WorldWideScience

Sample records for 1d structural sequences

  1. CLIPS-1D: analysis of multiple sequence alignments to deduce for residue-positions a role in catalysis, ligand-binding, or protein structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janda Jan-Oliver

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One aim of the in silico characterization of proteins is to identify all residue-positions, which are crucial for function or structure. Several sequence-based algorithms exist, which predict functionally important sites. However, with respect to sequence information, many functionally and structurally important sites are hard to distinguish and consequently a large number of incorrectly predicted functional sites have to be expected. This is why we were interested to design a new classifier that differentiates between functionally and structurally important sites and to assess its performance on representative datasets. Results We have implemented CLIPS-1D, which predicts a role in catalysis, ligand-binding, or protein structure for residue-positions in a mutually exclusive manner. By analyzing a multiple sequence alignment, the algorithm scores conservation as well as abundance of residues at individual sites and their local neighborhood and categorizes by means of a multiclass support vector machine. A cross-validation confirmed that residue-positions involved in catalysis were identified with state-of-the-art quality; the mean MCC-value was 0.34. For structurally important sites, prediction quality was considerably higher (mean MCC = 0.67. For ligand-binding sites, prediction quality was lower (mean MCC = 0.12, because binding sites and structurally important residue-positions share conservation and abundance values, which makes their separation difficult. We show that classification success varies for residues in a class-specific manner. This is why our algorithm computes residue-specific p-values, which allow for the statistical assessment of each individual prediction. CLIPS-1D is available as a Web service at http://www-bioinf.uni-regensburg.de/. Conclusions CLIPS-1D is a classifier, whose prediction quality has been determined separately for catalytic sites, ligand-binding sites, and structurally important sites. It generates hypotheses about residue-positions important for a set of homologous proteins and focuses on conservation and abundance signals. Thus, the algorithm can be applied in cases where function cannot be transferred from well-characterized proteins by means of sequence comparison.

  2. 𝒩-Structures Applied to Closed Ideals in BCH-Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ali Öztürk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The notions of 𝒩-subalgebras and 𝒩-closed ideals in BCH-algebras are introduced, and the relation between 𝒩-subalgebras and 𝒩-closed ideals is considered. Characterizations of 𝒩-subalgebras and 𝒩-closed ideals are provided. Using special subsets, 𝒩-subalgebras and 𝒩-closed ideals are constructed. A condition for an 𝒩-subalgebra to be an 𝒩-closed ideal is discussed. Given an 𝒩-structure, the greatest 𝒩-closed ideal which is contained in the 𝒩-structure is established.

  3. Exome sequencing identifies somatic gain-of-function PPM1D mutations in brainstem gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Chen, Lee H; Wan, Hong; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Jie; Yang, Shaohua; Jones, Siân; Wang, Sizhen; Zhou, Weixin; Zhu, Huishan; Killela, Patrick J; Zhang, Junting; Wu, Zhen; Li, Guilin; Hao, Shuyu; Wang, Yu; Webb, Joseph B; Friedman, Henry S; Friedman, Allan H; McLendon, Roger E; He, Yiping; Reitman, Zachary J; Bigner, Darell D; Yan, Hai

    2014-07-01

    Gliomas arising in the brainstem and thalamus are devastating tumors that are difficult to surgically resect. To determine the genetic and epigenetic landscape of these tumors, we performed exomic sequencing of 14 brainstem gliomas (BSGs) and 12 thalamic gliomas. We also performed targeted mutational analysis of an additional 24 such tumors and genome-wide methylation profiling of 45 gliomas. This study led to the discovery of tumor-specific mutations in PPM1D, encoding wild-type p53-induced protein phosphatase 1D (WIP1), in 37.5% of the BSGs that harbored hallmark H3F3A mutations encoding p.Lys27Met substitutions. PPM1D mutations were mutually exclusive with TP53 mutations in BSG and attenuated p53 activation in vitro. PPM1D mutations were truncating alterations in exon 6 that enhanced the ability of PPM1D to suppress the activation of the DNA damage response checkpoint protein CHK2. These results define PPM1D as a frequent target of somatic mutation and as a potential therapeutic target in brainstem gliomas. PMID:24880341

  4. Comments on the Bifurcation Structure of 1D Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belykh, V.N.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a complementary view on some of the phenomena related to the bifurcation structure of unimodal maps. An approximate renormalization theory for the period-doubling cascade is developed, and a mapping procedure is established that accounts directly for the box-within-a-box struct......The paper presents a complementary view on some of the phenomena related to the bifurcation structure of unimodal maps. An approximate renormalization theory for the period-doubling cascade is developed, and a mapping procedure is established that accounts directly for the box......-within-a-box structure of the total bifurcation set. This presents a picture in which the homoclinic orbit bifurcations act as a skeleton for the bifurcational set. At the same time, experimental results on continued subharmonic generation for piezoelectrically amplified sound waves, predating the Feigenbaum theory, are...

  5. Vibron properties in quasi 1D molecular structures: the case of two parallel unshifted macromolecuar chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ?evizovi?, D.; Petkovi?, S.; Galovi?, S.; Reshetnyak, A.; Chizhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the hopping mechanism of the vibron excitation transport in the system of two parallel unshifted 1D macromolecuar chains in the framework of non-adiabatic polaron theory. We suppose that the vibron interaction with thermal oscillations of the macromolecular structural elements will result in vibron self-trapping and the formation of the partial dressed vibron state. We also suppose that quasiparticle motion takes place via a sequence of random sitejumps, in each of which the quasiparticle can migrate either to the first neighbor site of the macromolecular chain. With use of the modified Holstein polaron model, we calculate the vibron effective mass in dependence of the basic system parameters and temperature. Special attention is paid to the influence of interchain coupling on vibron dressing. We find that for certain values of the system parameters the quasiparticle mass abruptly changes.

  6. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costanzo, L.; Drury, J; Christianson, D; Penning, T

    2009-01-01

    Human steroid 5{beta}-reductase (aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1D1) catalyzes reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-ene double bonds in steroid hormones and bile acid precursors. We have reported the structures of an AKR1D1-NADP{sup +} binary complex, and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-cortisone, AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-progesterone and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-testosterone ternary complexes at high resolutions. Recently, structures of AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone complexes showed that the product is bound unproductively. Two quite different mechanisms of steroid double bond reduction have since been proposed. However, site-directed mutagenesis supports only one mechanism. In this mechanism, the 4-pro-R hydride is transferred from the re-face of the nicotinamide ring to C5 of the steroid substrate. E120, a unique substitution in the AKR catalytic tetrad, permits a deeper penetration of the steroid substrate into the active site to promote optimal reactant positioning. It participates with Y58 to create a 'superacidic' oxyanion hole for polarization of the C3 ketone. A role for K87 in the proton relay proposed using the AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone structure is not supported.

  7. Formation of 1D adsorbed water structures on CaO(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xunhua; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of water with oxide surfaces is of fundamental importance for basic and engineering sciences. Recently, a spontaneous formation of one-dimensional (1D) adsorbed water structures have been observed on CaO(001). Interestingly, at other alkaline earth metal oxides, in particular MgO(001) and SrO(001), such structures have not been found experimentally. We calculate the relative stability of adsorbed water structures on the three oxides using density-functional theory combined with the ab initio atomistic thermodynamics. Low-energy structures at different coverages are obtained with a first-principles genetic algorithm. Finite-temperature vibrational spectra are calculated using ab initio molecular dynamics. We find a range of (T, p) conditions where 1D structures are thermodynamically stable on CaO(001). The orientation and vibrational spectra of the 1D structures are in agreement with the experiments. The formation of the 1D structures is found to be actuated by a symmetry breaking in the adsorbed water tetramer, as well as by a balance between water-water and water-substrate interactions, determined by the lattice constant of the oxide.

  8. An evaluation of LSU rDNA D1-D2 sequences for their use in species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of species via DNA sequences is the basis for DNA taxonomy and DNA barcoding. Currently there is a strong focus on using a mitochondrial marker for this purpose, in particular a fragment from the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI. While there is ample evidence that this marker is indeed suitable across a broad taxonomic range to delineate species, it has also become clear that a complementation by a nuclear marker system could be advantageous. Ribosomal RNA genes could be suitable for this purpose, because of their global occurrence and the possibility to design universal primers. However, it has so far been assumed that these genes are too highly conserved to allow resolution at, or even beyond the species level. On the other hand, it is known that ribosomal gene regions harbour also highly divergent parts. We explore here the information content of two adjacent divergence regions of the large subunit ribosomal gene, the D1-D2 region. Results Universal primers were designed to amplify the D1-D2 region from all metazoa. We show that amplification products in the size between 800–1300 bp can be obtained across a broad range of animal taxa, provided some optimizations of the PCR procedure are implemented. Although the ribosomal genes occur in multiple copies in the genomes, we find generally very little intra-individual polymorphism (Cottus and genus Aphyosemion show that the D1-D2 LSU sequence can resolve even very closely related species with the same fidelity as COI sequences. In one case we can even show that a mitochondrial transfer must have occurred, since the nuclear sequence confirms the taxonomic assignment, while the mitochondrial sequence would have led to the wrong classification. We have further explored whether hybrids between species can be detected with the nuclear sequence and we show for a test case of natural hybrids among cyprinid fish species (Alburnus alburnus and Rutilus rutilus that this is indeed possible. Conclusion The D1-D2 LSU region is a suitable marker region for applications in DNA based species identification and should be considered to be routinely used as a marker complementing broad scale studies based on mitochondrial markers.

  9. HERMES Precision Results on g1p, g1d and g1n and the First Measurement of the Tensor Structure Function b1d

    CERN Document Server

    Riedl, C; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Baturin, V; Baumgarten, C; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V V; Capitani, G P; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G M; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Ely, J; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Franz, J; Frullani, S; Gärber, Y; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G E; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Königsmann, K C; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V A; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Lindemann, T; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H O; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M A; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Orlandi, G; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Rith, K; Airapetian, A; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Yu I; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Scarlett, C; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Schwind, A; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R G; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V B; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M D; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stewart, J; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A V; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, Martin C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Visser, J; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ybeles-Smit, G V; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zohrabyan, H G; Zupranski, P; Riedl, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    Final HERMES results on the proton, deuteron and neutron structure function g1 are presented in the kinematic range 0.0021structure function b1d are presented.

  10. Study of phase transformation and crystal structure for 1D carbon-modified titania ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lihui, E-mail: lhzhou@ecust.edu.cn; Zhang, Fang; Li, Jinxia

    2014-02-15

    One-dimensional hydrogen titanate ribbons were successfully prepared with hydrothermal reaction in a highly basic solution. A series of one-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons were prepared via calcination of the mixture of hydrogen titanate ribbons and sucrose solution under N{sub 2} flow at different temperatures. The phase transformation process of hydrogen titanate ribbons was investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction at various temperatures. Besides, one-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons calcined at different temperatures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and so on. Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons showed one-dimensional ribbon crystal structure and various crystal phases of TiO{sub 2}. After being modified with carbon, a layer of uniform carbon film was coated on the surface of TiO{sub 2} ribbons, which improved their adsorption capacity for methyl orange as a model organic pollutant. One-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons also exhibited enhanced visible-light absorbance with the increase of calcination temperatures. - Highlights: • The synthesis of 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons. • The phase transformation of 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons. • 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} exhibites enhanced visible-light absorbance.

  11. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  12. Inherent structures and non-equilibrium dynamics of 1D constrained kinetic models a comparison study

    CERN Document Server

    Crisanti, A; Rocco, A; Sellitto, M

    2000-01-01

    e discuss the relevance of the Stillinger and Weber approach to the glass transition investigating the non-equilibrium behavior of models with non-trivial dynamics, but with simple equilibrium properties. We consider a family of 1D constrained kinetic models, which interpolates between the asymmetric chain introduced by Eisinger and J\\"ackle [Z. Phys. {\\bf B84}, 115 (1991)] and the symmetric chain introduced by Fredrickson and Andersen [Phys. Rev. Lett {\\bf 53}, 1244 (1984)], and the 1D version of the Backgammon model [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 75}, 1190 (1995)]. We show that the configurational entropy obtained from the inherent structures is the same for all models irrespective of their different microscopic dynamics. We present a detailed study of the coarsening behavior of these models, including the relation between fluctuations and response. Our results suggest that any approach to the glass transition inspired by mean-field ideas and resting on the definition of a configurational entropy must rely on the a...

  13. Quark-hadron duality in spin structure functions g1p and g1d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New measurements of the spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron g1p(x,Q2) and g1d(x,Q2) in the nucleon resonance region are compared with extrapolations of target-mass-corrected next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD fits to higher energy data. Averaged over the entire resonance region (W2 dependence for Q2>1.7 GeV2/c2. This ''global'' duality appears to result from cancellations among the prominent ''local'' resonance regions: in particular strong ?3/2 contributions in the ?(1232) region appear to be compensated by strong ?1/2 contributions in the resonance region centered on 1.5 GeV. These results are encouraging for the extension of NLO QCD fits to lower W and Q2 than have been used previously

  14. The Role of the Impedivity in the Magnetotelluric Response of 1D and 2D Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Roberta; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Patella, Domenico; Mariano Castelo Branco, Raimundo

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the resistivity dispersion on the magnetotelluric (MT) response is analyzed. MT uses the natural electromagnetic (EM) field to determine the electrical resistivity of the subsoil and retrieve the geometry of lithospheric structures, revealing the presence of bodies as metallic deposits, hydrocarbons reservoirs, geothermal fluids. The frequency range of the EM field used varies from 10-4 to 104 Hz. If the soil is polarizable, the dispersion of the resistivity, whose characteristic frequency interval is between 10-2 and 102 Hz, may affect MT responses. Resistivity dispersion is a known phenomenology, which constitutes the basis of the Induced Polarization (IP) prospecting method. In the frequency domain (FD), the dispersion consists in a variation of the resistivity parameter as the frequency of the exciting current is changed. The dispersive resistivity, called impedivity, is a complex function of the frequency. At vanishing frequency, however, the impedivity is real and coincides with the classical resistivity parameter used in DC geoelectrical methods. A real asymptote is also approached as the frequency tends to infinity. The complex physical and chemical fluid-metal-rock interactions may produce induced polarization effects, which are related to the dispersion in rocks. This is manifested on the MT response, creating a distortion on the experimental curves. Disregarding the distortion effect may lead to misleading interpretation of the surveyed structures. We show the results from simulation of the MT responses, when dispersion is assumed to characterize the electrical properties of a region of the explored half-space. Initially, a 1D-layered earth is considered, with intermediate layer assumed to be dispersive. The influence of the dispersion amplitude on the shape of the MT responses is evaluated. The dispersion alters the shape of the curves in a way that, without any external constraints, may make the interpretation of the curves quite ambiguous. Successively, a 2D case is considered, consisting in a magma chamber at a depth of 1 km, buried into a soil. The synthetic responses were performed considering both the non-dispersive and the dispersive case and the differences of the modelled MT curves are compared. As for the 1D case, the dispersion alters the resistivity values, particularly at the boundary of the buried body, leading to an ambiguous interpretation. MT data alone are not sufficient to distinguish polarization effects or can induce to see dispersion where is not present. An approach to solve this problem consists of the combined interpretation of DC geoelectrical and MT data collected at the same site. Review of real cases is also shown.

  15. MAGNETIC CORE SHELL STRUCTURES: from 0D to 1D assembling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficai, Denisa; Ficai, Anton; Dinu, Elena; Oprea, Ovidiu; Sonmez, Maria; Keler, Memduh Kagan; Sahin, Yesim Muge; Ekren, Nazmi; Inan, Ahmet Talat; Daglilar, Sibel; Gunduz, Oguzhan

    2015-01-01

    Material research and development studies are focused on different techniques of bringing out nanomaterials with desired characteristics and properties. From the point of view of materials development, nowadays scientists are strongly focused on obtaining materials with predefined characteristics and properties. The morphology control seems to be a determinant factor and increasing attention is devoted to this aspect. At this moment it is possible to engineer the material's features by using different methods and materials combination for both medical and industrial applications. In the applications of chemistry and synthesis, biology, mechanics, optics solar cells and microelectronics tailoring the adjustable parameters of stoichiometry, chemical structure, shape and segregation are evaluated and opens new fields. Because of the magnetic features of nanoparticles and durable particle size, less than 100 nm, this study is aiming to describe their uses in practical applications. That's why the whole hydrodynamic magnetic core shell topic will be reviewed on this paper. Additionally, the properties acting in general sight in solid-state physics are utilized for material selection and for defining issue connecting the core, shell structure and their producing properties. Here, in the study of core/shell nanoparticle various physical and chemical synthesis routes and the effect of electrospun method are briefly discussed. Starting from a real void of the scientific literature, the existent data related to the 1D magnetic electrospun materials are reviewed. The perspectives in the medical, environmental or energetic sector is great and bring some real advantages related to the 0D core@shell structures because both mechanical and biological properties are dependent on the morphology of the materials. PMID:26377653

  16. Wave propagation modelling in 1D structures using spectral finite elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudela, P.; Krawczuk, M.; Ostachowicz, W.

    2007-02-01

    The application of spectral finite elements (SFE) to one-dimensional (1D) elastic wave propagation problems is presented. Travelling waves in an isotropic rod and Timoshenko beam have been investigated. The rod has been modelled using 1D SFEs while the beam has been modelled using 1D and 2D SFEs. Numerical results have been compared to those obtained from the classical finite element approach. This comparison highlighted the efficiency of the SFE method. The numerical results have been also verified experimentally. A high degree of accuracy has been observed.

  17. Protein Structure Predicted from Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, Debora S; Sheridan, Robert; Hopf, Thomas A; Pagnani, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Sander, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by function and three-dimensional (3D) structure. Residues in spatial proximity tend to co-evolve, yet attempts to invert the evolutionary record to identify these constraints and use them to computationally fold proteins have so far been unsuccessful. Here, we show that co-variation of residue pairs, observed in a large protein family, provides sufficient information to determine 3D protein structure. Using a data-constrained maximum entropy model of the multiple sequence alignment, we identify pairs of statistically coupled residue positions which are expected to be close in the protein fold, termed contacts inferred from evolutionary information (EICs). To assess the amount of information about the protein fold contained in these coupled pairs, we evaluate the accuracy of predicted 3D structures for proteins of 50-260 residues, from 15 diverse protein families, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These structure predictions ...

  18. Permittivity and Permeability for Floquet-Bloch Space Harmonics in Infinite 1D Magneto-Dielectric Periodic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    For an infinite 1D periodic structure with unit cells consisting of two planar slabs of magnetodielectric materials, the electric field – as well as magnetic field, electric flux density, magnetic flux density, polarization, and magnetization – can be expressed as infinite series of Floquet-Bloch space harmonics. We discuss how space harmonic permittivity and permeability can be expressed in seemingly different though equivalent forms, and we investigate these parameters of the zeroeth order space harmonic for a particular 1D periodic structure that is based on a previously reported 3D periodic structure with unit cells containing a magneto-dielectric sphere.

  19. iPBA: a tool for protein structure comparison using sequence alignment strategies. : Structural Alphabet Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; De Brevern, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    With the immense growth in the number of available protein structures, fast and accurate structure comparison has been essential. We propose an efficient method for structure comparison, based on a structural alphabet. Protein Blocks (PBs) is a widely used structural alphabet with 16 pentapeptide conformations that can fairly approximate a complete protein chain. Thus a 3D structure can be translated into a 1D sequence of PBs. With a simple Needleman-Wunsch approach and a raw PB substitution ...

  20. Simulation of unsteady state performance of a secondary air system by the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Peng; Li, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the calculation method for unsteady state conditions in the secondary air systems in gas turbines. The 1D-3D-Structure coupled method was applied. A 1D code was used to model the standard components that have typical geometric characteristics. Their flow and heat transfer were described by empirical correlations based on experimental data or CFD calculations. A 3D code was used to model the non-standard components that cannot be described by typical geometric languages, while a finite element analysis was carried out to compute the structural deformation and heat conduction at certain important positions. These codes were coupled through their interfaces. Thus, the changes in heat transfer and structure and their interactions caused by exterior disturbances can be reflected. The results of the coupling method in an unsteady state showed an apparent deviation from the existing data, while the results in the steady state were highly consistent with the existing data. The difference in the results in the unsteady state was caused primarily by structural deformation that cannot be predicted by the 1D method. Thus, in order to obtain the unsteady state performance of a secondary air system more accurately and efficiently, the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method should be used.

  1. Sequence-structure relations of biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Christopher; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA data is transcribed into single-stranded RNA, which folds into specific molecular structures. In this paper we pose the question to what extent sequence- and structure-information correlate. We view this correlation as structural semantics of sequence data that allows for a different interpretation than conventional sequence alignment. Structural semantics could enable us to identify more general embedded "patterns" in DNA and RNA sequences. Results: We compute the partition function of sequences with respect to a fixed structure and connect this computation to the mutual information of a sequence-structure pair for RNA secondary structures. We present a Boltzmann sampler and obtain the a priori probability of specific sequence patterns. We present a detailed analysis for the three PDB-structures, 2JXV (hairpin), 2N3R (3-branch multi-loop) and 1EHZ (tRNA). We localize specific sequence patterns, contrast the energy spectrum of the Boltzmann sampled sequences versus those sequences that refold ...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain JSZL, Belonging to a New Subgenotype, 2.1d, Isolated in China in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Feng, Liping; Liu, Chunxiao; Chen, Jiazeng; Leng, Chaoliang; Bai, Yun; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Cai, Xuehui; Yang, Xufu; Tian, Zhijun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of classic swine fever virus (CSFV) strain JSZL was determined in this study. JSZL was originally isolated from an immune pig farm in Jiangsu Province, China. JSZL is more closely related to subgenotype 2.1b than to 2.1a and 2.1c. Importantly, JSZL was classified into a new subgenotype, 2.1d. PMID:26294620

  3. The structure and electronic properties of copper iodide 1D nanocrystals within single walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper iodide one-dimensional nanocrystals within single walled carbon nanotubes (1D CuI@SWCNTs), i.e. meta-nanotubes [1], were investigated by high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). In meta-nanotubes of diameter Dm = 1.3-1.4 nm produced by arc-discharge (AD) method close-packed hexagonal or deformed cubic 1D crystal anion sublattices were observed with cations in octahedral or tetrahedral positions. These two sublattices reversibly transform to one another. In catalysed chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) meta-nanotubes of diameters Dm = 1.5-2.0 nm cubic anion sublattices are formed. For diameters ?2.0 nm three-dimensional (3D) crystallization is observed

  4. 5-Fluoro pyrimidines: labels to probe DNA and RNA secondary structures by 1D 19F NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Puffer, Barbara; Kreutz, Christoph; Rieder, Ulrike; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Konrat, Robert; Micura, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable tool to monitor functionally important conformational transitions of nucleic acids. Here, we present a systematic investigation on the application of 5-fluoro pyrimidines to probe DNA and RNA secondary structures. Oligonucleotides with the propensity to adapt secondary structure equilibria were chosen as model systems and analyzed by 1D 19F and 1H NMR spectroscopy. A comparison with the unmodified analogs revealed that the equilibrium character...

  5. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO2 low dimensional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling-ju; Zeng, Zhi; He, Tao

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO2 nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO2 nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti2O4 building unit, a series of 1D TiO2 nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO2 chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO2 nanostructure in the future.

  6. From 1D chain to 3D network: A theoretical study on TiO2 low dimensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed a systematic study on a series of low dimensional TiO2 nanostructures under density functional theory methods. The geometries, stabilities, growth mechanism, and electronic structures of 1D chain, 2D ring, 2D ring array, and 3D network of TiO2 nanostructures are analyzed. Based on the Ti2O4 building unit, a series of 1D TiO2 nano chains and rings can be built. Furthermore, 2D ring array and 3D network nanostructures can be constructed from 1D chains and rings. Among non-periodic TiO2 chain and ring structures, one series of ring structures is found to be more stable. The geometry model of the 2D ring arrays and 3D network structures in this work has provided a theoretical understanding on the structure information in experiments. Based on these semiconductive low dimensional structures, moreover, it can help to understand and design new hierarchical TiO2 nanostructure in the future

  7. Inhibition of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1) by Finasteride and Structure of the Enzyme-Inhibitor Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.; Di Costanzo, L; Penning, T; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    The {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid functionality is present in nearly all steroid hormones apart from estrogens. The first step in functionalization of the A-ring is mediated in humans by steroid 5{alpha}- or 5{beta}-reductase. Finasteride is a mechanism-based inactivator of 5{alpha}-reductase type 2 with subnanomolar affinity and is widely used as a therapeutic for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is also used for androgen deprivation in hormone-dependent prostate carcinoma, and it has been examined as a chemopreventive agent in prostate cancer. The effect of finasteride on steroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1) has not been previously reported. We show that finasteride competitively inhibits AKR1D1 with low micromolar affinity but does not act as a mechanism-based inactivator. The structure of the AKR1D1 {center_dot} NADP{sup +} {center_dot} finasteride complex determined at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution shows that it is not possible for NADPH to reduce the {Delta}{sup 1-2}-ene of finasteride because the cofactor and steroid are not proximal to each other. The C3-ketone of finasteride accepts hydrogen bonds from the catalytic residues Tyr-58 and Glu-120 in the active site of AKR1D1, providing an explanation for the competitive inhibition observed. This is the first reported structure of finasteride bound to an enzyme involved in steroid hormone metabolism.

  8. Structure, electrochemical properties and capacitance performance of polypyrrole electrodeposited onto 1-D crystals of iridium complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka-?o?opa, Monika; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Composites of polypyrrole and one-dimensional iridium complex crystals [(C2H5)4N]0.55[IrCl2(CO)2] were prepared by in situ two-step electrodeposition. Initially, iridium complex crystals were formed during [IrCl2(CO)2]- complex oxidation. Next, pyrrole was electropolymerized on the surface of the iridium needles. The morphology of the composite was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At positive potentials, the iridium complex crystals and the polypyrrole were oxidized. In aprotic solvents, oxidation of the iridium complex crystals resulted in their dissolution. In water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chlorides, the 1-D iridium complex crystals were reversibly oxidized. The product of the iridium complex oxidation remained on the electrode surface in crystalline form. The iridium complex needles significantly influenced the redox properties of the polymer. The polypyrrole involved electrode processes become more reversible in presence of crystals of iridium complex. The current of polypyrrole oxidation was higher compared to that of pure polypyrrole and the capacitance properties of the polymer were significantly enhanced. A specific capacitance as high as 590 F g-1 was obtained for a composite of polypyrrole and 1-D crystals of the iridium complex in water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chloride. This value is approximately twice as high as the capacitance of the pure polymer deposited onto the electrode surface.

  9. Development of input structure software for MARS 1D-3D graphic user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A user-friendly Input Software for MARS 1D-3D GUI called MARA (MARS Adjunct Reactor Assembler) has been developed. Extension of the current MARA to the overall input system for MARS will result in an integrated commercial GUI comparable to those for computational analysis codes ANSYS, ABAQUS, FLUENT and CFX. MARA will help accelerate marketing of MARS and other potential system analysis codes to developing countries in Southeast Asia planning to put nuclear power in their electrical grids. MARS code and associated developmental technology are in the process of being disseminated to twenty-two organizations spanning the industry, academia and laboratories across the country. MARA will find its way to practical applications in a variety of engineering problems

  10. An evaluation of LSU rDNA D1-D2 sequences for their use in species identification

    OpenAIRE

    Tautz Diethard; Nolte Arne W; Sonnenberg Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Identification of species via DNA sequences is the basis for DNA taxonomy and DNA barcoding. Currently there is a strong focus on using a mitochondrial marker for this purpose, in particular a fragment from the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI). While there is ample evidence that this marker is indeed suitable across a broad taxonomic range to delineate species, it has also become clear that a complementation by a nuclear marker system could be advantageous. Ribosomal RNA ge...

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure, and properties of a 1-D terbium-substituted monolacunary Keggin-type polyoxotungstate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pengtao; Si, Yanan; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Shaowei; Wang, Jingping; Niu, Jingyang

    2015-03-01

    A new 1-D linear chainlike terbium-substituted polyoxometalate [Tb(H2O)2(?-PW11O39)]4- (1) has been synthesized in aqueous solution and characterized by elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), IR spectrum, thermal analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. X-ray structural analysis reveals that 1 displays a 1-D linear chain containing [Tb(H2O)2(?-PW11O39)]4- moieties. The Tb(III) cation incorporated into the monolacunary Keggin-type [?-PW11O39]7- unit resides in a distorted monocapped triangular prismatic geometry and acts as a linker to join two adjacent [?-PW11O39]7- units to form a 1-D chain structure. Solid-state photoluminescent property of 1 has been investigated at room temperature and the photoluminescent emission mainly results from the synergistic effect of the TbIII cation and the Na7[?-PW11O39] precursor. The ESI-MS spectrum of 1 confirms that the polyanion [Tb(H2O)(HPW11O39)]3- is stable in aqueous solution.

  12. Nucleic acid sequences encoding D1 and D1/D2 domains of human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2010-04-06

    The invention provides recombinant human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) polypeptides which bind adenovirus. Specifically, polypeptides corresponding to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2 are provided. In another aspect, the invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains and expression vectors for producing the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. The invention also includes an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide fused to a polypeptide which facilitates folding of D1 when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a CAR D1-binding virus, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. The invention also provides a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  13. Properties of Floquet-Bloch space harmonics in 1D periodic magneto-dielectric structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, O.

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a significant research interest in Floquet-Bloch analysis for determining the homogenized permittivity and permeability of metamaterials consisting of periodic structures. This work investigates fundamental properties of the Floquet-Bloch space harmonics in a 1-dimensional magneto-dielectric lossless structure supporting a transverse-electric-magnetic Floquet-Bloch wave; in particular, the space harmonic permittivity and permeability, as well as the space harmonic Poynting vector.

  14. Spatially encoded phase-contrast MRI-3D MRI movies of 1D and 2D structures at millisecond resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Uecker, Martin; Voit, Dirk; Frahm, Jens

    2011-10-01

    This work demonstrates that the principles underlying phase-contrast MRI may be used to encode spatial rather than flow information along a perpendicular dimension, if this dimension contains an MRI-visible object at only one spatial location. In particular, the situation applies to 3D mapping of curved 2D structures which requires only two projection images with different spatial phase-encoding gradients. These phase-contrast gradients define the field of view and mean spin-density positions of the object in the perpendicular dimension by respective phase differences. When combined with highly undersampled radial fast low angle shot (FLASH) and image reconstruction by regularized nonlinear inversion, spatial phase-contrast MRI allows for dynamic 3D mapping of 2D structures in real time. First examples include 3D MRI movies of the acting human hand at a temporal resolution of 50 ms. With an even simpler technique, 3D maps of curved 1D structures may be obtained from only three acquisitions of a frequency-encoded MRI signal with two perpendicular phase encodings. Here, 3D MRI movies of a rapidly rotating banana were obtained at 5 ms resolution or 200 frames per second. In conclusion, spatial phase-contrast 3D MRI of 2D or 1D structures is respective two or four orders of magnitude faster than conventional 3D MRI. PMID:21842502

  15. Local RNA structure alignment with incomplete sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Kolbe, Diana L.; Eddy, Sean R

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Accuracy of automated structural RNA alignment is improved by using models that consider not only primary sequence but also secondary structure information. However, current RNA structural alignment approaches tend to perform poorly on incomplete sequence fragments, such as single reads from metagenomic environmental surveys, because nucleotides that are expected to be base paired are missing.

  16. On maximal eigenfrequency separation in two-material structures: the 1D and 2D scalar cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    We present a method to maximize the separation of two adjacent eigenfrequencies in structures with two material components. The method is based on finite element analysis and topology optimization in which an iterative algorithm is used to find the optimal distribution of the materials. Results are...... presented for eigenvalue problems based on the 1D and 2D scalar wave equations. Two different objectives are used in the optimization, the difference between two adjacent eigenfrequencies and the ratio between the squared eigenfrequencies. In the ID case, we use simple interpolation of material parameters...

  17. Integrability of and differential–algebraic structures for spatially 1D hydrodynamical systems of Riemann type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new differential–algebraic–geometric approach for testing integrability is described. • The approach is applied to a generalized Riemann type hydrodynamic system. • The approach is applied to a generalized Ostrovsky–Vakhnenko system. • The approach is applied to a new two-component Burgers type hydrodynamic system. -- Abstract: A differential–algebraic approach to studying the Lax integrability of a generalized Riemann type hydrodynamic hierarchy is revisited and a new Lax representation is constructed. The related bi-Hamiltonian integrability and compatible Poissonian structures of this hierarchy are also investigated using gradient-holonomic and geometric methods. The complete integrability of a new generalized Riemann hydrodynamic system is studied via a novel combination of symplectic and differential–algebraic tools. A compatible pair of polynomial Poissonian structures, a Lax representation and a related infinite hierarchy of conservation laws are obtained. In addition, the differential–algebraic approach is used to prove the complete Lax integrability of the generalized Ostrovsky–Vakhnenko and a new Burgers type system, and special cases are studied using symplectic and gradient-holonomic tools. Compatible pairs of polynomial Poissonian structures, matrix Lax representations and infinite hierarchies of conservation laws are derived

  18. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1d(x) for 1 (GeV/c)2 2 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g1d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 2 2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g1d, including ?1d, and the net quark polarization ? ?

  19. Structure elucidation of organic compounds from natural sources using 1D and 2D NMR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Gulacti; Ulubelen, Ayhan

    2007-05-01

    In our continuing studies on Lamiaceae family plants including Salvia, Teucrium, Ajuga, Sideritis, Nepeta and Lavandula growing in Anatolia, many terpenoids, consisting of over 50 distinct triterpenoids and steroids, and over 200 diterpenoids, several sesterterpenoids and sesquiterpenoids along with many flavonoids and other phenolic compounds have been isolated. For Salvia species abietanes, for Teucrium and Ajuga species neo-clerodanes for Sideritis species ent-kaurane diterpenes are characteristic while nepetalactones are specific for Nepeta species. In this review article, only some interesting and different type of skeleton having constituents, namely rearranged, nor- or rare diterpenes, isolated from these species will be presented. For structure elucidation of these natural diterpenoids intensive one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ( 1H, 13C, APT, DEPT, NOE/NOESY, 1H- 1H COSY, HETCOR, COLOC, HMQC/HSQC, HMBC, SINEPT) were used besides mass and some other spectroscopic methods.

  20. 1D cyanide complexes with 2-pyridinemethanol: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say?n, Elvan; Kürkçüo?lu, Güne? Süheyla; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2015-12-01

    Two new one-dimensional coordination polymers, [Cu(hmpH)2Pd(?-CN)2(CN)2]n (1) and [Cu(hmpH)2Pt(?-CN)2(CN)2]n (2), (hmpH = 2-pyridinemethanol), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that complexes 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the triclinic system and P-1 space group. The Pd(II) or Pt(II) ions are four coordinated with four cyanide-carbon atoms in a square planar geometry. Cu(II) ion displays a distorted octahedral coordination by two N-atoms and two O-atoms of hmpH ligands, two bridging cyanide groups. In one dimensional structure of the complexes, [M(CN)4]2- (M = Pd(II) or Pt(II)) anions and [Cu(hmpH)2]2+ cations are linked via bridging cyanide ligands. In the complexes, the presence of intramolecular C-H⋯M (M = Pd(II) or Pt(II)) interactions with distance values of 3.00-2.95 Å are established, respectively.

  1. Quark-Hadron Duality in Spin Structure Functions $g_1^p$ and $g_1^d$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.E. Bosted; K.V. Dharmawardane; G.E. Dodge; T.A. Forest; S.E. Kuhn; Y. Prok

    2006-07-25

    New measurements of the spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2}) in the nucleon resonance region are compared with extrapolations of target-mass-corrected next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD fits to higher energy data. Averaged over the entire resonance region (W < 2 GeV), the data and QCD fits are in good agreement in both magnitude and Q{sup 2} dependence for Q{sup 2} > 1.7 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. This ''global'' duality appears to result from cancellations among the prominent ''local'' resonance regions: in particular strong {sigma}{sub 3/2} contributions in the {Delta}(1232) region appear to be compensated by strong {sigma}{sub 1/2} contributions in the resonance region centered on 1.5 GeV. These results are encouraging for the extension of NLO QCD fits to lower W and Q{sup 2} than have been used previously.

  2. Impetus for solvothermal synthesis technique: synthesis and structure of a novel 1-D borophosphate using ionic liquid as medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel borophosphate compound has been synthesized under solvothermal conditions using ionic liquid as a medium and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic, space group P2(1)/n, a=8.089(8) A, b=13.977(12) A, c=8.441(8) A, ?=112.517(11) deg. , Z=2, V=881.7(14) A3, R1=0.03, wR2=0.079 and S=1.01. Its structure consists of a 1-D straight chain that is built of the alternative linkage of mutually perpendicular four-member rings. Other characterizations by IR and thermal and elemental analyses are also described

  3. Designed Quasi-1D Potential Structures Realized in Compositionally Graded InAs1-xPx Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Lehmann, Sebastian; Capasso, Federico; Samuelson, Lars

    2016-02-10

    III-V semiconductor heterostructures are important components of many solid-state optoelectronic devices, but the ability to control and tune the electrical and optical properties of these structures in conventional device geometries is fundamentally limited by the bulk dimensionality and the inability to accommodate lattice-mismatched material combinations. Here we demonstrate how semiconductor nanowires may enable the creation of arbitrarily shaped one-dimensional potential structures for new types of designed device functionality. We describe the controlled growth of stepwise compositionally graded InAs1-xPx heterostructures defined along the axes of InAs nanowires, and we show that nanowires with sawtooth-shaped composition profiles behave as near-ideal unipolar diodes with ratchet-like rectification of the electron transport through the nanowires, in excellent agreement with simulations. This new type of designed quasi-1D potential structure represents a significant advance in band gap engineering and may enable fundamental studies of low-dimensional hot-carrier dynamics, in addition to constituting a platform for implementing novel electronic and optoelectronic device concepts. PMID:26788886

  4. HOTCFGM-1D: A Coupled Higher-Order Theory for Cylindrical Structural Components with Through-Thickness Functionally Graded Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this three-year project was to develop and deliver to NASA Lewis one-dimensional and two-dimensional higher-order theories, and related computer codes, for the analysis, optimization and design of cylindrical functionally graded materials/structural components for use in advanced aircraft engines (e.g., combustor linings, rotor disks, heat shields, blisk blades). To satisfy this objective, a quasi one-dimensional version of the higher-order theory, HOTCFGM-1D, and four computer codes based on this theory, for the analysis, design and optimization of cylindrical structural components functionally graded in the radial direction were developed. The theory is applicable to thin multi-phased composite shell/cylinders subjected to macroscopically axisymmetric thermomechanical and inertial loading applied uniformly along the axial direction such that the overall deformation is characterized by a constant average axial strain. The reinforcement phases are uniformly distributed in the axial and circumferential directions, and arbitrarily distributed in the radial direction, thereby allowing functional grading of the internal reinforcement in this direction.

  5. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1d(x) for 1 (GeV/c)2 2 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g1d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 2 2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g1d, including Gamma1d, and the net quark polarization Delta Sigma

  6. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function $g_{1}^{d(x)}$ for $1(GeV/c)^{2} < Q^{2} < 40 (GeV/c)^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Averett, T; Band, H R; Berisso, M C; Borel, H; Bosted, P E; Bultmann, S L; Buénerd, M; Chupp, T E; Churchwell, S; Court, G R; Crabb, D; Day, D; Decowski, P; De Pietro, P; Erbacher, R; Erickson, R; Feltham, A; Fonvieille, H; Frlez, E; Gearhart, R A; Ghazikhanian, V; Gómez, J; Griffioen, K A; Harris, C; Houlden, M A; Hughes, E W; Hyde-Wright, C E; Igo, G; Incerti, S; Jensen, J; Johnson, J R; King, P M; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kuhn, S E; Lindgren, R; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marroncle, J; McCarthy, J; McKee, P; Meyer, Werner T; Mitchell, G; Mitchell, J; Olson, M; Penttila, S; Peterson, G; Petratos, G G; Pitthan, R; Pocanic, D; Prepost, R; Prescott, C; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reyna, D; Rochester, L S; Rock, S E; Rondon-Aramayo, O A; Sabatie, F; Sick, I; Smith, T; Sorrell, L; Staley, F; Lorant, S St; Stuart, L M; Szalata, Z M; Terrien, Y; Tobias, A; Todor, L; Toole, T; Trentalange, S; Walz, D; Welsh, R C; Wesselmann, F R; Wright, T R; Young, C C; Zeier, M; Zhu, H; Zihlmann, B

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Sigma.

  7. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g_1^d(x) for 1 (GeV/c)^2 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2

    OpenAIRE

    E949 Collaboration

    1999-01-01

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Si...

  8. Exome Sequencing in Fetuses with Structural Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona L. Mackie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal diagnostic testing is a rapidly advancing field. An accurate diagnosis of structural anomalies and additional abnormalities in fetuses with structural anomalies is important to allow “triage” and designation of prognosis. This will allow parents to make an informed decision relating to the pregnancy. This review outlines the current tests used in prenatal diagnosis, focusing particularly on “new technologies” such as exome sequencing. We demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing above that of conventional karyotyping and Chromosomal Microarray (CMA alone by outlining a recent proof of concept study investigating 30 parent-fetus trios where the fetus is known to have a structural anomaly. This may allow the identification of pathological gene anomalies and consequently improved prognostic profiling, as well as excluding anomalies and distinguishing between de novo and inherited mutations, in order to estimate the recurrence risk in future pregnancies. The potential ethical dilemmas surrounding exome sequencing are also considered, and the future of prenatal genetic diagnosis is discussed.

  9. Quadruplex DNA: sequence, topology and structure

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are higher-order DNA and RNA structures formed from G-rich sequences that are built around tetrads of hydrogen-bonded guanine bases. Potential quadruplex sequences have been identified in G-rich eukaryotic telomeres, and more recently in non-telomeric genomic DNA, e.g. in nuclease-hypersensitive promoter regions. The natural role and biological validation of these structures is starting to be explored, and there is particular interest in them as targets for therapeutic interven...

  10. Self-assembly of three new coordination complexes: Formation of 2-D square grid, 1-D chain and tape structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrani, Murugan; Ramasubramanian, Ramasamy; Fronczek, Frank R.; Vasanthacharya, N. Y.; Kumaresan, Sudalaiandi

    2009-08-01

    Three distinct coordination complexes, viz., [Co(imi) 2(tmb) 2] ( 1) [where imi = imidazole], {[Ni(tmb) 2(H 2O) 3]·2H 2O} n ( 2) and [Cu 2(?-tmb) 4(CH 3OH) 2] ( 3), have been synthesized hydrothermally by the reactions of metal acetates, 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoic acid (Htmb) and with or without appropriate amine. The Ni analogue of 1 and the Co analogue of 2 have also been synthesized. X-ray single-crystal diffraction suggests that complex 1 represents discrete mononuclear species and complex 2 represents a 1D chain coordination polymer in which the Ni(II) ions are connected by the bridging water molecules. Complex 3 represents a neutral dinuclear complex. In 1, the central metal ions are associated by the carboxylate moiety and imidazole ligands, whereas the central metal atom is coordinated to the carboxylate moiety and the respective solvent molecules in 2 and 3. In 3, the four 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoate moieties act as a bridge connecting two copper (II) ions and the O atoms of methanol coordinate in an anti arrangement to form a square pyramidal geometry, with the methanol molecule at the apical position. In all the three structures the central metal atom sits on a crystallographic inversion centre. In all the cases, the coordination entities are further organized via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate multifarious supramolecular networks. Complexes 1, 2 and 3 have also been characterized by spectroscopic (UV/Vis and IR) and thermal analysis (TGA). In addition, the complexes were found to exhibit antimicrobial activity.The magnetic susceptibility measurements, measured from 8 to 300 K, revealed antiferromagnetic interactions between the Co(II) ions in compound 1 and the Ni(II) ions in 1a, respectively.

  11. Detecting mosaic structures in DNA sequence alignments

    OpenAIRE

    Husmeier, D.

    2006-01-01

    This article first provides a concise introduction to the statistical approach to phyloge- netics. It then describes a new method for detecting mosaic structures in DNA sequence alignments, which is based on combining two probabilistic graphical models: (1) a taxon graph (phylogenetic tree) representing the relationships among the taxa, and (2) a site graph (hidden Markov model) representing spatial correlations between nucleotides.

  12. From 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanoribbons: dimensional crossover signals in the structural thermal fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobry, Ariel; Costamagna, Sebastián

    2011-03-01

    I this work, by analyzing the thermal excited rippling in the graphene honeycomb lattice, we find clear signals of an existing dimensional crossover from 2D to 1D while reducing one of the dimensions of the graphene layer. Trough a joint study, using montecarlo atomistic simulations and analytical calculation based, we find that the normal-normal correlation function G (q) does not change the power law behavior valid on the long wavelength limit, however the system size dependency of the quadratic out of plane displacement h2 shows a breakdown of its corresponding scaling law. In this case we show that a new scaling law appear which correspond to a truly 1D system. On the basis of these results, and having explored a wide number of realistic systems size, we conclude that narrow nanoribbons presents strongest corrugations than the square graphene sheets. This result could have important consequences on the electron transport properties of freestanding graphene systems.

  13. From the 2D graphene honeycomb lattice to 1D nanoribbons: dimensional crossover signals in the structural thermal fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Costamagna, S.; Dobry, A.

    2011-01-01

    We study the dimensional crossover from 2D to 1D type behavior, which takes place in the thermal excited rippling of a graphene honeycomb lattice, when one of the dimensions of the layer is reduced. Through a joint study, by Monte Carlo (MC) atomistic simulations using a quasi-harmonic potential and analytical calculations, we find that the normal-normal correlation function does not change its power law behavior in the long wavelength limit. However the system size dependen...

  14. Bulk anisotropic excitons in type-II semiconductors built with 1D and 2D low-dimensional structures

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    H.A., Coyotecatl; M. del, Castillo-Mussot; J.A., Reyes; G.J., Vázquez; J.A., Montemayor-Aldrete; J.A., Reyes-Esqueda; G.H., Cocoletzi.

    Full Text Available Utilizamos un método variacional para tomar en cuenta la diferencia entre las masas efectivas del electrón y del hueco en excitones Wannier-Mott en heteroestructuras semiconductoras tipo II en las que el electrón está constreñido en un alambre cuántico unidimensional (AC1D) y el hueco en un pozo cuá [...] ntico bidimensional (PC2D) perpendicular al alambre o viceversa. La ecuación de Schrödinger resultante es similar a la de un excitón en el bulto en 3D porque el número de variables libres (no confinadas) es tres; dos que provienen del PC2D y una del AC1D. En este sistema interacción efectiva electrón-hueco depende de los potenciales de confinamiento. Abstract in english We used a simple variational approach to account for the difference in the electron and hole effective masses in Wannier-Mott excitons in type-II semiconducting heterostructures in which the electron is constrained in an one-dimensional quantum wire (1DQW) and the hole is in a two-dimensional quantu [...] m layer (2DQL) perpendicular to the wire or viceversa. The resulting Schrödinger equation is similar to that of a 3D bulk exciton because the number of free (nonconfined) variables is three; two coming from the 2DQL and one from the 1DQW. In this system the effective electron-hole interaction depends on the confinement potentials.

  15. Novel 1D coordination polymer {Tm(Piv)3}n: Synthesis, structure, magnetic properties and thermal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new 1D coordination polymer {Tm(Piv)3}n (1), where Piv=OOCBut?, was synthesized in high yield (>95%) by the reaction of thulium acetate with pivalic acid in air at 100 °S. According to the X-ray diffraction data, the metal atoms in compound 1 are in an octahedral ligand environment unusual for lanthanides. The magnetic and luminescence properties of polymer 1, it’s the solid-phase thermal decomposition in air and under argon, and the thermal behavior in the temperature range of ?50…+50 °S were investigated. The vaporization process of complex 1 was studied by the Knudsen effusion method combined with mass-spectrometric analysis of the gas-phase composition in the temperature range of 570–680 K. - Graphical Abstract: Novel 1D coordination polymer {Tm(Piv)3}n was synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. The magnetic, luminescence properties, the thermal behavior and the volatility for the compound {Tm(Piv)3}n were investigated.? Highlights: ? We synthesized the coordination polymer {Tm(Piv)3}n. ? Tm atoms in polymer have the coordination number 6. ? Polymer exhibits blue-color emission at room temperature. ? Polymer shows high thermal stability and volatility. ? Polymer has no phase transitions in the range of ?50…+50 °S.

  16. Studying the Venus terminator thermal structure observed by SOIR/VEx with a 1D radiative transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieux, A.; Erwin, J. T.; Chamberlain, S.; Robert, S.; Thomas, I.; Vandaele, A. C.; Trompet, L.; Wilquet, V.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-10-01

    The SOIR instrument on board Venus Express routinely measures the CO2 number density profiles in the mesosphere and thermosphere region at the Venus terminator using the solar occultation technique. Assuming the hydrostatic equilibrium, we derive temperature profiles, which show a permanent cold layer at 125 km, surrounded by two warmer layers at 100 km and 140 km. We developed a 1D conductive radiative transfer model to study the mean SOIR thermal profile, considering the main species, and carefully modelling the radiative terms. In order to correctly reproduce the thermal profile, aerosols cooling and heating terms are added. We describe how aerosols number density profiles can be calculated to have a good match of the thermal profiles.

  17. EURDYN-1D: a computer code for the one-dimensional non-linear dynamic analysis of structural systems. Description and users' manual (release 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the present report is to provide for a comprehensive users' manual describing the capabilities of the computer code EURDYN-1D. It includes information and examples about the type of problems which can be solved with the code and explanation on how to prepare input data and, how to interpret output results. The field of applications of EURDYN-1D is the one dimensional dynamic analysis of general structural systems and the code is particularly suited for fast transient events involving propagation of longitudinal mechanical waves (subsonic) in structures. Both geometrical and physical non-linearities can be taken into account. Typical examples are impact problems, fast dynamic loading due the explosions or sudden release for initial loads due to failures, etc. To these classes belong many problems encountered in the reactor safety field as well as in more common and general technological applications

  18. Adaptability of the semi-invariant natural killer T-cell receptor towards structurally diverse CD1d-restricted ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Florence, William C.; Xia, Chengfeng; Gordy, Laura E; Chen, Wenlan; Yalong ZHANG; Scott-Browne, James; Kinjo, Yuki; Yu, Karl O.A.; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Pellicci, Daniel G.; Patel, Onisha; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; McCluskey, James; Godfrey, Dale I.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    The semi-invariant natural killer (NK) T-cell receptor (NKTcr) recognises structurally diverse glycolipid antigens presented by the monomorphic CD1d molecule. While the ?-chain of the NKTcr is invariant, the ?-chain is more diverse, but how this diversity enables the NKTcr to recognise diverse antigens, such as an ?-linked monosaccharide (?-galactosylceramide and ?-galactosyldiacylglycerol) and the ?-linked trisaccharide (isoglobotriaosylceramide), is unclear. We demonstrate here that NKTcrs,...

  19. Versatile structures of group 13 metal halide complexes with 4,4'-bipy: from 1D coordination polymers to 2D and 3D metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevastianova, Tatiana N; Bodensteiner, Michael; Maulieva, Albina F; Davydova, Elena I; Virovets, Alexander V; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Balázs, Gábor; Graßl, Christian; Seidl, Michael; Scheer, Manfred; Frenking, Gernot; Berezovskaya, Ekaterina A; Kazakov, Igor V; Khoroshilova, Olesya V; Timoshkin, Alexey Y

    2015-12-21

    A systematic structural study of complexes formed by aluminium and gallium trihalides with 4,4'-bipyridine (bipy) in 2?:?1, 1?:?1, and 1?:?2 stoichiometric ratios has been performed. Molecular structures of 11 complexes in the solid state have been determined for the first time. Complexes of 2?:?1 composition are molecular, while complexes of 1?:?1 composition form metal-organic frameworks of different kinds: an ionic 3D network (three interpenetrated lvt nets for AlCl3bipy), an ionic 2D network for AlBr3bipy and GaBr3bipy and a 1D coordination polymer in the case of GaCl3bipy. Thus, the nature of the Lewis acid plays a critical role in the structural type of the complex in the solid state. Incorporation of excess bipy molecules into (GaCl3bipy)? (formation of crystallosolvate) leads to an unprecedented change of the molecular structure from a non-ionic 1D coordination polymer to an ionic 2D metal organic framework [GaCl2bipy2](+)[GaCl4](-)·2bipy. As indicated by the temperature-dependent XRD study, removal of bipy by heating in a vacuum restores the non-ionic 1D structure. Quantum chemical computations for simple cluster model systems (up to eight Al and Ga atoms) reveal that ionic forms are slightly favourable, although the energy differences between the ionic and non-ionic structures are not large. These theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental findings. Thus, even relatively simple cluster models may be used to indicate the structural preferences in the solid state. Both experimental and computational IR frequency shifts of the in-plane ring bending mode of bipy upon complexation correlate well with the M-N bond distances in the complexes. PMID:26564471

  20. Electric structure of the Copahue Volcano (Neuquén Province, Argentina), from magnetotelluric soundings: 1D and 2D modellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaní, M. J.; Borzotta, E.; Venencia, J. E.; Maidana, A.; Moyano, C. E.; Castiglione, B.

    2000-05-01

    Four magnetotelluric soundings were carried out in 1993 in the region of the Copahue active volcano located at the border between Chile and Argentina (37°45'S, 71°18'W). Three soundings were located inside the caldera of the ancient stratovolcano (east of Copahue) and the fourth outside it. The soundings inside the caldera were situated at about 6, 11, and 14 km from the volcano. Digital data were obtained covering the range of periods from 1 sec to 10,000 sec using induction coils and a flux-gate magnetometer to obtain the magnetic data and Cu-SO 4Cu electrodes for electric field measurements. The apparent resistivity curves corresponding to principal directions were analyzed in conjunction with the geological background in order to eliminate distortion — which is very important in this hot volcanic region. Then, 1D modellings were performed using the "normal" curves — i.e., curves without distortions. Using the apparent resistivity curves with distortions, 2D modelling was also performed along a profile perpendicular to the regional tectonic trend suggested by MT soundings into the caldera. Results show low resistivity values of about 3-15 ?m between 9 km to 20 km depth in the crust, suggesting high temperatures, with minimum values of about 700°C with partially melted zones in the upper crust between 9 km to 20 km depth under the caldera. The presence of a possible sulphide-carbonaceous layer (SC layer) in the upper basement could play an important role in lowering the electrical resistivities because of its high electronic conductivity.

  1. Inverted spin sequences in the spectra of odd-odd nuclei in the 2S-1d and 2P-1f shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of odd-odd nuclei, near magic numbers, there are found inverted sequences as well as few rotational members. In order to explain the unique feature of the spectra of odd-odd nuclei, we have applied modified form of rotational-vibrational model with two parameters A and B. It is found that level orders in inverted as well as in rotational sequences are very well reproduced on the basis of this model. In case of inverted spin sequences, the sign of B is found to be positive. The ratio of B/A is ? 10-2 as compared to its value of the order of 10-3 in case of even-even and odd-A nuclei. We infer that pair correlations are responsible for these invertions. The simple model applied here worked well to predict these inverted spectra. (author)

  2. Tools for integrated sequence-structure analysis with UCSF Chimera

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Conrad C; Couch Gregory S; Pettersen Eric F; Meng Elaine C; Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Comparing related structures and viewing the structures in the context of sequence alignments are important tasks in protein structure-function research. While many programs exist for individual aspects of such work, there is a need for interactive visualization tools that: (a) provide a deep integration of sequence and structure, far beyond mapping where a sequence region falls in the structure and vice versa; (b) facilitate changing data of one type based on the other (f...

  3. A case of Beauveria bassiana keratitis confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and LSU rDNA D1–D2 sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ligozzi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of fungal keratitis due to Beauveria bassiana in a farmer with Fuchs' dystrophy, treated with amphotericin B. Surgery with penetrating keratoplasty was necessary to resolve the lesions. Susceptibility testing and molecular sequencing permitted the identification and treatment of this rare aetiological agent of invasive fungal disease.

  4. A case of Beauveria bassiana keratitis confirmed by internal transcribed spacer and LSU rDNA D1–D2 sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Ligozzi, M; Maccacaro, L; Passilongo, M; Pedrotti, E; Marchini, G; Koncan, R.; Cornaglia, G.; Centonze, A. R.; Lo Cascio, G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of fungal keratitis due to Beauveria bassiana in a farmer with Fuchs' dystrophy, treated with amphotericin B. Surgery with penetrating keratoplasty was necessary to resolve the lesions. Susceptibility testing and molecular sequencing permitted the identification and treatment of this rare aetiological agent of invasive fungal disease.

  5. Application of 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques for the structural studies of glycoprotein-derived carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this thesis (Chapters 1 to 4) describe the determination of the primary structure for a large number of oligosaccharide-alditols obtained from bronchial sputum of cystic fibrosis patients suffering from chronic bronchitis. The second part (Chapters 5 to 8) is devoted to the application of two-dimensional NMR methods for the structural analysis of oligosaccharides. (H.W.). 163 refs.; 50 figs.; 25 tabs

  6. Designing polymorphic ISSR primers in order to study gene sequences x and y types glutenin subunits in 1D locus controlling favourable baking quality in elite mutant lines of bread wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baking quality is one of important traits in qualitative improvement of bread wheat. Gluten prolamins determine wheat flour quality for different technological process such as bread making. Between gluten proteins, High Molecular Glutenin (HMW) group and specially, d allele in 1D locus with x-type and y-type subunits are very valuable in baking quality. In this study, amino acid sequences of x-type subunits (2.1, 2.2, 2.2*, 5) and y-type subunits (10, 12) related to 1D locus were searched, found and compared together using Genedoc software. After amino acid sequences alignment of y-type subunits and x-type subunits, it was characterized that deletion, insertion (duplication) and point mutations in these subunits involved in biological function of proteins. most important insertion and deletion mutations were 185 amino acids sequence insertion of 2.2* subunit and 102 amino acids sequence insertion of x2.2 subunit in position 486 of amino acid sequence and six amino acid sequence deletion IGQGQQ in position 203 of y10 subunit. From important point mutations can be pointed to conversion of serine to cysteine in position 118 of x 5 subunit and substitution of glutamine to histidine in position 626 of x5 subunit. Finally, polymorph ISSR primers in repetitive domains were designed on similarities and differences in subunits of x and y-types. These primers show good banding polymorphisms in elite mutant lines, standard commercial cultivars and F2 populations from crosses. (author)

  7. Crystal Structure of Human Liver delta {4}-3-Ketosteroid 5 beta-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo,L.; Drury, J.; Penning, T.; Christianson, D.

    2008-01-01

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all 4-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an a,{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a 4-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90 bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human 4-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP+ at 1.79- and 1.35- Angstroms resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP+ and cortisone at 1.90- Angstroms resolution, NADP+ and progesterone at 2.03- Angstroms resolution, and NADP+ and testosterone at 1.62- Angstroms resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr58 and Glu120. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  8. Structural characterization of Kraft lignins from different spent cooking liquors by 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three Kraft lignins isolated from black liquors of several paper pulp mills of the North of Spain and Portugal were structurally characterized by using monodimensional (1H and 13C) and bidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry. From the latter, 13C–1H heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) were employed. Lignins from black liquors are usually burned for power generation. Nevertheless, they could become high value added products within a biorefinery context. In that case, a good understanding of their structure is a prior step to transform them. From all the NMR techniques studied, HSQC has risen as the most powerful tool in lignin characterization. Kraft cooking conditions and the type of wood seem to be the main factors that determine the differences observed in the lignins. All the samples have shown an important decrease in the number of ?–O–4? linkages, due to the Kraft process, and resinol has become the most resistant linkage to the process. Moreover, all samples seem to be mainly linked to a one polysaccharide: xylan. Several parameters like S/G ratio, portion of phenolic and aliphatic hydroxyls, amount of aromatic protons and other structural aspects were also estimated. - Highlights: • Lignins from three Kraft spent liquors were obtained by acid precipitation. • Structural characterization of the dissolved lignins was performed by NMR. • Wood source and pulping conditions determine the lignin characteristics. • Kraft process implies cleavage of ?–O–4 linkages and survival of resinol linkages. • Comparison of the samples would aid decisions on its future revalorization

  9. Tools for integrated sequence-structure analysis with UCSF Chimera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Conrad C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparing related structures and viewing the structures in the context of sequence alignments are important tasks in protein structure-function research. While many programs exist for individual aspects of such work, there is a need for interactive visualization tools that: (a provide a deep integration of sequence and structure, far beyond mapping where a sequence region falls in the structure and vice versa; (b facilitate changing data of one type based on the other (for example, using only sequence-conserved residues to match structures, or adjusting a sequence alignment based on spatial fit; (c can be used with a researcher's own data, including arbitrary sequence alignments and annotations, closely or distantly related sets of proteins, etc.; and (d interoperate with each other and with a full complement of molecular graphics features. We describe enhancements to UCSF Chimera to achieve these goals. Results The molecular graphics program UCSF Chimera includes a suite of tools for interactive analyses of sequences and structures. Structures automatically associate with sequences in imported alignments, allowing many kinds of crosstalk. A novel method is provided to superimpose structures in the absence of a pre-existing sequence alignment. The method uses both sequence and secondary structure, and can match even structures with very low sequence identity. Another tool constructs structure-based sequence alignments from superpositions of two or more proteins. Chimera is designed to be extensible, and mechanisms for incorporating user-specific data without Chimera code development are also provided. Conclusion The tools described here apply to many problems involving comparison and analysis of protein structures and their sequences. Chimera includes complete documentation and is intended for use by a wide range of scientists, not just those in the computational disciplines. UCSF Chimera is free for non-commercial use and is available for Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS X, Linux, and other platforms from http://www.cgl.ucsf.edu/chimera.

  10. Tails of the dynamical structure factor of 1D spinless fermions beyond the Tomonaga-Luttinger approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider one-dimensional interacting spinless fermions with a non-linear spectrum in a clean quantum wire (non-linear bosonization). We compute diagrammatically the one-dimensional dynamical structure factor, S(ω, q), beyond the Tomonaga-Luttinger approximation focusing on its tails, i.e. vertical bar ω vertical bar >> vq. We provide a re-derivation, through diagrammatics, of the result of Pustilnik, Mishchenko, Glazman, and Andreev. We also extend their results to finite temperatures and long-range interactions. As applications we determine curvature and interaction corrections to the small- momentum, high-frequency conductivity and the electron-electron scattering rate. (author)

  11. 1D 13C-NMR Data as Molecular Descriptors in Spectra — Structure Relationship Analysis of Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florbela Pereira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectra-structure relationships were investigated for estimating the anomeric configuration, residues and type of linkages of linear and branched trisaccharides using 13C-NMR chemical shifts. For this study, 119 pyranosyl trisaccharides were used that are trimers of the ? or ? anomers of D-glucose, D-galactose, D-mannose, L-fucose or L-rhamnose residues bonded through a or b glycosidic linkages of types 1?2, 1?3, 1?4, or 1?6, as well as methoxylated and/or N-acetylated amino trisaccharides. Machine learning experiments were performed for: (1 classification of the anomeric configuration of the first unit, second unit and reducing end; (2 classification of the type of first and second linkages; (3 classification of the three residues: reducing end, middle and first residue; and (4 classification of the chain type. Our previously model for predicting the structure of disaccharides was incorporated in this new model with an improvement of the predictive power. The best results were achieved using Random Forests with 204 di- and trisaccharides for the training set—it could correctly classify 83%, 90%, 88%, 85%, 85%, 75%, 79%, 68% and 94% of the test set (69 compounds for the nine tasks, respectively, on the basis of unassigned chemical shifts.

  12. Magnetic structure, phase transition and magnetization dynamics of pseudo-1D CoNiTAC mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a combined neutron scattering and magnetization study of the pseudo-one-dimensional magnetic compounds [(CH3)3NH]Co1-xNixCl3.2H2O, abbreviated as CoNiTAC. For Co rich samples, we determined the 3d magnetic structure to be canted antiferromagnetic having the magnetic space group Pnm'a'. We performed Monte-Carlo simulations and could reproduce well the measured temperature dependence of the sublattice magnetization assuming an Ising type, spatially strongly anisotropic interaction. The exchange integral along the chains (b-direction) is at least 100 times larger than the average exchange in the a-c-plane. Despite this strong one dimensional character of the exchange interactions the critical exponent ? was found to be very close to the theoretical value for a 3d Ising system (0.31). We did not discover any anomaly of the long range order component for the mixed crystals, for which a spin glass phase had been proposed by other authors on the basis of a decay of the TRM on macroscopic time scales. Instead, our polarized neutron diffraction and magnetization measurements reveal that the low temperature dynamics is connected to domain relaxation processes and not to a spin glass transition. (orig.)

  13. Finding Common Sequence and Structure Motifs in a set of RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, Laurie J.; Stormo, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to search for the most common motif, composed of a combination of sequence and structure constraints, among a collection of RNA sequences. The method uses a simplified version of the Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous folding and alignment of RNA sequences, but maintains tractability by constructing multi-sequence alignments for pairwise comparisons. The overall method has similarities to both CLUSTAL and CONSENSUS, but the core algorithm assures that the pairwi...

  14. Two extensions of 1D Toda hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extended Toda hierarchy of Carlet, Dubrovin and Zhang is reconsidered in light of a 2 + 1D extension of the 1D Toda hierarchy constructed by Ogawa. These two extensions of the 1D Toda hierarchy turn out to have a very similar structure, and the former may be thought of as a kind of dimensional reduction of the latter. In particular, this explains an origin of the mysterious structure of the bilinear formalism proposed by Milanov.

  15. Crystal Structure of Human Liver [delta][superscript 4]-3-Ketosteroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Drury, Jason E.; Penning, Trevor M.; Christianson, David W. (UPENN); (UPENN-MED)

    2008-07-15

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90{sup o} bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP{sup +} at 1.79- and 1.35-{angstrom} resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP{sup +} and cortisone at 1.90-{angstrom} resolution, NADP{sup +} and progesterone at 2.03-{angstrom} resolution, and NADP{sup +} and testosterone at 1.62-{angstrom} resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP{sup +}. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr{sup 58} and Glu{sup 120}. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  16. Human renin gene: structure and sequence analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hobart, P M; Fogliano, M; O'Connor, B A; Schaefer, I M; Chirgwin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The complete protein precursor of human kidney renin has been determined from the sequence of cloned genomic DNA. The gene spans 12 kilobases of DNA and is interrupted by eight intervening sequences. The nine regions (exons) encoding the protein were mapped with a mouse renin cDNA probe, synthetic oligonucleotide probes, and by hybridization of genomic restriction fragments to a 1600-nucleotide human kidney mRNA. The predicted 403-amino acid preprorenin consists of mature renin and a 66-resid...

  17. RNA secondary structure: a comparison of real and random sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs, Paul

    1993-01-01

    A sample of transfer RNA molecules is compared to a sample of random sequences having the same length and same percentage composition of the different bases. For each sequence all possible secondary structures are constructed and a distribution of free energies for the states is obtained. It is found that the ground state free energies of tRNA molecules are significantly lower than for random sequences, and that tRNA molecules have significantly fewer alternative secondary structures at energ...

  18. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Electroconducting Properties of a 1D Mixed-Valence Cu(I–Cu(II Coordination Polymer with a Dicyclohexyl Dithiocarbamate Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakatani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new mixed-valence Cu(I–Cu(II 1D coordination polymer, [CuI4CuIIBr4(Cy2dtc2]n, with an infinite chain structure is synthesized by the reaction of Cu(Cy2dtc2 (Cy2dtc? = dicyclohexyl dithiocarbamate, C13H22NS2 with CuBr·S(CH32. The as-synthesized polymer consists of mononuclear copper(II units of CuII(Cy2dtc2 and tetranuclear copper(I cluster units, CuI4Br4. In the cluster unit, all the CuI ions have distorted trigonal pyramidal coordination geometries, and the CuI–CuI or CuI–CuII distances between the nearest copper ions are shorter than the sum of van der Waals radii for Cu–Cu.

  19. Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of 5-(4-Sulfophenylazo) salicylate-bridged 1D coordination polymers containing linear trinuclear metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Song, Li-jun; Ju, Zhan-feng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2008-03-01

    Three new trinuclear metal complexes with an azobenzene-containing ligand [M 3(Sasa) 2(Py) 2(H 2O) 8] (Na 2HSasa = 5-(4-Sulfophenylazo) salicylic acid disodium salt; Py = pyridine; M = Cu, Co, Zn), are synthesized through the interface diffusion and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, XRPD analysis and spectral methods. The metal ions in distorted octahedral coordination environments are connected by Sasa ligands to form 1D coordination polymer chain containing the linear trinuclear units with single syn-anti carboxylate bridges. The extensive hydrogen bonding interactions hold these chains together into 3D supramolecular network. Weak antiferromagnetic interactions between adjacent metal ions with J = -1.85 cm -1 and J = -2.81 cm -1 dominate the magnetic properties of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes, separately.

  20. Formatt: Correcting protein multiple structural alignments by incorporating sequence alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniels Noah M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of multiple protein structure alignments are usually computed and assessed based on geometric functions of the coordinates of the backbone atoms from the protein chains. These purely geometric methods do not utilize directly protein sequence similarity, and in fact, determining the proper way to incorporate sequence similarity measures into the construction and assessment of protein multiple structure alignments has proved surprisingly difficult. Results We present Formatt, a multiple structure alignment based on the Matt purely geometric multiple structure alignment program, that also takes into account sequence similarity when constructing alignments. We show that Formatt outperforms Matt and other popular structure alignment programs on the popular HOMSTRAD benchmark. For the SABMark twilight zone benchmark set that captures more remote homology, Formatt and Matt outperform other programs; depending on choice of embedded sequence aligner, Formatt produces either better sequence and structural alignments with a smaller core size than Matt, or similarly sized alignments with better sequence similarity, for a small cost in average RMSD. Conclusions Considering sequence information as well as purely geometric information seems to improve quality of multiple structure alignments, though defining what constitutes the best alignment when sequence and structural measures would suggest different alignments remains a difficult open question.

  1. Bayesian Model of Protein Primary Sequence for Secondary Structure Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiwei; Dahl, David B.; Vannucci, Marina; Hyun Joo; Tsai, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Determining the primary structure (i.e., amino acid sequence) of a protein has become cheaper, faster, and more accurate. Higher order protein structure provides insight into a protein’s function in the cell. Understanding a protein’s secondary structure is a first step towards this goal. Therefore, a number of computational prediction methods have been developed to predict secondary structure from just the primary amino acid sequence. The most successful methods use machine learning approach...

  2. Mononuclear, dinuclear and 1-D polymeric complexes of Cd(II) of a pyridyl pyrazole ligand: Syntheses, crystal structures and photoluminescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kinsuk; Konar, Saugata; Jana, Atanu; Barik, Anil Kumar; Roy, Sangita; Kar, Susanta Kumar

    2013-03-01

    The syntheses, crystal structures and photoluminescence properties of four new Cd(II) complexes are reported using strongly coordinating ligand 3,5-dimethyl-1-(2'-pyridyl) pyrazole (L) in presence of anionic ancillary bridging ligands as nitrite, chloride and dicyanamide. Among the complexes two (1 and 2) are monomeric, 3 is ?2 - chloro bridged dimer and the last one (4) is a mixed alternate chloro - end to end (EE) dicyanamide bridged 1D polymer. All the four complexes have been X-ray crystallographically characterized. The ligand L behaves as a potent bidentate neutral N, N donor. Geometrical diversity of Cd(II) complexes is due to no loss or gain of crystal field stability with the variation of geometry. Consequently the stability of a structure depends on steric requirements. The ligand L shows considerable fluorescence and all four complexes in methanol exhibit interesting photoluminescence properties with different emission intensities. The band maxima and fluorescence efficiency (in methanol) are found to be dependent on the coordination chromophore and structural rigidity induced by the incorporated Cd(II) ion. Among the synthesized complexes 1 exhibits the highest fluorescence intensity in methanol.

  3. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Jena (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  4. Lipophilic bismuth phosphates: a molecular tetradecanuclear cage and a 1D-coordination polymer. Synthesis, structure and conversion to BiPO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli; Metre, Ramesh K; Suriya Narayanan, Ramakirushnan

    2013-06-28

    The reaction of the phosphate monoester {(ArO)PO(OH)2} (Ar = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3) with BiPh3 in a 1 : 1 ratio in refluxing toluene afforded a tetradecabismuth-oxo-phosphate cage [{(ArO)PO3}10{(ArO)PO2OH}2(Bi14O10)·2(CH3OH)]·3C6H12·3CH3OH·2H2O (Ar = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3) (1). On the other hand the reaction of the phosphate diester {((t)BuO)2PO(OH)} with BiPh3 in a 1 : 1 ratio at room temperature in ethanol afforded the 1D-coordination polymer [Bi(C6H5)2((t)BuO)2PO2]n (2). The molecular structure of 1 reveals that the cage is comprised of a central planar Bi6 rim and two Bi4 poles. The entire aggregate is held together by multiple coordination of O(2-), [(ArO)P(O)(OH)](-), [(ArO)PO3](2-) and methanol ligands. 2 is a 1D-coordination polymer where adjacent bismuth is bridged by isobidentate [((t)BuO)2PO2](-) ligands. In solution, however, 2 decomposes into the monomeric repeat unit [Ph2Bi{((t)BuO)2PO2}] which is indicated by ESI-MS studies. Thermolysis of 1 and 2 at 700 °C affords a pure phase of BiPO4. PMID:23632600

  5. Synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of novel mononuclear, tetranuclear, and 1D chain Mn(III) complexes involving three related asymmetrical trianionic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Jean-Pierre; Dahan, Françoise; Donnadieu, Bruno; Rodriguez Douton, Maria-Jesus; Fernandez Garcia, Maria-Isabel; Bousseksou, Azzedine; Tuchagues, Jean-Pierre

    2004-04-19

    The manganese(III) complexes studied in this report derive from asymmetrical trianionic ligands abbreviated H(3)L(i) (i = 4-6). These ligands are obtained through reaction of salicylaldehyde with "half-units", the latter resulting from monocondensation of different diamines with phenylsalicylate,. Upon deprotonation, L(i) (i = 4-6) possess an inner N(2)O(2) coordination site with one amido, one imine, and two phenoxo functions, and an outer amido oxygen donor. The trianionic character of such ligands yields original neutral complexes with the L/Mn stoichiometry. The crystal and molecular structures of three complexes have been determined at 190 K (1) or 180 K (2 and 3). Complex 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P (No. 2): a = 7.8582(14) A, b = 10.9225(16) A, c = 12.4882(18) A, alpha = 67.231(14) degrees, beta = 72.134(14) degrees, gamma = 82.589(13) degrees, V = 940.6(3) A(3), Z = 2. Complex 2 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn (Nuomicron. 60): a = 23.8283(15) A, b = 11.1605(7) A, c = 26.152(2) A, V = 6954.8(8) A(3), Z = 8, while complex 3 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c (No. 14) with a = 11.7443(14) A, b = 7.5996(10) A, c = 18.029(2) A, beta = 100.604(10) degrees, V = 1581.6(3) A(3), Z = 4. Owing to hydrogen bonds and pi-pi stackings, the mononuclear neutral molecules of 1 are arranged in a 2D network while complexes 2 and 3 are tetranuclear and polymeric (1D chain) species, respectively, owing to the bridging ability of the oxygen atom of the amido function. The experimental magnetic susceptibilities of complexes 2 and 3 indicate the occurrence of similarly weak Mn(III)-Mn(III) antiferromagnetic interactions (J = -1.1 cm(-1)). Single ion zero-field splitting of manganese(III) must be taken into account for satisfactorily fitting the data by exact calculation of the energy levels associated to the spin Hamiltonian through diagonalization of the full matrix for axial symmetry in 2 (J = - 1.1 cm(-1), D(1) = 2.2 cm(-1), D(2) = -2.8 cm(-1)), D(1) and D(2) being associated to the six- and five-coordinate Mn ions, respectively. A weaker antiferromagnetic interaction (J = - 0.2 cm(-1)) operates through pi-pi stacking in complex 1. Complex 3 is a weak ferromagnet (ordering temperature approximately 7 K) as a result of the spin canting originating from the crystal packing. PMID:15074994

  6. Spatial structure and dispersion of drift mirror waves coupled with Alfvén waves in a 1-D inhomogeneous plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper employs the frame of a 1-D inhomogeneous model of space plasma,to examine the spatial structure and growth rate of drift mirror modes, often suggested for interpreting some oscillation types in space plasma. Owing to its coupling with the Alfvén mode, the drift mirror mode attains dispersion across magnetic shells (dependence of the frequency on the wave-vector's radial component, kr. The spatial structure of a mode confined across magnetic shells is studied. The scale of spatial localization of the wave is shown to be determined by the plasma inhomogeneity scale and by the azimuthal component of the wave vector. The wave propagates across magnetic shells, its amplitude modulated along the radial coordinate by the Gauss function. Coupling with the Alfvén mode strongly influences the growth rate of the drift mirror instability. The mirror mode can only exist in a narrow range of parameters. In the general case, the mode represents an Alfvén wave modified by plasma inhomogeneity.

  7. Massively Parallel Sequencing Approaches for Characterization of Structural Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Koboldt, Daniel C.; Larson, David E; Chen, Ken; Ding, Li; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies offers an incredible opportunity to comprehensively study DNA sequence variation in human genomes. Commercially available platforms from Roche (454), Illumina (Genome Analyzer and Hiseq 2000), and Applied Biosystems (SOLiD) have the capability to completely sequence individual genomes to high levels of coverage. NGS data is particularly advantageous for the study of structural variation (SV) because it offers the sensitivity to de...

  8. Language as structured sequences: a causal role of Broca's region in sequence processing

    OpenAIRE

    Uddén, Julia

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis I approach language as a neurobiological system. I defend a sequence processing perspective on language and on the function of Broca's region in the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). This perspective provides a way to express common structural aspects of language, music and action, which all engage the LIFG. It also facilitates the comparison of human language and structured sequence processing in animals. Research on infants, song-birds and non-human primates suggests ...

  9. RSEARCH: Finding homologs of single structured RNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Sean R

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many RNA molecules, secondary structure rather than primary sequence is the evolutionarily conserved feature. No programs have yet been published that allow searching a sequence database for homologs of a single RNA molecule on the basis of secondary structure. Results We have developed a program, RSEARCH, that takes a single RNA sequence with its secondary structure and utilizes a local alignment algorithm to search a database for homologous RNAs. For this purpose, we have developed a series of base pair and single nucleotide substitution matrices for RNA sequences called RIBOSUM matrices. RSEARCH reports the statistical confidence for each hit as well as the structural alignment of the hit. We show several examples in which RSEARCH outperforms the primary sequence search programs BLAST and SSEARCH. The primary drawback of the program is that it is slow. The C code for RSEARCH is freely available from our lab's website. Conclusion RSEARCH outperforms primary sequence programs in finding homologs of structured RNA sequences.

  10. Structure Elucidation Of Flavonoid Compound from the Leaves of Coleus Atropurpureus Benth using 1d- And 2d-NMR Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation of flavonoid compound from ethylacetate extract of the leaves of Coleus atropurpureus Benth using column chromatography have been carried out. Structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was done by one-and two-dimensional NMR (1H, 13C, DEPT, COSY, HMQC and HMBC). Analysis of 1D-NMR spectra (1H-NMR showed signals at δ 6-8 ppm for the aromatic region of the flavonoid aglycone and 13C-NMR showed signals for three carbon atoms of the flavonoid ring C at δ 182.8 ppm (C-4), 103.9 ppm (C-3), 166.4 ppm (C-2) and DEPT showed the presence of CH and CH2 group). Analysis of 2D- NMR spectra (COSY showed correlation of proton at δ 7.86 and 6.92 ppm and HMBC showed correlation between proton at δ 6.61 with 166.4 ppm and 6.92 with 123.3 ppm). (author)

  11. Forest-atmosphere BVOC exchange in diverse and structurally complex canopies: 1-D modeling of a mid-successional forest in northern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Alexander M.; Cheng, Susan J.; Ashworth, Kirsti; Guenther, Alex B.; Hardiman, Brady S.; Bohrer, Gil; Steiner, Allison L.

    2015-11-01

    Foliar emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC)-important precursors of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols-vary widely by vegetation type. Modeling studies to date typically represent the canopy as a single dominant tree type or a blend of tree types, yet many forests are diverse with trees of varying height. To assess the sensitivity of biogenic emissions to tree height variation, we compare two 1-D canopy model simulations in which BVOC emission potentials are homogeneous or heterogeneous with canopy depth. The heterogeneous canopy emulates the mid-successional forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). In this case, high-isoprene-emitting foliage (e.g., aspen and oak) is constrained to the upper canopy, where higher sunlight availability increases the light-dependent isoprene emission, leading to 34% more isoprene and its oxidation products as compared to the homogeneous simulation. Isoprene declines from aspen mortality are 10% larger when heterogeneity is considered. Overall, our results highlight the importance of adequately representing complexities of forest canopy structure when simulating light-dependent BVOC emissions and chemistry.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Asymmetric Poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) Diblock Copolymer under 1D and 2D Nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K; Elmahdy, Mahdy M; Mapesa, Emmanuel U; Zhang, Jianqi; Böhlmann, Winfried; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Papadakis, Christine M; Kremer, Friedrich

    2015-06-17

    The impact of 1- and 2-dimensional (2D) confinement on the structure and dynamics of poly(styrene-b-1,4-isoprene) P(S-b-I) diblock copolymer is investigated by a combination of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS), and Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS). 1D confinement is achieved by spin coating the P(S-b-I) to form nanometric thin films on silicon substrates, while in the 2D confinement, the copolymer is infiltrated into cylindrical anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanopores. After dissolving the AAO matrix having mean pore diameter of 150 nm, the SEM images of the exposed P(S-b-I) show straight nanorods. For the thin films, GISAXS and AFM reveal hexagonally packed cylinders of PS in a PI matrix. Three dielectrically active relaxation modes assigned to the two segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks and the normal mode of the latter are studied selectively by BDS. The dynamic glass transition, related to the segmental modes of the styrene and isoprene blocks, is independent of the dimensionality and the finite sizes (down to 18 nm) of confinement, but the normal mode is influenced by both factors with 2D geometrical constraints exerting greater impact. This reflects the considerable difference in the length scales on which the two kinds of fluctuations take place. PMID:25660102

  13. Occurrence of protein structure elements in conserved sequence regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrokovski Shmuel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved protein sequence regions are extremely useful for identifying and studying functionally and structurally important regions. By means of an integrated analysis of large-scale protein structure and sequence data, structural features of conserved protein sequence regions were identified. Results Helices and turns were found to be underrepresented in conserved regions, while strands were found to be overrepresented. Similar numbers of loops were found in conserved and random regions. Conclusion These results can be understood in light of the structural constraints on different secondary structure elements, and their role in protein structural stabilization and topology. Strands can tolerate fewer sequence changes and nonetheless keep their specific shape and function. They thus tend to be more conserved than helices, which can keep their shape and function with more changes. Loop behavior can be explained by the presence of both constrained and freely changing loops in proteins. Our detailed statistical analysis of diverse proteins links protein evolution to the biophysics of protein thermodynamic stability and folding. The basic structural features of conserved sequence regions are also important determinants of protein structure motifs and their function.

  14. CAMP: Collection of sequences and structures of antimicrobial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghu, Faiza Hanif; Gopi, Lijin; Barai, Ram Shankar; Ramteke, Pranay; Nizami, Bilal; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are gaining importance as anti-infective agents. Here we describe the updated Collection of Antimicrobial Peptide (CAMP) database, available online at http://www.camp.bicnirrh.res.in/. The 3D structures of peptides are known to influence antimicrobial activity. Although there exists databases of AMPs, information on structures of AMPs is limited in these databases. CAMP is manually curated and currently holds 6756 sequences and 682 3D structures of AMPs. Sequence and structure analysis tools have been incorporated to enhance the usefulness of the database. PMID:24265220

  15. Accuracy of structure-based sequence alignment of automatic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Byungkook

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate sequence alignments are essential for homology searches and for building three-dimensional structural models of proteins. Since structure is better conserved than sequence, structure alignments have been used to guide sequence alignments and are commonly used as the gold standard for sequence alignment evaluation. Nonetheless, as far as we know, there is no report of a systematic evaluation of pairwise structure alignment programs in terms of the sequence alignment accuracy. Results In this study, we evaluate CE, DaliLite, FAST, LOCK2, MATRAS, SHEBA and VAST in terms of the accuracy of the sequence alignments they produce, using sequence alignments from NCBI's human-curated Conserved Domain Database (CDD as the standard of truth. We find that 4 to 9% of the residues on average are either not aligned or aligned with more than 8 residues of shift error and that an additional 6 to 14% of residues on average are misaligned by 1–8 residues, depending on the program and the data set used. The fraction of correctly aligned residues generally decreases as the sequence similarity decreases or as the RMSD between the C? positions of the two structures increases. It varies significantly across CDD superfamilies whether shift error is allowed or not. Also, alignments with different shift errors occur between proteins within the same CDD superfamily, leading to inconsistent alignments between superfamily members. In general, residue pairs that are more than 3.0 Å apart in the reference alignment are heavily (>= 25% on average misaligned in the test alignments. In addition, each method shows a different pattern of relative weaknesses for different SCOP classes. CE gives relatively poor results for ?-sheet-containing structures (all-?, ?/?, and ?+? classes, DaliLite for "others" class where all but the major four classes are combined, and LOCK2 and VAST for all-? and "others" classes. Conclusion When the sequence similarity is low, structure-based methods produce better sequence alignments than by using sequence similarities alone. However, current structure-based methods still mis-align 11–19% of the conserved core residues when compared to the human-curated CDD alignments. The alignment quality of each program depends on the protein structural type and similarity, with DaliLite showing the most agreement with CDD on average.

  16. Identifying Hierarchical Structure in Sequences A linear-time algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Nevill-Manning, C G

    1997-01-01

    SEQUITUR is an algorithm that infers a hierarchical structure from a sequence of discrete symbols by replacing repeated phrases with a grammatical rule that generates the phrase, and continuing this process recursively. The result is a hierarchical representation of the original sequence, which offers insights into its lexical structure. The algorithm is driven by two constraints that reduce the size of the grammar, and produce structure as a by-product. SEQUITUR breaks new ground by operating incrementally. Moreover, the method's simple structure permits a proof that it operates in space and time that is linear in the size of the input. Our implementation can process 50,000 symbols per second and has been applied to an extensive range of real world sequences.

  17. Strain-Gated Field Effect Transistor of a MoS2-ZnO 2D-1D Hybrid Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Longfei; Kou, Jinzong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an exciting material due to its unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties. Owing to an intrinsic band gap of 1.2-1.9 eV, monolayer or a-few-layer MoS2 is used for fabricating field effect transistors (FETs) with high electron mobility and on/off ratio. However, the traditional FETs are controlled by an externally supplied gate voltage, which may not be sensitive enough to directly interface with a mechanical stimulus for applications in electronic skin. Here we report a type of top-pressure/force-gated field effect transistors (PGFETs) based on a hybrid structure of a 2D MoS2 flake and 1D ZnO nanowire (NW) array. Once an external pressure is applied, the piezoelectric polarization charges created at the tips of ZnO NWs grown on MoS2 act as a gate voltage to tune/control the source-drain transport property in MoS2. At a 6.25 MPa applied stimulus on a packaged device, the source-drain current can be tuned for ?25%, equivalent to the results of applying an extra -5 V back gate voltage. Another type of PGFET with a dielectric layer (Al2O3) sandwiched between MoS2 and ZnO also shows consistent results. A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the received data. This study sets the foundation for applying the 2D material-based FETs in the field of artificial intelligence. PMID:26695840

  18. Construction of copper-based coordination polymers with 1D chain, 2D plane and wavy networks: Syntheses, structures, thermal behaviors and photoluminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianghua Li; Chi Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Three Cu-based coordination polymers (CPs), including [CuII ( -1 -NCS)2 (O-1 -DMF)2 (2 -3,3’-bptz)] (1), [CuI (1,3-2-NCS)(2-3,3’-bptz)] (2) and [(CuI (1,3-μ2- NCS))(2-4,4’-bptz)] (3) (DMF = , -dimethyl formamide, 3,3’-bptz = 3,6-bis(3-pyridyl)tetrazine and 4,4’-bptz = 3,6-bis(4-pyridyl)tetrazine) have been successfully constructed by solution diffusion reactions by using Cu(NO3)2 ·3H2O or CuNCS and KNCS with 3,3’-bptz / 4,4’-bptz ligands, respectively. The resulting crystalline materials have been characterized by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, FT-IR spectra, thermogravimetric analyses and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Single crystal X-ray analyses revealed that CP 1 is organized in one-dimensional (1D) chain in which the Cu(II) ions are coordinated by 1 -NCS− anions and 1-DMF molecules, and linked by 2-3,3’-bptz bridging ligands. CPs ,2 and 3 are structural isomers. CP 2 exhibits two-dimensional (2D) (4,4)-plane-like network in which Cu(I) ions are linked by 2-NCS − and 2-3,3’-bptz ligands. In CP 3, Cu(I) ions are connected by 2 -NCS − and 2-4,4’-bptz ligands to form 2D saw-tooth wavy network. In addition, the photoluminescence properties of CPs 1-3 were also investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  19. Implicit transfer of reversed temporal structure in visuomotor sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2014-04-01

    Some spatio-temporal structures are easier to transfer implicitly in sequential learning. In this study, we investigated whether the consistent reversal of triads of learned components would support the implicit transfer of their temporal structure in visuomotor sequence learning. A triad comprised three sequential button presses ([1][2][3]) and seven consecutive triads comprised a sequence. Participants learned sequences by trial and error, until they could complete it 20 times without error. Then, they learned another sequence, in which each triad was reversed ([3][2][1]), partially reversed ([2][1][3]), or switched so as not to overlap with the other conditions ([2][3][1] or [3][1][2]). Even when the participants did not notice the alternation rule, the consistent reversal of the temporal structure of each triad led to better implicit transfer; this was confirmed in a subsequent experiment. These results suggest that the implicit transfer of the temporal structure of a learned sequence can be influenced by both the structure and consistency of the change. PMID:24215394

  20. Accurate multiple sequence-structure alignment of RNA sequences using combinatorial optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klau Gunnar W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of functional non-coding RNA sequences has led to an increasing interest in algorithms related to RNA analysis. Traditional sequence alignment algorithms, however, fail at computing reliable alignments of low-homology RNA sequences. The spatial conformation of RNA sequences largely determines their function, and therefore RNA alignment algorithms have to take structural information into account. Results We present a graph-based representation for sequence-structure alignments, which we model as an integer linear program (ILP. We sketch how we compute an optimal or near-optimal solution to the ILP using methods from combinatorial optimization, and present results on a recently published benchmark set for RNA alignments. Conclusion The implementation of our algorithm yields better alignments in terms of two published scores than the other programs that we tested: This is especially the case with an increasing number of input sequences. Our program LARA is freely available for academic purposes from http://www.planet-lisa.net.

  1. Music and language perception: expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, showing that music cognition research provides insight into the understanding of not only music processing but also language processing and the processing of other structured stimuli. The hypothesis of shared resources between music and language processing and of domain-general dynamic attention has motivated the development of research to test music as a means to stimulate sensory, cognitive, and motor processes. PMID:22760955

  2. Nucleotide sequence and proposed secondary structure of Columnea latent viroid: a natural mosaic of viroid sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    HAMMOND, R.; Smith, D. R.; Diener, T. O.

    1989-01-01

    The Columnea latent viroid (CLV) occurs latently in certain Columnea erythrophae plants grown commercially. In potato and tomato, CLV causes potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV)-like symptoms. Its nucleotide sequence and proposed secondary structure reveal that CLV consists of a single-stranded circular RNA of 370 nucleotides which can assume a rod-like structure with extensive base-pairing characteristic of all known viroids. The electrophoretic mobility of circular CLV under nondenaturing con...

  3. Structure and Sequence Search on Aptamer-Protein Docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jiajie; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin; Salsbury, Freddie

    2015-03-01

    Interactions between proteins and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) play a significant role in the living systems, especially through gene regulation. However, short nucleic acids sequences (aptamers) with specific binding affinity to specific proteins exhibit clinical potential as therapeutics. Our capillary and gel electrophoresis selection experiments show that specific sequences of aptamers can be selected that bind specific proteins. Computationally, given the experimentally-determined structure and sequence of a thrombin-binding aptamer, we can successfully dock the aptamer onto thrombin in agreement with experimental structures of the complex. In order to further study the conformational flexibility of this thrombin-binding aptamer and to potentially develop a predictive computational model of aptamer-binding, we use GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations to both examine the conformational flexibility of the aptamer in the absence of binding to thrombin, and to determine our ability to fold an aptamer. This study should help further de-novo predictions of aptamer sequences by enabling the study of structural and sequence-dependent effects on aptamer-protein docking specificity.

  4. Massively Parallel Interrogation of Aptamer Sequence, Structure and Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N O; Tok, J B; Tarasow, T M

    2008-02-08

    Optimization of high affinity reagents is a significant bottleneck in medicine and the life sciences. The ability to synthetically create thousands of permutations of a lead high-affinity reagent and survey the properties of individual permutations in parallel could potentially relieve this bottleneck. Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides affinity reagents isolated by in vitro selection processes and as a class have been shown to bind a wide variety of target molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings. High density DNA microarray technology was used to synthesize, in situ, arrays of approximately 3,900 aptamer sequence permutations in triplicate. These sequences were interrogated on-chip for their ability to bind the fluorescently-labeled cognate target, immunoglobulin E, resulting in the parallel execution of thousands of experiments. Fluorescence intensity at each array feature was well resolved and shown to be a function of the sequence present. The data demonstrated high intra- and interchip correlation between the same features as well as among the sequence triplicates within a single array. Consistent with aptamer mediated IgE binding, fluorescence intensity correlated strongly with specific aptamer sequences and the concentration of IgE applied to the array. The massively parallel sequence-function analyses provided by this approach confirmed the importance of a consensus sequence found in all 21 of the original IgE aptamer sequences and support a common stem:loop structure as being the secondary structure underlying IgE binding. The microarray application, data and results presented illustrate an efficient, high information content approach to optimizing aptamer function. It also provides a foundation from which to better understand and manipulate this important class of high affinity biomolecules.

  5. Recursive dynamic programming for adaptive sequence and structure alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, R; Zimmer, R; Lengauer, T

    1995-01-01

    We propose a new alignment procedure that is capable of aligning protein sequences and structures in a unified manner. Recursive dynamic programming (RDP) is a hierarchical method which, on each level of the hierarchy, identifies locally optimal solutions and assembles them into partial alignments of sequences and/or structures. In contrast to classical dynamic programming, RDP can also handle alignment problems that use objective functions not obeying the principle of prefix optimality, e.g. scoring schemes derived from energy potentials of mean force. For such alignment problems, RDP aims at computing solutions that are near-optimal with respect to the involved cost function and biologically meaningful at the same time. Towards this goal, RDP maintains a dynamic balance between different factors governing alignment fitness such as evolutionary relationships and structural preferences. As in the RDP method gaps are not scored explicitly, the problematic assignment of gap cost parameters is circumvented. In order to evaluate the RDP approach we analyse whether known and accepted multiple alignments based on structural information can be reproduced with the RDP method. For this purpose, we consider the family of ferredoxins as our prime example. Our experiments show that, if properly tuned, the RDP method can outperform methods based on classical sequence alignment algorithms as well as methods that take purely structural information into account. PMID:7584462

  6. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahnen Johan A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model.

  7. High-Throughput Sequencing Based Methods of RNA Structure Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental and computational protocol for detecting the reverse transcription termination sites (RTTS-Seq). This protocol was subsequently applied to hydroxyl radical footprinting of three dimensional RNA structures to give a probing signal that correlates well with the RNA backbone solvent accessibility. Moreover, we applied RTTS-Seq to detect antisense oligonucleotide binding sites within a transcriptome. In this case, we applied an enrichment strategy to greatly reduce the background. Finally, we have modified the RTTS-Seq to study the secondary structure of 3’ untranslated regions. In the course of this thesis we describe several computational methods. One that alleviates PCR bias by estimating number of unique molecules existing before the amplification, and two methods for data normalization: one applicable when the paired end sequencing is performed, and the other that works with the single read sequencing with known priming sites.

  8. Sequence and structural conservation in RNA ribose zippers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Makio; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2002-03-01

    The ribose zipper, an important element of RNA tertiary structure, is characterized by consecutive hydrogen-bonding interactions between ribose 20-hydroxyls from different regions of an RNA chain or between RNA chains. These tertiary contacts have previously been observed to also involve base backbone and base base interactions (A-minor type). We searched for ribose zipper tertiary interactions in the crystal structures of the large ribosomal subunit RNAs of Haloarcula marismortui and Deinococcus radiodurans, and the small ribosomal subunit RNA of Thermus thermophilus and identified a total of 97 ribose zippers. Of these, 20 were found in T. thermophilus 16 S rRNA, 44 in H. marismortui 23 S rRNA (plus 2 bridging 5 S and 23 S rRNAs) and 30 in D. radiodurans 23 S rRNA (plus 1 bridging 5 S and 23 S rRNAs). These were analyzed in terms of sequence conservation, structural conservation and stability, location in secondary structure, and phylogenetic conservation. Eleven types of ribose zippers were defined based on ribose base interactions. Of these 11, seven were observed in the ribosomal RNAs. The most common of these is the canonical ribose zipper, originally observed in the P4 P6 group I intron fragment. All ribose zippers were formed by antiparallel chain interactions and only a single example extended beyond two residues, forming an overlapping ribose zipper of three consecutive residues near the small subunit A-site. Almost all ribose zippers link stem (Watson Crick duplex) or stem-like (base-paired), with loop (external, internal, or junction) chain segments. About two-thirds of the observed ribose zippers interact with ribosomal proteins. Most of these ribosomal proteins bridge the ribose zipper chain segments with basic amino acid residues hydrogen bonding to the RNA backbone. Proteins involved in crucial ribosome function and in early stages of ribosomal assembly also stabilize ribose zipper interactions. All ribose zippers show strong sequence conservation both within these three ribosomal RNA structures and in a large database of aligned prokaryotic sequences. The physical basis of the sequence conservation is stacked base triples formed between consecutive base-pairs on the stem or stem-like segment with bases (often adenines) from the loop-side segment. These triples have previously been characterized as Type I and Type II A-minor motifs and are stabilized by base base and base ribose hydrogen bonds. The sequence and structure conservation of ribose zippers can be directly used in tertiary structure prediction and may have applications in molecular modeling and design.

  9. The structure of verbal sequences analyzed with unsupervised learning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Recanati, Catherine; Bennani, Younès

    2007-01-01

    Data mining allows the exploration of sequences of phenomena, whereas one usually tends to focus on isolated phenomena or on the relation between two phenomena. It offers invaluable tools for theoretical analyses and exploration of the structure of sentences, texts, dialogues, and speech. We report here the results of an attempt at using it for inspecting sequences of verbs from French accounts of road accidents. This analysis comes from an original approach of unsupervised training allowing the discovery of the structure of sequential data. The entries of the analyzer were only made of the verbs appearing in the sentences. It provided a classification of the links between two successive verbs into four distinct clusters, allowing thus text segmentation. We give here an interpretation of these clusters by applying a statistical analysis to independent semantic annotations.

  10. Structural basis of sequence-specific collagen recognition by SPARC

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenester, Erhard; Sasaki, Takako; Giudici, Camilla; Farndale, Richard W; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    Protein interactions with the collagen triple helix play a critical role in collagen fibril formation, cell adhesion, and signaling. However, structural insight into sequence-specific collagen recognition is limited to an integrin-peptide complex. A GVMGFO motif in fibrillar collagens (O denotes 4-hydroxyproline) binds 3 unrelated proteins: von Willebrand factor (VWF), discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), and the extracellular matrix protein SPARC/osteonectin/BM-40. We report the crystal struc...

  11. Early-Stage Folding in Proteins (In Silico Sequence-to-Structure Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brylinski Micha?

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequence-to-structure library has been created based on the complete PDB database. The tetrapeptide was selected as a unit representing a well-defined structural motif. Seven structural forms were introduced for structure classification. The early-stage folding conformations were used as the objects for structure analysis and classification. The degree of determinability was estimated for the sequence-to-structure and structure-to-sequence relations. Probability calculus and informational entropy were applied for quantitative estimation of the mutual relation between them. The structural motifs representing different forms of loops and bends were found to favor particular sequences in structure-to-sequence analysis.

  12. Local variability and base sequence effects in DNA crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, D; Bansal, M

    1990-12-01

    The importance and usefulness of local doublet parameters in understanding sequence dependent effects has been described for A- and B-DNA oligonucleotide crystal structures. Each of the two sets of local parameters described by us in the NUPARM algorithm, namely the local doublet parameters, calculated with reference to the mean z-axis, and the local helical parameters, calculated with reference to the local helix axis, is sufficient to describe the oligonucleotide structures, with the local helical parameters giving a slightly magnified picture of the variations in the structures. The values of local doublet parameters calculated by NUPARM algorithm are similar to those calculated by NEWHELIX90 program, only if the oligonucleotide fragment is not too distorted. The mean values obtained using all the available data for B-DNA crystals are not significantly different from those obtained when a limited data set is used, consisting only of structures with a data resolution of better than 2.4 A and without any bound drug molecule. Thus the variation observed in the oligonucleotide crystals appears to be independent of the quality of their crystallinity. No strong correlation is seen between any pair of local doublet parameters but the local helical parameters are interrelated by geometric relationships. An interesting feature that emerges from this analysis is that the local rise along the z-axis is highly correlated with the difference in the buckle values of the two basepairs in the doublet, as suggested earlier for the dodecamer structures (Bansal and Bhattacharyya, in Structure & Methods: DNA & RNA, Vol. 3 (Eds., R.H. Sarma and M.H. Sarma), pp. 139-153 (1990)). In fact the local rise values become almost constant for both A- and B-forms, if a correction is applied for the buckling of the basepairs. In B-DNA the AA, AT, TA and GA basepair sequences generally have a smaller local rise (3.25 A) compared to the other sequences (3.4 A) and this seems to be an intrinsic feature of basepair stacking interaction and not related to any other local doublet parameter. The roll angles in B-DNA oligonucleotides have small values (less than +/- 8 degrees), while mean local twist varies from 24 degrees to 45 degrees. The CA/TG doublet sequences show two types of preferred geometries, one with positive roll, small positive slide and reduced twist and another with negative roll, large positive slide and increased twist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2100518

  13. Data Structures: Sequence Problems, Range Queries, and Fault Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØrgensen, Allan GrØnlund

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on algorithms, in particular data structures that give provably ecient solutions for sequence analysis problems, range queries, and fault tolerant computing. The work presented in this dissertation is divided into three parts. In Part I we consider algorithms for a range of sequence analysis problems that have risen from applications in pattern matching, bioinformatics, and data mining. On a high level, each problem is dened by a function and some constraints and the job at hand is to locate subsequences that score high with this function and are not invalidated by the constraints. Many variants and similar problems have been proposed leading to several dierent approaches and algorithms. We consider problems where the function is the sum of the elements in the sequence and the constraints only bound the length of the subsequences considered. We give optimal algorithms for several variants of the problem based on a simple idea and classic algorithms and data structures. In Part II we consider range query data structures. This a category of problems where the task is to preprocess an input sequence using as little time and space as possible such that one can eciently compute a certain function on the elements in a given query subsequence. There are many types of functions that has been considered in connection with input from dierent sources. The input could be ip-data sorted by ip-address, real estate prices sorted by zip code, advertising cost sorted by time etc. We consider data structures for two classic statistics functions, namely median and mode. Finally, Part III investigates fault tolerant algorithms and data structures. This deals with the trend of avoiding elaborate error checking and correction circuitry that would impose non-negligible costs in terms of hardware performance and money in the design of todays high speed memory technologies. Hardware, power failures, and environmental conditions such as cosmic rays and alpha particles can all alter the memory in unpredictable ways. In applications where large memory capacities are needed at low cost, it makes sense to assume that the algorithms themselves are in charge for dealing with memory faults. We investigate searching, sorting and counting algorithms and data structures that provably returns sensible information in spite of memory corruptions.

  14. The sequence, structure and evolutionary features of HOTAIR in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been identified recently. Different from all the others that function in cis to regulate local gene expression, the newly identified HOTAIR is located between HoxC11 and HoxC12 in the human genome and regulates HoxD expression in multiple tissues. Like the well-characterised lncRNA Xist, HOTAIR binds to polycomb proteins to methylate histones at multiple HoxD loci, but unlike Xist, many details of its structure and function, as well as the trans regulation, remain unclear. Moreover, HOTAIR is involved in the aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer. Results To identify conserved domains in HOTAIR and study the phylogenetic distribution of this lncRNA, we searched the genomes of 10 mammalian and 3 non-mammalian vertebrates for matches to its 6 exons and the two conserved domains within the 1800 bp exon6 using Infernal. There was just one high-scoring hit for each mammal, but many low-scoring hits were found in both mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates. These hits and their flanking genes in four placental mammals and platypus were examined to determine whether HOTAIR contained elements shared by other lncRNAs. Several of the hits were within unknown transcripts or ncRNAs, many were within introns of, or antisense to, protein-coding genes, and conservation of the flanking genes was observed only between human and chimpanzee. Phylogenetic analysis revealed discrete evolutionary dynamics for orthologous sequences of HOTAIR exons. Exon1 at the 5' end and a domain in exon6 near the 3' end, which contain domains that bind to multiple proteins, have evolved faster in primates than in other mammals. Structures were predicted for exon1, two domains of exon6 and the full HOTAIR sequence. The sequence and structure of two fragments, in exon1 and the domain B of exon6 respectively, were identified to robustly occur in predicted structures of exon1, domain B of exon6 and the full HOTAIR in mammals. Conclusions HOTAIR exists in mammals, has poorly conserved sequences and considerably conserved structures, and has evolved faster than nearby HoxC genes. Exons of HOTAIR show distinct evolutionary features, and a 239 bp domain in the 1804 bp exon6 is especially conserved. These features, together with the absence of some exons and sequences in mouse, rat and kangaroo, suggest ab initio generation of HOTAIR in marsupials. Structure prediction identifies two fragments in the 5' end exon1 and the 3' end domain B of exon6, with sequence and structure invariably occurring in various predicted structures of exon1, the domain B of exon6 and the full HOTAIR.

  15. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  16. DESIGN PACKAGE 1D SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.R. Eisler

    1995-02-02

    The purpose of this analysis is to systematically identify and evaluate hazards related to the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package 1D, Surface Facilities, (for a list of design items included in the package 1D system safety analysis see section 3). This process is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach was used since a radiological System Safety analysis is not required. The risk assessment in this analysis characterizes the accident scenarios associated with the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components in terms of relative risk and includes recommendations for mitigating all identified risks. The priority for recommending and implementing mitigation control features is: (1) Incorporate measures to reduce risks and hazards into the structure/system/component (S/S/C) design, (2) add safety devices and capabilities to the designs that reduce risk, (3) provide devices that detect and warn personnel of hazardous conditions, and (4) develop procedures and conduct training to increase worker awareness of potential hazards, on methods to reduce exposure to hazards, and on the actions required to avoid accidents or correct hazardous conditions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Design Package 1D structures/systems/components (S/S/Cs) during normal operations excluding hazards occurring during maintenance and ''off normal'' operations.

  17. Dicynamide bridged two new zig-zag 1-D Zn(II) coordination polymers of pyrimidine derived Schiff base ligands: Synthesis, crystal structures and fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konar, Saugata

    2015-07-01

    Two new zigzag 1-D polymeric Zn(II) coordination polymers {[Zn(L1)(μ1,5-dca)](H2O)}n (1), {[Zn(L2)(μ1,5-dca)](ClO4)}n (2) of two potentially tridentate NNO-, NNN-, donor Schiff base ligands [2-(2-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol] (L1), [1-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-2-yl)-2-(dipyridin-2ylmethylene)hydrazine] (L2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR and 1H NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The dicyanamide ions act as linkers (μ1,5 mode) in the formation of these coordination polymers. Both the complexes 1 and 2 have same distorted square pyramidal geometry around the Zn(II) centres. The weak forces like π⋯π, Csbnd H⋯π, anion⋯π interactions lead to various supramolecular architectures. Complex 1 shows high chelation enhanced fluorescence compared to that of 2. The fluorescence spectral changes observed high selectivity towards Zn(II) over other metal ions such as Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II).

  18. Dimension reduction for extracting geometrical structure of multidimensional phase space: Application to fast energy exchange in the reaction O(1D)+N2O?NO+NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most fundamental problems in studying general Hamiltonian systems with many degrees of freedom is to extract a low-dimensional subsystem including the essential dynamics. In this paper, a new partial normal form (PNF) method is developed to reduce the number of coupling terms in the Hamiltonian and to simplify the dynamics analyses. The PNF method allows one to decouple many unimportant bath modes as well as the reactive mode from the system by assessing the significance of the coupling terms. The method is applied to the chemical reaction O(1D)+N2O?NO+NO, which was found to exhibit efficient energy exchange between the two NO stretching modes despite the short lifetime of the reaction intermediate [S. Kawai et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 184315 (2006)]. Through the analysis of the two-dimensional PNF Hamiltonian subsystem, it is found that the motion of the subsystem preserves the 'normal mode picture' of the symmetric and antisymmetric NO stretching modes despite its high energy. Then the vibrational energy, initially localized in the newly formed NO bond, is transferred to the reactants' NO bond through the beating between the symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes. The preservation of the normal mode picture and the short period of the beating explain the fast energy exchange between the two NO bonds. This successful application proves that the PNF method can extract the essential small subspace from many-degrees-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems

  19. Secondary structure prediction and structure-specific sequence analysis of single-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    DONG, FANG; ALLAWI, HATIM T.; Anderson, Todd; NERI, BRUCE P.; Lyamichev, Victor I.

    2001-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis by oligonucleotide binding is often affected by interference with the secondary structure of the target DNA. Here we describe an approach that improves DNA secondary structure prediction by combining enzymatic probing of DNA by structure-specific 5?-nucleases with an energy minimization algorithm that utilizes the 5?-nuclease cleavage sites as constraints. The method can identify structural differences between two DNA molecules caused by minor seq...

  20. Age-structured Trait Substitution Sequence Process and Canonical Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Méléard, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    We are interested in a stochastic model of trait and age-structured population undergoing mutation and selection. We start with a continuous time, discrete individual-centered population process. Taking the large population and rare mutations limits under a well-chosen time-scale separation condition, we obtain a jump process that generalizes the Trait Substitution Sequence process describing Adaptive Dynamics for populations without age structure. Under the additional assumption of small mutations, we derive an age-dependent ordinary differential equation that extends the Canonical Equation. These evolutionary approximations have never been introduced to our knowledge. They are based on ecological phenomena represented by PDEs that generalize the Gurtin-McCamy equation in Demography. Another particularity is that they involve a fitness function, describing the probability of invasion of the resident population by the mutant one, that can not always be computed explicitly. Examples illustrate how adding an ag...

  1. Elongation method for electronic structure calculations of random DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimoto, Yuuichi; Liu, Kai; Aoki, Yuriko

    2015-10-30

    We applied ab initio order-N elongation (ELG) method to calculate electronic structures of various deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) models. We aim to test potential application of the method for building a database of DNA electronic structures. The ELG method mimics polymerization reactions on a computer and meets the requirements for linear scaling computational efficiency and high accuracy, even for huge systems. As a benchmark test, we applied the method for calculations of various types of random sequenced A- and B-type DNA models with and without counterions. In each case, the ELG method maintained high accuracy with small errors in energy on the order of 10(-8) hartree/atom compared with conventional calculations. We demonstrate that the ELG method can provide valuable information such as stabilization energies and local densities of states for each DNA sequence. In addition, we discuss the "restarting" feature of the ELG method for constructing a database that exhaustively covers DNA species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26337429

  2. Data Structures: Sequence Problems, Range Queries, and Fault Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    The focus of this dissertation is on algorithms, in particular data structures that give provably ecient solutions for sequence analysis problems, range queries, and fault tolerant computing. The work presented in this dissertation is divided into three parts. In Part I we consider algorithms for...... cost, it makes sense to assume that the algorithms themselves are in charge for dealing with memory faults. We investigate searching, sorting and counting algorithms and data structures that provably returns sensible information in spite of memory corruptions....... eciently compute a certain function on the elements in a given query subsequence. There are many types of functions that has been considered in connection with input from dierent sources. The input could be ip-data sorted by ip-address, real estate prices sorted by zip code, advertising cost sorted by time...... etc. We consider data structures for two classic statistics functions, namely median and mode. Finally, Part III investigates fault tolerant algorithms and data structures. This deals with the trend of avoiding elaborate error checking and correction circuitry that would impose non-negligible costs in...

  3. A DNA Structure-Based Bionic Wavelet Transform and Its Application to DNA Sequence Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Chen; Yuan-Ting Zhang

    2003-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis is of great significance for increasing our understanding of genomic functions. An important task facing us is the exploration of hidden structural information stored in the DNA sequence. This paper introduces a DNA structure-based adaptive wavelet transform (WT) – the bionic wavelet transform (BWT) – for DNA sequence analysis. The symbolic DNA sequence can be separated into four channels of indicator sequences. An adaptive symbol-to-number mapping, determined from the s...

  4. Sequence physical properties encode the global organization of protein structure space

    OpenAIRE

    Rackovsky, S.

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that, properly represented, the amino acid composition of protein sequences contains the information necessary to delineate the global properties of protein structure space. A numerical representation of amino acid sequence in terms of a set of property factors is used, and the values of those property factors are averaged over individual sequences and then over sets of sequences belonging to structurally defined groups. These sequence sets then can be viewed as points in a...

  5. Isolation, sequencing, and structure-activity relationships of cyclotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, David C; Clark, Richard J; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J

    2010-09-24

    Cyclotides are a topologically fascinating family of miniproteins discovered over the past decade that have expanded the diversity of plant-derived natural products. They are approximately 30 amino acids in size and occur in plants of the Violaceae, Rubiaceae, and Cucurbitaceae families. Despite their proteinaceous composition, cyclotides behave in much the same way as many nonpeptidic natural products in that they are resistant to degradation by enzymes or heat and can be extracted from plants using methanol. Their stability arises, in large part, due to their characteristic cyclic cystine knot (CCK) structural motif. Cystine knots are present in a variety of proteins of insect, plant, and animal origin, comprising a ring formed by two disulfide bonds and their connecting backbone segments that is threaded by a third disulfide bond. In cyclotides, the cystine knot is uniquely embedded within a head-to-tail cyclized peptide backbone, leading to the ultrastable CCK structural motif. Apart from the six absolutely conserved cysteine residues, the majority of amino acids in the six backbone loops of cyclotides are tolerant to variation. It has been predicted that the family might include up to 50,000 members; although, so far, sequences for only 140 have been reported. Cyclotides exhibit a variety of biological activities, including insecticidal, nematocidal, molluscicidal, antimicrobial, antibarnacle, anti-HIV, and antitumor activities. Due to their diverse activities and common structural core from which variable loops protrude, cyclotides can be thought of as combinatorial peptide templates capable of displaying a variety of amino acid sequences. They have thus attracted interest in drug design as well as in crop protection applications. PMID:20718473

  6. Fabrication de structures périodiques à base de polymères, 1D, 2D et 3D, par effet de transport de masse

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Nous avons étudié théoriquement et expérimentalement la formation de réseaux en relief sur des surfaces active ou passive, avec deux types de polymères photosensibles : résine photosensible négative et copolymère azobenzene. Le mécanisme de formation des structures est attribué à l'effet de transport de masse, qui déplace la matière dans des directions opposées dans ces deux matériaux. La technique de fabrication est basée sur l'utilisation de la lithographie par interférence, ce qui a permis...

  7. Adapter la structure mésoscopique et l'orientation des polymères semi-cristallins et des polymères de cristaux liquides : confinement à 1D et 2D

    OpenAIRE

    Odarchenko, Yaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Le contrôle de la microstructure des matériaux organiques est crucial pour des applications pratiques telles que la photonique, la biomédecine ou encore le domaine très dynamique de l'électronique organique. Les études récentes ont montré une possibilité de contrôler la structure des polymères à l'échelle nanométrique en utilisant l'auto-assemblage supramoléculaire sous confinement spatial. Bien que de nombreuses études ont déjà été effectuées dans ce domaine, plusieurs questions essentielles...

  8. Synthesis, structure, and electrochemistry and magnetic properties of a novel 1D homochiral MnIII(5-Brsalen) coordination polymer with left-handed helical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dapeng; Yu, Naisen; Zhao, Haiyan; Liu, Dedi; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhenghua; Liu, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    A novel homochiral manganese (III) Mn(5-Brsalen) coordination polymer with left-handed helical character by spontaneous resolution on crystallization by using Mn(5-Brsalen) and 4,4-bipyridine, [MnIII(5-Brsalen)(4,4-bipy)]·ClO4·CH3OH (1) (4,4-bipy = 4,4-bipyridine) has been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In compound 1, each manganese(III) anion is six-coordinate octahedral being bonded to four atoms of 5-Brsalen ligand in an equatorial plane and two nitrogen atoms from a 4,4-bipyridine ligand in axial positions. The structure of compound 1 can be described a supramolecular 2D-like structure which was formed by the intermolecular ?-stacking interactions between the neighboring chains of the aromatic rings of 4,4-bipyridine and 5-Brsalen molecules. UV-vis absorption spectrum, electrochemistry and magnetic properties of the compound 1 have also been studied.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic property of a new 1D molecular material [1-(4'-chlorobenzyl)-4-aminopyridinium](+) bis(maleonitriledithiolato)nickel(-)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ion-pair complex, [1-(4'-chlorobenzyl)-4-aminopyridinium](+)bis(maleonitrile-dithiolato) nickel(-),[ClbzPyNH2][Ni(mnt)2] (1), has been prepared and characterized. X-ray single crystal structure conforms that the Ni(mnt)2- anions and [ClbzPyNH2]+ cations of 1 form completely segregated uniform stacking columns with the Ni...Ni distance 3.944A in the Ni(mnt)2- stacking column. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals that 1 undergoes a magnetic transition, and exhibits ferromagnetic interaction in the high-temperature phase and spin gap system in the low-temperature phase

  10. Combining multiple structure and sequence alignments to improve sequence detection and alignment: Application to the SH2 domains of Janus kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Sheinerman, Felix B.; Honig, Barry

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an approach is described that combines multiple structure alignments and multiple sequence alignments to generate sequence profiles for protein families. First, multiple sequence alignments are generated from sequences that are closely related to each sequence of known three-dimensional structure. These alignments then are merged through a multiple structure alignment of family members of known structure. The merged alignment is used to generate a Hi...

  11. Assembling Metal Ions Induced Cyanide-Bridged Heterometallic 1D and Ion-Pair Complexes: Synthesis, Crystal Structures and Magnetic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingqian [Liaocheng Univ., Liaocheng (China); Zhao, Zengdian; Chen, Kexun; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Daopeng [Shandong Univ. of Technology, Zibo (China)

    2013-07-15

    We obtained a heterobimetallic one-dimensional cyanide-bridged Mn(II)-Ni(II) complex and an Co(III)-Ni(II) ion-pair complex with [Ni(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} as building block and M(II)-phenanthroline (M = Mn, Co) compounds as assembling segment. The different structural types of complexes 1 and 2 indicate that the property of the metal ions the assembling segment contained have obvious influence on the structure of the cyanide-bridged complex. Investigation over the magnetic properties of complex 1 reveals an overall weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the adjacent Mn(II) ions bridged by the antiferromagnetic [-NC-Ni-CN-] unit. Among of all the molecular magnetism systems, for the well known reasons, cyanide-containing complexes have been widely employed as bridges to assemble homo/hetero-metallic molecular magnetic materials by using the cyanide bridge transferring magnetic coupling between the neighboring paramagnetic ions, in whichsome showed interesting magnetic properties, such as high-Tc magnets, spin crossover materials, single-molecule magnets (SMMs) and single-chain magnets (SCMs)

  12. Assembling Metal Ions Induced Cyanide-Bridged Heterometallic 1D and Ion-Pair Complexes: Synthesis, Crystal Structures and Magnetic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtained a heterobimetallic one-dimensional cyanide-bridged Mn(II)-Ni(II) complex and an Co(III)-Ni(II) ion-pair complex with [Ni(CN)4]2- as building block and M(II)-phenanthroline (M = Mn, Co) compounds as assembling segment. The different structural types of complexes 1 and 2 indicate that the property of the metal ions the assembling segment contained have obvious influence on the structure of the cyanide-bridged complex. Investigation over the magnetic properties of complex 1 reveals an overall weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the adjacent Mn(II) ions bridged by the antiferromagnetic [-NC-Ni-CN-] unit. Among of all the molecular magnetism systems, for the well known reasons, cyanide-containing complexes have been widely employed as bridges to assemble homo/hetero-metallic molecular magnetic materials by using the cyanide bridge transferring magnetic coupling between the neighboring paramagnetic ions, in whichsome showed interesting magnetic properties, such as high-Tc magnets, spin crossover materials, single-molecule magnets (SMMs) and single-chain magnets (SCMs)

  13. Synthesis of cadmium complexes of 4'-chloro-terpyridine: From discrete dimer to 1D chain polymer, crystal structure and antibacterial activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lotfali Saghatforoush; Laura Valencia Matarranz; Firoozeh Chalabian; Shahriare Ghammamy; Fatemeh Katouzian

    2012-05-01

    Two new Cd(II) complexes with the ligand 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2"-terpyridine (Cltpy), [Cd(Cltpy)(N3)(CH3COO)], 1, and [Cd(Cltpy)(NCS)(CH3COO)], 2, have been synthesized and characterized by CHN elemental analyses, 1HNMR-, 13C NMR-, IR spectroscopy and structurally analysed by X-ray singlecrystal diffraction. The single crystal X-ray analyses show that the coordination number in these complexes is seven with three terpyridine (Cltpy) N-donor atoms, two acetate oxygens and two anionic bridged ligands. The crystal structure of 2 comprises a one-dimensional polymeric network bridged by NCS− anions. The antibacterial activities of Cltpy and its Cd(II) complexes are tested against different bacteria. Both complexes have shown good activity against all the tested bacteria. Against Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus, antibacterial activity of complexes is higher than Cltpy ligand. The higher activity of complexes may be explained on the basis of chelation theory.

  14. Structure and Active Stie Residues of Pg1D, an N-Acetyltransferase from the Bacillosamine Synthetic Pathway Required for N-Glycan Synthesis in Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan,E.; Ruane, K.; Sulea, T.; Watson, D.; Proteau, A.; Leclerc, S.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Young, N.

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is highly unusual among bacteria in forming N-linked glycoproteins. The heptasaccharide produced by its pgl system is attached to protein Asn through its terminal 2, 4-diacetamido-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc (QuiNAc4NAc or N, N'-diacetylbacillosamine) moiety. The crucial, last part of this sugar's synthesis is the acetylation of UDP-2-acetamido-4-amino-2, 4,6-trideoxy-d-Glc by the enzyme PglD, with acetyl-CoA as a cosubstrate. We have determined the crystal structures of PglD in CoA-bound and unbound forms, refined to 1.8 and 1.75 Angstroms resolution, respectively. PglD is a trimer of subunits each comprised of two domains, an N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}-domain and a C-terminal left-handed {beta}-helix. Few structural differences accompany CoA binding, except in the C-terminal region following the {beta}-helix (residues 189-195), which adopts an extended structure in the unbound form and folds to extend the {beta}-helix upon binding CoA. Computational molecular docking suggests a different mode of nucleotide-sugar binding with respect to the acetyl-CoA donor, with the molecules arranged in an 'L-shape', compared with the 'in-line' orientation in related enzymes. Modeling indicates that the oxyanion intermediate would be stabilized by the NH group of Gly143', with His125' the most likely residue to function as a general base, removing H+ from the amino group prior to nucleophilic attack at the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-CoA. Site-specific mutations of active site residues confirmed the importance of His125', Glu124', and Asn118. We conclude that Asn118 exerts its function by stabilizing the intricate hydrogen bonding network within the active site and that Glu124' may function to increase the pKa of the putative general base, His125'.

  15. Two new 1D chains of Ni2Na2 heterometallic double half-cubane building units: Synthesis, structures and variable temperature magnetic study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kartik Chandra Mondal; Bappaditya Gole; You Song; Stuart R Batten; David R Turner; Partha Sarathi Mukherjee

    2011-11-01

    An equimolar mixture of Ni(NO3)2·6H2O and pyridine-2-aldehyde with two equivalents of NaN3 in methanol in the presence of NaOMe resulted in the formation of light green precipitate which upon crystallization from dimethylformamide (DMF) yielded light green single crystals [{Ni2Na2(pic)4(N3)2(H2O)2(MeOH)}· MeOH·3H2O] (1) and [{Ni2Na2(pic)4(N3)2(H2O)4}$\\cdot$2DMF$\\cdot$H2O] (2) (pic = pyridine-2-carboxylate) at room temperature and high temperature (100°C), respectively. Variable temperature magnetic studies revealed the existence of overall ferromagnetic behaviour with ≈ +10 cm-1 and ≈ −2 to −7 cm-1 for 1 and 2, respectively. Negative values as well as variation of upon slight distortion of structure by varying reaction temperature were observed. The X-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of both 2 and 3 were recorded below 50 K. The structural distortion was also implicated from the EPR spectra. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on both complexes were performed in two different ways to corroborate the magnetic results. Considering only Ni$^{\\text{II}}_{2}$ dimeric unit, results were = +20.65 cm-1 and = −3.16 cm-1 for 1, and =+24.56 cm-1 and =−4.67 cm-1 for 2. However, considering Ni$^{\\text{II}}_{2}$Na$^{I}_{2}$ cubane as magnetic core the results were =+16.35 cm-1 (1), +19.54 cm-1 (2); =−3.05 cm-1 (1), −4.25 cm-1 (2).

  16. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g1p and g1d for 0.05 < Q2 < 3.0 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Burkert, Volker; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dodge, Gail; Griffioen, Keith; Kuhn, Sebastian; Minehart, Ralph; Adams, Gary; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, G.; Audit, Gerard; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Barrow, Steve; Battaglieri, Marco; Beard, Kevin; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bektasoglu, Mehmet; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bonner, Billy; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Cazes, Antoine; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Cords, Dieter; Corvisiero, Pietro; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Cummings, John; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Denizli, Haluk; Dennis, Lawrence; Dhuga, Kalvir; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dytman, Steven; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fatemi, Renee; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fersch, Robert; Feuerbach, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Guidal, Michel; Guillo, Matthieu; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hardie, John; Hassall, Neil; Heddle, David; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Huertas, Marco; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Kui; Kim, Kyungmo; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klusman, Mike; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, Dave; Lima, Ana; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; Lukashin, K.; MacCormick, Marion; Marchand, Claude; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McAleer, Simeon; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Morand, Ludyvine; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Mueller, James; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; O' Rielly, Grant; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Philips, Sasha; Pierce, J.; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Popa, Iulian; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Preedom, Barry; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Qin, Liming; Raue, Brian; Riccardi, Gregory; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Rowntree, David; Rubin, Philip; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seely, Mikell; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shaw, Jeffrey; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Skabelin, Alexander; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Suleiman, Riad; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; V

    2009-02-01

    The spin structure functions $g_1$ for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in $x$ and \\Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH$_3$ and ND$_3$ targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for $0.05 < Q^2 < 5 $\\ GeV$^2$ and $W < 3$ GeV. The first moments of $g_1$ for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low \\Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton $\\gamma_0^p$ is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above $Q^2$ = 1.5 GeV$^2$. Although the first moments of $g_1$ are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (\\ChPT) calculations up to approximately $Q^2 = 0.06$ GeV$^2$, a significant discrepancy is observed between the $\\gamma_0^p$ data and \\ChPT\\ for $\\gamma_0^p$,even at the lowest \\Q2.

  17. Moments of the Spin Structure Functions g_1^p and g_1^d for 0.05 < Q^2 < 3.0 GeV^2

    CERN Document Server

    Prok, Y; Burkert, V D; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dodge, G E; Griffioen, K A; Kuhn, S E; Minehart, R; Adams, G; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Credé, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Fersh, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Keith, C D; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Ji Li; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Lukashin, K; MacCormick, M; Marchand, C; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Müller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabati, F; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, e J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Seely, M L; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Sharov, D; Shaw, J; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2008-01-01

    The spin structure functions g_1 for the proton and the deuteron have been measured over a wide kinematic range in x and Q2 using 1.6 and 5.7 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons incident upon polarized NH_3 and ND_3 targets at Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons were detected in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, for 0.05 < Q^2 < 5 GeV^2 and W < 3 GeV. The first moments of g_1 for the proton and deuteron are presented -- both have a negative slope at low Q2, as predicted by the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule. The first result for the generalized forward spin polarizability of the proton gamma_0^p is also reported, and shows evidence of scaling above Q^2 = 1.5 GeV^2. Although the first moments of g_1 are consistent with Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) calculations up to approximately Q^2 = 0.06 GeV^2, a significant discrepancy is observed between the \\gamma_0^p data and ChPT for gamma_0^p,even at the lowest Q2.

  18. Identification of similar regions of protein structures using integrated sequence and structure analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiland Randy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding protein function from its structure is a challenging problem. Sequence based approaches for finding homology have broad use for annotation of both structure and function. 3D structural information of protein domains and their interactions provide a complementary view to structure function relationships to sequence information. We have developed a web site http://www.sblest.org/ and an API of web services that enables users to submit protein structures and identify statistically significant neighbors and the underlying structural environments that make that match using a suite of sequence and structure analysis tools. To do this, we have integrated S-BLEST, PSI-BLAST and HMMer based superfamily predictions to give a unique integrated view to prediction of SCOP superfamilies, EC number, and GO term, as well as identification of the protein structural environments that are associated with that prediction. Additionally, we have extended UCSF Chimera and PyMOL to support our web services, so that users can characterize their own proteins of interest. Results Users are able to submit their own queries or use a structure already in the PDB. Currently the databases that a user can query include the popular structural datasets ASTRAL 40 v1.69, ASTRAL 95 v1.69, CLUSTER50, CLUSTER70 and CLUSTER90 and PDBSELECT25. The results can be downloaded directly from the site and include function prediction, analysis of the most conserved environments and automated annotation of query proteins. These results reflect both the hits found with PSI-BLAST, HMMer and with S-BLEST. We have evaluated how well annotation transfer can be performed on SCOP ID's, Gene Ontology (GO ID's and EC Numbers. The method is very efficient and totally automated, generally taking around fifteen minutes for a 400 residue protein. Conclusion With structural genomics initiatives determining structures with little, if any, functional characterization, development of protein structure and function analysis tools are a necessary endeavor. We have developed a useful application towards a solution to this problem using common structural and sequence based analysis tools. These approaches are able to find statistically significant environments in a database of protein structure, and the method is able to quantify how closely associated each environment is to a predicted functional annotation.

  19. SCPRED: Accurate prediction of protein structural class for sequences of twilight-zone similarity with predicting sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure prediction methods provide accurate results when a homologous protein is predicted, while poorer predictions are obtained in the absence of homologous templates. However, some protein chains that share twilight-zone pairwise identity can form similar folds and thus determining structural similarity without the sequence similarity would be desirable for the structure prediction. The folding type of a protein or its domain is defined as the structural class. Current structural class prediction methods that predict the four structural classes defined in SCOP provide up to 63% accuracy for the datasets in which sequence identity of any pair of sequences belongs to the twilight-zone. We propose SCPRED method that improves prediction accuracy for sequences that share twilight-zone pairwise similarity with sequences used for the prediction. Results SCPRED uses a support vector machine classifier that takes several custom-designed features as its input to predict the structural classes. Based on extensive design that considers over 2300 index-, composition- and physicochemical properties-based features along with features based on the predicted secondary structure and content, the classifier's input includes 8 features based on information extracted from the secondary structure predicted with PSI-PRED and one feature computed from the sequence. Tests performed with datasets of 1673 protein chains, in which any pair of sequences shares twilight-zone similarity, show that SCPRED obtains 80.3% accuracy when predicting the four SCOP-defined structural classes, which is superior when compared with over a dozen recent competing methods that are based on support vector machine, logistic regression, and ensemble of classifiers predictors. Conclusion The SCPRED can accurately find similar structures for sequences that share low identity with sequence used for the prediction. The high predictive accuracy achieved by SCPRED is attributed to the design of the features, which are capable of separating the structural classes in spite of their low dimensionality. We also demonstrate that the SCPRED's predictions can be successfully used as a post-processing filter to improve performance of modern fold classification methods.

  20. Functional region prediction with a set of appropriate homologous sequences-an index for sequence selection by integrating structure and sequence information with spatial statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemoto Wataru

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of conserved residue clusters on a protein structure is one of the effective strategies for the prediction of functional protein regions. Various methods, such as Evolutionary Trace, have been developed based on this strategy. In such approaches, the conserved residues are identified through comparisons of homologous amino acid sequences. Therefore, the selection of homologous sequences is a critical step. It is empirically known that a certain degree of sequence divergence in the set of homologous sequences is required for the identification of conserved residues. However, the development of a method to select homologous sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues has not been sufficiently addressed. An objective and general method to select appropriate homologous sequences is desired for the efficient prediction of functional regions. Results We have developed a novel index to select the sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues, and implemented the index within our method to predict the functional regions of a protein. The implementation of the index improved the performance of the functional region prediction. The index represents the degree of conserved residue clustering on the tertiary structure of the protein. For this purpose, the structure and sequence information were integrated within the index by the application of spatial statistics. Spatial statistics is a field of statistics in which not only the attributes but also the geometrical coordinates of the data are considered simultaneously. Higher degrees of clustering generate larger index scores. We adopted the set of homologous sequences with the highest index score, under the assumption that the best prediction accuracy is obtained when the degree of clustering is the maximum. The set of sequences selected by the index led to higher functional region prediction performance than the sets of sequences selected by other sequence-based methods. Conclusions Appropriate homologous sequences are selected automatically and objectively by the index. Such sequence selection improved the performance of functional region prediction. As far as we know, this is the first approach in which spatial statistics have been applied to protein analyses. Such integration of structure and sequence information would be useful for other bioinformatics problems.

  1. Structural properties of replication origins in yeast DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequence-dependent DNA flexibility is an important structural property originating from the DNA 3D structure. In this paper, we investigate the DNA flexibility of the budding yeast (S. Cerevisiae) replication origins on a genome-wide scale using flexibility parameters from two different models, the trinucleotide and the tetranucleotide models. Based on analyzing average flexibility profiles of 270 replication origins, we find that yeast replication origins are significantly rigid compared with their surrounding genomic regions. To further understand the highly distinctive property of replication origins, we compare the flexibility patterns between yeast replication origins and promoters, and find that they both contain significantly rigid DNAs. Our results suggest that DNA flexibility is an important factor that helps proteins recognize and bind the target sites in order to initiate DNA replication. Inspired by the role of the rigid region in promoters, we speculate that the rigid replication origins may facilitate binding of proteins, including the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6, Cdt1 and the MCM2-7 complex

  2. A large 1D retroreflective autostereoscopic display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithwick, Quinn Y. J.; Ranieri, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    We aim to produce a wide field-of view large autostereoscopic display for multiple viewers based on a 1D retroreflective screen and overheard microprojectors. The 1D retroreflective screen consists of retroreflector, anisotropic diffuser, and embedded fiber-optic array with optical sensors. Microprojectors modified with wide angle converter lenses are mounted unobtrusively over each viewing location. Each projector's structured lighting is detected by the screen's sensor array for calibration. Pin-cushion distortion correction, rectification and cross-talk reduction are implemented for proper stereo fusion. We examine common viewing scenarios of single viewer autostereoscopic projection, multiprojector automultiscopic projection, side by side multiviewer common and independent autostereoscopic projection, and frontback autostereoscopic projection.

  3. High quality protein sequence alignment by combining structural profile prediction and profile alignment using SABERTOOTH

    OpenAIRE

    Bastolla Ugo; Minning Jonas; Teichert Florian; Porto Markus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein alignments are an essential tool for many bioinformatics analyses. While sequence alignments are accurate for proteins of high sequence similarity, they become unreliable as they approach the so-called 'twilight zone' where sequence similarity gets indistinguishable from random. For such distant pairs, structure alignment is of much better quality. Nevertheless, sequence alignment is the only choice in the majority of cases where structural data is not available. T...

  4. Structure and neural expression of a zebrafish homeobox sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njølstad, P R; Molven, A; Eiken, H G; Fjose, A

    1988-12-15

    A genomic library of zebrafish was constructed and screened with homeobox-containing probes. One of the positive clones contains a transcribed region which shares extensive sequence homology with the murine Hox-1.4 and Hox-2.6 genes and the human HHO.c13 gene. Characterization of this zebrafish homologue (ZF-13) with respect to expression demonstrated that it is transcribed during embryogenesis where a major RNA species of 2.5 kb and a minor transcript of 4.6 kb are detected. The highest concentration of both transcripts was found in embryos at the stage of somite formation. By in situ hybridization the spatial localization of expression was analysed in hatching embryos. Hybridization signals were mainly detected throughout the neural tube and in the brain. A small amount of RNA derived from ZF-13 was localized in differentiated muscle cells. Our results suggest that homeobox genes of distantly related vertebrate species are very similar with respect to structure and function. PMID:2468579

  5. Inferring Social Network Structure from Bacterial Sequence Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pluci?ski, Mateusz M.; Starfield, Richard; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2011-01-01

    Using DNA sequence data from pathogens to infer transmission networks has traditionally been done in the context of epidemics and outbreaks. Sequence data could analogously be applied to cases of ubiquitous commensal bacteria; however, instead of inferring chains of transmission to track the spread of a pathogen, sequence data for bacteria circulating in an endemic equilibrium could be used to infer information about host contact networks. Here, we show—using simulated data—that multilocus DN...

  6. A hexanucleotide sequence (dC1–dC6 tract) restricts the dC-specific cleavage of single-stranded DNA by endonuclease IV of bacteriophage T4

    OpenAIRE

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hirano, Nobutaka; Takahashi, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Endonuclease (Endo) IV encoded by denB of bacteriophage T4 is an enzyme that cleaves single-stranded (ss) DNA in a dC-specific manner. Previously we have demonstrated that a dTdCdA is most preferable for Endo IV when an oligonucleotide substrate having a single dC residue is used. Here we demonstrate that Endo IV cleaves ssDNAs exclusively at the 5?-proximal dC where a sequence comprises dC residues both at the 5? proximal and 3? proximal positions (a dCs tract-dependent cleavage). The dCs tr...

  7. The Structural Biology Knowledgebase: a portal to protein structures, sequences, functions, and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabanyi, Margaret J; Adams, Paul D; Arnold, Konstantin; Bordoli, Lorenza; Carter, Lester G; Flippen-Andersen, Judith; Gifford, Lida; Haas, Juergen; Kouranov, Andrei; McLaughlin, William A; Micallef, David I; Minor, Wladek; Shah, Raship; Schwede, Torsten; Tao, Yi-Ping; Westbrook, John D; Zimmerman, Matthew; Berman, Helen M

    2011-07-01

    The Protein Structure Initiative's Structural Biology Knowledgebase (SBKB, URL: http://sbkb.org ) is an open web resource designed to turn the products of the structural genomics and structural biology efforts into knowledge that can be used by the biological community to understand living systems and disease. Here we will present examples on how to use the SBKB to enable biological research. For example, a protein sequence or Protein Data Bank (PDB) structure ID search will provide a list of related protein structures in the PDB, associated biological descriptions (annotations), homology models, structural genomics protein target status, experimental protocols, and the ability to order available DNA clones from the PSI:Biology-Materials Repository. A text search will find publication and technology reports resulting from the PSI's high-throughput research efforts. Web tools that aid in research, including a system that accepts protein structure requests from the community, will also be described. Created in collaboration with the Nature Publishing Group, the Structural Biology Knowledgebase monthly update also provides a research library, editorials about new research advances, news, and an events calendar to present a broader view of structural genomics and structural biology. PMID:21472436

  8. High-Throughput Sequencing Based Methods of RNA Structure Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    describe several computational methods. One that alleviates PCR bias by estimating number of unique molecules existing before the amplification, and two methods for data normalization: one applicable when the paired end sequencing is performed, and the other that works with the single read sequencing with...... known priming sites....

  9. Combinatorial variation of structure in considerations of compound lumping in one- and two-dimensional property representations of condensable atmospheric organic compounds. 1. Lumping by 1-D volatility with nC fixed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, James F.; Niakan, Negar; Asher, William E.

    2013-12-01

    Many current models that aim to predict urban and regional levels of organic particulate matter (OPM) use either the 2 product (2p) framework for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, or a static 1-D volatility basis set (1-D-VBS). These approaches assume that: 1) the compounds involved in OPM condensation/evaporation can be lumped simply by volatility with no specificity regarding carbon number nC, MW, or polar functionality; 2) water uptake does not occur; and 3) the compounds are non-ionizing. This work considers the consequences for uniphasic PM caused by the first two assumptions due to effects of the condensed-phase mean molecular weight MWbar and activity coefficients (?i), including when RH (relative humidity) > 0. Setting nC = 10 for all bins, multiple chemical structures were developed for each bin of a 1-D-VBS for un-aged SOA in the ?-pinene/ozone system. For each bin, a group-contribution vapor pressure (pLo) prediction method was used to find multiple structures such that the groups-based log pLo for nC = 10 and variable numbers of aldehyde, ketone, hydroxyl, and carboxylic acid groups agrees, within ±0.5, with the bin volatility. The number of possible combinations with one structure taken from each bin was 17,640. The Raster-Roulette Organic Aerosol (RROA) model was used to calculate the equilibrium mass concentrations (?g m-3) of OPM (Mo) and co-condensed water (Mw) at 25 °C for each combination for ranges of RH and ?HC (change in parent hydrocarbon concentration). UNIFAC was used to determine the needed values of ?i. Frequency distributions from RROA for Mo, Mw, and the O:C ratio were developed. For Mo levels typical of the ambient atmosphere, then for the 1-D-VBS and all bins constrained at nC = 10, significant RH-induced enhancement of OPM condensation was observed in the distributions. The spread of the distributions was found to increase rapidly as the level of OPM decreased. The within-bin spread of ±0.5 log units in the groups-based estimates of log pL,iowas found to cause significant spread in the distributions at lower Mo values. At the chosen nC (=10), the groups-based log pL,iovalues show a spread of ±2 log units in a plot of log pL,iovs. O:C. When seeking to advance to 2-D-grid predictive modeling of atmospheric OPM, use of an O:C vs. nC grid will therefore require reliable information (or at least empirical calibration) as to the distributions of the likely structures at each gridpoint.

  10. Assembly of 1D, 2D and 3D lanthanum(iii) coordination polymers with perchlorinated benzenedicarboxylates: positional isomeric effect, structural transformation and ring-opening polymerisation of glycolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Chun; Dai, An-Qi; Huang, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Cui, Ai-Jun; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-16

    Utilizing a series of positional isomers of tetrachlorinated benzenedicarboxylic acid ligands, seven La(iii)-based coordination polymers were solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Their structural dimensionalities varying from 1D double chains, to the 2D 3,4,5-connected network, to 3D 6-connected pcu topological nets are only governed by the positions of carboxyl groups on the tetrachlorinated benzene ring. A comprehensive analysis and comparison reveals that the size of the carbonyl solvent molecules (DMF, DEF, DMA, and NMP) can affect the coordination geometries around the La(iii) ions, the coordination modes of carboxylate groups, the packing arrangements, and the void volumes of the overall crystal lattices. One as-synthesized framework further shows an unprecedented structural transformation from a 3D 6-connected network to a 3D 4,5-connected net through the dissolution and reformation pathway in water, suggesting that these easily hydrolyzed lanthanide complexes may serve as precursors to produce new high-dimensional frameworks. The bulk solvent-free melt polymerisation of glycolide utilizing these La(iii) complexes as initiators has been reported herein for the first time. All complexes were found to promote the polymerization of glycolide over a temperature range of 200 to 220 °C, producing poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) with a molecular weight up to 93 280. Under the same experimental conditions, the different catalytic activities for these complexes may result from their structural discrepancy. PMID:26811117

  11. Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from Homo sapiens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sarani; N A Udayaprakash; R Subashini; P Mridula; T Yamane; K Sekar

    2009-03-01

    Amino acid sequences are known to constantly mutate and diverge unless there is a limiting condition that makes such a change deleterious. However, closer examination of the sequence and structure reveals that a few large, cryptic repeats are nevertheless sequentially conserved. This leads to the question of why only certain repeats are conserved at the sequence level. It would be interesting to find out if these sequences maintain their conservation at the three-dimensional structure level. They can play an active role in protein and nucleotide stability, thus not only ensuring proper functioning but also potentiating malfunction and disease. Therefore, insights into any aspect of the repeats – be it structure, function or evolution – would prove to be of some importance. This study aims to address the relationship between protein sequence and its three-dimensional structure, by examining if large cryptic sequence repeats have the same structure.

  12. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes-both single copy and amplified-on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. PMID:26560630

  13. Implicit transfer of spatial structure in visuomotor sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kanji; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2014-11-01

    Implicit learning and transfer in sequence learning are essential in daily life. Here, we investigated the implicit transfer of visuomotor sequences following a spatial transformation. In the two experiments, participants used trial and error to learn a sequence consisting of several button presses, known as the m×n task (Hikosaka et al., 1995). After this learning session, participants learned another sequence in which the button configuration was spatially transformed in one of the following ways: mirrored, rotated, and random arrangement. Our results showed that even when participants were unaware of the transformation rules, accuracy of transfer session in the mirrored and rotated groups was higher than that in the random group (i.e., implicit transfer occurred). Both those who noticed the transformation rules and those who did not (i.e., explicit and implicit transfer instances, respectively) showed faster performance in the mirrored sequences than in the rotated sequences. Taken together, the present results suggest that people can use their implicit visuomotor knowledge to spatially transform sequences and that implicit transfers are modulated by a transformation cost, similar to that in explicit transfer. PMID:25261739

  14. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tungadri Bose; Anirban Dutta; Mohammed Mh; Hemang Gandhi; Sharmila S Mande

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, `FASTR’, for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. `FASTR’ – the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant `fastr’ string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the `FASTR’ methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  15. Using Structure to Explore the Sequence Alignment Space of Remote Homologs

    OpenAIRE

    Kuziemko, Andrew; Honig, Barry; Petrey, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Protein structure modeling by homology requires an accurate sequence alignment between the query protein and its structural template. However, sequence alignment methods based on dynamic programming (DP) are typically unable to generate accurate alignments for remote sequence homologs, thus limiting the applicability of modeling methods. A central problem is that the alignment that is “optimal” in terms of the DP score does not necessarily correspond to the alignment that produces the most ac...

  16. 4SALE – A tool for synchronous RNA sequence and secondary structure alignment and editing

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz Jörg; Dandekar Thomas; Müller Tobias; Seibel Philipp N; Wolf Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In sequence analysis the multiple alignment builds the fundament of all proceeding analyses. Errors in an alignment could strongly influence all succeeding analyses and therefore could lead to wrong predictions. Hand-crafted and hand-improved alignments are necessary and meanwhile good common practice. For RNA sequences often the primary sequence as well as a secondary structure consensus is well known, e.g., the cloverleaf structure of the t-RNA. Recently, some alignment ...

  17. Iterative multi-task sequence labeling for predicting structural properties of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Maes, Francis; Becker, Julien; Wehenkel, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Developing computational tools for predicting protein structural information given their amino acid sequence is of primary importance in protein science. Problems, such as the prediction of secondary structures, of solvent accessibility, or of disordered regions, can be expressed as sequence labeling problems and could be solved independently by existing machine learning based sequence labeling approaches. But, since these problems are closely related, we propose to rather approach them joint...

  18. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  19. Cloning of soybean leghemoglobin structural gene sequences synthesized in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, E; Gausing, K; Jochimsen, B; Jørgensen, Poul; Marcker, K A

    1979-01-01

    Double-stranded soybean leghemoglobin DNA was synthesized from leghemoglobin mRNA isolated from soybean nodules. The dsDNA was inserted into the Bam H1 site of plasmid pBR322 using the poly-dAT-joiner method. A cloned DNA fragment of one recombinant plasmid was isolated and characterized by restriction endonuclease digestion. The restriction cleavage map and the DNA sequence of a selected part of the inserted DNA are in complete accordance with the amino-acid sequence of soybean leghemoglobin.

  20. PredyFlexy: flexibility and local structure prediction from sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Craveur, Pierrick; Etchebest, Catherine; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Protein structures are necessary for understanding protein function at a molecular level. Dynamics and flexibility of protein structures are also key elements of protein function. So, we have proposed to look at protein flexibility using novel methods: (i) using a structural alphabet and (ii) combining classical X-ray B-factor data and molecular dynamics simulations. First, we established a library composed of structural prototypes (LSPs) to describe protein structure by a limited set of recu...

  1. Fraisse sequences: category-theoretic approach to universal homogeneous structures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubi?, Wieslaw

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 165, ?. 11 (2014), s. 1755-1811. ISSN 0168-0072 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GAP201/12/0290 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : universal homogeneous object * Fraissé sequence * amalgamation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.548, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168007214000773

  2. Quantized conductance through reconfigurable 1D channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shicheng; Annadi, Anil; Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Huang, Mengchen; Lee, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Sangwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) system has become a model system to investigate various exotic ground states of condensed matter physics. This system can co-host superconductivity, magnetism, and strong spin-orbit coupling at 2D interfaces which led to predictions of exotic phenomena such as unconventional superconductivity, helical/chiral modes, and Majorana phases in these interfaces. In order to explore these exotic phases high quality 1D devices are desirable. We demonstrate the realization of a gate tunable quantum point contact (QPC) structure embedded in a LAO/STO nanowire created using conductive AFM lithography. We observe integer quantized conductance in the units of e2 / h at high magnetic fields (B = 9 Tesla, T = 50 mK),a signature of the existence of 1D quantum channels. Significantly, we observe quantized conduction for nanowires as long as 1 ?m, implying that transport is ballistic along the magnetic-field induced chiral edge states in these devices. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and Grants: AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0524 and FA9550-12-1-0268), NSF (DMR-1124131 and DMR-1104191). AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  3. Structure of a Functional Amyloid Protein Subunit Computed Using Sequence Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Pengfei; Boomsma, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Functional amyloid fibers, called curli, play a critical role in adhesion and invasion of many bacteria. Unlike pathological amyloids, curli structures are formed by polypeptide sequences whose amyloid structure has been selected for during evolution. This important distinction provides us with an opportunity to obtain structural insights from an unexpected source: the covariation of amino acids in sequences of different curli proteins. We used recently developed methods to extract amino acid contacts from a multiple sequence alignment of homologues of the curli subunit protein, CsgA. Together with an efficient force field, these contacts allow us to determine structural models of CsgA. We find that CsgA forms a ?-helical structure, where each turn corresponds to previously identified repeat sequences in CsgA. The proposed structure is validated by previously measured solid-state NMR, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction data, and agrees with an earlier proposed model derived by complementary means.

  4. PROMALS3D: a tool for multiple protein sequence and structure alignments

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Jimin; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V.

    2008-01-01

    Although multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) are essential for a wide range of applications from structure modeling to prediction of functional sites, construction of accurate MSAs for distantly related proteins remains a largely unsolved problem. The rapidly increasing database of spatial structures is a valuable source to improve alignment quality. We explore the use of 3D structural information to guide sequence alignments constructed by our MSA program PROMALS. The resulting tool, PROMALS...

  5. Structure of a Functional Amyloid Protein Subunit Computed Using Sequence Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Pengfei; Boomsma, Wouter; Wang, Yong; Otzen, Daniel; Jensen, Mogens H; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2015-01-01

    Functional amyloid fibers, called curli, play a critical role in adhesion and invasion of many bacteria. Unlike pathological amyloids, curli structures are formed by polypeptide sequences whose amyloid structure has been selected for during evolution. This important distinction provides us with an opportunity to obtain structural insights from an unexpected source: the covariation of amino acids in sequences of different curli proteins. We used recently developed methods to extract amino acid co...

  6. A model of evolution and structure for multiple sequence alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Löytynoja, Ari; Goldman, Nick

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a phylogeny-aware progressive alignment method that recognizes insertions and deletions as distinct evolutionary events and thus avoids systematic errors created by traditional alignment methods. We now extend this method to simultaneously model regional heterogeneity and evolution. This novel method can be flexibly adapted to alignment of nucleotide or amino acid sequences evolving under processes that vary over genomic regions and, being fully probabilistic, provides an es...

  7. Structure and Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Norbert S. Schulz; Allen, Glenn; Bautz, Mark W.; Canizares, Claude C.; Davis, John; Dewey, Dan; Huenemoerder, David P.; Heilmann, Ralf; Houck, John; Marshall, Herman L; Nowak, Mike; Schattenburg, Mark; Audard, Marc; Drake, Jeremy; Gagne, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars are strong and variable X-ray emitters, as has been well established by EINSTEIN and ROSAT observatories. It was originally believed that this emission was of thermal nature and primarily originated from coronal activity (magnetically confined loops, in analogy with Solar activity) on contracting young stars. Broadband spectral analysis showed that the emission was not isothermal and that elemental abundances were non-Solar. The resolvi...

  8. Structural and Sequence Motifs of Protein (Histone) Methylation Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xiaodong; Collins, Robert E.; Zhang, Xing

    2005-01-01

    With genome sequencing nearing completion for the model organisms used in biomedical research, there is a rapidly growing appreciation that proteomics, the study of covalent modification to proteins, and transcriptional regulation will likely dominate the research headlines in the next decade. Protein methylation plays a central role in both of these fields, as several different residues (Arg, Lys, Gln) are methylated in cells and methylation plays a central role in the “histone code” that re...

  9. The Study of Correlation Structures of DNA Sequences A Critical Review

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    1997-01-01

    The study of correlation structure in the primary sequences of DNA is reviewed. The issues reviewed include: symmetries among 16 base-base correlation functions, accurate estimation of correlation measures, the relationship between $1/f$ and Lorentzian spectra, heterogeneity in DNA sequences, different modeling strategies of the correlation structure of DNA sequences, the difference of correlation structure between coding and non-coding regions (besides the period-3 pattern), and source of broad distribution of domain sizes. Although some of the results remain controversial, a body of work on this topic constitutes a good starting point for future studies.

  10. Effects of Template Sequence and Secondary Structure on DNA-Templated Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, Thomas M.; Tse, Brian N.; Liu, David R.

    2008-01-01

    DNA-templated organic synthesis enables the translation, selection, and amplification of DNA sequences encoding synthetic small-molecule libraries. As the size of DNA-templated libraries increases, the possibility of forming intramolecularly base-paired structures within templates that impede templated reactions increases as well. In order to achieve uniform reactivity across many template sequences and to computationally predict and remove any problematic sequences from DNA-templated librari...

  11. Sequence and structure of the dopa decarboxylase gene of Drosophila: evidence for novel RNA splicing variants.

    OpenAIRE

    Eveleth, D D; Gietz, R. D.; Spencer, C. A.; Nargang, F. E.; Hodgetts, R B; Marsh, J L

    1986-01-01

    In Drosophila, dopa decarboxylase (DDC) serves a dual role in neurotransmitter production and sclerotization of the cuticle. The Ddc gene is under complex hormonal and tissue-specific control and several sizes of Ddc RNA are observed at embryonic hatching, pupariation and adult eclosion. We present here the complete nucleotide sequence of the Drosophila dopa decarboxylase gene and the partial sequence of two corresponding Ddc cDNAs. The sequence allows us to account for the detailed structure...

  12. Allelic diversity and population structure of Bacillus sphaericus as revealed by multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yong; Hu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Dasheng; Wu, Yiming; Yuan, Zhiming

    2011-08-01

    The genetic diversity of 35 Bacillus sphaericus strains was analyzed by a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, toxin gene pool survey, and mosquito bioassay. The results demonstrated that strains assigned to the same sequence type (ST) had the same occurrence of toxin genes. Further sequence analysis revealed that toxic strains presented a nearly clonal population structure, whereas nontoxic strains had a high level of heterogeneity and were significantly distinct from toxic strains. PMID:21685170

  13. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure of Bacillus sphaericus as Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Typing ? †

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Yong; Hu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Dasheng; Wu, Yiming; Yuan, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 35 Bacillus sphaericus strains was analyzed by a newly developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, toxin gene pool survey, and mosquito bioassay. The results demonstrated that strains assigned to the same sequence type (ST) had the same occurrence of toxin genes. Further sequence analysis revealed that toxic strains presented a nearly clonal population structure, whereas nontoxic strains had a high level of heterogeneity and were significantly distinct from to...

  14. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.; Brunak, Søren; Ussery, David

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms of...... different origin, The typical genomic periodicity for Bacteria is 11 bp whilst it is 10 bp for Archaea, Eukaryotes have more complex spectra but the dominant period in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is 10.2 bp. These periodicities are most likely reflective of differences in chromatin structure....

  15. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms of different origin, The typical genomic periodicity for Bacteria is 11 bp whilst it is 10 bp for Archaea, Eukaryotes have more complex spectra but the dominant period in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is 10.2 bp. These periodicities are most likely reflective of differences in chromatin structure.

  16. Unraveling the sequence and structure of the protein osteocalcin from a 42 ka fossil horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrom, Peggy H.; Gandhi, Hasand; Strahler, John R.; Walker, Angela K.; Andrews, Philip C.; Leykam, Joseph; Stafford, Thomas W.; Kelly, Robert L.; Walker, Danny N.; Buckley, Mike; Humpula, James

    2006-04-01

    We report the first complete amino acid sequence and evidence of secondary structure for osteocalcin from a temperate fossil. The osteocalcin derives from a 42 ka equid bone excavated from Juniper Cave, Wyoming. Results were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and Edman sequencing with independent confirmation of the sequence in two laboratories. The ancient sequence was compared to that of three modern taxa: horse ( Equus caballus), zebra ( Equus grevyi), and donkey ( Equus asinus). Although there was no difference in sequence among modern taxa, MALDI-MS and Edman sequencing show that residues 48 and 49 of our modern horse are Thr, Ala rather than Pro, Val as previously reported (Carstanjen B., Wattiez, R., Armory, H., Lepage, O.M., Remy, B., 2002. Isolation and characterization of equine osteocalcin. Ann. Med. Vet.146(1), 31-38). MALDI-MS and Edman sequencing data indicate that the osteocalcin sequence of the 42 ka fossil is similar to that of modern horse. Previously inaccessible structural attributes for ancient osteocalcin were observed. Glu 39 rather than Gln 39 is consistent with deamidation, a process known to occur during fossilization and aging. Two post-translational modifications were documented: Hyp 9 and a disulfide bridge. The latter suggests at least partial retention of secondary structure. As has been done for ancient DNA research, we recommend standards for preparation and criteria for authenticating results of ancient protein sequencing.

  17. Interfacing sequences and structures of proteins: applications to protein annotation and sequence feature visualization

    OpenAIRE

    David, Fabrice Pierre André

    2009-01-01

    L’annotation présente dans UniProtKB (UniProt Knowledgebase) et les structures 3D dans PDB (Protein Data Bank) sont des sources de données importantes et complémentaires pour décrire la fonction et les caractéristiques des protéines. D’une part, une fraction de l’annotation séquentielle présente dans UniProtKB est générée à partir de données structurales. D’autre part, le transfert d’annotations séquentielles sur les structures peut souvent fournir un niveau supérieur de compréhension quant à...

  18. Content, Structure, and Sequence of the Detailing Discipline at Kendall College of Art and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Bruce E.

    A study identified the appropriate general content, structure, and sequence for a detailing discipline that promoted student achievement to professional levels. Its focus was the detailing discipline, a sequence of studio courses within the furniture design program at Kendall College of Art and Design, Grand Rapids, Michigan. (Detailing, an…

  19. Implicit Structured Sequence Learning: An FMRI Study of the Structural Mere-Exposure Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl MagnusPetersson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this event-related FMRI study we investigated the effect of five days of implicit acquisition on preference classification by means of an artificial grammar learning (AGL paradigm based on the structural mere-exposure effect and preference classification using a simple right-linear unification grammar. This allowed us to investigate implicit AGL in a proper learning design by including baseline measurements prior to grammar exposure. After 5 days of implicit acquisition, the FMRI results showed activations in a network of brain regions including the inferior frontal (centered on BA 44/45 and the medial prefrontal regions (centered on BA 8/32. Importantly, and central to this study, the inclusion of a naive preference FMRI baseline measurement allowed us to conclude that these FMRI findings were the intrinsic outcomes of the learning process itself and not a reflection of a preexisting functionality recruited during classification, independent of acquisition. Support for the implicit nature of the knowledge utilized during preference classification on day 5 come from the fact that the basal ganglia, associated with implicit procedural learning, were activated during classification, while the medial temporal lobe system, associated with explicit declarative memory, was consistently deactivated. Thus, preference classification in combination with structural mere-exposure can be used to investigate structural sequence processing (syntax in unsupervised AGL paradigms with proper learning designs.

  20. Sequence based characterization of structural variation in the mouse genome

    OpenAIRE

    Yalcin, B.; Wong, K.; Agam, A; Goodson, M; Keane, TM; Gan, X; Nellåker, C; Goodstadt, L; Nicod, J; Bhomra, A.; Hernandez-Pliego, P; Whitley, H; Cleak, J; Dutton, R; Janowitz, D

    2011-01-01

    Structural variation is widespread in mammalian genomes and is an important cause of disease, but just how abundant and important structural variants (SVs) are in shaping phenotypic variation remains unclear. Without knowing how many SVs there are, and how they arise, it is difficult to discover what they do. Combining experimental with automated analyses, we identified 711,920 SVs at 281,243 sites in the genomes of thirteen classical and four wild-derived inbred mouse strains. The majority o...

  1. Structure of fault zones in cohesive volcanic sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Normal fault systems are basic features in commercially important geological structures like e.g. sedimentary basins. While the interpretation of seismic data sets reveals the structure of the strata and its offset by larger faults, the properties of the fault planes itself remain undetermined. The information on e.g. permeability of laterally confined fault systems is derived from outcrops or theoretical models. The scope of the faulting research focuses on softer unconsolidated materials as...

  2. Progressive structure-based alignment of homologous proteins: Adopting sequence comparison strategies.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; De Brevern, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of multiple protein structures has a broad range of applications in the analysis of protein structure, function and evolution. Multiple structure alignment tools (MSTAs) are necessary to obtain a simultaneous comparison of a family of related folds. In this study, we have developed a method for multiple structure comparison largely based on sequence alignment techniques. A widely used Structural Alphabet named Protein Blocks (PBs) was used to transform the information on 3D protein...

  3. The Homeodomain Resource: sequences, structures, DNA binding sites and genomic information

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee-Basu, Sharmila; Sink, Daniel W.; Baxevanis, Andreas D.

    2001-01-01

    The Homeodomain Resource is an annotated collection of non-redundant protein sequences, three-dimensional structures and genomic information for the homeodomain protein family. Release 3.0 contains 795 full-length homeodomain-containing sequences, 32 experimentally-derived structures and 143 homeo­box loci implicated in human genetic disorders. Entries are fully hyperlinked to facilitate easy retrieval of the original records from source databases. A simple search engi...

  4. PROMALS3D: multiple protein sequence alignment enhanced with evolutionary and 3-dimensional structural information

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential tool with many applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Accurate MSA construction for divergent proteins remains a difficult computational task. The constantly increasing protein sequences and structures in public databases could be used to improve alignment quality. PROMALS3D is a tool for protein MSA construction enhanced with additional evolutionary and structural information from database searches. PROMALS3D automatically ...

  5. MODexplorer: an integrated tool for exploring protein sequence, structure and function relationships.

    KAUST Repository

    Kosinski, Jan

    2013-02-08

    SUMMARY: MODexplorer is an integrated tool aimed at exploring the sequence, structural and functional diversity in protein families useful in homology modeling and in analyzing protein families in general. It takes as input either the sequence or the structure of a protein and provides alignments with its homologs along with a variety of structural and functional annotations through an interactive interface. The annotations include sequence conservation, similarity scores, ligand-, DNA- and RNA-binding sites, secondary structure, disorder, crystallographic structure resolution and quality scores of models implied by the alignments to the homologs of known structure. MODexplorer can be used to analyze sequence and structural conservation among the structures of similar proteins, to find structures of homologs solved in different conformational state or with different ligands and to transfer functional annotations. Furthermore, if the structure of the query is not known, MODexplorer can be used to select the modeling templates taking all this information into account and to build a comparative model. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Freely available on the web at http://modorama.biocomputing.it/modexplorer. Website implemented in HTML and JavaScript with all major browsers supported. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Quantitative 1D saturation profiles on chalk by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dan; Topp, Simon; Stensgaard, Anders; Nørgaard, Jens Vinther; Reffstrup, Jens

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative one-dimensional saturation profiles showing the distribution of water and oil in chalk core samples are calculated from NMR measurements utilizing a 1D CSI spectroscopy pulse sequence. Saturation profiles may be acquired under conditions of fluid flow through the sample. Results reveal that strong saturation gradients exist in chalk core samples after core floods, due to capillary effects. The method is useful in analysis of corefloods, e.g., for determination of capillary pressure ...

  7. Four basic symmetry types in the universal 7-cluster structure of 143 complete bacterial genomic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, A N; Zinovyev, A Yu

    2011-01-01

    Coding information is the main source of heterogeneity (non-randomness) in the sequences of bacterial genomes. This information can be naturally modeled by analysing cluster structures in the "in-phase" triplet distributions of relatively short genomic fragments (200-400bp). We found a universal 7-cluster structure in bacterial genomic sequences and explained its properties. We show that codon usage of bacterial genomes is a multi-linear function of their genomic G+C-content with high accuracy. Based on the analysis of 143 completely sequenced bacterial genomes available in Genbank in August 2004, we show that there are four "pure" types of the 7-cluster structure observed. All 143 cluster animated 3D-scatters are collected in a database and is made available on our web-site: http://www.ihes.fr/~zinovyev/7clusters The finding can be readily introduced into any software for gene prediction, sequence alignment or bacterial genomes classification.

  8. Genome-Wide Probing of RNA Structures In Vitro Using Nucleases and Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure probing is an important technique that studies the secondary and tertiary conformations of an RNA. While it was traditionally performed on one RNA at a time, recent advances in deep sequencing has enabled the secondary structure mapping of thousands of RNAs simultaneously. Here, we describe the method Parallel Analysis for RNA Structures (PARS), which couples double and single strand specific nuclease probing to high throughput sequencing. Upon cloning of the cleavage sites into a cDNA library, deep sequencing and mapping of reads to the transcriptome, the position of paired and unpaired bases along cellular RNAs can be identified. PARS can be performed under diverse solution conditions and on different organismal RNAs to provide genome-wide RNA structural information. This information can also be further used to constrain computational predictions to provide better RNA structure models under different conditions. PMID:26483021

  9. SPARCS: a web server to analyze (un)structured regions in coding RNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Ponty, Yann; Blanchette, Mathieu; Lécuyer, Eric; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    More than a simple carrier of the genetic information, messenger RNA (mRNA) coding regions can also harbor functional elements that evolved to control different post-transcriptional processes, such as mRNA splicing, localization and translation. Functional elements in RNA molecules are often encoded by secondary structure elements. In this aticle, we introduce Structural Profile Assignment of RNA Coding Sequences (SPARCS), an efficient method to analyze the (secondary) structure profile of protein-coding regions in mRNAs. First, we develop a novel algorithm that enables us to sample uniformly the sequence landscape preserving the dinucleotide frequency and the encoded amino acid sequence of the input mRNA. Then, we use this algorithm to generate a set of artificial sequences that is used to estimate the Z-score of classical structural metrics such as the sum of base pairing probabilities and the base pairing entropy. Finally, we use these metrics to predict structured and unstructured regions in the input mRNA sequence. We applied our methods to study the structural profile of the ASH1 genes and recovered key structural elements. A web server implementing this discovery pipeline is available at http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/sparcs together with the source code of the sampling algorithm. PMID:23748952

  10. Protein secondary structure prediction for a single-sequence using hidden semi-Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction has been improving steadily towards the 88% estimated theoretical limit. There are two types of prediction algorithms: Single-sequence prediction algorithms imply that information about other (homologous proteins is not available, while algorithms of the second type imply that information about homologous proteins is available, and use it intensively. The single-sequence algorithms could make an important contribution to studies of proteins with no detected homologs, however the accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction from a single-sequence is not as high as when the additional evolutionary information is present. Results In this paper, we further refine and extend the hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM initially considered in the BSPSS algorithm. We introduce an improved residue dependency model by considering the patterns of statistically significant amino acid correlation at structural segment borders. We also derive models that specialize on different sections of the dependency structure and incorporate them into HSMM. In addition, we implement an iterative training method to refine estimates of HSMM parameters. The three-state-per-residue accuracy and other accuracy measures of the new method, IPSSP, are shown to be comparable or better than ones for BSPSS as well as for PSIPRED, tested under the single-sequence condition. Conclusions We have shown that new dependency models and training methods bring further improvements to single-sequence protein secondary structure prediction. The results are obtained under cross-validation conditions using a dataset with no pair of sequences having significant sequence similarity. As new sequences are added to the database it is possible to augment the dependency structure and obtain even higher accuracy. Current and future advances should contribute to the improvement of function prediction for orphan proteins inscrutable to current similarity search methods.

  11. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  12. Community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in undisturbed vegetation revealed by analyses of LSU rdna sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren; Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots and are found in most ecosystems. In this study the community structure of AMF in a clade of the genus Glomus was examined in undisturbed costal grassland using LSU rDNA sequences amplified from roots of Hieracium pilosella. Roots were sampled from May to November along eight 30-m transects, 30–120 m apart. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed 11 phylogenetic clusters within the clade of Glomus. The phylo...

  13. Using structural motif descriptors for sequence-based binding site prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Wan; Winter Christof; Henschel Andreas; Schroeder Michael

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Many protein sequences are still poorly annotated. Functional characterization of a protein is often improved by the identification of its interaction partners. Here, we aim to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI) and protein-ligand interactions (PLI) on sequence level using 3D information. To this end, we use machine learning to compile sequential segments that constitute structural features of an interaction site into one profile Hidden Markov Model descriptor. The...

  14. A Java applet for multiple linked visualization of protein structure and sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Thomas J

    2004-04-01

    The amount of biological data available from experimental techniques is huge, and rapidly expanding. The ability to make sense of this vast amount of data requires that we make correlations between distinct biological disciplines using visualization techniques to highlight the critical information. This article describes the visualization techniques of dynamic data brushing, view context maintenance, fisheye sequence view, and a magic lens that have been developed to display protein structure and sequence information. PMID:15562987

  15. Evolutionary Analyses of DNA Sequences Subject to Constraints on Secondary Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Muse, S V

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary models appropriate for analyzing nucleotide sequences that are subject to constraints on secondary structure are developed. The models consider the evolution of pairs of nucleotides, and they incorporate the effects of base-pairing constraints on nucleotide substitution rates by introducing a new parameter to extensions of standard models of sequence evolution. To illustrate some potential uses of the models, a likelihood-ratio test is constructed for the null hypothesis that two...

  16. Large Scale Identification and Categorization of Protein Sequences Using Structured Logistic Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panella; Ifrim, Georgiana; Liboriussen, Poul; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Palmgren, Michael G.; Nissen, Poul; Wiuf, Carsten Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Structured Logistic Regression (SLR) is a newly developed machine learning tool first proposed in the context of text categorization. Current availability of extensive protein sequence databases calls for an automated method to reliably classify sequences and SLR seems well-suited for this task. The classification of P-type ATPases, a large family of ATP-driven membrane pumps transporting essential cations, was selected as a test-case that would generate important biological ...

  17. Automatic phylogenetic classification of bacterial beta-lactamase sequences including structural and antibiotic substrate preference information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianmin; Eisenhaber, Frank; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2013-12-01

    Beta lactams comprise the largest and still most effective group of antibiotics, but bacteria can gain resistance through different beta lactamases that can degrade these antibiotics. We developed a user friendly tree building web server that allows users to assign beta lactamase sequences to their respective molecular classes and subclasses. Further clinically relevant information includes if the gene is typically chromosomal or transferable through plasmids as well as listing the antibiotics which the most closely related reference sequences are known to target and cause resistance against. This web server can automatically build three phylogenetic trees: the first tree with closely related sequences from a Tachyon search against the NCBI nr database, the second tree with curated reference beta lactamase sequences, and the third tree built specifically from substrate binding pocket residues of the curated reference beta lactamase sequences. We show that the latter is better suited to recover antibiotic substrate assignments through nearest neighbor annotation transfer. The users can also choose to build a structural model for the query sequence and view the binding pocket residues of their query relative to other beta lactamases in the sequence alignment as well as in the 3D structure relative to bound antibiotics. This web server is freely available at http://blac.bii.a-star.edu.sg/. PMID:24372040

  18. A program for the identification of tRNA-like structures in DNA sequence data.

    OpenAIRE

    Marvel, C C

    1986-01-01

    A computer algorithm has been developed which identifies tRNA genes and tRNA-like structures in DNA sequences. The program searches the sequence string for specific base positions that correspond to the invariant and semi-invariant bases found in tRNAs. The tRNA nature of the sequence is confirmed by the presence of complementary base pairing at the tRNA's calculated 5' and 3' ends (which in situ constitutes the amino-acyl stem region). The program achieves greater than 96% accuracy when run ...

  19. Main: 1D6R [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1D6R 大豆 Soybean Glycine max (L.) Merrill Bowman-Birk Type Proteinase Inhibitor Precursor Glyci ... Warkentin, G.Wenzl, P.Flecker Crystal Structure Of Cancer ... Chemopreventive Bowman-Birk Inhibitor In Ternary C ...

  20. Simulation of Organic Solar Cells Using AMPS-1D Program

    OpenAIRE

    Samah. G. Babiker; Yong Shuai

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of microelectronic and photonic structure in one dimension program [AMPS-1D] program has been successfully used to study inorganic solar cells. In this work the program has been used to optimize the performance of the organic solar cells. The cells considered consist of poly(2-methoxy-5-(3,7- dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) [MDMO-PPV

  1. Comparative analysis of MR sequences to detect structural brain lesions in tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a neurocutaneous genetically inherited disease with variable penetrance characterized by dysplasias and hamartomas affecting multiple organs. MR is the imaging method of choice to demonstrate structural brain lesions in TS. To compare MR sequences and determine which is most useful for the demonstration of each type of brain lesion in TS patients. We reviewed MR scans of 18 TS patients for the presence of cortical tubers, white matter lesions (radial bands), subependymal nodules, and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA) on the following sequences: (1) T1-weighted spin-echo (T1 SE) images before and after gadolinium (Gd) injection; (2) nonenhanced T1 SE sequence with an additional magnetization transfer contrast medium pulse on resonance (T1 SE/MTC); and (3) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Cortical tubers were found in significantly (P<0.05) larger numbers and more conspicuously in FLAIR and T1 SE/MTC sequences. The T1 SE/MTC sequence was far superior to other methods in detecting white matter lesions (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between the T1 SE/MTC and T1 SE (before and after Gd injection) sequences in the detection of subependymal nodules; FLAIR sequence showed less sensitivity than the others in identifying the nodules. T1 SE sequences after Gd injection demonstrated better the limits of the SGCA. We demonstrated the importance of appropriate MRI sequences for diagnosis of the most frequent brain lesions in TS. Our study reinforces the fact that each sequence has a particular application according to the type of TS lesion. Gd injection might be useful in detecting SGCA; however, the parameters of size and location are also important for a presumptive diagnosis of these tumors. (orig.)

  2. 1D WCIP and FEM hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Caroline; Raveu, Nathalie; Perrussel, Ronan; Li, Jia; Lanteri, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The hybridization between two numerical methods, the 1D Wave Concept Iterative Procedure (WCIP) and the 2D Finite Element Method (FEM), is introduced. Preliminary numerical results are also presented.

  3. MUMMALS: multiple sequence alignment improved by using hidden Markov models with local structural information

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed MUMMALS, a program to construct multiple protein sequence alignment using probabilistic consistency. MUMMALS improves alignment quality by using pairwise alignment hidden Markov models (HMMs) with multiple match states that describe local structural information without exploiting explicit structure predictions. Parameters for such models have been estimated from a large library of structure-based alignments. We show that (i) on remote homologs, MUMMALS achieves statistically...

  4. The PETfold and PETcofold web servers for intra- and intermolecular structures of multiple RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Menzel, Karl Peter; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The function of non-coding RNA genes largely depends on their secondary structure and the interaction with other molecules. Thus, an accurate prediction of secondary structure and RNA-RNA interaction is essential for the understanding of biological roles and pathways associated with a specific RNA gene. We present web servers to analyze multiple RNA sequences for common RNA structure and for RNA interaction sites. The web servers are based on the recent PET (Probabilistic Evolutionary and Thermo...

  5. A two-layer $\\alpha\\omega$ dynamo model, and its implications for 1-D dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Roald, C B

    1999-01-01

    I will discuss an attempt at representing an interface dynamo in a simplified, essentially 1D framework. The operation of the dynamo is broken up into two 1D layers, one containing the $\\alpha$ effect and the other containing the $\\omega$ effect, and these two layers are allowed to communicate with each other by the simplest possible representation of diffusion, an analogue of Newton's law of cooling. Dynamical back-reaction of the magnetic field on them with diagrams I computed for a comparable purely 1D model. The bifurcation structure shows remarkable similarity, but a couple of subtle changes imply dramatically different physical behaviour for the model. In particular, the solar-like dynamo mode found in the 1-layer model is not stable in the 2-layer version; instead there is an (apparent) homoclinic bifurcation and a sequence of periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic modes. I argue that the fragility of these models makes them effectively useless as predictors or interpreters of more complex dynamos.

  6. Polaron in a quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire

    OpenAIRE

    I.Nsangou; S.Maabou; Monteil, A; Teboul, V.; L.C.Fai

    2005-01-01

    Polaron states in a quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire with a parabolic confinement potential are investigated applying the Feynman variational principle. The effect of the wire radius on the polaron ground state energy level, the mass and the Fröhlich electron-phonon-coupling constant are obtained for the case of a quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire. The effect of anisotropy of the structure on the polaron ground state energy level and the mass are also investigated. It is observed that as th...

  7. Collation and analyses of DNA-binding protein domain families from sequence and structural databanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sony; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-04-01

    DNA-protein interactions govern several high fidelity cellular processes like DNA-replication, transcription, DNA repair, etc. Proteins that have the ability to recognise and bind DNA sequences can be classified either according to their DNA-binding motif or based on the sequence of the target nucleotides. We have collated the DNA-binding families by integrating information from both protein sequence family and structural databases. This resulted in a dataset of 1057 DNA-binding protein domain families. Their family properties (the number of members, percent identity distribution and length of members) and domain architectures were examined. Further, sequence domain families were mapped to structures in the protein databank (PDB) and the protein domain structure classification database (SCOP). The DNA-binding families, with no structural information, were clustered together into potential superfamilies based on sequence associations. On the basis of functions attributed to DNA-binding protein folds, we observe that a majority of the DNA-binding proteins follow divergent evolution. This study can serve as a basis for annotation and distribution of DNA-binding proteins in genome(s) of interest. The entire collated set of DNA-binding protein domains is available for download as Hidden Markov Models. PMID:25656606

  8. SeqHound: biological sequence and structure database as a platform for bioinformatics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SeqHound has been developed as an integrated biological sequence, taxonomy, annotation and 3-D structure database system. It provides a high-performance server platform for bioinformatics research in a locally-hosted environment. Results SeqHound is based on the National Center for Biotechnology Information data model and programming tools. It offers daily updated contents of all Entrez sequence databases in addition to 3-D structural data and information about sequence redundancies, sequence neighbours, taxonomy, complete genomes, functional annotation including Gene Ontology terms and literature links to PubMed. SeqHound is accessible via a web server through a Perl, C or C++ remote API or an optimized local API. It provides functionality necessary to retrieve specialized subsets of sequences, structures and structural domains. Sequences may be retrieved in FASTA, GenBank, ASN.1 and XML formats. Structures are available in ASN.1, XML and PDB formats. Emphasis has been placed on complete genomes, taxonomy, domain and functional annotation as well as 3-D structural functionality in the API, while fielded text indexing functionality remains under development. SeqHound also offers a streamlined WWW interface for simple web-user queries. Conclusions The system has proven useful in several published bioinformatics projects such as the BIND database and offers a cost-effective infrastructure for research. SeqHound will continue to develop and be provided as a service of the Blueprint Initiative at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute. The source code and examples are available under the terms of the GNU public license at the Sourceforge site http://sourceforge.net/projects/slritools/ in the SLRI Toolkit.

  9. The structure contours of the Calico sequence boundary in the Kaiparowits Plateau, southern Utah (csbstrc*g)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a polygon coverage of the structure contours of the Calico sequence boundary in the Kaiparowits Plateau, southern Utah. Sequence boundary elevations are...

  10. Integrated view of genome structure and sequence of a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold

    2013-01-01

    We show how a bird’s-eye view of genomic structure can be obtained at ?1-kb resolution from long (?2 Mb) DNA molecules extracted from whole chromosomes in a nanofluidic laboratoryon-a-chip. We use an improved single-molecule denaturation mapping approach to detect repetitive elements and known as well as unique structural variation. Following its mapping, a molecule of interest was rescued fromthe chip;amplified and localized to a chromosome by FISH; and interrogated down to 1-bp resolution with a commercial sequencer, thereby reconciling haplotype-phased chromosome substructure with sequence.

  11. Integrated view of genome structure and sequence of a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Rodolphe; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; L. V. Bauer, David; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Yusuf, Mohammed; Volpi, Emanuela; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Kristensen, Anders; U. Mirb, Kalim

    2013-01-01

    We show how a bird’s-eye view of genomic structure can be obtained at ∼1-kb resolution from long (∼2 Mb) DNA molecules extracted from whole chromosomes in a nanofluidic laboratoryon-a-chip. We use an improved single-molecule denaturation mapping approach to detect repetitive elements and known as...... well as unique structural variation. Following its mapping, a molecule of interest was rescued fromthe chip;amplified and localized to a chromosome by FISH; and interrogated down to 1-bp resolution with a commercial sequencer, thereby reconciling haplotype-phased chromosome substructure with sequence....

  12. Computational Design of the Sequence and Structure of a Protein-Binding Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Bosch, Dustin E.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Purbeck, Carrie; Machius, Mischa; Siderovski, David P.; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC)

    2012-08-10

    The de novo design of protein-binding peptides is challenging because it requires the identification of both a sequence and a backbone conformation favorable for binding. We used a computational strategy that iterates between structure and sequence optimization to redesign the C-terminal portion of the RGS14 GoLoco motif peptide so that it adopts a new conformation when bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}. An X-ray crystal structure of the redesigned complex closely matches the computational model, with a backbone root-mean-square deviation of 1.1 {angstrom}.

  13. Computational Design of the Sequence and Structure of a Protein-Binding Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Bosch, Dustin E.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Purbeck, Carrie; Machius, Mischa; Siderovski, David P; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The de novo design of protein-binding peptides is challenging, because it requires identifying both a sequence and a backbone conformation favorable for binding. We used a computational strategy that iterates between structure and sequence optimization to redesign the C-terminal portion of the RGS14 GoLoco motif peptide so that it adopts a new conformation when bound to G?i1. An X-ray crystal structure of the redesigned complex closely matches the computational model, with a backbone RMSD of ...

  14. Computational design of the sequence and structure of a protein-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammond, Deanne W; Bosch, Dustin E; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Purbeck, Carrie; Machius, Mischa; Siderovski, David P; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-03-30

    The de novo design of protein-binding peptides is challenging because it requires the identification of both a sequence and a backbone conformation favorable for binding. We used a computational strategy that iterates between structure and sequence optimization to redesign the C-terminal portion of the RGS14 GoLoco motif peptide so that it adopts a new conformation when bound to G?(i1). An X-ray crystal structure of the redesigned complex closely matches the computational model, with a backbone root-mean-square deviation of 1.1 Å. PMID:21388199

  15. Developing 1D nanostructure arrays for future nanophotonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooke DG

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThere is intense and growing interest in one-dimensional (1-D nanostructures from the perspective of their synthesis and unique properties, especially with respect to their excellent optical response and an ability to form heterostructures. This review discusses alternative approaches to preparation and organization of such structures, and their potential properties. In particular, molecular-scale printing is highlighted as a method for creating organized pre-cursor structure for locating nanowires, as well as vapor–liquid–solid (VLS templated growth using nano-channel alumina (NCA, and deposition of 1-D structures with glancing angle deposition (GLAD. As regards novel optical properties, we discuss as an example, finite size photonic crystal cavity structures formed from such nanostructure arrays possessing highQand small mode volume, and being ideal for developing future nanolasers.

  16. Independent premotor encoding of the sequence and structure of birdsong in avian cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basista, Mark J; Elliott, Kevin C; Wu, Wei; Hyson, Richard L; Bertram, Richard; Johnson, Frank

    2014-12-10

    How the brain coordinates rapid sequences of learned behavior, such as human speech, remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Birdsong is a model of such behavior, which is learned and controlled by a neural circuit that spans avian cortex, basal ganglia, and thalamus. The songs of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), produced as rapid sequences of vocal gestures (syllables), are encoded by the cortical premotor region HVC (proper name). While the motor encoding of song within HVC has traditionally been viewed as unitary and distributed, we used an ablation technique to ask whether the sequence and structure of song are processed independently within HVC. Results revealed a functional topography across the medial-lateral axis of HVC. Bilateral ablation of medial HVC induced a positive disruption of song (increase in atypical syllable sequences), whereas bilateral ablation of lateral HVC induced a negative disruption (omission of individual syllables). Bilateral ablation of central HVC either had no effect on song or induced syllable omission, similar to lateral HVC ablation. We then investigated HVC connectivity and found parallel afferent and efferent pathways that transit medial and lateral HVC and converge at vocal motor cortex. In light of recent evidence that syntactic and lexical components of human speech are processed independently by neighboring regions of cortex (Menenti et al., 2012), our demonstration of anatomically distinct pathways that differentially process the sequence and structure of birdsong in parallel suggests that the vertebrate brain relies on a common approach to encode rapid sequences of vocal gestures. PMID:25505334

  17. Structural characterization of HDPE/LLDPE blend-based nano composites obtained by different blending sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blending sequence affects the morphology formation of the nanocomposites. In this work, the blending sequences were explored to determine its influence in the rheological behavior of HDPE/LLDPE/OMMT nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were obtained by melt-intercalation using a mixture of LLDPE-g-MA and HDPE-g-MA as compatibilizer system in a torque rheometer at 180 deg C and five blending sequences were studied. The materials structures were characterized by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and by rheological properties. The nanoclay's addition increased the shear viscosity at low shear rates, changing the behavior of HDPE/LLDPE matrix to a Bingham model behavior with an apparent yield stress. Intense interactions were obtained for the blending sequence where LLDPE and/or LLDPE-g-MA were first reinforced with organoclay since the intercalation process occurs preferentially in the amorphous phase. (author)

  18. Effects of GWAS-associated genetic variants on lncRNAs within IBD and T1D candidate loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq H; Kaur, Simranjeet

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs are a new class of non-coding RNAs that are at the crosshairs in many human diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune disease like Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Nearly 90% of the phenotype-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) lie outside of the protein coding regions, and map to the non-coding intervals. However, the relationship between phenotype-associated loci and the non-coding regions including the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is poorly understood. Here, we systemically identified all annotated IBD and T1D loci-associated lncRNAs, and mapped nominally significant GWAS/ImmunoChip SNPs for IBD and T1D within these lncRNAs. Additionally, we identified tissue-specific cis-eQTLs, and strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) signals associated with these SNPs. We explored sequence and structure based attributes of these lncRNAs, and also predicted the structuraleffects of mapped SNPs within them. We also identified lncRNAs in IBD and T1D that are under recent positive selection. Our analysis identified putative lncRNA secondary structure-disruptive SNPs within and in close proximity (+/-5 kb flanking regions) of IBD and T1D loci-associated candidate genes, suggesting that these RNA conformation-altering polymorphisms might be associated with diseased-phenotype. Disruption of lncRNA secondary structure due to presence of GWAS SNPs provides valuable information that could be potentially useful for future structure-function studies on lncRNAs.

  19. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  20. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and secondary structure play complementary roles during binding site recognition by SRSF1. Conclusion In this study, we presented a computational model to predict the sequence consensus and optimal RNA secondary structure for protein-RNA binding regions. The successful implementation on SRSF1 CLIP-seq data demonstrates great potential to improve our understanding on the binding specificity of RNA binding proteins.

  1. Reading the three-dimensional structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Broglia, R A

    2000-01-01

    While all the information required for the folding of a protein is contained in its amino acid sequence, one has not yet learnt how to extract this information so as to predict the detailed, biological active, three-dimensional structure of a protein whose sequence is known. This situation is not particularly satisfactory, in keeping with the fact that while linear sequencing of the amino acids specifying a protein is relatively simple to carry out, the determination of the folded-native-conformation can only be done by an elaborate X-ray diffraction analysis performed on crystals of the protein or, if the protein is very small, by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Using insight obtained from lattice model simulations of the folding of small proteins (fewer than 100 residues), in particular of the fact that this phenomenon is essentially controlled by conserved contacts among strongly interacting amino acids, which also stabilize local elementary structures formed early in the folding process and leading...

  2. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure determination of Mn (II) ion based 1D polymer constructed from 2, 2? bipyridyl and azide group, its thermal stability, magnetic properties and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudsainiyan, R. K.; Jassal, Amanpreet Kaur; Chawla, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    The 1-D polymeric complex (I) is having formula [Mn(2,2?-BP).(N3)2]n, which has been crystallized in distilled water and characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectrum, powder X-ray diffraction analyses and single-crystal diffraction analysis. This polymer possesses 1D helical chains or coils where Mn-azide-Mn forms the base of the coil which is alternatively garlanded by rigid bi-pyridine rings, where coordinates are in anti-fashion. The Mn (II) ions in the repeating units are linked by two end-on azide groups which extend through the two end-to-end azide ligands to the next unit forming a 1-D polymeric chain. The present study suggests that the use of this rigid and neutral building block leads to give better arrangement of the polymeric motif with [010] chains in 2-c uninodal net. During investigation of strong or weak intermolecular interactions, X-ray diffraction analysis and Hirshfeld surface analysis give rise to comparable results but in Hirshfeld surface analysis, two-third times more results of close contacts are obtained. The fingerprint plots demonstrate that these weak non-bonding interactions are important for stabilizing the crystal packing. Magnetic properties of the complex (I) were analyzed on the basis of an alternating ferro- and antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain of Mn (II) ions. The J-exchange parameters found are J1=64.3 K (45.3 cm-1), and J2=-75.7 K (-53.3 cm-1). Magnetic properties are discussed in comparison with those of other similar molecular magnets of [Mn(L-L)(N3)2]n type.

  3. Structural and Sequence Stratigraphic Analysis of the Onshore Nile Delta, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Moataz; Dominik, Wilhelm

    2010-05-01

    The Nile Delta is considered the earliest known delta in the world. It was already described by Herodotus in the 5th Century AC. Nowadays; the Nile Delta is an emerging giant gas province in the Middle East with proven gas reserves which have more than doubled in size in the last years. The Nile Delta basin contains a thick sedimentary sequence inferred to extend from Jurassic to recent time. Structural styles and depositional environments varied during this period. Facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy of the Nile Delta are resolved using seismic stratigraphy based on (2D seismic lines) including synthetic seismograms and tying in well log data. Synthetic seismograms were constructed using sonic and density logs. The combination of structural interpretation and sequence stratigraphy of the development of the basin was resolved. Seven chrono-stratigraphic boundaries have been identified and correlated on seismic and well log data. Several unconformity boundaries also identified on seismic lines range from angular to disconformity type. Furthermore, time structure maps, velocity maps, depth structure maps as well as Isopach maps were constructed using seismic lines and log data. Several structural features were identified: normal faults, growth faults, listric faults, secondary antithetic faults and large rotated fault blocks of manly Miocene age. In some cases minor rollover structures could be identified. Sedimentary features such as paleo-channels were distinctively recognized. Typical Sequence stratigraphic features such as incised valley, clinoforms, topsets, offlaps and onlaps are identified and traced on the seismic lines allowing a good insight into sequence stratigraphic history of the Nile Delta most especially in the Miocene to Pliocene clastic sedimentary succession.

  4. Multidimensional Inversion of MT data from Krýsuvík High Temperature Geothermal Field, SW Iceland, and study of how 1D and 2D inversion can reproduce a given 2D/3D resistivity structure using synthetic MT data

    OpenAIRE

    Lemma Didana, Yohannes, 1972-

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) methods are frequently used in the exploration of geothermal resources for determining the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity. Of the various EM methods, magnetotelluric (MT) method was found to be the most effective in defining a conductive reservoir at a depth exceeding 1 km overlain by a larger and more conductive clay cap. The two main objectives of this study are: firstly to explore how 1D and 2D inversion can reproduce a given 2D and 3D resistivity stru...

  5. Sequence divergence of Entamoeba histolytica tubulin is responsible for its altered tertiary structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atypical microtubular structures of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) have been attributed to amino acid sequence divergence of Eh tubulin. To investigate if this sequence divergence leads to significant differences in the tertiary structure of the Eh ??-tubulin heterodimer, we have modeled ??-tubulin heterodimer of Eh based on the crystal structure of mammalian tubulin. The predicted 3D homology model exhibits an overall resemblance with the known crystal structure of mammalian tubulin except for the 16 residue long carboxy terminal region of Eh ?-tubulin. We propose that this C-terminal region may provide steric hindrance in the polymerization of Eh ??-tubulin for microtubule formation. Using docking studies, we have identified the binding sites for different microtubule specific drugs on Eh ?-tubulin. Our model provides a rational framework, both for understanding the contribution of Eh?-tubulin C-terminal region to ??-tubulin polymerization and design of new anti-protozoan drugs in order to control amoebiasis

  6. Welding sequence effects on residual stress distribution in offshore wind monopile structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mehmanparast

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stresses are often inevitably introduced into the material during the fabrication processes, such as welding, and are known to have significant effects on the subsequent fatigue crack growth behavior of welded structures. In this paper, the importance of welding sequence on residual stress distribution in engineering components has been reviewed. In addition, the findings available in the literature have been used to provide an accurate interpretation of the fatigue crack growth data on specimens extracted from the welded plates employed in offshore wind monopile structures. The results have been discussed in terms of the role of welding sequence in damage inspection and structural integrity assessment of offshore renewable energy structures.

  7. Polaron in a quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Nsangou

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Polaron states in a quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire with a parabolic confinement potential are investigated applying the Feynman variational principle. The effect of the wire radius on the polaron ground state energy level, the mass and the Fröhlich electron-phonon-coupling constant are obtained for the case of a quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire. The effect of anisotropy of the structure on the polaron ground state energy level and the mass are also investigated. It is observed that as the wire radius tends to zero, the polaron mass and energy diverge logarithmically. The polaron mass and energy differ from the canonical strong-coupling behavior by the Fröhlich electron-phonon coupling constant and the radius of the quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire that are expressed through a logarithmic function. Moreover, it is observed that the polaron energy and mass for strong coupling for the case of the quasi 1D cylindrical quantum wire are greater than those for bulk crystals. It is also observed that the anisotropy of the structure considerably affects both the polaron ground state energy level and the mass. It is found that as the radius of the cylindrical wire reduces, the regimes of the weak and intermediate coupling polaron shorten while the region of the strong coupling polaron broadens and extends into those of the weak and intermediate ones. Analytic expressions for the polaron ground state energy level and mass are derived for the case of strong coupling polarons.

  8. Quasi-1D parahydrogen in nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Omiyinka, Tokunbo

    2015-01-01

    The low temperature physics of parahydrogen (ph2) confined in cylindrical channels of diameter of the order of 1 nm is studied theoretically by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. On varying the attractive strength of the wall of the cylindrical pore, as well as its diameter, the equilibrium phase evolves from a single quasi-1D channel along the axis, to a concentric cylindrical shell. It is found that the quasi-1D system retains a strong propensity to crystallization, even though on weakly attractive substrates quantum fluctuations reduce somewhat such a tendency compared to the purely 1D system. No evidence of a topologically protected superfluid phase (in the Luttinger sense) is observed. Implications on the possible existence of a bulk superfluid phase of parahydrogen are discussed

  9. Blood flow quantification using 1D CFD parameter identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Richard; Kowarschik, Markus; Maday, Peter; Katouzian, Amin; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir

    2014-03-01

    Patient-specific measurements of cerebral blood flow provide valuable diagnostic information concerning cerebrovascular diseases rather than visually driven qualitative evaluation. In this paper, we present a quantitative method to estimate blood flow parameters with high temporal resolution from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences. Using a 3D DSA dataset and a 2D+t DSA sequence, the proposed algorithm employs a 1D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for estimation of time-dependent flow values along a cerebral vessel, combined with an additional Advection Diffusion Equation (ADE) for contrast agent propagation. The CFD system, followed by the ADE, is solved with a finite volume approximation, which ensures the conservation of mass. Instead of defining a new imaging protocol to obtain relevant data, our cost function optimizes the bolus arrival time (BAT) of the contrast agent in 2D+t DSA sequences. The visual determination of BAT is common clinical practice and can be easily derived from and be compared to values, generated by a 1D-CFD simulation. Using this strategy, we ensure that our proposed method fits best to clinical practice and does not require any changes to the medical work flow. Synthetic experiments show that the recovered flow estimates match the ground truth values with less than 12% error in the mean flow rates.

  10. Analysis of Developmental Sequences within the Structural Approach: Conceptual, Empirical, and Methodological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Eberhard; Edelstein, Wolfgang

    In this paper conceptual and methodological issues in the analysis of developmental sequences are discussed. Conceptually, the reconstruction of the logic of acquisition calls for the use of task or structure analysis. Methodologically, it calls for an individual-oriented approach, the use of statement calculus for formulation of the postulated…

  11. Recognition of a sequence as a structure containing series of recurring vectors from an alphabet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel'manov, A. V.; Mikhailova, L. V.

    2013-07-01

    A polynomial-time algorithm is designed for finding an optimal solution of a discrete optimization problem to which a pattern recognition problem is reduced, namely, the noise-proof recognition of a sequence as a structure consisting of contiguous subsequences in the form of series of identical nonzero vectors from an alphabet of vectors in the Euclidean space that alternate with zero vectors.

  12. Multiple Sequence Alignments as Tools for Protein Structure and Function Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso Valencia

    2003-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignments have much to offer to the understanding of protein structure, evolution and function. We are developing approaches to use this information in predicting protein-binding specificity, intra-protein and protein-protein interactions, and in reconstructing protein interaction networks.

  13. The Continental Margin of Morocco: Seismic Sequences, Structural Elements and the Geological Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hinz, K.; Dostmann, H; Fritsch, J.

    1981-01-01

    Seismic sequences, structural elements and the geological development of the Moroccan continental margin, which is subdivided from the south to the north into the North Tarfaya segment, the Tafelney Plateau, the Essaouira segment the Mazagan Plateau, the Prerif segment, are discussed.

  14. Multiple Sequence Alignments as Tools for Protein Structure and Function Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Valencia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sequence alignments have much to offer to the understanding of protein structure, evolution and function. We are developing approaches to use this information in predicting protein-binding specificity, intra-protein and protein-protein interactions, and in reconstructing protein interaction networks.

  15. PEPPLOT, a protein secondary structure analysis program for the UWGCG sequence analysis software package.

    OpenAIRE

    Gribskov, M.; Burgess, R R; Devereux, J

    1986-01-01

    We describe a program for the analysis of protein secondary structure that operates with the Sequence Analysis Software Package of the University of Wisconsin Genetics Computer Group (UWGCG). The program produces both graphic and printed output. Structure prediction using the Chou and Fasman and Robson et al methods, and hydropathy analysis by the method of Kyte and Doolittle are included along with a simplified method of hydrophobic moment analysis. The power of the program is the coordinate...

  16. PicXAA-R: Efficient structural alignment of multiple RNA sequences using a greedy approach

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon Byung-Jun; Sahraeian Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Accurate and efficient structural alignment of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has grasped more and more attentions as recent studies unveiled the significance of ncRNAs in living organisms. While the Sankoff style structural alignment algorithms cannot efficiently serve for multiple sequences, mostly progressive schemes are used to reduce the complexity. However, this idea tends to propagate the early stage errors throughout the entire process, thereby degrading the quality of t...

  17. RNA secondary structure prediction from sequence alignments using a network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Bindewald, Eckart; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a machine learning method (a hierarchical network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers) that uses an RNA sequence alignment in order to predict a consensus RNA secondary structure. The input to the network is the mutual information, the fraction of complementary nucleotides, and a novel consensus RNAfold secondary structure prediction of a pair of alignment columns and its nearest neighbors. Given this input, the network computes a prediction as to whether a particular pair of alignme...

  18. Telomeric DNA sequence and structure following de novo telomere synthesis in Euplotes crassus.

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeesch, J.R.; Price, C M

    1994-01-01

    To learn more about the mechanism of de novo telomere synthesis, we have characterized the sequence and structure of newly synthesized telomeres from Euplotes crassus. E. crassus is a particularly useful organism for studying telomere synthesis because millions of telomeres are made in each cell at a well-defined time during the sexual stage of the life cycle. These newly synthesized telomeres are approximately 50 bp longer than mature macronuclear telomeres. We have investigated the structur...

  19. Impact of genomic structural variation in Drosophila melanogaster based on population-scale sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Zichner, Thomas; Garfield, David A; Rausch, Tobias; Stütz, Adrian M; Cannavó, Enrico; Braun, Martina; Furlong, Eileen E. M.; Korbel, Jan O.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic structural variation (SV) is a major determinant for phenotypic variation. Although it has been extensively studied in humans, the nucleotide resolution structure of SVs within the widely used model organism Drosophila remains unknown. We report a highly accurate, densely validated map of unbalanced SVs comprising 8962 deletions and 916 tandem duplications in 39 lines derived from short-read DNA sequencing in a natural population (the “Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel,”...

  20. WebScipio: An online tool for the determination of gene structures using protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waack Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining the gene structure for a given protein encoding gene is an important step in many analyses. A software suited for this task should be readily accessible, accurate, easy to handle and should provide the user with a coherent representation of the most probable gene structure. It should be rigorous enough to optimise features on the level of single bases and at the same time flexible enough to allow for cross-species searches. Results WebScipio, a web interface to the Scipio software, allows a user to obtain the corresponding coding sequence structure of a here given a query protein sequence that belongs to an already assembled eukaryotic genome. The resulting gene structure is presented in various human readable formats like a schematic representation, and a detailed alignment of the query and the target sequence highlighting any discrepancies. WebScipio can also be used to identify and characterise the gene structures of homologs in related organisms. In addition, it offers a web service for integration with other programs. Conclusion WebScipio is a tool that allows users to get a high-quality gene structure prediction from a protein query. It offers more than 250 eukaryotic genomes that can be searched and produces predictions that are close to what can be achieved by manual annotation, for in-species and cross-species searches alike. WebScipio is freely accessible at http://www.webscipio.org.

  1. Determinación de la estructura de bases de Schiff derivadas de 2-aminofenol, nitro y flúor sustituidas, utilizando la RMN 1D y 2D / Structure determination of the Schiff bases derivated from 2- aminophenol, nitro and fluorid substituted, using RMN 1D and 2D

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sergio, Zamorano; Juan, Camus.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta el resultado de la síntesis de bases de Schiff a partir del 2-amino fenol con 4-nitro y 2-fluorbenzaldehído y se caracterizan los productos, usando el microanálisis, la espectroscopía infrarroja, la espectroscopía de RMN de H¹ y C13 y la RMN en dos dimensiones (COSY y HMB [...] C ), para determinar sus estructuras. Además, se estudia el corrimiento que sufren los carbonos con respecto al tipo de sustituyente del aldehído en la base de Schiff. Abstract in english In this work the result of the synthesis of a base of Schiff is presented, starting from the 2-amino phenol with 4-nitro and 2- fluorbenzaldehyde and the products are characterized, using the microanalysis, the infrared spectroscopy, the spectroscopy of RMN of H¹ and C13 and the RMN in two dimension [...] s (COSY and HMBC), to determine their structures. In addition, the shifts that suffering the carbon atoms respecting to the type of sustituents in the Schiff base are studied.

  2. A sequence-based survey of the complex structural organization of tumor genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Colin; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Volik, Stanislav; Yu, Peng; Wu, Chunxiao; Huang, Guiqing; Linardopoulou, Elena V.; Trask, Barbara J.; Waldman, Frederic; Costello, Joseph; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sridharan, Shivaranjani; Paris, Pamela; Tao, Quanzhou; Aerni, Sarah J.; Brown, Raymond P.; Bashir, Ali; Gray, Joe W.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; de Jong, Pieter; Nefedov, Mikhail; Ried, Thomas; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Collins, Colin C.

    2008-04-03

    The genomes of many epithelial tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal rearrangements. All classes of genome rearrangements can be identified using End Sequencing Profiling (ESP), which relies on paired-end sequencing of cloned tumor genomes. In this study, brain, breast, ovary and prostate tumors along with three breast cancer cell lines were surveyed with ESP yielding the largest available collection of sequence-ready tumor genome breakpoints and providing evidence that some rearrangements may be recurrent. Sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed translocations and complex tumor genome structures that include coamplification and packaging of disparate genomic loci with associated molecular heterogeneity. Comparison of the tumor genomes suggests recurrent rearrangements. Some are likely to be novel structural polymorphisms, whereas others may be bona fide somatic rearrangements. A recurrent fusion transcript in breast tumors and a constitutional fusion transcript resulting from a segmental duplication were identified. Analysis of end sequences for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed candidate somatic mutations and an elevated rate of novel SNPs in an ovarian tumor. These results suggest that the genomes of many epithelial tumors may be far more dynamic and complex than previously appreciated and that genomic fusions including fusion transcripts and proteins may be common, possibly yielding tumor-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  3. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Franx, Marijn; Bezanson, Rachel; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Kriek, Mariska T.; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Rigby, Jane R.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-09-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass ({M}\\star ), the “star formation sequence,” and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sérsic indices, n, of galaxies across the SFR-{M}\\star plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at 0.5 MIPS 24 ?m imaging, adding the unobscured and obscured star formation. We find that the scatter of the star formation sequence is related in part to galaxy structure; the scatter due to variations in n at fixed mass for star-forming galaxies ranges from 0.14 ± 0.02 dex at z ˜ 2 to 0.30 ± 0.04 dex at z 2 (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower {SFR}/{M}\\star than the main ridgeline of the star formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive z ˜ 2 galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At z < 1, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global {SFR}/{M}\\star , decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the scatter of the star formation sequence.

  4. Role of sequence and structural polymorphism on the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Myeongsang; Kim, Jae In; Na, Sungsoo; Eom, Kilho

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils playing a critical role in disease expression, have recently been found to exhibit the excellent mechanical properties such as elastic modulus in the order of 10 GPa, which is comparable to that of other mechanical proteins such as microtubule, actin filament, and spider silk. These remarkable mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are correlated with their functional role in disease expression. This suggests the importance in understanding how these excellent mechanical properties are originated through self-assembly process that may depend on the amino acid sequence. However, the sequence-structure-property relationship of amyloid fibrils has not been fully understood yet. In this work, we characterize the mechanical properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) fibrils with respect to their molecular structures as well as their amino acid sequence by using all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulation result suggests that the remarkable bending rigidity of amyloid fibrils can be achieved through a specific self-aggregation pattern such as antiparallel stacking of ? strands (peptide chain). Moreover, we have shown that a single point mutation of hIAPP chain constituting a hIAPP fibril significantly affects the thermodynamic stability of hIAPP fibril formed by parallel stacking of peptide chain, and that a single point mutation results in a significant change in the bending rigidity of hIAPP fibrils formed by antiparallel stacking of ? strands. This clearly elucidates the role of amino acid sequence on not only the equilibrium conformations of amyloid fibrils but also their mechanical properties. Our study sheds light on sequence-structure-property relationships of amyloid fibrils, which suggests that the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are encoded in their sequence-dependent molecular architecture. PMID:24551113

  5. 1-D equations of radiation hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation transfer equation is derived in the comoving frame, in curvilinear coordinates, to first order in u/c, no symmetry being assumed. This equation is then specialized to 1-D, and its moments are calculated for the limiting case of Thomson scattering. The equations of radiation hydrodynamics are also given

  6. 1d WCIP and FEM hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Caroline; Raveu, Nathalie; Lanteri, Stéphane; Perrussel, Ronan

    2012-01-01

    An hybridization between two numerical methods, the 1d Wave Concept Iterative Procedure (WCIP) and the 2d Finite Element Method (FEM), is developed. Using two examples, comparisons are provided between the new hybrid method and an analytic solution, when available, or the WCIP alone.

  7. Evol and ProDy for bridging protein sequence evolution and structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhi; Liu, Ying; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Lezon, Timothy R.; Bahar, Ivet

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between sequence evolution and structural dynamics are of utmost importance in understanding the molecular mechanisms of function and their evolution. We have integrated Evol, a new package for fast and efficient comparative analysis of evolutionary patterns and conformational dynamics, into ProDy, a computational toolbox designed for inferring protein dynamics from experimental and theoretical data. Using information-theoretic approaches, Evol coanalyzes conservation and coevolution profiles extracted from multiple sequence alignments of protein families with their inferred dynamics. Availability and implementation: ProDy and Evol are open-source and freely available under MIT License from http://prody.csb.pitt.edu/. Contact: bahar@pitt.edu PMID:24849577

  8. Bioinformatical approaches to RNA structure prediction & Sequencing of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Stinus

    2010-01-01

    Stinus Lindgreen has been working in two different fields during his Ph.D. The first part has been focused on computational approaches to predict the structure of non-coding RNA molecules at the base pairing level. This has resulted in the analysis of various measures of the base pairing potential in families of related RNA sequences. Also, the program MASTR was developed to perform simultaneous alignment of multiple RNA sequences and prediction of a common secondary structure. The webserver WAR was developed to make it easy for non-computer savy researchers to use the many RNA structure prediction tools that exist. The second part has been focused on the mapping and genotyping of ancient genomic DNA. The development of next generation sequencing technologies combined with the use of ancient DNA material present the researchers with some special challenges in the analyses. This work resulted in the publication of the first genome of an ancient human individual, where close to the theoretical maximum of the genome sequence was recovered with high confidence. Part of the project was the development of the program SNPest for genotyping and SNP calling that models various sources of error and predicts genotypes with the highest posterior probability.

  9. In Silico Analysis of Sequence-Structure-Function Relationship of the Escherichia coli Methionine Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shiv; Bhagabati, Puja; Sachan, Reena; Kaushik, Aman Chandra; Dwivedi, Vivek Dhar

    2015-12-01

    The molecular evolution of various metabolic pathways in the organisms can be employed for scrutinizing the molecular aspects behind origin of life. In the present study, we chiefly concerned about the sequence-structure-function relationship between the Escherichia coli methionine synthase and their respective animal homologs by in silico approach. Using homology prediction technique, it was observed that only 79 animal species showed similarity with the E. coli methionine synthase. Also, multiple sequence alignment depicted only 25 conserved patterns between the E. coli methionine synthase and their respective animal homologs. Based on that, Pfam analysis identified the protein families of 22 conserved patterns among the attained 25 conserved patterns. Furthermore, the 3D structure was generated by HHpred and evaluated by corresponding Ramachandran plot specifying 93 % of the ? and ? residues angles in the most ideal regions. Hence, the designed structure was established as a good quality model for the full length of E. coli methionine synthase. PMID:26223547

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of a DJ-1 homologue from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDJ-1D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyung Hye; Zhuang, Ningning; Cha, Joon-Yung; Son, Daeyoung; Lee, Kon Ho

    2012-01-01

    A DJ-1 homologue protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDJ-1D) belongs to the DJ-1/ThiJ/Pfpl superfamily and contains two tandem arrays of DJ-1-like sequences, but no structural information is available to date for this protein. AtDJ-1D was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized for structural analysis. A crystal of AtDJ-1D was obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 0.22 M NaCl, 0.1 M bis-tris pH 6.5, 21% polyethylene glycol 3350. AtDJ-1D crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 56.78, b = 75.21, c = 141.68 Å, ? = 96.87°, and contained a trimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to 2.05 Å resolution. The structure of AtDJ-1D has been determined using the multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method. PMID:22232184

  11. How the Sequence of a Gene Specifies Structural Symmetry in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaojuan; Huang, Tongcheng; Wang, Guanyu; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Internal symmetry is commonly observed in the majority of fundamental protein folds. Meanwhile, sufficient evidence suggests that nascent polypeptide chains of proteins have the potential to start the co-translational folding process and this process allows mRNA to contain additional information on protein structure. In this paper, we study the relationship between gene sequences and protein structures from the viewpoint of symmetry to explore how gene sequences code for structural symmetry in proteins. We found that, for a set of two-fold symmetric proteins from left-handed beta-helix fold, intragenic symmetry always exists in their corresponding gene sequences. Meanwhile, codon usage bias and local mRNA structure might be involved in modulating translation speed for the formation of structural symmetry: a major decrease of local codon usage bias in the middle of the codon sequence can be identified as a common feature; and major or consecutive decreases in local mRNA folding energy near the boundaries of the symmetric substructures can also be observed. The results suggest that gene duplication and fusion may be an evolutionarily conserved process for this protein fold. In addition, the usage of rare codons and the formation of higher order of secondary structure near the boundaries of symmetric substructures might have coevolved as conserved mechanisms to slow down translation elongation and to facilitate effective folding of symmetric substructures. These findings provide valuable insights into our understanding of the mechanisms of translation and its evolution, as well as the design of proteins via symmetric modules. PMID:26641668

  12. Phosphorylation-Dependent PIH1D1 Interactions Define Substrate Specificity of the R2TP Cochaperone Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hořejší

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The R2TP cochaperone complex plays a critical role in the assembly of multisubunit machines, including small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, RNA polymerase II, and the mTORC1 and SMG1 kinase complexes, but the molecular basis of substrate recognition remains unclear. Here, we describe a phosphopeptide binding domain (PIH-N in the PIH1D1 subunit of the R2TP complex that preferentially binds to highly acidic phosphorylated proteins. A cocrystal structure of a PIH-N domain/TEL2 phosphopeptide complex reveals a highly specific phosphopeptide recognition mechanism in which Lys57 and 64 in PIH1D1, along with a conserved DpSDD phosphopeptide motif within TEL2, are essential and sufficient for binding. Proteomic analysis of PIH1D1 interactors identified R2TP complex substrates that are recruited by the PIH-N domain in a sequence-specific and phosphorylation-dependent manner suggestive of a common mechanism of substrate recognition. We propose that protein complexes assembled by the R2TP complex are defined by phosphorylation of a specific motif and recognition by the PIH1D1 subunit.

  13. Structure of Moloney murine leukemia viral DNA: nucleotide sequence of the 5' long terminal repeat and adjacent cellular sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Beveren, C.; Goddard, J G; Berns, A.; Verma, I. M.

    1980-01-01

    Some unintegrated and all integrated forms of murine leukemia viral DNA contain long terminal repeats (LTRs). The entire nucleotide sequence of the LTR and adjacent cellular sequences at the 5' end of a cloned integrated proviral DNA obtained from BALB/Mo mouse has been determined. It was compared to the nucleotide sequence of the LTR at the 3' end. The results indicate: (i) a direct 517-nucleotide repeat at the 5' and 3' termini; (ii) 145 nucleotides out of 517 nucleotides represent sequence...

  14. Efficient system of homologous RNA recombination in brome mosaic virus: sequence and structure requirements and accuracy of crossovers.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, P. D.; Bujarski, J J

    1995-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a tripartite positive-stranded RNA virus of plants engineered to support intersegment RNA recombination, was used for the determination of sequence and structural requirements of homologous crossovers. A 60-nucleotide (nt) sequence, common between wild-type RNA2 and mutant RNA3, supported efficient repair (90%) of a modified 3' noncoding region in the RNA3 segment by homologous recombination with wild-type RNA2 3' noncoding sequences. Deletions within this sequence i...

  15. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  16. A comprehensive update of the sequence and structure classification of kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hong

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A comprehensive update of the classification of all available kinases was carried out. This survey presents a complete global picture of this large functional class of proteins and confirms the soundness of our initial kinase classification scheme. Results The new survey found the total number of kinase sequences in the protein database has increased more than three-fold (from 17,310 to 59,402, and the number of determined kinase structures increased two-fold (from 359 to 702 in the past three years. However, the framework of the original two-tier classification scheme (in families and fold groups remains sufficient to describe all available kinases. Overall, the kinase sequences were classified into 25 families of homologous proteins, wherein 22 families (~98.8% of all sequences for which three-dimensional structures are known fall into 10 fold groups. These fold groups not only include some of the most widely spread proteins folds, such as the Rossmann-like fold, ferredoxin-like fold, TIM-barrel fold, and antiparallel ?-barrel fold, but also all major classes (all ?, all ?, ?+?, ?/? of protein structures. Fold predictions are made for remaining kinase families without a close homolog with solved structure. We also highlight two novel kinase structural folds, riboflavin kinase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, which have recently been characterized. Two protein families previously annotated as kinases are removed from the classification based on new experimental data. Conclusion Structural annotations of all kinase families are now revealed, including fold descriptions for all globular kinases, making this the first large functional class of proteins with a comprehensive structural annotation. Potential uses for this classification include deduction of protein function, structural fold, or enzymatic mechanism of poorly studied or newly discovered kinases based on proteins in the same family.

  17. Feedback stabilization of a simplified 1d fluid- particle system

    OpenAIRE

    Badra, Mehdi; Takahashi, Takéo

    2013-01-01

    We consider the feedback stabilization of a simplified 1d model for a fluid-structure interaction system. The fluid equation is the viscous Burgers equation whereas the motion of the particle is given by the Newton's laws. We stabilize this system around a stationary state by using feedbacks located at the exterior boundary of the fluid domain. With one input, we obtain a local stabilizability of the system with an exponential decay rate of order $\\sigma

  18. Structural and sequence analysis of imelysin-like proteins implicated in bacterial iron uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D; Farr, Carol L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Grant, Joanna C; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Weekes, Dana; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    Imelysin-like proteins define a superfamily of bacterial proteins that are likely involved in iron uptake. Members of this superfamily were previously thought to be peptidases and were included in the MEROPS family M75. We determined the first crystal structures of two remotely related, imelysin-like proteins. The Psychrobacter arcticus structure was determined at 2.15 Å resolution and contains the canonical imelysin fold, while higher resolution structures from the gut bacteria Bacteroides ovatus, in two crystal forms (at 1.25 Å and 1.44 Å resolution), have a circularly permuted topology. Both structures are highly similar to each other despite low sequence similarity and circular permutation. The all-helical structure can be divided into two similar four-helix bundle domains. The overall structure and the GxHxxE motif region differ from known HxxE metallopeptidases, suggesting that imelysin-like proteins are not peptidases. A putative functional site is located at the domain interface. We have now organized the known homologous proteins into a superfamily, which can be separated into four families. These families share a similar functional site, but each has family-specific structural and sequence features. These results indicate that imelysin-like proteins have evolved from a common ancestor, and likely have a conserved function. PMID:21799754

  19. Cloning and sequencing of the structural gene for the porin protein of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z M; Hannah, J H; Stibitz, S; Nguyen, N Y; Manclark, C R; Brennan, M J

    1991-07-01

    Bordetella pertussis produces a porin protein which is a prominent outer membrane component found in both virulent and avirulent strains. N-terminal amino acid analysis of purified B. pertussis porin was performed and this amino acid sequence was used to design an oligonucleotide that was then utilized to screen a lambda gt11 library containing randomly sheared fragments of DNA from B. pertussis strain 347. One clone, lambda BpPor, was identified and subcloned into pUC18. A portion of the DNA insert in this subclone, pBpPor1, was sequenced and shown to contain the N-terminal region of the structural porin gene. This truncated gene sequence was used to design an additional oligonucleotide that was used to identify a clone, pBpPor2, which overlapped with pBpPor1 and contained a termination codon. The structural gene deduced from this sequence would encode a 365-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted mass of 39,103 daltons. The predicted product also contains a signal sequence of 20 residues that is similar to that found in other porin genes. The predicted B. pertussis porin protein sequence contains regions that are homologous to regions found in porins expressed by Neisseria species and Escherichia coli, including the presence of phenylalanine as the carboxy-terminal amino acid. DNA hybridization studies indicated that both virulent and avirulent strains of B. pertussis contain only one copy of this gene and that Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella parapertussis contain a similar gene. PMID:1658537

  20. A structural study for the optimisation of functional motifs encoded in protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmer-Citterich Manuela

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of PROSITE patterns select false positives and/or miss known true positives. It is possible that – at least in some cases – the weak specificity and/or sensitivity of a pattern is due to the fact that one, or maybe more, functional and/or structural key residues are not represented in the pattern. Multiple sequence alignments are commonly used to build functional sequence patterns. If residues structurally conserved in proteins sharing a function cannot be aligned in a multiple sequence alignment, they are likely to be missed in a standard pattern construction procedure. Results Here we present a new procedure aimed at improving the sensitivity and/ or specificity of poorly-performing patterns. The procedure can be summarised as follows: 1. residues structurally conserved in different proteins, that are true positives for a pattern, are identified by means of a computational technique and by visual inspection. 2. the sequence positions of the structurally conserved residues falling outside the pattern are used to build extended sequence patterns. 3. the extended patterns are optimised on the SWISS-PROT database for their sensitivity and specificity. The method was applied to eight PROSITE patterns. Whenever structurally conserved residues are found in the surface region close to the pattern (seven out of eight cases, the addition of information inferred from structural analysis is shown to improve pattern selectivity and in some cases selectivity and sensitivity as well. In some of the cases considered the procedure allowed the identification of functionally interesting residues, whose biological role is also discussed. Conclusion Our method can be applied to any type of functional motif or pattern (not only PROSITE ones which is not able to select all and only the true positive hits and for which at least two true positive structures are available. The computational technique for the identification of structurally conserved residues is already available on request and will be soon accessible on our web server. The procedure is intended for the use of pattern database curators and of scientists interested in a specific protein family for which no specific or selective patterns are yet available.

  1. Stabilization of the fibrous structure of an ?-helix-forming peptide by sequence reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ?3-peptide, which comprises three repeats of the sequence Leu-Glu-Thr-Leu-Ala-Lys-Ala and forms an amphipathic ?-helix, is unique among various ?-helix-forming peptides in that it assembles into fibrous structures that can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. As part of our investigation of the structure-stability relationships of the ?3-peptide, we synthesized the r3-peptide, whose amino acid sequence is the reverse of that of the ?3-peptide, and we investigated the effects of sequence reversal on ?-helix stability and the formation of fibrous structures. Unexpectedly, the r3-peptide formed a more-stable ?-helix and longer fibers than did the ?3-peptide. The stability of the r3-peptide helix decreased when the ionic strength of the buffer was increased and when the pH of the buffer was adjusted to 2 or 12. These results suggest that the r3-peptide underwent a 'magnet-like' oligomerization and that an increase in the charge-distribution inequality may be the driving force for the formation of fibrous structures

  2. DNA sequences of the D-serine deaminase control region and N-terminal portion of the structural gene.

    OpenAIRE

    McFall, E; Runkel, L

    1983-01-01

    We determined the DNA sequence of the D-serine deaminase promoter region and of the N-terminal region of the structural gene. There are possibilities in the promoter for secondary structure and for initiation recognition sequences, and there is an open reading frame. The N-terminal sequence for the structural gene confirms that part of the amino acid sequence previously determined by E. Schlitz and W. Schmitt (FEBS Lett. 134:57-62, 1981), including the active site of the enzyme, and spans the...

  3. Comparison of sequence-based and structure-based phylogenetic trees of homologous proteins: Inferences on protein evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Balaji; N Srinivasan

    2007-01-01

    Several studies based on the known three-dimensional (3-D) structures of proteins show that two homologous proteins with insignificant sequence similarity could adopt a common fold and may perform same or similar biochemical functions. Hence, it is appropriate to use similarities in 3-D structure of proteins rather than the amino acid sequence similarities in modelling evolution of distantly related proteins. Here we present an assessment of using 3-D structures in modelling evolution of homologous proteins. Using a dataset of 108 protein domain families of known structures with at least 10 members per family we present a comparison of extent of structural and sequence dissimilarities among pairs of proteins which are inputs into the construction of phylogenetic trees. We find that correlation between the structure-based dissimilarity measures and the sequence-based dissimilarity measures is usually good if the sequence similarity among the homologues is about 30% or more. For protein families with low sequence similarity among the members, the correlation coefficient between the sequence-based and the structure-based dissimilarities are poor. In these cases the structure-based dendrogram clusters proteins with most similar biochemical functional properties better than the sequence-similarity based dendrogram. In multi-domain protein families and disulphide-rich protein families the correlation coefficient for the match of sequence-based and structure-based dissimilarity (SDM) measures can be poor though the sequence identity could be higher than 30%. Hence it is suggested that protein evolution is best modelled using 3-D structures if the sequence similarities (SSM) of the homologues are very low.

  4. High-resolution NMR structure of an AT-rich DNA sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined, by proton NMR and complete relaxation matrix methods, the high-resolution structure of a DNA oligonucleotide in solution with nine contiguous AT base pairs. The stretch of AT pairs, TAATTATAA.TTATAATTA, is imbedded in a 27-nucleotide stem-and-loop construct, which is stabilized by terminal GC base pairs and an extraordinarily stable DNA loop GAA (Hirao et al., 1994, Nucleic Acids Res.22, 576-582). The AT-rich sequence has three repeated TAA.TTA motifs, one in the reverse orientation. Comparison of the local conformations of the three motifs shows that the sequence context has a minor effect here: atomic RMSD between the three TAA.TTA fragments is 0.4-0.5 A, while each fragment is defined within the RMSD of 0.3-0.4 A. The AT-rich stem also contains a consensus sequence for the Pribnow box, TATAAT. The TpA, ApT, and TpT.ApA steps have characteristic local conformations, a combination of which determines a unique sequence-dependent pattern of minor groove width variation. All three TpA steps are locally bent in the direction compressing the major groove of DNA. These bends, however, compensate each other, because of their relative position in the sequence, so that the overall helical axis is essentially straight

  5. Entanglement teleportation through 1D Heisenberg chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information transmission of two qubits through two independent 1D Heisenberg chains as a quantum channel is analyzed. It is found that the entanglement of two spin-12 quantum systems is decreased during teleportation via the thermal mixed state in 1D Heisenberg chain. The entanglement teleportation will be realized if the minimal entanglement of the thermal mixed state is provided in such quantum channel. High average fidelity of teleportation with values larger than 2/3 is obtained when the temperature T is very low. The mutual information I of the quantum channel declines with the increase of the temperature and the external magnetic field. The entanglement quality of input signal states cannot enhance mutual information of the quantum channel

  6. T-Coffee: a web server for the multiple sequence alignment of protein and RNA sequences using structural information and homology extension

    OpenAIRE

    Di Tommaso, P.; Moretti, S.; Xenarios, I.; Orobitg, M.; Montanyola, A.; Chang, J.-M.; Taly, J.-F.; Notredame, C.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a new interface for T-Coffee, a consistency-based multiple sequence alignment program. This interface provides an easy and intuitive access to the most popular functionality of the package. These include the default T-Coffee mode for protein and nucleic acid sequences, the M-Coffee mode that allows combining the output of any other aligners, and template-based modes of T-Coffee that deliver high accuracy alignments while using structural or homology derived templates. ...

  7. MultiSeq: unifying sequence and structure data for evolutionary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Dan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the publication of the first draft of the human genome in 2000, bioinformatic data have been accumulating at an overwhelming pace. Currently, more than 3 million sequences and 35 thousand structures of proteins and nucleic acids are available in public databases. Finding correlations in and between these data to answer critical research questions is extremely challenging. This problem needs to be approached from several directions: information science to organize and search the data; information visualization to assist in recognizing correlations; mathematics to formulate statistical inferences; and biology to analyze chemical and physical properties in terms of sequence and structure changes. Results Here we present MultiSeq, a unified bioinformatics analysis environment that allows one to organize, display, align and analyze both sequence and structure data for proteins and nucleic acids. While special emphasis is placed on analyzing the data within the framework of evolutionary biology, the environment is also flexible enough to accommodate other usage patterns. The evolutionary approach is supported by the use of predefined metadata, adherence to standard ontological mappings, and the ability for the user to adjust these classifications using an electronic notebook. MultiSeq contains a new algorithm to generate complete evolutionary profiles that represent the topology of the molecular phylogenetic tree of a homologous group of distantly related proteins. The method, based on the multidimensional QR factorization of multiple sequence and structure alignments, removes redundancy from the alignments and orders the protein sequences by increasing linear dependence, resulting in the identification of a minimal basis set of sequences that spans the evolutionary space of the homologous group of proteins. Conclusion MultiSeq is a major extension of the Multiple Alignment tool that is provided as part of VMD, a structural visualization program for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations. Both are freely distributed by the NIH Resource for Macromolecular Modeling and Bioinformatics and MultiSeq is included with VMD starting with version 1.8.5. The MultiSeq website has details on how to download and use the software: http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~schulten/multiseq/

  8. Preparation of 1D nanostructures using biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we have shown that one-dimensional (1D) particle arrays can be obtained using biomolecules, like DNA or amino-acids. Nano-arrays of silver and gold were prepared in a single-step synthesis, by exploiting the binding abilities of ?-DNA and L-Arginine. The morphology and optical properties of these nanostructures were investigated using AFM, TEM and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy.

  9. Comparative mapping of sequence-based and structure-based protein domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandonia John-Marc

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domains have long been an ill-defined concept in biology. They are generally described as autonomous folding units with evolutionary and functional independence. Both structure-based and sequence-based domain definitions have been widely used. But whether these types of models alone can capture all essential features of domains is still an open question. Methods Here we provide insight on domain definitions through comparative mapping of two domain classification databases, one sequence-based (Pfam and the other structure-based (SCOP. A mapping score is defined to indicate the significance of the mapping, and the properties of the mapping matrices are studied. Results The mapping results show a general agreement between the two databases, as well as many interesting areas of disagreement. In the cases of disagreement, the functional and evolutionary characteristics of the domains are examined to determine which domain definition is biologically more informative.

  10. Structurally complex and highly active RNA ligases derived from random RNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekland, E. H.; Szostak, J. W.; Bartel, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Seven families of RNA ligases, previously isolated from random RNA sequences, fall into three classes on the basis of secondary structure and regiospecificity of ligation. Two of the three classes of ribozymes have been engineered to act as true enzymes, catalyzing the multiple-turnover transformation of substrates into products. The most complex of these ribozymes has a minimal catalytic domain of 93 nucleotides. An optimized version of this ribozyme has a kcat exceeding one per second, a value far greater than that of most natural RNA catalysts and approaching that of comparable protein enzymes. The fact that such a large and complex ligase emerged from a very limited sampling of sequence space implies the existence of a large number of distinct RNA structures of equivalent complexity and activity.

  11. Chaos in 1d edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative instabilities that can develop in plasmas subjected to external heating and radiative cooling are of great importance in edge plasmas of tokamaks and stellarators. They will be analyzed in this paper on the basis of the 1d heat conduction equation. Bifurcation and time evolution of temperature profiles along magnetic field lines between two target plates have been reported. The simple model functions used there are applied here together with methods proved to be useful in nonlinear theories of dynamical systems in order to investigate stable, unstable and chaotic solutions of the 1d heat conduction equation. We consider the model of a radiative plasma with periodically (period ?) injected impurities. In order to show the basic mechanism we discuss at first the time-dependent problem which leads to an equation that can be integrated piecewise exactly analogous to the equation of motion for the periodically kicked rotator. Solution and Lyapunov stability analysis of that one-dimensional radiative map show the existence of stable and unstable solutions. Calculating attractors and Lyapunov exponents in dependence of parameters like power input or period ? shows the appearance of periodical solutions followed by period doubling and finally resulting in chaos in the radiative plasma. Second, we consider 1d and time-dependent problems by calculating profiles and attractors. Enhancing the period ? starting from ? = 0 (stationary problem) rediscovers the known routes to chaos in spatial extension like period doubling or intermittence. (orig.)

  12. Structural variation discovery in the cancer genome using next generation sequencing: Computational solutions and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Biao; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Morrison, Carl D.; Odunsi, Adekunle O; Qin, Maochun; Wei, Lei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Somatic Structural Variations (SVs) are a complex collection of chromosomal mutations that could directly contribute to carcinogenesis. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has emerged as the primary means of interrogating the SVs of the cancer genome in recent investigations. Sophisticated computational methods are required to accurately identify the SV events and delineate their breakpoints from the massive amounts of reads generated by a NGS experiment. In this review, we provide an...

  13. Capturing “attrition intensifying” structural traits from didactic interaction sequences of MOOC learners

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Tanmay; Li, Nan; Jermann, Patrick; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This work is an attempt to discover hidden structural configurations in learning activity sequences of students in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Leveraging combined representations of video click- stream interactions and forum activities, we seek to fundamentally understand traits that are predictive of decreasing engagement over time. Grounded in the inter- disciplinary field of network science, we follow a graph based approach to success- fully extract indicators of active and passiv...

  14. MultiSeq: unifying sequence and structure data for evolutionary analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright Dan; Eargle John; Roberts Elijah; Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Since the publication of the first draft of the human genome in 2000, bioinformatic data have been accumulating at an overwhelming pace. Currently, more than 3 million sequences and 35 thousand structures of proteins and nucleic acids are available in public databases. Finding correlations in and between these data to answer critical research questions is extremely challenging. This problem needs to be approached from several directions: information science to organize and...

  15. Nucleotide sequences and mutational analysis of the structural genes for nitrogenase 2 of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    Joerger, R D; Loveless, T M; Pau, R N; Mitchenall, L A; Simon, B H; Bishop, P E

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence (6,559 base pairs) of the genomic region containing the structural genes for nitrogenase 2 (V nitrogenase) from Azotobacter vinelandii was determined. The open reading frames present in this region are organized into two transcriptional units. One contains vnfH (encoding dinitrogenase reductase 2) and a ferredoxinlike open reading frame (Fd). The second one includes vnfD (encoding the alpha subunit of dinitrogenase 2), vnfG (encoding a product similar to the delta subu...

  16. The DNA structure and sequence preferences of WRN underlie its function in telomeric recombination events

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Deanna N.; Machwe, Amrita; Chen, Li; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Orren, David K

    2015-01-01

    Telomeric abnormalities caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN are linked to the multiple premature ageing phenotypes that characterize Werner syndrome. Here we examine WRN's role in telomeric maintenance, by comparing its action on a variety of DNA structures without or with telomeric sequences. Our results show that WRN clearly prefers to act on strand invasion intermediates in a manner that favours strand invasion and exchange. Moreover, WRN unwinding of these recombination st...

  17. A rostro-caudal gradient of structured sequence processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Uddén, Julia; Bahlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present two novel perspectives on the function of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). First, a structured sequence processing perspective facilitates the search for functional segregation within the LIFG and provides a way to express common aspects across cognitive domains including language, music and action. Converging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies suggests that the LIFG is engaged in sequential proces...

  18. An integrative probabilistic model for identification of structural variation in sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Sindi, Suzanne S.; Önal, Selim; Peng, Luke C; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Paired-end sequencing is a common approach for identifying structural variation (SV) in genomes. Discrepancies between the observed and expected alignments indicate potential SVs. Most SV detection algorithms use only one of the possible signals and ignore reads with multiple alignments. This results in reduced sensitivity to detect SVs, especially in repetitive regions. We introduce GASVPro, an algorithm combining both paired read and read depth signals into a probabilistic model that can an...

  19. Structural Elements And Formation Parameters For Some Lower Cretaceous Sequences In The Western Desert, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    El Dairy, M. D. [????? ????? ??????

    1987-01-01

    The Lower Cretaceous sequences in the northern part of the Western Desert has been penetrated by many of drilled bore—holes adopted by different oil companies. It was encountered at depths ranging from 1200 to 3500 m. The seismic data obtained for the study area have been interpreted. However, two structural elements are depicted. On the other hand, 11 core samples belonging to the Kharita Formation were used for studying some formation parameters such as rock porosity and permeability. Both ...

  20. Enlarged FAMSBASE: protein 3D structure models of genome sequences for 41 species

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Ei-ichiro; Yura, Kei; Kawakita, Shigetsugu; Umeyama, Hideaki; Go, Mitiko

    2003-01-01

    Enlarged FAMSBASE is a relational database of comparative protein structure models for the whole genome of 41 species, presented in the GTOP database. The models are calculated by Full Automatic Modeling System (FAMS). Enlarged FAMSBASE provides a wide range of query keys, such as name of ORF (open reading frame), ORF keywords, Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID, PDB heterogen atoms and sequence similarity. Heterogen atoms in PDB include cofactors, ligands and other factors that interact with protein...

  1. PAIRpred: Partner-specific prediction of interacting residues from sequence and structure

    OpenAIRE

    ul Amir Afsar Minhas, Fayyaz; Geiss, Brian J; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel partner-specific protein-protein interaction site prediction method called PAIRpred. Unlike most existing machine learning binding site prediction methods, PAIRpred uses information from both proteins in a protein complex to generate predict pairs of interacting residues from the two proteins. PAIRpred captures sequence and structure information about residue pairs through pairwise kernels that are used for training a support vector machine classifier. As a result, PAIRpred...

  2. De Novo Structure Prediction of Globular Proteins Aided by Sequence Variation-Derived Contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Kosciolek, Tomasz; Jones, David T

    2014-01-01

    The advent of high accuracy residue-residue intra-protein contact prediction methods enabled a significant boost in the quality of de novo structure predictions. Here, we investigate the potential benefits of combining a well-established fragment-based folding algorithm – FRAGFOLD, with PSICOV, a contact prediction method which uses sparse inverse covariance estimation to identify co-varying sites in multiple sequence alignments. Using a comprehensive set of 150 diverse globular target protei...

  3. Fifty Years Later: The Sequence, Structure and Function of Lacewing Cross-beta Silk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisman, Sarah; Okada, Shoko; Mudie, Stephen T.; Huson, Mickey G.; Trueman, Holly E.; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Haritos, Victoria S.; Sutherland, Tara D.; (CSIRO/MSE); (CSIRO)

    2009-12-01

    Classic studies of protein structure in the 1950s and 1960s demonstrated that green lacewing egg stalk silk possesses a rare native cross-beta sheet conformation. We have identified and sequenced the silk genes expressed by adult females of a green lacewing species. The two encoded silk proteins are 109 and 67 kDa in size and rich in serine, glycine and alanine. Over 70% of each protein sequence consists of highly repetitive regions with 16-residue periodicity. The repetitive sequences can be fitted to an elegant cross-beta sheet structural model with protein chains folded into regular 8-residue long beta strands. This model is supported by wide-angle X-ray scattering data and tensile testing from both our work and the original papers. We suggest that the silk proteins assemble into stacked beta sheet crystallites bound together by a network of cystine cross-links. This hierarchical structure gives the lacewing silk high lateral stiffness nearly threefold that of silkworm silk, enabling the egg stalks to effectively suspend eggs and protect them from predators.

  4. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  5. High evolutionary conservation of the secondary structure and of certain nucleotide sequences of U5 RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Branlant, C.; Krol, A., van der; Lazar, E.; Haendler, B; Jacob, M; Galego-Dias, L; Pousada, C

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of chicken, pheasant, duck and Tetrahymena pyriformis U5 RNAs as well as that of new mammalian variant U5 RNAs was determined and compared to that of rat and HeLa cells U5 RNAs. Primary structure conservation is about 95% between rat and human cells, 82% between mammals and birds and 57% between the Protozoan and mammals. The same model of secondary structure, a free single-stranded region flanked by two hairpins can be constructed from all RNAs and is identical to the...

  6. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  7. The ITS2 Database III—sequences and structures for phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Koetschan, Christian; Förster, Frank; Keller, Alexander; Schleicher, Tina; Ruderisch, Benjamin; Schwarz, Roland; Müller, Tobias; Wolf, Matthias; Schultz, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) is a widely used phylogenetic marker. In the past, it has mainly been used for species level classifications. Nowadays, a wider applicability becomes apparent. Here, the conserved structure of the RNA molecule plays a vital role. We have developed the ITS2 Database (http://its2.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de) which holds information about sequence, structure and taxonomic classification of all ITS2 in GenBank. In the new version, we use Hidden Mar...

  8. SARSA: a web tool for structural alignment of RNA using a structural alphabet

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yen-Fu; Huang, Yen-Lin; Lu, Chin Lung

    2008-01-01

    SARSA is a web tool that can be used to align two or more RNA tertiary structures. The basic idea behind SARSA is that we use the vector quantization approach to derive a structural alphabet (SA) of 23 nucleotide conformations, via which we transform RNA 3D structures into 1D sequences of SA letters and then utilize classical sequence alignment methods to compare these 1D SA-encoded sequences and determine their structural similarities. In SARSA, we provide two RNA structural alignment tools,...

  9. Image denoising by block-matching and 1D filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yingkun; Chen, Tao; Yang, Deyun; Zhu, Lili; Yang, Hongxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a new image denoising method based on block-matching and transform-domain filtering. The developed method is derived from the current state-of-the-art denoising method (BM3D). We separate the 3D transform in the original method to two steps 1D transform, to further enhance the sparsity for signals whose elements are highly similar and to weaken the sparsity for those signals whose elements are dissimilar. Because the 1D filtering is on highly similar elements and the 2D filtering on image blocks are all removed, the image details can be better reserved and fewer artifacts are introduced than original method. Experimental results demonstrate that the developed method is competitive and better than some of the current state-of-the-art denoising methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio, structural similarity, and subjective visual quality.

  10. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: Sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models

    OpenAIRE

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)n amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher order structure and function. This report defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing in the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA1-Gly-X1-X2, designated as G1G interruptions. Residue...

  11. Effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on the microbial community structure of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Toshio; Li, Xu; Zilles, Julie L; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2011-02-01

    The effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on a methanogenic microbial community were studied in a glucose-fed laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) exposed to stepwise increases of tylosin (0, 1.67, and 167 mg/L). The microbial community structure was determined using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene clone libraries of biomass samples. During the periods without tylosin addition and with an influent tylosin concentration of 1.67 mg/L, 16S rRNA gene sequences related to Syntrophobacter were detected and the relative abundance of Methanosaeta species was high. During the highest tylosin dose of 167 mg/L, 16S rRNA gene sequences related to Syntrophobacter species were not detected and the relative abundance of Methanosaeta decreased considerably. Throughout the experimental period, Propionibacteriaceae and high GC Gram-positive bacteria were present, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and FISH analyses, respectively. The accumulation of propionate and subsequent reactor failure after long-term exposure to tylosin are attributed to the direct inhibition of propionate-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria closely related to Syntrophobacter and the indirect inhibition of Methanosaeta by high propionate concentrations and low pH. PMID:20830676

  12. Sequence-structure-function relations of the mosquito leucine-rich repeat immune proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povelones Michael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and characterisation of factors governing innate immune responses in insects has driven the elucidation of many immune system components in mammals and other organisms. Focusing on the immune system responses of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, has uncovered an array of components and mechanisms involved in defence against pathogen infections. Two of these immune factors are LRIM1 and APL1C, which are leucine-rich repeat (LRR containing proteins that activate complement-like defence responses against malaria parasites. In addition to their LRR domains, these leucine-rich repeat immune (LRIM proteins share several structural features including signal peptides, patterns of cysteine residues, and coiled-coil domains. Results The identification and characterisation of genes related to LRIM1 and APL1C revealed putatively novel innate immune factors and furthered the understanding of their likely molecular functions. Genomic scans using the shared features of LRIM1 and APL1C identified more than 20 LRIM-like genes exhibiting all or most of their sequence features in each of three disease-vector mosquitoes with sequenced genomes: An. gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Comparative sequence analyses revealed that this family of mosquito LRIM-like genes is characterised by a variable number of 6 to 14 LRRs of different lengths. The "Long" LRIM subfamily, with 10 or more LRRs, and the "Short" LRIMs, with 6 or 7 LRRs, also share the signal peptide, cysteine residue patterning, and coiled-coil sequence features of LRIM1 and APL1C. The "TM" LRIMs have a predicted C-terminal transmembrane region, and the "Coil-less" LRIMs exhibit the characteristic LRIM sequence signatures but lack the C-terminal coiled-coil domains. Conclusions The evolutionary plasticity of the LRIM LRR domains may provide templates for diverse recognition properties, while their coiled-coil domains could be involved in the formation of LRIM protein complexes or mediate interactions with other immune proteins. The conserved LRIM cysteine residue patterns are likely to be important for structural fold stability and the formation of protein complexes. These sequence-structure-function relations of mosquito LRIMs will serve to guide the experimental elucidation of their molecular roles in mosquito immunity.

  13. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained by use of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings and is highly nonlinear.

  14. Viroids: from genotype to phenotype just relying on RNA sequence and structural motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RicardoFlores

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson-Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunvioidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunvioidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures ?either global or local ? determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs.

  15. Structural insights and ab initio sequencing within the DING proteins family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.elias@weizmann.ac.il [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Liebschner, Dorothee [CRM2, Nancy Université (France); Gotthard, Guillaume; Chabriere, Eric [AFMB, Université Aix-Marseille II (France)

    2011-01-01

    DING proteins constitute a recently discovered protein family that is ubiquitous in eukaryotes. The structural insights and the physiological involvements of these intriguing proteins are hereby deciphered. DING proteins constitute an intriguing family of phosphate-binding proteins that was identified in a wide range of organisms, from prokaryotes and archae to eukaryotes. Despite their seemingly ubiquitous occurrence in eukaryotes, their encoding genes are missing from sequenced genomes. Such a lack has considerably hampered functional studies. In humans, these proteins have been related to several diseases, like atherosclerosis, kidney stones, inflammation processes and HIV inhibition. The human phosphate binding protein is a human representative of the DING family that was serendipitously discovered from human plasma. An original approach was developed to determine ab initio the complete and exact sequence of this 38 kDa protein by utilizing mass spectrometry and X-ray data in tandem. Taking advantage of this first complete eukaryotic DING sequence, a immunohistochemistry study was undertaken to check the presence of DING proteins in various mice tissues, revealing that these proteins are widely expressed. Finally, the structure of a bacterial representative from Pseudomonas fluorescens was solved at sub-angstrom resolution, allowing the molecular mechanism of the phosphate binding in these high-affinity proteins to be elucidated.

  16. Functional and immunological relevance of Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a sequence and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Passos, Lygia M F; Lis, Katarzyna; Kenneil, Rachel; Valdés, James J; Ferrolho, Joana; Tonk, Miray; Pohl, Anna E; Grubhoffer, Libor; Zweygarth, Erich; Shkap, Varda; Ribeiro, Mucio F B; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Kocan, Katherine M; de la Fuente, José

    2013-01-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is caused by cattle infection with the tick-borne bacterium, Anaplasma marginale. The major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) has been used as a genetic marker for identifying A. marginale strains based on N-terminal tandem repeats and a 5'-UTR microsatellite located in the msp1a gene. The MSP1a tandem repeats contain immune relevant elements and functional domains that bind to bovine erythrocytes and tick cells, thus providing information about the evolution of host-pathogen and vector-pathogen interactions. Here we propose one nomenclature for A. marginale strain classification based on MSP1a. All tandem repeats among A. marginale strains were classified and the amino acid variability/frequency in each position was determined. The sequence variation at immunodominant B cell epitopes was determined and the secondary (2D) structure of the tandem repeats was modeled. A total of 224 different strains of A. marginale were classified, showing 11 genotypes based on the 5'-UTR microsatellite and 193 different tandem repeats with high amino acid variability per position. Our results showed phylogenetic correlation between MSP1a sequence, secondary structure, B-cell epitope composition and tick transmissibility of A. marginale strains. The analysis of MSP1a sequences provides relevant information about the biology of A. marginale to design vaccines with a cross-protective capacity based on MSP1a B-cell epitopes. PMID:23776456

  17. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  18. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  19. SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    2015-01-01

    Selective 2' Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) is an accurate method for probing of RNA secondary structure. In existing SHAPE methods, the SHAPE probing signal is normalized to a no-reagent control to correct for the background caused by premature termination of the reverse transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES-based selection of cDNA-RNA hybrids on streptavidin beads effectively removes the large majority of background signal present in SHAPE probing data and that sequencing-based SHAPES data contain the same amount of RNA structure data as regular sequencing-based SHAPE data obtained through normalization to a no-reagent control. Moreover, the selection efficiently enriches for probed RNAs, suggesting that the SHAPES strategy will be useful for applications with high-background and low-probing signal such as in vivo RNA structure probing.

  20. Multilocus sequence subtyping and genetic structure of Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Longxian; Ning, Changshen; Liu, Aiqin; Zhao, Jinfeng; Feng, Yaoyu; Qi, Meng; Wang, Helei; Lv, Chaochao; Zhao, Guanghui; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    In this study, nine C. muris and 43 C. andersoni isolates from various animals in China were subtyped by a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) tool. DNA sequence analyses showed the presence of 1-2 subtypes of C. muris and 2-6 subtypes of C. andersoni at each of the four loci (MS1, MS2, MS3, and MS16), nine of which represented new subtypes. Altogether, two C. muris and 10 C. andersoni MLST subtypes were detected. Linkage disequilibrium analysis indicated although the overall population structure of the two parasites was clonal, the Chinese C. andersoni in cattle has an epidemic structure. Three and two clusters were produced in the C. muris and C. andersoni populations by Structure 2.3.3 analysis, with Chinese C. muris and C. andersoni substructures differing from other countries. Thus, this study suggested the prevalence of C. andersoni in China is not attributed to the introduction of dairy cattle. More studies involving more genetic loci and systematic sampling are needed to better elucidate the population genetic structure of C. muris and C. andersoni in the world and the genetic basis for the difference in host specificity among the two most common gastric parasites. PMID:22937094

  1. Testing statistical significance scores of sequence comparison methods with structure similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leunissen Jack AM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past years the Smith-Waterman sequence comparison algorithm has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing computing power. However, the quality and sensitivity of a database search is not only determined by the algorithm but also by the statistical significance testing for an alignment. The e-value is the most commonly used statistical validation method for sequence database searching. The CluSTr database and the Protein World database have been created using an alternative statistical significance test: a Z-score based on Monte-Carlo statistics. Several papers have described the superiority of the Z-score as compared to the e-value, using simulated data. We were interested if this could be validated when applied to existing, evolutionary related protein sequences. Results All experiments are performed on the ASTRAL SCOP database. The Smith-Waterman sequence comparison algorithm with both e-value and Z-score statistics is evaluated, using ROC, CVE and AP measures. The BLAST and FASTA algorithms are used as reference. We find that two out of three Smith-Waterman implementations with e-value are better at predicting structural similarities between proteins than the Smith-Waterman implementation with Z-score. SSEARCH especially has very high scores. Conclusion The compute intensive Z-score does not have a clear advantage over the e-value. The Smith-Waterman implementations give generally better results than their heuristic counterparts. We recommend using the SSEARCH algorithm combined with e-values for pairwise sequence comparisons.

  2. Shielding effects in 1-D transformation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Dunbar P.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1996-02-01

    A new derivation is presented for the fraction of material transformed as a function of time, X( t), for 1-D phase transformations which occur via nucleation and growth and which produce anisotropic particles. The derivation, which is coached in terms of aggressor and blocker particles, accounts for shielding effects and is more easily generalizable to more complex situations than a previous derivation for X( t) for this problem. Since this 1-D problem is equivalent to the 2-D case in the limit of low seeding density, the accuracy of our resulting formula for X( t) is assessed by illustrative calculations using elliptically shaped particles. It is found that the derived expression is nearly precise. In addition, we examine the influence of particle growth rate anisotropy and particle shape on the importance of shielding effects. We conclude that for growth rate anisotropies (ratio of major to minor axis growth rates) smaller than 5, shielding effects are not very significant. Also, particle shape appears to have a small effect on transformation kinetics.

  3. Large scale identification and categorization of protein sequences using structured logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, BjØrn Panella; Ifrim, Georgiana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Structured Logistic Regression (SLR) is a newly developed machine learning tool first proposed in the context of text categorization. Current availability of extensive protein sequence databases calls for an automated method to reliably classify sequences and SLR seems well-suited for this task. The classification of P-type ATPases, a large family of ATP-driven membrane pumps transporting essential cations, was selected as a test-case that would generate important biological information as well as provide a proof-of-concept for the application of SLR to a large scale bioinformatics problem. Results Using SLR, we have built classifiers to identify and automatically categorize P-type ATPases into one of 11 pre-defined classes. The SLR-classifiers are compared to a Hidden Markov Model approach and shown to be highly accurate and scalable. Representing the bulk of currently known sequences, we analysed 9.3 million sequences in the UniProtKB and attempted to classify a large number of P-type ATPases. To examine the distribution of pumps on organisms, we also applied SLR to 1,123 complete genomes from the Entrez genome database. Finally, we analysed the predicted membrane topology of the identified P-type ATPases. Conclusions Using the SLR-based classification tool we are able to run a large scale study of P-type ATPases. This study provides proof-of-concept for the application of SLR to a bioinformatics problem and the analysis of P-type ATPases pinpoints new and interesting targets for further biochemical characterization and structural analysis.

  4. [Compariative study of mitochondrial tRNA gene sequence and secondary structure among fifteen Predatory birds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Sun, Yi; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Qian; Wang, Li; Yu, Ye-Fei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2004-04-01

    Three major clusters of mitochondrial tRNA genes (tRNA(Ile) -tRNA(Gln) -tRNA(Met), tRNA(Trp)- tRNA(Ala) -tRNA(Asn)- tRNA(CYs) -tRNA(Tyr) and tRNA(His) tRNA(Ser)(AGY) -tRNA(Leu)(CUN) from 13 species of Predatory birds were amplified and sequenced. The length of these tRNA clusters was similar among species (212 approximately 214 bp, 353 approximately 362 bp, 205 approximately 208 bp, respectively), and 47% of the sequences were variable, 67% of which were involved in the loop regions. The stem regions were relatively conserved, and the variable base pairs were under the restriction of compensatory changes or G-U wobble pairing which could be regarded as mechanisms for maintaining a stable secondary structure. Maximum-parsimony (MP) and Neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees were constructed using all the tRNA gene sequences or stein-forming nucleotides with Caprimulgus indicus as outgroup. We found that the bootstrap values for branches of trees using the tRNA sequences were commonly higher than the others, therefore the phylogenetic relationship of Predatory birds reflected by these data may be closer to the truth. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that Accipitridae was closer to Strigidae instead of Falconidae, and the classification of Tytonidae was different from the conclusion from the previously morphological and DNA-DNA hybridization studies. By comparing the secondary structure among taxa we found that the characters of nucleotide insertions and deletions in some tRNA genes have synapomorphies, suggesting that these characters may be useful for resolving the phylogenetic relationship of different families in Predatory birds with higher phylogenetic performance. PMID:15487512

  5. Prediction of catalytic residues using Support Vector Machine with selected protein sequence and structural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Cathy H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for functional prediction. Knowledge of catalytic sites provides a valuable insight into protein function. Although many computational methods have been developed to predict catalytic residues and active sites, their accuracy remains low, with a significant number of false positives. In this paper, we present a novel method for the prediction of catalytic sites, using a carefully selected, supervised machine learning algorithm coupled with an optimal discriminative set of protein sequence conservation and structural properties. Results To determine the best machine learning algorithm, 26 classifiers in the WEKA software package were compared using a benchmarking dataset of 79 enzymes with 254 catalytic residues in a 10-fold cross-validation analysis. Each residue of the dataset was represented by a set of 24 residue properties previously shown to be of functional relevance, as well as a label {+1/-1} to indicate catalytic/non-catalytic residue. The best-performing algorithm was the Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO algorithm, which is a Support Vector Machine (SVM. The Wrapper Subset Selection algorithm further selected seven of the 24 attributes as an optimal subset of residue properties, with sequence conservation, catalytic propensities of amino acids, and relative position on protein surface being the most important features. Conclusion The SMO algorithm with 7 selected attributes correctly predicted 228 of the 254 catalytic residues, with an overall predictive accuracy of more than 86%. Missing only 10.2% of the catalytic residues, the method captures the fundamental features of catalytic residues and can be used as a "catalytic residue filter" to facilitate experimental identification of catalytic residues for proteins with known structure but unknown function.

  6. Mapping of the serotonin 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} autoreceptor gene (HTR1D) on chromosome 1 using a silent polymorphism in the coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, N.; Lappalainen, J.; Linnoila, M. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    Serotonin (5-HT){sub ID} receptors are 5-HT release-regulating autoreceptors in the human brain. Abnormalities in brain 5-HT function have been hypothesized in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism, mood disorders, eating disorders, impulsive violent behavior, and alcoholism. Thus, mutations occurring in 5-HT autoreceptors may cause or increase the vulnerability to any of these conditions. 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} and 5-HT{sub 1D{Beta}} subtypes have been previously localized to chromosomes 1p36.3-p34.3 and 6q13, respectively, using rodent-human hybrids and in situ localization. In this communication, we report the detection of a 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} receptor gene polymorphism by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding sequence. The polymorphism was used for fine scale linkage mapping of 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} on chromosome 1. This polymorphism should also be useful for linkage studies in populations and in families. Our analysis also demonstrates that functionally significant coding sequence variants of the 5-HT{sub 1D{alpha}} are probably not abundant either among alcoholics or in the general population. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. RNA secondary structure prediction from sequence alignments using a network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindewald, Eckart; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2006-03-01

    We present a machine learning method (a hierarchical network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers) that uses an RNA sequence alignment in order to predict a consensus RNA secondary structure. The input to the network is the mutual information, the fraction of complementary nucleotides, and a novel consensus RNAfold secondary structure prediction of a pair of alignment columns and its nearest neighbors. Given this input, the network computes a prediction as to whether a particular pair of alignment columns corresponds to a base pair. By using a comprehensive test set of 49 RFAM alignments, the program KNetFold achieves an average Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.81. This is a significant improvement compared with the secondary structure prediction methods PFOLD and RNAalifold. By using the example of archaeal RNase P, we show that the program can also predict pseudoknot interactions. PMID:16495232

  8. Sequence composition and environment effects on residue fluctuations in protein structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M

    2009-01-01

    The spectrum and scale of fluctuations in protein structures affect the range of cell phenomena, including stability of protein structures or their fragments, allosteric transitions and energy transfer. The study presents a statistical-thermodynamic analysis of relationship between the sequence composition and the distribution of residue fluctuations in protein-protein complexes. A one-node-per residue elastic network model accounting for the nonhomogeneous protein mass distribution and the inter-atomic interactions through the renormalized inter-residue potential is developed. Two factors, a protein mass distribution and a residue environment, were found to determine the scale of residue fluctuations. Surface residues undergo larger fluctuations than core residues, showing agreement with experimental observations. Ranking residues over the normalized scale of fluctuations yields a distinct classification of amino acids into three groups. The structural instability in proteins possibly relates to the high con...

  9. Implicit Structured Sequence Learning: An FMRI Study of the Structural Mere-Exposure Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Karl MagnusPetersson

    2014-01-01

    In this event-related FMRI study we investigated the effect of five days of implicit acquisition on preference classification by means of an artificial grammar learning (AGL) paradigm based on the structural mere-exposure effect and preference classification using a simple right-linear unification grammar. This allowed us to investigate implicit AGL in a proper learning design by including baseline measurements prior to grammar exposure. After 5 days of implicit acquisition, the FMRI results ...

  10. Combining sequence-based prediction methods and circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopic data to improve protein secondary structure determinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lees Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of sequence-based methods exist for protein secondary structure prediction. Protein secondary structures can also be determined experimentally from circular dichroism, and infrared spectroscopic data using empirical analysis methods. It has been proposed that comparable accuracy can be obtained from sequence-based predictions as from these biophysical measurements. Here we have examined the secondary structure determination accuracies of sequence prediction methods with the empirically determined values from the spectroscopic data on datasets of proteins for which both crystal structures and spectroscopic data are available. Results In this study we show that the sequence prediction methods have accuracies nearly comparable to those of spectroscopic methods. However, we also demonstrate that combining the spectroscopic and sequences techniques produces significant overall improvements in secondary structure determinations. In addition, combining the extra information content available from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism data with sequence methods also shows improvements. Conclusion Combining sequence prediction with experimentally determined spectroscopic methods for protein secondary structure content significantly enhances the accuracy of the overall results obtained.

  11. Crystal structure of 1?-(?-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-1,4a?,5,6,7,7a?-hexahydro-7?-methyl-5 -oxocyclopenta[c]pyran-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (verbenalin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of verbenalin (C17H24O10) is determined by X-ray diffraction analysis (diffractometer, ?CuK?=1.5418 A, number of observed reflections=1881, R=0.035). The crystals are monoclinic, a=5.765(1), b=8.215(1), and c=19.538(4) A; ?=91.1(1) deg.; V=916.1 A3; sp. gr. P21; and Z=2. Conformation of various rings of the molecule is worked out. The molecules in the structure are linked together by intra- and intermolecular O-H···O and C-H···O hydrogen bonds

  12. Structure of the Hybrid-2 type intramolecular human telomeric G-quadruplex in K+ solution: insights into structure polymorphism of the human telomeric sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Jixun; Carver, Megan; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Jones, Roger A; Yang, Danzhou

    2007-01-01

    Formation of the G-quadruplex in the human telomeric sequence can inhibit the activity of telomerase, thus the intramolecular telomeric G-quadruplexes have been considered as an attractive anticancer target. Information of intramolecular telomeric G-quadruplex structures formed under physiological conditions is important for structure-based drug design. Here, we report the first structure of the major intramolecular G-quadruplex formed in a native, non-modified human telomeric sequence in K+ ...

  13. PAIRpred: partner-specific prediction of interacting residues from sequence and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Geiss, Brian J; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel partner-specific protein-protein interaction site prediction method called PAIRpred. Unlike most existing machine learning binding site prediction methods, PAIRpred uses information from both proteins in a protein complex to predict pairs of interacting residues from the two proteins. PAIRpred captures sequence and structure information about residue pairs through pairwise kernels that are used for training a support vector machine classifier. As a result, PAIRpred presents a more detailed model of protein binding, and offers state of the art accuracy in predicting binding sites at the protein level as well as inter-protein residue contacts at the complex level. We demonstrate PAIRpred's performance on Docking Benchmark 4.0 and recent CAPRI targets. We present a detailed performance analysis outlining the contribution of different sequence and structure features, together with a comparison to a variety of existing interface prediction techniques. We have also studied the impact of binding-associated conformational change on prediction accuracy and found PAIRpred to be more robust to such structural changes than existing schemes. As an illustration of the potential applications of PAIRpred, we provide a case study in which PAIRpred is used to analyze the nature and specificity of the interface in the interaction of human ISG15 protein with NS1 protein from influenza A virus. Python code for PAIRpred is available at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/supplements/pairpred/. PMID:24243399

  14. Metal-dependent assembly of a tetranuclear copper(II) complex versus a 1D chain coordination polymer of cobalt(III) complex with N2O2-chelating Schiff-base ligand: Synthesis, characterization and crystal structures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khalaji, A.D.; Hadadzadeh, H.; Fejfarová, Karla; Dušek, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 29, ?. 2 (2010), s. 807-812. ISSN 0277-5387 Grant ostatní: GA AV ?R(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Schiff bases * crystal structure * Jana2006 * coordination chemistry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.033, year: 2010

  15. Structure of the FoxM1 DNA-recognition domain bound to a promoter sequence

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    FoxM1 is a member of the Forkhead family of transcription factors and is implicated in inducing cell proliferation and some forms of tumorigenesis. It binds promoter regions with a preference for tandem repeats of a consensus ‘TAAACA’ recognition sequence. The affinity of the isolated FoxM1 DNA-binding domain for this site is in the micromolar range, lower than observed for other Forkhead proteins. To explain these FoxM1 features, we determined the crystal structure of its DNA-binding domain ...

  16. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl

    2010-01-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2.0 profile–profile scoring function suitable for close homology modeling. The new computational costly remote homology-modeling algorithm is only engaged provided that no suitable PDB template is identi...

  17. The PETfold and PETcofold web servers for intra- and intermolecular structures of multiple RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Menzel, Karl Peter; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan

    gene. We present web servers to analyze multiple RNA sequences for common RNA structure and for RNA interaction sites. The web servers are based on the recent PET (Probabilistic Evolutionary and Thermodynamic) models PETfold and PETcofold, but add user friendly features ranging from a graphical layer...... to interactive usage of the predictors. Additionally, the web servers provide direct access to annotated RNA alignments, such as the Rfam 10.0 database and multiple alignments of 16 vertebrate genomes with human. The web servers are freely available at: http://rth.dk/resources/petfold/...

  18. Galaxy Structure as a Driver of the Star Formation Sequence Slope and Scatter

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, Katherine E; Bezanson, Rachel; Brammer, Gabriel B; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska T; Labbe, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina G; Nelson, Erica J; Rigby, Jane R; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that (1) star-forming galaxies follow a relation between their star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass (M$_{\\star}$), the "star-formation sequence", and (2) the SFRs of galaxies correlate with their structure, where star-forming galaxies are less concentrated than quiescent galaxies at fixed mass. Here, we consider whether the scatter and slope of the star-formation sequence is correlated with systematic variations in the Sersic indices, $n$, of galaxies across the SFR-M$_{\\star}$ plane. We use a mass-complete sample of 23,848 galaxies at $0.52$ (implying more dominant bulges) have significantly lower SFR/M$_{\\star}$ than the main ridgeline of the star-formation sequence. These results suggest that bulges in massive $z\\sim2$ galaxies are actively building up, where the stars in the central concentration are relatively young. At $z<1$, the presence of older bulges within star-forming galaxies lowers global SFR/M$_{\\star}$, decreasing the slope and contributing significantly to the ...

  19. Tracing crosslinguistic influences in structural sequences: What does key structure analysis have to offer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilmari Ivaska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the detection-based approach, this article detects statistically significant frequency differences between the data of written Finnish by learners from various language backgrounds. It analyses crosslinguistic influences in a data-driven manner, as the analysis focuses on the morphological forms and their combinations (n-grams that prove to be the best predictors of differing first languages. Following the methodology applied – key structure analysis – the article then goes on to analyse the found n-grams in terms of their inner and cotextual variation in order to find out which linguistic phenomenon actually distinguishes the subsets of data. The results show several quantitative differences that may be due to the crosslinguistic influences and they were all detected in a data-driven manner without hypotheses of potential differences. The method can be useful especially in finding and analysing elusive crosslinguistic influences that cannot be interpreted to be transferred directly from the respective first languages.

  20. Estimating Rheological Parameters of Anhydrite from Folded Evaporite sequences: Implications for Internal Dynamics of Salt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Urai, Janos L.; Raith, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Salt structures have been identified as a potential target for hydrocarbon, CO2, or radioactive waste storage. The most suitable locations for magazines are considered in the thick and relatively homogeneous rock salt layers. However, salt structures often consist of the evaporite sequence including rock salt intercalated with other rock types e.g.: anhydrite, gypsum, potassium and magnesium salt, calcite, dolomite, or shale. The presence of such heterogeneities causes a serious disturbance in the structure management. Detailed analysis of the internal architecture and internal dynamics of the salt structure are crucial for evaluating them as suitable repositories and also their long-term stability. The goal of this study is to analyse the influence of the presence of anhydrite layers on the internal dynamics of salt structures. Anhydrite is a common rock in evaporite sequences. Its physical and mechanical properties strongly differ from the properties of rock salt. The density of anhydrite is much higher than the density of salt, thus anhydrite is likely to sink in salt causing the disturbance of the surrounding structures. This suggestion was the starting point to the discussion about the long-term stability of the magazines in salt structures [1]. However, the other important parameter that has to be taken into account is the viscosity of anhydrite. The high viscosity ratio between salt and anhydrite can restrain the layer from sinking. The rheological behaviour of anhydrite has been studied in laboratory experiments [2], but the results only provide information about the short-term behaviour. The long-term behaviour can be best predicted using indirect methods e.g. based on the analysis of natural structures that developed over geological time scale. One of the most promising are fold structures, the shape of which is very sensitive to the rheological parameters of the deforming materials. Folds can develop in mechanically stratified materials during layer parallel shortening. Mechanical model have been developed to rigorously correlate rheological properties of rock to the fold shape. A quantitative fold shape analysis combined with the folding theory allows deciphering the rock rheology. In this study, we analyse anhydrite layers embedded in the rock salt from the Upper Permian Zechstein salt formation from Dutch offshore. The anhydrite layers are common intercalation in the sequence. Their thickness varies between few millimetres up to hundred meters. The layers are strongly deformed often forming fold structures, which can be observed on a wide range of scales: in core samples, mine galleries, and also in the seismic sections. For our analysis, we select single layer fold trains. Quantitative fold shape analysis is carried out using Fold Geometry Toolbox [3], which allows deciphering the viscosity ratio between anhydrite and salt. The results indicate that anhydrite layer is ca. 10 to 30 times more viscous than the embedding salt. Further, we use the estimated rheological parameters of anhydrite in the numerical analysis of the internal salt dynamics. We solve an incompressible Stokes equation in the presence of the gravity using the finite element method solver MILAMIN [4]. We show that the presence of denser and more viscous anhydrite layers in the tectonically stable regime is insignificant for the internal stability of the salt structures. [1] Chemia, Z., Koyi, H., Schmeling, H. 2008. Numerical modelling of rise and fall of a dense layer in salt diapirs. Geophysical Journal International, 172: 798-816. [2] Muller, W.H., Briegel, U. 1978. The rheological behaviour of polycrystalline Anhydrite. Eclogae Geol. Helv, 71(2): 397-407 [3] Adamuszek M., Schmid D.W., Dabrowski M. 2011. Fold geometry toolbox - Automated determination of fold shape, shortening, and material properties, Journal of Structural Geology, 33: 1406-1416. [4] Dabrowski, M., Krotkiewski, M., and Schmid, D. W. 2008. MILAMIN: MATLAB-based finite element method solver for large problems. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 9: Q04030.

  1. Amplification and thrifty single-molecule sequencing of recurrent somatic structural variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anand; Schwab, Richard; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-02-01

    Deletion of tumor-suppressor genes as well as other genomic rearrangements pervade cancer genomes across numerous types of solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. However, even for a specific rearrangement, the breakpoints may vary between individuals, such as the recurrent CDKN2A deletion. Characterizing the exact breakpoints for structural variants (SVs) is useful for designating patient-specific tumor biomarkers. We propose AmBre (Amplification of Breakpoints), a method to target SV breakpoints occurring in samples composed of heterogeneous tumor and germline DNA. Additionally, AmBre validates SVs called by whole-exome/genome sequencing and hybridization arrays. AmBre involves a PCR-based approach to amplify the DNA segment containing an SV's breakpoint and then confirms breakpoints using sequencing by Pacific Biosciences RS. To amplify breakpoints with PCR, primers tiling specified target regions are carefully selected with a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize off-target amplification and maximize efficiency at capturing all possible breakpoints within the target regions. To confirm correct amplification and obtain breakpoints, PCR amplicons are combined without barcoding and simultaneously long-read sequenced using a single SMRT cell. Our algorithm efficiently separates reads based on breakpoints. Each read group supporting the same breakpoint corresponds with an amplicon and a consensus amplicon sequence is called. AmBre was used to discover CDKN2A deletion breakpoints in cancer cell lines: A549, CEM, Detroit562, MOLT4, MCF7, and T98G. Also, we successfully assayed RUNX1-RUNX1T1 reciprocal translocations by finding both breakpoints in the Kasumi-1 cell line. AmBre successfully targets SVs where DNA harboring the breakpoints are present in 1:1000 mixtures. PMID:24307551

  2. PyMod: sequence similarity searches, multiple sequence-structure alignments, and homology modeling within PyMOL

    OpenAIRE

    Bramucci Emanuele; Paiardini Alessandro; Bossa Francesco; Pascarella Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent years, an exponential growing number of tools for protein sequence analysis, editing and modeling tasks have been put at the disposal of the scientific community. Despite the vast majority of these tools have been released as open source software, their deep learning curves often discourages even the most experienced users. Results A simple and intuitive interface, PyMod, between the popular molecular graphics system PyMOL and several other tools (i.e., [PSI-]BLA...

  3. Complete sequence of the genome of the human isolate of Andes virus CHI-7913: comparative sequence and protein structure analysis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    NICOLE D, TISCHLER; JORGE, FERNÁNDEZ; ILSE, MÜLLER; RODRIGO, MARTÍNEZ; HÉCTOR, GALENO; ELIECER, VILLAGRA; JUDITH, MORA; EUGENIO, RAMÍREZ; MARIO, ROSEMBLATT; PABLO D.T., VALENZUELA.

    Full Text Available We report here the complete genomic sequence of the Chilean human isolate of Andes virus CHI-7913. The S, M, and L genome segment sequences of this isolate are 1,802, 3,641 and 6,466 bases in length, with an overall GC content of 38.7%. These genome segments code for a nucleocapsid protein of 428 am [...] ino acids, a glycoprotein precursor protein of 1,138 amino acids and a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of 2,152 amino acids. In addition, the genome also has other ORFs coding for putative proteins of 34 to 103 amino acids. The encoded proteins have greater than 98% overall similarity with the proteins of Andes virus isolates AH-1 and Chile R123. Among other sequenced Hantavirus, CHI-7913 is more closely related to Sin Nombre virus, with an overall protein similarity of 92%. The characteristics of the encoded proteins of this isolate, such as hydrophobic domains, glycosylation sites, and conserved amino acid motifs shared with other Hantavirus and other members of the Bunyaviridae family, are identified and discussed.

  4. High quality protein sequence alignment by combining structural profile prediction and profile alignment using SABER-TOOTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastolla Ugo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein alignments are an essential tool for many bioinformatics analyses. While sequence alignments are accurate for proteins of high sequence similarity, they become unreliable as they approach the so-called 'twilight zone' where sequence similarity gets indistinguishable from random. For such distant pairs, structure alignment is of much better quality. Nevertheless, sequence alignment is the only choice in the majority of cases where structural data is not available. This situation demands development of methods that extend the applicability of accurate sequence alignment to distantly related proteins. Results We develop a sequence alignment method that combines the prediction of a structural profile based on the protein's sequence with the alignment of that profile using our recently published alignment tool SABERTOOTH. In particular, we predict the contact vector of protein structures using an artificial neural network based on position-specific scoring matrices generated by PSI-BLAST and align these predicted contact vectors. The resulting sequence alignments are assessed using two different tests: First, we assess the alignment quality by measuring the derived structural similarity for cases in which structures are available. In a second test, we quantify the ability of the significance score of the alignments to recognize structural and evolutionary relationships. As a benchmark we use a representative set of the SCOP (structural classification of proteins database, with similarities ranging from closely related proteins at SCOP family level, to very distantly related proteins at SCOP fold level. Comparing these results with some prominent sequence alignment tools, we find that SABERTOOTH produces sequence alignments of better quality than those of Clustal W, T-Coffee, MUSCLE, and PSI-BLAST. HHpred, one of the most sophisticated and computationally expensive tools available, outperforms our alignment algorithm at family and superfamily levels, while the use of SABERTOOTH is advantageous for alignments at fold level. Our alignment scheme will profit from future improvements of structural profiles prediction. Conclusions We present the automatic sequence alignment tool SABERTOOTH that computes pairwise sequence alignments of very high quality. SABERTOOTH is especially advantageous when applied to alignments of remotely related proteins. The source code is available at http://www.fkp.tu-darmstadt.de/sabertooth_project/, free for academic users upon request.

  5. Structure and stability effects of mutations designed to increase the primary sequence symmetry within the core region of a ?-trefoil

    OpenAIRE

    Brych, Stephen R.; Blaber, Sachiko I.; Logan, Timothy M.; Blaber, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) is a member of the ?-trefoil hyperfamily and exhibits a characteristic threefold symmetry of the tertiary structure. However, evidence of this symmetry is not readily apparent at the level of the primary sequence. This suggests that while selective pressures may exist to retain (or converge upon) a symmetric tertiary structure, other selective pressures have resulted in divergence of the primary sequence during evolution. Using intra-chain and hom...

  6. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  7. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O?Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R. (Tumaini); (NIH); (Duke); (Kilimanjaro Repro.); (IAVI)

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  8. Structural basis for sequence-specific recognition of DNA by TAL effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Dong

    2012-01-05

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors, secreted by phytopathogenic bacteria, recognize host DNA sequences through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat comprises 33 to 35 conserved amino acids and targets a specific base pair by using two hypervariable residues [known as repeat variable diresidues (RVDs)] at positions 12 and 13. Here, we report the crystal structures of an 11.5-repeat TAL effector in both DNA-free and DNA-bound states. Each TAL repeat comprises two helices connected by a short RVD-containing loop. The 11.5 repeats form a right-handed, superhelical structure that tracks along the sense strand of DNA duplex, with RVDs contacting the major groove. The 12th residue stabilizes the RVD loop, whereas the 13th residue makes a base-specific contact. Understanding DNA recognition by TAL effectors may facilitate rational design of DNA-binding proteins with biotechnological applications.

  9. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  10. Prediction of new high pressure structural sequence in thorium carbide: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, B. D., E-mail: bdsahoo@barc.gov.in; Joshi, K. D.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-05-14

    In the present work, we report the detailed electronic band structure calculations on thorium monocarbide. The comparison of enthalpies, derived for various phases using evolutionary structure search method in conjunction with first principles total energy calculations at several hydrostatic compressions, yielded a high pressure structural sequence of NaCl type (B1) ? Pnma ? Cmcm ? CsCl type (B2) at hydrostatic pressures of ?19?GPa, 36?GPa, and 200?GPa, respectively. However, the two high pressure experimental studies by Gerward et al. [J. Appl. Crystallogr. 19, 308 (1986); J. Less-Common Met. 161, L11 (1990)] one up to 36?GPa and other up to 50?GPa, on substoichiometric thorium carbide samples with carbon deficiency of ?20%, do not report any structural transition. The discrepancy between theory and experiment could be due to the non-stoichiometry of thorium carbide samples used in the experiment. Further, in order to substantiate the results of our static lattice calculations, we have determined the phonon dispersion relations for these structures from lattice dynamic calculations. The theoretically calculated phonon spectrum reveal that the B1 phase fails dynamically at ?33.8?GPa whereas the Pnma phase appears as dynamically stable structure around the B1 to Pnma transition pressure. Similarly, the Cmcm structure also displays dynamic stability in the regime of its structural stability. The B2 phase becomes dynamically stable much below the Cmcm to B2 transition pressure. Additionally, we have derived various thermophysical properties such as zero pressure equilibrium volume, bulk modulus, its pressure derivative, Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient and Gruneisen parameter at 300?K and compared these with available experimental data. Further, the behavior of zero pressure bulk modulus, heat capacity and Helmholtz free energy has been examined as a function temperature and compared with the experimental data of Danan [J. Nucl. Mater. 57, 280 (1975)].

  11. Prediction of new high pressure structural sequence in thorium carbide: A first principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, we report the detailed electronic band structure calculations on thorium monocarbide. The comparison of enthalpies, derived for various phases using evolutionary structure search method in conjunction with first principles total energy calculations at several hydrostatic compressions, yielded a high pressure structural sequence of NaCl type (B1) ? Pnma ? Cmcm ? CsCl type (B2) at hydrostatic pressures of ?19?GPa, 36?GPa, and 200?GPa, respectively. However, the two high pressure experimental studies by Gerward et al. [J. Appl. Crystallogr. 19, 308 (1986); J. Less-Common Met. 161, L11 (1990)] one up to 36?GPa and other up to 50?GPa, on substoichiometric thorium carbide samples with carbon deficiency of ?20%, do not report any structural transition. The discrepancy between theory and experiment could be due to the non-stoichiometry of thorium carbide samples used in the experiment. Further, in order to substantiate the results of our static lattice calculations, we have determined the phonon dispersion relations for these structures from lattice dynamic calculations. The theoretically calculated phonon spectrum reveal that the B1 phase fails dynamically at ?33.8?GPa whereas the Pnma phase appears as dynamically stable structure around the B1 to Pnma transition pressure. Similarly, the Cmcm structure also displays dynamic stability in the regime of its structural stability. The B2 phase becomes dynamically stable much below the Cmcm to B2 transition pressure. Additionally, we have derived various thermophysical properties such as zero pressure equilibrium volume, bulk modulus, its pressure derivative, Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient and Gruneisen parameter at 300?K and compared these with available experimental data. Further, the behavior of zero pressure bulk modulus, heat capacity and Helmholtz free energy has been examined as a function temperature and compared with the experimental data of Danan [J. Nucl. Mater. 57, 280 (1975)

  12. Ebola virus RNA editing depends on the primary editing site sequence and an upstream secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedi, Masfique; Hoenen, Thomas; Robertson, Shelly; Ricklefs, Stacy; Dolan, Michael A; Taylor, Travis; Falzarano, Darryl; Ebihara, Hideki; Porcella, Stephen F; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV), the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever and a biosafety level 4 pathogen, increases its genome coding capacity by producing multiple transcripts encoding for structural and nonstructural glycoproteins from a single gene. This is achieved through RNA editing, during which non-template adenosine residues are incorporated into the EBOV mRNAs at an editing site encoding for 7 adenosine residues. However, the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing is currently not understood. In this study, we report for the first time that minigenomes containing the glycoprotein gene editing site can undergo RNA editing, thereby eliminating the requirement for a biosafety level 4 laboratory to study EBOV RNA editing. Using a newly developed dual-reporter minigenome, we have characterized the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing, and have identified cis-acting sequences that are required for editing, located between 9 nt upstream and 9 nt downstream of the editing site. Moreover, we show that a secondary structure in the upstream cis-acting sequence plays an important role in RNA editing. EBOV RNA editing is glycoprotein gene-specific, as a stretch encoding for 7 adenosine residues located in the viral polymerase gene did not serve as an editing site, most likely due to an absence of the necessary cis-acting sequences. Finally, the EBOV protein VP30 was identified as a trans-acting factor for RNA editing, constituting a novel function for this protein. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the RNA editing mechanism of EBOV, further understanding of which might result in novel intervention strategies against this viral pathogen. PMID:24146620

  13. Cloning, Sequencing, Purification, and Crystal Structure of Grenache (Vitis vinifera) Polyphenol Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, V.; Reyes Grajeda, J; Blanco-Labra, A; Mendiola-Olaya, E; Smith, G; Moreno, A; Whitaker, J

    2010-01-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence (P93622{_}VITVI) of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) cDNA from grape Vitis vinifera L., cv Grenache, was found to encode a translated protein of 607 amino acids with an expected molecular weight of ca. 67 kDa and a predicted pI of 6.83. The translated amino acid sequence was 99%, identical to that of a white grape berry PPO (1) (5 out of 607 amino acid potential sequence differences). The protein was purified from Grenache grape berries by using traditional methods, and it was crystallized with ammonium acetate by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals were orthorhombic, space group C2221. The structure was obtained at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation using the 39 kDa isozyme of sweet potato PPO (PDB code: 1BT1) as a phase donor. The basic symmetry of the cell parameters (a, b, and c and {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma}) as well as in the number of asymmetric units in the unit cell of the crystals of PPO, differed between the two proteins. The structures of the two enzymes are quite similar in overall fold, the location of the helix bundles at the core, and the active site in which three histidines bind each of the two catalytic copper ions, and one of the histidines is engaged in a thioether linkage with a cysteine residue. The possibility that the formation of the Cys-His thioether linkage constitutes the activation step is proposed. No evidence of phosphorylation or glycoslyation was found in the electron density map. The mass of the crystallized protein appears to be only 38.4 kDa, and the processing that occurs in the grape berry that leads to this smaller size is discussed.

  14. Structural organization of glycophorin A and B genes: Glycophorin B gene evolved by homologous recombination at Alu repeat sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycophorins A (GPA) and B (GPB) are two major sialoglycoproteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. Here the authors present a comparison of the genomic structures of GPA and GPB developed by analyzing DNA clones isolated from a K562 genomic library. Nucleotide sequences of exon-intron junctions and 5' and 3' flanking sequences revealed that the GPA and GPB genes consist of 7 and 5 exons, respectively, and both genes have >95% identical sequence from the 5' flanking region to the region ? 1 kilobase downstream from the exon encoding the transmembrane regions. In this homologous part of the genes, GPB lacks one exon due to a point mutation at the 5' splicing site of the third intron, which inactivates the 5' cleavage event of splicing and leads to ligation of the second to the fourth exon. Following these very homologous sequences, the genomic sequences for GPA and GPB diverge significantly and no homology can be detected in their 3' end sequences. The analysis of the Alu sequences and their flanking direct repeat sequences suggest that an ancestral genomic structure has been maintained in the GPA gene, whereas the GPB gene has arisen from the acquisition of 3' sequences different from those of the GPA gene by homologous recombination at the Alu repeats during or after gene duplication

  15. Modelling the effect of structure and base sequence on DNA molecular electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA is a material that has the potential to be used in nanoelectronic devices as an active component. However, the electronic properties of DNA responsible for its conducting behaviour remain controversial. Here we use a self-consistent quantum molecular dynamics method to study the effect of DNA structure and base sequence on the energy involved when electrons are added or removed from isolated molecules and the transfer of the injected charge along the molecular axis when an electric field is applied. Our results show that the addition or removal of an electron from DNA molecules is most exothermic for poly(dC)-poly(dG) in its B-form and poly(dA)-poly(dT) in its A-form, and least exothermic in its Z-form. Additionally, when an electric field is applied to a charged DNA molecule along its axis, there is electron transfer through the molecule, regardless of the number and sign of the injected charge, the molecular structure and the base sequence. Results from these simulations provide useful information that is hard to obtain from experiments and needs to be considered for further modelling aiming to improve charge transport efficiency in nanoelectronic devices based on DNA

  16. Nuclear Pore Complex Protein Sequences Determine Overall Copolymer Brush Structure and Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, David; Kim, Yongwoon; Zandi, Roya; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Disordered proteins are an interesting class of unfolded protein biopolymers which are functionally versatile. Their sequences are unconstrained by a sequence-structure relationship, and allow for a wide range of chemical and physical polymer properties. The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) contains over one hundred of such proteins (FG nups), which collectively function to regulate the exchange of all materials between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We perform coarse grained simulations of both individual FG nups and grafted rings of nups mimicking the in vivo geometry of the NPC, supplemented with polymer brush modeling. Our results indicate that different regions or ``blocks'' of an individual FG nup can have distinctly different forms of disorder, and that this property appears to be a conserved feature across eukarya. Furthermore, this block structure at the individual protein level is critical to the formation of a unique higher-order polymer brush architecture. Because the interactions between FG nups may be modulated by certain forms of transport factors, our results indicate that transitions between brush morphologies could play an important role in regulating transport across the NPC, suggesting novel forms of gated transport across membrane pores with wide biomimetic applicability.

  17. Functional and Structural Overview of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Comprehensively Obtained from Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Suwa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the functional mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is very important for GPCR-related drug design. We have developed an integrated GPCR database (SEVENS http://sevens.cbrc.jp/ that includes 64,090 reliable GPCR genes comprehensively identified from 56 eukaryote genome sequences, and overviewed the sequences and structure spaces of the GPCRs. In vertebrates, the number of receptors for biological amines, peptides, etc. is conserved in most species, whereas the number of chemosensory receptors for odorant, pheromone, etc. significantly differs among species. The latter receptors tend to be single exon type or a few exon type and show a high ratio in the numbers of GPCRs, whereas some families, such as Class B and Class C receptors, have long lengths due to the presence of many exons. Statistical analyses of amino acid residues reveal that most of the conserved residues in Class A GPCRs are found in the cytoplasmic half regions of transmembrane (TM helices, while residues characteristic to each subfamily found on the extracellular half regions. The 69 of Protein Data Bank (PDB entries of complete or fragmentary structures could be mapped on the TM/loop regions of Class A GPCRs covering 14 subfamilies.

  18. Adapter la structure mésoscopique et l'orientation des polymères semi-cristallins et des polymères de cristaux liquides : confinement à 1D et 2D

    OpenAIRE

    Odarchenko, Yaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Le contrôle de la microstructure des matériaux organiques est crucial pour des applications pratiques telles que la photonique, la biomédecine ou encore le domaine très dynamique de l'électronique organique. Les études récentes ont montré une possibilité de contrôler la structure des polymères à l'échelle nanométrique en utilisant l'auto-assemblage supramoléculaire sous confinement spatial. Bien que de nombreuses études ont déjà été effectuées dans ce domaine, plusieurs questions essentielles...

  19. Creation and structure determination of an artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Motoyasu, E-mail: adachi.motoyasu@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Rumi; Kuroki, Ryota [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    An artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats was created and the structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure showed threefold symmetry even though there is an amino- and carboxy-terminal. The artificial protein with threefold symmetry may be useful as a scaffold to capture small materials with C3 symmetry. Symfoil-4P is a de novo protein exhibiting the threefold symmetrical ?-trefoil fold designed based on the human acidic fibroblast growth factor. First three asparagine–glycine sequences of Symfoil-4P are replaced with glutamine–glycine (Symfoil-QG) or serine–glycine (Symfoil-SG) sequences protecting from deamidation, and His-Symfoil-II was prepared by introducing a protease digestion site into Symfoil-QG so that Symfoil-II has three complete repeats after removal of the N-terminal histidine tag. The Symfoil-QG and SG and His-Symfoil-II proteins were expressed in Eschericha coli as soluble protein, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Symfoil-II was further purified by anion-exchange chromatography after removing the HisTag by proteolysis. Both Symfoil-QG and Symfoil-II were crystallized in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.8 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant at 293 K; several crystal forms were observed for Symfoil-QG and II. The maximum diffraction of Symfoil-QG and II crystals were 1.5 and 1.1 Å resolution, respectively. The Symfoil-II without histidine tag diffracted better than Symfoil-QG with N-terminal histidine tag. Although the crystal packing of Symfoil-II is slightly different from Symfoil-QG and other crystals of Symfoil derivatives having the N-terminal histidine tag, the refined crystal structure of Symfoil-II showed pseudo-threefold symmetry as expected from other Symfoils. Since the removal of the unstructured N-terminal histidine tag did not affect the threefold structure of Symfoil, the improvement of diffraction quality of Symfoil-II may be caused by molecular characteristics of Symfoil-II such as molecular stability.

  20. Creation and structure determination of an artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats was created and the structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure showed threefold symmetry even though there is an amino- and carboxy-terminal. The artificial protein with threefold symmetry may be useful as a scaffold to capture small materials with C3 symmetry. Symfoil-4P is a de novo protein exhibiting the threefold symmetrical ?-trefoil fold designed based on the human acidic fibroblast growth factor. First three asparagine–glycine sequences of Symfoil-4P are replaced with glutamine–glycine (Symfoil-QG) or serine–glycine (Symfoil-SG) sequences protecting from deamidation, and His-Symfoil-II was prepared by introducing a protease digestion site into Symfoil-QG so that Symfoil-II has three complete repeats after removal of the N-terminal histidine tag. The Symfoil-QG and SG and His-Symfoil-II proteins were expressed in Eschericha coli as soluble protein, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Symfoil-II was further purified by anion-exchange chromatography after removing the HisTag by proteolysis. Both Symfoil-QG and Symfoil-II were crystallized in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.8 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant at 293 K; several crystal forms were observed for Symfoil-QG and II. The maximum diffraction of Symfoil-QG and II crystals were 1.5 and 1.1 Å resolution, respectively. The Symfoil-II without histidine tag diffracted better than Symfoil-QG with N-terminal histidine tag. Although the crystal packing of Symfoil-II is slightly different from Symfoil-QG and other crystals of Symfoil derivatives having the N-terminal histidine tag, the refined crystal structure of Symfoil-II showed pseudo-threefold symmetry as expected from other Symfoils. Since the removal of the unstructured N-terminal histidine tag did not affect the threefold structure of Symfoil, the improvement of diffraction quality of Symfoil-II may be caused by molecular characteristics of Symfoil-II such as molecular stability

  1. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akutsu Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM. Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several functionally unconfirmed proteins that are highly likely to be involved in the repair process. A new web service, INTREPED, has been made available for the immediate search and annotation of DNA repair proteins in newly sequenced genomes. Conclusion Despite complexity due to a multitude of repair pathways, combinations of sequence, structure, and homology with Support Vector Machines offer good methods in addition to existing homology searches for DNA repair protein identification and functional annotation. Most importantly, this study has uncovered relationships between the size of a genome and a genome's available repair repetoire, and offers a number of new predictions as well as a prediction service, both which reduce the search time and cost for novel repair genes and proteins.

  2. 1-D hybrid code for FRM dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1-D radial hybrid code has been written to study the start-up of the FRM via neutral-beam injection. This code, named FROST (Field Reversed One-dimensional STart-up), models the plasma as azimuthal symmetric with no axial dependence. A multi-group method in energy and canonical angular momentum describes the large-orbit ions from the beam. This method is designed to be more efficient than those employing particle tracking, since the characteristic timescale of the simulation is the ion slowing down time, rather than the much shorter cyclotron period. A time-differentiated Grad-Shafranov equation couples the ion current to massless fluid equations describing electrons and low energy ions. Flux coordinates are used in this fluid model, in preference to an Eulerian framework, so that coupling of plasma at the two different radii of a closed flux surface may be treated with ease. Since a fluid treatment for electrons is invalid near a field null, a separate model for the electron current has been included for this region, a unique feature. Results of simulation of injection into a 2XIIB-like plasma are discussed. Electron currents are found to retard, but not prevent reversal of the magnetic field at the plasma center

  3. Influence of loading sequence and stress ratio on Fatigue damage accumulation of a structural component

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hélder F. S. G., Pereira; Abílio M.P. de, Jesus; Alfredo S., Ribeiro; António A., Fernandes.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta resultados experimentais relativos à acumulação de dano de fadiga de um componente estrutural de aço P355NL1. O componente estrutural é uma placa rectangular com duplo entalhe. Foram aplicadas sequências de dois e múltiplos blocos de carga de amplitude constante, para várias co [...] mbinações de razões de tensão remotas, nomeadamente R=0, R=0.15 e R=0.3. Também foram analisados os efeitos da aplicação de blocos de amplitude variável, aplicados de acordo com um espectro de carga predefinido. Este estudo foi complementado com resultados de ensaios realizados em amplitude constante, os quais serviram para os cálculos de acumulação de dano. Em geral, o carregamento por blocos demonstra que o dano provocado por fadiga apresenta uma evolução não linear com o número de ciclos de carga, sendo esta evolução de dano função da sequência de carga, do nível de tensão e da razão de tensões. Geralmente, a aplicação de carregamentos de amplitude variável indicia um importante efeito da razão de tensões na acumulação de dano por fadiga. Particularmente, é observado um efeito claro da sequência de carga nos carregamentos compostos por dois blocos de carga, com razão de tensões nula. Para as outras razões de tensões (altas), os efeitos da sequência de carga são praticamente desprezáveis; contudo a evolução de dano continua a ser não linear. Abstract in english This paper presents experimental results about the fatigue damage accumulation behaviour of a structural component made of P355NL1 steel. The structural component is a rectangular double notched plate. Two and multiple alternated constant amplitude block sequences were applied for various combinatio [...] ns of remote stress ranges. Three stress ratios were investigated, namely R=0, R=0.15 and R=0.3. Variable amplitude blocks were also investigated according predefined stress spectra. Constant amplitude data was also generated which is applied for damage calculation purposes. In general, the block loading demonstrates that fatigue damage evolves nonlinearly with the number of loading cycles, function of the load sequence, stress level and stress ratios. Generally, the application of variable amplitude loading suggests an important stress ratio effect on fatigue damage accumulation. In particular, a clear load sequence effect is verified for the two block loading, with null stress ratio. For the other (higher) stress ratios, the load sequence effects are almost negligible; however the damage evolution still is non-linear.

  4. IntFOLD: an integrated server for modelling protein structures and functions from amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, Liam J; Atkins, Jennifer D; Salehe, Bajuna R; Shuid, Ahmad N; Roche, Daniel B

    2015-07-01

    IntFOLD is an independent web server that integrates our leading methods for structure and function prediction. The server provides a simple unified interface that aims to make complex protein modelling data more accessible to life scientists. The server web interface is designed to be intuitive and integrates a complex set of quantitative data, so that 3D modelling results can be viewed on a single page and interpreted by non-expert modellers at a glance. The only required input to the server is an amino acid sequence for the target protein. Here we describe major performance and user interface updates to the server, which comprises an integrated pipeline of methods for: tertiary structure prediction, global and local 3D model quality assessment, disorder prediction, structural domain prediction, function prediction and modelling of protein-ligand interactions. The server has been independently validated during numerous CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction) experiments, as well as being continuously evaluated by the CAMEO (Continuous Automated Model Evaluation) project. The IntFOLD server is available at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/bioinf/IntFOLD/. PMID:25820431

  5. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  6. An indirect generation of 1D M(II)-2,5-dihydroxybenzoquinone coordination polymers, their structural rearrangements and generation of materials with a high affinity for H2, CO2 and CH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Brendan F; Dharma, A David; Dyett, Brendan; Hudson, Timothy A; Maynard-Casely, Helen; Kingsbury, Christopher J; McCormick, Laura J; Robson, Richard; Sutton, Ashley L; White, Keith F

    2016-01-19

    A series of solid-state structural transformations are found to accompany desolvation of relatively simple coordination polymers to yield materials that exhibit unexpected gas sorbing properties. Reaction of 1,2,4,5-tetrahydroxybenzene with M(II) salts (M = Mg, or Zn) in an alcohol/water solution in the presence of air affords cis-M(II)(C6H2O4(-II))(H2O)2·2H2O·xROH, (M = Mg, or Zn), crankshaft-like chains in which the absolute configurations of the chiral metal centres follow the pattern ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?, and are hydrogen bonded together to generate spacious channels. When crystals of the crankshaft chain are air dried the crystals undergo a single crystal-to-powder rearrangement to form linear trans-M(II)(C6H2O4(-II))(H2O)2 chains. Further dehydration yields microporous solids that reversibly sorb H2, CH4 and CO2 with high sorption enthalpies. PMID:26733002

  7. UET: a database of evolutionarily-predicted functional determinants of protein sequences that cluster as functional sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lua, Rhonald C; Wilson, Stephen J; Konecki, Daniel M; Wilkins, Angela D; Venner, Eric; Morgan, Daniel H; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of proteins underlie most aspects of biology and their mutational perturbations often cause disease. To identify the molecular determinants of function as well as targets for drugs, it is central to characterize the important residues and how they cluster to form functional sites. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) achieves this by ranking the functional and structural importance of the protein sequence positions. ET uses evolutionary distances to estimate functional distances and correlates genotype variations with those in the fitness phenotype. Thus, ET ranks are worse for sequence positions that vary among evolutionarily closer homologs but better for positions that vary mostly among distant homologs. This approach identifies functional determinants, predicts function, guides the mutational redesign of functional and allosteric specificity, and interprets the action of coding sequence variations in proteins, people and populations. Now, the UET database offers pre-computed ET analyses for the protein structure databank, and on-the-fly analysis of any protein sequence. A web interface retrieves ET rankings of sequence positions and maps results to a structure to identify functionally important regions. This UET database integrates several ways of viewing the results on the protein sequence or structure and can be found at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/uet/. PMID:26590254

  8. A rostro-caudal gradient of structured sequence processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddén, Julia; Bahlmann, Jörg

    2012-07-19

    In this paper, we present two novel perspectives on the function of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). First, a structured sequence processing perspective facilitates the search for functional segregation within the LIFG and provides a way to express common aspects across cognitive domains including language, music and action. Converging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies suggests that the LIFG is engaged in sequential processing in artificial grammar learning, independently of particular stimulus features of the elements (whether letters, syllables or shapes are used to build up sequences). The LIFG has been repeatedly linked to processing of artificial grammars across all different grammars tested, whether they include non-adjacent dependencies or mere adjacent dependencies. Second, we apply the sequence processing perspective to understand how the functional segregation of semantics, syntax and phonology in the LIFG can be integrated in the general organization of the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Recently, it was proposed that the functional organization of the lateral PFC follows a rostro-caudal gradient, such that more abstract processing in cognitive control is subserved by more rostral regions of the lateral PFC. We explore the literature from the viewpoint that functional segregation within the LIFG can be embedded in a general rostro-caudal abstraction gradient in the lateral PFC. If the lateral PFC follows a rostro-caudal abstraction gradient, then this predicts that the LIFG follows the same principles, but this prediction has not yet been tested or explored in the LIFG literature. Integration might provide further insights into the functional architecture of the LIFG and the lateral PFC. PMID:22688637

  9. Detection of structural DNA variation from next generation sequencing data: a review of informatic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Haley J; Duncavage, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS), or massively paralleled sequencing, refers to a collective group of methods in which numerous sequencing reactions take place simultaneously, resulting in enormous amounts of sequencing data for a small fraction of the cost of Sanger sequencing. Typically short (50–250 bp), NGS reads are first mapped to a reference genome, and then variants are called from the mapped data. While most NGS applications focus on the detection of single nucleotide variants (SNVs)...

  10. Determination of protein folding kinetic types using sequence and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Tuo; Gao, Jianzhao; Ruan, Jishou; Shen, Shiyi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Proteins fold through a two-state (TS), with no visible intermediates, or a multi-state (MS), via at least one intermediate, process. We analyze sequence-derived factors that determine folding types by introducing a novel sequence-based folding type predictor called FOKIT. This method implements a logistic regression model with six input features which hybridize information concerning amino acid composition and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility. FOKIT provides predictions with average Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) between 0.58 and 0.91 measured using out-of-sample tests on four benchmark datasets. These results are shown to be competitive or better than results of four modern predictors. We also show that FOKIT outperforms these methods when predicting chains that share low similarity with the chains used to build the model, which is an important advantage given the limited number of annotated chains. We demonstrate that inclusion of solvent accessibility helps in discrimination of the folding kinetic types and that three of the features constitute statistically significant markers that differentiate TS and MS folders. We found that the increased content of exposed Trp and buried Leu are indicative of the MS folding, which implies that the exposure/burial of certain hydrophobic residues may play important role in the formation of the folding intermediates. Our conclusions are supported by two case studies. PMID:21082205

  11. Star formation along the Hubble sequence: Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, R M González; Pérez, E; García-Benito, R; Fernández, R López; Lacerda, E A D; Cortijo-Ferrero, C; de Amorim, A L; Asari, N Vale; Sánchez, S F; Walcher, C J; Wisotzki, L; Mast, D; Alves, J; Ascasibar, Y; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Galbany, L; Kennicutt, R C; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Mollá, M; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Vílchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with IFS, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to obtain radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past, and the local sSFR. To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF) we stack the individual radial profiles in bins of galaxy morphology and stellar masses. Our main results are: a) The intensity of SFR shows declining profiles that exhibit very little differences between spirals. The dispersion between the profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals. This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant intensity of SFR b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outwards, wi...

  12. Cluster Segmentation of Thermal Image Sequences Using kd-Tree Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ?wita, R.; Suszy?ski, Z.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents optimization methods for the K-means segmentation algorithm for a sequence of thermal images. Images of the sample response in the frequency domain to the thermal stimulation with a known spectrum were subjected to cluster segmentation, grouping pixels with similar frequency characteristics. Compared were all pixel characteristics in the function of the frame number and grouped using the minimal sum of deviations of the pixels from their segment mean for all the frames of the processed image sequence. A new initialization method for the K-means algorithm, using density information, was used. A K-means algorithm with a kd-tree structure C# implementation was tested for speed and accuracy. This algorithm divides the set of pixels to the subspaces in the hierarchy of a binary tree. This allows skipping the calculation of distances of pixels to some centroids and pruning a set of centroid clusters through the hierarchy tree. Results of the segmentation were compared with the K-means and FCM algorithm MATLAB implementations.

  13. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus

    2010-01-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2.0 profile-profile scoring function suitable for close homology modeling. The new computational costly remote homology-modeling algorithm is only engaged provided that no suitable PDB template is identified in the initial search. CPHmodels-3.0 was benchmarked in the CASP8 competition and produced models for 94% of the targets (117 out of 128), 74% were predicted as high reliability models (87 out of 117). These achieved an average RMSD of 4.6 A when superimposed to the 3D structure. The remaining 26% low reliably models (30 out of 117) could superimpose to the true 3D structure with an average RMSD of 9.3 A. These performance values place the CPHmodels-3.0 method in the group of high performing 3D prediction tools. Beside its accuracy, one of the important features of the method is its speed. For most queries, the response time of the server is

  14. Estimation of genetic structure of a Mycosphaerella musicola population using inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixouto, Y S; Dórea Bragança, C A; Andrade, W B; Ferreira, C F; Haddad, F; Oliveira, S A S; Darosci Brito, F S; Miller, R N G; Amorim, E P

    2015-01-01

    Among the diseases affecting banana (Musa sp), yellow Sigatoka, caused by the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella musicola Leach, is considered one of the most important in Brazil, causing losses throughout the year. Understanding the genetic structure of pathogen populations will provide insight into the life history of pathogens, including the evolutionary processes occurring in agrosystems. Tools for estimating the possible emergence of pathogen variants with altered pathogenicity, virulence, or aggressiveness, as well as resistance to systemic fungicides, can also be developed from such data. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity and population genetics of M. musicola in the main banana-producing regions in Brazil. A total of 83 isolates collected from different banana cultivars in the Brazilian states of Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, and Minas Gerais were evaluated using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. High variability was detected between the isolates, and 85.5% of the haplotypes were singletons in the populations. The highest source of genetic diversity (97.22%) was attributed to variations within populations. Bayesian cluster analysis revealed the presence of 2 probable ancestral groups, however, showed no relationship to population structure in terms of collection site, state of origin, or cultivar. Similarly, we detected noevidence of genetic recombination between individuals within different states, indicating that asexual cycles play a major role in M. musicola reproduction and that long-distance dispersal of the pathogen is the main factor contributing to the lack of population structure in the fungus. PMID:26214487

  15. Anti-Interference Receiver Structures for Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Li-Der; Ueng, Fang-Biau

    Conventional narrowband interference (NBI) rejection algorithms often assumed perfect pseudo-noise (PN) code synchronization. The functions of NBI rejection and code tracking are performed separately and independently by an adaptive filter and a code tracking loop, respectively. This paper presents two new receiver structures for direct sequence spread spectrum (DS/SS) systems, one operates in coherent mode and the other operates in noncoherent mode. Both receivers are designed to suppress NBI and minimize tracking jitter. Numerical results show that the proposed coherent receiver performs as good as the conventional receiver that uses an LMS NBI rejection filter with zero tracking jitter. The noncoherent receiver, when compared with the coherent one, suffers less than 3dB degradation for bit error probability smaller than 10-3.

  16. The D1-D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal DNA as barcode for ciliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeck, T; Przybos, E; Dunthorn, M

    2014-05-01

    Ciliates are a major evolutionary lineage within the alveolates, which are distributed in nearly all habitats on our planet and are an essential component for ecosystem function, processes and stability. Accurate identification of these unicellular eukaryotes through, for example, microscopy or mating type reactions is reserved to few specialists. To satisfy the demand for a DNA barcode for ciliates, which meets the standard criteria for DNA barcodes defined by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), we here evaluated the D1-D2 region of the ribosomal DNA large subunit (LSU-rDNA). Primer universality for the phylum Ciliophora was tested in silico with available database sequences as well as in the laboratory with 73 ciliate species, which represented nine of 12 ciliate classes. Primers tested in this study were successful for all tested classes. To test the ability of the D1-D2 region to resolve conspecific and congeneric sequence divergence, 63 Paramecium strains were sampled from 24 mating species. The average conspecific D1-D2 variation was 0.18%, whereas congeneric sequence divergence averaged 4.83%. In pairwise genetic distance analyses, we identified a D1-D2 sequence divergence of <0.6% as an ideal threshold to discriminate Paramecium species. Using this definition, only 3.8% of all conspecific and 3.9% of all congeneric sequence comparisons had the potential of false assignments. Neighbour-joining analyses inferred monophyly for all taxa but for two Paramecium octaurelia strains. Here, we present a protocol for easy DNA amplification of single cells and voucher deposition. In conclusion, the presented data pinpoint the D1-D2 region as an excellent candidate for an official CBOL barcode for ciliated protists. PMID:24165195

  17. Internal tectonic structure of the Central American Wadati-Benioff zone based on analysis of aftershock sequences.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špi?ák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Van?k, Ji?í; B?hounková, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Ro?. 112, B9 (2007), B09304/1-B09304/18. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA205/03/1203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : Wadati-Benioff zone * aftershocks sequences * internal tectonic structure Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.953, year: 2007

  18. Involvement of interstitial telomeric sequences in two new cases of mosaicism for autosomal structural rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Jonathan; Receveur, Aline; Jedraszak, Guillaume; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Renaldo, Florence; Gondry, Jean; Andrieux, Joris; Copin, Henri; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Portnoï, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    Mosaicism for an autosomal structural rearrangement that does not involve ring or marker chromosomes is rare. The mechanisms responsible for genome instability have not always been explained. Several studies have shown that interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs), involved in some mosaic constitutional anomalies, are potent sources of genomic instability. Here we describe two cases of mosaicism for uncommon constitutional autosomal rearrangements, involving ITSs, identified by karyotyping and characterized by FISH and SNP-array analysis. The first patient, a boy with global developmental delay, had a rare type of pure distal 1q inverted duplication (1q32-qter), attached to the end of the short arm of the same chromosome 1, in approximately 35% of his cells. The second patient, a phenotypically normal man, was diagnosed as having mosaic for a balanced non-reciprocal translocation of the distal segment of 7q (7q33qter), onto the terminal region of the short arm of a whole chromosome 12, in approximately 80% of his cells. The remaining 20% of the cells showed an unbalanced state of the translocation, with only the der(7) chromosome. He was ascertained through his malformed fetus carrying a non-mosaic partial monosomy 7q, identified at prenatal diagnosis. We show that pan-telomeric and subtelomeric sequences were observed at the interstitial junction point of the inv dup(1q) and of the der(12)t(7;12), respectively. The present cases and review of the literature suggest that the presence of ITSs at internal sites of the chromosomes may explain mechanisms of the patients's mosaic structural rearrangements. PMID:25428228

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  20. Predicting deleterious nsSNPs: an analysis of sequence and structural attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saqi Mansoor AS

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been an explosion in the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within public databases. In this study we focused on non-synonymous protein coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs, some associated with disease and others which are thought to be neutral. We describe the distribution of both types of nsSNPs using structural and sequence based features and assess the relative value of these attributes as predictors of function using machine learning methods. We also address the common problem of balance within machine learning methods and show the effect of imbalance on nsSNP function prediction. We show that nsSNP function prediction can be significantly improved by 100% undersampling of the majority class. The learnt rules were then applied to make predictions of function on all nsSNPs within Ensembl. Results The measure of prediction success is greatly affected by the level of imbalance in the training dataset. We found the balanced dataset that included all attributes produced the best prediction. The performance as measured by the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC varied between 0.49 and 0.25 depending on the imbalance. As previously observed, the degree of sequence conservation at the nsSNP position is the single most useful attribute. In addition to conservation, structural predictions made using a balanced dataset can be of value. Conclusion The predictions for all nsSNPs within Ensembl, based on a balanced dataset using all attributes, are available as a DAS annotation. Instructions for adding the track to Ensembl are at http://www.brightstudy.ac.uk/das_help.html

  1. In vivo 1D and 2D correlation MR spectroscopy of the soleus muscle at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Saadallah; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Wald, Lawrence L.; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    2010-05-01

    AimThis study aims to (1) undertake and analyse 1D and 2D MR correlation spectroscopy from human soleus muscle in vivo at 7T, and (2) determine T1 and T2 relaxation time constants at 7T field strength due to their importance in sequence design and spectral quantitation. MethodSix healthy, male volunteers were consented and scanned on a 7T whole-body scanner (Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany). Experiments were undertaken using a 28 cm diameter detunable birdcage coil for signal excitation and an 8.5 cm diameter surface coil for signal reception. The relaxation time constants, T1 and T2 were recorded using a STEAM sequence, using the 'progressive saturation' method for the T1 and multiple echo times for T2. The 2D L-Correlated SpectroscopY (L-COSY) method was employed with 64 increments (0.4 ms increment size) and eight averages per scan, with a total time of 17 min. ResultsT1 and T2 values for the metabolites of interest were determined. The L-COSY spectra obtained from the soleus muscle provided information on lipid content and chemical structure not available, in vivo, at lower field strengths. All molecular fragments within multiple lipid compartments were chemically shifted by 0.20-0.26 ppm at this field strength. 1D and 2D L-COSY spectra were assigned and proton connectivities were confirmed with the 2D method. ConclusionIn vivo 1D and 2D spectroscopic examination of muscle can be successfully recorded at 7T and is now available to assess lipid alterations as well as other metabolites present with disease. T1 and T2 values were also determined in soleus muscle of male healthy volunteers.

  2. GntR family of regulators in Mycobacterium smegmatis: a sequence and structure based characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Akash

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium smegmatis is fast growing non-pathogenic mycobacteria. This organism has been widely used as a model organism to study the biology of other virulent and extremely slow growing species like Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Based on the homology of the N-terminal DNA binding domain, the recently sequenced genome of M. smegmatis has been shown to possess several putative GntR regulators. A striking characteristic feature of this family of regulators is that they possess a conserved N-terminal DNA binding domain and a diverse C-terminal domain involved in the effector binding and/or oligomerization. Since the physiological role of these regulators is critically dependent upon effector binding and operator sites, we have analysed and classified these regulators into their specific subfamilies and identified their potential binding sites. Results The sequence analysis of M. smegmatis putative GntRs has revealed that FadR, HutC, MocR and the YtrA-like regulators are encoded by 45, 8, 8 and 1 genes respectively. Further out of 45 FadR-like regulators, 19 were classified into the FadR group and 26 into the VanR group. All these proteins showed similar secondary structural elements specific to their respective subfamilies except MSMEG_3959, which showed additional secondary structural elements. Using the reciprocal BLAST searches, we further identified the orthologs of these regulators in Bacillus subtilis and other mycobacteria. Since the expression of many regulators is auto-regulatory, we have identified potential operator sites for a number of these GntR regulators by analyzing the upstream sequences. Conclusion This study helps in extending the annotation of M. smegmatis GntR proteins. It identifies the GntR regulators of M. smegmatis that could serve as a model for studying orthologous regulators from virulent as well as other saprophytic mycobacteria. This study also sheds some light on the nucleotide preferences in the target-motifs of GntRs thus providing important leads for initiating the experimental characterization of these proteins, construction of the gene regulatory network for these regulators and an understanding of the influence of these proteins on the physiology of the mycobacteria.

  3. Structural characterization of genomes by large scale sequence-structure threading: application of reliability analysis in structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunham Robert C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We establish that the occurrence of protein folds among genomes can be accurately described with a Weibull function. Systems which exhibit Weibull character can be interpreted with reliability theory commonly used in engineering analysis. For instance, Weibull distributions are widely used in reliability, maintainability and safety work to model time-to-failure of mechanical devices, mechanisms, building constructions and equipment. Results We have found that the Weibull function describes protein fold distribution within and among genomes more accurately than conventional power functions which have been used in a number of structural genomic studies reported to date. It has also been found that the Weibull reliability parameter ? for protein fold distributions varies between genomes and may reflect differences in rates of gene duplication in evolutionary history of organisms. Conclusions The results of this work demonstrate that reliability analysis can provide useful insights and testable predictions in the fields of comparative and structural genomics.

  4. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju CELESTINO LADU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  5. A simple quasi-1D model of Fibonacci anyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger; Clarke, David; Alicea, Jason; Fendley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    There exists various ways of understanding the topological properties of Ising anyons--from simple free-fermion toy models to formal topological quantum field theory. For other types of anyons simple toy models rarely exist; their properties have to be obtained using formal self-consistency relations. We explore a family of gapped 1D local bosonic models that in a certain limit become trivial to solve and provide an intuitive picture for Fibonacci anyons. One can interpret this model as a quasi-1D wire that forms the building block of a 2D topological phase with Fibonacci anyons. With this interpretation all topological properties of the Fibonacci anyons become manifest including ground state degeneracy and braid relations. We conjecture that the structure of the model is protected by an emergent symmetry analogous to fermion parity. 1) NSF Grant DMR-1341822 2) Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation. 3) NSERC-PGSD.

  6. Structural plays in Ellesmerian sequence and correlative strata of the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Potter, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    Reservoirs in deformed rocks of the Ellesmerian sequence in southern NPRA are assigned to two hydrocarbon plays, the Thrust-Belt play and the Ellesmerian Structural play. The two plays differ in that the Thrust-Belt play consists of reservoirs located in allochthonous strata in the frontal part of the Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt, whereas those of the Ellesmerian Structural play are located in autochthonous or parautochthonous strata at deeper structural levels north of the Thrust-Belt play. Together, these structural plays are expected to contain about 3.5 TCF of gas but less than 6 million barrels of oil. These two plays are analyzed using a two-stage deformational model. The first stage of deformation occurred during the Neocomian, when distal strata of the Ellesmerian sequence were imbricated and assembled into deformational wedges emplaced northward onto regionally south-dipping authochon at 140-120 Ma. In the mid-Cretaceous following cessation of the deformation, the Colville basin, the foreland basin to the orogen, was filled with a thick clastic succession. During the second stage of deformation at about 60 Ma (early Tertiary), the combined older orogenic belt-foreland basin system was involved in another episode of north-vergent contractional deformation that deformed pre-existing stratigraphic and structurally trapped reservoir units, formed new structural traps, and caused significant amounts of uplift, although the amount of shortening was relatively small in comparison to the first episode of deformation. Hydrocarbon generation from source strata (Shublik Formation, Kingak Shale, and Otuk Formation) and migration into stratigraphic traps occurred primarily by sedimentary burial principally between 100-90 Ma, between the times of the two episodes of deformation. Subsequent burial caused deep stratigraphic traps to become overmature, cracking oil to gas, and some new generation to begin progressively higher in the section. Structural disruption of the traps in the Early Tertiary is hypothesized to have released sequestered hydrocarbons and caused remigration into newly formed structural traps formed at higher structural levels. Because of the generally high maturation of the Colville basin at the time of the deformation and remigration, most of the hydrocarbons available to fill traps were gas. In the the Thrust-Belt play, the primary reservoir lithology is expected to be dolomitic carbonate rocks of the Lisburne Group, which contain up to 15% porosity. Antiformal stacks of imbricated Lisburne Group strata form the primary trapping configuration, with chert and shale of the overlying Etivluk Group forming seals on closures. Traps are expected to have been charged primarily with remigrated gas, but oil generated from local sources in the Otuk Formation may have filled some traps at high structural levels. The timing for migration of gas into traps is excellent, but only moderate for oil because peak oil generation for the play as a whole occurred 30 to 40 m.y. before trap formation. Reservoir and seal quality in the play are questionable, reducing the likelyhood of hydrocarbon accumulations being present in the play. Our analysis suggests that the play will hold 5.7 million barrels of technically recoverable oil and 1.5 TCF gas (mean values). In the Ellesmerian Stuctural play, the primary reservoir lithologies will be dolomitic carbonate rocks of the Lisburne Group and, less likely, clastic units in the Ellesmerian sequence. Traps in the play are anticlinal closures caused by small amounts of strain in the footwall below the basal detachment for most early Tertiary thrusting. Because these traps lie beneath the main source rock units (Shublik, Kingak, lower Brookian sequence), reservoirs that are juxtaposed by faulting against source-rock units are expected to have the most favorable migration pathways. The charge will be primarily remigrated gas; no oil is expected because of the great depths (15,000 to 26,000 ft) and consequent high thermal maturity of this play. Although the the probability of charge an

  7. Sequence variability of bovine leukemia virus env gene and its relevance to the structure and antigenicity of the glycoproteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoun, R. Z.; Morisson, M; Rebeyrotte, N; Busetta, B; Couez, D; Kettmann, R.; Hospital, M; Guillemain, B.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the env genes of seven bovine leukemia viruses and the encoded peptide sequence were compared, with the objective of (i) determining the genetic distance separating bovine leukemia virus isolates from different geographical regions, (ii) identifying particular amino acids that contribute to the sequential and conformational epitopes, and (iii) relating such epitopes to their projected position in a three-dimensional model of the structure of the gp51 surface glycop...

  8. Insight into G-DNA Structural Polymorphism and Folding from Sequence and Loop Connectivity through Free Energy Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cang, Xiaohui; Šponer, Jiří; Cheatham, III, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The lengths of G-tracts and their connecting loop sequences determine G-quadruplex folding and stability. Complete understanding of the sequence–structure relationships remains elusive. Here, single-loop G-quadruplexes were investigated using explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the effect of loop length, loop sequence, and G-tract length on the folding topologies and stability of G-quadruplexes. Eight loop types, including different variants of lateral, diagon...

  9. A weighted sampling algorithm for the design of RNA sequences with targeted secondary structure and nucleotide distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Reinharz, Vladimir; Ponty, Yann; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Motivations: The design of RNA sequences folding into predefined secondary structures is a milestone for many synthetic biology and gene therapy studies. Most of the current software uses similar local search strategies (i.e. a random seed is progressively adapted to acquire the desired folding properties) and more importantly do not allow the user to control explicitly the nucleotide distribution such as the GC-content in their sequences. However, the latter is an important criterion for lar...

  10. Fast Large Scale Structure Perturbation Theory using 1D FFTs

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittfull, Marcel; McDonald, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The usual fluid equations describing the large-scale evolution of mass density in the universe can be written as local in the density, velocity divergence, and velocity potential fields. As a result, the perturbative expansion in small density fluctuations, usually written in terms of convolutions in Fourier space, can be written as a series of products of these fields evaluated at the same location in configuration space. Based on this, we establish a new method to numerically evaluate the 1-loop power spectrum (i.e., Fourier transform of the 2-point correlation function) with one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transforms. This is exact and a few orders of magnitude faster than previously used numerical approaches. Numerical results of the new method are in excellent agreement with the standard quadrature integration method. This fast model evaluation can in principle be extended to higher loop order where existing codes become painfully slow. Our approach follows by writing higher order corrections to the 2-point...

  11. Phonon multiplexing through 1D chains

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A., Avila; D., Reyes.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, phonon propagation through atomic structures has become a relevant study issue. The most important applications arise in the thermal field, since phonons can carry thermal and acoustic energy. It is expected that technological advances will make possible the engineering of thermal paths ac [...] cording to convenience. A simple phonon multiplexer was analyzed as a spring-mass model. It consists of mono-atomic chains of atoms with a coupling structure between them. Forces between atoms follow Hooke's law and are restricted to be first nearest neighbor interaction. It was possible to establish simple rules on constitutive parameters such as atom masses and bonding forces that enable one to select a wavelength of transmission. The method used enables the study of structures of much greater complexity than the one presented here.

  12. CYP1D1, pseudogenized in human, is expressed and encodes a functional drug-metabolizing enzyme in cynomolgus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) 1 family consists of the CYP1A, CYP1B, CYP1C, and CYP1D subfamilies. In the human genome, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 are expressed and encode functional enzymes, whereas CYP1D1P (formerly known as CYP1A8P) is present as a pseudogene due to five nonsense mutations in the putative coding region. In this study, we identified CYP1D1 cDNA, highly identical (nearly 95%) to human CYP1D1P sequence, in cynomolgus monkey, a species frequently used in drug metabolism studies due to its evolutionary closeness to human. The amino acid sequence deduced from cynomolgus monkey CYP1D1 cDNA shared the high sequence identity (91%) with human CYP1D1P (postulated from the gene sequence), and the highest sequence identity (44-45%) with CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 among cynomolgus monkey P450s. CYP1D1 mRNA was most abundantly expressed in liver, followed by kidney, and jejunum. The hepatic expression level of CYP1D1 mRNA was comparable to that of CYP1A1 mRNA and much higher than that of CYP1A2 mRNA. CYP1D1 was barely detectable in immunoblots of cynomolgus monkey liver. Cynomolgus monkey CYP1D1 mRNA was induced in primary hepatocytes with omeprazole. Cynomolgus monkey CYP1D1 protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation and caffeine 8-hydroxylation, which CYP1As also catalyze. Finally, no nonsense mutations, corresponding to those found in human CYP1D1P, were found in the 20 cynomolgus monkeys and 10 rhesus monkeys used in this study. These results suggest that CYP1D1 plays a role as a functional, drug-metabolizing enzyme in cynomolgus monkey liver. PMID:21070747

  13. Sequence-specific size, structure, and stability of tight protein knots

    CERN Document Server

    Dzubiella, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the known protein structures display knotted configurations in their native fold but their function is not understood. It has been speculated that the entanglement may inhibit mechanical protein unfolding or transport, e.g., as in cellular threading or translocation processes through narrow biological pores. Here we investigate tigh peptide knot (TPK) characteristics in detail by pulling selected 3_1 and 4_1-knotted peptides using all-atom molecular dynamics computer simulations. We find that the 3_1 and 4_1-TPK lengths are typically Delta l~4.7 nm and 6.9 nm, respectively, for a wide range of tensions (F < 1.5 nN), pointing to a pore diameter of ~2 nm below which a translocated knotted protein might get stuck. The 4_1-knot length is in agreement with recent AFM pulling experiments. Detailed TPK characteristics however, may be sequence-specific: we find a different size and structural behavior in polyglycines, and, strikingly, a strong hydrogen bonding and water molecule trapping capabi...

  14. Transcriptome sequencing of purple petal spot region in tree peony reveals differentially expressed anthocyanin structural genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhao; Cheng, Yanwei; Ya, Huiyuan; Xu, Shuzhen; Han, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    The pigmented cells in defined region of a petal constitute the petal spots. Petal spots attract pollinators and are found in many angiosperm families. Several cultivars of tree peony contain a single red or purple spot at the base of petal that makes the flower more attractive for the ornamental market. So far, the understanding of the molecular mechanism of spot formation is inadequate. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of the purple spot and the white non-spot of tree peony flower. We assembled and annotated 67,892 unigenes. Comparative analyses of the two transcriptomes showed 1,573 differentially expressed genes, among which 933 were up-regulated, and 640 were down-regulated in the purple spot. Subsequently, we examined four anthocyanin structural genes, including PsCHS, PsF3?H, PsDFR, and PsANS, which expressed at a significantly higher level in the purple spot than in the white non-spot. We further validated the digital expression data using quantitative real-time PCR. Our result uncovered transcriptome variance between the spot and non-spot of tree peony flower, and revealed that the co-expression of four anthocyanin structural genes was responsible for spot pigment in tree peony. The data will further help to unravel the genetic mechanism of peony flower spot formation. PMID:26583029

  15. The Pollino Seismic Sequence: Activated Graben Structures in a Seismic Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rößler, Dirk; Passarelli, Luigi; Govoni, Aladino; Bindi, Dino; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebatian; Maccaferri, Francesco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Mercure Basin (MB) and the Castrovillari Fault (CF) in the Pollino range (Southern Apennines, Italy) represent one of the most prominent seismic gaps in the Italian seismic catalogue, with no M>5.5 earthquakes during the last centuries. In historical times several swarm-like seismic sequences occurred in the area including two intense swarms within the past two decades. The most energetic one started in 2010 and has been still active in 2014. The seismicity culminated in autumn 2012 with a M=5 event on 25 October. The range hosts a number of opposing normal faults forming a graben-like structure. Their rheology and their interactions are unclear. Current debates include the potential of the MB and the CF to host large earthquakes and the style of deformation. Understanding the seismicity and the behaviour of the faults is necessary to assess the tectonics and the seismic hazard. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and INGV, Italy, have jointly monitored the ongoing seismicity using a small-aperture seismic array, integrated in a temporary seismic network. Based on this installation, we located more than 16,000 local earthquakes that occurred between November 2012 and September 2014. Here we investigate quantitatively all the phases of the seismic sequence starting from January 2010. Event locations along with moment tensor inversion constrain spatially the structures activated by the swarm and the migration pattern of the seismicity. The seismicity forms clusters concentrated within the southern part of the MB and along the Pollino Fault linking MB and CF. Most earthquakes are confined to the upper 10 km of the crust in an area of ~15x15 km2. However, sparse seismicity at depths between 15 and 20 km and moderate seismicity further north with deepening hypocenters also exist. In contrast, the CF appears aseismic; only the northern part has experienced micro-seismicity. The spatial distribution is however more complex than the major tectonic structures mapped for the area. Consistent with mapped faults, the seismicity interested both eastwards and westwards dipping normal faults that define the geometry of seismically active graben-like structures. At least one cluster shows an additional spatio-temporal migration with spreading hypocentres similar to other swarm areas with fluid-triggering mechanisms. The static Coulomb stress change transferred by the largest shock onto the swarm area and on the CF cannot explain the observed high seismicity rate. We study the evolution of the frequency-size distribution of the events and the seismicity rate changes. We find that the majority of the earthquakes cannot be justified as aftershocks (directly related to the tectonics or to earthquake-earthquake interaction) and are best explained by an additional forcing active over the entire sequence. Our findings are consistent with the action of fluids (e.g. pore-pressure diffusion) triggering seismicity on pre-loaded faults. Additional aseismic release of tectonic strain by transient, slow slip is also consistent with our analysis. Analysis of deformation time series may clarify this point in future studies.

  16. Growth and Magnetic characterization of 1D Permalloy Nanowires using self developed AAO Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Khan, G. G.; Das, B.; Mandal, K.

    2015-02-01

    1D Permalloy refers to an alloy of Ni and Fe with 80% and 20% composition respectively. 1D Permalloy nanowires are particularly attractive because of their high permeability, low coercivity, near zero magnetostriction and high anisotropic magnetoresistance. Because of low magnetostriction of Permalloy shape anisotropy plays a very important role. As a result, the nanowires show unidirectional anisotropy along their length. Because of this property, they can be used in many applications such as recording head sensors, magnetic storage devices etc. In the present work 1D Permalloy nanowires arrays were fabricated into the pores of self engineered Anodic Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates by a simple electrodeposition technique (EDT). By varying the Anodization voltage and the parameters of the electrolytic solutions we developed various AAO templates with different average pore diameters. We developed the 1D Permalloy NW's of different diameters depending on the pore size arrangement of AAO templates by varying the deposition conditions. Structural characterization of AAO templates and 1D Permalloy NW's was performed by Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy (TEM & SEM). XRD studies of 1D Permalloy NW's shows their fcc crystalline structure and the AAO template was found to be amorphous in nature. Magnetic studies show the 1D Permalloy NW's arrays to have obvious anisotropy, and the easy axis was found to be parallel to the nanowires axis. We performed the angular dependence measurement of 1D Permalloy NW's. When the applied magnetic field was parallel to the nanowires, the coercivity (Hc) and the maximum remanent ratio (Mr/Ms) were considerably higher than those while the magnetic field perpendicular to the nanowires. 1D Permalloy NW's developed in this work are expected to be utilize in magnetic memory and magnetic recording devices.

  17. Compression-based classification of biological sequences and structures via the Universal Similarity Metric: experimental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzini Giovanni

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similarity of sequences is a key mathematical notion for Classification and Phylogenetic studies in Biology. It is currently primarily handled using alignments. However, the alignment methods seem inadequate for post-genomic studies since they do not scale well with data set size and they seem to be confined only to genomic and proteomic sequences. Therefore, alignment-free similarity measures are actively pursued. Among those, USM (Universal Similarity Metric has gained prominence. It is based on the deep theory of Kolmogorov Complexity and universality is its most novel striking feature. Since it can only be approximated via data compression, USM is a methodology rather than a formula quantifying the similarity of two strings. Three approximations of USM are available, namely UCD (Universal Compression Dissimilarity, NCD (Normalized Compression Dissimilarity and CD (Compression Dissimilarity. Their applicability and robustness is tested on various data sets yielding a first massive quantitative estimate that the USM methodology and its approximations are of value. Despite the rich theory developed around USM, its experimental assessment has limitations: only a few data compressors have been tested in conjunction with USM and mostly at a qualitative level, no comparison among UCD, NCD and CD is available and no comparison of USM with existing methods, both based on alignments and not, seems to be available. Results We experimentally test the USM methodology by using 25 compressors, all three of its known approximations and six data sets of relevance to Molecular Biology. This offers the first systematic and quantitative experimental assessment of this methodology, that naturally complements the many theoretical and the preliminary experimental results available. Moreover, we compare the USM methodology both with methods based on alignments and not. We may group our experiments into two sets. The first one, performed via ROC (Receiver Operating Curve analysis, aims at assessing the intrinsic ability of the methodology to discriminate and classify biological sequences and structures. A second set of experiments aims at assessing how well two commonly available classification algorithms, UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean and NJ (Neighbor Joining, can use the methodology to perform their task, their performance being evaluated against gold standards and with the use of well known statistical indexes, i.e., the F-measure and the partition distance. Based on the experiments, several conclusions can be drawn and, from them, novel valuable guidelines for the use of USM on biological data. The main ones are reported next. Conclusion UCD and NCD are indistinguishable, i.e., they yield nearly the same values of the statistical indexes we have used, accross experiments and data sets, while CD is almost always worse than both. UPGMA seems to yield better classification results with respect to NJ, i.e., better values of the statistical indexes (10% difference or above, on a substantial fraction of experiments, compressors and USM approximation choices. The compression program PPMd, based on PPM (Prediction by Partial Matching, for generic data and Gencompress for DNA, are the best performers among the compression algorithms we have used, although the difference in performance, as measured by statistical indexes, between them and the other algorithms depends critically on the data set and may not be as large as expected. PPMd used with UCD or NCD and UPGMA, on sequence data is very close, although worse, in performance with the alignment methods (less than 2% difference on the F-measure. Yet, it scales well with data set size and it can work on data other than sequences. In summary, our quantitative analysis naturally complements the rich theory behind USM and supports the conclusion that the methodology is worth using because of its robustness, flexibility, scalability, and competitiveness with existing techniques. In particular, the methodology applies to all biological data in textual format. The software and data sets are available under the GNU GPL at the supplementary material web page.

  18. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Olfa, Siala; Ikhlass Hadj, Salem; Abdelaziz, Tlili; Imen, Ammar; Hanen, Belguith; Faiza, Fakhfakh.

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD softw [...] are. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA) and SGCG (c.*102A/C) genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  19. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  20. X-ray sequence and crystal structure of luffaculin 1, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Edward J

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence can be obtained through Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, or cDNA sequencing. High resolution X-ray crystallography can also be used to derive protein sequence information, but faces the difficulty in distinguishing the Asp/Asn, Glu/Gln, and Val/Thr pairs. Luffaculin 1 is a new type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP isolated from the seeds of Luffa acutangula. Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, luffaculin 1 also demonstrates activities including inhibiting tumor cells' proliferation and inducing tumor cells' differentiation. Results The crystal structure of luffaculin 1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. Its amino-acid sequence was derived from this high resolution structure using the following criteria: 1 high resolution electron density; 2 comparison of electron density between two molecules that exist in the same crystal; 3 evaluation of the chemical environment of residues to break down the sequence assignment ambiguity in residue pairs Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr; 4 comparison with sequences of the homologous proteins. Using the criteria 1 and 2, 66% of the residues can be assigned. By incorporating with criterion 3, 86% of the residues were assigned, suggesting the effectiveness of chemical environment evaluation in breaking down residue ambiguity. In total, 94% of the luffaculin 1 sequence was assigned with high confidence using this improved X-ray sequencing strategy. Two N-acetylglucosamine moieties, linked respectively to the residues Asn77 and Asn84, can be identified in the structure. Residues Tyr70, Tyr110, Glu159 and Arg162 define the active site of luffaculin 1 as an RNA N-glycosidase. Conclusion X-ray sequencing method can be effective to derive sequence information of proteins. The evaluation of the chemical environment of residues is a useful method to break down the assignment ambiguity in Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr pairs. The sequence and the crystal structure confirm that luffaculin 1 is a new type 1 RIP.

  1. Coherent structure resolving simulation of turbulent flows in natural meander bends with pool-riffle sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2010-12-01

    An efficient and versatile numerical model is developed for carrying out high-resolution simulations of turbulent flows in natural meandering streams with arbitrarily complex, albeit fixed, bathymetry and instream hydraulic structures. The numerical model solves the 3D, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes and continuity equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The potential of the model as a powerful tool for simulating energetic coherent structures in turbulent flows in natural river reaches is demonstrated by applying it to carry out LES and URANS simulations in a field scale natural-like meandering stream, Outdoor StreamLab, at resolution sufficiently fine to capture vortex shedding from cm-scale roughness elements on the bed. Comparisons between the simulated mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy fields with field-scale measurements are reported and show that the numerical model can capture all features of the measured flow with high accuracy. Furthermore, the simulated flowfields are analyzed to elucidate the multi-faceted physics of the flow in a natural stream with pool-riffle sequences and to uncover the underlying physical mechanisms. The simulations provide new insights into the role of large-scale roughness in flow through riffles and elucidate the 3D flow structure, interactions and governing mechanisms of the inner and outer bank secondary flow cells and recirculation zones in the pools. Moreover, the simulations underscore the role of turbulence anisotropy throughout the stream and suggest important links between stream hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. This work was supported by NSF grants EAR-0120914 (as part of the National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics) and EAR-0738726 and the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute. Computed instantaneous flow speed at the water surface Computed 2D streamlines at cross sections showing the double-cell secondary motion

  2. Sequences of three molluscan 5 S ribosomal RNAs confirm the validity of a dynamic secondary structure model.

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, B L; DE BAERE, R.; VANDENBERGHE, A; De Wachter, R.

    1982-01-01

    The collection of known 5 S rRNA primary structures is enriched with the sequences from three mollusca, the snails Helix pomatia and Arion rufus, and the mussel Mytilus edulis. The three sequences can be fitted in a five-helix secondary structure model previously shown (De Wachter et al. (1982) Biochimie 64, 311-329) to apply to all 5 S RNAs regardless of their origin. One of the helices in this model can undergo a bulge-internal loop transition. Within the metazoan kingdom, the dimensions of...

  3. The FC-1D: The profitable alternative Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Victor J.; Alvarez, Jaime; Harrington, Brook; Lujan, Michael A.; Mitlyng, David; Saroughian, Andy; Silva, Alex; Teale, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The FC-1D was designed as an advanced solution for a low cost commercial transport meeting or exceeding all of the 1993/1994 AIAA/Lockheed request for proposal requirements. The driving philosophy behind the design of the FC-1D was the reduction of airline direct operating costs. Every effort was made during the design process to have the customer in mind. The Flying Circus Commercial Aviation Group targeted reductions in drag, fuel consumption, manufacturing costs, and maintenance costs. Flying Circus emphasized cost reduction throughout the entire design program. Drag reduction was achieved by implementation of the aft nacelle wing configuration to reduce cruise drag and increase cruise speeds. To reduce induced drag, rather than increasing the wing span of the FC-1D, spiroids were included in the efficient wing design. Profile and friction drag are reduced by using riblets in place of paint around the fuselage and empennage of the FC-1D. Choosing a single aisle configuration enabled the Flying Circus to optimize the fuselage diameter. Thus, reducing fuselage drag while gaining high structural efficiency. To further reduce fuel consumption a weight reduction program was conducted through the use of composite materials. An additional quality of the FC-1D is its design for low cost manufacturing and assembly. As a result of this design attribute, the FC-1D will have fewer parts which reduces weight as well as maintenance and assembly costs. The FC-1D is affordable and effective, the apex of commercial transport design.

  4. (F1, D1, D3) Bound State, Its Scaling Limits and SL(2,Z) Duality

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, R G; Cai, Rong-Gen; Ohta, Nobuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the bound state (F1, D1, D3) in IIB supergravity in three different scaling limits and the $SL(2, Z)$ transformation of the resulting theories. In the simple decoupling limit with finite electric and magnetic components of NS $B$ field, the worldvolume theory is the ${\\cal N}$=4 SYM and the supergravity dual is still the $AdS_5 \\times S^5$. In the large magnetic field limit with finite electric field, the theory is the noncommutative super Yang-Mills (NCSYM), and the supergravity dual is the same as that without the electric background. We show how to take the decoupling limit of the closed string for the critical electric background and finite magnetic field, and that the resulting theory is the noncommutative open string (NCOS) with both space-time and space-space noncommutativity. It is shown that under the $SL(2, Z)$ transformation, the SYM becomes itself with different coupling constant, the NCSYM is mapped into the NCOS, but the NCOS in general transforms into another NC...

  5. Influence of the sequence on the ab initio band structures of single and double stranded DNA models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogár, Ferenc, E-mail: bogar@sol.cc.u-szeged.hu [MTA-SZTE, Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 8, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Chair for Theoretical Chemistry and Laboratory of the National Foundation for Cancer Research, Friedrich–Alexander-University Erlangen–Nürnberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Bende, Attila, E-mail: bende@itim-cj.ro [Molecular and Biomolecular Physics Department, National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Str. Donath 65-103, C.P. 700, Cluj Napoca RO-400293 (Romania); Chair for Theoretical Chemistry and Laboratory of the National Foundation for Cancer Research, Friedrich–Alexander-University Erlangen–Nürnberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Ladik, János, E-mail: Janos.Ladik@chemie.uni-erlangen.de [Chair for Theoretical Chemistry and Laboratory of the National Foundation for Cancer Research, Friedrich–Alexander-University Erlangen–Nürnberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-06-13

    The solid state physical approach is widely used for the characterization of electronic properties of DNA. In the simplest case the helical symmetry is explicitly utilized with a repeat unit containing only a single nucleotide or nucleotide pair. This model provides a band structure that is easily interpretable and reflects the main characteristic features of the single nucleotide or a nucleotide pair chain, respectively. The chemical variability of the different DNA chains is, however, almost completely neglected in this way. In the present work we have investigated the effect of the different sequences on the band structure of periodic DNA models. For this purpose we have applied the Hartree–Fock crystal orbital method for single and double stranded DNA chains with two different subsequent nucleotides in the repeat unit of former and two different nucleotide pairs in the latter case, respectively. These results are compared to simple helical models with uniform sequences. The valence and conduction bands related to the stacked nucleotide bases of single stranded DNA built up only from guanidine as well as of double stranded DNA built up only from guanidine–cytidine pairs showed special properties different from the other cases. Namely, they had higher conduction and lower valence band positions and this way larger band gaps and smaller widths of these bands. With the introduction of non-uniform guanidine containing sequences band structures became more similar to each other and to the band structures of other sequences without guanidine. The maximal bandwidths of the non-uniform sequences are considerably smaller than in the case of uniform sequences implying smaller charge carrier mobilities both in the conduction and valence bands. - Highlights: • HF Energy bands in DNA. • The role of aperiodicity in the DNA band structure. • Hole mobilities in quasi-periodic DNA with broader valence bands.

  6. Composite Sequence-Structure Stability Models as Screening Tools for Identifying Vulnerable Targets for HIV Drug and Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocheewa, Siriphan; Mittler, John E; Samudrala, Ram; Mullins, James I

    2015-11-01

    Rapid evolution and high sequence diversity enable Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) populations to acquire mutations to escape antiretroviral drugs and host immune responses, and thus are major obstacles for the control of the pandemic. One strategy to overcome this problem is to focus drugs and vaccines on regions of the viral genome in which mutations are likely to cripple function through destabilization of viral proteins. Studies relying on sequence conservation alone have had only limited success in determining critically important regions. We tested the ability of two structure-based computational models to assign sites in the HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) that would be refractory to mutational change. The destabilizing mutations predicted by these models were rarely found in a database of 5811 HIV-1 CA coding sequences, with none being present at a frequency greater than 2%. Furthermore, 90% of variants with the low predicted stability (from a set of 184 CA variants whose replication fitness or infectivity has been studied in vitro) had aberrant capsid structures and reduced viral infectivity. Based on the predicted stability, we identified 45 CA sites prone to destabilizing mutations. More than half of these sites are targets of one or more known CA inhibitors. The CA regions enriched with these sites also overlap with peptides shown to induce cellular immune responses associated with lower viral loads in infected individuals. Lastly, a joint scoring metric that takes into account both sequence conservation and protein structure stability performed better at identifying deleterious mutations than sequence conservation or structure stability information alone. The computational sequence-structure stability approach proposed here might therefore be useful for identifying immutable sites in a protein for experimental validation as potential targets for drug and vaccine development. PMID:26556362

  7. Structure and sequence of mutations induced by ionizing radiation at selectable loci in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum of mutations induced by ionizing radiation at two non-essential genetic loci varies markedly. Those at the adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (aprt) locus predominantly have no detectable alterations of gene structure on Southern blots, while those at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus are largely massive deletions eliminating all coding sequence. Insertion mutations were detected at both loci. To characterize the sequence alterations producing the minor changes at the aprt locus, two mutant genes were cloned from lambda genomic libraries and sequenced. One of these mutants proved to be a 20 base-pair deletion formed between two short (3 base-pair) direct repeat sequences, while the second was the result of a 58 base-pair insertion accompanied by a 13 base-pair deletion. (author)

  8. Model-Free RNA Sequence and Structure Alignment Informed by SHAPE Probing Reveals a Conserved Alternate Secondary Structure for 16S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A; Lorenz, Ronny; Zhang, Ge; Tamayo, Rita; Hofacker, Ivo L; Weeks, Kevin M

    2015-05-01

    Discovery and characterization of functional RNA structures remains challenging due to deficiencies in de novo secondary structure modeling. Here we describe a dynamic programming approach for model-free sequence comparison that incorporates high-throughput chemical probing data. Based on SHAPE probing data alone, ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) from three diverse organisms--the eubacteria E. coli and C. difficile and the archeon H. volcanii--could be aligned with accuracies comparable to alignments based on actual sequence identity. When both base sequence identity and chemical probing reactivities were considered together, accuracies improved further. Derived sequence alignments and chemical probing data from protein-free RNAs were then used as pseudo-free energy constraints to model consensus secondary structures for the 16S and 23S rRNAs. There are critical differences between these experimentally-informed models and currently accepted models, including in the functionally important neck and decoding regions of the 16S rRNA. We infer that the 16S rRNA has evolved to undergo large-scale changes in base pairing as part of ribosome function. As high-quality RNA probing data become widely available, structurally-informed sequence alignment will become broadly useful for de novo motif and function discovery. PMID:25992778

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure in Harpadon nehereus based on sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z H; Li, H Y; Qin, Y; Wang, R X

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the genetic diversity among ten populations of the Bombay duck was studied on the basis of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP). The ten populations were collected from the East China Sea and South China Sea areas. A total of 98 loci were obtained from 292 individuals using eight SRAP primers. The average proportion of polymorphic loci, genetic diversity (H), and Shannon's information index were 75.20%, 0.2478, and 0.3735, respectively. Nei's genetic distance and Shannon's information index between the ten populations ranged from 0.0410 to 0.3841 and from 0.2396 to 0.4506, and the averages Nei's gene diversity index (H = 0.2478) and Shannon's information index (I = 0.3735) at the population level were high. AMOVA showed that most of the variation was within populations (71.74%), and only 28.26% of the variation was between populations. The neighbor-joining tree based on genetic distance revealed that significant genealogical structure existed throughout the examined range of the Bombay duck. The results demonstrated that SRAP marker was an effective tool for the assessment of genetic diversity in the Bombay duck. The results could be used for further protection of the germplasm resource of the Bombay duck. PMID:25117356

  10. Structural variation discovery in the cancer genome using next generation sequencing: computational solutions and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Conroy, Jeffrey M; Morrison, Carl D; Odunsi, Adekunle O; Qin, Maochun; Wei, Lei; Trump, Donald L; Johnson, Candace S; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-03-20

    Somatic Structural Variations (SVs) are a complex collection of chromosomal mutations that could directly contribute to carcinogenesis. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has emerged as the primary means of interrogating the SVs of the cancer genome in recent investigations. Sophisticated computational methods are required to accurately identify the SV events and delineate their breakpoints from the massive amounts of reads generated by a NGS experiment. In this review, we provide an overview of current analytic tools used for SV detection in NGS-based cancer studies. We summarize the features of common SV groups and the primary types of NGS signatures that can be used in SV detection methods. We discuss the principles and key similarities and differences of existing computational programs and comment on unresolved issues related to this research field. The aim of this article is to provide a practical guide of relevant concepts, computational methods, software tools and important factors for analyzing and interpreting NGS data for the detection of SVs in the cancer genome. PMID:25849937

  11. Structural variation discovery in the cancer genome using next generation sequencing: Computational solutions and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Conroy, Jeffrey M.; Morrison, Carl D.; Odunsi, Adekunle O.; Qin, Maochun; Wei, Lei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Liu, Song; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Somatic Structural Variations (SVs) are a complex collection of chromosomal mutations that could directly contribute to carcinogenesis. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology has emerged as the primary means of interrogating the SVs of the cancer genome in recent investigations. Sophisticated computational methods are required to accurately identify the SV events and delineate their breakpoints from the massive amounts of reads generated by a NGS experiment. In this review, we provide an overview of current analytic tools used for SV detection in NGS-based cancer studies. We summarize the features of common SV groups and the primary types of NGS signatures that can be used in SV detection methods. We discuss the principles and key similarities and differences of existing computational programs and comment on unresolved issues related to this research field. The aim of this article is to provide a practical guide of relevant concepts, computational methods, software tools and important factors for analyzing and interpreting NGS data for the detection of SVs in the cancer genome. PMID:25849937

  12. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and phylogeographical structure of rock partridge (Alectoris graeca) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, V; Randi, E

    1998-11-01

    The rock partridge (Alectoris graeca) is distributed in the Alps, Apennines and Balkans, in mountainous areas that were heavily affected by cyclic climate and landscape changes during the last Pleistocene glaciations. Some partridge populations have colonized and expanded their present ranges only after deglaciation and recent deforestation by humans. Other populations have been segregated in land-bridge islands isolated after the rise in level of the Mediterranean Sea. Consequently, partridges from different areas could be genetically differentiated. This study has analysed 436 nucleotides of the domain I of the mitochondrial DNA control-region in 70 rock partridges collected from 14 populations throughout their distribution. Phylogenetic analysis and analysis of molecular variance showed that the Sicilian population is very divergent from the continental populations. The Albanian and central Apennine samples are slightly divergent from the Alpine rock partridges, which cluster in two groups according to their east-west distributions. The mitochondrial DNA sequences suggest the existence of a phylogeographical structuring among rock partridge populations, resulting from genetic divergence in southern refugia and subsequent postglacial colonization of northern mountain areas. Sicilian partridges could have been isolated for approximately 500,000 years, whereas the Albanian-Apennine populations could have been in contact since the last glacial maximum (21,000 yr BP) through the north Adriatic land-bridge. The Alps could have been colonized in two different periods or by two different source populations. The mitochondrial DNA phylogeographical structuring is not completely concordant with the subspecies distribution. These findings suggest that rock partridges should be managed based on the identification of phylogeographical units. PMID:9881452

  13. Universal nature of collective plasmonic excitations in finite 1D carbon-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Eric; Yngvesson, Sigfrid K.

    2015-08-01

    We provide evidence of the plasmon resonances in a number of representative 1D finite carbon-based nanostructures using first-principle computational electronic spectroscopy studies. Our special purpose real-space/real-time all-electron time-dependent density-functional theory simulator can perform excited-states calculations to obtain correct frequencies for known optical transitions, and capture various nanoscopic effects including collective plasmon excitations. The presence of 1D plasmons is universally predicted by the various numerical experiments, which also demonstrate a phenomenon of resonance splitting. For the metallic carbon nanotubes under study, the plasmons are expected to be related to the Tomonaga-Luttinger plasmons of infinitely long 1D structures. In-depth quantitative understanding of such resonances which have not been clearly identified in experiments so far, would be invaluable for future generations of nano-photonic and nano-electronic devices that employ 1D conductors.

  14. A comparison of genomic coding sequences for feather and scale keratins: structural and evolutionary implications.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregg, K; Wilton, S D; Parry, D A; Rogers, G E

    1984-01-01

    DNA sequences have been obtained for embryonic chick feather and scale keratin genes. Strong homologies exist between the protein coding regions of the two gene types and between the deduced amino acid sequences of the keratin proteins. Scale keratins are larger than feather keratins and the size difference is mainly attributable to four 13-amino acid repeats between residues 77 and 128 which compose a peptide sequence rich in glycine and tyrosine. The strong similarities between the two pept...

  15. Next-generation sequencing reveals phylogeographic structure and a species tree for recent bird divergences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCormack, John E.; Maley, James M.; Hird, Sarah M.; Derryberry, Elizabeth P.; Graves, Gary R.; Brumfield, Robb T.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing many biological disciplines but have been slow to take root in phylogeography. This is partly due to the difficulty of using NGS to sequence orthologous DNA fragments for many individuals at low cost. We explore cases of recent divergence in four phylogenetically diverse avian systems using a method for quick and cost-effective generation of primary DNA sequence data using pyrosequencing. NGS data were processed using an analytica...

  16. A weighted sampling algorithm for the design of RNA sequences with targeted secondary structure and nucleotide distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinharz, Vladimir; Ponty, Yann; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Motivations: The design of RNA sequences folding into predefined secondary structures is a milestone for many synthetic biology and gene therapy studies. Most of the current software uses similar local search strategies (i.e. a random seed is progressively adapted to acquire the desired folding properties) and more importantly do not allow the user to control explicitly the nucleotide distribution such as the GC-content in their sequences. However, the latter is an important criterion for large-scale applications as it could presumably be used to design sequences with better transcription rates and/or structural plasticity. Results: In this article, we introduce IncaRNAtion, a novel algorithm to design RNA sequences folding into target secondary structures with a predefined nucleotide distribution. IncaRNAtion uses a global sampling approach and weighted sampling techniques. We show that our approach is fast (i.e. running time comparable or better than local search methods), seedless (we remove the bias of the seed in local search heuristics) and successfully generates high-quality sequences (i.e. thermodynamically stable) for any GC-content. To complete this study, we develop a hybrid method combining our global sampling approach with local search strategies. Remarkably, our glocal methodology overcomes both local and global approaches for sampling sequences with a specific GC-content and target structure. Availability: IncaRNAtion is available at csb.cs.mcgill.ca/incarnation/ Contact: jeromew@cs.mcgill.ca or yann.ponty@lix.polytechnique.fr Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23812999

  17. Striking structural dynamism and nucleotide sequence variation of the transposon Galileo in the genome of Drosophila mojavensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzo Mar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galileo is a transposable element responsible for the generation of three chromosomal inversions in natural populations of Drosophila buzzatii. Although the most characteristic feature of Galileo is the long internally-repetitive terminal inverted repeats (TIRs, which resemble the Drosophila Foldback element, its transposase-coding sequence has led to its classification as a member of the P-element superfamily (Class II, subclass 1, TIR order. Furthermore, Galileo has a wide distribution in the genus Drosophila, since it has been found in 6 of the 12 Drosophila sequenced genomes. Among these species, D. mojavensis, the one closest to D. buzzatii, presented the highest diversity in sequence and structure of Galileo elements. Results In the present work, we carried out a thorough search and annotation of all the Galileo copies present in the D. mojavensis sequenced genome. In our set of 170 Galileo copies we have detected 5 Galileo subfamilies (C, D, E, F, and X with different structures ranging from nearly complete, to only 2 TIR or solo TIR copies. Finally, we have explored the structural and length variation of the Galileo copies that point out the relatively frequent rearrangements within and between Galileo elements. Different mechanisms responsible for these rearrangements are discussed. Conclusions Although Galileo is a transposable element with an ancient history in the D. mojavensis genome, our data indicate a recent transpositional activity. Furthermore, the dynamism in sequence and structure, mainly affecting the TIRs, suggests an active exchange of sequences among the copies. This exchange could lead to new subfamilies of the transposon, which could be crucial for the long-term survival of the element in the genome.

  18. Influence of the sequence on the ab initio band structures of single and double stranded DNA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogár, Ferenc; Bende, Attila; Ladik, János

    2014-06-01

    The solid state physical approach is widely used for the characterization of electronic properties of DNA. In the simplest case the helical symmetry is explicitly utilized with a repeat unit containing only a single nucleotide or nucleotide pair. This model provides a band structure that is easily interpretable and reflects the main characteristic features of the single nucleotide or a nucleotide pair chain, respectively. The chemical variability of the different DNA chains is, however, almost completely neglected in this way. In the present work we have investigated the effect of the different sequences on the band structure of periodic DNA models. For this purpose we have applied the Hartree-Fock crystal orbital method for single and double stranded DNA chains with two different subsequent nucleotides in the repeat unit of former and two different nucleotide pairs in the latter case, respectively. These results are compared to simple helical models with uniform sequences. The valence and conduction bands related to the stacked nucleotide bases of single stranded DNA built up only from guanidine as well as of double stranded DNA built up only from guanidine-cytidine pairs showed special properties different from the other cases. Namely, they had higher conduction and lower valence band positions and this way larger band gaps and smaller widths of these bands. With the introduction of non-uniform guanidine containing sequences band structures became more similar to each other and to the band structures of other sequences without guanidine. The maximal bandwidths of the non-uniform sequences are considerably smaller than in the case of uniform sequences implying smaller charge carrier mobilities both in the conduction and valence bands.

  19. Using an alignment of fragment strings for comparing protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Iddo; Harder, Tim; Kolodny, Rachel; Sitbon, Einat; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam

    2007-01-01

    powerful tool for protein structure comparison and classification, given the arsenal of sequence comparison tools developed by computational biology. However, in order to do so, there is a need to first understand how much information is contained in various possible 1D representations of protein structure......MOTIVATION: Most methods that are used to compare protein structures use three-dimensional (3D) structural information. At the same time, it has been shown that a 1D string representation of local protein structure retains a degree of structural information. This type of representation can be a....... RESULTS: Here we describe the use of a particular structure fragment library, denoted here as KL-strings, for the 1D representation of protein structure. Using KL-strings, we develop an infrastructure for comparing protein structures with a 1D representation. This study focuses on the added value gained...

  20. 1D–2D coupling for river flow modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Finaud-Guyot, Pascal; Delenne, Carole; Guinot, Vincent; Llovel, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    1D-2D coupling for river ow modeling. A shallow water-based model for river-oodplain interaction (SW12D for Shallow Water 1D-2D) is presented. The main channel and oodplain are discretized using 1D and 2D elements respectively. The proposed model provides an improved description of hydraulic phenomena over existing models by (i) including lateral momentum transfer between the main channel and the oodplain, (ii) taking the 2D nature of the ow into account within the 1D elements that describe t...

  1. Cryogenic Spectroscopy and Quantum Molecular Dynamics Determine the Structure of Cyclic Intermediates Involved in Peptide Sequence Scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseev, Oleg; Perez, Marta A S; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is a key technique used in mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing. Collisionally activated peptides undergo statistical dissociation, forming a series of backbone fragment ions that reflect their amino acid (AA) sequence. Some of these fragments may experience a "head-to-tail" cyclization, which after proton migration, can lead to the cyclic structure opening in a different place than the initially formed bond. This process leads to AA sequence scrambling that may hinder sequencing of the initial peptide. Here we combine cryogenic ion spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to isolate and characterize the precise structures of key intermediates in the scrambling process. The most stable peptide fragments show intriguing symmetric cyclic structures in which the proton is situated on a C2 symmetry axis and forms exceptionally short H-bonds (1.20 Å) with two backbone oxygens. Other nonsymmetric cyclic structures also exist, one of which is protonated on the amide nitrogen, where ring opening is likely to occur. PMID:26266729

  2. STING Millennium: a web-based suite of programs for comprehensive and simultaneous analysis of protein structure and sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Goran; Togawa, Roberto C.; Mancini, Adauto L.; Kuser, Paula R.; Yamagishi, Michel E. B.; Pappas, Georgios; Torres, Wellington V.; Campos, Tharsis Fonseca e; Ferreira, Leonardo L.; Luna, Fabio M.; Oliveira, Adilton G.; Miura, Ronald T.; Inoue, Marcus K.; Horita, Luiz G.; de Souza, Dimas F.; Dominiquini, Fabiana; Álvaro, Alexandre; Lima, Cleber S.; Ogawa, Fabio O.; Gomes, Gabriel B.; Palandrani, Juliana F.; dos Santos, Gabriela F.; de Freitas, Esther M.; Mattiuz, Amanda R.; Costa, Ivan C.; de Almeida, Celso L.; Souza, Savio; Baudet, Christian; Higa, Roberto H.

    2003-01-01

    STING Millennium Suite (SMS) is a new web-based suite of programs and databases providing visualization and a complex analysis of molecular sequence and structure for the data deposited at the Protein Data Bank (PDB). SMS operates with a collection of both publicly available data (PDB, HSSP, Prosite) and its own data (contacts, interface contacts, surface accessibility). Biologists find SMS useful because it provides a variety of algorithms and validated data, wrapped-up in a user friendly web interface. Using SMS it is now possible to analyze sequence to structure relationships, the quality of the structure, nature and volume of atomic contacts of intra and inter chain type, relative conservation of amino acids at the specific sequence position based on multiple sequence alignment, indications of folding essential residue (FER) based on the relationship of the residue conservation to the intra-chain contacts and C?–C? and C?–C? distance geometry. Specific emphasis in SMS is given to interface forming residues (IFR)—amino acids that define the interactive portion of the protein surfaces. SMS may simultaneously display and analyze previously superimposed structures. PDB updates trigger SMS updates in a synchronized fashion. SMS is freely accessible for public data at http://www.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br, http://mirrors.rcsb.org/SMS and http://trantor.bioc.columbia.edu/SMS. PMID:12824333

  3. An Introductory Bioinformatics Exercise to Reinforce Gene Structure and Expression and Analyze the Relationship between Gene and Protein Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Craig A.; Tardiff, Daniel F.; De Luca, Jane P.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an introductory bioinformatics exercise for sophomore biology and biochemistry students that reinforces the understanding of the structure of a gene and the principles and events involved in its expression. In addition, the activity illustrates the severe effect mutations in a gene sequence can have on the protein product.…

  4. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars - I. Overall structure

    OpenAIRE

    Beeck, Benjamin; Cameron, Robert H.; Reiners, Ansgar; Schüssler, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The near-surface layers of cool main-sequence stars are structured by convective flows, which are overshooting into the atmosphere. The flows and the associated spatio-temporal variations of density and temperature affect spectral line profiles and thus have an impact on estimates of stellar properties such as effective temperature, gravitational acceleration, and abundances. We aim at identifying distinctive properties of the thermodynamic structure of the atmospheres of di...

  5. Characterization of bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein: Sequence, structural, phylogenetic and subcellular localization analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Kollath-Leiß, Krisztina; Kempken, Frank, E-mail: fkempken@bot.uni-kiel.de

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •All eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. •The catalytic triad of BEM46 is illustrated using sequence and structural analysis. •We identified indels in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein. •Localization studies of BEM46 protein were carried out using GFP-fusion tagging. -- Abstract: The bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein from Neurospora crassa belongs to the ?/?-hydrolase superfamily. Recently, we have reported that the BEM46 protein is localized in the perinuclear ER and also forms spots close by the plasma membrane. The protein appears to be required for cell type-specific polarity formation in N. crassa. Furthermore, initial studies suggested that the BEM46 amino acid sequence is conserved in eukaryotes and is considered to be one of the widespread conserved “known unknown” eukaryotic genes. This warrants for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of this superfamily to unravel origin and molecular evolution of these genes in different eukaryotes. Herein, we observe that all eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. Upon scanning of these proteins in various genomes, we find that there are expansions leading into several paralogs in vertebrates. Usingcomparative genomic analyses, we identified insertion/deletions (indels) in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein, which allow to differentiate fungal classes such as ascomycetes from basidiomycetes. We also find that exonic indels are able to differentiate BEM46 homologs of different eukaryotic lineage. Furthermore, we unravel that BEM46 protein from N. crassa possess a novel endoplasmic-retention signal (PEKK) using GFP-fusion tagging experiments. We propose that three residues namely a serine 188S, a histidine 292H and an aspartic acid 262D are most critical residues, forming a catalytic triad in BEM46 protein from N. crassa. We carried out a comprehensive study on bem46 genes from a molecular evolution perspective with combination of functional analyses. The evolutionary history of BEM46 proteins is characterized by exonic indels in lineage specific manner.

  6. Characterization of bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein: Sequence, structural, phylogenetic and subcellular localization analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •All eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. •The catalytic triad of BEM46 is illustrated using sequence and structural analysis. •We identified indels in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein. •Localization studies of BEM46 protein were carried out using GFP-fusion tagging. -- Abstract: The bud emergence 46 (BEM46) protein from Neurospora crassa belongs to the ?/?-hydrolase superfamily. Recently, we have reported that the BEM46 protein is localized in the perinuclear ER and also forms spots close by the plasma membrane. The protein appears to be required for cell type-specific polarity formation in N. crassa. Furthermore, initial studies suggested that the BEM46 amino acid sequence is conserved in eukaryotes and is considered to be one of the widespread conserved “known unknown” eukaryotic genes. This warrants for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of this superfamily to unravel origin and molecular evolution of these genes in different eukaryotes. Herein, we observe that all eukaryotes have at least a single copy of a bem46 ortholog. Upon scanning of these proteins in various genomes, we find that there are expansions leading into several paralogs in vertebrates. Usingcomparative genomic analyses, we identified insertion/deletions (indels) in the conserved domain of BEM46 protein, which allow to differentiate fungal classes such as ascomycetes from basidiomycetes. We also find that exonic indels are able to differentiate BEM46 homologs of different eukaryotic lineage. Furthermore, we unravel that BEM46 protein from N. crassa possess a novel endoplasmic-retention signal (PEKK) using GFP-fusion tagging experiments. We propose that three residues namely a serine 188S, a histidine 292H and an aspartic acid 262D are most critical residues, forming a catalytic triad in BEM46 protein from N. crassa. We carried out a comprehensive study on bem46 genes from a molecular evolution perspective with combination of functional analyses. The evolutionary history of BEM46 proteins is characterized by exonic indels in lineage specific manner

  7. Sequence-Specific Assignment and Secondary Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Protein from Ubiquitination Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification which plays an important role in a wide variety of cellular processes including cell cycle, DNA repair and cell apoptosis. It is well known, that the ubiquitination requires sequential activity of three enzymes with different functions: activation, conjugation and ligation. Unfortunately, the three-dimensional structures of all three proteins responsible for these processes are not available at present and the process of proteins ubiquitination still is not understood in detail. In our communication, we present first, preliminary NMR data for the sequence-specific assignments for 112 amino acid residues long domain of one of the proteins from the ubiquitination pathway. The NMR samples were prepared by dissolving 1 mm either 15N-labeled or 15N, 13C-double labeled protein in 90%/10% H2O/D2O, 50 mm TRIS buffer, and 50 mm NaCl. The ph was adjusted to 6.5 (uncorrected value). All NMR measurements were performed on the Varian Unity+ 500 NMR spectrometer (11.7 T) equipped with three channels, Performa II PFG unit and 5 mm 1H, 13C, 15N-triple resonance pro behead. The 1H, 15N, and 13C backbone resonances were assigned by standard methods using 3D heteronuclear HNCACB, CBCA(CO)NH, HNCA, HN(CO)CA, HNCO, (HCA)CO(CA)NH NMR spectra collected at 303 K. The aliphatic 1H and 13C resonances were assigned on the basis of C(CO)NH, HBHA(CO)NH, and H(CO)NH experiments. After finishing of assignment procedure, solution of secondary structure in studied protein has been performed. The exact position of the ?-helices and ?-strands were solved on base analysis of cross-peaks between HN and H? protons in 3D 15N-edited NOESY-HSQC spectrum, 3JNH? coupling constants evaluated from 3D HNHA experiment, and chemical shifts of backbone nuclei (TALOS software). Obtained results will be used in future for solution of three-dimensional structure of catalytic domain with high resolution by means NMR methods. (author)

  8. Universal nature of collective plasmonic excitations in finite 1-D carbon-based nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Polizzi, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tomonaga-Luttinger (T-L) theory predicts collective plasmon resonances in 1-D nanostructure conductors of finite length, that vary roughly in inverse proportion to the length of the structure. Yet, such resonances have not been clearly identified in experiments so far. Here we provide evidence of the T-L plasmon resonances using first-principle computational real-time spectroscopy studies of representative finite 1-D carbon-based nanostructures ranging from atom and benzene-like chain structures to short carbon nanotubes. Our all-electron Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) real-time simulation framework is capable to accurately capture the relevant nanoscopic effects including correct frequencies for known optical transitions, and various collective plasmon excitations. The presence of 1-D T-L plasmons is universally predicted by the various numerical experiments, which also demonstrate a phenomenon of resonance splitting. Extending these simulations to longer structures will allow the accurate ...

  9. Correlation between sequence conservation and structural thermodynamics of microRNA precursors from human, mouse, and chicken genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shengqi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that microRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs have considerably more stable secondary structures than other native RNAs (tRNA, rRNA, and mRNA and artificial RNA sequences. However, pre-miRNAs with ultra stable secondary structures have not been investigated. It is not known if there is a tendency in pre-miRNA sequences towards or against ultra stable structures? Furthermore, the relationship between the structural thermodynamic stability of pre-miRNA and their evolution remains unclear. Results We investigated the correlation between pre-miRNA sequence conservation and structural stability as measured by adjusted minimum folding free energies in pre-miRNAs isolated from human, mouse, and chicken. The analysis revealed that conserved and non-conserved pre-miRNA sequences had structures with similar average stabilities. However, the relatively ultra stable and unstable pre-miRNAs were more likely to be non-conserved than pre-miRNAs with moderate stability. Non-conserved pre-miRNAs had more G+C than A+U nucleotides, while conserved pre-miRNAs contained more A+U nucleotides. Notably, the U content of conserved pre-miRNAs was especially higher than that of non-conserved pre-miRNAs. Further investigations showed that conserved and non-conserved pre-miRNAs exhibited different structural element features, even though they had comparable levels of stability. Conclusions We proposed that there is a correlation between structural thermodynamic stability and sequence conservation for pre-miRNAs from human, mouse, and chicken genomes. Our analyses suggested that pre-miRNAs with relatively ultra stable or unstable structures were less favoured by natural selection than those with moderately stable structures. Comparison of nucleotide compositions between non-conserved and conserved pre-miRNAs indicated the importance of U nucleotides in the pre-miRNA evolutionary process. Several characteristic structural elements were also detected in conserved pre-miRNAs.

  10. Statistical aspects of discerning indel-type structural variation via DNA sequence alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Richard K

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations in the form of DNA insertions and deletions are an important aspect of human genetics and especially relevant to medical disorders. Investigations have shown that such events can be detected via tell-tale discrepancies in the aligned lengths of paired-end DNA sequencing reads. Quantitative aspects underlying this method remain poorly understood, despite its importance and conceptual simplicity. We report the statistical theory characterizing the length-discrepancy scheme for Gaussian libraries, including coverage-related effects that preceding models are unable to account for. Results Deletion and insertion statistics both depend heavily on physical coverage, but otherwise differ dramatically, refuting a commonly held doctrine of symmetry. Specifically, coverage restrictions render insertions much more difficult to capture. Increased read length has the counterintuitive effect of worsening insertion detection characteristics of short inserts. Variance in library insert length is also a critical factor here and should be minimized to the greatest degree possible. Conversely, no significant improvement would be realized in lowering fosmid variances beyond current levels. Detection power is examined under a straightforward alternative hypothesis and found to be generally acceptable. We also consider the proposition of characterizing variation over the entire spectrum of variant sizes under constant risk of false-positive errors. At 1% risk, many designs will leave a significant gap in the 100 to 200 bp neighborhood, requiring unacceptably high redundancies to compensate. We show that a few modifications largely close this gap and we give a few examples of feasible spectrum-covering designs. Conclusion The theory resolves several outstanding issues and furnishes a general methodology for designing future projects from the standpoint of a spectrum-wide constant risk.

  11. Diversity, population structure, and evolution of local peach cultivars in China identified by simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z J; Ma, R J; Cai, Z X; Yu, M L; Zhang, Z

    2015-01-01

    The fruit peach originated in China and has a history of domestication of more than 4000 years. Numerous local cultivars were selected during the long course of cultivation, and a great morphological diversity exists. To study the diversity and genetic background of local peach cultivars in China, a set of 158 accessions from different ecological regions, together with 27 modern varieties and 10 wild accessions, were evaluated using 49 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) covering the peach genome. Broad diversity was also observed in local cultivars at the SSR level. A total of 648 alleles were amplified with an average of 13.22 observed alleles per locus. The number of genotypes detected ranged from 9 (UDP96015) to 58 (BPPCT008) with an average of 27.00 genotypes per marker. Eight subpopulations divided by STRUCTURE basically coincided with the dendrogram of genetic relationships and could be explained by the traditional groups. The 8 subpopulations were juicy honey peach, southwestern peach I, wild peach, Buddha peach + southwestern peach II, northern peach, southern crisp peach, ornamental peach, and Prunus davidiana + P. kansuensis. Most modern varieties carried the genetic backgrounds of juicy honey peach and southwestern peach I, while others carried diverse genetic backgrounds, indicating that local cultivars were partly used in modern breeding programs. Based on the traditional evolution pathway, a modified pathway for the development of local peach cultivars in China was proposed using the genetic background of subpopulations that were identified by SSRs. Current status and prospects of utilization of Chinese local peach cultivars were also discussed according to the SSR information. PMID:25729941

  12. Whole-Genome Sequencing Reveals Diverse Models of Structural Variations in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Caixia; Zhou, Yong; Li, Hongyi; Xiong, Teng; Li, Shuaicheng; Bi, Yanghui; Kong, Pengzhou; Wang, Fang; Cui, Heyang; Li, Yaoping; Fang, Xiaodong; Yan, Ting; Li, Yike; Wang, Juan; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Zhiwu; Song, Bin; Hu, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Qiu, Haile; Zhang, Gehong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Enwei; Shi, Ruyi; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Haiyan; He, Chanting; Zhao, Zhenxiang; Qian, Yu; Rong, Ruizhou; Han, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yanlin; Luo, Wen; Wang, Jiaqian; Peng, Shaoliang; Yang, Xukui; Li, Xiangchun; Li, Lin; Fang, Hu; Liu, Xingmin; Ma, Li; Chen, Yunqing; Guo, Shiping; Chen, Xing; Xi, Yanfeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Jianfang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Guo, Jiansheng; Jia, JunMei; Li, Qingshan; Cheng, Xiaolong; Zhan, Qimin; Cui, Yongping

    2016-02-01

    Comprehensive identification of somatic structural variations (SVs) and understanding their mutational mechanisms in cancer might contribute to understanding biological differences and help to identify new therapeutic targets. Unfortunately, characterization of complex SVs across the whole genome and the mutational mechanisms underlying esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is largely unclear. To define a comprehensive catalog of somatic SVs, affected target genes, and their underlying mechanisms in ESCC, we re-analyzed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from 31 ESCCs using Meerkat algorithm to predict somatic SVs and Patchwork to determine copy-number changes. We found deletions and translocations with NHEJ and alt-EJ signature as the dominant SV types, and 16% of deletions were complex deletions. SVs frequently led to disruption of cancer-associated genes (e.g., CDKN2A and NOTCH1) with different mutational mechanisms. Moreover, chromothripsis, kataegis, and breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) were identified as contributing to locally mis-arranged chromosomes that occurred in 55% of ESCCs. These genomic catastrophes led to amplification of oncogene through chromothripsis-derived double-minute chromosome formation (e.g., FGFR1 and LETM2) or BFB-affected chromosomes (e.g., CCND1, EGFR, ERBB2, MMPs, and MYC), with approximately 30% of ESCCs harboring BFB-derived CCND1 amplification. Furthermore, analyses of copy-number alterations reveal high frequency of whole-genome duplication (WGD) and recurrent focal amplification of CDCA7 that might act as a potential oncogene in ESCC. Our findings reveal molecular defects such as chromothripsis and BFB in malignant transformation of ESCCs and demonstrate diverse models of SVs-derived target genes in ESCCs. These genome-wide SV profiles and their underlying mechanisms provide preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for ESCCs. PMID:26833333

  13. Mosaic PPM1D mutations are associated with predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Elise; Snape, Katie; Humburg, Peter; Loveday, Chey; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Brough, Rachel; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Ramsay, Emma; Duarte, Silvana Del Vecchio; Rivas, Manuel A.; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Zachariou, Anna; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Hanks, Sandra; Murray, Anne; Pour, Naser Ansari; Douglas, Jenny; Gregory, Lorna; Rimmer, Andrew; Walker, Neil M.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Adlard, Julian W.; Barwell, Julian; Berg, Jonathan; Brady, Angela F.; Brewer, Carole; Brice, Glen; Chapman, Cyril; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Douglas, Fiona; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D. Gareth; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Henderson, Alex; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Ajith; Lalloo, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J.; Paterson, Joan; Porteous, Mary; Rogers, Mark T.; Shanley, Susan; Walker, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Houlston, Richard; Brown, Matthew A.; Caufield, Mark J.; Deloukas, Panagiotis; McCarthy, Mark I.; Todd, John A.; Turnbull, Clare; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Ashworth, Alan; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Lord, Christopher J.; Donnelly, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-01-01

    Improved sequencing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for investigating the role of rare genetic variation in common disease. However, there are considerable challenges with respect to study design, data analysis and replication1. Here, using pooled next-generation sequencing of 507 genes implicated in the repair of DNA in 1,150 samples, an analytical strategy focussed on protein truncating variants (PTVs) and a large-scale sequencing case-control replication experiment in 13,642 individuals, we show that rare PTVs in the p53 inducible protein phosphatase PPM1D are associated with predisposition to breast cancer and to ovarian cancer. PPM1D PTV mutations were present in 25/7781 cases vs 1/5861 controls; P=1.12×10?5, which included 18 mutations in 6,912 individuals with breast cancer; P = 2.42×10?4 and 12 mutations in 1,121 individuals with ovarian cancer; P = 3.10×10?9. Notably, all the identified PPM1D PTVs were mosaic in lymphocyte DNA and clustered within a 370 bp region in the final exon of the gene, C-terminal to the phosphatase catalytic domain. Functional studies demonstrated that the mutations result in enhanced suppression of p53 in response to ionising radiation exposure, suggesting the mutant alleles encode hyperactive PPM1D isoforms. Thus, although the mutations cause premature protein truncation, they do not result in the simple loss-of-function typically associated with this class of variant, but instead likely have a gain-of-function effect. Our results have implications for the detection and management of breast and ovarian cancer risk. More generally, these data provide new insights into the role of rare and of mosaic genetic variants in common conditions, and the utility of sequencing in their identification. PMID:23242139

  14. RBPmotif: a web server for the discovery of sequence and structure preferences of RNA-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kazan, Hilal; Morris, Quaid

    2013-01-01

    RBPmotif web server (http://www.rnamotif.org) implements tools to identify binding preferences of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Given a set of sequences that are known to be bound and unbound by the RBP of interest, RBPmotif provides two types of analysis: (i) de novo motif finding when there is no a priori knowledge on RBP’s binding preferences and (ii) analysis of structure preferences when there is a previously identified sequence motif for the RBP. De novo motif finding is performed with t...

  15. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the structural gene of ferredoxin I from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatt, E; Jouanneau, Y; Vignais, P M

    1989-11-01

    The structural gene (fdxN) encoding ferredoxin I (FdI) in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus was isolated from a cosmid library by using an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of FdI. The nucleotide sequences of the gene and of the 3'- and 5'-flanking regions were determined. The gene fdxN codes for a polypeptide of 64 mino acids having a calculated molecular weight of 6,728. Amino acid sequencing of the N- and C-terminal ends of FdI allowed the determination of 86% of the primary structure and confirmed that FdI is the fdxN gene product. Sequence comparisons indicate that FdI shares common structural features with ferredoxins containing two [4Fe-4S] clusters, including eight conserved cysteines. Maximal homology was found with a ferredoxin from Rhodo-pseudomonas palustris. Northern (RNA) hybridization using a 158-base-pair DNA fragment internal to the fdxN coding region revealed the existence of two mRNA transcripts of approximately 330 and 750 nucleotides. Neither of those transcripts was present under nif-repressing growth conditions. The 5' end of the smaller transcript was mapped by S1 nuclease protection and primer extension experiments. On the basis of Southern hybridization experiments, by using probes homologous to fdxN, nifE, and a fragment complementing a nif point mutation, fdxN was localized inside a cluster of nif genes. PMID:2681157

  16. VES/TEM 1D joint inversion by using Controlled Random Search (CRS) algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolozo, Cassiano Antonio; Porsani, Jorge Luís; Santos, Fernando Acácio Monteiro dos; Almeida, Emerson Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Electrical (DC) and Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) soundings are used in a great number of environmental, hydrological, and mining exploration studies. Usually, data interpretation is accomplished by individual 1D models resulting often in ambiguous models. This fact can be explained by the way as the two different methodologies sample the medium beneath surface. Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) is good in marking resistive structures, while Transient Electromagnetic sounding (TEM) is very sensitive to conductive structures. Another difference is VES is better to detect shallow structures, while TEM soundings can reach deeper layers. A Matlab program for 1D joint inversion of VES and TEM soundings was developed aiming at exploring the best of both methods. The program uses CRS - Controlled Random Search - algorithm for both single and 1D joint inversions. Usually inversion programs use Marquadt type algorithms but for electrical and electromagnetic methods, these algorithms may find a local minimum or not converge. Initially, the algorithm was tested with synthetic data, and then it was used to invert experimental data from two places in Paraná sedimentary basin (Bebedouro and Pirassununga cities), both located in São Paulo State, Brazil. Geoelectric model obtained from VES and TEM data 1D joint inversion is similar to the real geological condition, and ambiguities were minimized. Results with synthetic and real data show that 1D VES/TEM joint inversion better recovers simulated models and shows a great potential in geological studies, especially in hydrogeological studies.

  17. Next-generation-sequencing-based risk stratification and identification of new genes involved in structural and sequence variations in near haploid lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cai; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Gombert, Michael; Okpanyi, Vera; Binder, Vera; Röttgers, Silja; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Harbott, Jochen; Ginzel, Sebastian; Thiele, Ralf; Fischer, Ute; Dugas, Martin; Hu, Jianda; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2013-06-01

    Near haploidy (23-29 chromosomes) is a numerical cytogenetic aberration in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with particularly poor outcome. In contrast, high hyperdiploidy (51-67 chromosomes) has a favorable prognosis. Correct classification and appropriate risk stratification of near haploidy is frequently hampered by the presence of apparently high hyperdiploid clones that arise by endoreduplication of the original near haploid clone. We evaluated next-generation-sequencing (NGS) to distinguish between "high hyperdiploid" leukemic clones of near haploid and true high hyperdiploid origin. Five high hyperdiploid ALL cases and the "high hyperdiploid" cell line MHH-CALL-2, derived from a near haploid clone, were tested for uniparental isodisomy. NGS showed that all disomic chromosomes of MHH-CALL-2, but none of the patients, were of uniparental origin, thus reliably discriminating these subtypes. Whole-exome- and whole-genome-sequencing of MHH-CALL-2 revealed homozygous non-synonymous coding mutations predicted to be deleterious for the protein function of 63 genes, among them known cancer-associated genes, such as FANCA, NF1, TCF7L2, CARD11, EP400, histone demethylases, and transferases (KDM6B, KDM1A, PRDM11). Only eight of these were also, but heterozygously, mutated in the high hyperdiploid patients. Structural variations in MHH-CALL-2 include a homozygous deletion (MTAP/CDKN2A/CDKN2B/ANRIL), a homozygous inversion (NCKAP5), and an unbalanced translocation (FAM189A1). Together, the sequence variations provide MHH-CALL-2 with capabilities typically acquired during cancer development, e.g., loss of cell cycle control, enhanced proliferation, lack of DNA repair, cell death evasion, and disturbance of epigenetic gene regulation. Poorer prognosis of near haploid ALL most likely results from full penetrance of a large array of detrimental homozygous mutations. PMID:23508829

  18. A Study of Sequence Clustering on Protein’s Primary Structure using a Statistical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Bogan-Marta

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The clustering of biological sequences into biologically meaningful classesdenotes two computationally complex challenges: the choice of a biologically pertinent andcomputable criterion to evaluate the clusters homogenity, and the optimal exploration ofthe solution space. Here we are analysing the clustering potential of a new method ofsequence similarity based on statistical sequence content evaluation. Applying on the samedata the popular CLUSTAL W method for sequence similarity we contrasted the results.The analysis, computational efficiency and high accuracy of the results from the newmethod is encouraging for further development that could make it an appealing alternativeto the existent methods.

  19. Amino acid sequences and structures of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, K G; Jespersen, H M; Walther-Rasmussen, J; Skjødt, K

    1991-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulins have been determined by analyses of tryptic, V8-proteolytic and cyanogen bromide fragments, and by N-terminal sequencing. Mass spectrometric analysis of chicken beta 2-microglobulin supports the sequence-derived Mr of 11,048. The higher apparent Mr obtained for the avian beta 2-microglobulins as compared to human beta 2-microglobulin by SDS-PAGE is not understood. Chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin consist of 98 r...

  20. The Chinese hamster Alu-equivalent sequence: a conserved highly repetitious, interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid sequence in mammals has a structure suggestive of a transposable element.

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, S R; Toomey, T. P.; Leinwand, L; Jelinek, W R

    1981-01-01

    A consensus sequence has been determined for a major interspersed deoxyribonucleic acid repeat in the genome of Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells). This sequence is extensively homologous to (i) the human Alu sequence (P. L. Deininger et al., J. Mol. Biol., in press), (ii) the mouse B1 interspersed repetitious sequence (Krayev et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 8:1201-1215, 1980) (iii) an interspersed repetitious sequence from African green monkey deoxyribonucleic acid (Dhruva et al., Proc. Natl...

  1. Genetic structuring and differentiation of Echinococcus multilocularis in Slovakia assessed by sequencing and isoenzyme studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snabel, V.; Miterpakova, M.; D'Amelio, S.; Busi, M.; Bartkova, D.; Turcekova, L.; Maddox-Hyttel, Charlotte; Skuce, P.; Dubinsky, P.

    2006-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene and isoenzyme analysis were used to survey the genetic variability in Echinococcus multilocularis populations from Slovakia. A sample of 12 isolates acquired from 10 different districts from red foxes exhibited identical sequences. Compared with the previously described E. multilocularis variants, one base substitution was consistently observed relative to the M 1 variant (detected in China, Alaska, North Americ...

  2. Compression-based classification of biological sequences and structures via the Universal Similarity Metric: experimental assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Manzini Giovanni; Greco Valentina; Giancarlo Raffaele; Ferragina Paolo; Valiente Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Similarity of sequences is a key mathematical notion for Classification and Phylogenetic studies in Biology. It is currently primarily handled using alignments. However, the alignment methods seem inadequate for post-genomic studies since they do not scale well with data set size and they seem to be confined only to genomic and proteomic sequences. Therefore, alignment-free similarity measures are actively pursued. Among those, USM (Universal Similarity Metric) has gained ...

  3. Sequence and secondary structure of the colicin fragment of Bacillus stearothermophilus 16S ribosomal RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Charldorp, R; Van Kimmenade, A M; Van Knippenberg, P H

    1981-01-01

    The sequence and the position of post-transcriptionally modified residues of the 3' -terminal end of Bacillus stearothermophilus 16S ribosomal RNA have been determined from the fragment that is cleaved off by bacteriocin treatment. The fragment contains 52 nucleotides, as compared to the 49 nucleotides of the corresponding fragment from E. coli ribosomes, The additional nucleotides are present in the sequence UCU very next to the 3' -terminus as was published earlier (1). The remainder of the...

  4. Direct prediction of profiles of sequences compatible with a protein structure by neural networks with fragment-based local and energy-based nonlocal profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixiu; Yang, Yuedong; Faraggi, Eshel; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-10-01

    Locating sequences compatible with a protein structural fold is the well-known inverse protein-folding problem. While significant progress has been made, the success rate of protein design remains low. As a result, a library of designed sequences or profile of sequences is currently employed for guiding experimental screening or directed evolution. Sequence profiles can be computationally predicted by iterative mutations of a random sequence to produce energy-optimized sequences, or by combining sequences of structurally similar fragments in a template library. The latter approach is computationally more efficient but yields less accurate profiles than the former because of lacking tertiary structural information. Here we present a method called SPIN that predicts Sequence Profiles by Integrated Neural network based on fragment-derived sequence profiles and structure-derived energy profiles. SPIN improves over the fragment-derived profile by 6.7% (from 23.6 to 30.3%) in sequence identity between predicted and wild-type sequences. The method also reduces the number of residues in low complex regions by 15.7% and has a significantly better balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues at protein surface. The accuracy of sequence profiles obtained is comparable to those generated from the protein design program RosettaDesign 3.5. This highly efficient method for predicting sequence profiles from structures will be useful as a single-body scoring term for improving scoring functions used in protein design and fold recognition. It also complements protein design programs in guiding experimental design of the sequence library for screening and directed evolution of designed sequences. The SPIN server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. PMID:24898915

  5. Direct prediction of profiles of sequences compatible to a protein structure by neural networks with fragment-based local and energy-based nonlocal profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixiu; Yang, Yuedong; Faraggi, Eshel; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Locating sequences compatible to a protein structural fold is the well-known inverse protein-folding problem. While significant progress has been made, the success rate of protein design remains low. As a result, a library of designed sequences or profile of sequences is currently employed for guiding experimental screening or directed evolution. Sequence profiles can be computationally predicted by iterative mutations of a random sequence to produce energy-optimized sequences, or by combining sequences of structurally similar fragments in a template library. The latter approach is computationally more efficient but yields less accurate profiles than the former because of lacking tertiary structural information. Here we present a method called SPIN that predicts Sequence Profiles by Integrated Neural network based on fragment-derived sequence profiles and structure-derived energy profiles. SPIN improves over the fragment-derived profile by 6.7% (from 23.6% to 30.3%) in sequence identity between predicted and wild-type sequences. The method also reduces the number of residues in low complex regions by 15.7% and has a significant better balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues at protein surfaces. The accuracy of sequence profiles obtained is comparable to those generated from the protein design program RosettaDesign 3.5. This highly efficient method for predicting sequence profiles from structures will be useful as a single-body scoring term for improving scoring functions used in protein design and fold recognition. It also complements protein design programs in guiding experimental design of the sequence library for screening and directed evolution of designed sequences. The SPIN server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. PMID:24898915

  6. Structural repertoire in VH pseudogenes of immunoglobulins: comparison with human germline genes and human amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Madrazo, E; Almagro, J C; Lara-Ochoa, F

    1995-02-10

    In the pool of human immunoglobulin VH gene segments, pseudogenes amount to roughly 30% of the total number of genes. Some of them are highly conserved among unrelated individuals. These facts suggest a possible functional role for pseudogenes in the human immune response diversity. This paper intends to provide additional information about the structure of VH pseudogene sequences to evaluate the possible role of pseudogenes in the immune response. Mutations capable of altering framework stability in human VH pseudogenes were analyzed. Results indicate that VH pseudogenes are about 14 times as divergent as human VH functional germline genes on the one hand, and four times as divergent in the case of human VH amino acid sequences on the other. The high number of disruptive mutations in pseudogenes is an expected result because of the lack of functionality of these genes. In the second part of the work we analyze whether or not the same takes place in the positions that determine the existence of canonical structures in the hypervariable loops in VH pseudogenes. An extension of such analysis is applied to all species with reported VH pseudogenes. In contrast with results concerning framework positions, 69% of known human VH pseudogenes have canonical structures in the first hypervariable loop, while 48% do so in the second one. Comparison of these results with those found in human VH functional germline genes and human VH amino acid sequences shows that in the former as many as 100% and in the latter 96% have canonical structures. In VH amino acid sequences the result is similar to pseudogenes for H1. For H2, such value lies between the percentage of germline genes (96%) and the percentage of pseudogenes (48%). The possible significance of the existence of canonical structures in the hypervariable loops of VH pseudogenes is discussed. PMID:7853406

  7. Interaction of environmental contaminants with zebrafish organic anion transporting polypeptide, Oatp1d1 (Slco1d1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko [Laboratory for Molecular Ecotoxicology, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Fent, Karl [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Department of Environmental System Sciences, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Smital, Tvrtko, E-mail: smital@irb.hr [Laboratory for Molecular Ecotoxicology, Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-10-01

    Polyspecific transporters from the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP/Oatp) superfamily mediate the uptake of a wide range of compounds. In zebrafish, Oatp1d1 transports conjugated steroid hormones and cortisol. It is predominantly expressed in the liver, brain and testes. In this study we have characterized the transport of xenobiotics by the zebrafish Oatp1d1 transporter. We developed a novel assay for assessing Oatp1d1 interactors using the fluorescent probe Lucifer yellow and transient transfection in HEK293 cells. Our data showed that numerous environmental contaminants interact with zebrafish Oatp1d1. Oatp1d1 mediated the transport of diclofenac with very high affinity, followed by high affinity towards perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), nonylphenol, gemfibrozil and 17α-ethinylestradiol; moderate affinity towards carbaryl, diazinon and caffeine; and low affinity towards metolachlor. Importantly, many environmental chemicals acted as strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1. A strong inhibition of Oatp1d1 transport activity was found by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), chlorpyrifos-methyl, estrone (E1) and 17β-estradiol (E2), followed by moderate to low inhibition by diethyl phthalate, bisphenol A, 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4 tetrahydronapthalene and clofibrate. In this study we identified Oatp1d1 as a first Solute Carrier (SLC) transporter involved in the transport of a wide range of xenobiotics in fish. Considering that Oatps in zebrafish have not been characterized before, our work on zebrafish Oatp1d1 offers important new insights on the understanding of uptake processes of environmental contaminants, and contributes to the better characterization of zebrafish as a model species. - Highlights: • We optimized a novel assay for determination of Oatp1d1 interactors • Oatp1d1 is the first SLC characterized fish xenobiotic transporter • PFOS, nonylphenol, diclofenac, EE2, caffeine are high affinity Oatp1d1substrates • PFOA, chlorpyrifos-methyl, E1, E2 are strong inhibitors of Oatp1d1 • PFOA and diclofenac can block Oatp1d1 binding of DHEAS, E3S and E17ß-glucuronide.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of a 1D thiocyanato bridged [Cu(en)2Zn(NCS)4]?H2O. Comparison of the three structures with the same [Cu(en)2Zn(NCS)4] unit - different in structural terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzeszcz, Grzegorz; Muzio?, Tadeusz M.; Tereba, Natalia

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we report the synthesis method and the structure of a one-dimensional thiocyanato bridged heterometallic compound, [Cu(en)2Zn(NCS)4]?H2O (1). Moreover, we compare the structure of (1) with the previously described structures of [Cu(en)2Zn(NCS)4]?0.5H2O (2) and [Cu(en)2Zn(NCS)4]?CH3CN (3) Pryma et al. (2003) [7]. The compound (1) has been characterized by thermal decomposition, IR, Vis and EPR spectra, and magnetic studies. Structure has been determined by X-ray analysis. Described coordination polymer crystallizes in the orthorhombic Cmcm space group with a = 12.414(2), b = 10.3276(14), c = 14.967(2) Å, ? = ? = ? = 90°, V = 1918.8(5) Å3 and Z = 4. Each distorted tetrahedral zinc(II) centre (with N-bonded NCS-) links two tetragonally distorted octahedral copper(II) centres by two end-to-end thiocyanato bridges and vice versa forming a zigzag type of CuZn chain. The structures of (1), (2) and (3) differ in crystallographic system, space group and/or CuZn chain type as well as in details. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements show very weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the paramagnetic copper(II) ions for compound (1).

  9. Crystal structure of importin-α complexed with a classic nuclear localization sequence obtained by oriented peptide library screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Importin-α (Impα) plays a role in the classical nuclear import pathway, binding to cargo proteins with activities in the nucleus. Different Impα paralogs responsible for specific cargos can be found in a single organism. The cargos contain nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), which are characterized by one or two clusters of basic amino acids (monopartite and bipartite NLSs, respectively). In this work we present the crystal structure of Impα from M. musculus (residues 70-529, lacking the auto inhibitory domain) bound to a NLS peptide (pepTM). The peptide corresponds to the optimal sequence obtained by an oriented peptide library experiment designed to probe the specificity of the major NLS binding site. The peptide library used five degenerate positions and identified the sequence KKKRR as the optimal sequence for binding to this site for mouse Impα (70-529). The protein was obtained using an E. coli expression system and purified by affinity chromatography followed by an ion exchange chromatography. A single crystal of Impα -pepTM complex was grown by the hanging drop method. The data were collected using the Synchrotron Radiation Source LNLS, Brazil and processed to 2.3. Molecular replacement techniques were used to determine the crystal structure. Electron density corresponding to the peptide was present in both major and minor binding sites The peptide is bound to Impα similar as the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumour (T)-antigen NLS. Binding assays confirmed that the peptide bound to Impα with low nM affinities. This is the first time that structural information has been linked to an oriented peptide library screening approach for importin-α; the results will contribute to understanding of the sequence determinants of classical NLSs, and may help identify as yet unidentified classical NLSs in novel proteins. (author)

  10. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA3XA3G with the complement dCT3YT3G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G/center dot/C base pair become more stable than those containing only A/center dot/T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I/center dot/C /succ/ I/center dot/ A/succ/ I/center dot/T ∼ I/center dot/G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG)/center dot/d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.)

  11. Soil Parameters Drive the Structure, Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of the Bacterial Communities Across Temperate Beech Forest Soil Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbille, M; Buée, M; Bach, C; Cébron, A; Frey-Klett, P; Turpault, M P; Uroz, S

    2016-02-01

    Soil and climatic conditions as well as land cover and land management have been shown to strongly impact the structure and diversity of the soil bacterial communities. Here, we addressed under a same land cover the potential effect of the edaphic parameters on the soil bacterial communities, excluding potential confounding factors as climate. To do this, we characterized two natural soil sequences occurring in the Montiers experimental site. Spatially distant soil samples were collected below Fagus sylvatica tree stands to assess the effect of soil sequences on the edaphic parameters, as well as the structure and diversity of the bacterial communities. Soil analyses revealed that the two soil sequences were characterized by higher pH and calcium and magnesium contents in the lower plots. Metabolic assays based on Biolog Ecoplates highlighted higher intensity and richness in usable carbon substrates in the lower plots than in the middle and upper plots, although no significant differences occurred in the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities along the soil sequences as assessed using quantitative PCR. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicons revealed that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the most abundantly represented phyla. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Chlamydiae were significantly enriched in the most acidic and nutrient-poor soils compared to the Bacteroidetes, which were significantly enriched in the soils presenting the higher pH and nutrient contents. Interestingly, aluminium, nitrogen, calcium, nutrient availability and pH appeared to be the best predictors of the bacterial community structures along the soil sequences. PMID:26370112

  12. Sequence dependent structure and thermodynamics of DNA oligonucleotides and polynucleotides: uv melting and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-ela, F.M.

    1987-12-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for double strand formation have been measured for the twenty-five DNA double helices made by mixing deoxyoligonucleotides of the sequence dCA/sub 3/XA/sub 3/G with the complement dCT/sub 3/YT/sub 3/G. Each of the bases A, C, G, T, and I (I = hypoxanthine) have been substituted at the positions labeled X and Y. The results are analyzed in terms of nearest neighbors. At higher temperatures the sequences containing a G)centerreverse arrowdot)C base pair become more stable than those containing only A)centerreverse arrowdot)T. All molecules containing mismatcher are destabilized with respect to those with only Watson-Crick pairing, but there is a wide range of destabilization. Large neighboring base effects upon stability were observed. For example, when (X, Y) = (I, A), the duplex is eightfold more stable than when (X, Y) = (A, I). Independent of sequence effects the order of stabilities is: I)centerreverse arrowdot)C )succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot) A)succ) I)centerreverse arrowdot)T approx. I)centerreverse arrowdot)G. All of these results are discussed within the context of models for sequence dependent DNA secondary structure, replication fidelity and mechanisms of mismatch repair, and implications for probe design. The duplex deoxyoligonucleotide d(GGATGGGAG))centerreverse arrowdot)d(CTCCCATCC) is a portion of the gene recognition sequence of the protein transcription factor IIIA. The crystal structure of this oligonucleotide was shown to be A-form The present study employs Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, optical, chemical and enzymatic techniques to investigate the solution structure of this DNA 9-mer. (157 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. The Thiamine diphosphate dependent Enzyme Engineering Database: A tool for the systematic analysis of sequence and structure relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radloff Robert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thiamine diphosphate (ThDP-dependent enzymes form a vast and diverse class of proteins, catalyzing a wide variety of enzymatic reactions including the formation or cleavage of carbon-sulfur, carbon-oxygen, carbon-nitrogen, and especially carbon-carbon bonds. Although very diverse in sequence and domain organisation, they share two common protein domains, the pyrophosphate (PP and the pyrimidine (PYR domain. For the comprehensive and systematic comparison of protein sequences and structures the Thiamine diphosphate (ThDP-dependent Enzyme Engineering Database (TEED was established. Description The TEED http://www.teed.uni-stuttgart.de contains 12048 sequence entries which were assigned to 9443 different proteins and 379 structure entries. Proteins were assigned to 8 different superfamilies and 63 homologous protein families. For each family, the TEED offers multisequence alignments, phylogenetic trees, and family-specific HMM profiles. The conserved pyrophosphate (PP and pyrimidine (PYR domains have been annotated, which allows the analysis of sequence similarities for a broad variety of proteins. Human ThDP-dependent enzymes are known to be involved in many diseases. 20 different proteins and over 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of human ThDP-dependent enzymes were identified in the TEED. Conclusions The online accessible version of the TEED has been designed to serve as a navigation and analysis tool for the large and diverse family of ThDP-dependent enzymes.

  14. Nanowires and 1D arrays fabrication: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of M41S materials family in 1992, some special features like aligned pores perpendicularly to the substrate surface and long range order, have been looked for with great interest for many applications of these kind of nanomaterials. The growth of thin films displaying meso- and nano-porous structures have attracted the attention of many research groups in the last decade and, with that aim several techniques such as: MBE, CVD, AFM, ion beam lithography, etc., have been used. On the other hand, a lot of down-top techniques, particularly those in which, self-assembly processes play a relevant role in the growth mechanisms of that nanostructures have been reported. Among them, electrochemical techniques constitute one of the most used to fabricate highly ordered nanostructures to be used as templates for replicating other nanostructured materials and for growing functionalized material arrays. In this paper, a brief overview on the nanofabrication techniques is done mainly of those related with the nanowires and, in general, 1D nanostructures fabrication. In addition, we show some results on ordered and disordered nanoporous anodic alumina membranes (AAM) and anodic titania membranes (ATM), respectively. Besides some functionalized systems based on these membranes used as templates are presented such as, magnetic nanowire arrays, biosensors, and carbon nanotubes. The potentiality of these systems for applications on diverse field, such as, nanoelectronic, magneto-optic, biotechnology and optoelectronic is demonstrated

  15. Population genetic structure of Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha inferred from variation in mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, B K; Singh, N S; Paria, P; Sahoo, A K; Panda, D; Meena, D K; Das, P; Pakrashi, S; Biswas, D K; Sharma, A P

    2015-09-01

    Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha, is a commercially important anadromous fish representing major catch in Indo-pacific region. The present study evaluated partial Cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence of mtDNA in T. ilisha for determining genetic variation from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins. The genomic DNA extracted from T. ilisha samples representing two distant rivers in the Indian subcontinent, the Bhagirathi (lower stretch of Ganges) and the Tapi was analyzed. Sequencing of 307 bp mtDNA Cytochrome b gene fragment revealed the presence of 5 haplotypes, with high haplotype diversity (Hd) of 0.9048 with variance 0.103 and low nucleotide diversity (?) of 0.14301. Three population specific haplotypes were observed in river Ganga and two haplotypes in river Tapi. Neighbour-joining tree based on Cytochrome b gene sequences of T. ilisha showed that population from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins belonged to two distinct clusters. PMID:26521565

  16. Structural Analysis of HMGD-DNA Complexes Reveal Influence of Intercalation on Sequence Selectivity and DNA Bending

    OpenAIRE

    Churchill, Mair E.A.; Klass, Janet; Zoetewey, David L.

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitous eukaryotic High-Mobility-Group-Box (HMGB) chromosomal proteins promote many chromatin-mediated cellular activities through their non-sequence-specific binding and bending of DNA. Minor groove DNA binding by the HMG box results in substantial DNA bending toward the major groove owing to electrostatic interactions, shape complementarity and DNA intercalation that occurs at two sites. Here, the structures of the complexes formed with DNA by a partially DNA intercalation-deficient ...

  17. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraj S; Jayaram B; Saranya N; Gromiha M; Fukui Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such...

  18. Sequence and structural determinants of strand swapping in cadherin domains: Do all cadherins bind through the same adhesive interface?

    OpenAIRE

    Posy, Shoshana; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Cadherins are cell surface adhesion proteins important for tissue development and integrity. Type I and type II, or “classical”, cadherins form adhesive dimers via an interface formed through the exchange, or “swapping”, of the N-terminal ?-strands from their membrane-distal EC1 domains. Here we ask which sequence and structural features in EC1 domains are responsible for ?-strand swapping and whether members of other cadherin families also form similar strand-swapped binding interfaces. We f...

  19. Intelligent Access to Sequence and Structure Databases (IASSD) ? an interface for accessing information from major web databases

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguli, Sayak; GUPTA, MANOJ KUMAR; Basu, Protip; Banik, Rahul; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Vishal, Vineet; Bera, Abhisek Ranjan; Chakraborty, Hirak Jyoti; Das, Sasti Gopal

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of age of big data and advances in high throughput technology accessing data has become one of the most important step in the entire knowledge discovery process. Most users are not able to decipher the query result that is obtained when non specific keywords or a combination of keywords are used. Intelligent access to sequence and structure databases (IASSD) is a desktop application for windows operating system. It is written in Java and utilizes the web service descr...

  20. Self-assembled decanuclear Na(I)2Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 complexes: from discrete clusters to 1-D and 2-D structures, with the Mn(II)4Mn(III)4 unit displaying a large spin ground state and probable SMM behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-01

    The synthesis, magnetic characterization and X-ray crystal structures are reported for five new manganese compounds, [Mn(III)(teaH(2))(sal)]·(1/2)H(2)O (1), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(4)]·6MeOH (2), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·7MeOH (3), [Na(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(MeOH)(2)](n)·2MeOH·Et(2)O (4) and [K(I)(2)Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4)(teaH)(6)(sal)(4)(N(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n)·5MeOH (5). Complex 1 is a mononuclear compound, formed via the reaction of Mn(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O, triethanolamine (teaH(3)) and salicylic acid (salH(2)) in a basic methanolic solution. Compound 2 is a mixed-valent hetero-metallic cluster made up of a Mn(8)Na(2) decanuclear core and is formed via the reaction of sodium azide (NaN(3)) with 1. Compounds 3-5 are isolated as 1- or 2-D coordination polymers, each containing the decanuclear Mn(8)M(2) (M = Na(+) or K(+)) core building block as the repeating unit. Compound 3 is isolated when 1 is reacted with NaN(3) over a very short reaction time and forms a 1-D coordination polymer. Each unit displays inter-cluster bridges via the O-atoms of teaH(2-) ligands bonding to the sodium ions of an adjacent cluster. Increasing the reaction time appears to drive the formation of 4 which forms 2-D polymeric sheets and is a packing polymorph of 3. The addition of KMnO(4) and NaN(3) to 1 resulted in compound 5, which also forms a 1-D coordination polymer of the decanuclear core unit. The 1-D chains are now linked via inter-cluster potassium and salicylate bridges. Solid state DC susceptibility measurements were performed on compounds 1-5. The data for 1 are as expected for an S = 2 Mn(III) ion, with the isothermal M vs. H data being fitted by matrix diagonalization methods to give values of g and the axial (D) and rhombic (E) zero field splitting parameters of 2.02, -2.70 cm(-1) and 0.36 cm(-1) respectively. The data for 2-5, each with an identical Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)(4) metallic core, indicates large spin ground states, with likely values of S = 16 (±1) for each. Solid state AC susceptibility measurements confirm the large spin ground state values and is also suggestive of SMM behaviour for 2-5 as observed via the onset of frequency dependent out-of-phase peaks. PMID:21879081

  1. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson proto-oncogene homolog.

    OpenAIRE

    Henkemeyer, M J; Bennett, R. L.; Gertler, F B; Hoffmann, F M

    1988-01-01

    We report our molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type lb 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyros...

  2. The structural organization and DNA sequence of a wheat histone H4 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabata, T.; Sasaki, K.; Iwabuchi, M

    1983-01-01

    Some wheat histone H4 genes have been cloned from a Charon 4 wheat genomic DNA library using sea urchin histone H4 DNA as a probe. DNA sequence analysis of a cloned gene showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of wheat histone H4 protein was identical to that of pea. The 5' end of wheat histone H4 mRNA was mapped on the cloned gene by the S1-procedure. Southern blotting analysis of the genomic DNA indicated that histone H4 genes were reiterated 100 to 125 times per hexaploid wheat genome.

  3. Multilocus Sequence Subtyping and Genetic Structure of Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Longxian; Ning, Changshen; Liu, Aiqin; Zhao, Jinfeng; Feng, Yaoyu; Qi, Meng; Wang, Helei; Lv, Chaochao; Zhao, Guanghui; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    In this study, nine C. muris and 43 C. andersoni isolates from various animals in China were subtyped by a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) tool. DNA sequence analyses showed the presence of 1–2 subtypes of C. muris and 2–6 subtypes of C. andersoni at each of the four loci (MS1, MS2, MS3, and MS16), nine of which represented new subtypes. Altogether, two C. muris and 10 C. andersoni MLST subtypes were detected. Linkage disequilibrium analysis indicated although the overall population structu...

  4. Probing the dispersion properties of 1D nanophotonic waveguides with far-field Fourier optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Thomas, N.; Jágerská, J.; Houdré, R.; Kotlyar, M.V.; O'Faolain, L.; Beggs, D.M.; O'Brien, D.; Krauss, T.F.; Bolten, J.; Moormann, C.; Wahlbrink, T.; Cyroký, J.; Waldow, M.; Först, M.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2008-01-01

    We present an advanced Fourier space imaging technique to probe guided light in nanophotonic structures with an effective numerical aperture of 2.5. This superresolution technique allows us to successfully investigate the dispersive properties of 1D nanowaveguides such as photonic crystal W1 waveguides, photonic wire, slot waveguides and couplers.

  5. High throughput sequencing analysis of the joint effects of BDE209-Pb on soil bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Rong; Lin, Kuangfei

    2016-01-15

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) and Lead (Pb) are the main pollutants at e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs). However, the impact on soil microorganism of joint exposure to the two chemicals remains almost unknown. Therefore, the indoor incubation tests were performed to determine the response of soil microbial biomass and activity as well as bacterial community structure in the presence of the two chemicals during 60 d incubation period. The results indicated that after Pb alone or BDE209-Pb exposure, soil microbial biomass C (Cmic) was significantly lower (psoil basal respiration (SBR) and metabolic quotient (qCO2) were enhanced, while BDE209 barely resulted in significant influence (p>0.05). 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform demonstrated that a total 49,405 valid sequences widely represented the diversity of microbial community. Sequence analyses at phylum and genus taxonomic levels illustrated that 11 identified phyla and 297 genera were observed among all the soil samples, and the contaminants input had affected bacterial community structure, suggesting that Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria were the dominant phyla, and the genera Massilia and Bacillus were enriched in contaminated soil. BDE209 exposure alone in all the samples indicated a more similar community structure compared to the control. The results of these observations have provided a better understanding of ecotoxicological effects of BDE209 and Pb joint exposure on indigenous microorganisms in soil at EWRSs. PMID:26342145

  6. Sequence and structure comparison suggest that methionine aminopeptidase, prolidase, aminopeptidase P, and creatinase share a common fold.

    OpenAIRE

    Bazan, J F; Weaver, L H; Roderick, S L; R. Huber; Matthews, B. W.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparison suggests that the structure of Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.18) and the C-terminal domain of Pseudomonas putida creatinase (EC 3.5.3.3) are related. A detailed comparison of the three-dimensional folds of the two enzymes confirms this homology: with an approximately 260-residue chain segment, 218 C alpha atoms of the structures superimpose within 2.5 A; only 41 of these overlapping positions (i.e., 19%) feature identical amino acids in t...

  7. 1-D neutronics optimization design for ITER CH HCSB TBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutronics problem of the TBM module design connects closely with TBM's other problems, such as, tritium generation, thermo-hydraulic, safety, etc. An exact neutronics calculation for the TBM module is very important. Based on the 1-D calculation model given in the CH HCSB TBM design, a better 1-D neutronics optimization has been performed using the ONEDANT code with related database. (authors)

  8. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D S

    2000-08-21

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  9. Deep RNA sequencing improved the structural annotation of the Tuber melanosporum transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisserant, E; Da Silva, C; Kohler, A; Morin, E; Wincker, P; Martin, F

    2011-02-01

    • The functional complexity of the Tuber melanosporum transcriptome has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we applied high-throughput Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) to the transcriptome of T. melanosporum at different major developmental stages, that is free-living mycelium, fruiting body and ectomycorrhiza. • Sequencing of cDNA libraries generated a total of c. 24 million sequence reads representing > 882 Mb of sequence data. To construct a coverage signal profile across the genome, all reads were then aligned to the reference genome assembly of T. melanosporum Mel28. • We were able to identify a substantial number of novel transcripts, antisense transcripts, new exons, untranslated regions (UTRs), alternative upstream initiation codons and upstream open reading frames. • This RNA-Seq analysis allowed us to improve the genome annotation. It also provided us with a genome-wide view of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms generating an increased number of transcript isoforms during major developmental transitions in T. melanosporum. PMID:21223284

  10. Iterative Solvers within Sequences of Large Linear Systems in Non-linear Structural Mechanics.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartmann, S.; Duintjer Tebbens, Jurjen; Quint, K.J.; Meister, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 89, ?. 9 (2009), s. 711-728. ISSN 0044-2267 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R KJB100300703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : iterative solver * non-symmetric matrices * sequences of linear systems * finite strains * finite elements Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.866, year: 2009

  11. Temporal structure of the global sequence of volcanic eruptions: Order clustering and intermittent discharge rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A. A.

    2008-02-01

    To study the temporal organization of global volcanic activity over time scales from years to centuries, the following three event sequences were studied: two subsets of the regular catalog of eruptions after Siebert and Simkin [Siebert, L., Simkin, T., 2002. Volcanoes of the World… http://www.volcano.si.edu/gvp/world/], and the "ice core volcanic index" (IVI) sequence, based on the volcanic eruption record as acid layers in big glaciers (Robock, A., Free, M.P., 1996. The volcanic record in ice cores for the past 2000 years. In: Jones, P.D., Bradley, R.S., Jouzel, J. (Eds.), Climatic Variations and Forcing Mechanisms of the Last 2000 Years. Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 533-546). To perform the statistical analysis in a meaningful way, data subsets were extracted from the original data, with size thresholds and time intervals carefully selected to make these subsets nearly homogeneous. The analysis has revealed, generally, the tendency to clustering, manifested in the following three forms: (1) The event rate is not uniform in time: event dates form active episodes ("common" clusters). (2) In the time-ordered, sequential list of sizes of eruptions, larger events do not appear purely randomly; instead, they form tight groups ("order clusters"). (3) The volcanic products discharge rate is significantly non-uniform, and shows episodic (intermittent or bursty) behavior. It was also found that for the volcanic sequences analyzed, the two types of clustering behavior mentioned in (1) and (2) are positively correlated: larger events are concentrated at the periods of higher event rate. Such a relationship is best demonstrated by the fact that there is clear negative correlation between the following two time series: (1) of the exponent b of the power law size-frequency distribution (the analog of b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes) and (2) of the current event rate. Power spectra of the analyzed sequences mostly follow power laws, with negative exponent ?. Thus, these sequences can be qualified as pulse flicker noises. In other words, they are fractal sequences with correlation dimension Dc = ? + 1 < 1, and both their clustering and episodicity are of self-similar character. The revealed peculiarities of the global volcanic sequence suggest that some global-scale mechanism exists that is responsible for their origin. They are also or primary importance for understanding the impact of volcanism on climate.

  12. Sequence effects in the melting and renaturation of short DNA oligonucleotides: structure and mechanistic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renaturation/denaturation of DNA oligonucleotides is characterized in the context of expanded ensemble (EXE) and transition path sampling (TPS) simulations. Free energy profiles have been determined from EXE for DNA sequences of varying composition, chain length, and ionic strength. TPS simulations within a Langevin dynamics formalism have been carried out to obtain further information of the transition state for renaturation. Simulation results reveal that free energy profiles are strikingly similar for the various DNA sequences considered in this work. Taking intact double-stranded DNA to have an extent of reaction ? = 1.0, the maximum of the free energy profile appears at ??0.15, corresponding to ?2 base pairs. In terms of chain length, the free energy barrier of longer oligonucleotides (30 versus 15 base pairs) is higher and slightly narrower, due to increased sharpness associated with the transition. Low ionic strength tends to decrease free energy barriers, whereby increasing strand rigidity facilitates reassociation. Two mechanisms for DNA reassociation emerge from our analysis of the transition state ensemble. Repetitive sequences tend to reassociate through a non-specific pathway involving molecular slithering. In contrast, random sequences associate through a more restrictive pathway involving the formation of specific contacts, which then leads to overall molecular zippering. In both random and repetitive sequences, the distribution of contacts suggests that nucleation is favored for sites located within the middle region of the chain. The prevalent extent of reaction for the transition state is ??0.25, and the critical size of the nucleus as obtained from our analysis involves ?4 base pairs.

  13. Protein Classification Based on Analysis of Local Sequence-Structure Correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemla, A T

    2006-02-13

    The goal of this project was to develop an algorithm to detect and calculate common structural motifs in compared structures, and define a set of numerical criteria to be used for fully automated motif based protein structure classification. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains more than 33,000 experimentally solved protein structures, and the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database, a manual classification of these structures, cannot keep pace with the rapid growth of the PDB. In our approach called STRALCP (STRucture Alignment based Clustering of Proteins), we generate detailed information about global and local similarities between given set of structures, identify similar fragments that are conserved within analyzed proteins, and use these conserved regions (detected structural motifs) to classify proteins.

  14. Hfqs in Bacillus anthracis: Role of protein sequence variation in the structure and function of proteins in the Hfq family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrentas, Catherine; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Keefer, Andrea; Hu, Zonglin; Tomczak, Aurelie; Gittis, Apostolos G; Murthi, Athulaprabha; Garboczi, David N; Gottesman, Susan; Leppla, Stephen H

    2015-11-01

    Hfq proteins in Gram-negative bacteria play important roles in bacterial physiology and virulence, mediated by binding of the Hfq hexamer to small RNAs and/or mRNAs to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. However, the physiological role of Hfqs in Gram-positive bacteria is less clear. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, uniquely expresses three distinct Hfq proteins, two from the chromosome (Hfq1, Hfq2) and one from its pXO1 virulence plasmid (Hfq3). The protein sequences of Hfq1 and 3 are evolutionarily distinct from those of Hfq2 and of Hfqs found in other Bacilli. Here, the quaternary structure of each B. anthracis Hfq protein, as produced heterologously in Escherichia coli, was characterized. While Hfq2 adopts the expected hexamer structure, Hfq1 does not form similarly stable hexamers in vitro. The impact on the monomer-hexamer equilibrium of varying Hfq C-terminal tail length and other sequence differences among the Hfqs was examined, and a sequence region of the Hfq proteins that was involved in hexamer formation was identified. It was found that, in addition to the distinct higher-order structures of the Hfq homologs, they give rise to different phenotypes. Hfq1 has a disruptive effect on the function of E. coli Hfq in vivo, while Hfq3 expression at high levels is toxic to E. coli but also partially complements Hfq function in E. coli. These results set the stage for future studies of the roles of these proteins in B. anthracis physiology and for the identification of sequence determinants of phenotypic complementation. PMID:26271475

  15. Nucleotide sequence of a cDNA for branched chain acyltransferase with analysis of the deduced protein structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide sequence was determined for a 1.6-kilobase human cDNA putative for the branched chain acyltransferase protein of the branched chain ?-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. Translation of the sequence reveals an open reading frame encoding a 315-amino acid protein of molecular weight 35,759 followed by 560 bases of 3'-untranslated sequence. Three repeats of the polyadenylation signal hexamer ATTAAA are present prior to the polyadenylate tail. Within the open reading frame is a 10-amino acid fragment which matches exactly the amino acid sequence around the lipoate-lysine residue in bovine kidney branched chain acyltransferase, thus confirming the identity of the cDNA. Analysis of the deduced protein structure for the human branched chain acyltransferase revealed an organization into domains similar to that reported for the acyltransferase proteins of the pyruvate and ?-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. This similarity in organization suggests that a more detailed analysis of the proteins will be required to explain the individual substrate and multienzyme complex specificity shown by these acyltransferases

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the structural gene, tcpA, for a major pilin subunit of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faast, R; Ogierman, M A; Stroeher, U H; Manning, P A

    1989-12-21

    The toxin co-regulated pilus (Tcp) of Vibrio cholerae appears to be a major protective antigen. By cosmid cloning we have isolated a number of clones capable of converting Tcp- El Tor strains of V. cholerae to Tcp+. A synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe based upon the N-terminal amino acid sequence of TcpA, has been used to localize the structural gene within the cosmid clones. Using suitable subclones, the nucleotide sequence of the tcpA gene has been determined. The gene encodes a 23.3-kDa pre-protein which in its mature form has a size of 20.3 kDa. The N-terminal leader peptide or signal sequence is atypical and does not conform with the usual rules of such sequences. The TcpA protein shows some similarities to the major pilins of the methylated phenylalanine type or type-4 pili from other bacteria; however, it is sufficiently different that it may represent a new class. PMID:2576015

  17. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Xiao-Hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly simila...

  18. Structure-sequence based analysis for identification of conserved regions in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam T; Zhou, Carol E; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2013-05-28

    Disclosed are computational methods, and associated hardware and software products for scoring conservation in a protein structure based on a computationally identified family or cluster of protein structures. A method of computationally identifying a family or cluster of protein structures in also disclosed herein.

  19. ``Pinning strategy": a novel approach for predicting the backbone structure in terms of protein blocks from sequence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A G De Brevern; C Etchebest; C Benros; S Hazout

    2007-01-01

    The description of protein 3D structures can be performed through a library of 3D fragments, named a structural alphabet. Our structural alphabet is composed of 16 small protein fragments of 5 C in length, called protein blocks (PBs). It allows an efficient approximation of the 3D protein structures and a correct prediction of the local structure. The 72 most frequent series of 5 consecutive PBs, called structural words (SWs) are able to cover more than 90% of the 3D structures. PBs are highly conditioned by the presence of a limited number of transitions between them. In this study, we propose a new method called “pinning strategy” that used this specific feature to predict long protein fragments. Its goal is to define highly probable successions of PBs. It starts from the most probable SW and is then extended with overlapping SWs. Starting from an initial prediction rate of 34.4%, the use of the SWs instead of the PBs allows a gain of 4.5%. The pinning strategy simply applied to the SWs increases the prediction accuracy to 39.9%. In a second step, the sequence-structure relationship is optimized, the prediction accuracy reaches 43.6%.

  20. High-resolution deep sequencing reveals biodiversity, population structure, and persistence of HIV-1 quasispecies within host ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing provides the basis for analysis of biodiversity of taxonomically similar organisms in an environment. While extensively applied to microbiome studies, population genetics studies of viruses are limited. To define the scope of HIV-1 population biodiversity within infected individuals, a suite of phylogenetic and population genetic algorithms was applied to HIV-1 envelope hypervariable domain 3 (Env V3 within peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a group of perinatally HIV-1 subtype B infected, therapy-naïve children. Results Biodiversity of HIV-1 Env V3 quasispecies ranged from about 70 to 270 unique sequence clusters across individuals. Viral population structure was organized into a limited number of clusters that included the dominant variants combined with multiple clusters of low frequency variants. Next generation viral quasispecies evolved from low frequency variants at earlier time points through multiple non-synonymous changes in lineages within the evolutionary landscape. Minor V3 variants detected as long as four years after infection co-localized in phylogenetic reconstructions with early transmitting viruses or with subsequent plasma virus circulating two years later. Conclusions Deep sequencing defines HIV-1 population complexity and structure, reveals the ebb and flow of dominant and rare viral variants in the host ecosystem, and identifies an evolutionary record of low-frequency cell-associated viral V3 variants that persist for years. Bioinformatics pipeline developed for HIV-1 can be applied for biodiversity studies of virome populations in human, animal, or plant ecosystems.

  1. Sequences of epicuticular wax structures along stems in four selected tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaszewski Dominik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Wax layer formation accompanies the processes of epidermis and cuticle formation. To examine these changes, observationsalong current-year long shoots of four woody species (Acer negundo, A. rufinerve, Gymnocladus dioica, and Gingko biloba were made. Long shoots are suitable objects for such observations, because from the same stem, several samples can be obtained that represent a well-defined sequence of fragments of different ages.

  2. Developing digital test sequences for through-silicon vias within 3D structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbins, M.; Hopsch, F.; Schneider, P.; Straube, B; Vermeiren, W.

    2010-01-01

    Through-silicon vias (TSVs) present new, essential elements within 3D stacked Integrated Circuits (IC). Since they connect different layers of 3D stacks, their proper operation is an essential prerequisite for the system function. In this paper a procedure for deriving local digital test sequences for TSVs is presented. The behavior of TSVs including their typical surrounding circuitry is investigated under the impact of assumed faults using fault simulation. Since a purely digital considerat...

  3. Undesirable Choice Biases with Small Differences in the Spatial Structure of Chance Stimulus Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In two-alternative discrimination tasks, experimenters usually randomize the location of the rewarded stimulus so that systematic behavior with respect to irrelevant stimuli can only produce chance performance on the learning curves. One way to achieve this is to use random numbers derived from a discrete binomial distribution to create a 'full random training schedule' (FRS). When using FRS, however, sporadic but long laterally-biased training sequences occur by chance and such 'input biases' are thought to promote the generation of laterally-biased choices (i.e., 'output biases'). As an alternative, a 'Gellerman-like training schedule' (GLS) can be used. It removes most input biases by prohibiting the reward from appearing on the same location for more than three consecutive trials. The sequence of past rewards obtained from choosing a particular discriminative stimulus influences the probability of choosing that same stimulus on subsequent trials. Assuming that the long-term average ratio of choices matches the long-term average ratio of reinforcers, we hypothesized that a reduced amount of input biases in GLS compared to FRS should lead to a reduced production of output biases. We compared the choice patterns produced by a 'Rational Decision Maker' (RDM) in response to computer-generated FRS and GLS training sequences. To create a virtual RDM, we implemented an algorithm that generated choices based on past rewards. Our simulations revealed that, although the GLS presented fewer input biases than the FRS, the virtual RDM produced more output biases with GLS than with FRS under a variety of test conditions. Our results reveal that the statistical and temporal properties of training sequences interacted with the RDM to influence the production of output biases. Thus, discrete changes in the training paradigms did not translate linearly into modifications in the pattern of choices generated by a RDM. Virtual RDMs could be further employed to guide the selection of proper training schedules for perceptual decision-making studies. PMID:26305097

  4. Undesirable Choice Biases with Small Differences in the Spatial Structure of Chance Stimulus Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, David; Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In two-alternative discrimination tasks, experimenters usually randomize the location of the rewarded stimulus so that systematic behavior with respect to irrelevant stimuli can only produce chance performance on the learning curves. One way to achieve this is to use random numbers derived from a discrete binomial distribution to create a 'full random training schedule' (FRS). When using FRS, however, sporadic but long laterally-biased training sequences occur by chance and such 'input biases...

  5. Undesirable Choice Biases with Small Differences in the Spatial Structure of Chance Stimulus Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In two-alternative discrimination tasks, experimenters usually randomize the location of the rewarded stimulus so that systematic behavior with respect to irrelevant stimuli can only produce chance performance on the learning curves. One way to achieve this is to use random numbers derived from a discrete binomial distribution to create a 'full random training schedule' (FRS). When using FRS, however, sporadic but long laterally-biased training sequences occur by chance and such 'input biases' are thought to promote the generation of laterally-biased choices (i.e., 'output biases'). As an alternative, a 'Gellerman-like training schedule' (GLS) can be used. It removes most input biases by prohibiting the reward from appearing on the same location for more than three consecutive trials. The sequence of past rewards obtained from choosing a particular discriminative stimulus influences the probability of choosing that same stimulus on subsequent trials. Assuming that the long-term average ratio of choices matches the long-term average ratio of reinforcers, we hypothesized that a reduced amount of input biases in GLS compared to FRS should lead to a reduced production of output biases. We compared the choice patterns produced by a 'Rational Decision Maker' (RDM) in response to computer-generated FRS and GLS training sequences. To create a virtual RDM, we implemented an algorithm that generated choices based on past rewards. Our simulations revealed that, although the GLS presented fewer input biases than the FRS, the virtual RDM produced more output biases with GLS than with FRS under a variety of test conditions. Our results reveal that the statistical and temporal properties of training sequences interacted with the RDM to influence the production of output biases. Thus, discrete changes in the training paradigms did not translate linearly into modifications in the pattern of choices generated by a RDM. Virtual RDMs could be further employed to guide the selection of proper training schedules for perceptual decision-making studies. PMID:26305097

  6. From nonfinite to finite 1D arrays of origami tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai Chin; Rahman, Masudur; Norton, Michael L

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA based nanotechnology provides a basis for high-resolution fabrication of objects almost without physical size limitations. However, the pathway to large-scale production of large objects is currently unclear. Operationally, one method forward is to use high information content, large building blocks, which can be generated with high yield and reproducibility. Although flat DNA origami naturally invites comparison to pixels in zero, one, and two dimensions and voxels in three dimensions and has provided an excellent mechanism for generating blocks of significant size and complexity and a multitude of shapes, the field is young enough that a single "brick" has not become the standard platform used by the majority of researchers in the field. In this Account, we highlight factors we considered that led to our adoption of a cross-shaped, non-space-filling origami species, designed by Dr. Liu of the Seeman laboratory, as the building block ideal for use in the fabrication of finite one-dimensional arrays. Three approaches that can be employed for uniquely coding origami-origami linkages are presented. Such coding not only provides the energetics for tethering the species but also uniquely designates the relative orientation of the origami building blocks. The strength of the coding approach implemented in our laboratory is demonstrated using examples of oligomers ranging from finite multimers composed of four, six, and eight origami structures to semi-infinite polymers (100mers). Two approaches to finite array design and the series of assembly steps that each requires are discussed. The process of AFM observation for array characterization is presented as a critical case study. For these soft species, the array images do not simply present the solution phase geometry projected onto a two-dimensional surface. There are additional perturbations associated with fluidic forces associated with sample preparation. At this time, reconstruction of the "true" or average solution structures for blocks is more readily achieved using computer models than using direct imaging methods. The development of scalable 1D-origami arrays composed of uniquely addressable components is a logical, if not necessary, step in the evolution of higher order fully addressable structures. Our research into the fabrication of arrays has led us to generate a listing of several important areas of future endeavor. Of high importance is the re-enforcement of the mechanical properties of the building blocks and the organization of multiple arrays on a surface of technological importance. While addressing this short list of barriers to progress will prove challenging, coherent development along each of these lines of inquiry will accelerate the appearance of commercial scale molecular manufacturing. PMID:24803094

  7. Structural variation in the chicken genome identified by paired-end next-generation DNA sequencing of reduced representation libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okimoto Ron

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation within individual genomes ranges from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to kilobase, and even megabase, sized structural variants (SVs, such as deletions, insertions, inversions, and more complex rearrangements. Although much is known about the extent of SVs in humans and mice, species in which they exert significant effects on phenotypes, very little is known about the extent of SVs in the 2.5-times smaller and less repetitive genome of the chicken. Results We identified hundreds of shared and divergent SVs in four commercial chicken lines relative to the reference chicken genome. The majority of SVs were found in intronic and intergenic regions, and we also found SVs in the coding regions. To identify the SVs, we combined high-throughput short read paired-end sequencing of genomic reduced representation libraries (RRLs of pooled samples from 25 individuals and computational mapping of DNA sequences from a reference genome. Conclusion We provide a first glimpse of the high abundance of small structural genomic variations in the chicken. Extrapolating our results, we estimate that there are thousands of rearrangements in the chicken genome, the majority of which are located in non-coding regions. We observed that structural variation contributes to genetic differentiation among current domesticated chicken breeds and the Red Jungle Fowl. We expect that, because of their high abundance, SVs might explain phenotypic differences and play a role in the evolution of the chicken genome. Finally, our study exemplifies an efficient and cost-effective approach for identifying structural variation in sequenced genomes.

  8. Sequence and structure prediction of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of lily symptomless virus isolated from L. × 'Casablanca'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pinsan; Li, Huangai; Liu, Jiwen; Luan, Yushi; Yin, Yalei; Bai, Jianfang

    2011-06-01

    The DNA sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene of lily symptomless virus (LSV), a lily-infecting member of the genus Carlavirus, was determined from nine overlapping cDNA fragments of different sizes. The complete sequence of this RdRp gene (HM070294) consisted of 5,847 nucleotides coding for a protein of 220 kDa. It had 97-98% sequence identity with RdRps of other known isolates at both the DNA and the amino acid level. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this RdRp (designated as RdRp-DL) was closely related to the RdRp of the Korean isolate (AM516059), as well as to the RdRps from Passiflora latent virus (PLV) and Kalanchoe latent virus (KLV) of the genus Carlavirus. Hydrophobic analysis of RdRp-DL revealed a hydrophobic N-terminus and a hydrophilic C-terminus. Helices and Loops were the major secondary structures of RdRp-DL. In addition, RdRp-DL also had three coil structures. Four conserved domains were identified: typoviral methyltransferase, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, P-loop-containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases and carlavirus endopeptidase. A model of the tertiary structure predicted by I-TASSER was obtained for each of these conserved domains. This is the first report of a detailed phylogenetic analysis of LSV RdRp with those of other members of the genus Carlavirus, and the first to predict the domain structures of LSV RdRp. PMID:21409447

  9. Functional and structural analysis of the DNA sequence conferring glucocorticoid inducibility to the mouse mammary tumor virus gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of my thesis I show that the DNA element conferring glucocorticoid inducibility to the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (HRE) has enhancer properties. It activates a heterologous promoter - that of the β-globin gene, independently of distance, position and orientation. These properties however have to be regarded in relation to the remaining regulatory elements of the activated gene as the recombinants between HRE and the TK gene have demonstrated. In the second part of my thesis I investigated the biological significance of certain sequence motifs of the HRE, which are remarkable by their interaction with transacting factors or sequence homologies with other regulatory DNA elements. I could confirm the generally postulated modular structure of enhancers for the HRE and bring the relevance of the single subdomains for the function of the element into relationship. (orig.)

  10. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DS AND IDS ALGORITHMS IN SUPER-SPATIAL STRUCTURE PREDICTION FOR MEDICAL IMAGE SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferni Ukrit

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of digital technology the demand to preserve raw image data for further processing is increasing. In medical industry the images are generally in the form of sequences which are much correlated. These images are very important and hence lossless image compression is needed to reproduce the original quality of the image without any loss of information. The correlation among the image sequences is exploited by interframe coding. Interframe coding includes Motion Estimation and Motion Compensation process supported by the Block Matching Algorithm. There are various block matching algorithms. The proposed method has taken Diamond Search and Inverse Diamond Search for comparison. The algorithms are used in Super-Spatial Structure Prediction to achieve high compression ratio. Results are compared in terms of compression ratio and search points to the prior arts.

  11. Structure and Function of Lineage-Specific Sequence Insertions in the Bacterial RNA Polymerase beta' Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlenov,M.; Masuda, Y.; Murakami, K.; Nikiforov, V.; Darst, S.; Mustaev, A.

    2005-01-01

    The large {beta} and {beta}{prime} subunits of the bacterial core RNA polymerase (RNAP) are highly conserved throughout evolution. Nevertheless, large sequence insertions in {beta} and {beta}' characterize specific evolutionary lineages of bacteria. The Thermus aquaticus RNAP {beta}{prime} subunit contains a 283 residue insert between conserved regions A and B that is found in only four bacterial species. The Escherichia coli RNAP {beta}{prime} subunit contains a 188 residue insert in the middle of conserved region G that is found in a wide range of bacterial species. Here, we present structural studies of these two {beta}{prime} insertions. We show that the inserts comprise repeats of a previously characterized fold, the sandwich-barrel hybrid motif (as predicted from previous sequence analysis) and that the inserts serve significant roles in facilitating protein/protein and/or protein/nucleic acid interactions.

  12. Polar discontinuities and 1D interfaces in monolayered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gordillo, Rafael; Pruneda, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Interfaces are the birthplace of a multitude of fascinating discoveries in fundamental science, and have enabled modern electronic devices, from transistors, to lasers, capacitors or solar cells. These interfaces between bulk materials are always bi-dimensional (2D) 'surfaces'. However the advent of graphene and other 2D crystals opened up a world of possibilities, as in this case the interfaces become one-dimensional (1D) lines. Although the properties of 1D nanoribbons have been extensively discussed in the last few years, 1D interfaces within infinite 2D systems had remained mostly unexplored until very recently. These include grain boundaries in polycrystalline samples, or interfaces in hybrid 2D sheets composed by segregated domains of different materials (as for example graphene/BN hybrids, or chemically different transition metal dichalcogenides). As for their 2D counterparts, some of these 1D interfaces exhibit polar characteristics, and can give rise to fascinating new physical properties. Here, recent experimental discoveries and theoretical predictions on the polar discontinuities that arise at these 1D interfaces will be reviewed, and the perspectives of this new research topic, discussed.

  13. Tripeptides on Gold Nanoparticles: Structural Differences between Two Reverse Sequences as Determined by Solid-State NMR and DFT Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Ichhuk; Wang, Hong; Geise, Natalie R; Wilson, Brendan W; Lewis, James P; Gullion, Terry

    2015-09-10

    The reverse-sequence peptides CysAlaAla and AlaAlaCys may attach to gold nanoparticles through the thiol group, and they differ primarily by whether the charged amino or the carboxylate group is proximal to the sulfur. Alanine residues in these peptides are not expected to interact significantly with the gold surface and serve to place a large separation between the amino and carboxylate groups. Solid-state NMR experiments and DFT calculations were performed to explore the structural differences between CysAlaAla on gold nanoparticles and AlaAlaCys on gold nanoparticles. It is found that the relative positions between the thiol, amino, and carboxylate groups strongly influences the structures of the peptide-gold systems. CysAlaAla orients parallel to the gold surface in a monolayer fashion, whereas AlaAlaCys forms an interdigitating bilayer-like structure that is oriented upright relative to the gold surface. PMID:26308986

  14. A conditional random fields method for RNA sequence–structure relationship modeling and conformation sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    Accurate tertiary structures are very important for the functional study of non-coding RNA molecules. However, predicting RNA tertiary structures is extremely challenging, because of a large conformation space to be explored and lack of an accurate scoring function differentiating the native structure from decoys. The fragment-based conformation sampling method (e.g. FARNA) bears shortcomings that the limited size of a fragment library makes it infeasible to represent all possible conformatio...

  15. Non-virulence of a recombinant shrimp nidovirus is associated with its non structural gene sequence and not a large structural gene deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RT-PCR using a commercial kit for yellow head virus (YHV) detection in growth-retarded shrimp yielded an unusual 777 bp amplicon instead of expected amplicons of 277 bp for YHV type-1 (YHV-1) or 406 bp for YHV type-2 (YHV-2). Cloning and sequencing (GenBank (EU170438)) revealed approximately 80% identity to non-structural (NS) ORF1b sequences of both YHV-1 (GenBank (AA083987)) and YHV-2 (GenBank (AF227196)), indicating an atypical YHV type (A-YHV) phylogenetically equidistant from both types. An RT-PCR test specifically designed for A-YHV revealed that it was uncommon and that its occurrence in shrimp culture ponds did not correlate with growth retardation or mortality. By immunohistochemistry with YHV-specific monoclonal antibodies, the A-YHV gave positive reactions for envelope protein gp64 and capsid protein p20, but not for envelope protein gp116, even though gp116 and gp64 originate from a polyprotein of ORF3. Lack of gp116 immunoreactivity correlated with a large ORF3 deletion (GenBank (EU123854)) in the region of the protein targeted by an MAb against gp116. Transmission electron microscopy of A-YHV-infected shrimp revealed only unenveloped pre-virions. During manuscript revision, information received revealed that typing of YHV isolates based on sequences of ORF1b and ORF3 had yielded several geographical types, including one virulent type (YHV-1b) with an ORF3 deletion sequence that matched the sequence of A-YHV. Using these sequences and an additional A-YHV sequence ( (EU853170)) from the ORF1b typing region, A-YHV potentially represents a recombinant between type 1b and type 5. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed that type 1b produced a gp116 deletion protein that did not bind with the MAb or polyclonal Ab to normal gp116. Overall, the information suggested that lack of A-YHV virulence was associated with the NS gene sequence linked to ORF1b rather than the deletion in ORF3

  16. A three-layered cortical network encodes identity and abstract categorical structure of behavioral sequences as in the primate lateral prefrontal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Hinaut, Xavier; Dominey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Categorical encoding is crucial for mastering large bodies of related sensory experiences. Recent single-unit recording studies in the macaque prefrontal cortex have demonstrated two characteristic forms of neural encoding of the sequential structure of the animal's behaviour. One population of neurons encodes the specific behavioural sequences. A second population of neurons encodes the sequence category (e.g. ABAB, AABB or AAAA) and does not differentiate sequences within the category [1]. ...

  17. Nuclear Species-Diagnostic SNP Markers Mined from 454 Amplicon Sequencing Reveal Admixture Genomic Structure of Modern Citrus Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curk, Franck; Ancillo, Gema; Ollitrault, Frédérique; Perrier, Xavier; Jacquemoud-Collet, Jean-Pierre; Garcia-Lor, Andres; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Most cultivated Citrus species originated from interspecific hybridisation between four ancestral taxa (C. reticulata, C. maxima, C. medica, and C. micrantha) with limited further interspecific recombination due to vegetative propagation. This evolution resulted in admixture genomes with frequent interspecific heterozygosity. Moreover, a major part of the phenotypic diversity of edible citrus results from the initial differentiation between these taxa. Deciphering the phylogenomic structure of citrus germplasm is therefore essential for an efficient utilization of citrus biodiversity in breeding schemes. The objective of this work was to develop a set of species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for the four Citrus ancestral taxa covering the nine chromosomes, and to use these markers to infer the phylogenomic structure of secondary species and modern cultivars. Species-diagnostic SNPs were mined from 454 amplicon sequencing of 57 gene fragments from 26 genotypes of the four basic taxa. Of the 1,053 SNPs mined from 28,507 kb sequence, 273 were found to be highly diagnostic for a single basic taxon. Species-diagnostic SNP markers (105) were used to analyse the admixture structure of varieties and rootstocks. This revealed C. maxima introgressions in most of the old and in all recent selections of mandarins, and suggested that C. reticulata × C. maxima reticulation and introgression processes were important in edible mandarin domestication. The large range of phylogenomic constitutions between C. reticulata and C. maxima revealed in mandarins, tangelos, tangors, sweet oranges, sour oranges, grapefruits, and orangelos is favourable for genetic association studies based on phylogenomic structures of the germplasm. Inferred admixture structures were in agreement with previous hypotheses regarding the origin of several secondary species and also revealed the probable origin of several acid citrus varieties. The developed species-diagnostic SNP marker set will be useful for systematic estimation of admixture structure of citrus germplasm and for diverse genetic studies. PMID:25973611

  18. LNCipedia: a database for annotated human lncRNA transcript sequences and structures

    OpenAIRE

    Volders, Pieter-Jan; Helsens, Kenny; Wang, Xiaowei; Menten, Björn; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris; Vandesompele, Jo; Mestdagh, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present LNCipedia (http://www.lncipedia.org), a novel database for human long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts and genes. LncRNAs constitute a large and diverse class of non-coding RNA genes. Although several lncRNAs have been functionally annotated, the majority remains to be characterized. Different high-throughput methods to identify new lncRNAs (including RNA sequencing and annotation of chromatin-state maps) have been applied in various studies resulting in multiple unrelated...

  19. A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for 1-?-d arabino furanosylcytosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the blood level of 1-?-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C), an antileukemic agent, a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) system using anti-Ara-C serum, (5-3H) Ara-C and a dextran-coated charcoal method has been developed. The anti-Ara-C serum obtained from a guinea pig was hardly cross-reactive with 1-?-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (Ara-U), tetrahydrouridine (THU) and other Ara-C analogues. The RIA system for Ara-C could detect concentrations as low as 60 pg/ml in plasma. Average of the intra- and inter-assay variancies at 5, 10, 20 ng/ml were 4.3% and 5.6% respectively. Ara-C in blood samples obtained from human patients who orally received N4-palmitoyl-1-?-D-arabinofuranosyl-cytosine (PL-AC) was determined by the present RIA system. (author)

  20. 1D EM Modeling for Onshore Hydrocarbon Detection using MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H.H.M. Hanif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled Source Electromagnetic (CSEM is a new technique used for hydrocarbons detection. This study focuses on One dimension (1D modeling of hydrocarbon detection for onshore application using the principles of electromagnetic (EM waves propagation. The transmitted frequency which is 0.25 Hz was used to characterize the hydrocarbon at 500 m, 1000 m and 1500 m. Electric fields detected by the receivers at 500, 1000 and 1500 m were 22.85, 20.4 and 17.1 V m-1, respectively which was determined by using 1D simulation. This non-seismic 1D modeling may provide alternative solution for hydrocarbon (HC detection for oil and gas industry.

  1. Numerical modeling of block structure dynamics: Application to the Vrancea region and study of earthquakes sequences in the synthetic catalogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seismically active region is represented as a system of absolutely rigid blocks divided by infinitely thin plane faults. The interaction of the blocks along the fault planes and with the underlying medium is viscous-elastic. The system of blocks moves as a consequence of prescribed motion of boundary blocks and the underlying medium. When for some part of a fault plane the stress surpasses a certain strength level a stress-drop (''a failure'') occurs. It can cause a failure for other parts of fault planes. The failures are considered as earthquakes. As a result of the numerical simulation a synthetic earthquake catalogue is produced. This procedure is applied for numerical modeling of dynamics of the block structure approximating the tectonic structure of the Vrancea region. By numerical experiments the values of the model parameters were obtained which supplied the synthetic earthquake catalog with the space distribution of epicenters close to the real distribution of the earthquake epicenters in the Vrancea region. The frequency-magnitude relations (Gutenberg-Richter curves) obtained for the synthetic and real catalogs have some common features. The sequences of earthquakes arising in the model are studied for some artificial structures. It is found that ''foreshocks'', ''main shocks'', and ''aftershocks'' could be detected among earthquakes forming the sequences. The features of aftershocks, foreshocks, and catalogs of main shocks are analysed. (author). 5 refs, 12 figs, 16 tabs

  2. Molecular Evolution and Diversity of Conus Peptide Toxins, as Revealed by Gene Structure and Intron Sequence Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuwen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Qiang, Yuanyuan; Qin, Mengying; Luo, Shaonan; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2013-01-01

    Cone snails, which are predatory marine gastropods, produce a cocktail of venoms used for predation, defense and competition. The major venom component, conotoxin, has received significant attention because it is useful in neuroscience research, drug development and molecular diversity studies. In this study, we report the genomic characterization of nine conotoxin gene superfamilies from 18 Conus species and investigate the relationships among conotoxin gene structure, molecular evolution and diversity. The I1, I2, M, O2, O3, P, S, and T superfamily precursors all contain three exons and two introns, while A superfamily members contain two exons and one intron. The introns are conserved within a certain gene superfamily, and also conserved across different Conus species, but divergent among different superfamilies. The intronic sequences contain many simple repeat sequences and regulatory elements that may influence conotoxin gene expression. Furthermore, due to the unique gene structure of conotoxins, the base substitution rates and the number of positively selected sites vary greatly among exons. Many more point mutations and trinucleotide indels were observed in the mature peptide exon than in the other exons. In addition, the first example of alternative splicing in conotoxin genes was found. These results suggest that the diversity of conotoxin genes has been shaped by point mutations and indels, as well as rare gene recombination or alternative splicing events, and that the unique gene structures could have made a contribution to the evolution of conotoxin genes. PMID:24349297

  3. Antimicrobial and cell-penetrating properties of penetratin analogs : effect of sequence and secondary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper SØborg; Franzyk, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) show great potential as drug delivery vectors and new antibiotic drug entities, respectively. The current study deals with the properties of a variety of peptide analogs derived from the well-known CPP penetratin as well as octaarginine and different Tat sequences. The effects of peptide length, guanidinium content, and sequence of non-cationic residues were assessed in mammalian and bacterial cells. The arginine (Arg) content in the penetratin analogs was found to influence eukaryotic cell uptake efficiency, antimicrobial activity towards both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as eukaryotic cell viability. All examined analogs retained the ability to cross eukaryotic membranes giving rise to a distribution within the vacuolar apparatus. Interestingly, a series of shuffled analogs of penetratin with the cationic residues in conserved positions, attain the same a-helical conformation as native penetratin in the presence of cholesterol-containing liposomes, while conformational differences were observed in the presence of highly anionic liposomes. While the antibacterial effect of the two groups of peptides was similar, the eukaryotic cellular uptake of the shuffled analogs was noticeably lower than for native penetratin. Moreover, a point substitution of Met to Leu in native penetratin had no influence on eukaryotic cellular uptake and antimicrobial effect, and only a minor effect on cytotoxicity, in contrast to the fact that the same substitution in the shuffled analog gave rise to reduced eukaryotic cellular uptake while increasing the antibacterial effect and cytotoxicity.

  4. Analysis of the Om(1d) Locus in Drosophila Ananassae

    OpenAIRE

    Tanda, S.; Shrimpton, A E; Hinton, C. W.; Langley, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    From the ca;px stock, which is the progenitor of Om mutants caused by insertions of the tom retrotransposon, 50 kb of genomic DNA including the Om(1D) locus was cloned by tom tagging and chromosome walking. Southern blot analyses of six Om(1D) mutants exposed one or two tom elements inserted at five nonrandom sites within an 18-kb distal segment of the restriction map; the phenotypic uniformity between these mutants was not affected by variations in the position, number or orientation of thei...

  5. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BURIAN, STEVEN J. [NON LANL

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  6. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films. - Highlights: • Magnetostatic surface spin waves in 1D magnonic crystals were studied theoretically. • Mathematical model is based on plane wave method. • Mathematical model was applied to different types of magnonic crystals. • Stop band formation and nonreciprocity were obtained

  7. Toward a systematic 1/d expansion Two particle properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zaránd, G; Schiller, A; Zarand, Gergely; Cox, Daniel L.; Schiller, Avraham

    2000-01-01

    We present a procedure to calculate 1/d corrections to the two-particleproperties around the infinite dimensional dynamical mean field limit. Ourmethod is based on a modified version of the scheme of Ref.onlinecite{SchillerIngersent}}. To test our method we study the Hubbard modelat half filling within the fluctuation exchange approximation (FLEX), aselfconsistent generalization of iterative perturbation theory. Apart from theinherent unstabilities of FLEX, our method is stable and results in causalsolutions. We find that 1/d corrections to the local approximation arerelatively small in the Hubbard model.

  8. Conflict sequences and social structures in online communication:a case study of the Sherdog.com forum

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis, “Conflict Sequences and Social Structures in Online Communication: A Case Study of the Sherdog.com Forum”, was to explore and explain an online community through the analysis of the communication and linguistic features found within it. One of the goals of the study was to see whether or not being a long-time member of the community guaranteed respect and admiration from less experienced members. A rudimentary hierarchy was found within the community and it was discove...

  9. Structural properties and evolutionary relationships of PspA, a surface protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae, as revealed by sequence analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Yother, J; Briles, D E

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the sequence for the gene encoding PspA (pneumococcal surface protein A) of Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed the presence of four distinct domains in the mature protein. The structure of the N-terminal half of PspA was highly consistent with that of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein. The alpha-helical domain was followed by a proline-rich domain (with two regions in which 18 of 43 and 5 of 11 of the residues are prolines) and a repeat domain consisting of 10 highly conserved 2...

  10. Differential binding of quadruplex structures of muscle-specific genes regulatory sequences by MyoD, MRF4 and myogenin

    OpenAIRE

    Yafe, Anat; Shklover, Jeny; Weisman-Shomer, Pnina; Bengal, Eyal; Fry, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Four myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs); MyoD, Myf-5, MRF4 and Myogenin direct muscle tissue differentiation. Heterodimers of MRFs with E-proteins activate muscle-specific gene expression by binding to E-box motifs d(CANNTG) in their promoters or enhancers. We showed previously that in contrast to the favored binding of E-box by MyoD-E47 heterodimers, homodimeric MyoD associated preferentially with quadruplex structures of regulatory sequences of muscle-specific genes. To inquire whether othe...

  11. Ruthenium and osmium complexes of hemilabile chiral monophosphinite ligands derived from 1D-pinitol or 1D-chiro-inositol as catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Angela T; Lensink, Cornelis; Falshaw, Andrew; Clark, George R; Wright, L James

    2014-12-01

    The monophosphinite ligands, 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-cyclopentylidene-3-O-methyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P1), 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-3-O-methyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P2), 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-cyclohexylidene-3-O-methyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P3), and 1D-1,2;5,6-di-O-cyclopentylidene-3-O-ethyl-4-O-diphenylphosphino-chiro-inositol (D-P4), can be conveniently prepared from the chiral natural products 1D-pinitol or 1D-chiro-inositol. On treatment of toluene solutions of RuCl2(PPh3)3 with two mole equivalents of the ligands D-PY (Y = 1-4) the complexes RuCl2(D-P1)2 (1), RuCl2(D-P2)2 (4), RuCl2(D-P3)2 (5), or RuCl2(D-P4)2 (6), respectively, are formed. Similarly, treatment of OsCl2(PPh3)3 with D-P1 gives OsCl2(D-P1)2 (7). The single crystal X-ray structure determination of 1 reveals that each D-P1 ligand coordinates to ruthenium through phosphorus and the oxygen atom of the methoxyl group. Treatment of 1 with excess LiBr or LiI results in metathesis of the chloride ligands and RuBr2(D-P1)2 (2) or RuI2(D-P1)2 (3), respectively, are formed. Exposure of a solution of 1 to carbon monoxide results in the very rapid formation of RuCl2(CO)2(D-P1)2 (8), thereby demonstrating the ease with which the oxygen donors are displaced from the metal and hence the hemilabile nature of the two bidentate D-P1 ligands in 1. Preliminary studies indicate that 1-7 act as catalysts for the asymmetric hydrogenation reactions of acetophenone and 3-quinuclidinone to give the corresponding alcohols in generally high conversions but low enantiomeric excesses. PMID:25315464

  12. High-throughput RNA sequencing reveals structural differences of orthologous brain-expressed genes between western lowland gorillas and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovich, Leonard; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Jia, Hui; Sinkler, Christopher; McGowen, Michael; Sterner, Kirstin N; Weckle, Amy; Sugalski, Amara B; Pipes, Lenore; Gatti, Domenico L; Mason, Christopher E; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Grossman, Lawrence I; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E

    2016-02-01

    The human brain and human cognitive abilities are strikingly different from those of other great apes despite relatively modest genome sequence divergence. However, little is presently known about the interspecies divergence in gene structure and transcription that might contribute to these phenotypic differences. To date, most comparative studies of gene structure in the brain have examined humans, chimpanzees, and macaque monkeys. To add to this body of knowledge, we analyze here the brain transcriptome of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), an African great ape species that is phylogenetically closely related to humans, but with a brain that is approximately one-third the size. Manual transcriptome curation from a sample of the planum temporale region of the neocortex revealed 12 protein-coding genes and one noncoding-RNA gene with exons in the gorilla unmatched by public transcriptome data from the orthologous human loci. These interspecies gene structure differences accounted for a total of 134 amino acids in proteins found in the gorilla that were absent from protein products of the orthologous human genes. Proteins varying in structure between human and gorilla were involved in immunity and energy metabolism, suggesting their relevance to phenotypic differences. This gorilla neocortical transcriptome comprises an empirical, not homology- or prediction-driven, resource for orthologous gene comparisons between human and gorilla. These findings provide a unique repository of the sequences and structures of thousands of genes transcribed in the gorilla brain, pointing to candidate genes that may contribute to the traits distinguishing humans from other closely related great apes. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:288-308, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26132897

  13. Circular, Cryogenic Structures from the Hirnantian Deglaciation Sequence (Anti-Atlas, Morocco).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nutz, A.; Ghienne, J.-F.; Štorch, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 83, ?. 1 (2013), s. 115-131. ISSN 1527-1404 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Ordovician * Anti-Atlas (Morocco) * cryogenic structure Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.943, year: 2013

  14. Structure Contour of the Top of the Upper Miocene Sequence, Gulf Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The structure contours were created using biostratigraphic data in the Paleo-Data, Inc., Tenroc Regional Geologic Database. The depths of the microfossil locations...

  15. Structure Contour of the Top of the Lower Miocene 2 Sequence, Gulf Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The structure contours were created using biostratigraphic data in the Paleo-Data, Inc., Tenroc Regional Geologic Database. The depths of the microfossil locations...

  16. Structure Contour of the Top of the Middle Miocene Sequence, Gulf Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The structure contours were created using biostratigraphic data in the Paleo-Data, Inc., Tenroc Regional Geologic Database. The depths of the microfossil locations...

  17. Structure Contour of the Top of the Lower Miocene 1 Sequence, Gulf Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The structure contours were created using biostratigraphic data in the Paleo-Data, Inc., Tenroc Regional Geologic Database. The depths of the microfossil locations...

  18. Underwound DNA under Tension: Structure, Elasticity, and Sequence-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Forth, Scott; John F. Marko; Wang, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    DNA melting under torsion plays an important role in a wide variety of cellular processes. In the present Letter, we have investigated DNA melting at the single-molecule level using an angular optical trap. By directly measuring force, extension, torque, and angle of DNA, we determined the structural and elastic parameters of torsionally melted DNA. Our data reveal that under moderate forces, the melted DNA assumes a left-handed structure as opposed to an open bubble conformation and is highl...

  19. Sequence-specific 1H assignment and secondary structure of the bacteriocin AS-48 cyclic peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bacteriocin AS-48 is a cationic peptide (7149 Da) having a broad antimicrobial spectrum, encoded by the 68 kb conjugative plasmid pMB2 from Enterococcus faecalis S-48. It is a unique peptide since it has a cyclic structure, which is achieved by the formation of a tail-head peptide bond after ribosomal synthesis (Galvez et al., 1989; Martinez-Bueno et al., 1994; Samyn et al., 1994). Preliminary CD and calorimetric studies (data not shown) pointed towards a highly helical and very stable three dimensional structure.All the information gathered until now indicates that the target of AS-48 is the cytoplasmic membrane in which it opens channels or pores, leading to dissipation of the proton motive force and cell death, which in some cases is also followed by bacterial lysis (Galvez et al., 1991). This peptide is a suitable tool for studying protein-membrane interactions, and it also offers promising perspectives for biotechnological applications.Knowledge of the 3D structure of AS-48 is a first step in the conduct of further structure-function studies. Here we report the complete1 H NMR assignment of its proton resonances together with the resulting secondary structure pattern as prerequisites for the determination of a high-resolution 3D solution structure

  20. Nanoscale stabilization of zintl compounds: 1D ionic Li-P double helix confined inside a carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander S; Kar, Tapas; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    One-dimensional (1D) ionic nanowires are extremely rare materials due to the difficulty in stabilizing 1D chains of ions under ambient conditions. We demonstrate here a theoretical prediction of a novel hybrid material, a nanotube encapsulated 1D ionic lithium monophosphide (LiP) chain, featuring a unique double-helix structure, which is very unusual in inorganic chemistry. This nanocomposite has been investigated with density functional theory, including molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations. We find that the formation of the LiP double-helical nanowire is facilitated by strong interactions between LiP and CNTs resulting in a charge transfer. This work suggests that nanostructured confinement may be used to stabilize other polyphosphide 1D chains, thus opening new ways to study the chemistry of zintl compounds at the nanoscale. PMID:26796784