden, E; Chetty, M

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) are severely physically disabled due to frequent fracturing. Their disability poses numerous barriers that challenge their social development. Despite these limitations, several affected persons are able to rise above these problems and achieve success in their personal and professional life. This outcome is directly relevant to their psychosocial development.The achievements of five individuals with OI III living in Cape Town are highlighted in this article, as well as the challenges that they have experienced and continue to experience in their daily lives. The authors intend to promulgate understanding of the psychosocial circumstances of affected persons, thereby facilitating the deployment of appropriate efforts and resources to address these challenges. PMID:27245537

  17. A New Look at Type III Bursts and their Use as Coronal Diagnostics

    Beltran, Samuel Tun; White, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We present meter wave solar radio spectra of the highest spectrotemporal resolution achieved to date. The observations, obtained with the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), show unprecedented detail of solar emissions across a wide bandwidth during a Type III/IIIb storm. Our flux calibration demonstrates that the LWA1 can detect Type III bursts much weaker than 1 SFU, much lower than previous observations, and that the distribution of fluxes in these bursts varies with frequency. The high sensitivity and low noise in the data provide strong constraints to models of this type of plasma emission. The continuous generation of electron beams in the corona revealed by the high density Type III storm is evidence for ubiquitous magnetic reconnection in the lower corona. Such an abundance of reconnection events not only contributes to the total coronal energy budget, but also provides an engine by which to form the populations of seed particles responsible for proton-rich solar energetic particle even...

  18. Hierarchical effector protein transport by the Salmonella Typhimurium SPI-1 type III secretion system.

    Brit Winnen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type III secretion systems (TTSS are employed by numerous pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria to inject a cocktail of different "effector proteins" into host cells. These effectors subvert host cell signaling to establish symbiosis or disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have studied the injection of SipA and SptP, two effector proteins of the invasion-associated Salmonella type III secretion system (TTSS-1. SipA and SptP trigger different host cell responses. SipA contributes to triggering actin rearrangements and invasion while SptP reverses the actin rearrangements after the invasion has been completed. Nevertheless, SipA and SptP were both pre-formed and stored in the bacterial cytosol before host cell encounter. By time lapse microscopy, we observed that SipA was injected earlier than SptP. Computer modeling revealed that two assumptions were sufficient to explain this injection hierarchy: a large number of SipA and SptP molecules compete for transport via a limiting number of TTSS; and the TTSS recognize SipA more efficiently than SptP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This novel mechanism of hierarchical effector protein injection may serve to avoid functional interference between SipA and SptP. An injection hierarchy of this type may be of general importance, allowing bacteria to precisely time the host cell manipulation by type III effectors.

  19. In Situ Detection of Strong Langmuir Turbulence Processes in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Golla, Thejappa; Macdowall, Robert J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The high time resolution observations obtained by the WAVES experiment of the STEREO spacecraft in solar type III radio bursts show that Langmuir waves often occur as intense localized wave packets. These wave packets are characterized by short durations of only a few ms and peak intensities, which well exceed the supersonic modulational instability (MI) thresholds. These timescales and peak intensities satisfy the criterion of the solitons collapsed to spatial scales of a few hundred Debye lengths. The spectra of these wave packets consist of primary spectral peaks corresponding to beam-resonant Langmuir waves, two or more sidebands corresponding to down-shifted and up-shifted daughter Langmuir waves, and low frequency enhancements below a few hundred Hz corresponding to daughter ion sound waves. The frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the modulational instability (MI). Moreover, the tricoherences, computed using trispectral analysis techniques show that these spectral components are coupled to each other with a high degree of coherency as expected of the MI type of four wave interactions. The high intensities, short scale lengths, sideband spectral structures and low frequency spectral enhancements and, high levels of tricoherences amongst the spectral components of these wave packets provide unambiguous evidence for the supersonic MI and related strong turbulence processes in type III radio bursts. The implication of these observations include: (1) the MI and related strong turbulence processes often occur in type III source regions, (2) the strong turbulence processes probably play very important roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency, fpe, and (3) the Langmuir collapse probably follows the route of MI in type III radio bursts.

  20. The aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen. Studies on physiology and pathophysiology

    Jensen, L T

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the physiological basis for the clinical use of serum PIIINP as a marker of the deposition rate of type III collagen. The assumption was that the serum concentration of PIIINP would reflect the turnover of type III collagen and thus directly reflect the...... inflammatory response. For the study we assessed commercially available RIAs and optimised one of them. Porcine PIIINP was purified and compared with human PIIINP. The application of a gentle iodination procedure made it possible to perform tracer studies. An experimental model consisting of a thoracic duct......-venous shunt in conscious pigs was developed. Double and triple isotope tracer techniques were used for kinetic studies in the animal model and in cultures of tubule cells. The rat model with the induction of granulation tissue was used to investigate catabolic states. The anabolic state was studied in humans...

  1. Strongly radiating type-III ELMy H-mode in JET - an integrated scenario for ITER

    As solution to the problems of transient and steady state energy exhaust the type-III ELMy H-mode is proposed. In recent experiments at JET it has been demonstrated that with seeding of nitrogen a radiative power fraction of 95% can be achieved, reducing the steady state and transient heat flux to acceptable values. Though the confinement of these discharges is reduced as well. Nevertheless, the ITER operational domain for Q = 10 does foresee operation at confinement enhancement factors of H 98(y,2) ∼ 0.78 at higher plasma currents (I p = 17 MA). It has been demonstrated at JET that an integrated scenario with type-III ELMs is feasible

  2. Strongly radiating type-III ELMy H-mode in JET - an integrated scenario for ITER

    Rapp, J. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, TEC, 52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: juergen.rapp@jet.efda.org; Matthews, G.F. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom); Monier-Garbet, P. [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la Fusion Controlle, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sartori, R. [EFDA, CSU-Garching, 85748 Garching (Germany); Corre, Y. [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la Fusion Controlle, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Eich, T. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Felton, R. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom); Fundamenski, W. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom); Giroud, C. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, TEC, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, TEC, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Morgan, P. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom); O' Mullane, M. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom); Koslowski, H.R. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, TEC, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Stamp, M. [UKAEA-Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3EA, OXON (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    As solution to the problems of transient and steady state energy exhaust the type-III ELMy H-mode is proposed. In recent experiments at JET it has been demonstrated that with seeding of nitrogen a radiative power fraction of 95% can be achieved, reducing the steady state and transient heat flux to acceptable values. Though the confinement of these discharges is reduced as well. Nevertheless, the ITER operational domain for Q = 10 does foresee operation at confinement enhancement factors of H {sub 98(y,2)} {approx} 0.78 at higher plasma currents (I {sub p} = 17 MA). It has been demonstrated at JET that an integrated scenario with type-III ELMs is feasible.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Mn(III) chloro complexes with salen-type ligands

    A series of novel salen-type complexes ((Mn(III)(Lacn)Cl): n=1∼11) containing Cl- ion were obtained by reactions of the Mn(CH3COO)2·4H2O with the potentially tetradentate compartmental ligand (H2Lacn), prepared by condensation the of one mole of diamine (ethylenediamine, 1,3-propanediamine, o-phenylenediamine, and 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine) with two moles of aldehyde (salicylaldehyde, 5-chloro- salicylaldehyde, 3,5-dichlorosalicylal-dehyde, and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxy-benzaldehyde) in a methanol solution . The resulting salen-type ligands and their Mn(III) complexes were identified and characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity, thermogravimetry and UV-VIS, IR, and NMR spectroscopy

  4. Fate of circulating amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen in conscious pigs

    Jensen, L T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Risteli, J; Olesen, H P; Nielsen, M D; Lorenzen, I

    The amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP, M(r) 42,000) is a promising marker for the formation of type III collagen of granulation tissue in experimental and clinical studies. The disposal kinetics of circulating PIIINP is, however, almost unknown. In conscious pigs with a...... of the plasma disappearance curve originated from the formation and disappearance of a high and a low molecular weight (MW) fraction as part of the degradation of PIIINP. The high MW fraction (approximately M(r) 90,000) was similar to a previously described, but not further characterized, PIIINP...... immunoreactive component. The existence of the low MW fraction (approximately M(r) 20,000) has not been reported before. The lymphatic recirculation of intact PIIINP was rapid, and the lymph-serum ratio was almost constant within 1 h of injection. We conclude that the t1/2 of circulating PIIINP is 58 min, that...

  5. Type III Guyon Syndrome in 'B Boy' Break-Dancer: A Case Report

    Hu, Soo-young; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2015-01-01

    Although the musculoskeletal injuries associated with break-dancing which is gaining more popularity among adolescent and young people has been reported, the report regarding a peripheral nerve injury associated with breakdance is scarce. We report a rare case of a young amateur break-dancer, 'b-boy' who suffered from a painful paresthesia in his left hand, later diagnosed as type III Guyon's canal syndrome. A 23-year-old, right handed college man presented with a tenderness over the left hypothenar eminence and painful paresthesia over the ring and little fingers of 3 months duration. He trained himself as an amateur 'b boy' break-dancer for the last 10 months. Conservative management under the diagnosis of wrist sprain before presentation did not improve his hand pain. An magnetic resonance imaging and electrodiagnostic study revealed that painful paresthesia was caused by type III Guyon's canal syndrome, and 4 weeks of corticosteroid treatment was given with resolution of pain and paresthesia.

  6. Propagation of energetic electrons from the corona into interplanetary space and type III radio emission

    Breitling, F; Vocks, C

    2015-01-01

    During solar flares a large amount of electrons with energies greater than 20 keV is generated with a production rate of typically $10^{36}$ s$^{-1}$. A part of them is able to propagate along open magnetic field lines through the corona into interplanetary space. During their travel they emit radio radiation which is observed as type III radio bursts in the frequency range from 100 MHz down to 10 kHz by the WAVES radio spectrometer aboard the spacecraft WIND, for instance. From the drift rates of these bursts in dynamic radio spectra the radial propagation velocity $V_r$ of the type III burst exciting electrons is derived by employing a newly developed density model of the heliosphere. Calculations show that the radio radiation is emitted by electrons with different $V_r$ and therefore by different electrons of the initially produced electron distribution.

  7. On Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Left Censored Burr Type III Distribution

    Navid Feroze

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Burr type III is an important distribution used to model the failure time data. The paper addresses the problem of estimation of parameters of the Burr type III distribution based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE when the samples are left censored. As the closed form expression for the MLEs of the parameters cannot be derived, the approximate solutions have been obtained through iterative procedures. An extensive simulation study has been carried out to investigate the performance of the estimators with respect to sample size, censoring rate and true parametric values. A real life example has also been presented. The study revealed that the proposed estimators are consistent and capable of providing efficient results under small to moderate samples.

  8. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    Tran, Cindy S; Rangel, Stephanie M; Almblad, Henrik; Kierbel, Arlinet; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Hauser, Alan R; Engel, Joanne N

    2014-01-01

    -associated aggregation on the surface of polarized epithelial cells and at early time points in a murine model of acute pneumonia. In contrast, the translocon was not required for aggregation on abiotic surfaces, suggesting a novel function for the type III secretion system during cell-associated aggregation...... about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates...... exhibit key characteristics of biofilms, including the presence of extracellular matrix and increased resistance to antibiotics compared to planktonic bacteria. Using isogenic mutants in the type III secretion system, we found that the translocon, but not the effectors themselves, were required for cell...

  9. Disialylated apolipoprotein C-III proteoform is associated with improved lipids in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

    Koska, Juraj; Yassine, Hussein; Trenchevska, Olgica; Sinari, Shripad; Schwenke, Dawn C; Yen, Frances T; Billheimer, Dean; Nelson, Randall W; Nedelkov, Dobrin; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-05-01

    The apoC-III proteoform containing two sialic acid residues (apoC-III2) has different in vitro effects on lipid metabolism compared with asialylated (apoC-III0) or the most abundant monosialylated (apoC-III1) proteoforms. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between plasma apoC-III proteoforms (by mass spectrometric immunoassay) and plasma lipids were tested in two randomized clinical trials: ACT NOW, a study of pioglitazone in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (n = 531), and RACED (n = 296), a study of intensive glycemic control and atherosclerosis in type 2 diabetes patients. At baseline, higher relative apoC-III2 and apoC-III2/apoC-III1 ratios were associated with lower triglycerides and total cholesterol in both cohorts, and with lower small dense LDL in the RACED. Longitudinally, changes in apoC-III2/apoC-III1 were inversely associated with changes in triglycerides in both cohorts, and with total and small dense LDL in the RACED. apoC-III2/apoC-III1 was also higher in patients treated with PPAR-γ agonists and was associated with reduced cardiovascular events in the RACED control group. Ex vivo studies of apoC-III complexes with higher apoC-III2/apoC-III1 showed attenuated inhibition of VLDL uptake by HepG2 cells and LPL-mediated lipolysis, providing possible functional explanations for the inverse association between a higher apoC-III2/apoC-III1 and hypertriglyceridemia, proatherogenic plasma lipid profiles, and cardiovascular risk. PMID:26945091

  10. Increased nitric oxide release by neutrophils of a patient with tyrosinemia type III.

    D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Roberto; Celli, Mauro; Raccio, Ivana; Properzi, Enrico; Zicari, Alessandra

    2009-06-01

    Tyrosinemia type III (OMIM 276710) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPD). Few cases have been described with mental retardation or neurological symptoms. Recently it has been demonstrated that 4-HPD participates to nitric oxide (NO) intracellular sequestration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 4-HPD is an ubiquitous enzyme with a prominent expression in neutrophils and neurons. In the nervous system NO has been perceived to be a potential neuromodulator although prolonged excessive generation is detrimental. We analyzed NO release by neutrophils of a patient with tyrosinemia type III in order to evaluate a possible influence of 4-HPD deficiency on this process. Our patient, previously described, is a 30-year-old women with persistent tyrosinemia (450-680 micromol/l) and deficient activity of 4-HPD. At 17 months of age she experienced an acute ataxia and drowsiness lasting for 10 days, but further clinical course showed persistent tyrosinemia with normal growth and psychomotor development. Neutrophils isolated from our patient exhibited a NO release greatly higher in respect to the controls (mean+/-SEM 23.2+/-1.8 micromol/10(6) cells vs 3.5+/-0.5 micromol/10(6) cells). Clinical findings of tyrosinemia type III include neurological symptoms and mental retardation but no consistent phenotype has emerged. Therefore the pathogenesis of neurological involvement is yet not well understood. Our results suggest that an excessive neutrophils of NO release could reflect the lack of scavenging action of 4-HPD. Considering the prominent expression of this enzyme in neurons, we hypothesize that excessive NO release could participate in neuronal damage explaining the neurological involvement described in patients with tyrosinemia type III. PMID:18657947

  11. Global Analysis of a Delayed Impulsive Lotka-Volterra Model with Holling III Type Functional Response

    Hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A delayed impulsive Lotka-Volterra model with Holing III type functional response was established. With the help of Mawhin’s Continuation Theorem in coincidence degree theory, a sufficient condition is found for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the system under consideration. By applying the comparison theorem and constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the permanence and global attractivity of the model are proved. Two numerical simulations are also given to illustrate our main results.

  12. Overactive bladder after female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) type III.

    Abdulcadir, Jasmine; Dällenbach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A 27-year-old Somali woman with type III a-b female genital mutilation/cutting, consulted because of slow micturition, voiding efforts, urgency and urge incontinence (overactive bladder). She also referred primary dysmenorrhoea and superficial dyspareunia making complete sexual intercourses impossible. We treated her by defibulation and biofeedback re-educative therapy. We also offered a multidisciplinary counselling. At 5 months follow-up, urgency and urge incontinence had resolved and she became pregnant. PMID:24096069

  13. Some five-dimensional Bianchi type-iii string cosmological models in general relativity

    In this paper we have constructed some five-dimensional Bianchi type-III cosmological models in general relativity when source of gravitational field is a massive string. We obtained different classes of solutions by considering different functional forms of metric potentials. It is also observed that one of the models is not physically acceptable and the other models possess big-bang singularity. The physical and kinematical behaviors of the models are discussed

  14. Developmental Defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model for Type III Galactosemia

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana M.; Monje, José M.; Murdoch, Piedad del Socorro; Manuel J. Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosy...

  15. Type III IFN Receptor Expression and Functional Characterisation in the Pteropid Bat, Pteropus alecto

    Peng Zhou; Chris Cowled; Marsh, Glenn A.; Zhengli Shi; Lin-Fa Wang; Baker, Michelle L

    2011-01-01

    Bats are rich reservoir hosts for a variety of viruses, many of which are capable of spillover to other susceptible mammals with lethal consequences. The ability of bats to remain asymptomatic to viral infection may be due to the rapid control of viral replication very early in the immune response through innate antiviral mechanisms. Type I and III interferons (IFNs) represent the first line of defence against viral infection in mammals, with both families of IFNs present in pteropid bats. To...

  16. Management of a pregnancy complicated by type III spinal muscular atrophy

    Howarth, L.; Glanville, T

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the successful management of a pregnancy in a patient with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type III. It is a genetically inherited condition causing increasing weakness of the skeletal muscle. The patient in our case was confined to a wheelchair due to marked weakness in her lower limbs. A review of the available literature identified potential risk factors for the antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum period. These include increased risk of thromboembolism, urinary tract inf...

  17. A decade of solar Type III radio bursts observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph 1998-2008

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Kerdraon, Alain

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical survey of almost 10 000 radio Type III bursts observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph from 1998 to 2008, covering nearly a full solar cycle. In particular, sources sizes, positions, and fluxes were examined. We find an east-west asymmetry in source positions which could be attributed to a 6(+/-)1 degree eastward tilt of the magnetic field, that source FWHM sizes s roughly follow a solar-cycle averaged distribution dN/ds = 14 {\

  18. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    G. Thejappa; Macdowall, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz) are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz) in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langm...

  19. Deposition and degradation of C3 on type III group B streptococci.

    Campbell, J R; Baker, C J; Edwards, M S

    1991-01-01

    Antibody to the polysaccharide capsule of type III group B streptococci (GBS) and complement are essential to host defense against systemic infection in neonates. Interactions between C3 degradation products and specific neutrophil receptors mediate the attachment and ingestion of these organisms. To evaluate the influence of capsule on C3 disposition, we compared the C3 fragments released from a highly encapsulated clinical isolate (M861) with those from an unencapsulated mutant (COH 31-15) ...

  20. New Tetrachromic VOF Stain (Type III-G.S) for Normal and Pathological Fish Tissues

    Sarasquete, C.; Gutiérrez, M.

    2005-01-01

    A new VOF Type III-G.S stain was applied to histological sections of different organs and tissues of healthy and pathological larvae, juvenile and adult fish species (Solea senegalensis; Sparus aurata; Diplodus sargo; Pagrus auriga; Argyrosomus regius and Halobatrachus didactylus). In comparison to the original Gutiérrez VOF stain, more acid dyes of contrasting colours and polychromatic/metachromatic properties were incorporated as essential constituents of the tetrachromic VOF stain. This fa...

  1. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  2. The relationship between chronic type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation and cervical spine pain

    Vestri Anna R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was aimed at evaluating whether or not patients with chronic type III acromioclavicular dislocation develop cervical spine pain and degenerative changes more frequently than normal subjects. Methods The cervical spine of 34 patients with chronic type III AC dislocation was radiographically evaluated. Osteophytosis presence was registered and the narrowing of the intervertebral disc and cervical lordosis were evaluated. Subjective cervical symptoms were investigated using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ. One-hundred healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group. Results The rate and distribution of osteophytosis and narrowed intervertebral disc were similar in both of the groups. Patients with chronic AC dislocation had a lower value of cervical lordosis. NPQ score was 17.3% in patients with AC separation (100% = the worst result and 2.2% in the control group (p Conclusions Our study shows that chronic type III AC dislocation does not interfere with osteophytes formation or intervertebral disc narrowing, but that it may predispose cervical hypolordosis. The higher average NPQ values were observed in patients with chronic AC dislocation, especially in those that developed cervical hypolordosis.

  3. Type I and III procollagen propeptides in growth hormone-deficient patients: effects of increasing doses of GH

    Jensen, L T; Jørgensen, J O; Risteli, J;

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of growth hormone on collagen synthesis in GH-treated GH-deficient patients was determined in a short-term study. The synthesis of type I and III collagen was estimated by measurements of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen and the aminoterminal...... propeptide of type III procollagen. Type I collagen is mainly found in bone and type III collagen in loose connective tissue. We observed a GH dose dependency of both procollagen propeptides. Serum type I procollagen propeptide was significantly higher following GH doses of 4 and 6 IU/day for 14 days...... compared with 2 IU/day (normal replacement dose) (p = 0.04). Withdrawal of GH therapy for 14 days resulted in wider variation, but not significantly different from the levels at 2, 4 and 6 IU/day. A dose dependency was found regarding type III procollagen propeptide, showing significantly higher serum...

  4. First report on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of Spa type T037, Sequence type 239, SCCmec type III/IIIA in Malaysia

    V. Neela (Vasanthakumari); H. Ghasemzadeh Moghaddam (Hamed); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); D. Horst-Kreft (Deborah); N.S. Mariana (Nor Shamsudin); E. Ghaznavi Rad (Ehsanollah)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Malaysia were shown to possess staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-III and IIIA. Spa sequencing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) documented t037 and ST 239 (CC8) for 83.3% of the isolates. This confirms observation

  5. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  6. Cross-reactivity to human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus and molecular cloning of simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type III from African green monkeys.

    Hirsch, V.; Riedel, N.; Kornfeld, H; Kanki, P J; M Essex; Mullins, J I

    1986-01-01

    Simian T-lymphotropic retroviruses with structural, antigenic, and cytopathic features similar to the etiologic agent of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), have been isolated from a variety of primate species including African green monkeys (STLV-IIIAGM). This report describes nucleic acid cross-reactivity between STLV-IIIAGM and HTLV-III/LAV, molecular cloning of the STLV-IIIAGM genome, and evaluation...

  7. Training improves oxidative capacity, but not function, in spinal muscular atrophy type III

    Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Hansen, Regitze Sølling; Preisler, Nicolai;

    2015-01-01

    a 12-week training program, performing 42 30-minute sessions exercising at 65-70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). VO2max , muscle strength, functional tests, and self-reported activities of daily living were assessed before and after the training. RESULTS: Training induced a 27 ± 3% increase in......INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effect of 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type III (SMA III), a hereditary motor neuron disease with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. METHODS: Six SMA III patients and 9 healthy subjects completed...... VO2max (17 ± 2 to 21 ± 2 ml/kg/min, P < 0.001) in patients. However, fatigue was a major complaint and caused 1 patient to drop out, increased the need for sleep in 3 patients, and led to training modifications in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Cycle exercise improves VO2max in SMA III without causing...

  8. Effective drift velocity and initiation times of interplanetary type-III radio bursts

    Haggerty, D. K.; Roelof, E. C.

    2004-05-01

    We derive an "effective drift velocity" (EDV) from dynamic WIND/WAVES spectrograms of interplanetary type-III fast-drift radio bursts associated with 171 (1997-2003) near-relativistic electron events observed at 1 AU. The EDV should be regarded as a phenomenological parameter that characterizes the burst drift. It is a weighted spatial average of the exciter front velocities within the extended burst. A frequency-time contour at a constant observed intensity is a sample of emission from an irregular volume where the extended exciter region encounters the density corresponding to the frequency. Therefore the contour of the spectrogram that defines the "leading edge" of the emission is produced by the earliest exciter electrons to reach regions with that particular plasma frequency in sufficient numbers to produce type-III emission at the WIND spacecraft. The weighting involves not only the spatial distribution of the exciter electrons, but also the intrinsic brightness and radiation pattern of the type-III emission (as well as possible refraction effects). Nonetheless, even with all these caveats, the EDV derived from the "leading edge" will be among the fastest exciter velocities sampled from the entire burst pattern. The "leading edge" is established by a best fit of multiple time-frequency points obtained from different frequency cuts. The onset point for each given frequency is determined when the intensity curve rises above background. The same analysis technique also yields an estimate of the time at which the interplanetary type-III radio burst was initiated in the low corona. In this sense, the EDV and initiation times derived from the "leading edge" as well as the "peak" and "trailing edge" of the type-III burst are useful phenomenological parameters for the characterization of burst propagation. It is certainly a more robust a parameter than the ill-defined "transit time", when a contour of the emission pattern reaches the local plasma frequency. We

  9. Hybrid H-mode scenario with nitrogen seeding and type III ELMs in JET

    Corre, Y; Joffrin, E; Monier-Garbet, P; Arnoux, G; Hacquin, S; Imbeaux, F [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Andrew, Y; Beurskens, M; Brix, M; Buttery, R; Felton, R; Giroud, C; Kempenaars, M [EURATOM/UKAEA Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S; Huber, A [Institut fuer Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Germany); Coffey, I [Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De La Luna, E [EURATOM-CIEMAT, Laboratorio National de Fusion (Spain); Hobirk, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Jachmich, S [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, KMS-ERM B-1000, Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: yann.corre@cea.fr (and others)

    2008-11-15

    The performance of the 'hybrid' H-mode regime (long pulse operation with high neutron fluency) has been extensively investigated in JET during the 2005-2007 experimental campaign up to normalized pressure {beta}{sub N} = 3, toroidal magnetic field B{sub t} = 1.7 T, with type I ELMs plasma edge conditions. The optimized external current drive sources, self-generated non-inductive bootstrap current and plasma core stability properties provide a good prospect of achieving a high fusion gain at reduced plasma current for long durations in ITER. One of the remaining issues is the erosion of the divertor target plates associated with the type I ELM regime. A possible solution could be to operate with a plasma edge in the type III ELM regime (reduced transient and stationary heat loads) obtained with impurity seeding. An integrated hybrid type III ELM regime with a normalized pressure {beta}{sub N} = 2.6 (P{sub NBI} {approx} 20-22 MW) and a thermal confinement factor of H{sub 98}{sup *}(y,2){approx}0.83 has been recently successfully developed on JET with nitrogen seeding. This scenario shows good plasma edge condition (compatible with the future ITER-like wall on JET) and moderate MHD activity. In this paper, we report on the experimental development of the scenario (with plasma current I{sub p} = 1.7 MA and magnetic field B{sub t} = 1.7 T) and the trade-off between heat load reduction at the target plates and global confinement due to nitrogen seeding and type III ELM working conditions.

  10. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp

    Ruwandeepika, H. A. Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  11. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  12. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III

    Frederico Carlos Jaña Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo-Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive; presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score index; mortality rate; and infection rate. RESULTS: 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%. Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75% and IIIB (25% predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. CONCLUSION: The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions.

  13. Solution structure of monomeric BsaL, the type III secretion needle protein of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Yu; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2006-06-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria that are important human pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. During the establishment of infection, these pathogens coordinately assemble greater than 20 different proteins into a macromolecular structure that spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and, in many respects, resembles and functions like a syringe. This type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) is used to inject proteins into a host cell's membrane and cytoplasm to subvert normal cellular processes. The external portion of the TTSA is a needle that is composed of a single type of protein that is polymerized in a helical fashion to form an elongated tube with a central channel of 2-3 nm in diameter. TTSA needle proteins from a variety of bacterial pathogens share sequence conservation; however, no atomic structure for any TTSA needle protein is yet available. Here, we report the structure of a TTSA needle protein called BsaL from Burkholderia pseudomallei determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The central part of the protein assumes a helix-turn-helix core domain with two well-defined alpha-helices that are joined by an ordered, four-residue linker. This forms a two-helix bundle that is stabilized by interhelix hydrophobic contacts. Residues that flank this presumably exposed core region are not completely disordered, but adopt a partial helical conformation. The atomic structure of BsaL and its sequence homology with other TTSA needle proteins suggest potentially unique structural dynamics that could be linked with a universal mechanism for control of type III secretion in diverse gram-negative bacterial pathogens. PMID:16631790

  14. Complex Function for SicA, a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Type III Secretion-Associated Chaperone

    Tucker, Stephanie C.; Galán, Jorge E.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica encodes a type III secretion system within a pathogenicity island located at centisome 63 that is essential for virulence. All type III secretion systems require the function of a family of low-molecular-weight proteins that aid the secretion process by acting as partitioning factors and/or secretion pilots. One such protein is SicA, which is encoded immediately upstream of the type III secreted proteins SipB and SipC. We found that the absence of SicA results in the degra...

  15. Alterations in biosynthetic accumulation of collagen types I and III during growth and morphogenesis of embryonic mouse salivary glands

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the biosynthetic patterns of interstitial collagens in mouse embryonic submandibular and sublingual glands cultured in vitro. Rudiments explanted on day 13 of gestation and cultured for 24, 48, and 72 h all synthesized collagen types I, III, and V. However, while the total incorporation of label into collagenous proteins did not change over the three-day culture period, the rate of accumulation of newly synthesized types I and III did change. At 24 h, the ratio of newly synthesized collagen types I:III was approximately 2, whereas at 72 h, the ratio was approximately 5. These data suggest that collagen types I and III may be important in initiation of branching in this organ, but that type I may become dominant in the later stages of development and in maintenance of the adult organ.

  16. The type III secretion system apparatus determines the intracellular niche of bacterial pathogens.

    Du, Juan; Reeves, Analise Z; Klein, Jessica A; Twedt, Donna J; Knodler, Leigh A; Lesser, Cammie F

    2016-04-26

    Upon entry into host cells, intracellular bacterial pathogens establish a variety of replicative niches. Although some remodel phagosomes, others rapidly escape into the cytosol of infected cells. Little is currently known regarding how professional intracytoplasmic pathogens, including Shigella, mediate phagosomal escape. Shigella, like many other Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, uses a type III secretion system to deliver multiple proteins, referred to as effectors, into host cells. Here, using an innovative reductionist-based approach, we demonstrate that the introduction of a functional Shigella type III secretion system, but none of its effectors, into a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli is sufficient to promote the efficient vacuole lysis and escape of the modified bacteria into the cytosol of epithelial cells. This establishes for the first time, to our knowledge, a direct physiologic role for the Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) in mediating phagosomal escape. Furthermore, although protein components of the T3SA share a moderate degree of structural and functional conservation across bacterial species, we show that vacuole lysis is not a common feature of T3SA, as an effectorless strain of Yersinia remains confined to phagosomes. Additionally, by exploiting the functional interchangeability of the translocator components of the T3SA of Shigella, Salmonella, and Chromobacterium, we demonstrate that a single protein component of the T3SA translocon-Shigella IpaC, Salmonella SipC, or Chromobacterium CipC-determines the fate of intracellular pathogens within both epithelial cells and macrophages. Thus, these findings have identified a likely paradigm by which the replicative niche of many intracellular bacterial pathogens is established. PMID:27078095

  17. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins

    Lin Jin; Jong Hyun Ham; Rosemary Hage; Wanying Zhao; Jaricelis Soto-Hernández; Sang Yeol Lee; Seung-Mann Paek; Min Gab Kim; Charles Boone; Coplin, David L.; David Mackey

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, w...

  18. Regulation of the antibody response to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide by contrasuppressor T cells

    1984-01-01

    A soluble membrane component of type III pneumococcal polysaccharide- coupled spleen cells (S3-SCSM) induces S3-specific suppressor T cells (Ts) in mice. These Ts can be detected only if mice are pretreated with cyclophosphamide (Cy) or if cells adherent to the lectin Vicia villosa are removed from the spleen cell population prior to transfer. The V. villosa-adherent spleen cells from mice injected with S3-SCSM could abrogate suppression mediated by Ts induced by S3-SCSM in Cy-treated mice. T...

  19. Cloning and characterization of type III iodothyronine deiodinase from the fish Oreochromis niloticus

    Sanders, J.P.; Van Der Geyten, S; Kaptein, Ellen; Darras, Veerle; Kuhn, E.R.; Leonard, J L; Visser, Ton

    1999-01-01

    textabstractType III iodothyronine deiodinase (D3) catalyzes the inner ring deiodination (IRD) of T4 and T3 to the inactive metabolites rT3 and 3,3'-diiodothyronine (3,3'-T2), respectively. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of complementary DNA (cDNA) coding for D3 in fish (Oreochromis niloticus, tilapia). This cDNA contains 1478 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 267 amino acids, including a putative selenocysteine (Sec) residue, encoded by a TGA triplet, at position 131....

  20. The Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III Secretion Systems manipulate host cell MAPK for critical steps in pathogenesis.

    Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia

    2010-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a food-borne pathogen causing inflammation of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Pathogenic strains of this bacterium possess two Type III Secretion Systems (TTSS) that deliver effector proteins into host cells. In order to better understand human host cell responses to V. parahaemolyticus, the modulation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) activation in epithelial cells by an O3:K6 clinical isolate, RIMD2210633, was investigated. The importance of MAPK activation for the ability of the bacterium to be cytotoxic and to induce secretion of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) was determined.

  1. Serum type III procollagen peptide in asbestos workers: an early indicator of pulmonary fibrosis.

    1988-01-01

    Serum type III procollagen peptide (PIIIP) concentrations were determined in 36 male workers exposed to asbestos fibres in the production of asbestos cement items and in 13 healthy male controls. Mean (SD) PIIIP serum concentrations were 9.3 (1.5) ng/ml (range 7-12) in the controls and 13.7 (3.5)ng/ml (range 7.5-20) in the asbestos workers; the difference was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). The exposed workers were subdivided according to presence or absence of radiological sign...

  2. Developmental defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for type III galactosemia.

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana M; Monje, José M; Murdoch, Piedad Del Socorro; Muñoz, Manuel J

    2014-12-01

    Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosylation process. We also observed that gale-1 mutants are hypersensitive to galactose as well as to infections. Interestingly, we found interactions between gale-1 and the unfolded protein response. PMID:25298520

  3. Large scale simulations of solar type III radio bursts: flux density, drift rate, duration and bandwidth

    Ratcliffe, H.; Kontar, E. P.; Reid, H. A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal electrons accelerated in the solar corona can produce intense coherent radio emission, known as solar type III radio bursts. This intense radio emission is often observed from hundreds of MHz in the corona down to the tens of kHz range in interplanetary space. It involves a chain of physical processes from the generation of Langmuir waves to non-linear processes of wave-wave interaction. We develop a self-consistent model to calculate radio emission from a non-thermal electron pop...

  4. Type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (P-III-P), prolyl hydroxylase (PH), and laminin P sub 1 levels in serum and BALF of radiotherapy patients

    Matsumoto, Shuichi (Komaki Municipal Hospital, Aichi (Japan)); Shindo, Jo; Horiba, Michiaki; Hara, Michihiro; Inoue, Koji

    1992-01-01

    The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear, and at present there are no definite biochemical markers of its activity. We measured serum and BALF levels of type III procollagen N-terminal peptide (P-III-P), prolyl hydroxylase (PH), and laminin P{sub 1} in patients who had undergone radiotherapy for malignant neoplasms, and investigated their value as biochemical markers in a model of pulmonary fibrosis. The following results were obtained: 1) Patients with abnormal liver function had significantly higher serum P-III-P levels and showed a tendency to have higher serum PH levels. If P-III-P or PH are to be used as markers of pulmonary fibrosis, the effect of liver function must be taken into consideration; however, no significant difference was detected with respect to laminin P{sub 1} levels. 2) Serum P-III-P levels were significantly elevated by radiotherapy. 3) Laminin P{sub 1} levels rose in a similar manner to P-III-P levels after radiotherapy, but no significant change was detected. 4) In most cases, the levels of all markers in BALF were below the threshold of detection, nevertheless all three markers were elevated in a patient who developed diffuse radiation pneumonitis during radiotherapy. Increase in the lymphocyte count were found in BALF of this patient. 5) BALF hyaluronic acid levels were negative in the 3 cases assayed. 6) A significant correlation between P-III-P and laminin P{sub 1} in serum was shown, but no significant correlations could be found between the other combinations of markers in serum. Thus it appears that serum P-III-P and laminin P{sub 1} are valid biochemical markers of pulmonary fibrosis. It is expected that they will be useful for the detection of early radiation pneumonitis, the assessment of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, and the monitoring of steroid therapy. (author).

  5. Changes in Histoanatomical Distribution Of Types I, III And V Collagen Promote Adaptative Remodeling in Posterior Tibial Tendon Rupture

    Érika Satomi; Teodoro, Walcy R.; Parra, Edwin R; Túlio D. Fernandes; Ana Paula P. Velosa; Vera Luiza Capelozzi; Natalino Hajime Yoshinari

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is a common cause of adult flat foot deformity, and its etiology is unknown. PURPOSE: In this study, we characterized the morphologic pattern and distribution of types I, III and V collagen in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. METHOD: Tendon samples from patients with and without posterior tibial tendon dysfunction were stained by immunofluorescence using antibodies against types I, III and V collagen. RESULTS: Control samples showed that t...

  6. Role of NSO compounds during primary cracking of a Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite

    Behar, F.; Lorant, F.; Lewan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to follow the generation of NSO compounds during the artificial maturation of an immature Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite in order to determine the different sources of the petroleum potential during primary cracking. Experiments were carried out in closed system pyrolysis in the temperature range from 225 to 350 ??C. Two types of NSOs were recovered: one is soluble in n-pentane and the second in dichloromethane. A kinetic scheme was optimised including both kerogen and NSO cracking. It was validated by complementary experiments carried out on isolated asphaltenes generated from the Type II kerogen and on the total n-pentane and DCM extracts generated from the Type III lignite. Results show that kerogen and lignite first decompose into DCM NSOs with minor generation of hydrocarbons. Then, the main source of petroleum potential originates from secondary cracking of both DCM and n-pentane NSOs through successive decomposition reactions. These results confirm the model proposed by Tissot [Tissot, B., 1969. Premie??res donne??es sur les me??canismes et la cine??tique de la formation du pe??trole dans les bassins se??dimentaires. Simulation d'un sche??ma re??actionnel sur ordinateur. Oil and Gas Science and Technology 24, 470-501] in which the main source of hydrocarbons is not the insoluble organic matter, but the NSO fraction. As secondary cracking of the NSOs largely overlaps that of the kerogen, it was demonstrated that bulk kinetics in open system is a result of both kerogen and NSO cracking. Thus, another kinetic scheme for primary cracking in open system was built as a combination of kerogen and NSO cracking. This new kinetic scheme accounts for both the rate and amounts of hydrocarbons generated in a closed pyrolysis system. Thus, the concept of successive steps for hydrocarbon generation is valid for the two types of pyrolysis system and, for the first time, a common kinetic scheme is available for extrapolating results to natural

  7. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ type III effector family in Arabidopsis.

    Jennifer D Lewis

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found in both plant and animal pathogenic bacteria. In P. syringae, this superfamily includes the evolutionarily diverse HopZ1, HopZ2 and HopZ3 alleles. To investigate the roles of the HopZ family in immunomodulation, we generated dexamethasone-inducible T3SE transgenic lines of Arabidopsis for HopZ family members and characterized them for immune suppression phenotypes. We show that all of the HopZ family members can actively suppress various facets of Arabidopsis immunity in a catalytic residue-dependent manner. HopZ family members can differentially suppress the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase cascades or the production of reactive oxygen species, whereas all members can promote the growth of non-virulent P. syringae. Localization studies show that four of the HopZ family members containing predicted myristoylation sites are localized to the vicinity of the plasma membrane while HopZ3 which lacks the myristoylation site is at least partially nuclear localized, suggesting diversification of immunosuppressive mechanisms. Overall, we demonstrate that despite significant evolutionary diversification, all HopZ family members can suppress immunity in Arabidopsis.

  8. Terminal reassortment drives the quantum evolution of type III effectors in bacterial pathogens.

    John Stavrinides

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens employ a type III secretion system to deliver type III secreted effectors (T3SEs into host cells, where they interact directly with host substrates to modulate defense pathways and promote disease. This interaction creates intense selective pressures on these secreted effectors, necessitating rapid evolution to overcome host surveillance systems and defenses. Using computational and evolutionary approaches, we have identified numerous mosaic and truncated T3SEs among animal and plant pathogens. We propose that these secreted virulence genes have evolved through a shuffling process we have called "terminal reassortment." In terminal reassortment, existing T3SE termini are mobilized within the genome, creating random genetic fusions that result in chimeric genes. Up to 32% of T3SE families in species with relatively large and well-characterized T3SE repertoires show evidence of terminal reassortment, as compared to only 7% of non-T3SE families. Terminal reassortment may permit the near instantaneous evolution of new T3SEs and appears responsible for major modifications to effector activity and function. Because this process plays a more significant role in the evolution of T3SEs than non-effectors, it provides insight into the evolutionary origins of T3SEs and may also help explain the rapid emergence of new infectious agents.

  9. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  10. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  11. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  12. Adenocarcinoma arising in a heterotopic pancreas (Heinrich type III: a case report

    Egashira Yutaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Heterotopic pancreatic cancer in the duodenum is a very rare disease. Only twelve cases have been reported worldwide to date. We report a rare case of malignant transformation of heterotopic pancreas (Heinrich type III in the duodenum with long-term survival of the patient, and review the 12 cases in the literature. Case presentation A 75-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of nausea and vomiting. Endoscopy and upper gastrointestinal contrast study showed marked duodenal stenosis. A pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histopathological examination of the surgically resected specimen showed malignant transformation of heterotopic pancreas (Heinrich type III in the duodenum. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 30. He is well and shows no signs of recurrence at the time of writing, six years after the surgery. Conclusion Adenocarcinoma arising within the heterotopic pancreas appears to be rare. It is difficult to obtain a correct diagnosis preoperatively. The management of heterotopic pancreas depends on the presence or absence of symptoms. If the patient is asymptomatic or benign, conservative treatment with regular follow-up is recommended. When the patient is symptomatic or there is a suspicion of malignancy, surgical management with intra-operative frozen section diagnosis is indicated.

  13. Endofungal bacterium controls its host by an hrp type III secretion system.

    Lackner, Gerald; Moebius, Nadine; Hertweck, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Burkholderia rhizoxinica and Rhizopus microsporus form a unique symbiosis in which intracellular bacteria produce the virulence factor of the phytopathogenic fungus. Notably, the host strictly requires endobacteria to sporulate. In this study, we show that the endofungal bacteria possess a type III secretion system (T3SS), which has a crucial role in the maintenance of the alliance. Mutants defective in type III secretion show reduced intracellular survival and fail to elicit sporulation of the host. Furthermore, genes coding for T3SS components are upregulated during cocultivation of the bacterial symbiont with their host. This is the first report on a T3SS involved in bacterial-fungal symbiosis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the T3SS represents a prototype of a clade of yet uncharacterized T3SSs within the hrp superfamily of T3SSs from plant pathogenic microorganisms. In a control experiment, we demonstrate that under laboratory conditions, rhizoxin production was not required for establishment of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:20720578

  14. Establishment of an inducing medium for type III effector secretion in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Guo-Feng Jiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the type III secretion system (T3SS and type III (T3 effectors are essential for the pathogenicity of most bacterial phytopathogens and that the expression of T3SS and T3 effectors is suppressed in rich media but induced in minimal media and plants. To facilitate in-depth studies on T3SS and T3 effectors, it is crucial to establish a medium for T3 effector expression and secretion. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc is a model bacterium for studying plant-pathogen interactions. To date no medium for Xcc T3 effector secretion has been defined. Here, we compared four minimal media (MME, MMX, XVM2, and XOM2 which are reported for T3 expression induction in Xanthomonas spp. and found that MME is most efficient for expression and secretion of Xcc T3 effectors. By optimization of carbon and nitrogen sources and pH value based on MME, we established XCM1 medium, which is about 3 times stronger than MME for Xcc T3 effectors secretion. We further optimized the concentration of phosphate, calcium, and magnesium in XCM1 and found that XCM1 with a lower concentration of magnesium (renamed as XCM2 is about 10 times as efficient as XCM1 (meanwhile, about 30 times stronger than MME. Thus, we established an inducing medium XCM2 which is preferred for T3 effector secretion in Xcc.

  15. Tenascin C promiscuously binds growth factors via its fifth fibronectin type III-like domain.

    Laura De Laporte

    Full Text Available Tenascin C (TNC is an extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during development as well as tissue remodeling. TNC is comprised of multiple independent folding domains, including 15 fibronectin type III-like (TNCIII domains. The fifth TNCIII domain (TNCIII5 has previously been shown to bind heparin. Our group has shown that the heparin-binding fibronectin type III domains of fibronectin (FNIII, specifically FNIII12-14, possess affinity towards a large number of growth factors. Here, we show that TNCIII5 binds growth factors promiscuously and with high affinity. We produced recombinant fragments of TNC representing the first five TNCIII repeats (TNCIII1-5, as well as subdomains, including TNCIII5, to study interactions with various growth factors. Multiple growth factors of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF family, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF family, the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β superfamily, the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGF-BPs, and neurotrophins were found to bind with high affinity to this region of TNC, specifically to TNCIII5. Surface plasmon resonance was performed to analyze the kinetics of binding of TNCIII1-5 with TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, NT-3, and FGF-2. The promiscuous yet high affinity of TNC for a wide array of growth factors, mediated mainly by TNCIII5, may play a role in multiple physiological and pathological processes involving TNC.

  16. Type III Mixed Cryoglobulinemia and Antiphospholipid Syndrome in a Patient With Partial DiGeorge Syndrome

    Alice D. Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a 14 year-old boy with partial DiGeorge syndrome (DGS, status post complete repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, who developed antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia. He presented with recurrent fever and dyspnea upon exertion secondary to right pulmonary embolus on chest computed tomography (CT. Coagulation studies revealed homozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT mutations, elevated cardiolipin IgM antibodies, and elevated β2-glycoprotein I IgM antibodies. Infectious work-up revealed only positive anti-streptolysin O (ASO and anti-DNAse B titers. Autoimmune studies showed strongly positive anti-platelet IgM, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF, and positive cryocrit. Renal biopsy for evaluation of proteinuria and hematuria showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN with membranoproliferative features consistent with cryoglobulinemia. Immunofixation showed polyclonal bands. Our patient was treated successfully with antibiotics, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF. This is the first report of a patient with partial DGS presenting with APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia possibly due to Streptococcal infection.

  17. Percutaneous K-wiring for Gartland type III supracondylar humerus fractures in children

    To assess the ability of closed reduction and percutanepous K-wire fixation, to obtain and maintain an adequate reduction, and thereby achieve satisfactory end results. A prospective study conducted on 60 children over 28 months at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India, from March 2003 to June 2005, in which Gartland type-III supracondylar fracture humerus were treated by closed reduction and percutaneous pinning either from lateral side only from medical side also, under image intensifier control. There was no problem in union. Patients were graded by Flynn's criteria with excellent results in 88.88%, good in 4.44% cases. Only one patient had developed cubitus varus deformity and one had Iatrogenic Ulnar nerve palsy from medial pin, which recovered subsequently. The Baumann's angle was well with in the normal range of 66-840. Percutaneous K-wire fixation is a safe and effective method for the management of Gartland type III Supracondylar fractures with minimal hospital stay and without risking vascular compromise. (author)

  18. Type III and N Einstein spacetimes in higher dimensions: General properties

    The Sachs equations governing the evolution of the optical matrix of geodetic WANDs (Weyl aligned null directions) are explicitly solved in n dimensions in several cases which are of interest in potential applications. This is then used to study Einstein spacetimes of type III and N in the higher dimensional Newman-Penrose formalism, considering both Kundt and expanding (possibly twisting) solutions. In particular, the general dependence of the metric and of the Weyl tensor on an affine parameter r is obtained in a closed form. This allows us to characterize the peeling behavior of the Weyl 'physical' components for large values of r, and thus to discuss, e.g., how the presence of twist affects polarization modes, and qualitative differences between four and higher dimensions. Further, the r dependence of certain nonzero scalar curvature invariants of expanding spacetimes is used to demonstrate that curvature singularities may generically be present. As an illustration, several explicit type N/III spacetimes that solve Einstein's vacuum equations (with a possible cosmological constant) in higher dimensions are finally presented.

  19. Hereditary angioedema type III (estrogen-dependent) report of three cases and literature review.

    Miranda, Amanda Rodrigues; Ue, Ana Paula Fusel de; Sabbag, Dominique Vilarinho; Furlani, Wellington de Jesus; Souza, Patrícia Karla de; Rotta, Osmar

    2013-01-01

    In this article, three cases of hereditary angioedema (HAE) type III (estrogen-dependent or with normal C1 inhibitor) are reported. The HAE was initially described in women of the same family in association with high-leveled estrogenic conditions such as the use of oral contraceptives and pregnancy. There is no change in the C1 inhibitor as happens in other types of hereditary angioedema, and mutations are observed in the encoding gene of the XII factor of coagulation in several patients. The current diagnosis is mainly clinical and treatment consists in the suspension of the triggering factors and control of acute symptoms. A brief review of physiopathology, clinical features, genetic alterations and treatment are also presented. PMID:24068129

  20. Subtypes of batterers in treatment: empirical support for a distinction between type I, type II and type III.

    José Luis Graña

    Full Text Available This study explores the existence of different types of batterers in a sample of 266 men who had been court referred for intimate partner violence. The data collected in the assessment that have been used to perform a hierarchical and a two-step cluster analysis fall into three areas: aggression towards the partner, general aggression and presence of psychopathology and personality traits, more specifically, alcohol use, borderline and antisocial personality traits, psychopathy traits, state anger and trait anger, anger expression and control, anger, hostility, and, finally, impulsivity. The results show a typology consisting of 3 types of batterers on the basis of violence level and psychopathology: low (65%, moderate (27.8% and high (7.1%. This study provides empirical support for the development of batterer typologies. These typologies will help achieve early detection of different types of batterers, allowing us to tailor interventions on the basis of the needs of each of the types.

  1. Subtypes of batterers in treatment: empirical support for a distinction between type I, type II and type III.

    Graña, José Luis; Redondo, Natalia; Muñoz-Rivas, Marina J; Cantos, Arthur L

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the existence of different types of batterers in a sample of 266 men who had been court referred for intimate partner violence. The data collected in the assessment that have been used to perform a hierarchical and a two-step cluster analysis fall into three areas: aggression towards the partner, general aggression and presence of psychopathology and personality traits, more specifically, alcohol use, borderline and antisocial personality traits, psychopathy traits, state anger and trait anger, anger expression and control, anger, hostility, and, finally, impulsivity. The results show a typology consisting of 3 types of batterers on the basis of violence level and psychopathology: low (65%), moderate (27.8%) and high (7.1%). This study provides empirical support for the development of batterer typologies. These typologies will help achieve early detection of different types of batterers, allowing us to tailor interventions on the basis of the needs of each of the types. PMID:25329828

  2. Nitrated type III collagen as a biological marker of nitric oxide-mediated synovial tissue metabolism in osteoarthritis

    Richardot, P; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Toh, L;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nitric oxide (NO) is a major mediator of joint tissue inflammation and damage in osteoarthritis (OA) and mediates the nitration of tyrosine (Y*) residues in proteins. We investigated the nitration of type III collagen, a major constituent of synovial membrane, in knee OA. METHODS: A...... polyclonal antibody directed against the nitrated QY*DSY*DVKSG sequence from type III collagen N-telopeptide was generated. Synovial tissues from patients with knee OA (n=4) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n=4) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for IIINys. Serum IIINys levels were measured by enzyme......-linked immunosorbent assay in 87 patients with painful knee OA (mean age: 63.0+/-8.0 years, Kellgren-Lawrence score II-III) and in 40 sex and age-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Competition experiments using various nitrated and un-nitrated type III collagen and derived sequences, showed that the antibody was...

  3. Biophysical analysis of apolipoprotein E3 variants linked with development of type III hyperlipoproteinemia.

    Dimitra Georgiadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein E (apoE is a major protein of the lipoprotein transport system that plays important roles in lipid homeostasis and protection from atherosclerosis. ApoE is characterized by structural plasticity and thermodynamic instability and can undergo significant structural rearrangements as part of its biological function. Mutations in the 136-150 region of the N-terminal domain of apoE, reduce its low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor binding capacity and have been linked with lipoprotein disorders, such as type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP in humans. However, the LDL-receptor binding defects for these apoE variants do not correlate well with the severity of dyslipidemia, indicating that these variants may carry additional properties that contribute to their pathogenic potential. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we examined whether three type III HLP predisposing apoE3 variants, namely R136S, R145C and K146E affect the biophysical properties of the protein. Circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy revealed that these mutations do not significantly alter the secondary structure of the protein. Thermal and chemical unfolding analysis revealed small thermodynamic alterations in each variant compared to wild-type apoE3, as well as effects in the reversibility of the unfolding transition. All variants were able to remodel multillamelar 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC vesicles, but R136S and R145C had reduced kinetics. Dynamic light scattering analysis indicated that the variant R136S exists in a higher-order oligomerization state in solution. Finally, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding suggested that the variant R145C exposes a larger amount of hydrophobic surface to the solvent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our findings suggest that single amino acid changes in the functionally important region 136-150 of apoE3 can affect the molecule's stability and conformation in solution and may

  4. Spectroscopic Identification of Type 2 Quasars at Z < 1 in SDSS-III/BOSS

    Yuan, Sihan; Zakamska, Nadia L

    2016-01-01

    The physics and demographics of type 2 quasars remain poorly understood, and new samples of such objects selected in a variety of ways can give insight into their physical properties, evolution, and relationship to their host galaxies. We present a sample of 2758 type 2 quasars at z $\\leq$ 1 from the SDSS-III/BOSS spectroscopic database, selected on the basis of their emission-line properties. We probe the luminous end of the population by requiring the rest-frame equivalent width of [OIII] to be > 100 {\\AA}. We distinguish our objects from star-forming galaxies and type 1 quasars using line widths, standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams at z 0.52. The majority of our objects have [OIII] luminosities in the range 10^8.5-10^10 L$_{\\odot}$ and redshifts between 0.4 and 0.65. Our sample includes over 400 type 2 quasars with incorrectly measured redshifts in the BOSS database; such objects often show kinematic substructure or outflows in the [OIII] line. The majority of the sample has counterparts in t...

  5. EVIDENCE FOR GENTLY SLOPING PLASMA DENSITY PROFILES IN THE DEEP CORONA: TYPE III OBSERVATIONS

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency fp and near its harmonic 2fp by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) ∝ (t - t0)-α, where α can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r -2, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index α varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have α ≤ 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) ∝ (r - r0)-β, with minimum, mean, and median β = 2α of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source region.

  6. Subtypes of Batterers in Treatment: Empirical Support for a Distinction between Type I, Type II and Type III

    José Luis Graña; Natalia Redondo; Muñoz-Rivas, Marina J.; Arthur L Cantos

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the existence of different types of batterers in a sample of 266 men who had been court referred for intimate partner violence. The data collected in the assessment that have been used to perform a hierarchical and a two-step cluster analysis fall into three areas: aggression towards the partner, general aggression and presence of psychopathology and personality traits, more specifically, alcohol use, borderline and antisocial personality traits, psychopathy traits, state ...

  7. Changes in histoanatomical distribution of types I, III and V collagen promote adaptative remodeling in posterior tibial tendon rupture

    Érika Satomi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is a common cause of adult flat foot deformity, and its etiology is unknown. PURPOSE: In this study, we characterized the morphologic pattern and distribution of types I, III and V collagen in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. METHOD: Tendon samples from patients with and without posterior tibial tendon dysfunction were stained by immunofluorescence using antibodies against types I, III and V collagen. RESULTS: Control samples showed that type V deposited near the vessels only, while surgically obtained specimens displayed type V collagen surrounding other types of collagen fibers in thicker adventitial layers. Type III collagen levels were also increased in pathological specimens. On the other hand, amounts of collagen type I, which represents 95% of the total collagen amount in normal tendon, were decreased in pathological specimens. CONCLUSION: Fibrillogenesis in posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is altered due to higher expression of types III and V collagen and a decreased amount of collagen type I, which renders the originating fibrils structurally less resistant to mechanical forces.

  8. Relationship of type III radio bursts with quasi-periodic pulsations in a solar flare

    Kupriyanova, E G; Reid, H A S; Myagkova, I N

    2016-01-01

    We studied a solar flare with pronounced quasi-periodic pulsations detected in the microwave, X-ray, and radio bands. We used the methods of correlation, Fourier, and wavelet analyses to examine the temporal fine structures and relationships between the time profiles in each wave band. We found that the time profiles of the microwaves, hard X-rays and type III radio bursts vary quasi-periodically with the common period of 40-50 s. The average amplitude of the variations is high, above 30% of the background flux level and reaching 80% after the flare maximum. We did not find the periodicity in either the thermal X-ray flux component or source size dynamics. Our findings indicate that the detected periodicity is likely to be associated with periodic dynamics in the injection of non-thermal electrons, that can be produced by periodic modulation of magnetic reconnection.

  9. Non-LTE calculations of Al III line strengths in early-type stars

    Dufton, P.L.; Brown, P.J.F.; Lennon, D.J.; Lynas-Gray, A.E.

    1986-10-15

    Non-LTE line formation calculations, based on the 'complete linearization method' are presented for the Al III ion in early-type stars. Equivalent widths, together with the corresponding LTE values, are tabulated for 15 ultraviolet and visible region transitions, for effective temperatures from 20 000 to 35 000 K, logarithmic gravities of 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5, microturbulent velocities of 0 and 5 km s/sup -1/ and logarithmic aluminium abundances of 6.0, 6.5 and 7.0. The non-LTE line strengths are significantly larger than the LTE values particularly for the visible region transitions and the implications of this are briefly discussed.

  10. Non-LTE calculations of Al III line strengths in early-type stars

    Non-LTE line formation calculations, based on the 'complete linearization method' are presented for the Al III ion in early-type stars. Equivalent widths, together with the corresponding LTE values, are tabulated for 15 ultraviolet and visible region transitions, for effective temperatures from 20 000 to 35 000 K, logarithmic gravities of 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5, microturbulent velocities of 0 and 5 km s-1 and logarithmic aluminium abundances of 6.0, 6.5 and 7.0. The non-LTE line strengths are significantly larger than the LTE values particularly for the visible region transitions and the implications of this are briefly discussed. (author)

  11. Software Reliability Growth Model on Burr Type III-An Order Statistics Approach

    K.Sobhana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Software reliability plays an integral part in the software development process. Growth in the use of IT in today?s interconnected world precipitates the production of reliable software systems considering the potential loss and damage due to failure. Several software reliability growth models exist to predict the reliability of software systems. Non-homogeneous Poisson process (NHPP is a probabilistic model for determining software reliability. Application of order statistics is a relatively new technique for estimating software reliability for time domain data based on NHPP with a distribution model. This paper presents the Burr Type III model as a software reliability growth model and derives the expressions for an efficient reliability function using order statistics. The parameters are estimated using the maximum likelihood (ML estimation procedure. The live data sets are analysed and the results are exhibited.

  12. Chemical shift assignments of the fibronectin III like domains 7-8 of type VII collagen.

    Hermsdorf, Ulrike; Seeger, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Type VII collagen (Col7) is important for skin stability. This is underlined by the severe skin blistering phenotype in the Col7 related diseases dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA). Col7 has a large N-terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) that is followed by the triple helical collagenous domain. The NC1 domain has subdomains with homology to adhesion molecules and mediates important interactions within the extracellular matrix. An 185 amino acid long part of the NC1-subdomain termed fibronectin III like domains 7 and 8 (FNIII7-8) was investigated. Antibodies against this region are pathogenic in a mouse model of EBA and one reported missense mutations of Col7 lies within these domains. The nearly complete NMR resonance assignment of recombinant FNIII7-8 of Col7 is reported. PMID:26364055

  13. Model interpretation of type III radio burst characteristics. I - Spatial aspects

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The ways that the finite size of the source region and directivity of the emitted radiation modify the observed characteristics of type III radio bursts as they propagate through the interplanetary medium are investigated. A simple model that simulates the radio source region is developed to provide insight into the spatial behavior of the parameters that characterize radio bursts. The model is used to demonstrate that observed radio azimuths are systematically displaced from the geometric centroid of the exciter electron beam in such a way as to cause trajectories of the radio bursts to track back to the observer at low frequencies, rather than to follow expected Archimedean spiral-like paths. The source region model is used to investigate the spatial behavior of the peak intensities of radio bursts, and it is found that the model can qualitatively account for both the frequency dependence and the east-west asymmetry of the observed peak flux densities.

  14. An Adult Case of Bartter Syndrome Type III Presenting with Proteinuria.

    Cha, Eun Jung; Hwang, Won Min; Yun, Sung-Ro; Park, Moon Hyang

    2016-03-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) I-IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting salt reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. This report highlights clinicopathological findings and genetic studies of classic BS in a 22-year-old female patient who presented with persistent mild proteinuria for 2 years. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mild to moderate increase in the mesangial cells and matrix of most glomeruli, along with marked juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia. These findings suggested BS associated with mild IgA nephropathy. Focal tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and lymphocytic infiltration were also observed. A genetic study of the patient and her parents revealed a mutation of the CLCNKB genes. The patient was diagnosed with BS, type III. This case represents an atypical presentation of classic BS in an adult patient. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy combined with genetic analysis and clinicolaboratory findings are important in making an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26755355

  15. Kilometer-wave type III burst - Harmonic emission revealed by direction and time of arrival

    Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F. T.; Potter, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A type III solar burst was observed at seven frequencies between 3.5 MHz and 80 kHz by the Michigan experiment aboard the IMP-6 satellite. From the data burst direction of arrival as well as time of arrival can be determined. These quantities are predicted, using simple models whose parameters are varied to obtain a good fit to the observations. It is found that between 3.5 MHz and 230 kHz the observed radiation was emitted at the fundamental of the local plasma frequency, while below 230 kHz it was emitted at the second harmonic. The exciter particles that produced the burst onset and burst peak have velocities of 0.27 and 0.12, respectively, in units of the velocity of light.

  16. Lepton Flavor Violation in the Two Higgs Doublet Model type III

    Díaz, R; Rodríguez, José Alberto

    2001-01-01

    We consider a two Higgs doublet model type III which produces Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) at tree level in the leptonic sector. In the framework of this model we have two situations: when both doublets acquire a vacuum expectation value different from zero and the case when only one of them get it. We find that both models contain the Standard Model in the decoupling limit for the Higgs fields but in the former FCNC at tree level remains by means of the interaction with the would-be Goldstone boson of Z, meanwhile in the latter these ones are completely absent. We get an upper bound for the flavour changing factor $N_{\\mu e}$ in the decoupling limit using the rare processes $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to eee$. Also, we present allowed regions in the $N_{\\mu e}-m_{h^0}$ plane.

  17. Parent type chemical species formed by recoil implantation reaction in tris(β-diketonato)metal(III)

    Chemical reactions induced by recoil implantation were studied focussing on parent type species in tris(β-diketonato)metal(III) complexes. The yield of the substitution reaction *M + M(acac)3 → *M(acac)3 + M was dependent on the force constant ratio K(*M-O)/K(M-O), showing that competition occurred between *M and M in the cage of the acetylacetonate complex. In the case of *Cr implantation in Co(acac)3, an exceptionally large yield could be explained by formation of Co(acac)2, whose central metal easily exchanges with *Cr, and by pickup of acac. When different β-diketonate complexes were examined in the reaction *Cr + M(β-dik)3 → *Cr(β-dik)3 + M the yield was dependent on the stability of the M(β-dik)3 complexes. A reaction model to explain these results reasonably was presented. (orig.)

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an octaketide-producing plant type III polyketide synthase

    Octaketide synthase from A. arborescens has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.6 Å. Octaketide synthase (OKS) from Aloe arborescens is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase that produces SEK4 and SEK4b from eight molecules of malonyl-CoA. Recombinant OKS expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 281.4 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a plant type III polyketide synthase that produces benzalacetone

    Benzalacetone synthase from R. palmatum has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 1.8 Å. Benzalacetone synthase (BAS) from Rheum palmatum is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the one-step decarboxylative condensation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA with malonyl-CoA to produce the diketide 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-but-3-en-2-one. Recombinant BAS expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.6, b = 89.6, c = 81.1 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 100.5°. Diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8

  20. Decays $h\\to \\gamma \\gamma, \\, \\gamma Z$ in the Two Higgs Doublet Model Type III

    Cordero-Cid, A; Honorato, C G; Moretti, S

    2015-01-01

    We study the enhancement of the branching ratios of the decays $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma, \\, \\gamma Z$ in the Two Higgs Doublet Model Type III, assuming a four-zero Yukawa Texture and a general Higgs potential. We show that these processes are very sensitive to the flavor pattern of the Yukawa texture and the structure of the triple coupling $h H^\\pm H^\\mp$ from the Higgs potential. We can accomodate the parameters of the model such that one can obtain the $h \\to\\gamma \\gamma$ rates reported by the LHC and at the same time we can get a $ h \\to \\gamma Z$ fraction larger than in the SM and within experimental reach. The possibility of obtaining a light charged Higgs boson within the ensuing parameter space and compatible with current experimental measurements is also presented.

  1. Biofilms and type III secretion are not mutually exclusive in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Mikkelsen, H; Bond, N J; Skindersoe, M E;

    2009-01-01

    fast growth. Conversely, chronic infections are often associated with the biofilm mode of growth, low virulence and slow growth that resembles that of planktonic cells in stationary phase. Biofilm formation and type III secretion have been shown to be reciprocally regulated, and it has been suggested......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that causes acute and chronic infections in immunocompromised individuals. It is also a model organism for bacterial biofilm formation. Acute infections are often associated with planktonic or free-floating cells, high virulence and...... that factors related to acute infection may be incompatible with biofilm formation. In a previous proteomic study of the interrelationships between planktonic cells, colonies and continuously grown biofilms, we showed that biofilms under the growth conditions applied are more similar to planktonic...

  2. Effect of using heat-inactivated serum with the Abbott human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III antibody test.

    Jungkind, D. L.; DiRenzo, S A; Young, S J

    1986-01-01

    The Abbott enzyme immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) antibody was evaluated to determine the effect of using heat-inactivated (56 degrees C for 30 min) serum as the sample. Each of 58 nonreactive serum samples gave a higher A492 value when tested after heat inactivation. Ten of the samples became reactive after heating. Heat-inactivated serum should not be used in the current Abbott HTLV-III antibody test, because thi...

  3. Hemolytic C-Type Lectin CEL-III from Sea Cucumber Expressed in Transgenic Mosquitoes Impairs Malaria Parasite Development

    Shigeto Yoshida; Yohei Shimada; Daisuke Kondoh; Yoshiaki Kouzuma; Ghosh, Anil K.; Marcelo Jacobs-Lorena; Sinden, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and ra...

  4. Cross-complementation study of the flagellar type III export apparatus membrane protein FlhB.

    Clive S Barker

    Full Text Available The bacterial type III export apparatus is found in the flagellum and in the needle complex of some pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In the needle complex its function is to secrete effector proteins for infection into Eukaryotic cells. In the bacterial flagellum it exports specific proteins for the building of the flagellum during its assembly. The export apparatus is composed of about five membrane proteins and three soluble proteins. The mechanism of the export apparatus is not fully understood. The five membrane proteins are well conserved and essential. Here a cross-complementation assay was performed: substituting in the flagellar system of Salmonella one of these membrane proteins, FlhB, by the FlhB ortholog from Aquifex aeolicus (an evolutionary distant hyperthermophilic bacteria or a chimeric protein (AquSalFlhB made by the combination of the trans-membrane domain of A. aeolicus FlhB with the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB dramatically reduced numbers of flagella and motility. From cells expressing the chimeric AquSalFlhB protein, suppressor mutants with enhanced motility were isolated and the mutations were identified using whole genome sequencing. Gain-of-function mutations were found in the gene encoding FlhA, another membrane protein of the type III export apparatus. Also, mutations were identified in genes encoding 4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase, ubiquinone/menaquinone biosynthesis methyltransferase, and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate synthase, which are required for ubiquinone biosynthesis. The mutations were shown by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography to reduce the quinone pool of the cytoplasmic membrane. Ubiquinone biosynthesis could be restored for the strain bearing a mutated gene for 4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase by the addition of excess exogenous 4-hydroxybenzoate. Restoring the level of ubiquinone reduced flagella biogenesis with the AquSalFlhB chimera

  5. Global impact of Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA on host cells

    Highlights: • We analyzed HeLa cells transcriptome in response to Salmonella SteA. • Significant differential expression was detected for 58 human genes. • They are involved in ECM organization and regulation of some signaling pathways. • Cell death, cell adhesion and cell migration were decreased in SteA-expressing cells. • These results contribute to understand the role of SteA during infections. - Abstract: Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes gastroenteritis, bacteremia and typhoid fever in several animal species including humans. Its virulence is greatly dependent on two type III secretion systems, encoded in pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. These systems translocate proteins called effectors into eukaryotic host cell. Effectors interfere with host signal transduction pathways to allow the internalization of pathogens and their survival and proliferation inside vacuoles. SteA is one of the few Salmonella effectors that are substrates of both type III secretion systems. Here, we used gene arrays and bioinformatics analysis to study the genetic response of human epithelial cells to SteA. We found that constitutive synthesis of SteA in HeLa cells leads to induction of genes related to extracellular matrix organization and regulation of cell proliferation and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways. SteA also causes repression of genes related to immune processes and regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis and pathway-restricted SMAD protein phosphorylation. In addition, a cell biology approach revealed that epithelial cells expressing steA show altered cell morphology, and decreased cytotoxicity, cell–cell adhesion and migration

  6. Global impact of Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA on host cells

    Cardenal-Muñoz, Elena, E-mail: e_cardenal@us.es; Gutiérrez, Gabriel, E-mail: ggpozo@us.es; Ramos-Morales, Francisco, E-mail: framos@us.es

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • We analyzed HeLa cells transcriptome in response to Salmonella SteA. • Significant differential expression was detected for 58 human genes. • They are involved in ECM organization and regulation of some signaling pathways. • Cell death, cell adhesion and cell migration were decreased in SteA-expressing cells. • These results contribute to understand the role of SteA during infections. - Abstract: Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes gastroenteritis, bacteremia and typhoid fever in several animal species including humans. Its virulence is greatly dependent on two type III secretion systems, encoded in pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. These systems translocate proteins called effectors into eukaryotic host cell. Effectors interfere with host signal transduction pathways to allow the internalization of pathogens and their survival and proliferation inside vacuoles. SteA is one of the few Salmonella effectors that are substrates of both type III secretion systems. Here, we used gene arrays and bioinformatics analysis to study the genetic response of human epithelial cells to SteA. We found that constitutive synthesis of SteA in HeLa cells leads to induction of genes related to extracellular matrix organization and regulation of cell proliferation and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways. SteA also causes repression of genes related to immune processes and regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis and pathway-restricted SMAD protein phosphorylation. In addition, a cell biology approach revealed that epithelial cells expressing steA show altered cell morphology, and decreased cytotoxicity, cell–cell adhesion and migration.

  7. A DECADE OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE NANCAY RADIOHELIOGRAPH 1998-2008

    Saint-Hilaire, P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vilmer, N.; Kerdraon, A., E-mail: shilaire@ssl.berkeley.edu [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris-Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical survey of almost 10,000 radio type III bursts observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph from 1998 to 2008, covering nearly a full solar cycle. In particular, sources sizes, positions, and fluxes were examined. We find an east-west asymmetry in source positions that could be attributed to a 6 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign eastward tilt of the magnetic field, that source FWHM sizes s roughly follow a solar-cycle-averaged distribution (dN/ds) Almost-Equal-To 14 {nu}{sup -3.3} s {sup -4} arcmin{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and that source fluxes closely follow a solar-cycle-averaged (dN/ds {sub {nu}}) Almost-Equal-To 0.34 {nu}{sup -2.9} S {sup -1.7} {sub {nu}} sfu{sup -1} day{sup -1} distribution (when {nu} is in GHz, s in arcminutes, and S {sub {nu}} in sfu). Fitting a barometric density profile yields a temperature of 0.6 MK, while a solar wind-like ({proportional_to}h {sup -2}) density profile yields a density of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} at an altitude of 1 R{sub S} , assuming harmonic emission. Finally, we found that the solar-cycle-averaged radiated type III energy could be similar in magnitude to that radiated by nanoflares via non-thermal bremsstrahlung processes, and we hint at the possibility that escaping electron beams might carry as much energy away from the corona as is introduced into it by accelerated nanoflare electrons.

  8. Bovine type III interferon significantly delays and reduces the severity of foot-and-mouth disease in cattle

    Interferons (IFNs) are the first line of defense against viral infections. Although type I and II IFNs have proven effective to inhibit foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication in swine, a similar approach has had only limited efficacy in cattle. Recently, a new family of IFNs, type III IFN o...

  9. Accumulation of properly folded human type III procollagen molecules in specific intracellular membranous compartments in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Keizer-Gunnink, I; Vuorela, A; Myllyharju, J; Pihlajaniemi, T; Kivirikko, K I; Veenhuis, M

    2000-02-01

    It was recently reported that co-expression of the proalpha1(III) chain of human type III procollagen with the subunits of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase in Pichia pastoris produces fully hydroxylated and properly folded recombinant type III procollagen molecules (Vuorela, A., Myllyharju, J., Nissi, R., Pihlajaniemi, T., Kivirikko, K.I., 1997. Assembly of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase and type III collagen in the yeast Pichia pastoris: formation of a stable enzyme tetramer requires coexpression with collagen and assembly of a stable collagen requires coexpression with prolyl 4-hydroxylase. EMBO J. 16, 6702-6712). These properly folded molecules accumulated inside the yeast cell, however, only approximately 10% were found in the culture medium. We report here that replacement of the authentic signal sequence of the human proalpha1(III) with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha mating factor prepro sequence led only to a minor increase in the amount secreted. Immunoelectron microscopy studies indicated that the procollagen molecules accumulate in specific membranous vesicular compartments that are closely associated with the nuclear membrane. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumenal enzyme, was found to be located in the same compartments. Non-helical proalpha1(III) chains produced by expression without recombinant prolyl 4-hydroxylase likewise accumulated within these compartments. The data indicate that properly folded recombinant procollagen molecules accumulate within the ER and do not proceed further in the secretory pathway. This may be related to the large size of the procollagen molecule. PMID:10686423

  10. FLARE-ASSOCIATED TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND DYNAMICS OF THE EUV JET FROM SDO/AIA AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS

    We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in active region AR11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011 February 15. The timing of the Type III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes coincided with an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet and hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI, respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the HXR emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggests that Type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

  11. Evidence for four- and three-wave interactions in solar type III radio emissions

    G. Thejappa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The high time resolution observations obtained by the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in the source regions of solar type III radio bursts, Langmuir waves often occur as intense localized wave packets with short durations of only few ms. One of these wave packets shows that it is a three-dimensional field structure with WLneTe ~ 10−3, where WL is the peak energy density, and ne and Te are the electron density and temperature, respectively. For this wave packet, the conditions of the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI and supersonic collapse are satisfied within the error range of determination of main parameters. The density cavity, observed during this wave packet indicates that its depth, width and temporal coincidence are consistent with those of a caviton, generated by the ponderomotive force of the collapsing wave packet. The spectrum of each of the parallel and perpendicular components of the wave packet contains a primary peak at fpe, two secondary peaks at fpe ± fS and a low-frequency enhancement below fS, which, as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the fast Fourier transform (FFT-based tricoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, fpe + fS, fpe − fS, are coupled to each other by the OTSI type of four-wave interaction (fpe is the local electron plasma frequency and fS is the frequency of ion sound waves. In addition to the primary peak at fpe, each of these spectra also contains a peak at 2fpe, which as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the wavelet-based bicoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, appears to correspond to the second harmonic electromagnetic waves generated as a result of coalescence of oppositely propagating sidebands excited by the OTSI. Thus, these observations for the first time provide combined evidence that (1 the OTSI and related strong turbulence processes play a significant role in the stabilization of the electron beam, (2 the coalescence

  12. Type III TGFβ receptor and Src direct hyaluronan-mediated invasive cell motility.

    Allison, Patrick; Espiritu, Daniella; Barnett, Joey V; Camenisch, Todd D

    2015-03-01

    During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. This process requires epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and directed cellular invasion. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and coronary vessel development. Using primary epicardial cells derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, high-molecular weight hyaluronan (HMWHA) stimulated cellular invasion and filamentous (f-actin) polymerization are detected in Tgfbr3(+/+) cells, but not in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. Furthermore, HMWHA-stimulated cellular invasion and f-actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(+/+) epicardial cells are dependent on Src kinase. Src activation in HMWHA-stimulated Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells is not detected in response to HMWHA. RhoA and Rac1 also fail to activate in response to HMWHA in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. These events coincide with defective f-actin formation and deficient cellular invasion. Finally, a T841A activating substitution in TGFβR3 drives ligand-independent Src activation. Collectively, these data define a TGFβR3-Src-RhoA/Rac1 pathway that is essential for hyaluronan-directed cell invasion in epicardial cells. PMID:25499979

  13. The type III protein secretion system contributes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri biofilm formation

    Zimaro, Tamara

    2014-04-18

    Background: Several bacterial plant pathogens colonize their hosts through the secretion of effector proteins by a Type III protein secretion system (T3SS). The role of T3SS in bacterial pathogenesis is well established but whether this system is involved in multicellular processes, such as bacterial biofilm formation has not been elucidated. Here, the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (X. citri) was used as a model to gain further insights about the role of the T3SS in biofilm formation. Results: The capacity of biofilm formation of different X. citri T3SS mutants was compared to the wild type strain and it was observed that this secretion system was necessary for this process. Moreover, the T3SS mutants adhered proficiently to leaf surfaces but were impaired in leaf-associated growth. A proteomic study of biofilm cells showed that the lack of the T3SS causes changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolic processes, energy generation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and bacterial motility as well as outer membrane proteins. Furthermore, EPS production and bacterial motility were also altered in the T3SS mutants. Conclusions: Our results indicate a novel role for T3SS in X. citri in the modulation of biofilm formation. Since this process increases X. citri virulence, this study reveals new functions of T3SS in pathogenesis. 2014 Zimaro et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. Defective glycosylation of coagulation factor XII underlies hereditary angioedema type III

    Björkqvist, Jenny; de Maat, Steven; Lewandrowski, Urs; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Oschatz, Chris; Schönig, Kai; Nöthen, Markus M.; Drouet, Christian; Braley, Hal; Nolte, Marc W.; Sickmann, Albert; Panousis, Con; Maas, Coen; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema type III (HAEIII) is a rare inherited swelling disorder that is associated with point mutations in the gene encoding the plasma protease factor XII (FXII). Here, we demonstrate that HAEIII-associated mutant FXII, derived either from HAEIII patients or recombinantly produced, is defective in mucin-type Thr309-linked glycosylation. Loss of glycosylation led to increased contact-mediated autoactivation of zymogen FXII, resulting in excessive activation of the bradykinin-forming kallikrein-kinin pathway. In contrast, both FXII-driven coagulation and the ability of C1-esterase inhibitor to bind and inhibit activated FXII were not affected by the mutation. Intravital laser-scanning microscopy revealed that, compared with control animals, both F12–/– mice reconstituted with recombinant mutant forms of FXII and humanized HAEIII mouse models with inducible liver-specific expression of Thr309Lys-mutated FXII exhibited increased contact-driven microvascular leakage. An FXII-neutralizing antibody abolished bradykinin generation in HAEIII patient plasma and blunted edema in HAEIII mice. Together, the results of this study characterize the mechanism of HAEIII and establish FXII inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy to interfere with excessive vascular leakage in HAEIII and potentially alleviate edema due to other causes. PMID:26193639

  15. Activation of type III interferon genes by pathogenic bacteria in infected epithelial cells and mouse placenta.

    Hélène Bierne

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections trigger the expression of type I and II interferon genes but little is known about their effect on type III interferon (IFN-λ genes, whose products play important roles in epithelial innate immunity against viruses. Here, we studied the expression of IFN-λ genes in cultured human epithelial cells infected with different pathogenic bacteria and in the mouse placenta infected with Listeria monocytogenes. We first showed that in intestinal LoVo cells, induction of IFN-λ genes by L. monocytogenes required bacterial entry and increased further during the bacterial intracellular phase of infection. Other Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecalis, also induced IFN-λ genes when internalized by LoVo cells. In contrast, Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Chlamydia trachomatis did not substantially induce IFN-λ. We also found that IFN-λ genes were up-regulated in A549 lung epithelial cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in HepG2 hepatocytes and BeWo trophoblastic cells infected with L. monocytogenes. In a humanized mouse line permissive to fetoplacental listeriosis, IFN-λ2/λ3 mRNA levels were enhanced in placentas infected with L. monocytogenes. In addition, the feto-placental tissue was responsive to IFN-λ2. Together, these results suggest that IFN-λ may be an important modulator of the immune response to Gram-positive intracellular bacteria in epithelial tissues.

  16. Defective glycosylation of coagulation factor XII underlies hereditary angioedema type III.

    Björkqvist, Jenny; de Maat, Steven; Lewandrowski, Urs; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Oschatz, Chris; Schönig, Kai; Nöthen, Markus M; Drouet, Christian; Braley, Hal; Nolte, Marc W; Sickmann, Albert; Panousis, Con; Maas, Coen; Renné, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema type III (HAEIII) is a rare inherited swelling disorder that is associated with point mutations in the gene encoding the plasma protease factor XII (FXII). Here, we demonstrate that HAEIII-associated mutant FXII, derived either from HAEIII patients or recombinantly produced, is defective in mucin-type Thr309-linked glycosylation. Loss of glycosylation led to increased contact-mediated autoactivation of zymogen FXII, resulting in excessive activation of the bradykinin-forming kallikrein-kinin pathway. In contrast, both FXII-driven coagulation and the ability of C1-esterase inhibitor to bind and inhibit activated FXII were not affected by the mutation. Intravital laser-scanning microscopy revealed that, compared with control animals, both F12-/- mice reconstituted with recombinant mutant forms of FXII and humanized HAEIII mouse models with inducible liver-specific expression of Thr309Lys-mutated FXII exhibited increased contact-driven microvascular leakage. An FXII-neutralizing antibody abolished bradykinin generation in HAEIII patient plasma and blunted edema in HAEIII mice. Together, the results of this study characterize the mechanism of HAEIII and establish FXII inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy to interfere with excessive vascular leakage in HAEIII and potentially alleviate edema due to other causes. PMID:26193639

  17. AGN III - primordial activity in nuclei of late-type galaxies with pseudobulges

    Komberg, B V

    2013-01-01

    1. Based on observational data on evolution of quasars and galaxies of different types along with the results of numerical simulations we make a conclusion that on low redshifts ($z<0.5$) QSOI/II objects in massive elliptical and spiral galaxies with classical bulges cannot be in late single activity event (be "primordial"). Instead of it they have had events of activity earlier in their evolution. It means that their presence on low redshifts is connected with the recurrence phenomenon, sequential wet minor mergings, because timescale of the activity does not exceed several units of $10^7$ years. 2. We define a new class - "AGN III" as active galactic nuclei in isolated late-type spirals with low-mass rapidly rotating pseudobulges. We also state that only such objects can be in the primordial phase of activity at low redshifts. Black holes in such galaxies have masses $M_{BH}<10^7M_\\odot$ and also, probably very high spin. Such properties can explain their peculiar emission spectra. A good representati...

  18. Biomechanical Study Using the Finite Element Method of Internal Fixation in Pauwels Type III Vertical Femoral Neck Fractures

    Noda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Several factors are known to influence osseous union of femoral neck fractures. Numerous clinical studies have reported different results, hence with different recommendations regarding treatment of Pauwels III fractures: femoral neck fractures with a more vertically oriented fracture line. The current study aimed to analyze biomechanically whether this fracture poses a higher risk of nonunion. Objectives To analyze the influence of one designated factor, authors believe that a computerized fracture model, using a finite element Finite Element Method (FEM, may be essential to negate the influence of other factors. The current study aimed to investigate a single factor, i.e. orientation of the fracture line toward a horizontal line, represented by Pauwels classification. It was hypothesized that a model with a vertically oriented fracture line maintaining parity of all other related factors has a higher stress at the fracture site, which would delay fracture healing. This result can be applicable to other types of pinning. Patients and Methods The finite element models were constructed from computed tomography data of the femur. Three fracture models, treated with pinning, were constructed based on Pauwels classification: Type I, 30° between the fracture line and a horizontal line; Type II, 50°; and Type III, 70°. All other factors were matched between the models. The Von Mises stress and principal stress distribution were examined along with the fracture line in each model. Results The peak Von Mises stresses at the medial femoral neck of the fracture site were 35, 50 and 130 MPa in Pauwels type I, II, and III fractures, respectively. Additionally, the peak Von Mises stresses along with the fracture site at the lateral femoral neck were 140, 16, and 8 MPa in Pauwels type I, II, and III fractures, respectively. The principal stress on the medial femoral neck in Pauwels type III fracture was identified as a traction stress, whereas

  19. Oblique Axis Body Fracture: An Unstable Subtype of Anderson Type III Odontoid Fractures—Apropos of Two Cases

    Hirokazu Takai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as “oblique type axis body fracture.” Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic “oblique type” fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1–C3/4 posterior fusion and the course was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion for this injury and suggest early operative stabilization.

  20. Ulysses Observations of Nonlinear Wave-wave Interactions in the Source Regions of Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    G. Thejappa; R. J. MacDowall

    2000-09-01

    The Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (URAP) has observed Langmuir, ion-acoustic and associated solar type III radio emissions in the interplanetary medium. Bursts of 50-300 Hz (in the spacecraft frame) electric field signals, corresponding to long-wavelength ion-acoustic waves are often observed coincident in time with the most intense Langmuir wave spikes, providing evidence for the electrostatic decay instability. Langmuir waves often occur as envelope solitons, suggesting that strong turbulence processes, such as modulational instability and soliton formation, often coexist with weak turbulence processes, such as electrostatic decay, in a few type III burst source regions.

  1. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men

  2. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Zang, E.A.; Morrison, J.M.; Harley, E.J.; de Cordoba, S.R.; Bacino, C.; Ting, R.C.; Bodner, A.J.; Sarngadharan, M.G.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-04-25

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men.

  3. In silico identification of potential chaperone genes that belong to type III and type IV secretion systems in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    Letícia Khater

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The secretion of bacterial virulence factors and flagellar components requires the assistance of specific type III and flagellar chaperones. Standard computational annotation of the genome of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri, a plant pathogen that causes citrus canker, initially did not identify any genes belonging to these chaperone categories since the primary sequence homology between them was very low. However, in a search for hypothetical proteins with characteristics similar to these chaperones, we have now identified 30 chromosomal and 10 plasmidial potential genes encoding chaperones belonging to types III/IV, and flagellar secretion systems in this organism. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  4. Two Cases of Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Type III Glycogen Storage Disease.

    Lee, Teresa M; Berman-Rosenzweig, Erika S; Slonim, Alfred E; Chung, Wendy K

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) comprise a large, heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal glycogen deposition. Multiple cases in the literature have demonstrated an association between GSD type I and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We now also report on two patients with GSD type III and PAH, a novel association. The first patient was a 16-year-old girl of Nicaraguan descent with a history of hepatomegaly and growth retardation. Molecular testing identified a homozygous 17delAG mutation in AGL consistent with GSD type IIIb. At the age of 16, she was found to have PAH and was started on medical therapy. Two years later, she developed acute chest pain and died shortly thereafter. The second patient is a 13-year-old girl of Colombian descent homozygous for the c.3911dupA mutation consistent with GSD IIIa. An echocardiogram at age 2 showed left ventricular hypertrophy, which resolved following the institution of a high protein, moderate carbohydrate diet during the day and continuous gastric-tube feeding overnight. At the age of 12, she was found to have pulmonary hypertension. She was started on sildenafil, and her clinical status has shown marked improvement including normalization of her elevated transaminases. PAH may be a rare association in patients with GSD IIIa and IIIb and should be evaluated with screening echocardiograms for cardiac hypertrophy or if they present with symptoms of right-sided heart failure such as shortness of breath, chest pain, cyanosis, fatigue, dizziness, syncope, or edema. Early diagnosis of PAH is important as increasingly effective treatments are now available. PMID:23430832

  5. Identification of novel Xanthomonas euvesicatoria type III effector proteins by a machine-learning approach.

    Teper, Doron; Burstein, David; Salomon, Dor; Gershovitz, Michael; Pupko, Tal; Sessa, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease in pepper and tomato. Xcv pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion (T3S) system that delivers effector proteins into host cells to suppress plant immunity and promote disease. The pool of known Xcv effectors includes approximately 30 proteins, most identified in the 85-10 strain by various experimental and computational techniques. To identify additional Xcv 85-10 effectors, we applied a genome-wide machine-learning approach, in which all open reading frames (ORFs) were scored according to their propensity to encode effectors. Scoring was based on a large set of features, including genomic organization, taxonomic dispersion, hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp)-dependent expression, 5' regulatory sequences, amino acid composition bias and GC content. Thirty-six predicted effectors were tested for translocation into plant cells using the hypersensitive response (HR)-inducing domain of AvrBs2 as a reporter. Seven proteins (XopAU, XopAV, XopAW, XopAP, XopAX, XopAK and XopAD) harboured a functional translocation signal and their translocation relied on the HrpF translocon, indicating that they are bona fide T3S effectors. Remarkably, four belong to novel effector families. Inactivation of the xopAP gene reduced the severity of disease symptoms in infected plants. A decrease in cell death and chlorophyll content was observed in pepper leaves inoculated with the xopAP mutant when compared with the wild-type strain. However, populations of the xopAP mutant in infected leaves were similar in size to those of wild-type bacteria, suggesting that the reduction in virulence was not caused by impaired bacterial growth. PMID:26104875

  6. BACE1 Processing of NRG1 Type III Produces a Myelin-Inducing Signal but Is Not Essential for the Stimulation of Myelination

    Velanac, Viktorija; Unterbarnscheidt, Tilmann; Hinrichs, Wilko; Gummert, Maike N.; Fischer, Tobias M; Rossner, Moritz J.; Trimarco, Amelia; Brivio, Veronica; Taveggia, Carla; Willem, Michael; Haass, Christian; Möbius, Wiebke; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Schwab, Markus H

    2011-01-01

    Myelin sheath thickness is precisely adjusted to axon caliber, and in the peripheral nervous system, neuregulin 1 (NRG1) type III is a key regulator of this process. It has been proposed that the protease BACE1 activates NRG1 dependent myelination. Here, we characterize the predicted product of BACE1-mediated NRG1 type III processing in transgenic mice. Neuronal overexpression of a NRG1 type III-variant, designed to mimic prior cleavage in the juxtamembrane stalk region, induces hypermyelinat...

  7. Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of type III radio bursts

    Tsiklauri, David

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution, 1.5D Particle-in-Cell, relativistic, fully electromagnetic simulations are used to model electromagnetic wave emission generation in the context of solar type III radio bursts. The model studies generation of electromagnetic waves by a super-thermal, hot beam of electrons injected into a plasma thread that contains uniform longitudinal magnetic field and a parabolic density gradient. In effect, a single magnetic line connecting Sun to earth is considered, for which four cases are studied. (i) We find that the physical system without a beam is stable and only low amplitude level electromagnetic drift waves (noise) are excited. (ii) The beam injection direction is controlled by setting either longitudinal or oblique electron initial drift speed, i.e. by setting the beam pitch angle. In the case of zero pitch angle, the beam excites only electrostatic, standing waves, oscillating at local plasma frequency, in the beam injection spatial location, and only low level electromagnetic drift wave nois...

  8. Phase Coupling Between Spectral Components of Collapsing Langmuir Solitons in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the high time resolution observations of one of the Langmuir wave packets obtained in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. This wave packet satisfies the threshold condition of the supersonic modulational instability, as well as the criterion of a collapsing Langmuir soliton, i.e., the spatial scale derived from its peak intensity is less than that derived from its short time scale. The spectrum of t his wave packet contains an intense spectral peak at local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe) and relatively weaker peaks at 2f(sub pe) and 3f(sub pe). We apply the wavelet based bispectral analysis technique on this wave packet and compute the bicoherence between its spectral components. It is found that the bicoherence exhibits two peaks at (approximately f(sub pe), approximately f(sub pe)) and (approximately f(sub pe) approximately 2f(sub pe)), which strongly suggest that the spectral peak at 2f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the second harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of the merging of antiparallel propagating Langmuir waves trapped in the collapsing Langmuir soliton, and, the spectral peak at 3f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the third harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of merging of a trapped Langmuir wave and a second harmonic electromagnetic wave.

  9. QCD Corrections to Pair Production of Type III Seesaw Leptons at Hadron Colliders

    Ruiz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s)$ rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy $SU(2)_L$ triplet leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13,$ 14, and 100 TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) $K$-factors span, approximately, $K^{NLO}=1.1 - 1.4$ for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range $m_T = 100~\\text{GeV}-2\\text{TeV}$. Total production cross sections exhibit a $^{+5\\%}_{-6\\%}$ scale dependence at 14 TeV and $\\pm1\\%$ at 100 TeV. The NLO differential $K$-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na\\"ive scaling by the total $K^{NLO}$ is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are la...

  10. Neutrino Masses at LHC: Minimal Lepton Flavour Violation in Type-III See-saw

    Eboli, O J P; Gonzalez-Garcia, M C

    2011-01-01

    We study the signatures of minimal lepton flavour violation in a simple Type-III see--saw model in which the flavour scale is given by the new fermion triplet mass and it can be naturally light enough to be produced at the LHC. In this model the flavour structure of the couplings of the triplet fermions to the Standard Model leptons can be reconstructed from the neutrino mass matrix and the smallness of the neutrino mass is associated with a tiny violation of total lepton number. Characteristic signatures of this model include suppressed lepton number violation decays of the triplet fermions, absence of displaced vertices in their decays and predictable lepton flavour composition of the states produced in their decays. We study the observability of these signals in the processes $pp\\rightarrow 3\\ell + 2j +\\Sla{E_T}$ and $pp\\rightarrow 2\\ell + 4j$ with $\\ell =e$ or $\\mu$ taking into account the present low energy data on neutrino physics and the corresponding Standard Model backgrounds. Our results indicate th...

  11. Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III Overexpression By Gene Therapy Exerts Antitumoral Activity In Mouse Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Raúl González

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma develops in cirrhotic liver. The nitric oxide (NO synthase type III (NOS-3 overexpression induces cell death in hepatoma cells. The study developed gene therapy designed to specifically overexpress NOS-3 in cultured hepatoma cells, and in tumors derived from orthotopically implanted tumor cells in fibrotic livers. Liver fibrosis was induced by CCl4 administration in mice. Hepa 1-6 cells were used for in vitro and in vivo experiments. The first generation adenovirus was designed to overexpress NOS-3 (or GFP and luciferase cDNA under the regulation of murine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP and Rous Sarcoma Virus (RSV promoters, respectively. Both adenoviruses were administered through the tail vein two weeks after orthotopic tumor cell implantation. AFP-NOS-3/RSV-Luciferase increased oxidative-related DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and caspase-8 activity in cultured Hepa 1-6 cells. The increased expression of CD95/CD95L and caspase-8 activity was abolished by l-NAME or p53 siRNA. The tail vein infusion of AFP-NOS- 3/RSV-Luciferase adenovirus increased cell death markers, and reduced cell proliferation of established tumors in fibrotic livers. The increase of oxidative/nitrosative stress induced by NOS-3 overexpression induced DNA damage, p53, CD95/CD95L expression and cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The effectiveness of the gene therapy has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Structure of a bacterial type III secretion system in contact with a host membrane in situ

    Nans, Andrea; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Saibil, Helen R.; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    Many bacterial pathogens of animals and plants use a conserved type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells to subvert host functions. Contact with host membranes is critical for T3SS activation, yet little is known about T3SS architecture in this state or the conformational changes that drive effector translocation. Here we use cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging to derive the intact structure of the primordial Chlamydia trachomatis T3SS in the presence and absence of host membrane contact. Comparison of the averaged structures demonstrates a marked compaction of the basal body (4 nm) occurs when the needle tip contacts the host cell membrane. This compaction is coupled to a stabilization of the cytosolic sorting platform-ATPase. Our findings reveal the first structure of a bacterial T3SS from a major human pathogen engaged with a eukaryotic host, and reveal striking `pump-action' conformational changes that underpin effector injection.

  13. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes.

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M

    2015-10-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2-9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  14. Serum type III procollagen N-terminal peptide in coal miners.

    Janssen, Y M; Engelen, J J; Giancola, M S; Low, R B; Vacek, P; Borm, P J

    1992-01-01

    Health surveillance of workers exposed to fibrogenic agents ideally should identify individuals at risk or detect pulmonary fibrosis in preclinical stages. We investigated serum procollagen type III N-terminal peptide (PIIIP) in several groups of active miners and in a nondust-exposed control group. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of PIIIP as an early noninvasive marker of pulmonary fibrosis in workers exposed to coal mine dust. PIIIP levels were significantly elevated in miners without radiological signs of coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) as compared with the nonexposed controls. However, in coal miners with CWP beyond ILO classification 1/0, PIIIP levels were not significantly different from nondust-exposed controls. Trend analysis within the miners group indicated a decrease in PIIIP levels with progression of the fibrosis. Our data suggest that detection of early lung fibrosis by measuring serum PIIIP values may be more sensitive than radiological diagnosis of CWP. However, follow-up of the control miners with respect to serum PIIIP and chest radiography is essential to validate PIIIP as a biological marker for CWP. PMID:1572317

  15. Variation of Langmuir wave polarization with electron beam speed in type III radio bursts

    Observations by the twin STEREO spacecraft of in-situ electric field waveforms and radio signatures associated with type III radio bursts have demonstrated that the polarization of electron beam-driven waves near the local plasma frequency depends strongly on the speed of the driving electron beam. We expand upon a previous study by including all radio bursts with in-situ waveforms observed by STEREO in 2011. The expanded data set contains five times more radio bursts (35 up from 7) and three times as many Langmuir waves (663 up from 168). While this expanded study supports the results of the original study, that faster (slower) beam electrons drive waves with strong (weak) electric fields perpendicular to the local magnetic field, the larger data set emphasizes that the observation of strong perpendicular electric fields at high electron beam speeds is probabilistic rather than definite. This property supports the interpretation of wave polarization dependence on beam speed as Langmuir/z-mode waves shifted to small wave number through interaction with turbulent solar wind density fluctuations.

  16. Quorum Sensing Regulates Type III Secretion in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Henke, Jennifer M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2004-01-01

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria communicate with one another by producing, releasing, detecting, and responding to signal molecules called autoinducers. Vibrio harveyi, a marine pathogen, uses two parallel quorum-sensing circuits, each consisting of an autoinducer-sensor pair, to control the expression of genes required for bioluminescence and a number of other target genes. Genetic screens designed to discover autoinducer-regulated targets in V. harveyi have revealed genes encoding components of a putative type III secretion (TTS) system. Using transcriptional reporter fusions and TTS protein localization studies, we show that the TTS system is indeed functional in V. harveyi and that expression of the genes encoding the secretion machinery requires an intact quorum-sensing signal transduction cascade. The newly completed genome of the closely related marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is a human pathogen, shows that it possesses the genes encoding both of the V. harveyi-like quorum-sensing signaling circuits and that it also has a TTS system similar to that of V. harveyi. We show that quorum sensing regulates TTS in V. parahaemolyticus. Previous reports connecting quorum sensing to TTS in enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli show that quorum sensing activates TTS at high cell density. Surprisingly, we find that at high cell density (in the presence of autoinducers), quorum sensing represses TTS in V. harveyi and V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:15175293

  17. Magnetic Reconnection of Solar Flare Detected by Solar Radio Burst Type III

    The Sun is an ideal object of a blackbody with a large and complex magnetic field. In solar activity specifically solar flare phenomenon, the magnetic reconnection is one of the most significant factors of the Sun that can simplify a better understanding of our nearest star. This factor is due to the motion of the plasma and other particles through the convection mechanism inside the Sun. In our work, we will highlight one of the solar burst events that associated with solar flares. This event occurred on 13th November 2012 from 2:00:03 UT till 2:00:06 UT. It peaked with M2.0 solar flare at 2.04 UT. Within short time intervals of about l02 ∼ 103s, large quantities of energy of 1022 ∼ 1026J are emancipated. The changing magnetic field converts magnetic potential energy into kinetic energy by accelerating plasmas in the solar corona. It is believed that the plasma is channelled by the magnetic field up and away from the Sun. It is also accelerated back down along the magnetic field into the chromosphere. In conclusion, we showed that the structure of the solar radio burst type III is an indicator of a starting point of magnetic reconnection

  18. Type III effector activation via nucleotide binding, phosphorylation, and host target interaction.

    Darrell Desveaux

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector protein avirulence protein B (AvrB is delivered into plant cells, where it targets the Arabidopsis RIN4 protein (resistance to Pseudomonas maculicula protein 1 [RPM1]-interacting protein. RIN4 is a regulator of basal host defense responses. Targeting of RIN4 by AvrB is recognized by the host RPM1 nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat disease resistance protein, leading to accelerated defense responses, cessation of pathogen growth, and hypersensitive host cell death at the infection site. We determined the structure of AvrB complexed with an AvrB-binding fragment of RIN4 at 2.3 A resolution. We also determined the structure of AvrB in complex with adenosine diphosphate bound in a binding pocket adjacent to the RIN4 binding domain. AvrB residues important for RIN4 interaction are required for full RPM1 activation. AvrB residues that contact adenosine diphosphate are also required for initiation of RPM1 function. Nucleotide-binding residues of AvrB are also required for its phosphorylation by an unknown Arabidopsis protein(s. We conclude that AvrB is activated inside the host cell by nucleotide binding and subsequent phosphorylation and, independently, interacts with RIN4. Our data suggest that activated AvrB, bound to RIN4, is indirectly recognized by RPM1 to initiate plant immune system function.

  19. Type III Interferons Produced by Human Placental Trophoblasts Confer Protection against Zika Virus Infection.

    Bayer, Avraham; Lennemann, Nicholas J; Ouyang, Yingshi; Bramley, John C; Morosky, Stefanie; Marques, Ernesto Torres De Azeved; Cherry, Sara; Sadovsky, Yoel; Coyne, Carolyn B

    2016-05-11

    During mammalian pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier between the maternal and fetal compartments. The recently observed association between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during human pregnancy and fetal microcephaly and other anomalies suggests that ZIKV may bypass the placenta to reach the fetus. This led us to investigate ZIKV infection of primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), which are the barrier cells of the placenta. We discovered that PHT cells from full-term placentas are refractory to ZIKV infection. In addition, medium from uninfected PHT cells protects non-placental cells from ZIKV infection. PHT cells constitutively release the type III interferon (IFN) IFNλ1, which functions in both a paracrine and autocrine manner to protect trophoblast and non-trophoblast cells from ZIKV infection. Our data suggest that for ZIKV to access the fetal compartment, it must evade restriction by trophoblast-derived IFNλ1 and other trophoblast-specific antiviral factors and/or use alternative strategies to cross the placental barrier. PMID:27066743

  20. On oxygen perovskites of type Ba3Bsup(III)RuIrO9

    The black perovskites Ba3Bsup(III)RuIrO9 with Bsup(III) = La, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, In, Sc are isotypic. They crystallize in a hexagonal BaTiO3 structure (sequence (hcc)2). The mean oxydation state of the noble metal ions is +4.5. (author)

  1. Ultradiscrete limit of Bessel function type solutions of the Painlev\\'{e} III equation

    Isojima, Shin

    2014-01-01

    An ultradiscrete analog of the Bessel function is constructed by taking the ultradiscrete limit for a $q$-difference analog of the Bessel function. Then, a direct relationship between a class of special solutions for the ultradiscrete Painlev\\'{e} III equation and those of the discrete Painlev\\'{e} III equation which have a determinantal structure is established.

  2. QCD corrections to pair production of Type III Seesaw leptons at hadron colliders

    Ruiz, Richard

    2015-12-01

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the O({α}_s) rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy SU(2) L triplet leptons in pp collisions at √{s} = 13, 14 and 100TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) K-factors span, approximately, K NLO = 1 .1 - 1 .4 for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range m T = 100 GeV - 2 TeV. Total production cross sections exhibit a - 6 % + 5 % scale dependence at 14 TeV and ±1% at 100 TeV. The NLO differential K-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na¨ıve scaling by the total K NLO is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are large in TeV-scale dilepton systems. Discovery potential to heavy lepton pairs at 14 and 100 TeV is briefly explored: at the High-Luminosity LHC, we estimate a 4 .8 - 6 .3 σ discovery potential maximally for m T = 1 .5 - 1 .6 TeV after 3000 fb-1. With 300 (3000) fb-1, there is 2σ sensitivity up to m T = 1 .3 - 1 .4 TeV (1 .7 - 1 .8 TeV) in the individual channels. At 100 TeV and with 10 fb-1, a 5 σ discovery can be achieved for m T = 1 .4 - 1 .6 TeV. Due to the factorization properties of Drell-Yan-type systems, the fixed order and resummed calculations reduce to convolutions over tree-level quantities.

  3. Ubiquity of Putative Type III Secretion Genes among Clinical and Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates in Northern Australia

    Smith-Vaughan, H C; Gal, D; Lawrie, P. M.; Winstanley, C.; Sriprakash, K S; Currie, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-like type III secretion (TTS1) genes were present in all 116 Northern Australian Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates tested but were not detected in other common environmental Burkholderia species. PCR of TTS1 genes may prove valuable as a diagnostic test.

  4. A note on classification of proper homothetic vector fields in Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi type III Lorentzian manifolds

    Shabbir, Ghulam

    2011-01-01

    A complete study of Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi type III space-times according to their proper homothetic vector fields is given by using direct integration technique. Using the above mentioned technique we have shown that very special classes of the above space-times admit proper homothetic vector fields. The dimension of homothetic vector fields is five.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype III, Multilocus Sequence Type 283 Strain SG-M1

    Kurosh S. Mehershahi; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien; Chen, Swaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is a common commensal strain in the human gastrointestinal tract that can also cause invasive disease in humans and other animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of S. agalactiae SG-M1, a serotype III, multilocus sequence type 283 strain, isolated from a Singaporean patient suffering from meningitis.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype III, Multilocus Sequence Type 283 Strain SG-M1.

    Mehershahi, Kurosh S; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien; Chen, Swaine L

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is a common commensal strain in the human gastrointestinal tract that can also cause invasive disease in humans and other animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of S. agalactiae SG-M1, a serotype III, multilocus sequence type 283 strain, isolated from a Singaporean patient suffering from meningitis. PMID:26494662

  7. Hepatic and renal extraction of circulating type III procollagen amino-terminal propeptide and hyaluronan in pig

    Bentsen, K D; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Boesby, S;

    1989-01-01

    Hepatic and renal clearance of the amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) and of the glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA) were investigated in a catheterization study of seven healthy anesthetized pigs. Two assays were used, in order to distinguish between the metabolism of...

  8. Exact Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi types I and III cosmological models with a conformally invariant scalar field

    Exact solutions of the Einstein-Conformally Invariant Scalar Field Equations are obtained for Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi types I and III cosmologies. The presence of the conformally invariant scalar field is responsible for some interesting features of the solutions. In particular it is found that the Bianchi I model is consistent with the big-bang theory of cosmology. (Author)

  9. Talents and Type Iiis: The Effects of the Talents Unlimited Model on Creative Productivity in Gifted Youngsters

    Newman, Jane L.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined a set of lessons that integrate the Talents Unlimited Model (TU; C. L. Schlichter, 1986) with the 10 steps of completing a Type III activity (J. S. Renzulli & S. M. Reis, 1985) to determine the effects of these lessons on the quality of students' creative products and on the number of students who completed their products.…

  10. Upregulation of heme oxygenase and collagen type III in the rat bladder after partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Inaba, Mitsuhiko; Ukimura, Osamu; Yaoi, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Fushiki, Shinji; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate possible changes of the gene expression and localization of the enzymes, heme oxygenase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), with reference to increase of collagen type III in response to the partial obstruction of the bladder. Following initial obstruction, whole rat bladders were removed for real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated significantly enhanced expression of HO (p < 0.01) and collagen type III (p < 0.001) gene on postoperative day 14. Enhanced expression of NOS gene was seen only on postoperative day 4 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry revealed that immunoreactivity to HO-1 had much in common in neural cells and fibers, although immunoreactivity to HO-2 and iNOS was relatively weak. This study suggested gene expression of HO, especially HO-1, was more dramatically changed than NOS, and was upregulated simultaneously with increase of collagen type III after obstruction. HO systems could be involved in the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction related to increase of collagen type III after obstruction. PMID:17406140

  11. The First Type III Domain of Fibronectin is Associated with the Expression of Cytokines within the Lung Tumor Microenvironment

    Mingzhe Zheng, David M. Jones, Carol Horzempa, Aparna Prasad, Paula J. McKeown-Longo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have pointed to changes in tissue mechanics as a contributory element to the development of malignancies. Increased tissue rigidity is associated with the unfolding of the Type III domains of fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. The consequences of this unfolding on cellular functions within the lung are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a peptide representing a partially unfolded intermediate of the first Type III repeat of fibronectin (FnIII-1c on inflammatory gene expression in adult human lung fibroblast cells. FnIII-1c induced expression of cytokines, CXCL1-3, IL-8 and TNF-α, by lung fibroblast cells. The increase in IL-8 expression was dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 and NFκB. Immunohistochemistry of tissue arrays representing squamous cell carcinoma of the lung revealed extensive stromal staining for IL-8 and fibronectin fibrils which were co-aligned with myofibroblasts. These data suggest a model in which unfolding of FnIII domains secondary to myofibroblast-generated tension may induce the release of cytokines by stromal fibroblasts present within the lung tumor.

  12. Uptake Of Trivalent Actinides (Cm(III)) And Lanthanides (Eu(III)) By Cement-Type Minerals: A Wet Chemistry And Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) Study

    Tits, J.; Stumpf, T; Wieland, E.; Fanghaenel, T

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of the two chemical homologues Cm (III) and Eu(III) with calcium silicate hydrates at pH 13.3 has been investigated in batch-type sorption studies using Eu(III), and complemented with time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy using Cm(III). The sorption data for Eu(III) reveal fast sorption kinetics, and a strong uptake by CSH phases, with distribution ratios of 6({+-}3)*105 L kg-1. Three different types of sorbed Cm(III) species have been identified: a non-fluorescing species, which was identified as Cm cluster present either as surface precipitate or as Cm(III) colloid in solution, and two sorbed fluorescing species. The sorbed fluorescing species have characteristic emission spectra (main peak maxima at 618.9 nm and 620.9 nm) and fluorescence emission lifetimes (289 {+-} 11 ms and 1482{+-} 200 ms). From the fluorescence lifetimes, it appears that the two fluorescing Cm(III) species have, respectively, one to two or no water molecules left in their first coordination sphere, suggesting that these species are incorporated into the CSH structure. A structural model for Cm(III) and Eu(III) incorporation into CSH phases is proposed based on the substitution of Ca at two different types of sites in the CSH structure. (author)

  13. Identification and classification of bacterial Type III toxin–antitoxin systems encoded in chromosomal and plasmid genomes

    Blower, Tim R.; Short, Francesca L.; Rao, Feng; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Pei, Xue Y.; Fineran, Peter C.; Luisi, Ben F.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin systems are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They perform diverse functional roles, including the generation of persistence, maintenance of genetic loci and resistance to bacteriophages through abortive infection. Toxin–antitoxin systems have been divided into three types, depending on the nature of the interacting macromolecules. The recently discovered Type III toxin–antitoxin systems encode protein toxins that are inhibited by pseudoknots of antitoxic RNA, encoded by sho...

  14. Observation of solar radio bursts of type II and III at kilometer wavelengths from Prognoz-8 during STIP Interval XII

    Type II and type III radio events were observed at low frequencies (2.16 MHz to 114 kHz) by the Prognoz-8 satellite during the period of STIP Interval XII in April and May, 1981, respectively. This review covers briefly a chronology of the sub-megahertz radio events, and where possible their association with both groundbased radio observations and solar flare. (author)

  15. Chromosomal assignments of the genes coding for human types II, III, and IV collagen: a dispersed gene family.

    Solomon, E; Hiorns, L R; Spurr, N; Kurkinen, M.; Barlow, D; Hogan, B L; Dalgleish, R.

    1985-01-01

    The human type II collagen gene, COL2A1, has been assigned to chromosome 12, the type III gene, COL3A1, to chromosome 2, and one of the type IV genes, COL4A1, to chromosome 13. These assignments were made by using cloned genes as probes on Southern blots of DNA from a panel of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids. The two genes of type I collagen, COL1A1 and COL2A1, have been mapped previously to chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively. This family of conserved genes seems therefore to be dispersed th...

  16. Influence of Term of Exposure to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Myocardial Collagen Type I and III

    Obesity is a risk factor for many medical complications; medical research has shown that hemodynamic, morphological and functional abnormalities are correlated with the duration and severity of obesity. Present study determined the influence of term of exposure to high-fat diet-induced obesity on myocardial collagen type I and III. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: a control (C) group fed a standard rat chow and an obese (Ob) group alternately fed one of four palatable high-fat diets. Each diet was changed daily, and the rats were maintained on their respective diets for 15 (C15 and Ob15) and 30 (C30 and Ob30) consecutive weeks. Obesity was determined by adiposity index. The Ob15 group was similar to the C15 group regarding the expression of myocardial collagen type I; however, expression in the Ob30 group was less than C30 group. The time of exposure to obesity was associated with a reduction in collagen type I in Ob30 when compared with Ob15. Obesity did not affect collagen type III expression. This study showed that the time of exposure to obesity for 30 weeks induced by unsaturated high-fat diet caused a reduction in myocardial collagen type I expression in the obese rats. However, no effect was seen on myocardial collagen type III expression

  17. Influence of Term of Exposure to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Myocardial Collagen Type I and III

    Silva, Danielle Cristina Tomaz da [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André Soares [Departamento de Esportes, Centro de Educação Física e Desportos da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo (UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil); Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé de; Nascimento, André Ferreira do [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Sílvio Assis Junior de [Escola de Fisioterapia da Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Padovani, Carlos Roberto [Departamento de Bioestatística do Instituto de Ciências Biológicas da Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Cicogna, Antonio Carlos, E-mail: dany.tomaz@gmail.com [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for many medical complications; medical research has shown that hemodynamic, morphological and functional abnormalities are correlated with the duration and severity of obesity. Present study determined the influence of term of exposure to high-fat diet-induced obesity on myocardial collagen type I and III. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: a control (C) group fed a standard rat chow and an obese (Ob) group alternately fed one of four palatable high-fat diets. Each diet was changed daily, and the rats were maintained on their respective diets for 15 (C{sub 15} and Ob{sub 15}) and 30 (C{sub 30} and Ob{sub 30}) consecutive weeks. Obesity was determined by adiposity index. The Ob{sub 15} group was similar to the C{sub 15} group regarding the expression of myocardial collagen type I; however, expression in the Ob{sub 30} group was less than C{sub 30} group. The time of exposure to obesity was associated with a reduction in collagen type I in Ob{sub 30} when compared with Ob{sub 15}. Obesity did not affect collagen type III expression. This study showed that the time of exposure to obesity for 30 weeks induced by unsaturated high-fat diet caused a reduction in myocardial collagen type I expression in the obese rats. However, no effect was seen on myocardial collagen type III expression.

  18. Diversity of mecA and ccrB in SCCmec type III of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit;

    in mecA and ccrB were used as markers to study evolution and possible transfer of SCCmec III across distinct staphylococcal species. Materials and Methods: A collection of genetically and epidemiologically diverse animal and human S. aureus (n=5), S. fleurettii (n=5), S. capitis (n=4), S......: The occurrence in distinct staphylococcal species of SCCmec type III that are undistinguishable on the basis of ccrB and mecA sequencing suggests that this large genetic element has been transferred horizontally between distantly related species within the genus. Ongoing studies on sequence diversity...

  19. A bacterial type III secretion assay for delivery of fungal effector proteins into wheat.

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mago, Rohit; Staskawicz, Brian J; Ayliffe, Michael A; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-03-01

    Large numbers of candidate effectors from fungal pathogens are being identified through whole-genome sequencing and in planta expression studies. Although Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression has enabled high-throughput functional analysis of effectors in dicot plants, this assay is not effective in cereal leaves. Here, we show that a nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens engineered to express the type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. syringae and the wheat pathogen Xanthomonas translucens can deliver fusion proteins containing T3SS signals from P. syringae (AvrRpm1) and X. campestris (AvrBs2) avirulence (Avr) proteins, respectively, into wheat leaf cells. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter protein was delivered effectively into wheat and barley by both bacteria. Absence of any disease symptoms with P. fluorescens makes it more suitable than X. translucens for detecting a hypersensitive response (HR) induced by an effector protein with avirulence activity. We further modified the delivery system by removal of the myristoylation site from the AvrRpm1 fusion to prevent its localization to the plasma membrane which could inhibit recognition of an Avr protein. Delivery of the flax rust AvrM protein by the modified delivery system into transgenic tobacco leaves expressing the corresponding M resistance protein induced a strong HR, indicating that the system is capable of delivering a functional rust Avr protein. In a preliminary screen of effectors from the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, we identified one effector that induced a host genotype-specific HR in wheat. Thus, the modified AvrRpm1:effector-Pseudomonas fluorescens system is an effective tool for large-scale screening of pathogen effectors for recognition in wheat. PMID:24156769

  20. The Type III Secretion System-Related CPn0809 from Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Astrid C Engel

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS, which enables the pathogen to deliver, in a single step, effector proteins for modulation of host-cell functions into the human host cell cytosol to establish a unique intracellular niche for replication. The translocon proteins located at the top of the T3SS needle filament are essential for its function, as they form pores in the host-cell membrane. Interestingly, unlike other Gram-negative bacteria, C. pneumoniae has two putative translocon operons, named LcrH_1 and LcrH_2. However, little is known about chlamydial translocon proteins. In this study, we analyzed CPn0809, one of the putative hydrophobic translocators encoded by the LcrH_1 operon, and identified an 'SseC-like family' domain characteristic of T3S translocators. Using bright-field and confocal microscopy, we found that CPn0809 is associated with EBs during early and very late phases of a C. pneumoniae infection. Furthermore, CPn0809 forms oligomers, and interacts with the T3SS chaperone LcrH_1, via its N-terminal segment. Moreover, expression of full-length CPn0809 in the heterologous host Escherichia coli causes a grave cytotoxic effect that leads to cell death. Taken together, our data indicate that CPn0809 likely represents one of the translocon proteins of the C. pneumoniae T3SS, and possibly plays a role in the translocation of effector proteins in the early stages of infection.

  1. Tracking the cognitive, social and neuroanatomical profile in early neurodegeneration: Type III Cockayne syndrome

    Sandra Baez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is an autosomal recessive disease associated with premature aging, progressive multiorgan degeneration and nervous system abnormalities including cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, brain calcifications and white matter abnormalities. Although several clinical descriptions of CS patients have reported developmental delay and cognitive impairment with relative preservation of social skills, no previous studies have carried out a comprehensive neuropsychological and social cognition assessment. Furthermore, no previous research in individuals with CS has examined the relationship between brain atrophy and performance on neuropsychological and social cognition tests. This study describes the case of an atypical late-onset type III CS patient who exceeds the mean life expectancy of individuals with this pathology. The patient and a group of healthy controls underwent a comprehensive assessment that included multiple neuropsychological and social cognition (emotion recognition, theory of mind and empathy tasks. In addition, we compared the pattern of atrophy in the patient to controls and to its concordance with ERCC8 gene expression in a healthy brain. The results showed memory, language and executive deficits that contrast with the relative preservation of social cognition skills. The cognitive profile of the patient was consistent with his pattern of global cerebral and cerebellar loss of gray matter volume (frontal structures, bilateral cerebellum, basal ganglia, temporal lobe, and occipito-temporal/occipito-parietal regions, which in turn was anatomically consistent with the ERCC8 gene expression level in a healthy donor’s brain. The study of exceptional cases, such as the one described here, is fundamental to elucidating the processes that affect the brain in premature aging diseases, and such studies provide an important source of information for understanding the problems associated with normal and pathological aging.

  2. Multiple Xanthomonas euvesicatoria Type III Effectors Inhibit flg22-Triggered Immunity.

    Popov, Georgy; Fraiture, Malou; Brunner, Frederic; Sessa, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Xanthomonas euvesicatoria is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease in pepper and tomato. X. euvesicatoria bacteria interfere with plant cellular processes by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion (T3S) system. About 35 T3S effectors have been identified in X. euvesicatoria 85-10, and a few of them were implicated in suppression of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). We used an Arabidopsis thaliana pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify X. euvesicatoria 85-10 effectors that interfere with PTI signaling induced by the bacterial peptide flg22. Of 33 tested effectors, 17 inhibited activation of a PTI-inducible promoter. Among them, nine effectors also interfered with activation of an abscisic acid-inducible promoter. However, effectors that inhibited flg22-induced signaling did not affect phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases acting downstream of flg22 perception. Further investigation of selected effectors revealed that XopAJ, XopE2, and XopF2 inhibited activation of a PTI-inducible promoter by the bacterial peptide elf18 in Arabidopsis protoplasts and by flg22 in tomato protoplasts. The effectors XopF2, XopE2, XopAP, XopAE, XopH, and XopAJ inhibited flg22-induced callose deposition in planta and enhanced disease symptoms caused by attenuated Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Finally, selected effectors were found to localize to various plant subcellular compartments. These results indicate that X. euvesicatoria bacteria utilize multiple T3S effectors to suppress flg22-induced signaling acting downstream or in parallel to MAP kinase cascades and suggest they act through different molecular mechanisms. PMID:27529660

  3. [Serum determination of N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen as a marker of fibrotic activity].

    García Montes, J M; De Bonilla Blánez, F; Herrerías Gutiérrez, J M

    1989-03-01

    Among the noninvasive methods proposed for the study of collagen metabolism as an of fibrosis and inflammation, the most widely accepted method is quantitation in serum of the N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen (P-III-Ps). We measured this variable in 87 subjects classified into five study groups: 19 controls (C), 18 alcoholics (E), 15 patients diagnosed as liver cirrhosis (CH), 11 chronic liver disease (HC) and 24 pregnant women (EMB). In our environment, the serum level of P-III-P in the healthy population was 9.12-12.8 ng/ml. In 27.77% of the alcoholics studied (5 cases) the mean value exceeded this level, 19.35 +/- 3.05 ng/ml. Forty percent of the cirrhotics (6 cases) presented the highest values, 26.54 +/- 11.45 ng/ml, while 83.33% of the patients with chronic active hepatitis presented a mean value of 18.53 +/- 3.8 ng/ml. Of the 24 pregnant women, 95.83% (23 cases) had higher than normal values, and concentrations roses in the last trimester of gestation with respect to the previous trimesters. Analysis of the correlations of all the biochemical parameters of liver function with P-III-Ps disclosed a relationship between P-III-Ps and alkaline phosphatase in the groups of cirrhotics and chronic persistent hepatitis (p less than 0.05). We conclude that the N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen is a useful marker of active fibrosis. PMID:2734469

  4. Spectrum of AGL mutations in Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type III: identification of 31 novel mutations.

    Lu, Chaoxia; Qiu, Zhengqing; Sun, Miao; Wang, Wei; Wei, Min; Zhang, Xue

    2016-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III), a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by hepatomegaly, fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, is caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (AGL). Direct sequencing of human AGL cDNA and genomic DNA has enabled analysis of the underlying genetic defects responsible for GSD III. To date, the frequent mutations in different areas and populations have been described in Italy, Japan, Faroe Islands and Mediterranean area, whereas little has been performed in Chinese population. Here we report a sequencing-based mutation analysis in 43 Chinese patients with GSD III from 41 families. We identified 51 different mutations, including 15 splice-site (29.4%), 11 small deletions (21.6%), 12 nonsense (23.5%), 7 missense (13.7%), 5 duplication (9.8%) and 1 complex deletion/insertion (2.0%), 31 of which are novel mutations. The most common mutation is c.1735+1G>T (11.5%). The association of AGL missense and small in-frame deletion mutations with normal creatine kinase level was observed. Our study extends the spectrum of AGL mutations and suggests a genotype-phenotype correlation in GSD III. PMID:26984562

  5. Kinetics of allopregnanolone formation catalyzed by human 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type III (AKR1C2).

    Trauger, John W; Jiang, Alice; Stearns, Brian A; LoGrasso, Philip V

    2002-11-12

    Allopregnanolone is a neurosteroid which exhibits anxiolytic and anticonvulsant activities through potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor. The reduction of 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone (5alpha-DHP), the last step in allopregnanolone biosynthesis, is catalyzed by 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3alpha-HSDs). While the mechanism of action of allopregnanolone and the physiological and pharmacological modulation of allopregnanolone concentrations in vivo have been extensively studied, there has been little characterization of the kinetics of human 3alpha-HSD catalyzed allopregnanolone formation. We report here determination of the kinetic mechanism for 5alpha-DHP reduction catalyzed by human 3alpha-HSD type III by using steady-state kinetics studies and assessment of the ability of fluoxetine and various other small molecules to activate 3alpha-HSD type III catalyzed allopregnanolone formation. Enzyme-catalyzed 5alpha-DHP reduction yielded two products, allopregnanolone and 5alpha,20alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone, as measured by using a radiometric thin-layer chromatography assay, while 5beta-DHP reduction yielded the neurosteroid pregnanolone as the only product. 5Beta-DHP reduction proceeded with a catalytic efficiency 10 times higher than that of 5alpha-DHP reduction. Two-substrate kinetic analysis and dead-end inhibition studies for 5alpha-DHP reduction and allopregnanolone oxidation indicated that 3alpha-HSD type III utilized a ternary complex (sequential) kinetic mechanism, with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor binding before steroid substrate and leaving after steroid product. Since previous reports suggested that fluoxetine and certain other small molecules increased allopregnanolone concentrations in vivo by activating 3alpha-HSD type III, we investigated whether these small molecules were able to activate human 3alpha-HSD type III. Our results showed that, at concentrations up to 50 microM, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, norfluoxetine

  6. Bioinformatics-enabled identification of the HrpL regulon and type III secretion system effector proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A

    The ability of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola to cause halo blight of bean is dependent on its ability to translocate effector proteins into host cells via the Hrp type III secretion system (T3SS). To identity genes encoding type III effectors and other potential virulence factors that are r...

  7. Ice nucleation in emulsified aqueous solutions of antifreeze protein type III and poly(vinyl alcohol).

    Inada, Takaaki; Koyama, Toshie; Goto, Fumitoshi; Seto, Takafumi

    2011-06-23

    Antifreeze protein (AFP) III and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) are known as anti-ice nucleating agents (anti-INAs), which inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation. However, the effectiveness of these anti-INAs in inhibiting ice nucleation in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions, in which homogeneous ice nucleation can be experimentally simulated, is unclear. In this study, the ice nucleation temperature in emulsified solutions of AFP III, PVA, and other nonanti-INA polymers was measured, and then the nucleation rate was analyzed based on classical nucleation theory. Results showed that ice nucleation was surface-initiated and, except for PVA solutions, probably caused heterogeneously by the emulsifier, SPAN 65, at the droplet surfaces. In this nucleation mode, AFP III had no significant effect on the ice nucleation rate. In contrast, PVA exhibited ice-nucleating activity only at the droplet surfaces, suggesting that the nucleation is due to the interaction between PVA and SPAN 65. PMID:21619040

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an acridone-producing novel multifunctional type III polyketide synthase from Huperzia serrata

    An acridone-producing novel type III polyketide synthase from H. serrata has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.0 Å. Polyketide synthase 1 (PKS1) from Huperzia serrata is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase that shows an unusually versatile catalytic potential, producing various aromatic tetraketides, including chalcones, benzophenones, phlorogulucinols and acridones. Recombinant H. serrata PKS1 expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.3, b = 85.0, c = 137.7 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8

  9. T346Hunter: a novel web-based tool for the prediction of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems in bacterial genomes.

    Pedro Manuel Martínez-García

    Full Text Available T346Hunter (Type Three, Four and Six secretion system Hunter is a web-based tool for the identification and localisation of type III, type IV and type VI secretion systems (T3SS, T4SS and T6SS, respectively clusters in bacterial genomes. Non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS and T6SS are complex molecular machines that deliver effector proteins from bacterial cells into the environment or into other eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells, with significant implications for pathogenesis of the strains encoding them. Meanwhile, T4SS is a more functionally diverse system, which is involved in not only effector translocation but also conjugation and DNA uptake/release. Development of control strategies against bacterial-mediated diseases requires genomic identification of the virulence arsenal of pathogenic bacteria, with T3SS, T4SS and T6SS being major determinants in this regard. Therefore, computational methods for systematic identification of these specialised machines are of particular interest. With the aim of facilitating this task, T346Hunter provides a user-friendly web-based tool for the prediction of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS clusters in newly sequenced bacterial genomes. After inspection of the available scientific literature, we constructed a database of hidden Markov model (HMM protein profiles and sequences representing the various components of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS. T346Hunter performs searches of such a database against user-supplied bacterial sequences and localises enriched regions in any of these three types of secretion systems. Moreover, through the T346Hunter server, users can visualise the predicted clusters obtained for approximately 1700 bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. T346Hunter offers great help to researchers in advancing their understanding of the biological mechanisms in which these sophisticated molecular machines are involved. T346Hunter is freely available at http://bacterial-virulence-factors.cbgp.upm.es/T346Hunter.

  10. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins.

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L; Mackey, David

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B' regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B' subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B' subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B' subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B' subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  11. Inheritance of Pantoea type III secretion systems through both vertical and horizontal transfer.

    Kirzinger, Morgan W B; Butz, Cory J; Stavrinides, John

    2015-12-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is an extracellular apparatus used by many Gram-negative bacteria to deliver effector proteins directly into plant and animal cells, thereby facilitating host-specific association. Strains of the enterobacterial genus, Pantoea, have been isolated from a wide variety of hosts, including plants, insects, and humans, yet it is unclear whether the T3SS may be involved in these associations. In this study, we use comparative genomics and phylogenetic methods to examine the origin and distribution of T3SSs in 35 sequenced environmental and clinical strains of Pantoea. We began our analysis by examining the distribution of the previously characterized plant cell-specific PSI-1 and animal cell-specific PSI-2 of the plant pathogenic Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii DC283 (PstDC283), and showed that both had a somewhat limited distribution. Our analysis, however, identified two variants of a unique plant cell-specific T3SS (PSI-1a and PSI-1b) in six Pantoea strains, including a clinical isolate. Our genome analysis of PstDC283 also identified a third T3SS that we named PSI-3, which has a similar genetic content and organization to the Salmonella, animal cell-specific SPI-2 system. Phylogenetic analysis of all three systems suggests that the PSI-1 system has been inherited vertically, whereas the newly identified PSI-1a and PSI-1b systems have been acquired independently from other genera within the Enterobacteriaceae. PSI-2 appears to have been acquired horizontally as far back as the Erwinia/Pantoea common ancestor, with evidence of more recent horizontal acquisition of the PSI-3 system. Our results suggest that Pantoea is a relatively old plant pathogen that has lost and subsequently regained different plant-associated T3SSs. This work has broad implications for understanding the host-associating capacity of Pantoea strains, and reveals the propensity for Pantoea isolates to exchange pathogenicity determinants with human

  12. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins.

    Lin Jin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B' regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000, associates with specific PP2A B' subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B' subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B' subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B' subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family.

  13. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Barta, Michael L.; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2010-10-05

    Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg) C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. In this study, we present the 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155) of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC{sup 1-151}). Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric 'head-to-head' dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC{sup 1-151}. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions: From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II chaperones may

  14. Ethylene polymerization by PN3-type pincer chromium(III) complexes

    Gong, Dirong

    2014-12-01

    Chromium (III) complexes, Cr1, [2,6-(tBu2PNH) 2C5H4N]CrCl3; Cr2, [2,6-(Ph 2PNH)2C5H4N]CrCl3; Cr3, [2-(tBu2PNH)C5H4N]CrCl3 THF; Cr4, [6-(tBu2PNH)C5H4N-2- CH2NEt2]CrCl3; Cr5, [6-(tBu 2PNH)C5H4N-2-C3H2N 2]CrCl3; Cr6, [6-(tBu2PNH)C 5H4N-2-(3,5-Me2)C3H 2N2]CrCl3; Cr7, [6-(tBu 2PNH)C5H4N-2-(3,5-iPr 2)C3H2N2]CrCl3; Cr8, [6-(tBu2PNH)C5H4N-2-(3,5-Ph 2)C3H2N2]CrCl3, bearing a family of neutral PN3-type pincer ligands have been prepared. The molecular structure of Cr2 was further elucidated by the X-ray crystallographic analysis, showing an octahedral geometry. Treatment of these complexes with MAO or alkylaluminum led to catalysts with moderate activities (about 105 g (PE)/Cr(mol) h) for ethylene polymerization, affording exclusively linear low molecular weight solid PE without any detectable oligomers. Among Cr1-Cr8, the highest activity was achieved for Cr1/MAO at room temperature with production of PE with highest molecular weight, indicating that replacement of both tBu groups in Cr1 with Ph groups, or one PtBu2 with the N (imine) arm, resulted in a lower catalytic activity and lower M w. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L.; Mackey, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B’ regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B’ subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B’ subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B’ subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B’ subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  16. Evidence for alternative quaternary structure in a bacterial Type III secretion system chaperone

    Picking Wendy L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type III secretion systems are a common virulence mechanism in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. These systems use a nanomachine resembling a molecular needle and syringe to provide an energized conduit for the translocation of effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm for the benefit of the pathogen. Prior to translocation specialized chaperones maintain proper effector protein conformation. The class II chaperone, Invasion plasmid gene (Ipg C, stabilizes two pore forming translocator proteins. IpgC exists as a functional dimer to facilitate the mutually exclusive binding of both translocators. Results In this study, we present the 3.3 Å crystal structure of an amino-terminally truncated form (residues 10-155, denoted IpgC10-155 of the class II chaperone IpgC from Shigella flexneri. Our structure demonstrates an alternative quaternary arrangement to that previously described for a carboxy-terminally truncated variant of IpgC (IpgC1-151. Specifically, we observe a rotationally-symmetric "head-to- head" dimerization interface that is far more similar to that previously described for SycD from Yersinia enterocolitica than to IpgC1-151. The IpgC structure presented here displays major differences in the amino terminal region, where extended coil-like structures are seen, as opposed to the short, ordered alpha helices and asymmetric dimerization interface seen within IpgC1-151. Despite these differences, however, both modes of dimerization support chaperone activity, as judged by a copurification assay with a recombinant form of the translocator protein, IpaB. Conclusions From primary to quaternary structure, these results presented here suggest that a symmetric dimerization interface is conserved across bacterial class II chaperones. In light of previous data which have described the structure and function of asymmetric dimerization, our results raise the possibility that class II

  17. Open reading frame 2 of porcine circovirus type 2 encodes a major capsid protein.

    Nawagitgul, P; Morozov, I; Bolin, S R; Harms, P A; Sorden, S D; Paul, P S

    2000-09-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), a single-stranded DNA virus associated with post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome of swine, has two potential open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, greater than 600 nucleotides in length. ORF1 is predicted to encode a replication-associated protein (Rep) essential for replication of viral DNA, while ORF2 contains a conserved basic amino acid sequence at the N terminus resembling that of the major structural protein of chicken anaemia virus. Thus far, the structural protein(s) of PCV2 have not been identified. In this study, a viral structural protein of 30 kDa was identified in purified PCV2 particles. ORF2 of PCV2 was cloned into a baculovirus expression vector and the gene product was expressed in insect cells. The expressed ORF2 gene product had a molecular mass of 30 kDa, similar to that detected in purified virus particles. The recombinant ORF2 protein self-assembled to form capsid-like particles when viewed by electron microscopy. Antibodies against the ORF2 protein were detected in samples of sera obtained from pigs as early as 3 weeks after experimental infection with PCV2. These results show that the major structural protein of PCV2 is encoded by ORF2 and has a molecular mass of 30 kDa. PMID:10950986

  18. The Bacterium Pantoea stewartii Uses Two Different Type III Secretion Systems To Colonize Its Plant Host and Insect Vector

    Correa, Valdir R.; Majerczak, Doris R.; Ammar, El-Desouky; Merighi, Massimo; Pratt, Richard C.; Saskia A Hogenhout; Coplin, David L.; Redinbaugh, Margaret G.

    2012-01-01

    Plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (herein referred to as P. stewartii), the causative agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize, carries phylogenetically distinct T3SSs. In addition to an Hrc-Hrp T3SS, known to be essential for maize pathogenesis, P. stewartii has a secon...

  19. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 310-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins

  20. Use of amino terminal type III procollagen peptide (P3NP) assay in methotrexate therapy for psoriasis

    Khan, S; Subedi, D; Chowdhury, M M U

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis continues to be a risk in patients receiving methotrexate for psoriasis. Measurement of amino terminal levels of type III procollagen (P3NP) has been advocated as an effective non‐invasive test for ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis that could avoid liver biopsies. An audit was conducted to assess the practice of P3NP monitoring using guidelines produced by Manchester and whether the agreed levels correlate with histological severity. Sixty five patients with 174 P3NP assays and 30...

  1. Functional Interaction between Type III-Secreted Protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and Human G3BP1

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector protei...

  2. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-9-mediated type III collagen degradation as a novel serological biochemical marker for liver fibrogenesis

    Veidal, Sanne S; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Barascuk, Natasha;

    2010-01-01

    During fibrogenesis in the liver, in which excessive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs, both the quantity of type III collagen (CO3) and levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP-9, increase significantly. MMPs play major roles in ECM remodelling, via their...... activity in the proteolytic degradation of extracellular macromolecules such as collagens, resulting in the generation of specific cleavage fragments. These neo-epitopes may be used as markers of fibrosis....

  4. Determination of the Stoichiometry of the Complete Bacterial Type III Secretion Needle Complex Using a Combined Quantitative Proteomic Approach.

    Zilkenat, Susann; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Galán, Jorge E; Macek, Boris; Wagner, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Precisely knowing the stoichiometry of their components is critical for investigating structure, assembly, and function of macromolecular machines. This has remained a technical challenge in particular for large, hydrophobic membrane-spanning protein complexes. Here, we determined the stoichiometry of a type III secretion system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using two complementary protocols of gentle complex purification combined with peptide concatenated standard and synthetic stable isotope-labeled peptide-based mass spectrometry. Bacterial type III secretion systems are cell envelope-spanning effector protein-delivery machines essential for colonization and survival of many Gram-negative pathogens and symbionts. The membrane-embedded core unit of these secretion systems, termed the needle complex, is composed of a base that anchors the machinery to the inner and outer membranes, a hollow filament formed by inner rod and needle subunits that serves as conduit for substrate proteins, and a membrane-embedded export apparatus facilitating substrate translocation. Structural analyses have revealed the stoichiometry of the components of the base, but the stoichiometry of the essential hydrophobic export apparatus components and of the inner rod protein remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the export apparatus of type III secretion systems contains five SpaP, one SpaQ, one SpaR, and one SpaS. We confirmed that the previously suggested stoichiometry of nine InvA is valid for assembled needle complexes and describe a loose association of InvA with other needle complex components that may reflect its function. Furthermore, we present evidence that not more than six PrgJ form the inner rod of the needle complex. Providing this structural information will facilitate efforts to obtain an atomic view of type III secretion systems and foster our understanding of the function of these and related flagellar machines. Given that other virulence

  5. Diagnosing physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites from observations of solar microwave type III bursts

    Tan, Bao-Lin; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Huang, Guang-Li

    2016-05-01

    In the physics of solar flares, it is crucial to diagnose the physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites. However, so far it is unclear how to diagnose these physical conditions. A solar microwave type III burst is believed to be a sensitive signature of primary energy release and electron accelerations in solar flares. This work takes into account the effect of the magnetic field on the plasma density and develops a set of formulas which can be used to estimate the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field near the magnetic reconnection site and particle acceleration region, and the velocity and energy of electron beams. We apply these formulas to three groups of microwave type III pairs in an X-class flare, and obtained some reasonable and interesting results. This method can be applied to other microwave type III bursts to diagnose the physical conditions of source regions, and provide some basic information to understand the intrinsic nature and fundamental processes occurring near the flare energy-release sites.

  6. Structural basis for the endoribonuclease activity of the type III-A CRISPR-associated protein Csm6

    Niewoehner, Ole; Jinek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR–Cas systems provide an RNA-guided mechanism for genome defense against mobile genetic elements such as viruses and plasmids. In type III-A CRISPR–Cas systems, the RNA-guided multisubunit Csm effector complex targets both single-stranded RNAs and double-stranded DNAs. In addition to the Csm complex, efficient anti-plasmid immunity mediated by type III-A systems also requires the CRISPR-associated protein Csm6. Here we report the crystal structure of Csm6 from Thermus thermophilus and show that the protein is a ssRNA-specific endoribonuclease. The structure reveals a dimeric architecture generated by interactions involving the N-terminal CARF and C-terminal HEPN domains. HEPN domain dimerization leads to the formation of a composite ribonuclease active site. Consistently, mutations of invariant active site residues impair catalytic activity in vitro. We further show that the ribonuclease activity of Csm6 is conserved across orthologs, suggesting that it plays an important functional role in CRISPR–Cas systems. The dimer interface of the CARF domains features a conserved electropositive pocket that may function as a ligand-binding site for allosteric control of ribonuclease activity. Altogether, our work suggests that Csm6 proteins provide an auxiliary RNA-targeting interference mechanism in type III-A CRISPR–Cas systems that operates in conjunction with the RNA- and DNA-targeting endonuclease activities of the Csm effector complex. PMID:26763118

  7. Diagnosing the Source Region of a Solar Burst on 26 September 2011 by Microwave Type III Pairs

    Tan, Baolin; Meszarosova, Hana; Kashapova, Larisa; Huang, Jing; Yan, Yan; Kontar, Eduard P

    2016-01-01

    This work reports a peculiar and interesting train of microwave type III pair bursts in the impulsive rising phase of a solar flare on 2011 September 26. The observations include radio spectrometers at frequency of 0.80 - 2.00 GHz, hard X-ray (RHESSI and FERMI), EUV images of SWAP/PROBA-2 and magnetogram of HMI/SDO. By using a recently developed method (Tan et al. 2016a), we diagnosed the plasma density, temperature, plasma beta, magnetic field near the source region, the energy of energetic electrons and the distance between the acceleration region and the emission start sites of type III bursts. From the diagnostics, we find that: (1) The plasma density, temperature, magnetic field, and the distance between the acceleration region and the emission start sites almost have no obvious variations during the period of type III pair trains, while the energy of electrons has an obvious peak value which is consistent to the hard X-ray emission. (2) The plasma beta is much higher than an unity showing a highly dynam...

  8. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  9. Small molecule inhibitors of the Yersinia type III secretion system impair the development of Chlamydia after entry into host cells

    Henriques-Normark Birgitta

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that possess a type III secretion system to deliver proteins into the host cell during infection. Small molecule inhibitors of type III secretion in Yersinia, termed INPs (Innate Pharmaceuticals AB were reported to strongly inhibit Chlamydia growth in epithelial cells. In this study we have analyzed the effect of these drugs on bacterial invasiveness. Results We demonstrate that INPs affect Chlamydia growth in a dose dependent manner after bacterial invasion. The efficiency of C. trachomatis L2 and C. caviae GPIC entry into host cells was not altered in the presence of INPs. In C. caviae, entry appears to proceed normally with recruitment of actin and the small GTPases Rac, Cdc42 and Arf6 to the site of bacterial entry. Conclusion INPs have a strong inhibitory effect on Chlamydia growth. However, bacterial invasion is not altered in the presence of these drugs. In the light of these results, we discuss several hypotheses regarding the mode of action of INPs on type III secretion during the Chlamydia infectious cycle.

  10. Automatic recognition of type III solar radio bursts. Automated radio burst identification system method and first observations

    Complete text of publication follows. Because of the rapidly increasing role of technology, including complicated electronic systems, spacecraft, etc., modern society has become more vulnerable to a set of extraterrestrial influences (space weather) and requires continuous observation and forecasts of space weather. The major space weather events like solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompanied by solar radio bursts, which can be used for a real-time space weather forecast. Coronal type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency and near its harmonic by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration of the coronal burst being about 1-3 s. This paper presents a new method developed to detect coronal type III bursts automatically and its implementation in a new Automated Radio Burst Identification System (ARBIS), which is working in real-time. The central idea of the implementation is to use the Radon transform for more objective detection of the bursts as approximately straight lines in dynamic spectra. Preliminary tests of the method with the use of the spectra obtained during 13 days show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ∼84%, while no false positives are observed and 23 events not listed previously are found. The first automatically detected coronal type III radio bursts are presented.

  11. Diagnose Physical Conditions Near the Flare Energy-release Sites from Observations of Solar Microwave Type III Bursts

    Tan, Baolin; Meszarosova, Hana; Huang, Guangli

    2015-01-01

    In the physics of solar flares, it is crucial to diagnose the physical conditions near the flare energy-release sites. However, so far it is unclear how do diagnose these physical conditions. Solar microwave type III burst is believed to be a sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in solar flares. This work takes into account the effect of magnetic field on the plasma density and developed s set of formulas which can be used to estimate the plasma density, temperature, magnetic field near the magnetic reconnection site and particle acceleration region, and the velocity and energy of electron beams. We applied these formulas to three groups of microwave type III pairs in a X-class flare, and obtained some reasonable and interesting results. This method can be applied to other microwave type III bursts to diagnose the physical conditions of source regions, and provide some basic information to understand the intrinsic nature and fundamental processes occurring near the flar...

  12. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Shigeto Yoshida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50 of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions.

  13. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Shimada, Yohei; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Ghosh, Anil K; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Sinden, Robert E

    2007-12-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50) of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions. PMID:18159942

  14. Progressive non-infectious anterior vertebral fusion in a baby with Saethre-Chotzen-acrocephalosyndactyly type III syndrome

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 3-months old baby of Austrian origin and product of non-consanguineous parents. Abnormal craniofacial contour was the main deformity. The overall clinico-radiographic features were consistent with Saether-Chotzen-acrocephalosyndactyly type III syndrome. Bi-directional sequencing of the exon 8 and of the FGFR3-genes, exons 7 of FGFR3 (Fibroblast growth factor receptor3 genes, the exon 5 of the FGFR1 gene, revealed no mutations. Sagittal MRI imaging of the spine showed anterior vertebral fusion along the thoraco-lumbar vertebrae compatible with the non-infectious type.

  15. Type 2 AGNs with Double-Peaked [O III] Lines: Narrow Line Region Kinematics or Merging Supermassive Black Hole Pairs?

    Liu, Xin; Strauss, Michael A; Greene, Jenny E

    2009-01-01

    We present a sample of 167 type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III]4959,5007 narrow emission lines, selected from the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The double-peaked profiles can be well modeled by two velocity components, blueshifted and redshifted from the systemic velocity. Half of these objects have a more prominent redshifted component. In cases where the H-beta emission line is strong, it also shows two velocity components whose line-of-sight (LOS) velocity offsets are consistent with those of [O III]. The relative LOS velocity offset between the two components is typically a few hundred km/s, larger by a factor of ~1.5 than the line full width at half maximum of each component. The offset correlates with the host stellar velocity dispersion sigma. The host galaxies of this sample show systematically larger sigmas, stellar masses, and concentrations, and older luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages than a regular type 2 AGN sample matched in redshift, [O III]5007 equivalent width an...

  16. Possible radio precursors/signatures of the CMEs onset: radio type III bursts and fine structures in the centimeter-metric wavelength region

    Seventy-one occurrences of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with radio bursts, seemingly associated with type III bursts/fine structures (FSs), in the centimeter-metric frequency range during 2003-2005, were obtained with the spectrometers at the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and the Culgoora radio spectrometer and are presented. The statistical results of 68 out of 71 events associated with the radio type III bursts or FSs during the initiation or early stages of the CMEs indicate that most CMEs contain the emissions of radio type III bursts/FSs near the time of the CME's onset, in spite of their fast or slow speeds. Therefore, we propose that type III bursts and FSs are possible precursors of the onset of CMEs. We stress that the radio type III bursts/FSs in the centimeter-metric wavelength region and the CME transients possibly occurred in conjunction with the origin of the coronal precursor structures. Thus, the statistical results support the suggestions that type III bursts/FSs are indicators of extra energy input into the corona at the CMEs' onset, and that the type III bursts/FSs are produced primarily due to a coronal instability which eventually triggers the CME process. This may signify that the centimeter-metric radio bursts corresponding to or near the CME's onset are caused by the disturbed corona (possibly including minor magnetic reconnections).

  17. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  18. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding.

    Avery, Adam W; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D; Hays, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  19. Lack of the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in colorectal cancer

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Olsen, Dorte Aalund; Nielsen, Jens Nederby;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) analysis by traditional immunohistochemistry does not provide clinicians with a reliable tool for the selection of patients to EGFR-targeted treatment in colorectal cancer (CRC). Alternative methods and further understanding of the EGFR signaling...... therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of EGFRvIII in CRC by PCR and protein analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 79 colorectal cancer patients for PCR analysis and 50 patients for protein analysis by Western blots, in two different laboratories. RESULTS...

  20. Biosynthesis of Dictyostelium discoideum differentiation-inducing factor by a hybrid type I fatty acid–type III polyketide synthase

    Austin, Michael B; Saito, Tamao; Bowman, Marianne E.; Haydock, Stephen; Kato, Atsushi; Moore, Bradley S.; Kay, Robert R.; Noel, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are well known to modulate formation of distinct communal cell types from identical Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas, but DIF biosynthesis remains obscure. We report complimentary in vivo and in vitro experiments identifying one of two ~3,000-residue D. discoideum proteins, termed ‘steely’, as responsible for biosynthesis of the DIF acylphloroglucinol scaffold. Steely proteins possess six catalytic domains homologous to metazoan type I fatty acid syntha...

  1. [Medium-term outcome, follow-up, and quality of life in children treated for type III esophageal atresia].

    Lepeytre, C; De Lagausie, P; Merrot, T; Baumstarck, K; Oudyi, M; Dubus, J-C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the medium-term outcome (health status, medical and surgical French National Health Authority-recommended follow-up, and quality of life) of children born with type III esophageal atresia (EA). Previous events (during the perinatal period, associated abnormalities, respiratory and digestive complications) of children treated for type III EA at the Marseille university hospitals between 1999 and 2009 were noted. Parents completed a standardized questionnaire concerning the health of their children during the previous year, and a quality-of-life questionnaire (PedsQL 4.0) was also completed by children aged more than 8 years. Among the 68 children treated, 44 responded to our solicitation (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 3-12.8 years). Previous important events were : pneumonia(s) (65%), asthma before the age of 3 years (66%), hospitalization for a respiratory event (45%), fundoplication (20%), and esophageal dilatation (45%). We noted current chronic cough (16%), asthma (30%), dysphagia (39%), and symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (9%). National guidelines were not respected, except for the surgical indications in children aged less than 6 years. The quality-of-life scores (n=43 children) were similar to healthy controls but were negatively influenced by a gastrostomy procedure (P=0.020), pneumonia (P=0.013), and hospitalization due to a respiratory event (P=0.006) or a digestive event (P=0.010), and also by current asthma (P=0.004). In conclusion, despite recurrent respiratory or digestive symptoms and inadequate recommended follow-up, the quality of life of children treated for type III of EA is good. PMID:23932659

  2. Crystal structures of type III{sub H} NAD-dependent D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase from two thermophiles

    Kumar, S.M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Pampa, K.J. [Department of Studies in Microbiology, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Manjula, M. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Hemantha Kumar, G. [Department of Studies in Computer Science, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India); Kunishima, Naoki [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Lokanath, N.K., E-mail: lokanath@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Determined the crystal structures of PGDH from two thermophiles. • Monomer is composed of nucleotide binding domain and substrate binding domain. • Crystal structures of type III{sub H} PGDH. - Abstract: In the L-Serine biosynthesis, D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH) catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-3-phosphoglycerate to phosphohydroxypyruvate. PGDH belongs to 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases family. We have determined the crystal structures of PGDH from Sulfolobus tokodaii (StPGDH) and Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhPGDH) using X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.77 Å and 1.95 Å, respectively. The PGDH protomer from both species exhibits identical structures, consisting of substrate binding domain and nucleotide binding domain. The residues and water molecules interacting with the NAD are identified. The catalytic triad residues Glu-His-Arg are highly conserved. The residues involved in the dimer interface and the structural features responsible for thermostability are evaluated. Overall, structures of PGDHs with two domains and histidine at the active site are categorized as type III{sub H} and such PGDHs structures having this type are reported for the first time.

  3. History of settlement of villages from Central Tunisia by studying families sharing a common founder Glycogenosis type III mutation.

    Rhouma, Faten Ben; Messai, Habib; Hsouna, Sana; Halim, Nizar Ben; Cherif, Wafa; Fadhel, Sihem Ben; Tiar, Afaf; Nagara, Majdi; Azzouz, Hatem; Sfar, Mohamed-Tahar; Dridi, Marie-Françoise Ben; Tebib, Neji; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kefi, Rym

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III; Cori disease; Forbes disease) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disorder resulting from deficient glycogen debrancher enzyme activity in liver and muscle. In this study, we focused on a single AGL gene mutation p.W1327X in 16 Tunisian patients from rural area surrounding the region of Mahdia in Central Tunisia. This constitutes the largest pool of patients with this mutation ever described. This study was performed to trace the history of the patients' ancestries in a single region. After extraction of genomic DNA, exon 31 of AGL gene was sequenced. The patients were investigated for the hypervariable segment 1 of mitochondrial DNA and 17 Y-STR markers. We found that the p.W1327X mutation was a founder mutation in Tunisia Analysis of maternal lineages shows an admixture of autochthonous North African, sub-Saharan and a predominance of Eurasian haplogroups. Heterogeneity of maternal haplogroups indicates an ancient settlement. However, paternal gene flow was highly homogeneous and originates from the Near East. We hypothesize that the p.W1327X mutation was introduced into the Tunisian population probably by a recent migration event; then the mutation was fixed in a small region due to the high rate of consanguineous marriages and genetic drift. The screening for this mutation should be performed in priority for GSD III molecular diagnosis, for patients from the region of Mahdia and those from regions sharing the same settlement history. PMID:26704523

  4. Deep vein thrombosis, an unreported first manifestation of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III

    M Horsey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old woman with severe right lower leg pain, edema and erythema was presented to the Emergency Department and was found to have an extensive deep vein thrombosis (DVT confirmed by ultrasound. She underwent an extensive evaluation due to her prior history of malignancy and new hypercoagulable state, but no evidence of recurrent disease was detected. Further investigation revealed pernicious anemia (PA, confirmed by the presence of a macrocytic anemia (MCV=115.8fL/red cell, Hgb=9.0g/dL, decreased serum B12 levels (56pg/mL, with resultant increased methylmalonic acid (5303nmol/L and hyperhomocysteinemia (131μmol/L, the presumed etiology of the DVT. The patient also suffered from autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD, and both antithyroglobulin and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were detected. She responded briskly to anticoagulation with heparin and coumadin and treatment of PA with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections. Our case suggests that a DVT secondary to hyperhomocystenemia may represent the first sign of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III-B (PAS III-B, defined as the coexistent autoimmune conditions AITD and PA. It is important to recognize this clinical entity, as patients may not only require acute treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation and prolonged anticoagulation, as in this patient, but may also harbor other autoimmune diseases.

  5. Magnaporthe oryzae MTP1 gene encodes a type III transmembrane protein involved in conidiation and conidial germination*

    Lu, Qin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Min, Hang; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    In this study the MTP1 gene, encoding a type III integral transmembrane protein, was isolated from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The Mtp1 protein is 520 amino acids long and is comparable to the Ytp1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with 46% sequence similarity. Prediction programs and MTP1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion expression results indicate that Mtp1 is a protein located at several membranes in the cytoplasm. The functions of the MTP1 gene in the growth and deve...

  6. Increased urine level of amino-terminal peptide derivatives of type III procollagen in patients with liver diseases.

    Koide, Norio; Ukida,Minoru; Kondo, Hideaki; Jitoku,Michihiro; Ono,Ryosaku; Tanabe,Takayoshi; Nagashima,Hideo

    1986-01-01

    The amino-terminal peptides of type III procollagen (PIIIP) in the urine of 40 patients with various liver diseases were determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay kit. The level of urinary PIIIP (uPIIIP) was correlated well with serum PIIIP (sPIIIP) in 9 patients, the coefficient of correlation being r = 0.836 (p less than 0.01) and the regression line being y = 1.42x + 24. Urinary PIIIP consisted of at least 4 different molecular species with molecular weights of 49 k, 18 k, 10 k and 4.6...

  7. Dynamics of Bianchi type I, III and Kantowski-Sachs solutions in f(R,T) gravity

    Zubair, M.; Ali Hassan, Syed M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we reconstruct a suitable model in f(R,T) gravity, (where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor) which depict the current cosmic picture in more consistent way. The dynamical field equations are solved for generic anisotropic space-time. The solution of field equations helps us to determine the future cosmic evolution for both physical and kinematical quantities. We explore the nature of deceleration parameter, NEC and energy density for three different cases representing Bianchi type I, III and Kantowski-Sachs universe model. We find that this study favors the phantom cosmic evolution in all cases.

  8. Salmonella Type III Secretion-Associated Protein InvE Controls Translocation of Effector Proteins into Host Cells

    Kubori, Tomoko; Galán, Jorge E.

    2002-01-01

    Salmonella enterica encodes a type III secretion system (TTSS) within a pathogenicity island located at centisome 63 (SPI-1), which is essential for its pathogenicity. This system mediates the transfer of a battery of bacterial proteins into the host cell with the capacity to modulate cellular functions. The transfer process is dependent on the function of protein translocases SipB, SipC, and SipD. We report here that Salmonella protein InvE, which is also encoded within SPI-1, is essential f...

  9. Chlamydia pneumoniae CopD Translocator Protein Plays a Critical Role in Type III Secretion (T3S) and Infection

    Bulir, David C.; Waltho, Daniel A.; Stone, Christopher B.; Mwawasi, Kenneth A.; Nelson, Jordan C.; Mahony, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use type III secretion (T3S) to inject effector proteins into the host cell to create appropriate conditions for infection and intracellular replication. Chlamydia spp. are believed to use T3S to infect their host cell, and the translocator proteins are an essential component of this system. Chlamydia pneumoniae contains genes encoding two sets of translocator proteins; CopB and CopD, and CopB2 and CopD2. In this study, we identified novel interactions betwee...

  10. Purification of porcine aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen from lymph and use for lymphatic clearance studies in pigs

    Jensen, L T; Risteli, J; Nielsen, M D; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Olesen, H P; Risteli, L; Lorenzen, I

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the lymphatic transport of the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) we established a thoracic duct-venous shunt in 6 pigs. Porcine PIIINP was purified, characterised, and compared with human PIIINP to ensure the suitability of the radioimmunoassay of human PIIINP...... amount of PIIINP in lymph did not differ during the light and dark periods. Serum PIIINP remained unchanged over the 24 h. The lymphatic clearance of total PIIINP immunoreactive components was 6.2 ml serum/min and the lymphatic clearance of intact PIIINP was 9.1 ml serum/min, equal to 7 and 10 times the...

  11. Effect of some d-transition metal complexes of salen-type ligands and acetylacetone on fluorescence of europium(III) and terbium(III)

    Fluorescence spectra of europium(III) and terbium(III) have been measured in methanolic solutions containing various amounts of [M(salen)] (M=Cu(II), Ni(II)), [Cr(salen)(H2O)2]Cl, [M(saltn)] (M=Cu(II), Ni(II)), [Cu(acacen)], [M(acac)2] (M=Cu(II), VIVO), [M(acac)3] (M=Cr(III), Co(III)), or [Ni(acac)2(H2O)2]. Our purpose was to investigate the influence of these metal complexes on the fluorescence of Eu(III) and Tb(III), where H2salen, H2saltn, H2acacen, and Hacac stand for N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine, N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine, N,N'-bis(1-methyl-3-oxobutylidene)ethylenediamine, and acetylacetone, respectively. The fluorescence intensities of both Eu(III) and Tb(III) decreased with increasing the concentration of [M(salen)] (M=Cu, Ni), [Cr(salen)(H2O)2]Cl, [M(saltn)] (M=Cu, Ni), [Cu(acacen)], and [M(acac)3] (M=Cr, Co), whereas it was little affected by simple metal salts. The intensity of Tb(III) increased up to the addition of a given amount of [M(acac)2] (M=Cu, VO) or [Ni(acac)2(H2O)2] and then decreased on further addition, whereas the intensity of Eu(III) decreased gradually by the addition of these acetylacetonate complexes. These results are explained by the formation of heteronuclear complex species and by the stabilities of acetylacetonate complexes. (author)

  12. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors. [US DOE

    Brynda, W J; Lobner, P R; Powell, R W; Straker, E A

    1978-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems.

  13. Deep vein thrombosis, an unreported first manifestation of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III

    Hogan, P; Oliver, T

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 71-year-old woman with severe right lower leg pain, edema and erythema was presented to the Emergency Department and was found to have an extensive deep vein thrombosis (DVT) confirmed by ultrasound. She underwent an extensive evaluation due to her prior history of malignancy and new hypercoagulable state, but no evidence of recurrent disease was detected. Further investigation revealed pernicious anemia (PA), confirmed by the presence of a macrocytic anemia (MCV=115.8fL/red cell, Hgb=9.0g/dL), decreased serum B12 levels (56pg/mL), with resultant increased methylmalonic acid (5303nmol/L) and hyperhomocysteinemia (131μmol/L), the presumed etiology of the DVT. The patient also suffered from autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), and both antithyroglobulin and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were detected. She responded briskly to anticoagulation with heparin and coumadin and treatment of PA with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections. Our case suggests that a DVT secondary to hyperhomocystenemia may represent the first sign of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III-B (PAS III-B), defined as the coexistent autoimmune conditions AITD and PA. It is important to recognize this clinical entity, as patients may not only require acute treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation and prolonged anticoagulation, as in this patient, but may also harbor other autoimmune diseases. Learning points A DVT can be the first physical manifestation of a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. Hyperhomocysteinemia secondary to pernicious anemia should be considered as an etiology of an unprovoked DVT in a euthyroid patient with autoimmune thyroid disease. Patients with DVT secondary to hyperhomocysteinemia should undergo screening for the presence of co-existent autoimmune diseases in addition to treatment with B12 supplementation and anticoagulation to prevent recurrent thromboembolism. PMID:27482386

  14. Clonal structure of Trypanosoma cruzi Colombian strain (biodeme Type III: biological, isoenzymic and histopathological analysis of seven isolated clones

    Camandaroba Edson Luiz Paes

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The clonal structure of the Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, biodeme Type III and zymodeme 1, was analyzed in order to characterize its populations and to establish its homogeneity or heterogeneity. Seven isolated clones presented the basic characteristics of Biodeme Type III, with the same patterns of parasitemic curves, tissue tropism to skeletal muscle and myocardium, high pathogenicity with extensive necrotic-inflammatory lesions from the 20th to 30th day of infection. The parental strain and its clones C1, C3, C4 and C6, determined the higher levels of parasitemia, 20 to 30 days of infection, with high mortality rate up to 30 days (79 to 100%; clones C2, C5 and C7 presented lower levels of parasitemia, with low mortality rates (7.6 to 23%. Isoenzymic patterns, characteristic of zymodeme 1, (Z1 were similar for the parental strain and its seven clones. Results point to a phenotypic homogeneity of the clones isolated from the Colombian strain and suggest the predominance of a principal clone, responsible for the biological behavior of the parental strain and clones.

  15. Endovascular Repair of a Type III Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Occlusion of Visceral Arteries

    The successful endovascular repair of a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) with the use of a tube endograft is reported. A 56-year-old male with a 6.4-cm type III TAAA, a 4.2-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chronic renal insufficiency presented with flank pain, nausea, acute anuria, and serum creatinine of 6.1 mg/dl. Acute occlusion of the left solitary renal artery was diagnosed and emergent recanalization with percutaneus transluminal angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully, with reversal of the serum creatinine level at 1.6 mg/dl. Further imaging studies for TAAA management revealed ostial occlusion of both the celiac artery (CA) and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) but a hypertrophic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) providing retrograde flow to the aforementioned vessels. This rare anatomic serendipity allowed us to repair the TAAA simply by using a two-component tube endograft without fenestrations (Zenith; William Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) that covered the entire length of the aneurysm, including the CA and SMA origins, since a natural arterial bypass from the IMA to the CA and SMA already existed, affording protection from gastrointestinal ischemic complications. The patient had a fast and uneventful recovery and is currently doing well 6 months after the procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of successful endovascular repair of a TAAA involving visceral arteries with the simple use of a tube endograft

  16. A DECADE OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE NANÇAY RADIOHELIOGRAPH 1998-2008

    We present a statistical survey of almost 10,000 radio type III bursts observed by the Nançay Radioheliograph from 1998 to 2008, covering nearly a full solar cycle. In particular, sources sizes, positions, and fluxes were examined. We find an east-west asymmetry in source positions that could be attributed to a 6° ± 1° eastward tilt of the magnetic field, that source FWHM sizes s roughly follow a solar-cycle-averaged distribution (dN/ds) ≈ 14 ν–3.3 s –4 arcmin–1 day–1, and that source fluxes closely follow a solar-cycle-averaged (dN/ds ν) ≈ 0.34 ν–2.9 S –1.7ν sfu–1 day–1 distribution (when ν is in GHz, s in arcminutes, and S ν in sfu). Fitting a barometric density profile yields a temperature of 0.6 MK, while a solar wind-like (∝h –2) density profile yields a density of 1.2 × 106 cm–3 at an altitude of 1 RS , assuming harmonic emission. Finally, we found that the solar-cycle-averaged radiated type III energy could be similar in magnitude to that radiated by nanoflares via non-thermal bremsstrahlung processes, and we hint at the possibility that escaping electron beams might carry as much energy away from the corona as is introduced into it by accelerated nanoflare electrons.

  17. Comparison between fused silica of type II and III after surface heating with a CO2 laser

    Doualle, Thomas; Hébert, David; Combis, Patrick; Hecquet, Christophe; Gallais, Laurent; Rullier, Jean-Luc

    2016-02-01

    We compare the effect of CO2 laser heating on silica samples of type II and III; these two materials having significant differences in composition and physical properties. For both types of silica, the crater shape and depths are similar through all the parameter ranges that were studied. This is particularly true when evaporation is the major mechanism of the crater formation process. Our numerical simulations of thermal heating are consistent with these results, and calculations with a physically based model of evaporation evaluate correctly the crater depths. Therefore, it can be conclude that the heating of silica surface by CO2 laser at temperatures sufficient to remove some material is independent of their metallic impurities and hydroxyl content, or the different values for the annealing and softening temperatures.

  18. Detection of type III secretion system genes in Aeromonas hydrophila and their relationship with virulence in Nile tilapia.

    Carvalho-Castro, G A; Lopes, C O; Leal, C A G; Cardoso, P G; Leite, R C; Figueiredo, H C P

    2010-08-26

    The goals of this study were to develop a PCR technique to detect ascV and aopB genes from the type III secretion system (T3SS), to evaluate the frequency of these genes in Aeromonas hydrophila strains isolated from diseased fish and from aquaculture environments, and to determine the relationship between the presence of these genes and virulence of A. hydrophila in Nile tilapia. The PCR assay developed here successfully detected the target genes, showing three different profiles for the strains ascV+/aopB+, ascV+/aopB-, and ascV-/aopB-. A higher frequency of ascV+/aopB+ was verified in isolates from diseased fish compared to those from aquaculture environments (PPCR technique was shown to be a specific and efficient tool for detection of T3SS, and this technique can be used for virulence typing of A. hydrophila isolates. PMID:20185253

  19. Immunocytochemical evidence for co-expression of Type III IP3 receptor with signaling components of bitter taste transduction

    Kinnamon Sue C

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli into electrical signals that lead to the sense of taste. An important second messenger in taste transduction is IP3, which is involved in both bitter and sweet transduction pathways. Several components of the bitter transduction pathway have been identified, including the T2R/TRB taste receptors, phospholipase C β2, and the G protein subunits α-gustducin, β3, and γ13. However, the identity of the IP3 receptor subtype in this pathway is not known. In the present study we used immunocytochemistry on rodent taste tissue to identify the IP3 receptors expressed in taste cells and to examine taste bud expression patterns for IP3R3. Results Antibodies against Type I, II, and III IP3 receptors were tested on sections of rat and mouse circumvallate papillae. Robust cytoplasmic labeling for the Type III IP3 receptor (IP3R3 was found in a large subset of taste cells in both species. In contrast, little or no immunoreactivity was seen with antibodies against the Type I or Type II IP3 receptors. To investigate the potential role of IP3R3 in bitter taste transduction, we used double-label immunocytochemistry to determine whether IP3R3 is expressed in the same subset of cells expressing other bitter signaling components. IP3R3 immunoreactive taste cells were also immunoreactive for PLCβ2 and γ13. Alpha-gustducin immunoreactivity was present in a subset of IP3R3, PLCβ2, and γ13 positive cells. Conclusions IP3R3 is the dominant form of the IP3 receptor expressed in taste cells and our data suggest it plays an important role in bitter taste transduction.

  20. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Type I+II Seesaw Models

    Borah, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    We study neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric extension of the standard model with type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses. Due to the enhanced gauge symmetry as well as extended scalar sector, there are several new physics sources of neutrinoless double beta decay in this model. Ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and heavy-light neutrino mixing, we first compute the contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay for type I and type II dominant seesaw separately and compare with the standard light neutrino contributions. We then repeat the exercise by considering the presence of both type I and type II seesaw, having non-negligible contributions to light neutrino masses and show the difference in results from individual seesaw cases. Assuming the new gauge bosons and scalars to be around a TeV, we constrain different parameters of the model including both heavy and light neutrino masses from the requirement of keeping the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude below th...

  1. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). III. 142 additional O-type systems

    Apellániz, J Maíz; Arias, J I; Barbá, R H; Walborn, N R; Simón-Díaz, S; Negueruela, I; Marco, A; Leão, J R S; Herrero, A; Gamen, R C; Alfaro, E J

    2016-01-01

    This is the third installment of GOSSS, a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R~2500 digital observations selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog (GOSC). In this paper we present 142 additional stellar systems with O stars from both hemispheres, bringing the total of O-type systems published within the project to 590. Among the new objects there are 20 new O stars. We also identify 11 new double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s), of which 6 are of O+O type and 5 of O+B type, and an additional new tripled-lined spectroscopic binary (SB3) of O+O+B type. We also revise some of the previous GOSSS classifications, present some egregious examples of stars erroneously classified as O-type in the past, introduce the use of luminosity class IV at spectral types O4-O5.5, and adapt the classification scheme to the work of Arias et al. (2016).

  2. Neutrinoless double beta decay in type I+II seesaw models

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2015-11-01

    We study neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric extension of the standard model with type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses. Due to the enhanced gauge symmetry as well as extended scalar sector, there are several new physics sources of neutrinoless double beta decay in this model. Ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and heavy-light neutrino mixing, we first compute the contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay for type I and type II dominant seesaw separately and compare with the standard light neutrino contributions. We then repeat the exercise by considering the presence of both type I and type II seesaw, having non-negligible contributions to light neutrino masses and show the difference in results from individual seesaw cases. Assuming the new gauge bosons and scalars to be around a TeV, we constrain different parameters of the model including both heavy and light neutrino masses from the requirement of keeping the new physics contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude below the upper limit set by the GERDA experiment and also satisfying bounds from lepton flavor violation, cosmology and colliders.

  3. Clinical significance of determination of serum type IV collagen, type III procollagen, hyaluronic acid and laminin in patients with chronic B hepatitis

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum type collagen IV (CIV), type precollagen III (PCIII), hyaluronic acid (HA) and laminin (LN) levels in chronic hepatitis B patients. Methods: Serum CIV, PCIII, HA and Ln levels were measured with radioimmunoassay in 129 patients with chronic hepatitis B and 43 controls. Results: Serum CIV, PCIII, HA and LN levels in chronic hepatitis B were significantly higher than those in the controls (p < 0.05). Serum concentration of CIV, PCIII, HA and LN gradually increased as the disease progressing and reached the highest levels in liver cirrhosis. Conclusion: The results suggest that serum CIV, PCIII, HA and LN levels can reflect the degree of hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B patients

  4. MPEG-2 encoded VoD series over fixed wireless channels using ARQ schemes

    Ma, Hairuo; El Zarki, Magda

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the possibility and effectiveness of applying ARQ schemes to the transmission of MPEG-2 encoded video streams over fixed wireless links in B- FWANs in video-on-demand services. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the overall system performance, which is then compared to a scheme using FEC with cell interleaving. Important metrics relevant to the broadband video services are analyzed, including the quality of the reconstructed video sequences, the excess delay and delay variation introduced by the ARQ scheme, the throughput, and the required average channel bandwidth. A hidden Markov model was also introduced to model the variation of the wireless channel.

  5. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). III. 142 Additional O-type Systems.

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sota, A.; Arias, J. I.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; Leão, J. R. S.; Herrero, A.; Gamen, R. C.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    This is the third installment of the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS), a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ∼ 2500 digital observations selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog. In this paper, we present 142 additional stellar systems with O stars from both hemispheres, bringing the total of O-type systems published within the project to 590. Among the new objects, there are 20 new O stars. We also identify 11 new double-lined spectroscopic binaries, 6 of which are of O+O type and 5 of O+B type, and an additional new tripled-lined spectroscopic binary of O+O+B type. We also revise some of the previous GOSSS classifications, present some egregious examples of stars erroneously classified as O-type in the past, introduce the use of luminosity class IV at spectral types O4-O5.5, and adapt the classification scheme to the work of Arias et al. The GOSSS spectroscopic data in this article were gathered with five facilities: the 1.5 m Telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO), the 3.5 m Telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA), and the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM).

  6. Neutrino Masses and Leptogenesis in Type I+II Seesaw Models

    Borah, Debasish; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The baryon to photon ratio in the present Universe is very accurately measured to be $(6.065 \\pm 0.090) \\times 10^{-10}$. We study the possible origin of this baryon asymmetry in the neutrino sector through the generic mechanism of baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We consider both type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses within the framework of left right symmetric models (LRSM). Using the latest best fit global neutrino oscillation data of mass squared differences, mixing angles...

  7. DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III/IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS SUMMARY DOCUMENT

    Mickalonis, J.; Wiersma, B.; Garcia-Diaz, B.

    2009-10-01

    Dissolution of salt from Type III/IIIA waste tanks at the Savannah River Site may create solutions with inhibitor concentrations below those currently required (0.6M OH{sup -} and 1.1M OH{sup -} + NO{sub 2}{sup -}) per the Corrosion Control Program for high nitrate salt solutions (5.5 to 8.5M NO{sub 3}{sup -}). An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of grade A537 carbon steel for waste simulants containing 4.5-8.5M NaNO{sub 3} with maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2}. These maximum inhibitor concentrations used in this program are at a reduced level from those currently required. Current requirements were initially established for the Types I, II and IV tanks made of A285 carbon steel. The experimental program involved corrosion testing to evaluate the pitting and stress corrosion stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of the Type III/IIIA waste tank materials. The program was conducted in two phases; the results of the first phase were reported previously (WSRC-STI-2006-00029). In this second phase, the corrosion specimens were modified to represent the 'as-fabricated' condition of the tank wall, and included specimens with mill scale, ground welds and stress-relief heat treatments. The complete description of the corrosion testing and the results are reported herein. The collective corrosion test results for A537 carbon steel in high nitrate waste simulants (4.5 - 8.5M) with the maximum inhibitor concentrations of 0.6M NaOH and 0.2M NaNO{sub 2} were as follows: (1) In long-term non-polarized U-bend testing, heat treatment, similar to the waste tank stress relief regime, reduced the incidence of cracking over the 18-month test period. Vapor space SCC was found to initiate on non-heat treated U-bend coupons. (2) In polarized U-bend testing, cracking occurred on U-bend coupons that had welds prepared similar to those in the waste tanks, i.e. ground and heat treated. (3) In

  8. Type III procollagen peptide and PZ-peptidase serum levels in pre-cirrhotic liver diseases.

    Morelli, A; Vedovelli, A; Fiorucci, S; Angelini, G P; Fini, C; Palmerini, C A; Floridi, A

    1985-05-30

    To obtain a dynamic and non-invasive picture of hepatic fibrosis in pre-cirrhotic liver diseases we measured both the concentration of the N-terminal peptide of procollagen III, as a marker of collagen synthesis, and the activity of PZ-peptidase, an enzyme involved in collagen degradation, in the serum of alcoholic or chronic viral hepatitis patients. Peptide serum levels were similar in chronic persistent hepatitis and controls, but significantly higher in chronic active hepatitis. Chronic persistent hepatitis patients had PZ-peptidase levels higher than controls, but similar to chronic active hepatitis. The increase in collagen synthesis without a parallel increase in collagen degradation seen in chronic active hepatitis could be regarded as a sign of impending cirrhosis, whereas the unbalanced rise in PZ-peptidase observed in chronic persistent hepatitis is consistent with the non-progressive character of this disorder. In alcoholic hepatitis both peptide concentration and PZ-peptidase activity were elevated, thus suggesting that both collagen synthesis and degradation are activated. However, the greater increase in PZ-peptidase than in peptide serum levels seen in some patients seems to indicate a minor tendency to progressive fibrosis or a trend towards resolution. Unlike liver disease patients, normal peptide and PZ-peptidase levels were found in patients with pancreatic fibrosis. Since circulating inhibitors and activators of the PZ-peptidase activity can be excluded, as proved by this study, joint peptide and PZ-peptidase serum measurements would seem to offer a simple reliable non-invasive method for differentiating and monitoring progressive and non-progressive forms of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:3888456

  9. KS-CGE Model V2012 TypeIII: Mathematical settings and its applications

    Komsan Suriya Author-Email; Tatcha Sudtasan

    2013-01-01

    Faculty of Economics, Chiang Mai University has developed its own computable general equilibrium model (CGE). This paper will reveal the settings of the so called “KS-CGE Model V2012 TypeIII”. It will also introduce the scope and limit of applications that the model can provide.

  10. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. III. Lithium Abundances

    Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    We report on the abundance analysis of Li in solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars which were found by the analysis of Kepler photometric data. Li is a key element to understand the evolution of the stellar convection zone which reflects the age of solar-type stars. We performed the high dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS, and confirmed that 34 stars show no evidence of binarity in our previous study. In this study, we derived the Li abundances of these 34 objects. We investigate correlations of Li abundance with stellar atmospheric parameters, rotational velocity, and superflare activities to understand the nature of superflare stars and the possibility of the nucleosynthesis of Li by superflares. We confirm the large dispersion in the Li abundance, and the correlation with stellar parameters is not seen. As compared with the Li abundance in Hyades cluster which is younger than the Sun, it is suggested that half of the observed stars are younger than Hyades cl...

  11. Type III interferon protects swine against foot-and-mouth disease

    In recent years we have developed novel strategies to control foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) including the use of biotherapeutics such as interferons (IFN) delivered by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). Swine can be sterilely protected after vaccination with an Ad5 that encodes po...

  12. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein. PMID:17977832

  13. Potential efficacy of enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapy in three siblings with Gaucher disease type III.

    Cox-Brinkman, J; van Breemen, M J; van Maldegem, B T; Bour, L; Donker, W E; Hollak, C E M; Wijburg, F A; Aerts, J M F G

    2008-12-01

    We report three siblings with Gaucher disease type III, born between 1992 and 2004. During this period, new developments resulted in different potential therapies, changing clinical practice. The two eldest siblings received enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) from the age of 24 and 5 months respectively, later followed by an increase in dosage. ERT was combined with substrate reduction therapy (SRT) from the ages of 12 and 8 years, respectively. In the youngest sibling the combination of high-dose ERT and SRT was given from the age of 5 months. The two eldest siblings showed significant neurological impairment from the age of 1.5 years, starting with a convergent strabismus and partial oculomotor apraxia, followed by cognitive decline and an abnormal EEG and BAER. In contrast, the neurological development in the youngest sibling is almost completely normal. At the age of 3 years, cognitive development, EEG and BAER are all normal. Disturbed saccadic eye movements, which were already present at the start of therapy, remained stable. In addition to the clinical efficacy, we report on the biochemical response to therapy. Based on our results, the combination of high-dose ERT and SRT should be considered as a possible therapeutic approach for GD III, especially if started at a young age. Further follow-up studies are necessary to explore the long-term therapeutic effects. PMID:18850301

  14. On the molecular basis of D-bifunctional protein deficiency type III.

    Maija L Mehtälä

    Full Text Available Molecular basis of D-bifunctional protein (D-BP deficiency was studied with wild type and five disease-causing variants of 3R-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase fragment of the human MFE-2 (multifunctional enzyme type 2 protein. Complementation analysis in vivo in yeast and in vitro enzyme kinetic and stability determinants as well as in silico stability and structural fluctuation calculations were correlated with clinical data of known patients. Despite variations not affecting the catalytic residues, enzyme kinetic performance (K(m, V(max and k(cat of the recombinant protein variants were compromised to a varying extent and this can be judged as the direct molecular cause for D-BP deficiency. Protein stability plays an additional role in producing non-functionality of MFE-2 in case structural variations affect cofactor or substrate binding sites. Structure-function considerations of the variant proteins matched well with the available data of the patients.

  15. All-optical digital 4 × 2 encoder based on 2D photonic crystal ring resonators

    Moniem, Tamer A.

    2016-04-01

    The photonic crystals draw significant attention to build all-optical logic devices and are considered one of the solutions for the opto-electronic bottleneck via speed and size. The paper presents a novel optical 4 × 2 encoder based on 2D square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods. The main realization of optical encoder is based on the photonic crystal ring resonator NOR gates. The proposed structure has four logic input ports, two output ports, and two bias input port. The photonic crystal structure has a square lattice of silicon rods with a refractive index of 3.39 in air. The structure has lattice constant 'a' equal to 630 nm and bandgap range from 0.32 to 044. The total size of the proposed 4 × 2 encoder is equal to 35 μm × 35 μm. The simulation results using the dimensional finite difference time domain and Plane Wave Expansion methods confirm the operation and the feasibility of the proposed optical encoder for ultrafast optical digital circuits.

  16. Neuronal merlin influences ERBB2 receptor expression on Schwann cells through neuregulin 1 type III signalling

    Schulz, Alexander; Kyselyova, Anna; Baader, Stephan L.; Jung, Marie Juliane; Zoch, Ansgar; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Hagel, Christian; Morrison, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Axonal surface proteins encompass a group of heterogeneous molecules, which exert a variety of different functions in the highly interdependent relationship between axons and Schwann cells. We recently revealed that the tumour suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumour syndrome neurofibromatosis type 2, impacts significantly on axon structure maintenance in the peripheral nervous system. We now report on a role of neuronal merlin in the regulation of the axonal surface protei...

  17. Visualizing translocation and localization of bacterial type III effector proteins using a genetically encoded reporter system

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M.; Enninga, Jost; Andrew J. Roe

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Type Three Secretion System (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bac...

  18. Tissue elasticity displayed by elastography and its correlation with the characteristics of collagen type I and type III in prostatic stroma

    Jie Tang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prostate elasticity displayed by elastography and its correlation with the content and distribution of collagen type I (Col1 and type III (Col3. A total of 62 patients underwent transrectal real-time tissue elastography (TRTE examinations. Targeted biopsies were performed after 12-core systematic biopsy. The tissues corresponding to the elastograms were stained with picric acid-sirius red. The distribution of Col1 and type Col3 was observed, and the collagen volume fraction (CVF of these two types of collagen fibers was calculated. The CVFs of Col1 in the stiff and soft groups were 0.05 ± 0.02 and 0.02 ± 0.01 (P = 0.002, respectively. The CVFs of Col3 in the stiff and soft groups were 0.05 ± 0.04 and 0.07 ± 0.03 (P = 0.13, respectively. The circular analysis results showed that collagen fibers were disorganized both in the soft and stiff groups. Col1 and Col3 were mainly cross-linked, and some parallelization was observed in the sections. The distributions of Col1 and Col3 were different between the stiff and soft groups (P = 0.03. In conclusion, the texture of the prostate is due to the content of Col1 and its relative correlation with Col3.

  19. A case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III complicated with autoimmune hepatitis.

    Oki, Kenji; Yamane, Kiminori; Koide, Junko; Mandai, Koichi; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Fujikawa, Rumi; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2006-10-01

    A 58-year-old woman complaining of finger tremor was referred to our hospital. The diagnosis of Graves' disease was made based on increased free triiodothyronine (18.88 pg/ml) and free thyroxine (7.47 ng/dl), low TSH (TSH receptor binding antibody activity (70.9%). Serum level of AST (62 U/l) and ALT (93 U/l) were increased and liver biopsy revealed linkage of adjacent portal areas by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and fibrosis with piecemeal necrosis. Although antinuclear antibody was negative, these findings indicated that she had autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) according to the criteria of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Scoring System. Slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) was confirmed by a diabetic response pattern due to 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test, and seropositivity towards anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (725 U/ml) and islet cell (80 JDF Units) antibodies. This case exhibited an extremely rare combination of three different autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease, slowly progressive type 1 DM and AIH, and had no known sensitive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing or haplotype for these disorders. Although it is common for patients with Graves' disease to exhibit abnormal liver function, it is important to make an accurate diagnosis of AIH because of this life-threatening disorder. PMID:16946565

  20. Conversion from electron plasma waves to type III solar radio bursts with 'HELIOS' observations

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce new HELIOS observation which confirm the basic mechanism of type 3 solar radio bursts and then to compare them with ground and/or near earth satellite observations. It is considered that the bursts are generated by a two-step process. The process is the production of localized electron plasma oscillation and the conversion of this plasma oscillation to escaping electromagnetic radiation. Variations of the characteristic frequency of solar radio bursts come from the gradual decrease in the electron plasma frequency encountered. Examples of the temporal distributions of electron plasma oscillations and associated type 3 solar radio bursts are shown. The so-called ''forward drift'' is seen. Another example shows that the burst sources are distributed along a spiral magnetic field in the interplanetary space. The result of comparison of conventional ground and recent HELIOS observations is presented. The frequency range of the type 3 bursts is from 10 to 200 kHz in case of HELIOS, which is much lower than the frequency observed on the ground. Source location, dynamic spectrum, duration time of burst, drift rate, flare electron velocity, electron plasma oscillation, location of EPO or solar flare electrons, intensities of fundamental and harmonic frequencies, and polarization were also compared between ground and HELIOS observations. (Kato, T.)

  1. Domains and maturation processes that regulate the activity of ADAMTS-2, a metalloproteinase cleaving the aminopropeptide of fibrillar procollagens types I-III and V

    Colige, Alain; Ruggiero, Florence; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Dubail, Johanne; Kesteloot, Frédéric; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Beschin, Alain; Brys, Lea; Lapière, Charles M.; Nusgens, Betty

    2005-01-01

    Processing of fibrillar collagens is required to generate collagen monomers able to self-assemble into elongated and cylindrical collagen fibrils. ADAMTS-2 belongs to the "A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs" (ADAMTS) family. It is responsible for most of the processing of the aminopropeptide of type I procollagen in the skin, and it also cleaves type II and type III procollagens. ADAMTS are complex secreted enzymes that are implicated in various physiologica...

  2. An archaeal CRISPR type III-B system exhibiting distinctive RNA targeting features and mediating dual RNA and DNA interference

    Peng, Wenfang; Feng, Mingxia; Feng, Xu;

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide a small RNA-based mechanism to defend against invasive genetic elements in archaea and bacteria. To investigate the in vivo mechanism of RNA interference by two type III-B systems (Cmr-α and Cmr-β) in Sulfolobus islandicus, a genetic assay was developed using plasmids...... carrying an artificial mini-CRISPR (AC) locus with a single spacer. After pAC plasmids were introduced into different strains, Northern analyses confirmed that mature crRNAs were produced from the plasmid-borne CRISPR loci, which then guided gene silencing to target gene expression. Spacer mutagenesis....... islandicus Cmr-α mediated transcription-dependent DNA interference, the Cmr-α constitutes the first CRISPR system exhibiting dual targeting of RNA and DNA....

  3. An enantiomerically pure siderophore type ligand for the diastereoselective 1 : 1 complexation of lanthanide(III ions

    Markus Albrecht

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A facile synthesis of a highly preorganized tripodal enterobactine-type ligand 1a-H3 consisting of a chiral C3-symmetric macrocyclic peptide and three tridentate 2-amido-8-hydroxyquinoline coordinating units is presented. Complex formation with various metal ions (Al3+, Ga3+, Fe3+, La3+ and Eu3+ was investigated by spectrophotometric methods. Only in the case of La3+ and Eu3+ were well defined 1 : 1 complexes formed. On the basis of CD spectroscopy and DFT calculations the configuration at the metal centre of the La3+ complex was determined to show Λ helicity. The coordination compounds [(1aLn] presented should be prototypes for further lanthanide(III complexes with an enterobactine analogue binding situation.

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 1 HindIII fragment L encodes spliced and complementary mRNA species.

    Frink, R J; Anderson, K P; Wagner, E K

    1981-01-01

    We have used DNA bound to cellulose to isolate and translate in vitro herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mRNA's encoded by HindIII fragment L (mapping between 0.592 and 0.647), and 8.450-base-pair (8.45-kb) portion of the long unique region of the viral genome. Readily detectable, late mRNA's 2.7 and 1.9 kb in size encoding 69,000- and 58,000-dalton polypeptides, respectively, were isolated. A very minor late mRNA family composed of two colinear forms, one 2.6 kb and one 2.8 kb, was isolated...

  5. ORF13 in the Type III secretion system gene cluster of Edwardsiella tarda binds to the mammalian factor Cugbp2.

    Okuda, Jun; Takeuchi, Yusuke; Yasuda, Masashi; Nakai, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Type III secretion system (TTSS) is essential for the intracellular replication of Edwardsiella tarda in phagocytes of fish and mammals, and a hypothetical gene (orf13) located in the TTSS gene cluster is required for intracellular replication and virulence of E. tarda. Here, we show that under TTSS-inducing conditions, the protein ORF13 was secreted into culture supernatant. Then, using a yeast 2-hybrid screen, we show that the mammalian factor Cugbp2, which regulates apoptosis in breast cancer cells, directly interacts with ORF13. A pull-down assay revealed that ORF13 binds to the C-terminal region of Cugbp2. Our results suggest that ORF13 may facilitate E. tarda replication in phagocytes by binding to Cugbp2. PMID:27137075

  6. Serum type III procollagen peptide in patients with Pneumocystis carinii infection. The Copenhagen-Amsterdam PCP-Prednisolone Study Group

    Bentsen, K D; Nielsen, T L; Eaftinck Schattenkerk, J K;

    1993-01-01

    Inflammation may play a central role in the pathogenesis of HIV-related Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). Serum levels of the amino-terminal propeptide of Type III procollagen (PIIINP) reflect inflammatory activity in granulation tissue and in chronic rheumatic and liver disorders. To...... investigate changes in PIIINP serum levels during an episode of HIV-related PCP, consecutive serum samples were taken from 48 HIV-infected patients with PCP in a randomized, placebo-controlled study of the effect of adjunctive methylprednisolone therapy (26 in corticosteroid [CS] group and 22 in control group...... steroid was administered. At Days 21 to 28 there were no difference in the levels of PIIINP between the two groups. PIIINP serum levels may predict the clinical outcome of PCP. The antimicrobial therapy may exacerbate the inflammatory reaction in HIV-related PCP, leading to respiratory failure. CS...

  7. Enzymes of collagen synthesis and type III procollagen aminopropeptide in the evaluation of D-penicillamine and medroxyprogesterone treatments of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Savolainen, E R; Miettinen, T A; Pikkarainen, P.; Salaspuro, M P; Kivirikko, K I

    1983-01-01

    Changes in serum immunoreactive prolyl hydroxylase protein (IRPH), galactosylhydroxylysyl glucosyltransferase activity (GGT) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen [Pro(III)-N-P] were studied in 21 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis during a follow-up period of up to three years. The patients received either D-penicillamine (600 mg/day), medroxyprogesterone acetate (5 mg/day), or a placebo, or no treatment after the D-penicillamine or medroxyprogesterone medication, eac...

  8. Inhibition of a type III secretion system by the deletion of a short loop in one of its membrane proteins

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A. [Okinawa Instiute of Science and Technology, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Kitao, Akio [University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutionary Science and Technology, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A., E-mail: f.a.samatey@oist.jp [Okinawa Instiute of Science and Technology, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan)

    2013-05-01

    Crystal structures of the cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from S. typhimurium and A. aeolicus were solved at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. The deletion of a short loop in the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB completely abolishes secretion by the type III secretion system. A molecular-dynamics simulation shows that the deletion of the loop affects the flexibility of a linker between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system. It is composed of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhB{sub C}). Here, the crystal structures of FlhB{sub C} from Salmonella typhimurium and Aquifex aeolicus are described at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. These flagellar FlhB{sub C} structures are similar to those of paralogues from the needle type III secretion system, with the major difference being in a linker that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. It was found that deletion of a short flexible loop in a globular part of Salmonella FlhB{sub C} leads to complete inhibition of secretion by the flagellar secretion system. Molecular-dynamics calculations demonstrate that the linker region is the most flexible part of FlhB{sub C} and that the deletion of the loop reduces this flexibility. These results are in good agreement with previous studies showing the importance of the linker in the function of FlhB and provide new insight into the relationship between the different parts of the FlhB{sub C} molecule.

  9. Inhibition of a type III secretion system by the deletion of a short loop in one of its membrane proteins

    Crystal structures of the cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from S. typhimurium and A. aeolicus were solved at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. The deletion of a short loop in the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB completely abolishes secretion by the type III secretion system. A molecular-dynamics simulation shows that the deletion of the loop affects the flexibility of a linker between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system. It is composed of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhBC). Here, the crystal structures of FlhBC from Salmonella typhimurium and Aquifex aeolicus are described at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. These flagellar FlhBC structures are similar to those of paralogues from the needle type III secretion system, with the major difference being in a linker that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. It was found that deletion of a short flexible loop in a globular part of Salmonella FlhBC leads to complete inhibition of secretion by the flagellar secretion system. Molecular-dynamics calculations demonstrate that the linker region is the most flexible part of FlhBC and that the deletion of the loop reduces this flexibility. These results are in good agreement with previous studies showing the importance of the linker in the function of FlhB and provide new insight into the relationship between the different parts of the FlhBC molecule

  10. Near-atomic resolution analysis of BipD, a component of the type III secretion system of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    The type III secretion system needle-tip protein BipD has been crystallized in a form that diffracts X-rays to 1.5 Å resolution and the structure has been refined to an R factor of 16.1% and an Rfree of 19.8% at this resolution. The putative antiparallel dimer interface that was observed in earlier structures is conserved. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, possesses a type III protein secretion apparatus that is similar to those found in Salmonella and Shigella. A major function of these secretion systems is to inject virulence-associated proteins into target cells of the host organism. The bipD gene of B. pseudomallei encodes a secreted virulence factor that is similar in sequence and is most likely to be functionally analogous to IpaD from Shigella and SipD from Salmonella. Proteins in this family are thought to act as extracellular chaperones at the tip of the secretion needle to help the hydrophobic translocator proteins enter the target cell membrane, where they form a pore and may also link the translocon pore with the secretion needle. BipD has been crystallized in a monoclinic crystal form that diffracted X-rays to 1.5 Å resolution and the structure was refined to an R factor of 16.1% and an Rfree of 19.8% at this resolution. The putative dimer interface that was observed in previous crystal structures was retained and a larger surface area was buried in the new crystal form

  11. Identification of small-molecule inhibitors of Yersinia pestis Type III secretion system YscN ATPase.

    Wieslaw Swietnicki

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is a gram negative zoonotic pathogen responsible for causing bubonic and pneumonic plague in humans. The pathogen uses a type III secretion system (T3SS to deliver virulence factors directly from bacterium into host mammalian cells. The system contains a single ATPase, YscN, necessary for delivery of virulence factors. In this work, we show that deletion of the catalytic domain of the yscN gene in Y. pestis CO92 attenuated the strain over three million-fold in the Swiss-Webster mouse model of bubonic plague. The result validates the YscN protein as a therapeutic target for plague. The catalytic domain of the YscN protein was made using recombinant methods and its ATPase activity was characterized in vitro. To identify candidate therapeutics, we tested computationally selected small molecules for inhibition of YscN ATPase activity. The best inhibitors had measured IC(50 values below 20 µM in an in vitro ATPase assay and were also found to inhibit the homologous BsaS protein from Burkholderia mallei animal-like T3SS at similar concentrations. Moreover, the compounds fully inhibited YopE secretion by attenuated Y. pestis in a bacterial cell culture and mammalian cells at µM concentrations. The data demonstrate the feasibility of targeting and inhibiting a critical protein transport ATPase of a bacterial virulence system. It is likely the same strategy could be applied to many other common human pathogens using type III secretion system, including enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei species.

  12. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  13. SPIDER - III. Environmental dependence of the Fundamental Plane of early-type galaxies

    La Barbera, F.; Lopes, P. A. A.; de Carvalho, R. R.; de La Rosa, I. G.; Berlind, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    We analyse the Fundamental Plane (FP) relation of 39993 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the optical (griz) and 5080 ETGs in the near-infrared (NIR; YJHK) wavebands, forming an optical+NIR sample of 4589 galaxies. We focus on the analysis of the FP as a function of the environment where galaxies reside. We characterize the environment using the largest group catalogue, based on 3D data, generated from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at low redshift (z population properties with mass in ETGs is shallower for galaxies at high density, resulting from tidal stripping and quenching of star formation in galaxies falling into the group's potential well. We do not detect any dependence of the FP coefficients on the presence of substructures in parent galaxy groups.

  14. Specific inhibition of secreted NRG1 types I-II by heparin enhances Schwann Cell myelination.

    Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Gordon, Aaron; Sukhanov, Natalya; Peles, Elior

    2016-07-01

    Primary cultures of mixed neuron and Schwann cells prepared from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are extensively used as a model to study myelination. These dissociated DRG cultures have the particular advantage of bypassing the difficulty in purifying mouse Schwann cells, which is often required when using mutant mice. However, the drawback of this experimental system is that it yields low amounts of myelin. Here we report a simple and efficient method to enhance myelination in vitro. We show that the addition of heparin or low molecular weight heparin to mixed DRG cultures markedly increases Schwann cells myelination. The myelin promoting activity of heparin results from specific inhibition of the soluble immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing isoforms of neuregulin 1 (i.e., NRG1 types I and II) that negatively regulates myelination. Heparin supplement provides a robust and reproducible method to increase myelination in a simple and commonly used culture system. GLIA 2016;64:1227-1234. PMID:27143444

  15. Protein misfolding as an underlying molecular defect in mucopolysaccharidosis III type C.

    Matthew Feldhammer

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIC or Sanfilippo syndrome type C (MPS IIIC, MIM #252930 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal membrane enzyme, heparan sulfate acetyl-CoA: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase (HGSNAT, EC 2.3.1.78, which catalyses transmembrane acetylation of the terminal glucosamine residues of heparan sulfate prior to their hydrolysis by alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Lysosomal storage of undegraded heparan sulfate in the cells of affected patients leads to neuronal death causing neurodegeneration and is accompanied by mild visceral and skeletal abnormalities, including coarse facies and joint stiffness. Surprisingly, the majority of MPS IIIC patients carrying missense mutations are as severely affected as those with splicing errors, frame shifts or nonsense mutations resulting in the complete absence of HGSNAT protein.In order to understand the effects of the missense mutations in HGSNAT on its enzymatic activity and biogenesis, we have expressed 21 mutant proteins in cultured human fibroblasts and COS-7 cells and studied their folding, targeting and activity. We found that 17 of the 21 missense mutations in HGSNAT caused misfolding of the enzyme, which is abnormally glycosylated and not targeted to the lysosome, but retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. The other 4 mutants represented rare polymorphisms which had no effect on the activity, processing and targeting of the enzyme. Treatment of patient cells with a competitive HGSNAT inhibitor, glucosamine, partially rescued several of the expressed mutants. Altogether our data provide an explanation for the severity of MPS IIIC and suggest that search for pharmaceutical chaperones can in the future result in therapeutic options for this disease.

  16. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - III. Properties of the circumnuclear gas emission

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2015-08-01

    Many early-type galaxies have ionized gas emission in their centres that extends to scales of ˜1 kpc. The majority of such objects are classified as low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs), but the nature of their ionizing source is still not clear. The kinematics associated with these gaseous structures usually shows deviations from a pure rotational motion due to non-gravitational effects (e.g. outflows) or to non-axisymmetric potentials (e.g. bars or tri-axial systems). This is the third of a series of papers that describes a sample of 10 nearby (d 200 km s-1) early-type galaxies observed with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph in Integral Field mode installed on the Gemini-South telescope. In Paper II, we performed spectral synthesis to subtract the stellar components from the data cubes of the sample galaxies in order to study their nuclear spectra. In this work, we analyse the circumnuclear gas emission (scales of ˜100 pc) of the sample galaxies and we compare the results with those obtained with Principal Component Analysis Tomography in Paper I. We detected circumnuclear gas emission in seven galaxies of the sample, all of them classified as LINERs. Pure gaseous discs are found in three galaxies. In two objects, gaseous discs are probably present, but their kinematics are affected by non-Keplerian motions. In one galaxy (IC 5181), we detected a spiral structure of gas that may be caused either by a non-axisymmetric potential or by an outflow together with a gaseous disc. In NGC 3136, an ionization bicone is present in addition to five compact structures with LINER-like emission. In galaxies with a gaseous disc, we found that ionizing photons emitted by an active galactic nucleus are not enough to explain the observed Hα flux along this structure. On the other hand, the Hα flux distribution and equivalent width along the direction perpendicular the gaseous disc suggest the presence of low-velocity ionized gas emission which seem to be related

  17. A De Vries-type Duality Theorem for Locally Compact Spaces -- III

    Dimov, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we prove some new Stone-type duality theorems for some subcategories of the category $\\ZLC$ of locally compact zero-dimensional Hausdorff spaces and continuous maps. These theorems are new even in the compact case. They concern the cofull subcategories $\\SkeZLC$, $\\QPZLC$, $\\OZLC$ and $\\OPZLC$ of the category $\\ZLC$ determined, respectively, by the skeletal maps, by the quasi-open perfect maps, by the open maps and by the open perfect maps. In this way, the zero-dimensional analogues of Fedorchuk Duality Theorem and its generalization are obtained. Further, we characterize the injective and surjective morphisms of the category $\\HLC$ of locally compact Hausdorff spaces and continuous maps, as well as of the category $\\ZLC$, and of some their subcategories, by means of some properties of their dual morphisms. This generalizes some well-known results of M. Stone and de Vries. An analogous problem is investigated for the homeomorphic embeddings, dense embeddings, LCA-embeddings etc., and a generali...

  18. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - III. Properties of the circumnuclear gas emission

    Ricci, T V; Menezes, R B

    2015-01-01

    Many Early-type galaxies (ETG) have ionized gas emission in their centres that extends to scales of ~ 1kpc. The majority of such objects are classified as LINERs, but the nature of their ionizing source is still not clear. The kinematics associated with these gaseous structures usually shows deviations from a pure rotational motion due to non-gravitational effects or to non-axisymmetric potentials. This is the third of a series of papers that describes a sample of 10 nearby and massive ETG observed with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph in Integral Field mode installed on the Gemini-South telescope. In paper II, we performed spectral synthesis to subtract the stellar components from the data cubes of the sample galaxies in order to study their nuclear spectra. Here, we analyse the circumnuclear gas emission (scales of ~ 100 pc) of the sample galaxies. Circumnuclear gas emission was detected in seven galaxies, all of them classified as LINERs. Pure gaseous discs are found in three galaxies. In two objects, ...

  19. Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Chiroptical Studies of Bidentate Salen-Type Lanthanide (III) Complexes.

    Berardozzi, Roberto; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Di Pietro, Sebastiano; Resta, Claudio; Ballistreri, Francesco P; Pappalardo, Andrea; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Di Bari, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    The salen-type ligand prepared with (R,R) diphenylethan-1,2-diamine and salicylaldehyde provides stable and inert complexes KLnL2 upon simple reaction with lanthanide halides or pseudohalides LnX3 (Ln = Tb(3+) -Lu(3+) ; X = Cl(-) or TfO(-) ) of its potassium salt. All the complexes were completely characterized through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electronic circular dichroism (ECD) in the UV and some (Er(3+) , Tm(3+) , Yb(3+) ) also with Near-IR ECD (NIR-ECD) and luminescence (Tb(3+) , Tm(3+) ). Careful analysis of the NMR shifts demonstrated that the complexes are isostructural in solution and afforded an accurate geometry. This was further confirmed by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) optimization of the Lu(3+) complex, and by comparing the ligand-centered experimental and time-dependent TD-DFT computed UV-ECD spectra. As final validation, we used the NIR-ECD spectrum of the Yb(3+) derivative calculated by means of Richardson's equations. The excellent match between calculated and experimental ECD spectra confirm the quality of the NMR structure. PMID:26422601

  20. Photon storage in Λ-type optically dense atomic media. III. Effects of inhomogeneous broadening

    In a recent paper [Gorshkov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 123601 (2007)] and in the two preceding papers [Gorshkov et al., this issue, Phys. Rev. A 76, 033804 (2006); 76, 033805 (2006)], we used a universal physical picture to optimize and demonstrate equivalence between a wide range of techniques for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in homogeneously broadened Λ-type atomic media, including the adiabatic reduction of the photon group velocity, pulse-propagation control via off-resonant Raman techniques, and photon-echo-based techniques. In the present paper, we generalize this treatment to include inhomogeneous broadening. In particular, we consider the case of Doppler-broadened atoms and assume that there is a negligible difference between the Doppler shifts of the two optical transitions. In this situation, we show that, at high enough optical depth, all atoms contribute coherently to the storage process as if the medium were homogeneously broadened. We also discuss the effects of inhomogeneous broadening in solid state samples. In this context, we discuss the advantages and limitations of reversing the inhomogeneous broadening during the storage time, as well as suggest a way for achieving high efficiencies with a nonreversible inhomogeneous profile

  1. [Effectiveness of phytotherapy in supportive treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus III. Momordica (Momordica charantia)].

    Rudá-Kučerová, Jana; Kotolová, Hana; Koupý, David

    2015-09-01

    Momordica charantia is a thermophilic voluble plant from the tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. In central Europe, momordica requires greenhouse plantations. Mature fruits resemble a cucumber or a pumpkin and can be used as other similar vegetables. Crude fruits are very bitter and refreshing. For centuries the plant has been known in Chinese traditional medicine for its antidiabetic effects as well as for the treatment of cancer or infections caused by worms, viruses and malaria. Antidiabetic effects are attributed namely to cucurbitane type triterpenoids, charantin, p-insulin and 9cis-11trans-13trans-conjugated linolenic acid. These substances in momordica preparations show antidiabetic effectiveness in clinical studies by increasing insulin secretion and deceasing insulin resistance or glucose absorption from the gut. Beside this main effect the extract possesses certain neuroprotective and antioxidant effects (especially p9cis-11trans-13trans-conjugated linolenic acid) and contributes to normalize blood lipid and adipokine levels which results in the normalization of metabolic syndrome. Antidiabetic effectiveness of momordica was compared to active treatment with several oral antidiabetic drugs and proved comparable effects. However, the number of studies is limited and their methodological approach variable. Therefore, the evidence is so far inconclusive. PMID:26459126

  2. Evolution of planetary nebulae. III. Position-velocity images of butterfly-type nebulae

    Observations of the motions of the shells of the planetary nebulae NGC 2346, NGC 2371-2, NGC 2440, NGC 6058, NGC 6210, IC 1747, IC 5217, J-320, and M2-9 are presented. These are all 'butterfly' type PNs, and show evidence for bipolar shocks. The observations are interpreted in terms of a fast spherical wind, driven by the central star into a quasi-toroidal envelope deposited earlier by the star, during its slow-wind phase on the asymptotic giant branch. It is shown that this model, which is a straightforward extension of a mechanism previously invoked to account for elliptical PNs, reproduces the essential kinematic features of butterfly PNs. It is inferred that the envelopes of butterflies must have a considerable equator-to-pole density gradient, and it is suggested that the origin of this asphericity must be sought in an as yet unknown mechanism during the AGB, Mira, or OH/IR phases of late stellar evolution. 28 references

  3. Search for heavy lepton partners of neutrinos in proton-proton collisions in the context of the type III seesaw mechanism

    A search is presented in proton-proton collisions at √(s)=7 TeV for fermionic triplet states expected in type III seesaw models. The search is performed using final states with three isolated charged leptons and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb-1. No excess of events is observed above the background predicted by the standard model, and the results are interpreted in terms of limits on production cross sections and masses of the heavy partners of the neutrinos in type III seesaw models. Depending on the considered scenarios, lower limits are obtained on the mass of the heavy partner of the neutrino that range from 180 to 210 GeV. These are the first limits on the production of type III seesaw fermionic triplet states reported by an experiment at the LHC.

  4. Search for heavy lepton partners of neutrinos in proton-proton collisions in the context of the type III seesaw mechanism

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.M.; Tumasyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Eroe, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Hammer, J.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knuenz, V.; Krammer, M. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der OeAW, Wien (Austria); and others

    2012-12-05

    A search is presented in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV for fermionic triplet states expected in type III seesaw models. The search is performed using final states with three isolated charged leptons and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1}. No excess of events is observed above the background predicted by the standard model, and the results are interpreted in terms of limits on production cross sections and masses of the heavy partners of the neutrinos in type III seesaw models. Depending on the considered scenarios, lower limits are obtained on the mass of the heavy partner of the neutrino that range from 180 to 210 GeV. These are the first limits on the production of type III seesaw fermionic triplet states reported by an experiment at the LHC.

  5. Statistical Survey of Type III Radio Bursts at Long Wavelengths Observed by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)/Waves Instruments: Goniopolarimetric Properties and Radio Source Locations

    Krupar, Vratislav; Santolik, Ondrej; Cecconi, Baptiste; Kruparova, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    We have performed statistical analysis of a large number of Type III radio bursts observed by STEREO between May 2007 and February 2013. Only intense, simple, and isolated cases have been included in our data set. We have focused on the goniopolarimetric (GP, also referred to as direction-finding) properties at frequencies between $125$ kHz and $2$ MHz. The apparent source size $\\gamma$ is very extended ($\\approx60^\\circ$) for the lowest analyzed frequencies. Observed apparent source sizes $\\gamma$ expand linearly with a radial distance from the Sun at frequencies below $1$ MHz. We have shown that Type III radio bursts statistically propagate in the ecliptic plane. Calculated positions of radio sources suggest that scattering of the primary beam pattern plays an important role in the propagation of Type III radio bursts in the IP medium.

  6. Search for heavy lepton partners of neutrinos in proton-proton collisions in the context of the type III seesaw mechanism

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Biggio, C; Bisello, Dario; Bonnet, F; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Yohay, Rachel; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Park, Myeonghun; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    A search is presented in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV for fermionic triplet states expected in type III seesaw models. The search is performed using final states with three isolated charged leptons and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. No excess of events is observed above the background predicted by the standard model, and the results are interpreted in terms of limits on production cross sections and masses of the heavy partners of the neutrinos in type III seesaw models. Depending on the considered scenarios, lower limits are obtained on the mass of the heavy partner of the neutrino that range from 180 to 210 GeV. These are the first limits on the production of type III seesaw fermionic triplet states reported by an experiment at the LHC.

  7. A low-luminosity type-1 QSO sample. III. Optical spectroscopic properties and activity classification

    Tremou, E.; Garcia-Marin, M.; Zuther, J.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-Schneider, M.; Vitale, M.; Shan, C.

    2015-08-01

    Context. We report on the optical spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 99 low-luminosity quasi-stellar objects (LLQSOs) at z ≤ 0.06 base the Hamburg/ESO QSO Survey (HES). To better relate the low-redshift active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the QSO population it is important to study samples of the latter type at a level of detail similar to that of the low-redshift AGN. Powerful QSOs, however, are absent at low redshifts due to evolutionary effects and their small space density. Our understanding of the (distant) QSO population is, therefore, significantly limited by angular resolution and sensitivity. The LLQSOs presented here offer the possibility of studying the faint end of this population at smaller cosmological distances and, therefore, in greater detail. Aims: In comparing two spectroscopic methods, we aim to establish a reliable activity classification scheme of the LLQSOs sample. Our goal is to enrich our systematic multiwavelength analysis of the AGN/starburst relation in these systems and give a complementary information on this particular sample of LLQSOs from the Hamburg ESO survey. Methods: Here, we present results of the analysis of visible wavelength spectroscopy provided by the HES and the 6 Degree Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). These surveys use different spectroscopic techniques, long-slit and circular fiber, respectively. These allow us to assess the influence of different apertures on the activity of the LLQSOs using classical optical diagnostic diagrams. We perform a Gaussian fitting of strong optical emission lines and decompose narrow and broad Balmer components. Results: A small number of our LLQSO present no broad component, which is likely to be present but buried in the noise. Two sources show double broad components, whereas six comply with the classic NLS1 requiremnts. As expected in NLR of broad line AGNs, the [Sii]-based electron density values range between 100 and 1000 Ne/cm3. Using the optical characteristics of Populations A and B

  8. Asymptotic behavior of the solution to the Cauchy problem for the Timoshenko system in thermoelasticity of type III

    Rahali, Radouane

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the decay property of a Timoshenko system in thermoelasticity of type III in the whole space where the heat conduction is given by the Green and Naghdi theory. Surprisingly, we show that the coupling of the Timoshenko system with the heat conduction of Green and Naghdi\\'s theory slows down the decay of the solution. In fact we show that the L-2-norm of the solution decays like (1 + t)(-1/8), while in the case of the coupling of the Timoshenko system with the Fourier or Cattaneo heat conduction, the decay rate is of the form (1 + t)(-1/4) [25]. We point out that the decay rate of (1 + t)(-1/8) has been obtained provided that the initial data are in L-1 (R) boolean AND H-s (R); (s >= 2). If the wave speeds of the fi rst two equations are di ff erent, then the decay rate of the solution is of regularity-loss type, that is in this case the previous decay rate can be obtained only under an additional regularity assumption on the initial data. In addition, by restricting the initial data to be in H-s (R) boolean AND L-1,L-gamma (R) with gamma is an element of [0; 1], we can derive faster decay estimates with the decay rate improvement by a factor of t(-gamma/4).

  9. Crystal structure of Legionella DotD: insights into the relationship between type IVB and type II/III secretion systems.

    Noboru Nakano

    Full Text Available The Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS is a pivotal determinant of Legionella pneumophila pathogenesis. L. pneumophila translocate more than 100 effector proteins into host cytoplasm using Dot/Icm T4BSS, modulating host cellular functions to establish a replicative niche within host cells. The T4BSS core complex spanning the inner and outer membranes is thought to be made up of at least five proteins: DotC, DotD, DotF, DotG and DotH. DotH is the outer membrane protein; its targeting depends on lipoproteins DotC and DotD. However, the core complex structure and assembly mechanism are still unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of DotD at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of DotD is distinct from that of VirB7, the outer membrane lipoprotein of the type IVA secretion system. In contrast, the C-terminal domain of DotD is remarkably similar to the N-terminal subdomain of secretins, the integral outer membrane proteins that form substrate conduits for the type II and the type III secretion systems (T2SS and T3SS. A short β-segment in the otherwise disordered N-terminal region, located on the hydrophobic cleft of the C-terminal domain, is essential for outer membrane targeting of DotH and Dot/Icm T4BSS core complex formation. These findings uncover an intriguing link between T4BSS and T2SS/T3SS.

  10. Change in muscle strength over time in spinal muscular atrophy types II and III. A long-term follow-up study

    Werlauff, U; Vissing, J; Steffensen, B F

    2012-01-01

    Whether muscle strength deteriorates with time in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) types II and III is still debated. We present a long-term follow-up study on muscle strength in 30 patients with SMA types II and III. Median follow-up time was 17 years. Median number of assessments was four. All...... patients were assessed by Manual Muscle Testing (MMT), Brooke upper limb scale and EK scale. There was a difference in muscle strength of the upper limbs from first to last assessment in SMA II (p...

  11. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol bacterium on rice growth and disease resistance

    Haiying Ren; Ganyu Gu; Juying Long; Qian Yin; Tingquan Wu; Tao Song; Shujian Zhang; Zhiyi Chen; Hansong Dong

    2006-12-01

    Expression of HpaGXoo, a bacterial type-III effector, in transgenic plants induces disease resistance. Resistance also can be elicited by biocontrol bacteria. In both cases, plant growth is often promoted. Here we address whether biocontrol bacteria and HpaGXoo can act together to provide better results in crop improvement. We studied effects of Pseudomonas cepacia on the rice variety R109 and the hpaGXoo-expressing rice line HER1. Compared to R109, HER1 showed increased growth, grain yield, and defense responses toward diseases and salinity stress. Colonization of roots by P. cepacia caused 20% and 13% increase, in contrast to controls, in root growth of R109 and HER1. Growth of leaves and stems also increased in R109 but that of HER1 was inhibited. When P. cepacia colonization was subsequent to plant inoculation with Rhizoctonia solani, a pathogen that causes sheath blight, the disease was less severe than controls in both R109 and HER1; HER1, nevertheless, was more resistant, suggesting that P. cepacia and HpaGXoo cooperate in inducing disease resistance. Several genes that critically regulate growth and defense behaved differentially in HER1 and R109 while responding to P. cepacia. In R109 leaves, the OsARF1 gene, which regulates plant growth, was expressed in consistence with growth promotion by P. cepacia. Inversely, OsARF1 expression was coincident with inhibition in growth of HER1 leaves. In both plants, the expression of OsEXP1, which encodes an expansin protein involved in plant growth, was concomitant with growth promotion in leaves instead of roots, in response to P. cepacia. We also studied OsMAPK, a gene that encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase and controls defense responses toward salinity and infection by pathogens in rice. In response to P. cepacia, an early expression of OsMAPK was coincident with R109 resistance to the disease, while HER1 expressed the gene similarly whether P. cepacia was present or not. Evidently, P. cepacia and GXoo

  12. Evaluation of W/P Ratio, Setting Time and Compressive Strength of Dental Stone Type III and IV Marketed in Jakarta

    Yosi Kusuma Eriwati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental gypsum products in Indonesia are mainly imported from countries with non-tropical weather. Mostly, these gypsum products marketed in Jakarta are without adequate packaging, data or manipulative and maintenance instructions, which can cause misuse & abuse in the materials manipulation and handling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the W/P ratio, setting time and compressive strength of dental stone type III and IV in relation with room temperature condition and relative humidity in Jakarta, Indonesia. One hundred and eighty dental stone Type III (unlabelled Blue Hard Stone; Giludur, Germany: Moldaroc, Germany and Type IV (New Fujirock, Japan; Glastone, USA; unlabelled Quickstone specimens were made as recommended by ISO 6873-1983 for setting time (with Vicat needle and compressive strength determination (Shimadzu mechanical testing machine with W/P ratio variables of 0.28; 0.29; 0.30 for Type III and 0.20; 0.21; 0.22 for type IV. The tests were conducted in 2 rooms with different temperature and humidity and with and without air-conditioned. Statistical analysis using T-test. The results shows that the increasing of W/P ratio will decrease the dental stone type III and IV setting time. Jakarta condition of high room temperature and relative humidity significantly shorten the setting time of Moldaroc and New Fujirock. The rest of the stones were reduced statistically insignificant. It can be concluded that the temperature and humidity in Jakarta can influence the setting time and compressive strength of dental stone type III and IV. However, since the setting time and strength values are still within the ISO standard, these stones can be accepted and used in Indonesia.

  13. Spatiotemporal Control of Type III-A CRISPR-Cas Immunity: Coupling DNA Degradation with the Target RNA Recognition.

    Kazlauskiene, Migle; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Kostiuk, Georgij; Venclovas, Česlovas; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2016-04-21

    Streptococcus thermophilus (St) type III-A CRISPR-Cas system restricts MS2 RNA phage and cuts RNA in vitro. However, the CRISPR array spacers match DNA phages, raising the question: does the St CRISPR-Cas system provide immunity by erasing phage mRNA or/and by eliminating invading DNA? We show that it does both. We find that (1) base-pairing between crRNA and target RNA activates single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) degradation by StCsm; (2) ssDNase activity is confined to the HD-domain of Cas10; (3) target RNA cleavage by the Csm3 RNase suppresses Cas10 DNase activity, ensuring temporal control of DNA degradation; and (4) base-pairing between crRNA 5'-handle and target RNA 3'-flanking sequence inhibits Cas10 ssDNase to prevent self-targeting. We propose that upon phage infection, crRNA-guided StCsm binding to the emerging transcript recruits Cas10 DNase to the actively transcribed phage DNA, resulting in degradation of both the transcript and phage DNA, but not the host DNA. PMID:27105119

  14. Aspergillus oryzae type III polyketide synthase CsyA is involved in the biosynthesis of 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid.

    Seshime, Yasuyo; Juvvadi, Praveen Rao; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Nonaka, Takamasa; Fujii, Isao

    2010-08-15

    As a novel superfamily of type III polyketide synthases in microbes, four genes csyA, csyB, csyC, and csyD, were found in the genome of Aspergillus oryzae, an industrially important filamentous fungus. In order to analyze their functions, we carried out the overexpression of csyA under the control of alpha-amylase promoter in A. oryzae and identified 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) as the major product. Feeding experiments using (13)C-labeled acetates confirmed that the acetate labeling pattern of DHBA coincided with that of orcinol derived from orsellinic acid, a polyketide formed by the condensation and cyclization of four acetate units. Further oxidation of methyl group of orcinol by the host fungus could lead to the production of DHBA. Comparative molecular modeling of CsyA with the crystal structure of Neurospora crassa 2'-oxoalkylresorcylic acid synthase indicated that CsyA cavity size can only accept short-chain acyl starter and tetraketide formation. Thus, CsyA is considered to be a tetraketide alkyl-resorcinol/resorcylic acid synthase. PMID:20630753

  15. Inhibition of a type III secretion system by the deletion of a short loop in one of its membrane proteins.

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A; Kitao, Akio; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A

    2013-05-01

    The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system. It is composed of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhBC). Here, the crystal structures of FlhBC from Salmonella typhimurium and Aquifex aeolicus are described at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. These flagellar FlhBC structures are similar to those of paralogues from the needle type III secretion system, with the major difference being in a linker that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. It was found that deletion of a short flexible loop in a globular part of Salmonella FlhBC leads to complete inhibition of secretion by the flagellar secretion system. Molecular-dynamics calculations demonstrate that the linker region is the most flexible part of FlhBC and that the deletion of the loop reduces this flexibility. These results are in good agreement with previous studies showing the importance of the linker in the function of FlhB and provide new insight into the relationship between the different parts of the FlhBC molecule. PMID:23633590

  16. A novel transcriptional autoregulatory loop enhances expression of the Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii Hrp type III secretion system.

    Merighi, Massimo; Majerczak, Doris R; Coplin, David L

    2005-02-15

    The hrp type III secretion regulon of Pantoea stewartii is regulated by a cascade involving the HrpX/HrpY two-component system, the HrpS enhancer-binding protein and the HrpL alternate sigma factor. hrpXY is both constitutive and autoregulated; HrpY controls hrpS; and HrpS activates hrpL. These regulatory genes are arranged in the order hrpL, hrpXY and hrpS and constitute three operons. This study describes a novel autoregulatory loop involving HrpS. Genetic experiments using a chromosomal hrpS-lacZ fusion demonstrated that ectopic expression of HrpS increases hrpS transcription and that this effect is blocked by polar mutations in hrpXY and hrpL and by a nonpolar mutation in hrpY. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis revealed a hrpL-hrpXY polycistronic mRNA. These results suggest that HrpS-mediated autoregulation is due to activation of hrpS by increased levels of HrpY resulting from read-through transcription of hrpXY from the hrpL promoter. This novel autoregulatory loop may serve to rapidly induce hrp genes during infection and to compensate for negative regulatory mechanisms that keep the regulon off in the insect vector. PMID:15751134

  17. The bacterium Pantoea stewartii uses two different type III secretion systems to colonize its plant host and insect vector.

    Correa, Valdir R; Majerczak, Doris R; Ammar, El-Desouky; Merighi, Massimo; Pratt, Richard C; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Coplin, David L; Redinbaugh, Margaret G

    2012-09-01

    Plant- and animal-pathogenic bacteria utilize phylogenetically distinct type III secretion systems (T3SS) that produce needle-like injectisomes or pili for the delivery of effector proteins into host cells. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (herein referred to as P. stewartii), the causative agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize, carries phylogenetically distinct T3SSs. In addition to an Hrc-Hrp T3SS, known to be essential for maize pathogenesis, P. stewartii has a second T3SS (Pantoea secretion island 2 [PSI-2]) that is required for persistence in its flea beetle vector, Chaetocnema pulicaria (Melsh). PSI-2 belongs to the Inv-Mxi-Spa T3SS family, typically found in animal pathogens. Mutagenesis of the PSI-2 psaN gene, which encodes an ATPase essential for secretion of T3SS effectors by the injectisome, greatly reduces both the persistence of P. stewartii in flea beetle guts and the beetle's ability to transmit P. stewartii to maize. Ectopic expression of the psaN gene complements these phenotypes. In addition, the PSI-2 psaN gene is not required for P. stewartii pathogenesis of maize and is transcriptionally upregulated in insects compared to maize tissues. Thus, the Hrp and PSI-2 T3SSs play different roles in the life cycle of P. stewartii as it alternates between its insect vector and plant host. PMID:22773631

  18. Increased urine level of amino-terminal peptide derivatives of type III procollagen in patients with liver diseases.

    Koide,Norio

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The amino-terminal peptides of type III procollagen (PIIIP in the urine of 40 patients with various liver diseases were determined with a commercial radioimmunoassay kit. The level of urinary PIIIP (uPIIIP was correlated well with serum PIIIP (sPIIIP in 9 patients, the coefficient of correlation being r = 0.836 (p less than 0.01 and the regression line being y = 1.42x + 24. Urinary PIIIP consisted of at least 4 different molecular species with molecular weights of 49 k, 18 k, 10 k and 4.6 k as estimated by column chromatography on Sephadex G-100. Furthermore. uPIIIP was found to be significantly elevated in acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and other liver diseases, in which the elevation of sPIIIP has been reported by others. The mean values +/- standard deviations of uPIIIP were 44.0 +/- 32.0, 60.4 +/- 32.0, 62.0 +/- 46.5, 53.0 +/- 27.1 and 48.1 +/- 22.8 ng/ml for the respective liver diseases, and 13.2 +/- 4.5 for the non-hepatic disease group.

  19. Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopAF1 suppresses plant immunity by targeting methionine recycling to block ethylene induction

    Washington, Erica J.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Finkel, Omri M.; Wan, Li; Kieber, Joseph J.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    HopAF1 is a type III effector protein of unknown function encoded in the genomes of several strains of Pseudomonas syringae and other plant pathogens. Structural modeling predicted that HopAF1 is closely related to deamidase proteins. Deamidation is the irreversible substitution of an amide group with a carboxylate group. Several bacterial virulence factors are deamidases that manipulate the activity of specific host protein substrates. We identified Arabidopsis methylthioadenosine nucleosidase proteins MTN1 and MTN2 as putative targets of HopAF1 deamidation. MTNs are enzymes in the Yang cycle, which is essential for the high levels of ethylene biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We hypothesized that HopAF1 inhibits the host defense response by manipulating MTN activity and consequently ethylene levels. We determined that bacterially delivered HopAF1 inhibits ethylene biosynthesis induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and that Arabidopsis mtn1 mtn2 mutant plants phenocopy the effect of HopAF1. Furthermore, we identified two conserved asparagines in MTN1 and MTN2 from Arabidopsis that confer loss of function phenotypes when deamidated via site-specific mutation. These residues are potential targets of HopAF1 deamidation. HopAF1-mediated manipulation of Yang cycle MTN proteins is likely an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby HopAF1 orthologs from multiple plant pathogens contribute to disease in a large variety of plant hosts. PMID:27274076

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease virus replicates independently of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and type III phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases.

    Berryman, Stephen; Moffat, Katy; Harak, Christian; Lohmann, Volker; Jackson, Terry

    2016-08-01

    Picornaviruses form replication complexes in association with membranes in structures called replication organelles. Common themes to emerge from studies of picornavirus replication are the need for cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). In infected cells, type III phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4KIIIs) generate elevated levels of PI4P, which is then exchanged for cholesterol at replication organelles. For the enteroviruses, replication organelles form at Golgi membranes in a process that utilizes PI4KIIIβ. Other picornaviruses, for example the cardioviruses, are believed to initiate replication at the endoplasmic reticulum and subvert PI4KIIIα to generate PI4P. Here we investigated the role of PI4KIII in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. Our results showed that, in contrast to the enteroviruses and the cardioviruses, FMDV replication does not require PI4KIII (PI4KIIIα and PI4KIIIβ), and PI4P levels do not increase in FMDV-infected cells and PI4P is not seen at replication organelles. These results point to a unique requirement towards lipids at the FMDV replication membranes. PMID:27093462

  1. Decreased abundance of type III secretion system-inducing signals in Arabidopsis mkp1 enhances resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

    Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Wan, Ying; Kim, Young-Mo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Peck, Scott C.

    2014-04-21

    Many phytopathogenic bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject defense-suppressing effector proteins into host cells. Genes encoding the T3SS are induced at the start of infection, yet host signals that initiate T3SS gene expression are poorly understood. Here we identify several plant-derived metabolites that induce the T3SS in the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. In addition, we report that mkp1 (mapk phosphatase 1), an Arabidopsis mutant that is more resistant to bacterial infection, produces decreased levels of these T3SS-inducing metabolites. Consistent with the observed decrease in these metabolites, T3SS effector delivery by DC3000 was impaired in mkp1. Addition of the bioactive metabolites to the mkp1-DC3000 interaction fully restored T3SS effector delivery and suppressed enhanced resistance in mkp1. Together, these results demonstrate that DC3000 perceives multiple signals derived from plants to initiate their virulence program, and reveal a new layer of molecular communication between plants and these pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Genetic Dissection of the Signaling Cascade that Controls Activation of the Shigella Type III Secretion System from the Needle Tip.

    Murillo, I; Martinez-Argudo, I; Blocker, A J

    2016-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (T3SSs) for virulence. The Shigella T3SS consists of a hollow needle, made of MxiH and protruding from the bacterial surface, anchored in both bacterial membranes by multimeric protein rings. Atop the needle lies the tip complex (TC), formed by IpaD and IpaB. Upon physical contact with eukaryotic host cells, T3S is initiated leading to formation of a pore in the eukaryotic cell membrane, which is made of IpaB and IpaC. Through the needle and pore channels, further bacterial proteins are translocated inside the host cell to meditate its invasion. IpaD and the needle are implicated in transduction of the host cell-sensing signal to the T3S apparatus. Furthermore, the sensing-competent TC seems formed of 4 IpaDs topped by 1 IpaB. However, nothing further is known about the activation process. To investigate IpaB's role during T3SS activation, we isolated secretion-deregulated IpaB mutants using random mutagenesis and a genetic screen. We found ipaB point mutations in leading to defects in secretion activation, which sometimes diminished pore insertion and host cell invasion. We also demonstrated IpaB communicates intramolecularly and intermolecularly with IpaD and MxiH within the TC because mutations affecting these interactions impair signal transduction. PMID:27277624

  3. Use of amino terminal type III procollagen peptide (P3NP) assay in methotrexate therapy for psoriasis

    Khan, S; Subedi, D; Chowdhury, M M U

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis continues to be a risk in patients receiving methotrexate for psoriasis. Measurement of amino terminal levels of type III procollagen (P3NP) has been advocated as an effective non‐invasive test for ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis that could avoid liver biopsies. An audit was conducted to assess the practice of P3NP monitoring using guidelines produced by Manchester and whether the agreed levels correlate with histological severity. Sixty five patients with 174 P3NP assays and 30 liver biopsies were reviewed between the years 1999 and 2003. Total number of patient‐methotrexate years was 278.9 and the mean cumulative dose of methotrexate received was 2000 (SD 1838) mg. A higher cumulative dose of methotrexate correlated significantly with high mean and maximum P3NP levels. Of the 30 liver biopsies, 26 (86.6%) showed normal histology or mild to moderate steatosis, three had focal fibrosis, and one had early cirrhosis. A median P3NP value of 5.8 μg/l or higher had a stronger correlation with histological severity. It is concluded that P3NP assay is a valuable adjunct to the clinical management of patients receiving long term methotrexate that can avoid or reduce unnecessary liver biopsies. PMID:16679477

  4. Structural Basis of Cytotoxicity Mediated by the Type III Secretion Toxin ExoU from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Gendrin, Claire; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Elsen, Sylvie; Lemaire, David; Skoufias, Dimitrios A.; Huber, Philippe; Attree, Ina; Dessen, Andréa

    2012-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a complex macromolecular machinery employed by a number of Gram-negative pathogens to inject effectors directly into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. ExoU from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most aggressive toxins injected by a T3SS, leading to rapid cell necrosis. Here we report the crystal structure of ExoU in complex with its chaperone, SpcU. ExoU folds into membrane-binding, bridging, and phospholipase domains. SpcU maintains the N-terminus of ExoU in an unfolded state, required for secretion. The phospholipase domain carries an embedded catalytic site whose position within ExoU does not permit direct interaction with the bilayer, which suggests that ExoU must undergo a conformational rearrangement in order to access lipids within the target membrane. The bridging domain connects catalytic domain and membrane-binding domains, the latter of which displays specificity to PI(4,5)P2. Both transfection experiments and infection of eukaryotic cells with ExoU-secreting bacteria show that ExoU ubiquitination results in its co-localization with endosomal markers. This could reflect an attempt of the infected cell to target ExoU for degradation in order to protect itself from its aggressive cytotoxic action. PMID:22496657

  5. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Yin, Wenbin; Ma, Minghong

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE) 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter) and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found), similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice) have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology. PMID:26942602

  6. Mathematical Model for Length Control by the Timing of Substrate Switching in the Type III Secretion System.

    Nariya, Maulik K; Israeli, Johnny; Shi, Jack J; Deeds, Eric J

    2016-04-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS) are complex bacterial structures that provide gram-negative pathogens with a unique virulence mechanism whereby they grow a needle-like structure in order to inject bacterial effector proteins into the cytoplasm of a host cell. Numerous experiments have been performed to understand the structural details of this nanomachine during the past decade. Despite the concerted efforts of molecular and structural biologists, several crucial aspects of the assembly of this structure, such as the regulation of the length of the needle itself, remain unclear. In this work, we used a combination of mathematical and computational techniques to better understand length control based on the timing of substrate switching, which is a possible mechanism for how bacteria ensure that the T3SS needles are neither too short nor too long. In particular, we predicted the form of the needle length distribution based on this mechanism, and found excellent agreement with available experimental data from Salmonella typhimurium with only a single free parameter. Although our findings provide preliminary evidence in support of the substrate switching model, they also make a set of quantitative predictions that, if tested experimentally, would assist in efforts to unambiguously characterize the regulatory mechanisms that control the growth of this crucial virulence factor. PMID:27078235

  7. Thermal-hydraulic stability tests for newly designed BWR rod bundle (step-III fuel type B)

    The Step-III Fuel Type B is a new fuel design for high burn-up operation in BWRs in Japan. The fuel design uses a 9x9 - 9 rod bundle to accommodate the high fuel duty of high burn-up operation and a square water-channel to provide enhanced neutron moderation. The objective of this study is to confirm the thermal-hydraulic stability performance of the new fuel design by tests which simulate the parallel channel configuration of the BWR core. The stability testing was performed at the NFI test loop. The test bundle geometry used for the stability test is a 3x3 heater rod bundle which has about 1/8 of the cross section area of the full size 9x9 - 9 rod bundle. Full size heater rods were used to simulate the fuel rods. For parallel channel simulation, a bypass channel with a 6x6 - 8 heater rod bundle was connected in parallel with the 3x3 rod bundle test channel. The stability test results showed typical flow oscillation features which have been described as density wave oscillations. The stationary limit cycle oscillation extended flow amplitudes to several tens of a percent of the nominal value, during which periodic dry-out and re-wetting were observed. The test results were used for verification of a stability analysis code, which demonstrated that the stability performance of the new fuel design has been conservatively predicted. (author)

  8. Metal binding properties and structure of a type III metallothionein from the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    Fernandez, Lucia Rubio; Vandenbussche, Guy; Roosens, Nancy; Govaerts, Cédric; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are low molecular weight proteins with cysteine-rich sequences that bind heavy metals with remarkably high affinities. Plant MTs differ from animal ones by a peculiar amino acid sequence organization consisting of two short Cys-rich terminal domains (containing from 4 to 8 Cys each) linked by a Cys free region of about 30 residues. In contrast with the current knowledge on the 3D structure of animal MTs, there is a striking lack of structural data on plant MTs. We have expressed and purified a type III MT from Noccaea caerulescens (previously Thlaspi caerulescens). This protein is able to bind a variety of cations including Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+), with different stoichiometries as shown by mass spectrometry. The protein displays a complete absence of periodic secondary structures as measured by far-UV circular dichroism, infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics. When attached onto a BIA-ATR biosensor, no significant structural change was observed upon removing the metal ions. PMID:22668884

  9. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease. PMID:23915008

  10. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System.

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M; Enninga, Jost; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found theEscherichia coliO157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of theShigella flexnerieffector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  11. Abundant type III lipid transfer proteins in Arabidopsis tapetum are secreted to the locule and become a constituent of the pollen exine.

    Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-11-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small secretory proteins in plants with defined lipid-binding structures for possible lipid exocytosis. Special groups of LTPs unique to the anther tapetum are abundant, but their functions are unclear. We studied a special group of LTPs, type III LTPs, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Their transcripts were restricted to the anther tapetum, with levels peaking at the developmental stage of maximal pollen-wall exine synthesis. We constructed an LTP-Green Fluorescent Protein (LTP-GFP) plasmid, transformed it into wild-type plants, and monitored LTP-GFP in developing anthers with confocal laser scanning microscopy. LTP-GFP appeared in the tapetum and was secreted via the endoplasmic reticulum-trans-Golgi network machinery into the locule. It then moved to the microspore surface and remained as a component of exine. Immuno-transmission electron microscopy of native LTP in anthers confirmed the LTP-GFP observations. The in vivo association of LTP-GFP and exine in anthers was not observed with non-type III or structurally modified type III LTPs or in transformed exine-defective mutant plants. RNA interference knockdown of individual type III LTPs produced no observable mutant phenotypes. RNA interference knockdown of two type III LTPs produced microscopy-observable morphologic changes in the intine underneath the exine (presumably as a consequence of changes in the exine not observed by transmission electron microscopy) and pollen susceptible to dehydration damage. Overall, we reveal a novel transfer pathway of LTPs in which LTPs bound or nonbound to exine precursors are secreted from the tapetum to become microspore exine constituents; this pathway explains the need for plentiful LTPs to incorporate into the abundant exine. PMID:24096413

  12. Profile of differentially expressed genes mediated by the type III epidermal growth factor receptor mutation expressed in a small-cell lung cancer cell line

    Pedersen, M.W.; Andersen, Thomas Thykjær; Ørntoft, Torben Falck;

    2001-01-01

    understanding of how the EGFRvIII contributes to the malignant phenotype is of major importance for future therapy. The GeneChip Hu6800Set developed by Affymetrix was used to identify changes in gene expression caused by the expression of EGFRvIII. The cell line selected for the study was an EGF receptor...... negative small-cell-lung cancer cell line, GLC3, stably transfected with the EGFRvIII gene in a Tet-On system. By comparison of mRNA levels in EGFRvIII-GLC3 with those of Tet-On-GLC3, it was found that the levels of mRNAs encoding several transcription factors (ATF-3, JunD, and c-Myb), cell adhesion......Previous studies have shown a correlation between expression of the EGF receptor type III mutation (EGFRvIII) and a more malignant phenotype of various cancers including: non-small-cell lung cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, prostate cancer and breast cancer. Thus, a detailed molecular genetic...

  13. Development, validation, and utilization of a novel antibody specific to the type III chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    McFarlane, H O; Joseph, N T; Maddineni, S R; Ramachandran, R; Bédécarrats, G Y

    2011-02-01

    Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRH-Rs) have been characterized in chickens to date: cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III, with cGnRH-R-III being the predominant pituitary form. The purpose of the present study was to first validate a novel antibody for the specific detection of cGnRH-R-III and second, using this antibody, detect changes in cGnRH-R-III protein levels in the pituitary gland of male and female chickens during a reproductive cycle. The localization of cGnRH-R-III within the anterior pituitary gland was also determined. Western blotting of pituitary extracts and transiently transfected COS-7 cell lysates revealed that our antibody is highly specific to cGnRH-R-III protein. Similarly, when used in immunocytochemistry, this antibody specifically detects cells expressing cGnRH-R-III and not cGnRH-R-I. Western blot analyses of chicken pituitary gland homogenates show that cGnRH-R-III protein levels are significantly greater in sexually mature birds than in immature birds or birds at the end of a reproductive cycle (P chickens. PMID:21093197

  14. Acquired type III secretion system determines environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the interaction with bacterivorous protists.

    Carsten Matz

    Full Text Available Genome analyses of marine microbial communities have revealed the widespread occurrence of genomic islands (GIs, many of which encode for protein secretion machineries described in the context of bacteria-eukaryote interactions. Yet experimental support for the specific roles of such GIs in aquatic community interactions remains scarce. Here, we test for the contribution of type III secretion systems (T3SS to the environmental fitness of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Comparisons of V. parahaemolyticus wild types and T3SS-defective mutants demonstrate that the T3SS encoded on genome island VPaI-7 (T3SS-2 promotes survival of V. parahaemolyticus in the interaction with diverse protist taxa. Enhanced persistence was found to be due to T3SS-2 mediated cytotoxicity and facultative parasitism of V. parahaemolyticus on coexisting protists. Growth in the presence of bacterivorous protists and the T3SS-2 genotype showed a strong correlation across environmental and clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. Short-term microcosm experiments provide evidence that protistan hosts facilitate the invasion of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus into a coastal plankton community, and that water temperature and productivity further promote enhanced survival of T3SS-2 positive V. parahaemolyticus. This study is the first to describe the fitness advantage of GI-encoded functions in a microbial food web, which may provide a mechanistic explanation for the global spread and the seasonal dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus pathotypes, including the pandemic serotype cluster O3:K6, in aquatic environments.

  15. Measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) employing the ADVIA Centaur platform. Validation, reference interval and comparison to UniQ RIA

    Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Heickendorff, Lene; Nexo, Ebba

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, measurement of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) was introduced as a part of the hepatic cirrhotic marker enhanced liver fibrosis™ test on the automated ADVIA Centaur® immunoassay platform (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA). In...

  16. Closing the circle on the discovery of genes encoding Hrp regulon members and type III secretion system effectors in the genomes of three model Pseudomonas syringae strains

    Pseudomonas syringae strains translocate large and distinct collections of effector proteins into plant cells via the type III secretion system (T3SS). P. syringae effectors are designated Hop (Hrp outer protein) or Avr (avirulence) proteins. Some Hop proteins are considered to be extracellular T3...

  17. Further Characterization of a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) and of a New Effector Protein from a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas Hydrophila - Part I

    A type III secretion system (T3SS)-associated cytotoxin, AexT, with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bifuncational toxins ExoT/S, was recently identified from a fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida. In this study, we reported the molecular cha...

  18. Inflammatory Acne in the Asian Skin Type III Treated with a Square Pulse, Time Resolved Spectral Distribution IPL System: A Preliminary Study

    Lee, Geun-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims: Acne remains a severe problem for both patients and clinicians. Various approaches using photosurgery and phototherapy have been reported with varying degrees of success and robustness of results. An improved intense pulsed light (IPL) system has become available with interesting beam characteristic which might improve IPL treatment of inflammatory acne in the Asian skin, Fitzpatrick type III/IV.

  19. Deletions in the repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion effector genes reveal functional overlap among effectors

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals disarm and remodel host cells by injecting large repertoires of effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS). The repertoires of individual strains appear to function as robust systems that can tolerate loss of individual effectors with little or ...

  20. A survey of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion system effector repertoire reveals several effectors that are deleterious when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The injection of nearly 30 effector proteins by the type III secretion system underlies the ability of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 to cause disease in tomato and other host plants. The search for effector functions is complicated by redundancy within the repertoire and by plant R-g...

  1. Search for type-III Seesaw heavy leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 8$ TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    A search for the pair-production of heavy leptons ($N^0,L^{\\pm}$) predicted by the type-III seesaw theory formulated to explain the origin of small neutrino masses is presented. The decay channels $N^0\\rightarrow W^{\\pm}l^{\\mp}$ ($\\ell = e, \\mu, \\tau$) and $L^{\\pm}\\rightarrow W^\\pm \

  2. Density gradient centrifugation: Application to the separation of macerals of type I, II, and III sedimentary organic matter

    Stankiewicz, B.A.; Kruge, M.A.; Crelling, J.C.; Salmon, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    Samples of organic matter from nine well-known geological units (Green River Fm., Tasmanian Tasmanite, Lower Toarcian Sh. of the Paris Basin, Duwi Fm., New Albany Sh., Monterey Fm., Herrin No. 6 coal, Eocene coal, and Miocene lignite from Kalimantan) were processed by density gradient centrifugation (DGC) to isolate the constituent macerals. Optimal separation, as well as the liberation of microcrystalline pyrite from the organic matter, was obtained by particle size minimization prior to DGC by treatment with liquid N2 and micronization in a fluid energy mill. The resulting small particle size limits the use of optical microscopy, thus microfluorimetry and analytical pyrolysis were also employed to assess the quality and purity of the fractions. Each of the samples exhibits one dominant DGC peak (corresponding to alginite in the Green River Fm., amorphinite in the Lower Toarcian Sh., vitrinite in the Herrin No. 6, etc.) which shifts from 1.05 g mL-1 for the Type I kerogens to between 1.18 and 1.23 g mL-1 for Type II and II-S. The characteristic densities for Type III organic matter are greater still, being 1.27 g mL-1 for the hydrogen-rich Eocene coal, 1.29 g mL-1 for the Carboniferous coal and 1.43 g mL-1 for the oxygen-rich Miocene lignite. Among Type II kerogens, the DGC profile represents a compositional continuum from undegraded alginite through (bacterial) degraded amorphinite; therefore chemical and optical properties change gradually with increasing density. The separation of useful quantities of macerals that occur in only minor amounts is difficult. Such separations require large amounts of starting material and require multiple processing steps. Complete maceral separation for some samples using present methods seems remote. Samples containing macerals with significant density differences due to heteroatom diversity (e.g., preferential sulfur or oxygen concentration in the one maceral), on the other hand, may be successfully separated (e.g., coals and

  3. Towards an entirely endovascular aortic world: an update of techniques and outcomes for endovascular and open treatment of type I, II, and III endoleaks.

    Mangialardi, Nicola; Orrico, Matteo; Ronchey, Sonia; Praquin, Barbara; Alberti, Vittorio; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is largely the most adopted strategy for aneurysmal disease of the aorta. Nevertheless, the high incidence of reintervention makes it difficult to identify EVAR as a definitive solution; in particular, the most frequent indication of reintervention is endoleak, which is defined as persistent flow into the aneurysmal sac from different sources. Several treatment strategies are described. A contemporary literature search was performed with the intent of describing techniques and outcomes of endovascular and open strategies to type I, II, and III endoleak. Described techniques and outcomes were organized by indication (type I, II, and III endoleak) and by type of approach (endovascular, open, and laparoscopic) to give an overview of the current status of the treatment for the three most frequent types of endoleak. Several endovascular means are described in the literature for the treatment of endoleak. PMID:27465391

  4. Impairment of type I but not type III IFN signaling by hepatitis C virus infection influences antiviral responses in primary human hepatocytes.

    Jacques Friborg

    Full Text Available Peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda, a type III interferon (IFN, acts through a unique receptor complex with limited cellular expression outside the liver which may result in a differentiated tolerability profile compared to peginterferon alfa (alfa. In Phase 2b clinical studies, Lambda administered in combination with ribavirin (RBV was efficacious in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection representing genotypes 1 through 4, and was associated with more rapid declines in HCV RNA compared to alfa plus RBV. To gain insights into potential mechanisms for this finding, we investigated the effects of HCV replication on IFN signaling in primary human hepatocytes (PHH and in induced hepatocyte-like cells (iHLCs. HCV infection resulted in rapid down-regulation of the type I IFN-α receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 transcript in hepatocytes while the transcriptional level of the unique IFN-λ receptor subunit IL28RA was transiently increased. In line with this observation, IFN signaling was selectively impaired in infected cells upon stimulation with alfa but not in response to Lambda. Importantly, in contrast to alfa, Lambda was able to induce IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression in HCV-infected hepatocytes, reflecting the onset of innate responses. Moreover, global transcriptome analysis in hepatocytes indicated that Lambda stimulation prolonged the expression of various ISGs that are potentially beneficial to antiviral defense mechanisms. Collectively, these observed effects of HCV infection on IFN receptor expression and signaling within infected hepatocytes provide a possible explanation for the more pronounced early virologic responses observed in patients treated with Lambda compared to alfa.

  5. Lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate causes mitochondrial defects, altered autophagy, and neuronal death in the mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis III type C.

    Pshezhetsky, Alexey V

    2016-06-01

    The genetic metabolic disease mucopolysaccharidosis III type C (MPS IIIC, Sanfilippo disease type C) causes progressive neurodegeneration in infants and children, leading to dementia and death before adulthood. MPS IIIC stands out among lysosomal diseases because it is the only one caused by a deficiency not of a hydrolase but of HGSNAT (heparan--glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase), which catalyzes acetylation of glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS) prior to its hydrolysis. PMID:25998837

  6. New method of identification of I and III collagen types at forming fibril framework of mesonephros and metanephros of human embryos

    Boyko T.A.; Shapovalova Ye.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Becoming of collagen composition of fibril framework of meso- and metanephros was studied by the method of immunohistochemistry and lectinochistochemistry on 124 human embryos in age from 21 days to 12 weeks of intrauterine development. Embryos were fixed in formalin and embedded in the paraffin. Primary antibodies were monoclonal antibodies to the collagen type I and III. Lectins of Perca fluviatilis and Vica Alba were used. It is received, that collagen fibers type I were stained by lectin ...

  7. Fraturas supracondilares tipo III do úmero em crianças: tratamento com braço reto Type III supracondylar fractures of the humerus in children: straight-arm treatment

    Jamish Gandhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As fraturas supracondilares de Gartland tipo III são as lesões comuns em crianças. Apresentamos um método de redução manipulativa, imobilização e fixação usando gesso-de-Paris, com o cotovelo em extensão total (braço reto. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo analisando todos os pacientes com fraturas supracondilares de Gartland tipo III no Wellington Public Hospital, durante o período de fevereiro de 1999 a março de 2007. Os sete pacientes foram tratados pela técnica do braço reto, e os desfechos clínicos foram revisados neste estudo. RESULTADO: Todos os pais ficaram satisfeitos com os resultados. Usando os critérios de Flynn,6 seis pacientes atingiram excelentes resultados e um teve resultado bom quando se analisou o ângulo de alinhamento. Ao verificar a amplitude de movimento, quatro pacientes tiveram resultados bons, um moderado e dois, ruim. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento com braço reto das fraturas supracondilares de Gartland tipo III parece ser uma alternativa não-invasiva e segura da fixação com fio K.OBJECTIVE: Gartland type III supracondylar fractures are a common injury in children. We present a method of manipulative reduction, immobilization and fixation using Plaster of Paris with the elbow in full extension (straight-arm. METHOD: Retrospective study analyzing all patients with Gartland type III supracondylar fractures at the Wellington Public Hospital during the period from February 1999 to March 2007. The seven patients had been treated with the straight-arm technique, and the clinical outcomes are reviewed in this study. RESULT: All the parents were satisfied with the results. Using the Flynn criteria6, six patients achieved excellent results and one good, in relation to the carrying angle. With regard to the range of motion, four patients had good results, one fair, and two poor. CONCLUSION: Straight-arm treatment of Gartland type III supracondylar fractures appears to be a non-invasive and safe

  8. Supramolecular structure and functional analysis of the type III secretion system in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24

    Ping eLiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in nonpathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homologue protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS.

  9. Characterization of the N-terminal domain of BteA: a Bordetella type III secreted cytotoxic effector.

    Chen Guttman

    Full Text Available BteA, a 69-kDa cytotoxic protein, is a type III secretion system (T3SS effector in the classical Bordetella, the etiological agents of pertussis and related mammalian respiratory diseases. Currently there is limited information regarding the structure of BteA or its subdomains, and no insight as to the identity of its eukaryotic partners(s and their modes of interaction with BteA. The mechanisms that lead to BteA dependent cell death also remain elusive. The N-terminal domain of BteA is multifunctional, acting as a docking platform for its cognate chaperone (BtcA in the bacterium, and targeting the protein to lipid raft microdomains within the eukaryotic host cell. In this study we describe the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of this domain (BteA287 and determine its architecture. We characterize BteA287 as being a soluble and highly stable domain which is rich in alpha helical content. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR experiments combined with size exclusion and analytical ultracentrifugation measurements confirm these observations and reveal BteA287 to be monomeric in nature with a tendency to oligomerize at concentrations above 200 µM. Furthermore, diffusion-NMR demonstrated that the first 31 residues of BteA287 are responsible for the apparent aggregation behavior of BteA287. Light scattering analyses and small angle X-ray scattering experiments reveal a prolate ellipsoidal bi-pyramidal dumb-bell shape. Thus, our biophysical characterization is a first step towards structure determination of the BteA N-terminal domain.

  10. Perturbation of maize phenylpropanoid metabolism by an AvrE family type III effector from Pantoea stewartii.

    Asselin, Jo Ann E; Lin, Jinshan; Perez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Gentzel, Irene; Majerczak, Doris; Opiyo, Stephen O; Zhao, Wanying; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Coplin, David L; Blakeslee, Joshua J; Mackey, David

    2015-03-01

    AvrE family type III effector proteins share the ability to suppress host defenses, induce disease-associated cell death, and promote bacterial growth. However, despite widespread contributions to numerous bacterial diseases in agriculturally important plants, the mode of action of these effectors remains largely unknown. WtsE is an AvrE family member required for the ability of Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii (Pnss) to proliferate efficiently and cause wilt and leaf blight symptoms in maize (Zea mays) plants. Notably, when WtsE is delivered by a heterologous system into the leaf cells of susceptible maize seedlings, it alone produces water-soaked disease symptoms reminiscent of those produced by Pnss. Thus, WtsE is a pathogenicity and virulence factor in maize, and an Escherichia coli heterologous delivery system can be used to study the activity of WtsE in isolation from other factors produced by Pnss. Transcriptional profiling of maize revealed the effects of WtsE, including induction of genes involved in secondary metabolism and suppression of genes involved in photosynthesis. Targeted metabolite quantification revealed that WtsE perturbs maize metabolism, including the induction of coumaroyl tyramine. The ability of mutant WtsE derivatives to elicit transcriptional and metabolic changes in susceptible maize seedlings correlated with their ability to promote disease. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors that block metabolic flux into the phenylpropanoid pathways targeted by WtsE also disrupted the pathogenicity and virulence activity of WtsE. While numerous metabolites produced downstream of the shikimate pathway are known to promote plant defense, our results indicate that misregulated induction of phenylpropanoid metabolism also can be used to promote pathogen virulence. PMID:25635112

  11. Perturbation of Maize Phenylpropanoid Metabolism by an AvrE Family Type III Effector from Pantoea stewartii1[OPEN

    Asselin, Jo Ann E.; Lin, Jinshan; Perez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Gentzel, Irene; Majerczak, Doris; Opiyo, Stephen O.; Zhao, Wanying; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Coplin, David L.; Blakeslee, Joshua J.; Mackey, David

    2015-01-01

    AvrE family type III effector proteins share the ability to suppress host defenses, induce disease-associated cell death, and promote bacterial growth. However, despite widespread contributions to numerous bacterial diseases in agriculturally important plants, the mode of action of these effectors remains largely unknown. WtsE is an AvrE family member required for the ability of Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii (Pnss) to proliferate efficiently and cause wilt and leaf blight symptoms in maize (Zea mays) plants. Notably, when WtsE is delivered by a heterologous system into the leaf cells of susceptible maize seedlings, it alone produces water-soaked disease symptoms reminiscent of those produced by Pnss. Thus, WtsE is a pathogenicity and virulence factor in maize, and an Escherichia coli heterologous delivery system can be used to study the activity of WtsE in isolation from other factors produced by Pnss. Transcriptional profiling of maize revealed the effects of WtsE, including induction of genes involved in secondary metabolism and suppression of genes involved in photosynthesis. Targeted metabolite quantification revealed that WtsE perturbs maize metabolism, including the induction of coumaroyl tyramine. The ability of mutant WtsE derivatives to elicit transcriptional and metabolic changes in susceptible maize seedlings correlated with their ability to promote disease. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors that block metabolic flux into the phenylpropanoid pathways targeted by WtsE also disrupted the pathogenicity and virulence activity of WtsE. While numerous metabolites produced downstream of the shikimate pathway are known to promote plant defense, our results indicate that misregulated induction of phenylpropanoid metabolism also can be used to promote pathogen virulence. PMID:25635112

  12. Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system mutants exhibit delayed vacuolar escape phenotypes in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J; Nair, Vinod; Warawa, Jonathan M; Woods, Donald E; Gherardini, Frank C

    2008-07-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen capable of surviving and replicating within eukaryotic cells. Recent studies have shown that B. pseudomallei Bsa type III secretion system 3 (T3SS-3) mutants exhibit vacuolar escape and replication defects in J774.2 murine macrophages. In the present study, we characterized the interactions of a B. pseudomallei bsaZ mutant with RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Following uptake, the mutant was found to survive and replicate within infected RAW 264.7 cells over an 18-h period. In addition, high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and RANTES, but not IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, were detected in culture supernatants harvested from infected monolayers. The subcellular location of B. pseudomallei within infected RAW 264.7 cells was determined, and as expected, the bsaZ mutant demonstrated early-vacuolar-escape defects. Interestingly, however, experiments also indicated that this mutant was capable of delayed vacuolar escape. Consistent with this finding, evidence of actin-based motility and multinucleated giant cell formation were observed between 12 and 18 h postinfection. Further studies demonstrated that a triple mutant defective in all three B. pseudomallei T3SSs exhibited the same phenotype as the bsaZ mutant, indicating that functional T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 did not appear to be responsible for the delayed escape phenotype in RAW 264.7 cells. Based upon these findings, it appears that B. pseudomallei may not require T3SS-1, -2, and -3 to facilitate survival, delayed vacuolar escape, and actin-based motility in activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. PMID:18443088

  13. Genetic inviability is a major driver of type III survivorship in experimental families of a highly fecund marine bivalve.

    Plough, L V; Shin, G; Hedgecock, D

    2016-02-01

    The offspring of most highly fecund marine fish and shellfish suffer substantial mortality early in the life cycle, complicating prediction of recruitment and fisheries management. Early mortality has long been attributed to environmental factors and almost never to genetic sources. Previous work on a variety of marine bivalve species uncovered substantial genetic inviability among the offspring of inbred crosses, suggesting a large load of early-acting deleterious recessive mutations. However, genetic inviability of randomly bred offspring has not been addressed. Here, genome-wide surveys reveal widespread, genotype-dependent mortality in randomly bred, full-sib progenies of wild-caught Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas). Using gene-mapping methods, we infer that 11-19 detrimental alleles per family render 97.9-99.8% of progeny inviable. The variable genomic positions of viability loci among families imply a surprisingly large load of partially dominant or additive detrimental mutations in wild adult oysters. Although caution is required in interpreting the relevance of experimental results for natural field environments, we argue that the observed genetic inviability corresponds with type III survivorship, which is characteristic of both hatchery and field environments and that our results, therefore, suggest the need for additional experiments under the near-natural conditions of mesocosms. We explore the population genetic implications of our results, calculating a detrimental mutation rate that is comparable to that estimated for conifers and other highly fecund perennial plants. Genetic inviability ought to be considered as a potential major source of low and variable recruitment in highly fecund marine animals. PMID:26756438

  14. Lambda interferon (IFN-lambda), a type III IFN, is induced by viruses and IFNs and displays potent antiviral activity against select virus infections in vivo

    Ank, Nina; West, Hans; Bartholdy, Christina;

    2006-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (interleukin-28/29 or lambda interferon [IFN-lambda]) are cytokines with IFN-like activities. Here we show that several classes of viruses induce expression of IFN-lambda1 and -lambda2/3 in similar patterns. The IFN-lambdas were-unlike alpha/beta interferon (IFN......-alpha potently restricted both viruses. Using three murine models for generalized virus infections, we found that while recombinant IFN-alpha reduced the viral load after infection with EMCV, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), and HSV-2, treatment with recombinant IFN-lambda in vivo did not affect viral......-alpha/beta)-induced directly by stimulation with IFN-alpha or -lambda, thus identifying type III IFNs as IFN-stimulated genes. In vitro assays revealed that IFN-lambdas have appreciable antiviral activity against encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) but limited activity against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), whereas IFN...

  15. Lambda Interferon (IFN-gamma), a Type III IFN, is induced by viruses and IFNs and displays potent antiviral activity against select virus infections in vivo

    Ank, Nina; West, Hans; Bartholdy, C.;

    2006-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (interleukin-28/29 or lambda interferon [IFN-lambda]) are cytokines with IFN-like activities. Here we show that several classes of viruses induce expression of IFN-lambda1 and -lambda2/3 in similar patterns. The IFN-lambdas were-unlike alpha/beta interferon (IFN......-alpha potently restricted both viruses. Using three murine models for generalized virus infections, we found that while recombinant IFN-alpha reduced the viral load after infection with EMCV, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), and HSV-2, treatment with recombinant IFN-lambda in vivo did not affect viral......-alpha/beta)-induced directly by stimulation with IFN-alpha or -lambda, thus identifying type III IFNs as IFN-stimulated genes. In vitro assays revealed that IFN-lambdas have appreciable antiviral activity against encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) but limited activity against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), whereas IFN...

  16. Effect of obesity and exercise on the expression of the novel myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5

    Jonathan M. Peterson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle is a major contributor to the development of type 2 diabetes. Endurance exercise training has long been established as an effective means to directly restore skeletal muscle glucose and lipid uptake and metabolism. However, in addition to the direct effects of skeletal muscle on glucose and lipids, there is renewed interest in the ability of skeletal muscle to coordinate metabolic activity of other tissues, such as adipose tissue and liver. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of endurance exercise on the expression level of two novel muscle-derived secreted factors, or myokines, Myonectin and Fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5, the precursor for Irisin. Methods. We performed immunoblot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Myonectin and FNDC5 in the diaphragm muscles of obese Zucker rat (OZR and lean Zucker rat (LZR with 9 weeks of aerobic training on a motorized treadmill. Results. We show that myonectin gene expression is increased in the OZR model of obesity and decreases with exercise in both lean and obese Zucker rats. Conversely, myonectin protein concentration was elevated with exercise. Similarly, FNDC5 mRNA levels are significantly higher in the OZR, however exercise training had no effect on the expression level of FNDC5 in either the LZR or OZR. We did not observe any difference in muscle protein content of Irisin with obesity or exercise. Conclusion. Our data shows that exercise training does not increase either FNDC5 or myonectin gene expression, indicating that increased transcriptional regulation of these myokines is not induced by exercise. However, our data also indicates a yet to be explored disconnect between myonectin gene expression and protein content. Further, this report highlights the importance of verifying reference genes when completing gene expression analysis. We found that many commonly used reference genes varied significantly by

  17. The chicken type III GnRH receptor homologue is predominantly expressed in the pituitary, and exhibits similar ligand selectivity to the type I receptor.

    Joseph, Nerine T; Morgan, Kevin; Sellar, Robin; McBride, Derek; Millar, Robert P; Dunn, Ian C

    2009-07-01

    Two GnRH isoforms (cGnRH-I and GnRH-II) and two GnRH receptor subtypes (cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III) occur in chickens. Differential roles for these molecules in regulating gonadotrophin secretion or other functions are unclear. To investigate this we cloned cGnRH-R-III from a broiler chicken and compared its structure, expression and pharmacological properties with cGnRH-R-I. The broiler cGnRH-R-III cDNA was 100% identical to the sequence reported in the red jungle fowl and white leghorn breed. Pituitary cGnRH-R-III mRNA was approximately 1400-fold more abundant than cGnRH-R-I mRNA. Northern analysis indicated a single cGnRH-R-III transcript. A pronounced sex and age difference existed, with higher pituitary transcript levels in sexually mature females versus juvenile females. In contrast, higher expression levels occurred in juvenile males versus sexually mature males. Functional studies in COS-7 cells indicated that cGnRH-R-III has a higher binding affinity for GnRH-II than cGnRH-I (K(d): 0.57 vs 19.8 nM) with more potent stimulation of inositol phosphate production (ED(50): 0.8 vs 4.38 nM). Similar results were found for cGnRH-R-I, (K(d): 0.51 vs 10.8 nM) and (ED(50): 0.7 vs 2.8 nM). The initial rate of internalisation was faster for cGnRH-R-III than cGnRH-R-I (26 vs 15.8%/min). Effects of GnRH antagonists were compared at the two receptors. Antagonist #27 distinguished between cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III (IC(50): 2.3 vs 351 nM). These results suggest that cGnRH-R-III is probably the major mediator of pituitary gonadotroph function, that antagonist #27 may allow delineation of receptor subtype function in vitro and in vivo and that tissue-specific recruitment of cGnRH-R isoforms has occurred during evolution. PMID:19380456

  18. Plasma Pro-C3 (N-terminal type III collagen propeptide) predicts fibrosis progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Nielsen, Mette J.; Veidal, Sanne S.; Karsdal, Morten A.;

    2015-01-01

    of helical collagen type III degradation (C3M), in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. METHOD: Pro-C3 and C3M were measured by ELISA in plasma from CHC patients (n = 194) from a prior phase II antifibrotic trial (NCT00244751). Plasma samples and paired liver biopsies were obtained at baseline and......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Fibrogenesis results in release of certain extracellular matrix protein fragments into the circulation. We evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic performance of two novel serological markers, the precisely cleaved N-terminal propeptide of type III collagen (Pro-C3) and a peptide...... after 1-year. Patients were stratified according to Ishak stages 2-4. Internal cross-validation was performed by bootstrap analysis. RESULTS: Pro-C3 levels were significantly higher in CHC patients in Ishak stage 4 compared to stage 2 (P < 0.001) or 3 (P < 0.01). Pro-C3 could significantly distinguish...

  19. Purification, crystal structure determination and functional characterization of type III antifreeze proteins from the European eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    Wilkens, Casper; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Ramløv, Hans;

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are essential components of many organisms adaptation to cold temperatures. Fish type III AFPs are divided into two groups, SP isoforms being much less active than QAE1 isoforms. Two type III AFPs from Zoarces viviparus, a QAE1 (ZvAFP13) and an SP (ZvAFP6) isoform, are...... here characterized and their crystal structures determined. We conclude that the higher activity of the QAE1 isoforms cannot be attributed to single residues, but rather a combination of structural effects. Furthermore both ZvAFP6 and ZvAFP13 crystal structures have water molecules around T18...... equivalent to the tetrahedral-like waters previously identified in a neutron crystal structure. Interestingly, ZvAFP6 forms dimers in the crystal, with a significant dimer interface. The presence of ZvAFP6 dimers was confirmed in solution by native electrophoresis and gel filtration. To our knowledge this is...

  20. Compound Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Type II and III Kerogen Extracted by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-IRMS

    Socki, Richard A.; Pernia, Denet; Evans, Michael; Fu, Qi; Bissada, Kadry K.; Curiale, Joseph A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Hydrogen (H) isotopes in understanding oil and gas resource plays is in its infancy. Described here is a technique for H isotope analysis of organic compounds pyrolyzed from oil and gas shale-derived kerogen. Application of this technique will progress our understanding. This work complements that of Pernia et al. (2013, this meeting) by providing a novel method for the H isotope analysis of specific compounds in the characterization of kerogen extracted by analytically diverse techniques. Hydrogen isotope analyses were carried out entirely "on-line" utilizing a CDS 5000 Pyroprobe connected to a Thermo Trace GC Ultra interfaced with a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS. Also, a split of GC-separated products was sent to a DSQ II quadrupole MS to make semi-quantitative compositional measurements of the extracted compounds. Kerogen samples from five different basins (type II and III) were dehydrated (heated to 80 C overnight in vacuum) and analyzed for their H isotope compositions by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS. This technique takes pyrolysis products separated via GC and reacts them in a high temperature conversion furnace (1450 C) which quantitatively forms H2, following a modified method of Burgoyne and Hayes, (1998, Anal. Chem., 70, 5136-5141). Samples ranging from approximately 0.5 to 1.0mg in size, were pyrolyzed at 800 C for 30s. Compounds were separated on a Poraplot Q GC column. Hydrogen isotope data from all kerogen samples typically show enrichment in D from low to high molecular weight compounds. Water (H2O) average deltaD = -215.2 (V-SMOW), ranging from -271.8 for the Marcellus Shale to -51.9 for the Polish Shale. Higher molecular weight compounds like toluene (C7H8) have an average deltaD of -89.7 0/00, ranging from -156.0 for the Barnett Shale to -50.0 for the Monterey Shale. We interpret these data as representative of potential H isotope exchange between hydrocarbons and sediment pore water during formation within each basin. Since hydrocarbon H isotopes

  1. Quantification of the physiochemical constraints on the export of spider silk proteins by Salmonella type III secretion

    Voigt Christopher A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The type III secretion system (T3SS is a molecular machine in gram negative bacteria that exports proteins through both membranes to the extracellular environment. It has been previously demonstrated that the T3SS encoded in Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1 can be harnessed to export recombinant proteins. Here, we demonstrate the secretion of a variety of unfolded spider silk proteins and use these data to quantify the constraints of this system with respect to the export of recombinant protein. Results To test how the timing and level of protein expression affects secretion, we designed a hybrid promoter that combines an IPTG-inducible system with a natural genetic circuit that controls effector expression in Salmonella (psicA. LacO operators are placed in various locations in the psicA promoter and the optimal induction occurs when a single operator is placed at the +5nt (234-fold and a lower basal level of expression is achieved when a second operator is placed at -63nt to take advantage of DNA looping. Using this tool, we find that the secretion efficiency (protein secreted divided by total expressed is constant as a function of total expressed. We also demonstrate that the secretion flux peaks at 8 hours. We then use whole gene DNA synthesis to construct codon optimized spider silk genes for full-length (3129 amino acids Latrodectus hesperus dragline silk, Bombyx mori cocoon silk, and Nephila clavipes flagelliform silk and PCR is used to create eight truncations of these genes. These proteins are all unfolded polypeptides and they encompass a variety of length, charge, and amino acid compositions. We find those proteins fewer than 550 amino acids reliably secrete and the probability declines significantly after ~700 amino acids. There also is a charge optimum at -2.4, and secretion efficiency declines for very positively or negatively charged proteins. There is no significant correlation with hydrophobicity

  2. Expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen in human fetal tissues: comparison with expression of mRNAs for collagen types I, II, and III

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the topographic distribution of the multiple mRNAs coding for a novel human short-chain collagen, the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen. To identify the tissues and cells expressing these mRNAs, human fetal tissues of 15-19 gestational wk were studied by Northern and in situ hybridizations. The distribution pattern of the type XIII collagen mRNAs was compared with that of fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III using specific human cDNA probes for each collagen type. No...

  3. Yersinia enterocolitica Type III Secretion Depends on the Proton Motive Force but Not on the Flagellar Motor Components MotA and MotB

    Wilharm, Gottfried; Lehmann, Verena; Krauss, Kristina; Lehnert, Beatrix; Richter, Susanna; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Heesemann, Jürgen; Trülzsch, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    The flagellum is believed to be the common ancestor of all type III secretion systems (TTSSs). In Yersinia enterocolitica, expression of the flagellar TTSS and the Ysc (Yop secretion) TTSS are inversely regulated. We therefore hypothesized that the Ysc TTSS may adopt flagellar motor components in order to use the pathogenicity-related translocon in a drill-like manner. As a prerequisite for this hypothesis, we first tested a requirement for the proton motive force by both systems using the pr...

  4. PSYCHOMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SCALE FOR TREATMENT ADHERENCE IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS VERSION III (EATDMIII©) IN A SAMPLE OF DIABETICS PATIENTS OF COSTA RICA

    Villalobos-Pérez, Alfonso; JUAN C. BRENES-SÁENZ; Quirós-Morales, Diego; León-Sanabria, Giovanny

    2006-01-01

    The Scale for Treatment Adherence in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus version III (EATDMIII©) was tested. It was compounded by the following factors: Family Support, Organization and Community Support, Physical Exercise, Medical Control, Hygiene and SelfCare, Diet and Assessment of Physical Condition. The research was developed at Dr. Rafael Ángel Calderón Guardia Hospital, Costa Rica, n=104 subjects, both genders, during the months of FebruaryMarch 2006. The instrument showed a high reliability (á=...

  5. Synthesis of Unnatural 2-Substituted Quinolones and 1,3-Diketones by a Member of Type III Polyketide Synthases from Huperzia serrata.

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao; Li, Jun; Shi, Xiao-Ping; Song, Yue-Lin; Zeng, Ke-Wu; Zhang, Le; Tu, Peng-Fei; Shi, She-Po

    2016-08-01

    A curcuminoids, benzalacetone-, and quinolone-producing type III polyketide synthase (HsPKS3) from Huperzia serrata uniquely catalyzes the formation of unnatural 2-substituted quinolones and 1,3-diketones via head-to-head condensation of two completely different substrates. The broad range of substrate tolerance of HsPKS3 facilitates accessing structurally diverse 2-substituted quinolones and 1,3-diketones. PMID:27399835

  6. A Solvent-Exposed Patch in Chaperone-Bound YopE Is Required for Translocation by the Type III Secretion System▿

    Rodgers, Loren; Mukerjea, Romila; Birtalan, Sara; Friedberg, Devorah; Ghosh, Partho

    2010-01-01

    Most effector proteins of bacterial type III secretion (T3S) systems require chaperone proteins for translocation into host cells. Such effectors are bound by chaperones in a conserved and characteristic manner, with the chaperone-binding (Cb) region of the effector wound around the chaperone in a highly extended conformation. This conformation has been suggested to serve as a translocation signal in promoting the association between the chaperone-effector complex and a bacterial component re...

  7. Collagen content, but not the ratios of collagen type III/I mRNAs, differs among hypertensive, alcoholic, and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    H.N. Soufen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac interstitial fibrosis may contribute to ventricular dysfunction and the prognosis of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The objective of the present study was to determine if total myocardial collagen content and collagen type III/I (III/I ratio mRNAs differ in hypertensive, alcoholic, and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy subjects. Echocardiography and exercise cardiopulmonary testing were performed in patients with idiopathic (N = 22, hypertensive (N = 12, and alcoholic (N = 11 dilated cardiomyopathy. Morphometric analysis of collagen was performed in fragments obtained by endomyocardial biopsy with picrosirius red staining. The collagen III/I ratio was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Samples of controls (N = 10 were obtained from autopsy. Echocardiographic variables and maximal oxygen uptake were not different among dilated cardiomyopathy groups. Collagen was higher in all dilated cardiomyopathy groups (idiopathic, hypertensive and alcoholic, 7.36 ± 1.09% versus controls (1.12 ± 0.18%, P < 0.05. Collagen was lower in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (4.97 ± 0.83% than hypertensive (8.50 ± 1.11% and alcoholic (10.77 ± 2.09% samples (P < 0.005 for both. The collagen III/I ratio in all samples from dilated cardiomyopathy patients was higher compared to that in controls (0.29 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 but was the same in the samples from idiopathic (0.77 ± 0.07, hypertensive (0.75 ± 0.07, and alcoholic (0.81 ± 0.16 dilated cardiomyopathy groups. Because of the different physical properties of the types of collagen, the higher III/I ratio may contribute to progressive ventricular dilation and dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy patients.

  8. Multiple activities of the plant pathogen type III effector proteins WtsE and AvrE require WxxxE motifs.

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris R; Nomura, Kinya; Mecey, Christy; Uribe, Francisco; He, Sheng-Yang; Mackey, David; Coplin, David L

    2009-06-01

    The broadly conserved AvrE-family of type III effectors from gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria includes important virulence factors, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these effectors function inside plant cells to promote disease. We have identified two conserved motifs in AvrE-family effectors: a WxxxE motif and a putative C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention/retrieval signal (ERMRS). The WxxxE and ERMRS motifs are both required for the virulence activities of WtsE and AvrE, which are major virulence factors of the corn pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii and the tomato or Arabidopsis pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, respectively. The WxxxE and the predicted ERMRS motifs are also required for other biological activities of WtsE, including elicitation of the hypersensitive response in nonhost plants and suppression of defense responses in Arabidopsis. A family of type III effectors from mammalian bacterial pathogens requires WxxxE and subcellular targeting motifs for virulence functions that involve their ability to mimic activated G-proteins. The conservation of related motifs and their necessity for the function of type III effectors from plant pathogens indicates that disturbing host pathways by mimicking activated host G-proteins may be a virulence mechanism employed by plant pathogens as well. PMID:19445595

  9. Distribution of the secondary type III secretion system locus found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates among Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains.

    Makino, Sou-Ichi; Tobe, Toru; Asakura, Hiroshi; Watarai, Masahisa; Ikeda, Testuya; Takeshi, Koichi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2003-06-01

    The ability of the complete genome sequence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 led to the identification of a 17-kb chromosomal region which contained a type III secretion system gene cluster at min 64.5. This locus contains open reading frames whose amino acid sequences show high degrees of similarity with those of proteins that make up the type III secretion apparatus, which is encoded by the inv-spa-prg locus on a Salmonella SPI-1 pathogenicity island. This locus was designated ETT2 (E. coli type III secretion 2) and consisted of the epr, epa, and eiv genes. ETT2 was found in enteropathogenic E. coli strains and also in some non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains, but most of them contained a truncated portion of ETT2. Most O157 isolates had a complete collection of toxin-encoding genes eae and hlyA and the ETT2 locus, while most O26 strains had toxin-encoding genes eae and hlyA genes but an incomplete ETT2 locus. Thus, an intact copy of ETT2 might mark a pathogenic distinction for particular STEC strains. Therefore, the presence of the ETT2 locus can be used for identification of truly pathogenic STEC strains and for molecular fingerprinting of the epidemic strains in humans and animals. PMID:12791847

  10. Distribution of the Secondary Type III Secretion System Locus Found in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates among Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Strains

    Makino, Sou-Ichi; Tobe, Toru; Asakura, Hiroshi; Watarai, Masahisa; Ikeda, Testuya; Takeshi, Koichi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2003-01-01

    The ability of the complete genome sequence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 led to the identification of a 17-kb chromosomal region which contained a type III secretion system gene cluster at min 64.5. This locus contains open reading frames whose amino acid sequences show high degrees of similarity with those of proteins that make up the type III secretion apparatus, which is encoded by the inv-spa-prg locus on a Salmonella SPI-1 pathogenicity island. This locus was designated ETT2 (E. coli type III secretion 2) and consisted of the epr, epa, and eiv genes. ETT2 was found in enteropathogenic E. coli strains and also in some non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains, but most of them contained a truncated portion of ETT2. Most O157 isolates had a complete collection of toxin-encoding genes eae and hlyA and the ETT2 locus, while most O26 strains had toxin-encoding genes eae and hlyA genes but an incomplete ETT2 locus. Thus, an intact copy of ETT2 might mark a pathogenic distinction for particular STEC strains. Therefore, the presence of the ETT2 locus can be used for identification of truly pathogenic STEC strains and for molecular fingerprinting of the epidemic strains in humans and animals. PMID:12791847

  11. Type III polyketide synthase beta-ketoacyl-ACP starter unit and ethylmalonyl-CoA extender unit selectivity discovered by Streptomyces coelicolor genome mining.

    Song, Lijiang; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Corre, Christophe; Xiang, Longkuan; Udwary, Daniel W; Austin, Michael B; Noel, Joseph P; Moore, Bradley S; Challis, Gregory L

    2006-11-22

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are involved in the biosynthesis of many important natural products. In bacteria, type III PKSs typically catalyze iterative decarboxylation and condensation reactions of malonyl-CoA building blocks in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyaromatic products. Here it is shown that Gcs, a type III PKS encoded by the sco7221 ORF of the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, is required for biosynthesis of the germicidin family of 3,6-dialkyl-4-hydroxypyran-2-one natural products. Evidence consistent with Gcs-catalyzed elongation of specific beta-ketoacyl-ACP products of the fatty acid synthase FabH with ethyl- or methylmalonyl-CoA in the biosynthesis of germicidins is presented. Selectivity for beta-ketoacyl-ACP starter units and ethylmalonyl-CoA as an extender unit is unprecedented for type III PKSs, suggesting these enzymes may be capable of utilizing a far wider range of starter and extender units for natural product assembly than believed until now. PMID:17105255

  12. Search for Type-III Seesaw Heavy Fermions with Multilepton Final States using 2.3/fb of 13 TeV proton-proton Collision Data

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for type-III seesaw signal in events with three or more electrons or muons is presented. The data sample corresponds to $2.3\\,\\textrm{fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13\\,$TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Since the signal populates channels with at least three leptons and diverse kinematic properties, the data is binned in exclusive channels. The primary selection is based on the number of leptons and the invariant mass of opposite-sign dilepton systems which helps discriminate the signal against the Standard Model background. The final optimization for the type-III seesaw signal is based on the sum of leptonic transerve momenta and missing transverse energy. Control samples in data are used to check the robustness of background evaluation techniques and to minimize the reliance on simulation. The observations are consistent with expectations from Standard Model processes. The results are used to exclude heavy fermions of the type-III seesaw model wi...

  13. Substitution of Aspartate for glycine 1018 in the Type III procollagen (COL3AI) gene causes type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: The mutated allele is present in most blood leukocytes of the asymptomatic and mosaic mother

    Kontusaari, S.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Stolle, C. (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)); Pope, F.M.

    1992-09-01

    A proband with arterial ruptures and skin changes characteristic of the type IV variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was found to have a single-base mutation in the type III procollagen gene, which converted the codon for glycine at amino position 1018 to a codon for aspartate. (Amino acid positions are numbered by the standard convention in which the first glycine of the triple-helical domain of an [alpha] chain is number 1. The numbers of positions in the [alpha]1(III) chains can be converted to positions in the human pro[alpha](III) chain by adding 167.). Nucleotide sequencing of overlapping PCR products in which the two alleles were distinguished demonstrated that the mutation of glycine 1018 was the only mutation that changed the primary structure of type III procollagen. The glycine substitution markedly decreased the amount of type III procollagen secreted into the medium by cultured skin fibroblasts from the proband. It is surprising that the same mutation was found in about 94% of the peripheral blood leukocytes from the proband's asymptomatic 72-year-old mother. Other tissues from the mother contained the mutated allele; it was present in 0%-100% of different samples of hair cells and in about 40% of cells from the oral epithelium. Therefore, the mother was a mosaic for the mutation. Since the mutated allele was present in cells derived from all three germ layers, the results indicated that the mutation arose by the late blastocyst stage of development. The results also indicate that assays of blood leukocytes do not always reveal mosaicism or predict phenotypic involvement of tissues, such as blood vessels, that are derived from the same embryonic cells as are leukocytes. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. THE BLUESHIFTING AND BALDWIN EFFECTS FOR THE [O III] λ5007 EMISSION LINE IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We use homogeneous samples of radio-quiet Seyfert 1 galaxies and QSOs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the connection between the velocity shift and the equivalent width (EW) of the [O III] λ5007 emission line, and their correlations with physical parameters of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find a significant and negative correlation between the EW of the core component, EW(core), and the blueshift of either the core (the peak), the wing, or the total profile of [O III] emission; it is fairly strong for the blueshift of the total profile in particular. However, both quantities (EW and velocity shift) generally have only weak, if any, correlations with fundamental AGN parameters such as the nuclear continuum luminosity at 5100 A (5100), black hole mass (MBH), and the Eddington ratio (L/LEdd); these correlations include the classical Baldwin effect of EW(core), an inverse Baldwin effect of EW(wing), and the relationship between velocity shifts and L/LEdd. Our findings suggest that both the large object-to-object variation in the strength of [O III] emission and the blueshift-EW(core) connection are not governed primarily by fundamental AGN parameters such as L5100, MBH, and L/LEdd. We propose that the interstellar medium conditions of the host galaxies play a major role instead in the diversity of the [O III] properties in active galaxies. This suggests that the use of [O III] λ5007 luminosity as a proxy of AGN luminosity does not depend strongly on the above-mentioned fundamental AGN parameters.

  15. The metastability of human UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE) is increased by variants associated with type III galactosemia but decreased by substrate and cofactor binding

    Angel L Pey; Padín-Gonzalez, Esperanza; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Timson, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Type III galactosemia is an inherited disease caused by mutations which affect the activity of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE). We evaluated the impact of four disease-associated variants (p.N34S, p.G90E, p.V94M and p.K161N) on the conformational stability and dynamics of GALE. Thermal denaturation studies showed that wild-type GALE denatures at temperatures close to physiological, and disease-associated mutations often reduce GALE's thermal stability. This denaturation is under kinetic con...

  16. Effect of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 Type III Secretion System on Salmonella Survival in Activated Chicken Macrophage-Like HD11 Cells

    Wisner, Amanda L. S.; Potter, Andrew A.; Köster, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In order to better identify the role of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type III secretion system (T3SS) in chickens, we used the well-known gentamicin protection assay with activated HD11 cells. HD11 cells are a macrophage-like chicken cell line that can be stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to exhibit more macrophage-like morphology and greater production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Activated HD11 cells were infected with a wild-type Salmonella enteric...

  17. Hybrid MPI-OpenMP Paradigm on SMP Clusters: MPEG-2 Encoder and N-Body Simulation

    Duy, Truong Vinh Truong; Yamazaki, Katsuhiro; Ikegami, Kosai; Oyanagi, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of SMP nodes provide support for a wide diversity of parallel programming paradigms. Combining both shared memory and message passing parallelizations within the same application, the hybrid MPI-OpenMP paradigm is an emerging trend for parallel programming to fully exploit distributed shared-memory architecture. In this paper, we improve the performance of MPEG-2 encoder and n-body simulation by employing the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programming paradigm on SMP clusters. The hierarchical im...

  18. Analysis of combinatorial variability reveals selective accumulation of the fibronectin type III domains B and D of tenascin-C in injured brain.

    Dobbertin, Alexandre; Czvitkovich, Stefan; Theocharidis, Ursula; Garwood, Jeremy; Andrews, Melissa R; Properzi, Francesca; Lin, Rachel; Fawcett, James W; Faissner, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Tenascin-C (Tnc) is a multimodular extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is markedly upregulated in CNS injuries where it is primarily secreted by reactive astrocytes. Different Tnc isoforms can be generated by the insertion of variable combinations of one to seven (in rats) alternatively spliced distinct fibronectin type III (FnIII) domains to the smallest variant. Each spliced FnIII repeat mediates specific actions on neurite outgrowth, neuron migration or adhesion. Hence, different Tnc isoforms might differentially influence CNS repair. We explored the expression pattern of Tnc variants after cortical lesions and after treatment of astrocytes with various cytokines. Using RT-PCR, we observed a strong upregulation of Tnc transcripts containing the spliced FnIII domains B or D in injured tissue at 2-4 days post-lesion (dpl). Looking at specific combinations, we showed a dramatic increase of Tnc isoforms harboring the neurite outgrowth-promoting BD repeat with both the B and D domains being adjacent to each other. Isoforms containing only the axon growth-stimulating spliced domain D were also dramatically enhanced after injury. Injury-induced increase of Tnc proteins comprising the domain D was confirmed by Western Blotting and immunostaining of cortical lesions. In contrast, the FnIII modules C and AD1 were weakly modulated after injury. The growth cone repulsive A1A2A4 domains were poorly expressed in normal and injured tissue but the smallest isoform, which is also repellant, was highly expressed after injury. Expression of the shortest Tnc isoform and of variants containing B, D or BD, was strongly upregulated in cultured astrocytes after TGFbeta1 treatment, suggesting that TGFbeta1 could mediate, at least in part, the injury-induced upregulation of these isoforms. We identified complex injury-induced differential regulations of Tnc isoforms that may well influence axonal regeneration and repair processes in the damaged CNS. PMID:20451518

  19. Evidence for the co-circulation of dengue virus type 3 genotypes III and V in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics

    Meri Bordignon Nogueira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The reintroduction of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3 in Brazil in 2000 and its subsequent spread throughout the country was associated with genotype III viruses, the only DENV-3 genotype isolated in Brazil prior to 2002. We report here the co-circulation of two different DENV-3 genotypes in patients living in the Northern region of Brazil during the 2002-2004 epidemics. Complete genomic sequences of viral RNA were determined from these epidemics, and viruses belonging to genotypes V (Southeast Asia/South Pacific and III were identified. This recent co-circulation of different DENV-3 genotypes in South America may have implications for pathological and epidemiological dynamics.

  20. Type I and III IFNs Produced by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Response to a Member of the Flaviviridae Suppress Cellular Immune Responses.

    Reid, Elizabeth; Juleff, Nicholas; Windsor, Miriam; Gubbins, Simon; Roberts, Lisa; Morgan, Sophie; Meyers, Gregor; Perez-Martin, Eva; Tchilian, Elma; Charleston, Bryan; Seago, Julian

    2016-05-15

    The pestivirus noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) can suppress IFN production in the majority of cell types in vitro. However, IFN is detectable in serum during acute infection in vivo for ∼5-7 d, which correlates with a period of leucopoenia and immunosuppression. In this study, we demonstrate that a highly enriched population of bovine plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) produced IFN in response to BVDV in vitro. We further show that the majority of the IFN produced in response to infection both in vitro and in vivo is type III IFN and acid labile. Further, we show IL-28B (IFN-λ3) mRNA is induced in this cell population in vitro. Supernatant from plasmacytoid DCs harvested postinfection with BVDV or recombinant bovine IFN-α or human IL-28B significantly reduced CD4(+) T cell proliferation induced by tubercle bacillus Ag 85-stimulated monocyte-derived DCs. Furthermore, these IFNs induced IFN-stimulated gene expression predominantly in monocyte-derived DCs. IFN-treated immature DCs derived from murine bone marrow also had a reduced capacity to stimulate T cell proliferative responses to tubercle bacillus Ag 85. Immature DCs derived from either source had a reduced capacity for Ag uptake following IFN treatment that is dose dependent. Immunosuppression is a feature of a number of pestivirus infections; our studies suggest type III IFN production plays a key role in the pathogenesis of this family of viruses. Overall, in a natural host, we have demonstrated a link between the induction of type I and III IFN after acute viral infection and transient immunosuppression. PMID:27053760

  1. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type IV: a multi-exon deletion in one of the two COL3A1 alleles affecting structure, stability, and processing of type III procollagen

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gugler, E.; Gitzelmann, R.; Steinmann, B.

    1988-05-05

    The authors have studied a patient with severe, dominantly inherited Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The results indicate that this patient carries a deletion of 3.3 kilobase pairs in the triple helical coding domain of one of the two alleles for the pro-..cap alpha..-chains of type III collagen (COL3A1). His cultured skin fibroblasts contain equal amounts of normal length mRNA and of mRNA shortened by approximately 600 bases, and synthesize both normal and shortened pro-..cap alpha..1(III)-chains. In procollagen molecules containing one or more shortened chains, a triple helix is formed with a length of only about 780 amino acids. The mutant procollagen molecules have decreased thermal stability, are less efficiently secreted, and are not processed as their normal counterpart. The deletion in this family is the first mutation to be described in COL3A1.

  2. Charged lepton flavour violcxmation and neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric models with type I+II seesaw

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    We study the new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) half-life and lepton flavour violation (LFV) amplitude within the framework of the minimal left-right symmetric model (MLRSM). Considering all possible new physics contributions to 0 νββ and charged lepton flavour violation μ → eγ , μ → 3 e in MLRSM, we constrain the parameter space of the model from the requirement of satisfying existing experimental bounds. Assuming the breaking scale of the left-right symmetry to be O (1) TeV accessible at ongoing and near future collider experiments, we consider the most general type I+II seesaw mechanism for the origin of tiny neutrino masses. Choosing the relative contribution of the type II seesaw term allows us to calculate the right handed neutrino mass matrix as well as Dirac neutrino mass matrix as a function of the model parameters, required for the calculation of 0νββ and LFV amplitudes. We show that such a general type I+II seesaw structure results in more allowed parameter space compared to individual type I or type II seesaw cases considered in earlier works. In particular, we show that the doubly charged scalar masses M Δ are allowed to be smaller than the heaviest right handed neutrino mass M N from the present experimental bounds in these scenarios which is in contrast to earlier results with individual type I or type II seesaw showing M Δ > M N .

  3. Oral delivery of the Sj23LHD-GST antigen by Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system protects against Schistosoma japonicum infection in mice.

    Guo Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease and oral vaccine delivery system would be benefit for prevention of this disease. Although attenuated salmonella has been used as an antigen expression vector for oral vaccine development, the membrane-bound vacuoles in which bacteria reside hinders the presentation of expressed heterologous antigens to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. The present work used an attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain VNP20009 to secretory expression of Sj23LHDGST bivalent antigen from Schistosoma japonicum and tested the protective efficacy against S. japonicum infection in orally immunized mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Promoters (nirB or pagC were used to express the antigen (Sj23LHDGST and the Salmonella type III or α-hemolysin secretion system was employed to secrete it. The immunoblotting analysis and fluorescent microscopy revealed that the antigen was effectively expressed and delivered to the cytosol of macrophages in vitro. Among recombinant vaccine strains, an engineered VNP20009 which expressed the antigen by nirB promoter and secreted it through type III secretion system (nirB-sopE(1-104-Sj23LHD-GST efficiently protected against S. japonicum infection in a mouse model. This strain elicited a predominantly IgG(2a antibody response and a markedly increase in the production of IL-12 and IFN-γ. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that this strain caused T cell activation as evidenced by significantly increased expression of CD44 and CD69. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral delivery of antigen by nirB-driven Salmonella typhimurium type III secretion system is a novel, safe, inexpensive, efficient and convenient approach for schistosome vaccine development.

  4. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M.; Stebbins, C. Erec, E-mail: stebbins@rockefeller.edu [Laboratory of Structural Microbiology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella InvA shares homology to a recurring scaffold in the membrane-spanning components of the type II and type III secretion systems. Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events.

  5. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    The cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella InvA shares homology to a recurring scaffold in the membrane-spanning components of the type II and type III secretion systems. Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events

  6. Measurement of matrix metalloproteinase 9-mediated Collagen type III degradation fragment as a marker of skin fibrosis

    Larsen Lise

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study utilized a Bleomycin-induced model of skin fibrosis to investigate the neo-epitope CO3-610 (KNGETGPQGP, a fragment of collagen III released during matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9 degradation of the protein, we have previously described as a novel biomarker for liver fibrosis. The aim was to investigate CO3-610 levels in another well characterised model of fibrosis, to better describe the biomarker in relation to additional fibrotic pathologies. Methods Skin fibrosis was induced by daily injections of Bleomycin to a total of 52 female C3 H mice, while control mice (n = 28 were treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, for 2, 4, 6 or 8 weeks. Skin fibrosis was evaluated using Visiopharm software on Sirius-red stained skin sections. Urine ELISA assays and creatinine corrections were performed to measure CO3-610 levels. Results CO3-610 levels were significantly higher in Bleomycin-treated vs. PBS-treated mice at each time point of termination. The mean increases were: 59.2%, P Conclusion Increased levels in mouse urine of the MMP-9 mediated collagen III degradation fragment CO3-610 were correlated with skin fibrosis progression, suggesting that CO3-610 may be a potential positive biomarker to study the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis in mice.

  7. Multiple Activities of the Plant Pathogen Type III Effector Proteins WtsE and AvrE1 require WxxxE Motifs

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris R.; Nomura, Kinya; Mecey, Christy; Uribe, Francisco de, (S.I.) (1613-1667); He, Sheng-Yang; Mackey, David; Coplin, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The broadly conserved AvrE-family of type III effectors from Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria includes important virulence factors, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which these effectors function inside plant cells to promote disease. We have identified two conserved motifs in AvrE-family effectors: a WxxxE motif and a putative C-terminal endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention/retrieval signal (ERMRS). The WxxxE and ERMRS motifs are both required for the virulence activiti...

  8. A Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secreted protein, BopE, facilitates bacterial invasion of epithelial cells and exhibits guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity

    M.P. Stevens; Friebel, A; Taylor, L A; Wood, M W; Brown, P. J.; Hardt, W D; Galyov, E E

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of BopE, a type III secreted protein that is encoded adjacent to the Burkholderia pseudomallei bsa locus and is homologous to Salmonella enterica SopE/SopE2. Inactivation of bopE impaired bacterial entry into HeLa cells, indicating that BopE facilitates invasion. Consistent with this notion, BopE expressed in eukaryotic cells induced rearrangements in the subcortical actin cytoskeleton, and purified BopE exhibited guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity for ...

  9. Fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 interact directly with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Li, Shizhong; Hinsby, Anders Mørkeberg;

    2008-01-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule (CAM) L1 promotes axonal outgrowth, presumably through an interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). The present study demonstrates a direct interaction between L1 fibronectin type III (FN3) modules I-V and FGFR1 immunoglobulin (Ig) modules II...... receptor phosphorylation, and this resulted in the induction of differentiation of primary neurons, reflected by neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, ATP modulated L1-induced neuronal differentiation and FGFR1 phosphorylation through regulation of the L1-FGFR1 interaction....

  10. Identification of Critical Amino Acids Conferring Lethality in VopK, a Type III Effector Protein of Vibrio cholerae: Lessons from Yeast Model System

    Bankapalli, Leela Krishna; Mishra, Rahul Chandra; Singh, Balvinder; Raychaudhuri, Saumya

    2015-01-01

    VopK, a type III effector protein, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae strains belonging to diverse serogroups. Ectopic expression of this protein exhibits strong toxicity in yeast model system. In order to map critical residues in VopK, we scanned the primary sequence guided by available data on various toxins and effector proteins. Our in silico analysis of VopK indicated the presence of predicted MCF1-SHE (SHxxxE) serine peptidase domain at the C-terminus region of t...

  11. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of a specific MMP-9 mediated degradation fragment of type III collagen--A novel biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque remodeling

    Barascuk, Natasha; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Larsen, Lise;

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of collagen in the arterial wall by matrix metalloproteinases is the hallmark of atherosclerosis. We have developed an ELISA for the quantification of type III collagen degradation mediated by MMP-9 in urine....

  12. Protein Binding between PcrG-PcrV and PcrH-PopB/PopD Encoded by the pcrGVH-popBD Operon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion System

    Allmond, Leonard R.; Karaca, Timur J.; Nguyen, Vinh N.; Nguyen, Thong; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.; Sawa, Teiji

    2003-01-01

    Of the proteins encoded by the pcrGVH-popBD operon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system, PcrG bound to PcrV and PcrH bound to PopB/PopD. In addition, Yersinia LcrG bound to PcrV, and Yersinia LcrH bound to PopD. The results imply a highly functional conservation of type III secretion between P. aeruginosa and Yersinia species.

  13. High-Pressure Raman and Calorimetry Studies of Vanadium(III) Alkyl Hydrides for Kubas-Type Hydrogen Storage.

    Morris, Leah; Trudeau, Michel L; Reed, Daniel; Book, David; Antonelli, David M

    2016-03-16

    Reversible hydrogen storage under ambient conditions has been identified as a major bottleneck in enabling a future hydrogen economy. Herein, we report an amorphous vanadium(III) alkyl hydride gel that binds hydrogen through the Kubas interaction. The material possesses a gravimetric adsorption capacity of 5.42 wt % H2 at 120 bar and 298 K reversibly at saturation with no loss of capacity after ten cycles. This corresponds to a volumetric capacity of 75.4 kgH2  m(-3) . Raman experiments at 100 bar confirm that Kubas binding is involved in the adsorption mechanism. The material possesses an enthalpy of H2 adsorption of +0.52 kJ mol(-1) H2 , as measured directly by calorimetry, and this is practical for use in a vehicles without a complex heat management system. PMID:26762590

  14. Fine specificity and cross-reactions of monoclonal antibodies to group B streptococcal capsular polysaccharide type III

    Pincus, Seth H; Moran, Emily; Maresh, Grace;

    2012-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Despite aggressive campaigns using antenatal prophylactic antibiotic therapy, infections continue. Developing an effective maternal vaccine is a public health priority. Antibody (Ab) to the capsular polysaccharide (CPS......, synthetic carbohydrate structures, and cells. The results showed marked differences in the fine specificity among these mAbs to a single carbohydrate structure. Cross-reactions with synthetic GD3 and GT3 carbohydrates, representing structures found on surfaces of neural and developing cells, were...... demonstrated using carbohydrate array technology. The anti-CPS(III) mAbs did not react with cells expressing GD3 and GT3, nor did mAbs specific for the host carbohydrates cross-react with GBS, raising questions about the physiological relevance of this cross-reaction. But in the process of these investigations...

  15. Involvement of SPI-2-encoded SpiC in flagellum synthesis in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Sugita Asami

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SpiC encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium chromosome is required for survival within macrophages and systemic infection in mice. Additionally, SpiC contributes to Salmonella-induced activation of the signal transduction pathways in macrophages by affecting the expression of FliC, a component of flagella filaments. Here, we show the contribution of SpiC in flagellum synthesis. Results Quantitative RT-PCR shows that the expression levels of the class 3 fliD and motA genes that encode for the flagella cap and motor torque proteins, respectively, were lower for a spiC mutant strain than for the wild-type Salmonella. Further, this mutant had lower expression levels of the class 2 genes including the fliA gene encoding the flagellar-specific alternative sigma factor. We also found differences in flagella assembly between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Many flagella filaments were observed on the bacterial surface of the wild-type strain, whereas the spiC mutant had only few flagella. The absence of spiC led to reduced expression of the FlhD protein, which functions as the master regulator in flagella gene expression, although no significant difference at the transcription level of the flhDC operon was observed between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Conclusion The data show that SpiC is involved in flagella assembly by affecting the post-transcription expression of flhDC.

  16. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    Burger, MPM; VanLeeuwen, AM; Hollema, H; Quint, WGV; Pieters, WJLM

    1997-01-01

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group compr

  17. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1 30-bp deletion and Xho I-loss is associated with type III nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Malaysia

    See Hui

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a human epithelial tumour with high prevalence amongst Chinese in Southern China and South East Asia and is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. The viral genome harbours an oncogene, namely, the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 gene and known variants such as the 30-bp deletion and loss of XhoI restriction site have been found. Less is known about the relationship between these variants and the population characteristics and histological type. Methods In this study, the EBV LMP1 gene variants from 42 NPC and 10 non-malignant archived formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, as well as plasma from another 35 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were determined by using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Statistical analysis was performed by using SPSS programme. Results LMP1 30-bp deletion was detected in 19/34 (55.9% of NPC tissues, 7/29 (24.1% of plasma but absent in non-malignant tissues (8/8. Coexistence of variants with and without 30bp deletion was found only in 5/29 (17.2% plasma samples but not in NPC tissues. The loss of XhoI restriction site in LMP1 gene was found in 34/39 (87.2% of the NPC tissues and 11/30 (36.7% of plasma samples. None of the non-malignant nasopharyngeal tissues (8/8 harbour XhoI-loss variants. LMP1 30-bp deletion was detected in 16/18 Chinese versus 3/15 Malays and 13/16 type III (undifferentiated carcinoma versus 1/6 type I (keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. XhoI-loss was found in 19/19 Chinese versus 14/19 Malays and 18/18 type III (undifferentiated versus 2/5 type I (keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. Statistical analysis showed that these variants were associated with ethnic race (30-bp deletion, p XhoI-loss, p = 0.046 and histological type of NPC (30-bp deletion, p = 0.011; XhoI-loss, p = 0.006. Nineteen out of 32 NPC tissues (19/32; 59.4% and 6/24 (25% of plasma samples showed the coexistence of both the 30-bp deletion and the loss of Xho

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a type III cohesin–dockerin complex from the cellulosome system of Ruminococcus flavefaciens

    The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a trimodular type III cohesin–dockerin complex from the R. flavefaciens cellulosome system are described. In Ruminococcus flavefaciens, a predominant fibre-degrading bacterium found in ruminants, cellulosomal proteins are anchored to the bacterial cell wall through a relatively small ScaE scaffoldin which includes a single type III cohesin. The cotton-binding protein CttA consists of two cellulose-binding modules and a C-terminal modular pair (XDoc) comprising an X-module and a contiguous dockerin, which exhibits high affinity towards the ScaE cohesin. Seleno-l-methionine-labelled derivatives of the ScaE cohesin module and the XDoc from CttA have been expressed, copurified and cocrystallized. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.7, c = 203.4 Å, and the unit cell contains a single cohesin–XDoc complex in the asymmetric unit. The diffraction data were phased to 2.0 Å resolution using the anomalous signal of the Se atoms

  19. The Pseudomonas syringae Type III Effector AvrRpt2 Promotes Pathogen Virulence via Stimulating Arabidopsis Auxin/Indole Acetic Acid Protein Turnover1[C][W][OA

    Cui, Fuhao; Wu, Shujing; Sun, Wenxian; Coaker, Gitta; Kunkel, Barbara; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2013-01-01

    To accomplish successful infection, pathogens deploy complex strategies to interfere with host defense systems and subvert host physiology to favor pathogen survival and multiplication. Modulation of plant auxin physiology and signaling is emerging as a common virulence strategy for phytobacteria to cause diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. We have previously shown that the Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpt2 alters Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) auxin physiology. Here, we report that AvrRpt2 promotes auxin response by stimulating the turnover of auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins, the key negative regulators in auxin signaling. AvrRpt2 acts additively with auxin to stimulate Aux/IAA turnover, suggesting distinct, yet proteasome-dependent, mechanisms operated by AvrRpt2 and auxin to control Aux/IAA stability. Cysteine protease activity is required for AvrRpt2-stimulated auxin signaling and Aux/IAA degradation. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the dominant axr2-1 mutation recalcitrant to AvrRpt2-mediated degradation ameliorated the virulence functions of AvrRpt2 but did not alter the avirulent function mediated by the corresponding RPS2 resistance protein. Thus, promoting auxin response via modulating the stability of the key transcription repressors Aux/IAA is a mechanism used by the bacterial type III effector AvrRpt2 to promote pathogenicity. PMID:23632856

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of FliJ, a cytoplasmic component of the flagellar type III protein-export apparatus from Salmonella sp

    FliJ is one of the essential cytoplasmic components of the flagellar type III protein-export apparatus; it has been expressed, produced and crystallized and the crystals have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. The axial component proteins of the bacterial flagellum are synthesized in the cytoplasm and then translocated into the central channel of the flagellum by the flagellar type III protein-export apparatus for self-assembly at the distal growing end of the flagellum. FliJ is an essential cytoplasmic component of the export apparatus. In this study, Salmonella FliJ with an extra three residues (glycine, serine and histidine) attached to the N-terminus as the remainder of a His tag (GSH-FliJ) was purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 300 as a precipitant. GSH-FliJ crystals grew in the hexagonal space group P6122 or P6522. While the native crystals diffracted to 3.3 Å resolution, the diffraction resolution limit of mercury derivatives was extended to 2.1 Å. Anomalous and isomorphous difference Patterson maps of the mercury-derivative crystal showed significant peaks in their Harker sections, indicating the usefulness of the derivative data for structure determination

  1. Extracellular secretion of Carocin S1 in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum occurs via the type III secretion system integral to the bacterial flagellum

    Chuang Duen-yau

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum is a phytopathogenic enterobacterium responsible for soft rot, a disease characterized by extensive maceration of the affected plant tissue. This species also produces two or more antibacterial substances called bacteriocins, which enhance its competitiveness against related rival species. However, the secretion mechanism for low-molecular-weight bacteriocin is still unknown. Results A mutant (flhC::Tn5 that did not secrete the low-molecular-weight bacteriocin (LMWB, Carocin S1, was generated by Tn5 insertional mutagenesis. Sequence analysis indicated that this insertion disrupted open reading frame 2 (ORF2 and ORF3 of this strain. Deletion and rescue experiments indicated that ORF2 and ORF3 were both required for extracellular LMWB secretion. The ORF2 and ORF3 sequences showed high homology with the flhD and flhC gene sequences of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atroseptica, Serratia marcescens, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Escherichia coli, indicating that they likely encoded key regulatory components of the type III flagella secretion system. Conclusion Thus, the extracellular export of Carocin S1 by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum appears to utilize the type III secretion system integral to bacterial flagella.

  2. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. XIV. Classical and Type II Cepheids in the Galactic Bulge

    Soszynski, I; Pietrukowicz, P; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Poleski, R; Kozlowski, S

    2011-01-01

    The fourteenth part of the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars (OIII-CVS) contains Cepheid variables detected in the OGLE-II and OGLE-III fields toward the Galactic bulge. The catalog is divided into two main categories: 32 classical Cepheids (21 single-mode fundamental-mode F, four first-overtone 1O, two double-mode F/1O, three double-mode 1O/2O and two triple-mode 1O/2O/3O pulsators) and 335 type II Cepheids (156 BL Her, 128 W Vir and 51 RV Tau stars). Six of the type II Cepheids likely belong to the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy. The catalog data include the time-series photometry collected in the course of the OGLE survey, observational parameters of the stars, finding charts, and cross-identifications with the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We discuss some statistical properties of the sample and compare it with the OGLE catalogs of Cepheids in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Multi-mode classical Cepheids in the Galactic bulge show systematically smaller period ratios than their counter...

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of MxiH, a subunit of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system needle

    Deane, Janet E.; Cordes, Frank S.; Roversi, Pietro [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Johnson, Steven [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Kenjale, Roma; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas (United States); Lea, Susan M., E-mail: susan.lea@biop.ox.ac.uk [Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Blocker, Ariel [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-01

    A monodisperse truncation mutant of MxiH, the subunit of the S. flexneri type III secretion system needle, has been crystallized. SeMet derivatives and a uranyl derivative have undergone preliminary crystallographic analysis. A monodisperse truncation mutant of MxiH, the subunit of the needle from the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system (TTSS), has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of native and selenomethionine-labelled MxiH{sub CΔ5} and diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 183.4, b = 28.1, c = 27.8 Å, β = 96.5°. An anomalous difference Patterson map calculated with the data from the SeMet-labelled crystals revealed a single peak on the Harker section v = 0. Inspection of a uranyl derivative also revealed one peak in the isomorphous difference Patterson map on the Harker section v = 0. Analysis of the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold non-crystallographic symmetry axis approximately along a. The calculated Matthews coefficient is 1.9 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} for two molecules per asymmetric unit, corresponding to a solvent content of 33%.

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of MxiH, a subunit of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system needle

    A monodisperse truncation mutant of MxiH, the subunit of the S. flexneri type III secretion system needle, has been crystallized. SeMet derivatives and a uranyl derivative have undergone preliminary crystallographic analysis. A monodisperse truncation mutant of MxiH, the subunit of the needle from the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system (TTSS), has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of native and selenomethionine-labelled MxiHCΔ5 and diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 183.4, b = 28.1, c = 27.8 Å, β = 96.5°. An anomalous difference Patterson map calculated with the data from the SeMet-labelled crystals revealed a single peak on the Harker section v = 0. Inspection of a uranyl derivative also revealed one peak in the isomorphous difference Patterson map on the Harker section v = 0. Analysis of the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold non-crystallographic symmetry axis approximately along a. The calculated Matthews coefficient is 1.9 Å3 Da−1 for two molecules per asymmetric unit, corresponding to a solvent content of 33%

  5. Salter-Harris type III and IV displaced fracture of the hallux in young gymnasts: A series of four cases at 1-year follow-up.

    Perugia, Dario; Fabbri, Mattia; Guidi, Marco; Lepri, Marco; Masi, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe four exceptional cases of Salter-Harris type III and IV fractures of the proximal phalanx of the hallux in young high-level gymnasts. All gymnasts underwent the same mechanism of injury of hyperadduction, which indicates a role of the abductor hallucis muscle in the genesis and displacement of these fractures. An open reduction and internal fixation was performed to achieve an anatomical reduction and avoid chronic disability. At 1-year follow-up, all patients had an excellent American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score (100 points), and there was no shortening or angulation of the first ray and no evidence of degenerative joint disease on X-ray. Moreover, all the gymnasts had returned to pre-injury levels of sporting activity. To our knowledge, there are no previous studies that address these types of injuries and how they are handled in gymnasts. PMID:25457317

  6. Radioimmunotargeting of malignant glioma by monoclonal antibody D2C7 reactive against both wild-type and variant III mutant epidermal growth factor receptors

    Introduction: Malignant glioma remains a significant therapeutic challenge, and immunotherapeutics might be a beneficial approach for these patients. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for multiple molecular targets could expand the treatable patient population and the fraction of tumor cells targeted, with potentially increased efficacy. This motivated the generation of MAb D2C7, which recognizes both wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRwt) and a tumor-specific mutant, EGFRvIII. Methods: D2C7 binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance and its specificity characterized through comparison to EGFRwt-specific EGFR.1 and EGFRvIII-specific L8A4 MAbs by flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analysis. The three MAbs were labeled with 125I or 131I using Iodogen, and paired-label internalization assays and biodistribution experiments in athymic mice with human tumor xenografts were performed. Results: The affinity of D2C7 for EGFRwt and EGFRvIII was 5.2×109 M−1 and 3.6×109 M−1, and cell-surface reactivity with both receptors was documented by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed D2C7 reactivity with malignant glioma tissue from 90 of 101 patients. Internalization assays performed on EGFRwt-expressing WTT cells and EGFRvIII-expressing NR6M cells indicated a threefold lower degradation of 125I-labeled D2C7 compared with 131I-labeled EGFR.1. Uptake of 125I-labeled D2C7 in NR6M xenografts (52.45±13.97 %ID g−1 on Day 3) was more than twice that of 131I-labeled L8A4; a threefold to fivefold tumor delivery advantage was seen when compared to 131I-labeled EGFR.1 in mice with WTT xenografts. Conclusions: These results suggest that D2C7 warrants further evaluation for the development of MAb-based therapeutics against cancers expressing EGFRwt and EGFRvIII.

  7. Comparison of tamsulosin vs tamsulosin/sildenafil effectiveness in the treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients affected by type III chronic prostatitis

    Ubaldo Cantoro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We evaluated the effectiveness of tamsulosin monotherapy versus tamsulosin plus sildenafil combination therapy on erectile dysfunction (ED in young patients with type III chronic prostatitis and ED by using symptom score scales. Materials and methods: 44 male patients were divided into 2 groups: the first group (20 patients was treated with tamsulosin 0,4 mg monotherapy and the second one 24 patients was treated with tamsulosin 0,4 mg plus sildenafil 50 mg combination therapy. “International Prostate Symptom Score” (IPSS, “National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index” (NIH-CPSI and “International Index of Erectile Function” (IIEF-5 were inves- tigated in each group of patients, and scores calculated during the first medical examination. Both groups were treated with tamsulosin once daily for 60 days, while sildenafil 50 mg was given on demand (at least 2 times per week for 60 days. During the second medical examination IPSS, NIH-CPSI and IIEF-5 scores were analyzed once more. Afterwards, the alterations of scores among medical examinations in each group and between both groups were statistically compared. Results: The age average of the 44 cases included was 32.04 ± 3.15 years. Both groups present a statistically significant decrease, between the first and the second medical examination, in IPSS, NIH-CPSI scores and statistically significant increase in IIEF-5 score. In addition, there is no sta- tistically significant difference, in all scores, between mono and combination therapy. Conclusions: tamsulosin monotherapy, as well as a combination therapy (tamsulosin plus silde-nafil has an improving effect on symptoms and on ED in patients with type III prostatitis. In the near future alpha-blockers monotherapy could be used in the treatment of chronic prostatitis and ED cases instead of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5 inhibitors combination therapy.

  8. Evaluation of muscle strength and motor abilities in children with type II and III spinal muscle atrophy treated with valproic acid

    Zanoteli Edmar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects the motoneurons of the spinal anterior horn, resulting in hypotonia and muscle weakness. The disease is caused by deletion or mutation in the telomeric copy of SMN gene (SMN1 and clinical severity is in part determined by the copy number of the centromeric copy of the SMN gene (SMN2. The SMN2 mRNA lacks exon 7, resulting in a production of lower amounts of the full-length SMN protein. Knowledge of the molecular mechanism of diseases has led to the discovery of drugs capable of increasing SMN protein level through activation of SMN2 gene. One of these drugs is the valproic acid (VPA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Methods Twenty-two patients with type II and III SMA, aged between 2 and 18 years, were treated with VPA and were evaluated five times during a one-year period using the Manual Muscle Test (Medical Research Council scale-MRC, the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (HFMS, and the Barthel Index. Results After 12 months of therapy, the patients did not gain muscle strength. The group of children with SMA type II presented a significant gain in HFMS scores during the treatment. This improvement was not observed in the group of type III patients. The analysis of the HFMS scores during the treatment period in the groups of patients younger and older than 6 years of age did not show any significant result. There was an improvement of the daily activities at the end of the VPA treatment period. Conclusion Treatment of SMA patients with VPA may be a potential alternative to alleviate the progression of the disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01033331

  9. Association of the HindIII and S447X Polymorphisms in LPL Gene with Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes in Mexican Families

    Salvador Muñoz-Barrios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein lipase (LPL is a key enzyme in lipid metabolismand is associatedwith obesity, dyslipidemias, hypertension (HTN and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. LPL gene polymorphisms can be related with the development of cardiovascular risk factors. The present study was conducted to analyze the relationship of the HindIII and S447X polymorphisms in LPL gene with cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican families. The study population comprised ninety members of 30 Mexican families, in which an index case had obesity, were included in the study. We evaluated the body composition by bioelectrical impedance. Peripheral blood samples were collected to determine biochemical parameters. Screening for both polymorphisms was made by PCR-RFLPs. In the parents, both polymorphisms were in Hardy-Weinberg’s equilibrium. We found that the genotype T/T of HindIII was associated with diastolic blood pressure ≧ 85 mmHg (OR = 1.1; p = 0.011, whereas the genotype C/C of S447X was associated with systolic blood pressure ≧ 130 mmHg (OR = 1.2; p < 0.001, diastolic blood pressure ≧ 85 mmHg (OR = 1.3; p < 0.001, T2DM (OR = 1.3; p < 0.001 and with increase of total cholesterol (β = 23.6 mg/mL; p = 0.03. These data suggest that the HindIII and S447X LPL gene polymorphisms can confer susceptibility for the development of hypertension and T2DM in Mexican families.

  10. Defect Scheelite-Type Lanthanoid(III Ortho-Oxomolybdates(VI Ln0.667[MoO4] (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm and Their Relationship to Zircon and the NaTl-Type Structure

    Ingo Hartenbach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The rare-earth metal(III ortho-oxomolybdates with the formula Ln0.667[MoO4] (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm and defect scheelite-type structure crystallize in the tetragonal space group I41/a (a = 533–525, c = 1183–1158 pm with four formula units per unit cell. The Ln3+ cations at Wyckoff position 4b exhibit a coordination sphere of eight oxygen atoms in the shape of a trigonal dodecahedron. The same site symmetry (.. is observed for the tetrahedral oxomolybdate(VI entities [MoO4]2–, since their central Mo6+ cation is situated at the 4a position. Due to this equal site multiplicity, the lanthanoid(III cations have to be statistically under-occupied to maintain electroneutrality, thus a defect scheelite structure emerges. The partial structure of both the Ln3+ cations and the [MoO4]2– anions (if shrunk to their centers of gravity can be best described as distorted diamond-like arrangements. Therefore, these two interpenetrating partial structures exhibit a similar setup as found in the zircon-type as well as in the NaTl-type structure.

  11. Chimeric Hepatitis B core antigen virus-like particles displaying the envelope domain III of dengue virus type 2

    Arora Upasana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a global public health problem for which no drug or vaccine is available. Currently, there is increasing interest in developing non-replicating dengue vaccines based on a discrete antigenic domain of the major structural protein of dengue viruses (DENVs, known as envelope domain III (EDIII. The use of bio-nanoparticles consisting of recombinant viral structural polypeptides, better known as virus-like particles (VLPs, has emerged as a potential platform technology for vaccine development. This work explores the feasibility of developing nanoparticles based on E. coli-expressed recombinant Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg designed to display EDIII moiety of DENV on the surface. Findings We designed a synthetic gene construct encoding HBcAg containing an EDIII insert in its c/e1 loop. The fusion antigen HBcAg-EDIII-2 was expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity using Ni+2 affinity chromatography and demonstrated to assemble into discrete 35–40 nm VLPs by electron microscopy. Competitive ELISA analyses showed that the EDIII-2 moieties of the VLPs are accessible to anti-EDIII-2-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, suggesting that they are surface-displayed. The VLPs were highly immunogenic eliciting high titer anti-EDIII-2 antibodies that were able to recognize, bind and neutralize infectious DENV based on ELISA, immunofluorescence and virus-neutralization assays. Conclusion This work demonstrates that HBcAg-derived nanoparticles can serve as a useful platform for the display of DENV EDIII. The EDIII-displaying nanoparticles may have potential applications in diagnostics/vaccines for dengue.

  12. Virulence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens clinical strain MFN1032 towards Dictyostelium discoideum and macrophages in relation with type III secretion system

    Sperandio Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I MFN1032 is a clinical isolate able to grow at 37°C. This strain displays secretion-mediated hemolytic activity involving phospholipase C and cyclolipopeptides, and a cell-associated hemolytic activity distinct from the secreted hemolytic activity. Cell-associated hemolysis is independent of biosurfactant production and remains in a gacA mutant. Disruption of the hrpU-like operon (the basal part of type III secretion system from rhizospheric strains suppresses this activity. We hypothesized that this phenotype could reflect evolution of an ancestral mechanism involved in the survival of this species in its natural niche. In this study, we evaluated the hrpU-like operon’s contribution to other virulence mechanisms using a panel of Pseudomonas strains from various sources. Results We found that MFN1032 inhibited the growth of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum and that this inhibition involved the hrpU-like operon and was absent in a gacA mutant. MFN1032 was capable of causing macrophage lysis, if the hrpU-like operon was intact, and this cytotoxicity remained in a gacA mutant. Cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage necrosis were found in other P. fluorescens clinical isolates, but not in biocontrol P. fluorescens strains harbouring hrpU-like operon. The growth of Dictyostelium discoideum was inhibited to a different extent by P. fluorescens strains without correlation between this inhibition and hrpU-like operon sequences. Conclusions In P. fluorescens MFN1032, the basal part of type III secretion system plays a role in D. discoideum growth inhibition and macrophage necrosis. The inhibition of D. discoideum growth is dependent on the GacS/GacA system, while cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage lysis are not. Virulence against eukaryotic cells based on the hrpU-like operon may be more than just a stochastic evolution of a conserved system dedicated to survival in

  13. Genome Sequencing of Xanthomonas vasicola Pathovar vasculorum Reveals Variation in Plasmids and Genes Encoding Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Type-IV Pilus and Type-III Secretion Effectors

    Arthur Wasukira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas vasicola pathovar vasculorum (Xvv is the bacterial agent causing gumming disease in sugarcane. Here, we compare complete genome sequences for five isolates of Xvv originating from sugarcane and one from maize. This identified two distinct types of lipopolysaccharide synthesis gene clusters among Xvv isolates: one is similar to that of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri (Xac and is probably the ancestral type, while the other is similar to those of the sugarcane-inhabiting species, Xanthomonas sacchari. Four of six Xvv isolates harboured sequences similar to the Xac plasmid, pXAC47, and showed a distinct Type-IV pilus (T4P sequence type, whereas the T4P locus of the other two isolates resembled that of the closely related banana pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm. The Xvv isolate from maize has lost a gene encoding a homologue of the virulence effector, xopAF, which was present in all five of the sugarcane isolates, while xopL contained a premature stop codon in four out of six isolates. These findings shed new light on evolutionary events since the divergence of Xvv and Xcm, as well as further elucidating the relationships between the two closely related pathogens.

  14. ["ReMeEx", the adjustable-tension suburetral sling in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence due to intrinsic sphincteric dysfunction (type III)].

    Cortese, P; Gallo, F; Gastaldi, E; Schenone, M; Ninotta, G; Gilberti, C

    2009-01-01

    The anti-incontinence methods "tension free" may be insufficient in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (IUS) due to intrinsic sphincteric dysfunction (ISD). We report our findings on the use of the suburetral sling with adjustable tension "Remeex" sistem in the treatment of 24 patients. METHODS. Between May 2002 and February 2008, 24 patients with IUS of type III, were subjected to suburetral sling "Reemex." Positioning. The intervention provides a vaginal access to the positioning of suburetral sling and an access to the positioning of a varitensor which the wires are connected at the sling seats, recovered by the passage of a Stamey needle carrier of. The average operative time was approximately 70 minutes, the resignation was in I-II day. The tension of the sling was adjusted the day following intervention by turning the screw connected to the varitensor. Patients were followed with physical examination and completed the Korman's questionnaire about the quality of life. RESULTS. At a follow-up average 30 months, 21 patients (87.5%) were perfectly continent with improvement of quality of life. Among the complications, wound infection occurred in 2 patients (8%); 1 (4%) with mild recurrence IUS; 1 (4%) reported "de novo" urgency, 1 (4%) reported urinary retention. CONCLUSIONS. Our data show that the use of the suburetral sling "ReMeEx" is a effective option in the treatment of IUS due to ISD which is a condition often secondary to urogynecologic surgery and refractory to common techniques antincontinence. PMID:21086308

  15. Variability of Massive Stars with Known Spectral Types in the Small Magellanic Cloud Using 8 Years of OGLE-III Data

    Kourniotis, M; Soszynski, I; Poleski, R; Krikelis, G; Udalski, A; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Kozlowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    We present a variability study of 4646 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with known spectral types from the catalog of Bonanos et al. (2010) using the light curves from OGLE-III database. The goal is to exploit the time domain information available through OGLE-III to gain insight into the processes that govern the evolution of massive stars. We find 60% of our sample (2766 stars) to be "constant" and 40% (1880 stars) to exhibit variability distributed as follows: 807 stars display low-amplitude stochastic variability with fluctuations in I-band of 0.05 mag, 443 stars present irregular variability of higher amplitude (76% of these are reported as variables for the first time), 212 are eclipsing binaries, including 108 newly discovered systems, 43 are candidate rotating variables, 126 are classical Cepheids, 188 stars exhibit short-term sinusoidal periodicity (P < 3 days) making them candidate "slowly pulsating B stars" and non-radial Be pulsators, and 61 periodic stars exhibit longer period...

  16. Scrape-off layer ion temperature measurements at the divertor target during type III and type I ELMs in MAST measured by RFEA

    Elmore, S.; Allan, S. Y.; Fishpool, G.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A. J.; Walkden, N. R.; Harrison, J. R.; the MAST Team

    2016-06-01

    In future nuclear fusion reactors high heat load events, such as edge-localised modes (ELMs), can potentially damage divertor materials and release impurities into the main plasma, limiting plasma performance. The most difficult to handle are type I ELMs since they carry the largest fraction of energy from the plasma and therefore deposit the largest heat flux at the target and on first wall materials. Knowing the temperature of the ions released from ELM events is important since it determines the potential sputtering they would cause from plasma facing materials. To make measurements of T i by retarding field energy analyser (RFEA) during type I ELMs a new operational technique has been used to allow faster measurements to be made; this is called the fast swept technique (FST). The FST method allows measurements to be made within the time of the ELM event which has previously not been possible with T i measurements. This new technique has been validated by comparing it with a slower average measurement previously used to make ion temperature measurements of ELMs. Presented here are the first T i measurements during Type I ELMs made at a tokamak divertor. Temperatures as high as 20 eV are measured more than 15 cm from the peak heat flux of an ELM, in a region where no inter-ELM current is measured by the RFEA; showing that ELM events cause hot ions to reach the divertor target far into the scrape off layer. Fast camera imaging has been used to investigate the type of ELM filaments that have been measured by the divertor RFEA. It is postulated that most of the ion temperatures measured in type I ELMs are from secondary ELM filaments which have not been previously identified in MAST plasmas.

  17. IgGG Kappa Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) Presenting as Acquired Type III Von Willebrand Syndrome

    Howard, C.; Lin, T; Cunningham, M; Lipe, B

    2014-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand Syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder associated with hematoproliferative disorders, autoimmune conditions, neoplasia, and cardiovascular disorders that often presents a diagnostic challenge. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is one of the most common causes of AVWS that typically presents later in life with mucocutaneous or postsurgical bleeding and multimers consistent with type I or II von Willebrand Disease (VWD). Here we present the c...

  18. The IACOB project: III. New observational clues to understand macroturbulent broadening in massive O- and B-type stars

    Simón-Díaz, S; Castro, N; Herrero, A; Aerts, C; Puls, J; Telting, J; Grassitelli, L

    2016-01-01

    We aim to provide new empirical clues about macroturbulent spectral line broadening in O- and B-type stars to evaluate its physical origin. We use high-resolution spectra of ~430 stars with spectral types in the range O4-B9 (all luminosity classes). We characterize the line-broadening of adequate diagnostic metal lines using a combined FT and GOF technique. We perform a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the whole sample using automatic tools coupled with a huge grid of FASTWIND models. We also incorporate quantitative information about line asymmetries to our observational description of the characteristics of the line-profiles, and present a comparison of the shape and type of line-profile variability found in a small sample of O stars and B supergiants with still undefined pulsational properties and B main sequence stars with variable line-profiles. We present a homogeneous and statistically significant overview of the (single snapshot) line-broadening properties of stars in the whole O and B star doma...

  19. Scrape-off layer ion temperature measurements at the divertor target during type III and type I ELMs in MAST measured by RFEA

    Elmore, S; Fishpool, G; Kirk, A; Thornton, A J; Walkden, N R; Harrison, J R

    2016-01-01

    In future nuclear fusion reactors high heat load events, such as edge-localised modes (ELMs), can potentially damage divertor materials and release impurities into the main plasma, limiting plasma performance. The most difficult to handle are type I ELMs since they carry the largest fraction of energy from the plasma and therefore deposit the largest heat flux at the target and on first wall materials. Knowing the temperature of the ions released from ELM events is important since it determines the potential sputtering they would cause from plasma facing materials. To make measurements of Ti by retarding field energy analyser (RFEA) during type I ELMs a new operational technique has been used to allow faster measurements to be made; this is called the fast swept technique (FST).

  20. Type-III two Higgs doublet model plus a pseudoscalar confronted with h→μτ, muon g−2 and dark matter

    Xuewen Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce an extra singlet pseudoscalar into the Type-III two Higgs doublet model (2HDM which is supposed to solve a series of problems in the modern particle-cosmology. With existence of a light pseudoscalar, the h→μτ excess measured at CMS and as well as the (g−2μ anomaly could be simultaneously explained within certain parameter spaces that can also tolerate the data on the flavor-violating processes τ→μγ and Higgs decay gained at LHC. Within the same parameter spaces, the DM relic abundance is well accounted. Moreover, the recently observed Galactic Center gamma ray excess (GCE is proposed to realize through dark matter (DM pair annihilations, and in this work, the scenario of the annihilation being mediated by the pseudoscalar is also addressed.