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Sample records for 1d photonic crystal

  1. The Gain Properties of 1-D Active Photonic Crystal

    2003-01-01

    The terminology 'ID frequency'(w ID) is proposed after analyzing the 1D active photonic crystal based on the transfer matrix method. The relationship between wID and the structure parameters of the photonic crystal is investigated.

  2. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  3. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  4. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    Tschikin, Maria; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2012-10-01

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  5. Optical properties of LEDs with patterned 1D photonic crystal

    Hronec, P.; Kuzma, A.; Å kriniarová, J.; Kováč, J.; Benčurová, A.; Haščík, Å.; Nemec, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we focus on the application of the one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PhC) structures on the top of Al0.295Ga0.705As/GaAs multi-quantum well light emitting diode (MQW LED). 1D PhC structures with periods of 600 nm, 700 nm, 800 nm, and 900 nm were fabricated by the E-Beam Direct Write (EBDW) Lithography. Effect of 1D PhC period on the light extraction enhancement was studied. 1D PhC LED radiation profiles were obtained from Near Surface Light Emission Images (NSLEI). Measurements showed the strongest light extraction enhancement using 800 nm period of PhC. Investigation of PhC LED radiation profiles showed strong light decoupling when light reaches PhC structure. Achieved LEE was from 22.6% for 600 nm PhC LED to 47.0% for 800 nm PhC LED. LED with PhC structure at its surface was simulated by FDTD simulation method under excitation of appropriate launch field.

  6. Simple model of the density of states in 1D photonic crystal

    Rudziński, Adam; Tyszka-Zawadzka, Anna; Szczepański, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple, yet versatile, analytical model of one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC). In our theoretical model, we take into account direction of propagation and therefore do not neglect anisotropic nature of photonic crystals. We derive analytical expressions for mode spectrum and density of states in 1D photonic crystal. With those formulas, we obtain mode spectrum characteristics, which depict formation of photonic band gap and reveal properties of photonic cryst...

  7. Parametric Simulations of Slanted 1D Photonic Crystal Sensors.

    Breuer-Weil, Aaron; Almasoud, Naif Nasser; Abbasi, Badaruddin; Yetisen, Ali K; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2016-12-01

    Photonic crystals and band gap materials act as manipulators of light and have a plethora of applications. They are made up of stacks of alternating dielectric constants. This article shows the simulations of an inclined, one dimensional and tuneble photonic crystal, using numerical finite element methods. The photonic crystal was made up of silver nanoparticles embedded in a hydrogel matrix and it has the ability to change and recover its periodicity. A series of factors concerning the geometry of the lattice were tested in order to analyze the efficiency, performance and optimize the properties of the optical sensor. These factors range from the size of the nanoparticles and their density within the stacks, to observing the effect of diffraction angle in readouts. PMID:27000025

  8. Fresnel Lenses fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining on Polymer 1D Photonic Crystal

    Guduru Surya S.K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of micro Fresnel lenses by femtosecond laser surface ablation on polymer 1D photonic crystals. This device is designed to focus the transmitted wavelength of the photonic crystal and filter the wavelengths corresponding to the photonic band gap region. Integration of such devices in a wavelength selective light harvesting and filtering microchip can be achieved.

  9. 1D photonic crystal sensor integrated in a microfluidic system

    Nunes, Pedro; Mortensen, Asger; Kutter, Jörg Peter; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2009-01-01

    A refractive index sensor was designed as a 1D resonator incorporated in a microfluidic channel, where aqueous solutions were injected. A sensitivity of 480 nm/RIU and a minimum difference of Deltan = 0.002 were determined.......A refractive index sensor was designed as a 1D resonator incorporated in a microfluidic channel, where aqueous solutions were injected. A sensitivity of 480 nm/RIU and a minimum difference of Deltan = 0.002 were determined....

  10. A study of slow light in 1D photonic crystals

    Yudistira, D.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Hammer, M; Marpaung, D.A.I.

    2005-01-01

    Slow light (SL) states corresponding to wavelength regions near the bandgap edge of grating structure are known to show strong field enhancement. Such states may be excited efficiently by well-optimised adiabatic transitions in such structures, e.g., by slowly turning on the modulation depth. To study adiabatic excitations, a detailed research in 1D is performed to obtain insight into the relation between the device parameters and properties like enhancement and modal reflection. The results ...

  11. Theory of slow light excitation in 1D photonic crystals

    Yudistira, D.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Handoyo, H.P.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Hammer, M; Tjia, M.O.; Iskandar, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Slow light (SL) states corresponding to wavelength regions near the bandgap edge of grated structures are known to show strong eld enhancement. Such states may be excited efciently by well-optimised adiabatic transitions in grating structures, e.g., by slowly turning on the modulation depth. To study adiabatic excitations, a detailed investigation in 1D is performed to obtain insight into the relation between the device parameters and properties like eld enhancement and modal reection. The re...

  12. Refractive index sensor based on a 1D photonic crystal in a microfluidic channel

    Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André; Mortensen, Asger; Kutter, Jörg Peter;

    2010-01-01

    A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC) embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental demonstrat......A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC) embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental...

  13. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  14. Dynamical Diffraction of Light from 1D Photonic Crystals with Sinusoidal Profile of Permittivity

    Bragg reflection and transmission spectra of the 1D photonic crystals characterized by a spatially sinusoidal profile of permittivity are studied as a function of the crystal-plate thickness. Applicability of the dynamical theory of diffraction in describing such spectra is considered. In the framework of the dynamical theory, we (i) calculated and analysed the reflection and transmission spectra for oblique incidence of polarized light, (ii) computed the spectra making use of the transfer matrix technique, and (iii) compared quantitatively the results of the two approaches. As a result, the analytical dynamical theory of diffraction is found to be correct in calculating the Bragg spectra in the vicinity of single photonic band-gap when the plate thickness is equal to the integer number of the spatial periods, or the permittivity is symmetric about the middle plane of the structure

  15. Refractive Index Sensor Based on a 1D Photonic Crystal in a Microfluidic Channel

    Klaus B. Mogensen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental demonstrations performed with several ethanol solutions ranging from a purity of 96.00% (n = 1.36356 to 95.04% (n = 1.36377 yielded a sensitivity (Δλ/Δn of 836 nm/RIU and a limit of detection (LOD of 6 x 10-5 RIU, which is, however, still one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical lower limit of the limit of detection 1.3 x 10–6 RIU.

  16. Numerical and experimental investigations of surface roughness in 1D photonic crystals

    We present numerical simulations as well as experimental investigations of 1D photonic crystals (PhC) with intentionally introduced surface roughness. An 'experimental simulation' of the roughness was created by gluing alumina powder to both sides of each alumina plate in an alumina-air structure. Transmission experiments were performed on this 1D PhC at microwave frequencies. A 'red-shift' of the band edges observed in experiment and simulation is explained by an increase of the effective thickness of the alumina layers as the surface roughness becomes stronger. The influence of the features of the roughness becomes visible in the simulations only at wavelengths short enough to be of the order of the dimensions of these features. Then, the band edges are smeared and the residual transmission in the band gaps is increased. We show that the main effect responsible for the smearing of the band edges is the scattering of the wave on roughness features. Even for very strong roughness (40% of the plate thickness) the band gaps are not destroyed completely.

  17. Effective index approximations of photonic crystal slabs: a 2-to-1-D assessment

    Hammer, Manfred; Ivanova, Olena V.

    2009-01-01

    The optical properties of slab-like photonic crystals are often discussed on the basis of effective index (EI) approximations, where a 2-D effective refractive index profile replaces the actual 3-D structure. Our aim is to assess this approximation by analogous steps that reduce finite 2-D waveguide

  18. Study of optical reflectance properties in 1D annular photonic crystal containing double negative (DNG) metamaterials

    Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Aghajamali, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical investigation of photonic band gaps or reflection bands in one-dimensional annular photonic crystal (APC) containing double negative (DNG) metamaterials and air has been presented. The proposed structure consists of the alternate layers of dispersive DNG material and air immersed in free space. In order to study photonic band gaps we obtain the reflectance spectrum of the annular PC by employing the transfer matrix method (TMM) in the cylindrical waves for both TE and TM polarizations. In this work we study the effect of azimuthal mode number (m) and starting radius (ρ0) on the three band gaps viz. zero averaged refractive index (zero-nbar) gap, zero permittivity (zero- ε) and zero permeability (zero- μ) gaps. It is found that for m ≥ 1 , zero- μ gap appears in TE mode and zero- ε gap appears in TM mode. The width of both zero- μ and zero- ε gap increases by increasing m values, but the enhancement of zero- μ gap is more appreciable. Also, the effect of ρ0 on the three band gaps (reflection bands) of annular PC structure at the given m-number has been studied, for both TE and TM polarizations. The result shows that in both polarizations zero- ε and zero- μ gaps decreases when ρ0 increases, whereas zero-nbar gap remains invariant.

  19. Fabrication of GaN/AlGaN 1D photonic crystals designed for nonlinear optical applications

    Stomeo, T; Tasco, V; Tarantini, I; Campa, A; De Vittorio, M; Passaseo, A; Braccini, M; Larciprete, M C; Sibilia, C; Bovino, F A

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a reliable process to fabricate GaN/AlGaN one dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PhC) microcavities with nonlinear optical properties. We used a heterostructure with a GaN layer embedded between two Distributed Bragg Reflectors consisting of AlGaN/GaN multilayers, on sapphire substrate, designed to generate a {\\lambda}= 800 nm frequency down-converted signal (\\chi^(2) effect) from an incident pump signal at {\\lambda}= 400 nm. The heterostructure was epitaxially grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) and integrates a properly designed 1D-PhC grating, which amplifies the signal by exploiting the double effect of cavity resonance and non linear GaN enhancement. The integrated 1D-PhC microcavity was fabricate combing a high resolution e-beam writing with a deep etching technique. For the pattern transfer we used ~ 170 nm layer Cr metal etch mask obtained by means of high quality lift-off technique based on the use of bi-layer resist (PMMA/MMA). At the same time, plasma co...

  20. Zero permeability and zero permittivity band gaps in 1D metamaterial photonic crystals

    Depine, Ricardo A. [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Martinez-Ricci, Maria L. [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Monsoriu, Juan A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: jmonsori@fis.upv.es; Silvestre, Enrique [Departamento de Optica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Andres, Pedro [Departamento de Optica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2007-04-30

    We consider layered heterostructures combining ordinary positive index materials and dispersive metamaterials. We show that these structures can exhibit a new type of photonic gap around frequencies where either the magnetic permeability {mu} or the electric permittivity {epsilon} of the metamaterial is zero. Although the interface of a semi-infinite medium with zero refractive index (a condition attained either when {mu}=0 or when {epsilon}=0) is known to give full reflectivity for all incident polarizations, here we show that a gap corresponding to {mu}=0 occurs only for TE polarized waves, whereas a gap corresponding to {epsilon}=0 occurs only for TM polarized waves. These band gaps are scale-length invariant and very robust against disorder, although they may disappear for the particular case of propagation along the stratification direction.

  1. Transverse-electric/transverse-magnetic polarization converter using 1D finite biaxial photonic crystal.

    Ouchani, Noama; Bria, Driss; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Nougaoui, Abdelkarim

    2007-09-01

    We show that by using a one-dimensional anisotropic photonic structure, it is possible to realize optical wave polarization conversion by reflection and transmission processes. Thus a single incident S(P) polarized plane wave can produce a single reflected P(S) polarized wave and a single transmitted P(S) polarized wave. This polarization conversion property can be fulfilled with a simple finite superlattice (SL) constituted of anisotropic dielectric materials. We discuss the appropriate choices of the material and geometrical properties to realize such structures. The transmission and reflection coefficients are calculated in the framework of the Green's function method. The amplitude and the polarization characteristics of reflected and transmitted waves are determined as functions of frequency, wave vector k(parallel) (parallel to the interface), and the orientations of the principal axes of the layers constituting the SL. Specific applications of these results are given for a SL consisting of alternating biaxial anisotropic layers NaNO(2)/SbSI sandwiched between two identical semi-infinite isotropic media. PMID:17767240

  2. Conversion of optical wave polarizations in 1D finite anisotropic photonic crystal

    We show that by using one dimensional anisotropic photonic structures, it is possible to realize optical wave polarization conversion by transmission or by reflection. Thus a single incident S(P) polarized plane wave can produce a single reflected P(S) polarized wave and a single transmitted P(S) polarized wave. This polarization conversion property can be fulfilled with a simple finite superlattice constituted by anisotropic dielectric materials. We discuss the appropriate choices of the material and geometrical properties to realize such structures. The transmission and reflection coefficients are discussed in relation with the dispersion curves of the finite structure embedded between two isotropic substrates. Both transmission and reflection coefficients are calculated in the framework of Green's function method. The amplitude and the polarization characteristics of reflected and transmitted waves are determined as function of frequency ω , and wave vector kparallel ( parallel to the interface) and the orientations of the principal axes of the layers constituting the SL. Moreover, this structure exhibits a coupling between S and P waves that does not exist in SL composed only of isotropic materials. Specific applications of these results are given for a superlattice consisting of alternating biaxial anisotropic layers NaNO2/SbSi sandwiched between two identical semi-infinite isotropic media. (author)

  3. New method for computation of band structures in 1D photonic crystals based on the Fresnel equations

    Roshan Entezar, S.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new method for calculation of band structure in one-dimensional bilayer photonic crystals, based on the Fresnel equations. We derive a new relation to obtain the band structure without using the Floquet theorem. It is shown that this relation can be simplified under the assumption that the single-path phase-shift acquired through the individual layers of the photonic crystal be equal to ? . The results obtained by our method are compared with the ones obtained from the transfer matrix method to show that they are exactly identical.

  4. Fractal Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Zapata-Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Silvestre, Enrique; Furlan, Walter D.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new class of one-dimensional (1D) photonic waveguides: the fractal photonic crystal waveguides (FPCWs). These structures are photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) etched with fratal distribution of grooves such as Cantor bars. The transmission properties of the FPCWs are investigated and compared with those of the conventional 1D PCWs. It is shown that the FPCW transmission spectrum has self-similarity properties associated with the fractal distribution of grooves. Furthermore, FPCW...

  5. Engineering photonic band gap in 1D phonic crystals using fresnel coefficients and comparing with the results of transfer matrix meghod

    A Rahmatnezamabad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper photonic band gaps of 1D photonic crystal are compared by using transfer matrix method and Fresnel coefficients method. In Fresnel coefficients method, the refractive indices of each layer and incidence light angle to the surface are used for calculating Fresnel coefficients, and then the necessary and sufficient condition for a 100% reflection from the surface of double layer dielectrics is applied in such a way that reflection coefficient tends to unity so that photonic band gaps are determined. But in transfer matrix method there are some complications needed for solving quadratic partial differential equations and applying continuity of tangent components of fields and Bloch’s condition, though the results are the same

  6. Effects of loss factors on zero permeability and zero permittivity gaps in 1D photonic crystal containing DNG materials

    Aghajamali, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.aghajamali@fsriau.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alamfard, Tannaz [Department of Physics, Marvdasht Branch, Islamic Azad University, Marvdasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barati, Mahmood [Department of Physics, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Fars (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    The effects of electric and magnetic loss factors on zero-= and zero-= gaps in a one-dimensional lossy photonic crystal composed of double-negative and double-positive materials are theoretically investigated by employing the characteristic matrix method. This study contradicts the previous reports as it indicates that by applying the inevitable factors of electric and magnetic losses to the double-negative material, the zero-= and zero-= gaps appear simultaneously in the transmission spectrum, being independent of the incidence angle and polarizations. Moreover, the results show that these gaps appear not only for an oblique incidence but also in the case of normal incidence, and their appearance at the normal incidence is directly related to the magnetic and electric loss factors. Besides, the results indicate that as the loss factors and angle of incidence increase, the width of both gaps also increases.

  7. Optical Effects Accompanying the Dynamical Bragg Diffraction in Linear 1D Photonic Crystals Based on Porous Silicon

    Anton Maydykovskiy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We survey our recent results on the observation and studies of the effects accompanying the dynamical Bragg diffraction in one-dimensional photonic crystals (PhC. Contrary to the kinematic Bragg diffraction, the dynamical one considers a continuous interaction between the waves travelling within a spatially-periodic structure and is the most pronounced in the so called Laue geometry, leading to a number of exciting phenomena. In the described experiments, we study the PhC based on porous silicon or porous quartz, made by the electrochemical etching of crystalline silicon with the consequent thermal annealing. Importantly, these PhC are approximately hundreds of microns thick and contain a few hundreds of periods, so that the experiments in the Laue diffraction scheme are available. We discuss the effect of the temporal splitting of femtosecond laser pulses and show that the effect is quite sensitive to the polarization and the phase of a femtosecond laser pulse. We also show the experimental realization of the Pendular effect in porous quartz PhC and demonstrate the experimental conditions for the total spatial switching of the output radiation between the transmitted and diffracted directions. All described effects are of high interest for the control over the light propagation based on PhC structures.

  8. Properties of the Band Gaps in 1D Ternary Lossy Photonic Crystal Containing Double-Negative Materials

    Alireza Aghajamali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, the characteristics matrix method is employed to investigate and compare the properties of the band gaps of the one-dimensional ternary and binary lossy photonic crystals which are composed of double-negative and double-positive materials. This study shows that by varying the angle of incidence, the band gaps for TM and TE waves behave differently in both ternary and binary lossy structures. The results demonstrate that, by increasing the angle of incidence for the TE wave, the width and the depth of zero-n¯, zero-μ, and Bragg gap increase in both ternary and binary structures. On the other hand, the enhancement of the angle of incidence for the TM wave contributes to reduction of the width and the depth of the zero-n¯ and Bragg gaps, and they finally disappear for incidence angles greater than 50° and 60° for the binary structure and 40° and 45° for the ternary structures, respectively. In addition, the details of the edges of the band gaps variations as a function of incidence angle for both structures are studied.

  9. Multiple and colorful cone-shaped lasing induced by band-coupling in a 1D dual-periodic photonic crystal

    Cui-Feng Ying

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate multiple and colorful cone-shaped lasing from dual-periodic photonic crystal, indicating that coupling occurs between the photonic bands in a photonic crystal laser system. We propose a band-coupling model to estimate lasing wavelengths and emission-cone angles, which match well those from experimental observations from cone-shaped lasing. Band coupling may yield a high optical-conversion efficiency in photonic crystal laser systems, and be of interest in quantum optics communication.

  10. Photonic crystals

    Busch, Kurt; Wehrspohn, Ralf B; Föll, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the contributions in this topically edited book stems from the priority program SPP 1113 ""Photonische Kristalle"" run by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), resulting in a survey of the current state of photonic crystal research in Germany. The first part of the book describes methods for the theoretical analysis of their optical properties as well as the results. The main part is dedicated to the fabrication, characterization and modeling of two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, while the final section presents a wide spectrum of applications: gas sensors, micr

  11. Photonic crystals principles and applications

    Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary Properties of Photonic CrystalsFabrication of Photonic CrystalsPhotonic Crystal All-Optical SwitchingTunable Photonic Crystal FilterPhotonic Crystal LaserPhotonic Crystal Logic DevicesPhotonic Crystal Sensors

  12. Near-infrared tunable narrow filter properties in a 1D photonic crystal containing semiconductor metamaterial photonic quantum-well defect

    Barati, Mahmood; Aghajamali, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) narrow filter properties in the transmission spectra of a one-dimensional photonic crystal doped with semiconductor metamaterial photonic quantum-well defect (PQW) were theoretically studied. The behavior of the defect mode as a function of the stack number of the PQW defect structure, the filling factor of semiconductor metamaterial layer, the polarization and the angle of incidence were investigated for Al-doped ZnO (AZO) and ZnO as the semiconductor metamaterial layer. It is found that the frequency of the defect mode can be tuned by variation of the period of the defect structure, polarization, incidence angle, and the filling factor of the semiconductor metamaterial layer. It is also shown that the number of the defect mode is independent of the period of the PQW defect structure and is in sharp contrast with the case where a common dielectric or metamaterial defect are used. The results also show that for both polarizations the defect mode is red-shifted as the number of the defect period and filling factor increase. An opposite trend is observed as the angle of incidence increases. The proposed structure could provide useful information for designing new types of tuneable narrowband filters at NIR region.

  13. Silicon on-chip 1D photonic crystal nanobeam bandstop filters for the parallel multiplexing of ultra-compact integrated sensor array.

    Yang, Daquan; Wang, Chuan; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-07-25

    We propose a novel multiplexed ultra-compact high-sensitivity one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PC) nanobeam cavity sensor array on a monolithic silicon chip, referred to as Parallel Integrated 1D PC Nanobeam Cavity Sensor Array (PI-1DPC-NCSA). The performance of the device is investigated numerically with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) technique. The PI-1DPC-NCSA consists of multiple parallel-connected channels of integrated 1D PC nanobeam cavities/waveguides with gap separations. On each channel, by connecting two additional 1D PC nanobeam bandstop filters (1DPC-NBFs) to a 1D PC nanobeam cavity sensor (1DPC-NCS) in series, a transmission spectrum with a single targeted resonance is achieved for the purpose of multiplexed sensing applications. While the other spurious resonances are filtered out by the stop-band of 1DPC-NBF, multiple 1DPC-NCSs at different resonances can be connected in parallel without spectrum overlap. Furthermore, in order for all 1DPC-NCSs to be integrated into microarrays and to be interrogated simultaneously with a single input/output port, all channels are then connected in parallel by using a 1 × n taper-type equal power splitter and a n × 1 S-type power combiner in the input port and output port, respectively (n is the channel number). The concept model of PI-1DPC-NCSA is displayed with a 3-parallel-channel 1DPC-NCSs array containing series-connected 1DPC-NBFs. The bulk refractive index sensitivities as high as 112.6nm/RIU, 121.7nm/RIU, and 148.5nm/RIU are obtained (RIU = Refractive Index Unit). In particular, the footprint of the 3-parallel-channel PI-1DPC-NCSA is 4.5μm × 50μm (width × length), decreased by more than three orders of magnitude compared to 2D PC integrated sensor arrays. Thus, this is a promising platform for realizing ultra-compact lab-on-a-chip applications with high integration density and high parallel-multiplexing capabilities. PMID:27464080

  14. Control of coupling in 1D photonic crystal coupled-cavity nano-wire structures via hole diameter and position variation

    Zain, A. R. Md; De La Rue, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We have successfully demonstrated close experimental control of the resonance splitting/free spectral range of a coupled micro-cavity one-dimensional photonic crystal/photonic wire device structure based on silicon-on-insulator. Clear splitting of the resonances, with FSR values ranging from 8 nm to 48 nm, was obtained through the use of different hole arrangements within the middle section of the device structures, between the coupled cavities. The results show good agreement with calculations obtained using a finite-difference time-domain simulation approach.

  15. Overlay Alignment Using Two Photonic Crystals

    Peng, C; Morton, K; Yu, Z; Chou, Stephen Y.; Morton, Keith; Peng, Can; Yu, Zhaoning

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we proposed a novel overlay alignment method using two sets of identical photonic crystals (PhCs). In this method the reflection or transmission spectrum of the two overlaid photonic crystals is measured to help wafer tilt, yaw rotation, and translation aligning. The initial testing results with two 1D photonic crystals and analysis of the alignment accuracy are presented. This method is particularly useful in building photonic crystal stacks with nanoimprint lithography (NIL).

  16. Polymer-based photonic crystals

    Edrington, A.C.; Urbas, A.M.; Fink, Y.; Thomas, E.L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; DeRege, P. [Firmenich, Inc., Port Newark, NJ (United States); Chen, C.X.; Swager, T.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Hadjichristidis, N. [Athens Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Chemistry; Xenidou, M.; Fetters, L.J. [ExxonMobil Research Corp., Annandale, NJ (United States); Joannopoulos, J.D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2001-03-16

    The development of polymers as photonic crystals is highlighted, placing special emphasis on self-assembled block copolymers. 1D self-assembled multilayers as well as 2D and 3D self-assembled structures are examined, then intricate block polymer structures such as that shown in the Figure are discussed as are birefringent multilayer and elastomeric films. (orig.)

  17. Photonic Crystal Optical Tweezers

    Wilson, Benjamin K; Bachar, Stephanie; Knouf, Emily; Bendoraite, Ausra; Tewari, Muneesh; Pun, Suzie H; Lin, Lih Y

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive optical manipulation of particles has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for biological study and nanotechnology. In particular, trapping and rotation of cells, cell nuclei and sub-micron particles enables unique functionality for various applications such as tissue engineering, cancer research and nanofabrication. We propose and demonstrate a purely optical approach to rotate and align particles using the interaction of polarized light with photonic crystal nanostructures to generate enhanced trapping force. With a weakly focused laser beam we observed efficient trapping and transportation of polystyrene beads with sizes ranging from 10 um down to 190 nm as well as cancer cell nuclei. In addition, we demonstrated alignment of non-spherical particles using a 1-D photonic crystal structure. Bacterial cells were trapped, rotated and aligned with optical intensity as low as 17 uW/um^2. Finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations of the optical near-field and far-field above the photonic c...

  18. Photonic crystal fibers

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D;

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  19. Superconducting photonic crystals

    Berman, Oleg L.; Lozovik, Yurii E.; Eiderman, Sergey L.; Coalson, Rob D.

    2006-01-01

    The band structure of a novel type of photonic crystal with superconducting constituent elements is calculated numerically via a plane wave expansion. The density of states and the dependence of the width of the photonic gap on the filling factor is analyzed for a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of an infinite array of parallel superconducting cylinders.

  20. Novel 1-D Sandwich Photonic Bandgap Structure

    庞云波; 高葆新

    2004-01-01

    A sandwich photonic bandgap (PBG) structure is a novel PBG structure whose periodic lattice is buried in the middle of a substrate. Neither drilling nor suspending the substrate is required, and the integrity of the ground plane is maintained. This paper presents several modification techniques for sandwich PBG structure fabrication. The forbidden gap can be improved by adopting the chirping technique, applying the tapering technique, enlarging the periodic elements, adjusting the location of the periodic lattice in the substrate, and using different dielectric media H-shape elements. A finite difference time domain method is applied to analyze the structures. Deep and wide stopbands can be obtained using the modified sandwich structures. Experimental measurement results agree well with the theoretical analysis.

  1. Planar photonic crystal

    Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Pearsall, T. P.; Kuchinsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, M. D.; Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel

    2001-01-01

    We present results of guiding light in a single-line-defect planar photonic crystal (PPC) waveguide with 90° and 60° bends. The wave guiding is obtained by total internal reflection perpendicular to the plane of propagation and by the photonic band gap for the 2D photonic crystal in the plane. The results for photonic waveguiding are shown and demonstrated at 1.5 µm wavelength.

  2. Photonic Crystal Waveguide Fabrication

    Høvik, Jens

    2012-01-01

    This research is entirely devoted to the study and fabrication of structures with periodic dielectric constants, also known as photonic crystals (PhCs). These structures show interesting dispersion characteristics which give them a range of prohibited frequencies that are not allowed to propagate within the crystal. This property makes them suited for a wide array of photonic-based components. One-dimensional photonic crystals are already commercialized and are of widespread use in for exampl...

  3. Application of Photonic Crystals in Semiconductor Lasers

    LIU Guang-yu; WANG Li-jun; ZHANG Yan; PENG Biao; SUN Yan-fang; LI Te; CUI Jin-jiang; NING Yong-qiang; QIN Li; LIU Yun

    2007-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have attracted much considerable research attention in the past two decades. They are artificially fabricated periodic dielectric structures. The periodic dielectric structures have photonic band gap (PBG) and are referred to as photonic band gap materials. This paper mainly introduces one-dimensional (1-D) and 2D PCs applied in the semiconductor lasers.

  4. ALICE photon spectrometer crystals

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Members of the mechanical assembly team insert the last few crystals into the first module of ALICE's photon spectrometer. These crystals are made from lead-tungstate, a crystal as clear as glass but with nearly four times the density. When a high-energy particle passes through one of these crystals it will scintillate, emitting a flash of light allowing the energy of photons, electrons and positrons to be measured.

  5. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    Cowan, Benjamin; Javanmard, Mehdi; Siemann, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optic...

  6. Liquid crystal tunable photonic crystal dye laser

    Buss, Thomas; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Smith, Cameron; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We present a dye-doped liquid crystal laser using a photonic crystal cavity. An applied electric field to the liquid crystal provides wavelength tunability. The photonic crystal enhances resonant interaction with the gain medium.

  7. Photonic Crystal Fiber Attenuator

    Joo Beom Eom; Hokyung Kim; Jinchae Kim; Un-Chul Paek; Byeong Ha Lee

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel fiber attenuator based on photonic crystal fibers. The difference in the modal field diameters of a conventional single mode fiber and a photonic crystal fiber was used. A variable optical attenuator was also achieved by applying macro-bending on the PCF part of the proposed attenuator

  8. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... crystal semiconductor optical amplier. As a step towards such a component, photonic crystal waveguides with a single quantum well, 10 quantum wells and three layers of quantum dots are fabricated and characterized. An experimental study of the amplied spontaneous emission and a implied transmission are...... presented in this thesis. A variation of photonic crystal design parameters are used leading to a spectral shift of the dispersion, it is veried that the observed effects shift accordingly. An enhancement of the amplified spontaneous emission was observed close to the band edge, where light is slowed down...

  9. Liquid crystal tunable photonic crystal dye laser

    Buss, Thomas; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Smith, Cameron;

    2010-01-01

    We present a dye-doped liquid crystal laser using a photonic crystal cavity. An applied electric field to the liquid crystal provides wavelength tunability. The photonic crystal enhances resonant interaction with the gain medium.......We present a dye-doped liquid crystal laser using a photonic crystal cavity. An applied electric field to the liquid crystal provides wavelength tunability. The photonic crystal enhances resonant interaction with the gain medium....

  10. Ultrafast photonic crystal optical switching

    GONG Qi-huang; HU Xiao-yong

    2006-01-01

    Photonic crystal,a novel and artificial photonic material with periodic dielectric distribution,possesses photonic bandgap and can control the propagation states of photons.Photonic crystal has been considered to be a promising candidate for the future integrated photonic devices.The properties and the fabrication method of photonic crystal are expounded.The progresses of the study of ultrafast photonic crystal optical switching are discussed in detail.

  11. Transformation of the spectrum of TM polaritons of a 1D magnetic photonic crystal under conditions of the quadratic electro-optic effect

    Conditions under which quadratic magneto-optical interaction leads to a number of features in the conditions of localization and propagation of collective magnetic TM polaritons are determined by the example of a 1D magnetic superlattice of the easy-axis-antiferromagnet-nonmagnetic-insulator type, in which the easy magnetization axis is orthogonal to the applied external dc electric field.

  12. A novel photonic crystal fibre switch

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Hermann, D.S.; Broeng, Jes;

    2003-01-01

    A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB.......A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB....

  13. Main Factors for Affecting Photonic Bandgap of Photonic Crystals

    LI Xia; XUE Wei; JIANG Yu-rong; YU Zhi-nong; WANG Hua-qing

    2007-01-01

    The factors affecting one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PhCs) are systemically analyzed in this paper by numerical simulation.Transfer matrix method (TMM) is employed for 1D PCs, both finite difference time domain method (FDTD) and plane wave expansion method (PWE) are employed for 2D PCs.The result shows that the photonic bandgaps (PBG) are directly affected by crystal type, crystal lattice constant, modulation of refractive index and periodicity, and it is should be useful for design of different type photonic crystals with the required PBG and functional devices.Finally, as an example, a near-IR 1D PCs narrow filter was designed.

  14. Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Sanchez Bjarklev, Araceli

    bandgap structures and thoughts of inspiration from microstructures in nature, as well as classification of the various photonic crystal fibres, theoretical tools for analysing the fibres and methods of their production. Finally, the book points toward some of the many future applications, where photonic...

  15. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    Lisenkov, I., E-mail: ivan.lisenkov@phystech.edu [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, 11-7 Mokhovaya st., Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Oakland University, 2200 N. Squirrel Rd., Rochester, MI 48309 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Instituskij per., Dolgoprudny, 141700, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kalyabin, D., E-mail: dmitry.kalyabin@phystech.edu [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, 11-7 Mokhovaya st., Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Instituskij per., Dolgoprudny, 141700, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Osokin, S. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, 11-7 Mokhovaya st., Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Instituskij per., Dolgoprudny, 141700, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klos, J.W.; Krawczyk, M. [Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, Poznan 61-614 (Poland); Nikitov, S., E-mail: nikitov@cplire.ru [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, 11-7 Mokhovaya st., Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Instituskij per., Dolgoprudny, 141700, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Saratov State University, 112 Bol' shaya Kazach' ya, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films. - Highlights: • Magnetostatic surface spin waves in 1D magnonic crystals were studied theoretically. • Mathematical model is based on plane wave method. • Mathematical model was applied to different types of magnonic crystals. • Stop band formation and nonreciprocity were obtained.

  16. Nonreciprocity of edge modes in 1D magnonic crystal

    Spin waves propagation in 1D magnonic crystals is investigated theoretically. Mathematical model based on plane wave expansion method is applied to different types of magnonic crystals, namely bi-component magnonic crystal with symmetric/asymmetric boundaries and ferromagnetic film with periodically corrugated top surface. It is shown that edge modes in magnonic crystals may exhibit nonreciprocal behaviour at much lower frequencies than in homogeneous films. - Highlights: • Magnetostatic surface spin waves in 1D magnonic crystals were studied theoretically. • Mathematical model is based on plane wave method. • Mathematical model was applied to different types of magnonic crystals. • Stop band formation and nonreciprocity were obtained

  17. A novel photonic crystal fibre switch

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Hermann, D.S.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    A new thermo-optic fibre switch is demonstrated, which utilizes the phase transitions of a thermochromic liquid crystal inside a photonic crystal fibre. We report an extinction ratio of 60 dB and an insertion loss of 1 dB.

  18. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  19. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  20. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  1. Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Hansen, Kim Per

    2004-01-01

    applications based on four-wave mixing. In addition, the broad supercontinua have a range of applications within biomedicine, telecommunication and metrology. The special structure of photonic crystal fibers opens up the possibility, in a simple way, to create polarization-maintaining fibers without the use of...

  2. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    William J. Wadsworth; Jonathan C. Knight; William H. Reeves; Philip St.J. Russell

    2003-01-01

    By offering greatly enhanced control of light compared to conventional step-index structures, photonic crystal fibres are radically improving the performance of linear and nonlinear fibre devices, including gas-Raman cells, super-continuum generators, soliton systems and cladding-pumped lasers.

  3. Photonic Crystal VCSELs

    D.; S.; Song; J.; W.; Paek; K.; H.; Lee; Y.; H.; Lee

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (PC VCSELs) are reviewed. The PC VCSEL shows single-transverse-mode continuous wave operation in the entire current range with side mode suppression ratio 35-40 dB. A simple 3-D plane wave expansion method is found to be very effective in analyzing the modal properties of the PC VCSELs.

  4. Photonic Crystal VCSELs

    D. S. Song; J. W. Paek; K. H. Lee; Y. H. Lee

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (PC VCSELs) are reviewed. The PC VCSEL shows single-transverse-mode continuous wave operation in the entire current range with side mode suppression ratio 35-40dB. A simple 3-D plane wave expansion method is found to be very effective in analyzing the modal properties of the PC VCSELs.

  5. Quantum dot photonic crystal lasers

    Yoshie, T.; Shchekin, O. B.; Chen, H.; Deppe, D. G.; Scherer, A.

    2002-01-01

    Coupled cavity designs on two-dimensional square lattice photonic crystal slabs were used to demonstrate optically pumped indium arsenide quantum dot photonic crystal lasers at room temperature. Threshold pump powers of 120 and 370 μW were observed for coupled cavities including two and four defect cavities defined in optimised photonic crystals.

  6. Photonic Eigenmodes in a Photonic Crystal Membrane

    E. Ya. Glushko; O. E. Glushko; L. A. Karachevtseva

    2012-01-01

    Photonic membranes are the most widely used kind of 2D photonic crystals in signal processing. Nevertheless, some important aspects of electromagnetic field behavior in membrane like photonic crystals (MPCs) need detail investigation. We develop the approach close to resonant coupling modes method which unites both external and intrinsic problems, in-plane and out-of-plane geometries, and resonator properties of MPC. The resonator standing modes are excited by an external source through the s...

  7. Photonic Crystal Optical Tweezers

    Wilson, Benjamin K.; Mentele, Tim; Bachar, Stephanie; Knouf, Emily; Bendoraite, Ausra; Tewari, Muneesh; Pun, Suzie H.; Lin, Lih Y.

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive optical manipulation of particles has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool for biological study and nanotechnology. In particular, trapping and rotation of cells, cell nuclei and sub-micron particles enables unique functionality for various applications such as tissue engineering, cancer research and nanofabrication. We propose and demonstrate a purely optical approach to rotate and align particles using the interaction of polarized light with photonic crystal nanostructures ...

  8. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  9. Variable frequency photonic crystals

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Yang, Jing-Hai; Li, Hong; Chen, Wan-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed a new one-dimensional variable frequency photonic crystals (VFPCs), and calculated the transmissivity and the electronic field distribution of VFPCs with and without defect layer, and considered the effect of defect layer and variable frequency function on the transmissivity and the electronic field distribution. We have obtained some new characteristics for the VFPCs, which should be help to design a new type optical devices.

  10. Graphene-based photonic crystal

    Berman, Oleg L.; Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Kolesnikov, Anton A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel type of photonic crystal formed by embedding a periodic array of constituent stacks of alternating graphene and dielectric discs into a background dielectric medium is proposed. The photonic band structure and transmittance of such photonic crystal are calculated. The graphene-based photonic crystals can be used effectively as the frequency filters and waveguides for the far infrared region of electromagnetic spectrum. Due to substantial suppression of absorption of low-frequency radi...

  11. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Andrea Di Falco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  12. Natural photonic crystals

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  13. Natural photonic crystals

    Vigneron, Jean Pol, E-mail: jean-pol.vigneron@fundp.ac.be [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Simonis, Priscilla [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), rue de Bruxelles, 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  14. Natural photonic crystals

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  15. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Sabarinathan J; Cox JD; Singh

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap th...

  16. Photonic crystals in epitaxial semiconductors

    La Rue, R M de

    1998-01-01

    The title of the paper uses the expression "photonic crystals". By photonic crystals, we mean regular periodic structures with a substantial refractive index variation in one-, two- or three- dimensional space. Such crystals can $9 exist naturally, for example natural opal, but are more typically fabricated by people. Under sufficiently strong conditions, i.e., sufficiently large refractive index modulation, correct size of structural components, and $9 appropriate rotational and translational symmetry, these crystals exhibit the characteristics of a photonic bandgap (PBG) structure. In a full photonic bandgap structure there is a spectral stop band for electromagnetic waves $9 propagating in any direction through the structure and with an arbitrary state of polarization. This behavior is of interest both from a fundamental viewpoint and from the point of view of novel applications in photonic devices. The $9 paper gives an outline review of work on photonic crystals carried out by the Optoelectronics Researc...

  17. Cholesteric liquid crystal photonic crystal lasers and photonic devices

    Zhou, Ying

    This dissertation discusses cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and polymers based photonic devices including one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal lasers and broadband circular polarizers. CLCs showing unique self-organized chiral structures have been widely used in bistable displays, flexible displays, and reflectors. However, the photonic band gap they exhibit opens a new way for generating laser light at the photonic band edge (PBE) or inside the band gap. When doped with an emissive laser dye, cholesteric liquid crystals provide distributed feedback so that mirrorless lasing is hence possible. Due to the limited surface anchoring, the thickness of gain medium and feedback length is tens of micrometers. Therefore lasing efficiency is quite limited and laser beam is highly divergent. To meet the challenges, we demonstrated several new methods to enhance the laser emission while reducing the beam divergence from a cholesteric liquid crystal laser. Enhanced laser emission is demonstrated by incorporating a single external CLC reflector as a polarization conserved reflector. Because the distributed feedback from the active layer is polarization selective, a CLC reflector preserves the original polarization of the reflected light and a further stimulated amplification ensues. As a result of virtually doubled feedback length, the output is dramatically enhanced in the same circular polarization state. Meanwhile, the laser beam divergence is dramatically reduced due to the increased cavity length from micrometer to millimeter scale. Enhanced laser emission is also demonstrated by the in-cell metallic reflector because the active layer is pumped twice. Unlike a CLC reflector, the output from a mirror-reflected CLC laser is linearly polarized as a result of coherent superposition of two orthogonal circular polarization states. The output linear polarization direction can be well controlled and fine tuned by varying the operating temperature and cell gap. Enhanced laser

  18. Photonic-crystal fibers gyroscope

    Ali Muse Haider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we proposed to use of a photonic crystal fiber with an inner hollow defect. The use of such fibers is not affected by a material medium on the propagation of optical radiation. Photonic crystal fibers present special properties and capabilities that lead to an outstanding potential for sensing applications

  19. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  20. Optical tornadoes in photonic crystals

    Onoda, Masaru; Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Based on an optical analogy of spintronics, the generation of optical tornadoes is theoretically investigated in two-dimensional photonic crystals without space-inversion symmetry. We address its close relation to the Berry curvature in crystal momentum space, which represents the non-trivial geometric property of a Bloch state. It is shown that the Berry curvature is easily controlled by tuning two types of dielectric rods in a honeycomb photonic crystal. Then, Bloch states with large Berry ...

  1. Quasimetallic silicon micromachined photonic crystals

    We report on fabrication of a layer-by-layer photonic crystal using highly doped silicon wafers processed by semiconductor micromachining techniques. The crystals, built using (100) silicon wafers, resulted in an upper stop band edge at 100 GHz. The transmission and defect characteristics of these structures were found to be analogous to metallic photonic crystals. We also investigated the effect of doping concentration on the defect characteristics. The experimental results agree well with predictions of the transfer matrix method simulations

  2. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  3. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities

  4. Pendellosung effect in photonic crystals

    Savo, S; Miletto, C; Andreone, A; Dardano, P; Moretti, L; Mocella, V

    2008-01-01

    At the exit surface of a photonic crystal, the intensity of the diffracted wave can be periodically modulated, showing a maximum in the "positive" (forward diffracted) or in the "negative" (diffracted) direction, depending on the slab thickness. This thickness dependence is a direct result of the so-called Pendellosung phenomenon, consisting of the periodic exchange inside the crystal of the energy between direct and diffracted beams. We report the experimental observation of this effect in the microwave region at about 14 GHz by irradiating 2D photonic crystal slabs of different thickness and detecting the intensity distribution of the electromagnetic field at the exit surface and inside the crystal itself.

  5. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  6. Modeling of photonic Crystal Fibres

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Barkou, Stig Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated.......Diferent theoretical models for analysis of photonic crystal fibres are reviewed and compaired. The methods span from simple scalar approaches to full-vectorial models using different mode-field decompositions. The specific advantages of the methods are evaluated....

  7. Photonic crystals: features and applications (physics research and technology)

    2013-01-01

    The present book is focused on the study of unprecedented control and manipulation of light by photonic crystals (PCs) and their applications. These are micro- or usually nano-structures composed of periodic indexes of refraction of dielectrics with high refractive index contrast. They exhibit optical frequency band gaps in analogy to electronic bands for a periodic potential of a semiconductor crystal lattice. The gemstone opal and butterflys feathers colours are already referred to as natural examples of photonic crystals. The characteristics of such supper-lattices were first reported by Yablonovitch in 1987. The exploitation of photonic crystals is a promising tool in communication, sensors, optical computing, and nanophotonics. Discussed are the various features of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, photonic quasi crystals, heterostuctures and PC fibres under a variety of conditions using several materials, and metamaterials. It also focuses on the applications of PCs in opt...

  8. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  9. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  10. Quantum computation in photonic crystals

    Angelakis, D G; Yannopapas, V; Ekert, A; Angelakis, Dimitris G.; Santos, Marcelo Franca; Yannopapas, Vassilis; Ekert, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Quantum computers require technologies that offer both sufficient control over coherent quantum phenomena and minimal spurious interactions with the environment. We show, that photons confined to photonic crystals, and in particular to highly efficient waveguides formed from linear chains of defects doped with atoms can generate strong non-linear interactions which allow to implement both single and two qubit quantum gates. The simplicity of the gate switching mechanism, the experimental feasibility of fabricating two dimensional photonic crystal structures and integrability of this device with optoelectronics offers new interesting possibilities for optical quantum information processing networks.

  11. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  12. Modelling of photonic crystal fibres

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    In the presenta ph.d. work a theoretical study of aspects of modelling photonic crystal fibres was carried out. Photonic crystal fibres form a class of optical waveguides where guidance is no longer provided by a difference in refractive index between core and cladding. Instead, guidance is...... provided by an arrangement of air-holes running along the length of the fibre. Depending on the geometry of the fibre, the guiding mechanism may be either arising from the formation of a photonic bandgap in the cladding structure (photonic bandgap fibre), or by an effect resembling total internal...... modes in contiguous fibre segments curved at different radii. Overall microbend loss is expressed as a statistical mean of mismatch losses. Extending a well proven, established formula for macrobending losses in stop index fibres, we provide an estimate of macrobend losses in an air-guiding photonic...

  13. Photonic crystal fibers -

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou

    2002-01-01

    possibilities, the thesis will attempot to offer a proof of concept, rather than an in-depth analysis, thus reflecting the present state of the art within the area of micro-structured fibers. Another important sub-class of micro-structured fibers is photonic bandgap fibers. Photonic bandgap fibers are far more......-structured fibers that guide light by simple index effects. However, photonic bandgap fibers offer more radical possibilities, such as core regions with an effective index that is lower than the surrounding effective cladding index one may guide light in air- and dispersion qualities that differ from both those of...

  14. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  15. Low loss liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber in the near-infrared region

    Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei; Gauza, S.;

    2010-01-01

    We infiltrate a photonic crystal fiber with a perdeuterated liquid crystal, which has a reduced infrared absorption. The lowest loss ever reported (about 1 dB) in the middle of the near-infrared bandgap is achieved.......We infiltrate a photonic crystal fiber with a perdeuterated liquid crystal, which has a reduced infrared absorption. The lowest loss ever reported (about 1 dB) in the middle of the near-infrared bandgap is achieved....

  16. Photonic band gap of 2D complex lattice photonic crystal

    GUAN Chun-ying; YUAN Li-bo

    2009-01-01

    It is of great significance to present a photonic crystal lattice structure with a wide photonic bandgap. A two-dimension complex lattice photonic crystal is proposed. The photonic crystal is composed of complex lattices with triangular structure, and each single cell is surrounded by six scatterers in an hexagon. The photonic band gaps are calculated based on the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The results indicate that the photonic crystal has tunable large TM polarization band gap, and a gap-midgap ratio of up to 45.6%.

  17. Photonic-crystal waveguide biosensor

    Skivesen, Nina; Têtu, Amélie; Kristensen, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    A photonic-crystal waveguide sensor is presented for biosensing. The sensor is applied for refractive index measurements and detection of protein-concentrations. Concentrations around 10 μg/ml (0.15μMolar) are measured with excellent signal to noise ratio, and a broad, dynamic refractive index...

  18. Imprinted photonic crystal chemical sensors

    Boersma, A.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Saalmink, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present the use of Photonic Crystals as chemical sensors. These 2D nanostructured sensors were prepared by nano-imprint lithography during which a nanostructure is transferred from a nickel template into a responsive polymer, that is be specifically tuned to interact with the chemic

  19. Optical echo in photonic crystals

    Antipov, A E

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of photonic wavepacket in the effective oscillator potential is studied. The oscillator potential is constructed on a base of one dimensional photonic crystal with a period of unit cell adiabatically varied in space. The structure has a locally equidistant discrete spectrum. This leads to an echo effect, i.e. the periodical reconstruction of the packet shape. The effect can be observed in a nonlinear response of the system. Numerical estimations for porous-silicon based structures are presented for femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser pump.

  20. Tunable Photonic Band Gaps In Photonic Crystal Fibers Filled With a Cholesteric Liquid Crystal

    Thomas; Tanggaard; Larsen; David; Sparre; Hermann; Anders; Bjarklev

    2003-01-01

    A photonic crystal fiber has been filled with a cholesteric liquid crystal. A temperature sensitive photonic band gap effect was observed, which was especially pronounced around the liquid crystal phase transition temperature.

  1. FABRICATION OF PHOTONIC CRYSTAL WITH SUPERLATTICES

    SUN Cheng; Chen Haihua; Zhang Jizhong; Wei Hongmei; Gu Zhongze

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique was used to fabricate three-dimensional photonic crystals with superlattices. The super structure was fabricated by assembling monodispersed microspheres in the grooves of the scales of morpho butterfly, which makes the photonic crystal being composed of two kinds of different photonic structures (natural groove structure of butterfly wing and artificial microspherical colloids arrangement). The superstructural photonic crystal exhibits some unique optical properties different from both the butterfly wing and the colloidal crystal. The approach exhibited here provides a new way for fabricate photonic crystals with superlattices.

  2. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates $\\vec{r}$, it is different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals constituting by the medium columns of dielectric constants are constants. We find the band gaps of two-dimensional function photonic crystals are different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals, and when the functions form of dielectric constants are different, the band gaps structure should be changed, which can be designed into the appropriate band gaps structures by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals.

  3. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  4. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. (focus issue)

  5. Algorithms and technologies for photonic crystal modelling

    Hart, Elizabeth E.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis an investigation into the behaviour of light when passing through photonic crystals was carried out using numerical methods. Photonic crystals are expensive and difficult to fabricate so there is a requirement for computer simulations that can quickly and accurately model how the crystal structure will affect the behaviour of light. A finite difference method was written to model two-dimensional photonic crystals. The results from the finite difference method mod...

  6. Heat Treatment of the Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Joo; Beom; Eom; Seongwoo; Yoo; Jinchae; Kim; Hokyung; Kim; Un-Chul; Paek; Byeong; Ha; Lee

    2003-01-01

    We report heat treatment of the photonic crystal fiber. As the temperature was increased, the transmission of the photonic crystal fiber was increased, unlike conventional single mode fiber. The transmission increase at short wavelength region was larger than long wavelength region for the various temperatures. After crystallization of the silica glass, the spectra of the photonic crystal fiber were just decreased at all wavelength regions, but, in case of the single mode fiber, the absorption in visibl...

  7. Photon Polarization in Photonic Crystal Fibers under Compton Scattering

    HAO Dong-shan; ZHANG Xiao-fu

    2007-01-01

    Using the quantum invariant theory and unitary transformation means, we study the influences of multi-photon nonlinear Compton scattering on the photon polarization in photonic crystal fibers(PCF). The results show that the photon polarization of the incident photon changes a lot due to scattered optical, and its general geometric phase factor, Hamiton number and evolution operator are definited both by the incident and scattered optical.

  8. Photonic crystals with topological defects

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Xiong, Wen; Cao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    We introduce topological defect to a square lattice of elliptical cylinders. Despite the broken translational symmetry, the long-range positional order of the cylinders leads to residual photonic bandgap in the density of optical states. However, the band-edge modes are strongly modified by the spatial variation of ellipse orientation. The $\\Gamma-X$ band-edge mode splits into four regions of high intensity and the output flux becomes asymmetric due to the formation of crystalline domains with different orientation. The $\\Gamma-M$ band-edge mode has the energy flux circulates around the topological defect center, creating an optical vortex. By removing the elliptical cylinders at the center, we create localized defect states which are dominated by either clockwise or counter-clockwise circulating waves. The flow direction can be switched by changing the ellipse orientation. The deterministic aperiodic variation of the unit cell orientation adds another dimension to the control of light in photonic crystals, e...

  9. Photonic Crystals: Physics and Technology

    Sibilia, Concita; Marciniak, Marian; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the work is give an overview of the activity in the field of Photonic Crystal developed in the frame of COST P11 action . The main objective of the COST P11 action was to unify and coordinate national efforts aimed at studying linear and nonlinear optical interactions with Photonic Crystals (PCs), without neglecting an important aspect related to the material research as idea and methods of realizations of 3D PC, together with the development and implementation of measurement techniques for the experimental evaluation of their potential applications in different area, as for example telecommunication with novel optical fibers, lasers, nonlinear multi-functionality, display devices , opto-electronics, sensors. The book contain contributions from authors who gave their lecture at the Cost P11 Training School. Training School was held at the Warsaw University (2007) and National Institute of Telecommunications (May 23), Warsaw. It was attended by 23 students. The focus of the School was on the work of...

  10. Statistics of scattered photons from a driven three-level emitter in 1D open space

    Roy, Dibyendu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Div. and Center for Nonlinear Studies; Bondyopadhaya, Nilanjan [Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan (India). Integrated Science Education and Research Centre

    2014-01-07

    We derive the statistics of scattered photons from a Λ- or ladder-type three-level emitter (3LE) embedded in a 1D open waveguide. The weak probe photons in the waveguide are coupled to one of the two allowed transitions of the 3LE, and the other transition is driven by a control beam. This system shows electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) which is accompanied with the Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) at a strong driving by the control beam, and some of these effects have been observed recently. We show that the nature of second-order coherence of the transmitted probe photons near two-photon resonance changes from bunching to antibunching to constant as strength of the control beam is ramped up from zero to a higher value where the ATS appears.

  11. Biased liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard;

    2008-01-01

    We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure.......We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure....

  12. Spatial solitons in nonlinear photonic crystals

    Corney, Joel Frederick; Bang, Ole

    2000-01-01

    We study solitons in one-dimensional quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals with periodic linear and nonlinear susceptibilities. We show that such crystals support stable bright and dark solitons, even when the effective quadratic nonlinearity is zero.......We study solitons in one-dimensional quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals with periodic linear and nonlinear susceptibilities. We show that such crystals support stable bright and dark solitons, even when the effective quadratic nonlinearity is zero....

  13. PLANAR OPTICAL WAVEGUIDES WITH PHOTONIC CRYSTAL STRUCTURE

    2003-01-01

    Planar optical waveguide comprising a core region and a cladding region comprising a photonic crystal material, said photonic crystal material having a lattice of column elements, wherein at least a number of said column elements are elongated substantially in an axial direction for said core...

  14. Numerical analysis of multicore photonic crystal fibers

    Yanfeng Li(栗岩锋); Qingyue Wang(王清月); Minglie Hu(胡明列)

    2003-01-01

    A Galerkin's method-based numerical procedure is extended to obtain the modal field distribution ofmulticore photonic crystal fibers for the first time to our knowledge, which can reveal how the air hole sizeinfluences the mode coupling and how the coupling strength varies with wavelength. These results will behelpful in the future design of multicore photonic crystal fibers with proper guidance properties.

  15. Optical experiments on 3D photonic crystals

    Koenderink, F.; Vos, W.

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystals are optical materials that have an intricate structure with length scales of the order of the wavelength of light. The flow of photons is controlled in a manner analogous to how electrons propagate through semiconductor crystals, i.e., by Bragg diffraction and the formation of band

  16. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B; Hoiby, P E; Missier, V; Pedersen, L H; Hansen, Theis Peter; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Bang, Ole

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and...

  17. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  18. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    John D. Williams

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  19. Surface states in photonic crystals

    Vojtíšek P.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among many unusual and interesting physical properties of photonic crystals (PhC, in recent years, the propagation of surface electromagnetic waves along dielectric PhC boundaries have attracted considerable attention, also in connection to their possible applications. Such surfaces states, produced with the help of specialized defects on PhC boundaries, similarly to surfaces plasmons, are localized surfaces waves and, as such, can be used in various sensing applications. In this contribution, we present our recent studies on numerical modelling of surface states (SS for all three cases of PhC dimensionality. Simulations of these states were carried out by the use of plane wave expansion (PWE method via the MIT MPB package.

  20. Heat Treatment of the Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Joo Beom Eom; Seongwoo Yoo; Jinchae Kim; Hokyung Kim; Un-Chul Paek; Byeong Ha Lee

    2003-01-01

    We report heat treatment of the photonic crystal fiber. As the temperature was increased, the transmission of the photonic crystal fiber was increased, unlike conventional single mode fiber. The transmission increase at short wavelength region was larger than long wavelength region for the various temperatures. After crystallization of the silica glass, the spectra of the photonic crystal fiber were just decreased at all wavelength regions, but, in case of the single mode fiber, the absorption in visible region around 450 nm increased with increasing temperature.

  1. Liquid crystal orientation control in photonic liquid crystal fibers

    Chychlowski, M. S.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Woliński, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    Similarly to liquid crystal displays technology in photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) a molecular orientation control is a crucial issue that influences proper operation of PLCF-based devices. The paper presents two distinct configurations: planar and radial escaped orientation of the LC molecules inside capillaries as well as methods of their application to photonic liquid crystal fibers. Possibilities of LC orientation control influence both: attenuation and transmitting spectra of the PLCF The orienting method is based on creation of an additional orienting layer on the inner surface of the capillary or air hole of the photonic liquid crystal fiber. Aligning materials used in the experiment are commercially available polyimides SE1211 and SE130 which induce liquid crystal homeotropic and planar anchoring conditions. The orienting layer increase an order parameter of the liquid crystal improving propagation properties and stability of photonic liquid crystal fiber-based devices.

  2. Electrically Rotatable Polarizer Using One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Nematic Liquid Crystal Defect Layer

    Ryotaro Ozaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of defect mode peaks in a one-dimensional (1D photonic crystal (PC with a nematic liquid crystal (NLC defect layer have been investigated. Two different polarized defect modes are observed in a stop band. One group of defect modes is polarized along the long molecular axis of the NLC, whereas another group is polarized along its short axis. Polarizations of the defect modes can be tuned by field-induced in-plane reorientation of the NLC in the defect layer. The polarization properties of the 1D PC with the NLC defect layer is also investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation.

  3. Electromechanical tuning of vertically-coupled photonic crystal nanobeams

    Midolo, L; Pagliano, F; Xia, T; van Otten, F W M; Lermer, M; Höfling, S; Fiore, A

    2012-01-01

    We present the design, the fabrication and the characterization of a tunable one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal cavity (PCC) etched on two vertically-coupled GaAs nanobeams. A novel fabrication method which prevents their adhesion under capillary forces is introduced. We discuss a design to increase the flexibility of the structure and we demonstrate a large reversible and controllable electromechanical wavelength tuning (> 15 nm) of the cavity modes.

  4. Photonic band gap engineering in 2D photonic crystals

    Yogita Kalra; R K Sinha

    2006-12-01

    The polarization-dependent photonic band gaps (TM and TE polarizations) in two-dimensional photonic crystals with square lattices composed of air holes in dielectric and vice versa i.e., dielectric rods in air, using the plane-wave expansion method are investigated. We then study, how the photonic band gap size is affected by the changing ellipticity of the constituent air holes/dielectric rods. It is observed that the size of the photonic band gap changes with changing ellipticity of the constituent air holes/dielectric rods. Further, it is reported, how the photonic band gap size is affected by the change in the orientation of the constituent elliptical air holes/dielectric rods in 2D photonic crystals.

  5. Biased liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fiber

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Scolari, Lara;

    2009-01-01

    A simulation scheme for the transmission spectrum of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal and subject to an external bias is presented. The alignment of the biased liquid crystal is simulated using the finite element method to solve the relevant system of coupled...... partial differential equations. From the liquid crystal alignment the full tensorial dielectric permittivity in the capillaries is derived. The transmission spectrum for the photonic crystal fiber is obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue problem deriving from Maxwell’s equations using a vector...... element based finite element method. We demonstrate results for a splay aligned liquid crystal infiltrated into the capillaries of a four-ring photonic crystal fiber and compare them to corresponding experiments....

  6. Sidewall roughness measurement of photonic wires and photonic crystals

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Garnæs, Jørgen;

    2007-01-01

    The performance of nanophotonic building blocks such as photonic wires and photonic crystals are rapidly improving, with very low propagation loss and very high cavity Q-factors being reported. In order to facilitate further improvements in performance the ability to quantitatively measure...

  7. Large-bandwidth planar photonic crystal waveguides

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    defect has appropriate dispersion properties relative to the photonic crystal slab material surrounding the line defect. A three-dimensional theoretical analysis is given for large-bandwidth waveguide designs based on a silicon-air photonic crystal slab suspended in air. In one example, the leakage......A general design principle is presented for making finite-height photonic crystal waveguides that support leakage-free guidance of light over large frequency intervals. The large bandwidth waveguides are designed by introducing line defects in photonic crystal slabs, where the material in the line......-free single-mode guidance is found for a large frequency interval covering 60% of the photonic band-gap....

  8. The optical transmission characteristics in metallic photonic crystals

    We theoretically studied electromagnetic wave propagation in a one-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystal (1D MDPC) consisting of alternating metallic and dielectric materials by using the transfer matrix method in visible and infrared regions. We have investigated the photonic band gap by using four kinds of metals: silver, lithium, gold and copper. We discuss the details of the calculated results in terms of the thickness of the metallic layer and different kinds of metals, and the plasma frequency. Our results have a potential for applications in optical devices because it is easy and cheap to manufacture.

  9. Tuning of resonances in photonic crystal photodetectors

    Full text: Photonic crystal slabs (PCS) have shown capabilities for detectivity enhancement of photodetectors in the mid-infrared region (MIR). The increased photon lifetime at the PCS resonance peaks leads to a higher photon absorption. For tuning of the resonances of a PCS quantum well infrared photodetector we used a device structure, that allows PCS heating by a lateral current flow. It was additionally designed for resonance tuning by postprocessing the PCS thickness. The combination of postprocessing and thermal tuning allows coarse and fine shifting of the photonic crystal resonances. Peakshifts up to 4 cm-1 were achieved by thermal fine tuning at a design wavelength of 8 μm. (author)

  10. Photonic crystal laser-driven accelerator structures

    Cowan, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs, including two- and three-dimensional planar structures and fibers. The discussion of 2D structures demonstrates guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in a photonic crystal lattice and reveals design considerations and trade-offs. With a three-dimensional lattice, we introduce a candidate geometry and discuss beam dynamics, coupling, and manufacturing techniques for that structure. In addition we discuss W-band scale tests of photonic crystal structures. The computational methods are also discussed.

  11. Nonlinear photonic crystals as source of entangled photons

    Full text: Nonlinear photonic crystals can be used to provide phase matching for frequency conversion in optically isotropic materials. The phase-matching mechanism proposed here is a combination of form birefringence and phase velocity dispersion in a periodic structure. Since the phase matching relies on the geometry of the photonic crystal, it becomes possible to use highly nonlinear materials. This is illustrated considering a one dimensional periodic Al0.4Ga0.6As/air structure for the generation of 1.5 micrometer light. The down-conversion process is treated quantum mechanically and analytical predictions of the down-converted emission are made. We show that emission suitable for the extraction of polarization-entangled photon pairs can be generated in one-dimensional photonic crystal structures that can be realistically fabricated. (author)

  12. Parametric solitons in nonlinear photonic crystals

    K Gallo; Stivala, S; Pasquazi, A.; Assanto, G

    2007-01-01

    We present theoretical and experimental investigations on the soliton dynamics associated to multiple second harmonic generation resonances in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals, highlighting a wealth of new possibilities for soliton management in such structures.

  13. Recent Progress of Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Katsusuke; Tajima

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers are attractive since we can realize a wide variety of unique features in the PCFs, which cannot be realized in conventional single-mode fibers. We describe recent progress in the PCF.

  14. Enhanced nonlinear effects in photonic crystal fibers

    LI Yan-feng; HU Ming-lie; CHAI Lu; WANG Ching-yue

    2006-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers are a new class of single-material optical fibers with wavelength-scale air holes running down the entire fiber length.Photonic crystal fibers were first developed in 1996 and have subsequently been the focus of increasing scientific and technological interest in the field of fiber optics.The manufacturing,principles,basic properties,and some applications of photonic crystal fibers are briefly described in this paper.A review of our recent work on the nonlinear effects in photonic crystal fibers is presented,and special emphasis is placed on such effects as supercontinuum generation,frequency conversion, and solitons observed when femtosecond light pulses propagate in these fibers.

  15. Selective gas sensing for photonic crystal lasers

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas; Kristensen, Anders; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2011-01-01

    We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk....

  16. Photonic crystal biosensor in spatial fourier domain

    Hallynck, Elewout; Bienstman, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We propose a photonic crystal biosensor, operating at a single wavelength, based on analysis of resonant guided modes in the spatial Fourier domain. Sensitivities of 65 degrees per RIU and more have been simulated.

  17. Photonic crystal fiber modelling and applications

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Libori, Stig E. Barkou;

    2001-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a microstructured air-silica cross section offer new optical properties compared to conventional fibers for telecommunication, sensor, and other applications. Recent advances within research and development of these fibers are presented....

  18. Photonic crystal fibers, devices, and applications

    Wei JIN; Jian JU; Hoi Lut HO; Yeuk Lai HOO; Ailing ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews different types of air-silica photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), discusses their novel properties, and reports recent advances in PCF components and sensors as well as techniques for splicing PCFs to standard telecomm fibers.

  19. Wafer-scale plasmonic and photonic crystal sensors

    George, M. C.; Liu, J.-N.; Farhang, A.; Williamson, B.; Black, M.; Wangensteen, T.; Fraser, J.; Petrova, R.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2015-08-01

    200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, metrology, and optical modeling results are reviewed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on 2-D metallic nano-dome and nano-hole arrays (NHA's) as well as 1-D photonic crystal sensors based on a leaky-waveguide mode resonance effect, with potential applications in label free sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SEFS). Potential markets include micro-arrays for medical diagnostics, forensic testing, environmental monitoring, and food safety. 1-D and 2-D nanostructures were fabricated on glass, fused silica, and silicon wafers using optical lithography and semiconductor processing techniques. Wafer-scale optical metrology results are compared to FDTD modeling and presented along with application-based performance results, including label-free plasmonic and photonic crystal sensing of both surface binding kinetics and bulk refractive index changes. In addition, SEFS and SERS results are presented for 1-D photonic crystal and 2-D metallic nano-array structures. Normal incidence transmittance results for a 550 nm pitch NHA showed good bulk refractive index sensitivity, however an intensity-based design with 665 nm pitch was chosen for use as a compact, label-free sensor at both 650 and 632.8 nm wavelengths. The optimized NHA sensor gives an SPR shift of about 480 nm per refractive index unit when detecting a series of 0-40% glucose solutions, but according to modeling shows about 10 times greater surface sensitivity when operating at 532 nm. Narrow-band photonic crystal resonance sensors showed quality factors over 200, with reasonable wafer-uniformity in terms of both resonance position and peak height.

  20. Photonic Crystals Mathematical Analysis and Numerical Approximation

    Dörfler, Willy; Plum, Michael; Schneider, Guido; Wieners, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This book concentrates on the mathematics of photonic crystals, which form an important class of physical structures investigated in nanotechnology. Photonic crystals are materials which are composed of two or more different dielectrics or metals, and which exhibit a spatially periodic structure, typically at the length scale of hundred nanometers. In the mathematical analysis and the numerical simulation of the partial differential equations describing nanostructures, several mathematical difficulties arise, e. g., the appropriate treatment of nonlinearities, simultaneous occurrence of contin

  1. Selective gas sensing for photonic crystal lasers

    Smith, Cameron; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk.......We facilitate photonic crystal lasers to sense gases via an additional swelling polymer film. We describe the transduction transfer function and experimentally demonstrate an enhanced ethanol vapor sensitivity over 15 dB with low humidity crosstalk....

  2. Enhanced Gain in Photonic Crystal Amplifiers

    Ek, Sara; Semenova, Elizaveta; Hansen, Per Lunnemann;

    2012-01-01

    study of a 1 QW photonic crystal amplifier. Net gain is achieved which enables laser oscillation in photonic crystal micro cavities. The ability to freely tailor the dispersion in a semiconductor optical amplifier makes it possible to raise the optical gain considerably over a certain bandwidth. These...... results are promising for short and efficient semiconductor optical amplifiers. This effect will also benefit other devices, such as mode locked lasers....

  3. Veselago lens by photonic hyper-crystals

    Huang, Zun

    2014-01-01

    An imaging system functioning as a Veselago lens has been proposed based on the novel concept of photonic "hyper-crystal" -- an artificial optical medium synthesizing the properties of hyperbolic materials and photonic crystals. This Veselago lens shows a nearly constant negative refractive index and substantially reduced image aberrations. It can find potential applications in photolithography and hot-spots detection of silicon-based integrated circuits.

  4. Polymer and metallodielectric based photonic crystals

    Kassim, Syara

    2014-01-01

    The bottom-up colloidal synthesis of photonic crystals has attracted interest over top-down approaches due to their relatively simplicity, the potential to produce large areas, and the low-costs with this approach in fabricating complex 3-dimensional structures. This thesis focuses on the bottom-up approach in the fabrication of polymeric colloidal photonic crystals and their subsequent modification. Poly(methyl methacrylate) sub-micron spheres were used to produce opals, inverse opals and 3D...

  5. High-birefringent photonic crystal fiber

    Libori, Stig E. Barkou; Broeng, Jes; Knudsen, Erik;

    2001-01-01

    A highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber design is analysed. Birefringence up to 10-3 is found. Random fluctuations in the cladding design are analysed, and the fiber is found to be a feasible polarization maintaining fiber.......A highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber design is analysed. Birefringence up to 10-3 is found. Random fluctuations in the cladding design are analysed, and the fiber is found to be a feasible polarization maintaining fiber....

  6. Photonic crystal fibers: fundamentals to emerging applications

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2005-01-01

    A review of the fundamental properties of photonic crystal fibers is presented. Special focus is held on the emerging fields of application within areas such as actively controlled fiber devices and high-power fiber lasers.......A review of the fundamental properties of photonic crystal fibers is presented. Special focus is held on the emerging fields of application within areas such as actively controlled fiber devices and high-power fiber lasers....

  7. Photonic crystal waveguides in artificial opals

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Kiyan, Roman; Neumeister, Andrei; Schweizer, Thorsten; Leyrer, Reinhold J.; Wohlleben, Wendel

    3D photonic crystals based on Si inverted-opals are numerically explored as hosts for effective air-channel waveguides, which can serve as parts of photonic circuits. Two basic shapes of straight waveguides are considered: cylindrical and a chain of spheres. Modelling shows that transmission is h...

  8. Dispersion properties of photonic crystal fibres

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Broeng, Jes; Dridi, Kim;

    1998-01-01

    Approximate dispersion and bending properties of all-silica two-dimensional photonic crystal fibres are characterised by the combination of an effective-index model and classical analysis tools for optical fibres. We believe for the first time to have predicted the dispersion properties of photonic...

  9. Propagation of Light in Photonic Crystal Fibre Devices

    Dabirian, Ali; Akbari, Mahmood; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2005-01-01

    We describe a semi-analytical approach for three-dimensional analysis of photonic crystal fibre devices. The approach relies on modal transmission-line theory. We offer two examples illustrating the utilization of this approach in photonic crystal fibres: the verification of the coupling action in a photonic crystal fibre coupler and the modal reflectivity in a photonic crystal fibre distributed Bragg reflector.

  10. Integrated photonic devices using self-assembled and optically defined photonic crystal superstructures

    Wang, Ying

    Photonic crystals are structures with dielectric constants modulated in one, two, or three dimensions. They are an interesting subject of active research due to their ability to control the flow of light on a very small-length scale. In the research for this thesis, two integrated photonic devices were designed, fabricated and characterized which utilize the special optical properties of photonic crystals. The first device is a photonic crystal-photodiode micro-electro-optic filter, where a vertical self-assembly method was employed to grow a 3D face-centered cubic (FCC) photonic crystal over a working electro-optic device, a photodiode and a photodiode-plus-preamplifier made using conventional CMOS techniques. The objective of this project was to judge the practicality of the process and to observe the effect of the photonic crystal on the spectral response of the photodiode and photodiode-amplifier. Spectral measurements taken using a grating monochrometer confirmed that a stop band exists in the photocurrent response of this integrated photonic device, photonic crystal photodiode filter, at the predicted wavelength of 600 nm. These results were consistent with the simulation results made by using a 1D slab structure model. Although many groups have developed procedures to successfully grow self-assembled photonic crystals on substrates, we believe this is the first application of grown opals over functioning integrated electronics. This work explored the ability to include photonic functionality on the wafer with integrated electronic circuitry, and demonstrated a simple, practical and economic way to achieve it. The second device is a tunable planar waveguide with an optically defined 1D photonic crystal cladding layer. In this section a planar waveguide with a photosensitive cladding layer (mixture of PMMA co DR1 and side-chain nematic liquid crystal polymer) that is optically addressable and reversible is presented. The maximum of intensity decrease of the

  11. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  12. Fabrication of oxide materials for one-dimensional photonic crystals

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (PCs) were fabricated, and their optical properties were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The fabricated 1D PCs were basically multilayered films composed of a high-index material (TiO2) and a low-index one (Al2O3). All the PCs were prepared in an ultrahigh-vacuum radio-frequency magnetron-sputtering system. According to the simulation results, if the repetition number is larger than 8, an almost complete photonic bandgap (PBG) can be achieved. The transmittance spectrum of the fabricated PC was measured, and a PBG phenomenon developed at the designed wavelength. The measured spectrum was compared with the spectrum simulated by using the transfer-matrix method and was in good agreement with the simulated one.

  13. Light-directing chiral liquid crystal nanostructures: from 1D to 3D.

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2014-10-21

    Endowing external, remote, and dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is a principal driving force in the bottom-up nanofabrication of molecular devices. Light-driven chiral molecular switches or motors in liquid crystal (LC) media capable of self-organizing into optically tunable one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) superstructures represent such an elegant system. As a consequence, photoresponsive cholesteric LCs (CLCs), i.e., self-organized 1D helical superstructures, and LC blue phases (BPs), i.e., self-organized 3D periodic cubic lattices, are emerging as a new generation of multifunctional supramolecular 1D and 3D photonic materials in their own right because of their fundamental academic interest and technological significance. These smart stimuli-responsive materials can be facilely fabricated from achiral LC hosts by the addition of a small amount of a light-driven chiral molecular switch or motor. The photoresponsiveness of these materials is a result of both molecular interaction and geometry changes in the chiral molecular switch upon light irradiation. The doped photoresponsive CLCs undergo light-driven pitch modulation and/or helix inversion, which has many applications in color filters, polarizers, all-optical displays, optical lasers, sensors, energy-saving smart devices, and so on. Recently, we have conceptualized and rationally synthesized different light-driven chiral molecular switches that have very high helical twisting powers (HTPs) and exhibit large changes in HTP in different states, thereby enabling wide phototunability of the systems by the addition of very small amounts of the molecular switches into commercially available achiral LCs. The light-driven chiral molecular switches are based on well-recognized azobenzene, dithienylcyclopentene, and spirooxazine derivatives. We have demonstrated high-resolution and lightweight photoaddressable displays without patterned electronics on

  14. Photonic crystal-adaptive optical devices

    Buss, Thomas

    This Ph.D. thesis presents methods for enhancing the optical functionality of transparent glass panes by introduction of invisible nanoscale surface structures, such as gratings and planar photonic cyrstals. In this way the primary functionality of the glass - transparancy - may be enhanced with...... new properties, turning window glasses or glass surfaces of hand-held electronics into multifunctional devices. Common to all examples discussed, gratings and photonic crystals are used to engineer the optical dispersion and selectively modify the direction of guided light and transfer free...... minimized, thus allowing a homogeneous, glare-free, white-light daylighting into the room. Even more functionality can be achieved when the optical effects are tunable or reconfigurable. This is investigated with photonic crystal dye lasers. These lasers combine a photonic crystal resonator with a dye...

  15. Photonic Crystal Slab Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector

    Full text: Photonic crystals (PCs) exhibit fascinating properties for the control of light. Two-dimensional (2D) PCs are the most important class, as they are compatible with standard semiconductor processing. For confinement of photons in the out-of-plane direction a photonic crystal slab (PCS) is often used. By fabricating a PCS from a photosensitive material the resonant modes of the PCS can be directly measured in the photocurrent spectrum of the device. For detection of light in the mid-infrared region (MIR) we used a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP). At the resonance frequencies of the PCS the lifetime of the photons is increased, which increases the photon absorption. Therefore, a lower doping concentration in the quantum wells of the active zone can be used. With a lower doping concentration the thermal noise is reduced and maximum operation temperature can be increased. (author)

  16. Two-Dimentional Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    1999-01-01

    In the recent years a new class of periodic high-index contrast dielectric structures, known as photonic bandgap structures, has been discovered. In these structures frequency intervals, known as photonic bandgaps, where propagation of electromagnetic waves is not allowed, exist due to the periodic...... dielectric function. This is analogous to semiconductors, where electronic bandgaps exist due to the periodic arrangement of atoms. As is also the case for semiconductor structures, photonic bandgap structures may become of even greater value when defects are introduced. In particular, point defects make...... possible a novel class of optical microcavities, whereas line defects make possible a novel class of waveguides. In this paper we will analyze two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides based on photonic crystals with rods arranged on a triangular and a square lattice using a plane-wave expansion method...

  17. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  18. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  19. Wavelength demultiplexer consisting of Photonic crystal superprism and superlens.

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Fujita, Shinji; Baba, Toshihiko

    2005-12-26

    We propose a novel compact wavelength demultiplexer, for which two functions arising from the anomalous dispersion characteristics of photonic crystals are combined. One is the superprism that exhibits large angular dispersion and expansion of light beam. The other is the superlens used for the focusing of the expanded light beam. Theoretically, a high resolution of 0.4 nm will be realized in the 1.55 ?m wavelength range with device areas of 0.2 and 2.0 mm2, respectively, for available bandwidths of 3 and 35 nm. Also, a low insertion loss of less than 1 dB is expected by the optimization of input and output ends of the photonic crystals. The demultiplexing function is clearly demonstrated in finite-difference timedomain simulation. PMID:19503294

  20. Structure, electrochemical properties and capacitance performance of polypyrrole electrodeposited onto 1-D crystals of iridium complex

    Wysocka-Żołopa, Monika; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Composites of polypyrrole and one-dimensional iridium complex crystals [(C2H5)4N]0.55[IrCl2(CO)2] were prepared by in situ two-step electrodeposition. Initially, iridium complex crystals were formed during [IrCl2(CO)2]- complex oxidation. Next, pyrrole was electropolymerized on the surface of the iridium needles. The morphology of the composite was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At positive potentials, the iridium complex crystals and the polypyrrole were oxidized. In aprotic solvents, oxidation of the iridium complex crystals resulted in their dissolution. In water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chlorides, the 1-D iridium complex crystals were reversibly oxidized. The product of the iridium complex oxidation remained on the electrode surface in crystalline form. The iridium complex needles significantly influenced the redox properties of the polymer. The polypyrrole involved electrode processes become more reversible in presence of crystals of iridium complex. The current of polypyrrole oxidation was higher compared to that of pure polypyrrole and the capacitance properties of the polymer were significantly enhanced. A specific capacitance as high as 590 F g-1 was obtained for a composite of polypyrrole and 1-D crystals of the iridium complex in water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chloride. This value is approximately twice as high as the capacitance of the pure polymer deposited onto the electrode surface.

  1. Design and fabrication of photonic crystals in epitaxy-free silicon for ultrathin solar cells

    Meng, Xianqin; Depauw, Valerie; Gomard, Guillaume; El Daif, Ounsi; Trompoukis, Christos; Drouard, Emmanuel; Fave, Alain; Dross, Frederic; Gordon, Ivan; Seassal, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the integration of an absorbing photonic crystal within a thin film photovoltaic solar cell. Optical simulations performed on a complete solar cell revealed that patterning the epitaxial crystalline silicon active layer as a 1D and 2D photonic crystal enabled to increase its integrated absorption by 37%abs and 68%absbetween 300 nm and 1100 nm, compared to a similar but unpatterned stack. In order to fabricate such promising cells, a specific fabrication processes bas...

  2. Quantum Dots in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Sollner, Immo Nathanael

    This Thesis is focused on the study of quantum electrodynamics in photonic crystal waveguides. We investigate the interplay between a single quantum dot and the fundamental mode of the photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate experimental coupling eciencies for the spontaneous emission into the...... chiral quantum-dot-waveguide coupling. Such a structure is ideally suited for a number of applications in quantum information processing and among others we propose an on-chip spin-photon interface, a single photon transistor, and a deterministic cNOT gate.......This Thesis is focused on the study of quantum electrodynamics in photonic crystal waveguides. We investigate the interplay between a single quantum dot and the fundamental mode of the photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate experimental coupling eciencies for the spontaneous emission into the...... mode exceeding 98% for emitters spectrally close to the band-edge of the waveguide mode. In addition we illustrate the broadband nature of the underlying eects, by obtaining coupling eciencies above 90% for quantum dots detuned from the band edge by as far as 20nm. These values are in good agreement...

  3. Study of transmission properties for waveguide bends by use of a circular photonic crystal

    Xiao, Sanshui; Qiu, Min

    2005-01-01

    We study the transmission properties for the waveguide bends composed by a circular photonic crystal. Two types (Y and U type) of the waveguide bends utilizing the circular photonic crystal are studied. It has been shown, compared with the conventional photonic crystal waveguide bends, transmission properties for these bends can be significantly improved. Over a 6.4% bandwidth, less than 1-dB loss/bend are observed. U bent waveguide, i.e., $180^o$ bend, can be easily realized with low loss us...

  4. Ultrafast Optical Switching Using Photonic Molecules in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qiu, Kangsheng; Gao, Yunan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    We study the coupling between photonic molecules and waveguides in photonic crystal slab structures using finite-difference time-domain method and coupled mode theory. In a photonic molecule with two cavities, the coupling of cavity modes results in two super-modes with symmetric and anti-symmetric field distributions. When two super-modes are excited simultaneously, the energy of electric field oscillates between the two cavities. To excite and probe the energy oscillation, we integrate photonic molecule with two photonic crystal waveguides. In coupled structure, we find that the quality factors of two super-modes might be different because of different field distributions of super-modes. After optimizing the radii of air holes between two cavities of photonic molecule, nearly equal quality factors of two super-modes are achieved, and coupling strengths between the waveguide modes and two super-modes are almost the same. In this case, complete energy oscillations between two cavities can be obtained with a p...

  5. Coupled Photonic Crystal Cavity Array Laser

    Schubert, Martin

    quantum dots are carried out. In agreement with a simple gain model the structures do not show stimulated emission. The spectral splitting due to the coupling between single cavities as well as arrays of cavities is studied theoretically and experimentally. Lasing is observed for photonic crystal cavity......This thesis describes the design, fabrication and characterization of photonic crystal slab lasers. The main focus is on coupled photonic crystal cavity lasers which are examined in great detail. The cavity type which is mainly explored consists of a defect formed by a single missing hole in the...... structures with quantum wells. A detailed Analysis is conducted on single cavities, two coupled cavities and arrays of coupled cavities. The lasing threshold is determined by measuring the photoluminescence intensity depending on the excitation power. Changes in the linewidth and peak position for different...

  6. Microplasma array serving as photonic crystals and plasmon chains

    An array of microplasmas with sizes ranging from a millimeter to a micrometer, has potential for novel and promising electromagnetic-wave media, especially when the wave frequency is below the electron plasma frequency. Photonic crystals or band-gap materials composed of microplasmas have unique properties arising from their loss term, and they can become band-pass filters instead of the band-stop filters usually observed in photonic crystals of dielectrics. Such behavior is well understood using the dispersion relation in a three-dimensional space of frequency and complex wavenumber with real and imaginary parts. Another functional array is a simple one-dimensional (1D) array; it can conduct microwaves for a wide frequency range below the electron plasma frequency. The propagating modes are similar to the coupling of localized surface plasmon polaritons observed along a metallic nanoparticle chain in the photon range; however a 1D microplasma array features differ from those of a metallic sphere array, leading to a dynamic wide-band waveguide. (author)

  7. Optical properties of photonic crystals

    Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between the radiation field and matter is the most fundamen­ tal source of dynamics in nature. It brings about the absorption and emission of photons, elastic and inelastic light scattering, the radiative lifetime of elec­ tronic excited states, and so on. The huge amount of energy carried from the sun by photons is the source of all activities of creatures on the earth. The absorption of photons by chlorophylls and the successive electronic excita­ tion initiate a series of chemical reactions that are known as photosynthesis, which support all life on the earth. Radiative energy is also the main source of all meteorological phenomena. The fundamentals of the radiation field and its interaction with matter were clarified by classical electromagnetism and quantum electrodynamics. These theories, we believe, explain all electromagnetic phenomena. They not only provide a firm basis for contemporary physics but also generate a vast range of technological applications. These include television, ...

  8. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  9. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  10. Slow light in photonic crystal waveguides

    Moulin, G.; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Borel, Peter Ingo; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob

    report on the first experiments where a direct measure of the group velocity is performed; this is done by measuring the time delay of modulated light propagating through a photonic crystal waveguide. The structure is fabricated in silicon-on-insulator (SOI). A group index (c/vg) of up to almost 200 has......In photonic crystal waveguides the group velocity vg of the fundamental guided mode generally decreases at wavelengths close to the cut-off of the mode. This can be inferred from the calculated band diagram (frequency vs. wavevector) since the slope of the mode corresponds to its group velocity. We...

  11. Selective filling of Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Nielsen, Kristian; Noordegraaf, Danny; Sørensen, Thorkild; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Hansen, Theis Peter

    2005-01-01

    A model for calculating the time necessary for filling one or more specific holes in a photonic crystal fibre is made. This model is verified for water, and its enabling potential is illustrated by a polymer application. Selective filling of the core in an air-guide photonic crystal fibre is...... demonstrated for a polymer and for water. Launching light into such a hybrid-material core proves to be very easily done. Finally, a scheme for enabling access to the core alone, by use of a fusion splicer, is presented....

  12. Photonic crystal fiber pressure sensor

    Fávero, F. C.; Quintero, S. M. M.; Silva, V. V.; Martelli, C.; Braga, Arthur M. B.; Carvalho, Isabel C. S.; Llerena, Roberth W. A.

    2009-10-01

    A high sensitivity optical fiber pressure sensor based on a modal interferometer with high birefringence photonic fiber is proposed and demonstrated. The sensor dependence with hydrostatic pressure is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. The measured pressure sensitivity at room temperature is found to be 3.36 nmMPa-1.

  13. Adaptivity in Bandstructure Calculations of Photonic Crystals

    Krämer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals are refractive materials with a certain periodic structure. By the Floquet-Bloch transformation the Maxwell eigenvalue problem for the propagating frequencies in an infinite domain (modelling an infinite crystal) is reformulated into a set of eigenvalue problems in the elementary cell, parameterised by the quasi-momemtum k. The aim of this thesis is to develop adaptive techniques to deal with the family of eigenvalue problems.

  14. Magneto-tunable one-dimensional graphene-based photonic crystal

    Jahani, D., E-mail: dariush110@gmail.com; Soltani-Vala, A., E-mail: asoltani@tabrizu.ac.ir; Barvestani, J.; Hajian, H. [Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-21

    We investigate the effect of a perpendicular static magnetic field on the optical bandgap of a one-dimensional (1D) graphene-dielectric photonic crystal in order to examine the possibility of reaching a rich tunable photonic bandgap. The solution of the wave equation in the presence of the anisotropic Hall situation suggests two decoupled circularly polarized wave each exhibiting different degrees of bandgap tunability. It is also numerically demonstrated that applying different values of field intensity lead to perceptible changes in photonic bandgap of such a structure. Finally, the effect of opening a finite electronic gap in the spectrum of graphene on the optical dispersion solution of such a 1D photonic crystal is reported. It is shown that increasing the value of the electronic gap results in the shrinkage of the associated photonic bandgaps.

  15. Optically triggered Q-switched photonic crystal laser

    Maune, Brett; Witzens, Jeremy; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Atwater, Harry; Scherer, Axel; Hagen, Rainer; Qiu, Yueming

    2005-01-01

    An optically triggered liquid crystal infiltrated Q-switched photonic crystal laser is demonstrated. A photonic crystal laser cavity was designed and fabricated to support two orthogonally polarized high-Q cavity modes after liquid crystal infiltration. By controlling the liquid crystal orientation via a layer of photoaddressable polymer and a writing laser, the photonic crystal lasing mode can be reversibly switched between the two modes which also switches the laser’s emission polarization ...

  16. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  17. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, a photonic hyper-crystal, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  18. Polarization squeezing with photonic crystal fibers

    Milanovic, J.; Huck, Alexander; Heersink, J.; Marquardt, C.; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Leuchs, G.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the generation of polarization squeezing by employing intense, ultrashort light pulses in a single pass method in photonic crystal fibers. We investigated the squeezing behavior near the zero-dispersion wavelength and in the anomalous dispersion regime by using two distinct fibers. We...

  19. Topology optimised planar photonic crystal building blocks

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Hede, K. K.; Borel, Peter Ingo; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    A photonic crystal waveguide (PhCW) 1x4 splitter has been constructed from PhCW 60° bends1 and Y-splitters2 that have been designed individually by utilising topology optimisation3. The splitter has been fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator material (Fig. 1) and exhibits a broadband splitting for...

  20. Silicon photonic crystals and spontaneous emission

    Dood, Michiel Jacob Andries de

    2002-01-01

    Photonic crystals, i.e. materials that have a periodic variation in refractive index, form an interesting new class of materials that can be used to modify spontaneous emission and manipulate optical modes in ways that were impossible so far. This thesis is divided in three parts. Part I discusses

  1. Monolithic photonic crystal quantum-cascade laser

    Benz, A; Deutsch, C H; Fasching, G; Unterrainer, K [Photonics Institute and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 29/387, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Andrews, A M; Klang, P; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G, E-mail: alexander.benz@tuwien.ac.a [Institute of Solid-State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7/362, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-11-15

    We present the design and realization of active photonic crystal (PhC) terahertz quantum-cascade lasers. The devices consist of sub-wavelength isolated pillars which are embedded in a double-metal waveguide. The lasing is observed at flat-band regions not in the bandgap itself. A stable single-mode emission under all driving conditions is achieved.

  2. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  3. Bandwidth engineering of photonic crystal waveguide bends

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Harpøth, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    An effective design principle has been applied to photonic crystal waveguide bends fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material using deep UV lithography resulting in a large increase in the low-loss bandwidth of the bends. Furthermore, it is experimentally demonstrated that the absolute bandwidth...

  4. low pump power photonic crystal fibre amplifiers

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Designs of low pump power optical amplifiers, based on photonic crystal fibres are presented. The potential of these fibre amplifiers is investigated, and it is demonstrated that such amplifiers may deliver gains of more than 15 dB at 1550 nm with less than 1 mW of optical pump power....

  5. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications

    Dorfner, D.; Zabel, T.; Hürlimann, T.;

    2009-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine...

  6. Chaotic behaviour of photonic crystals resonators

    Di Falco, A.

    2015-02-08

    We show here theoretically and experimentally how chaotic Photonic Crystal resonators can be used for en- ergy harvesting applications and the demonstration of fundamental theories, like the onset of superradiance in quantum systems. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  7. Limits of slow light in photonic crystals

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2008-01-01

    are presented. The results obtained are entirely general and may be applied to any effect which results in a broadening of the electromagnetic states, such as loss, disorder, and finite-size effects. This significantly limits the reduction in group velocity attainable via photonic crystals....

  8. Planar photonic crystal waveguides in silicon oxynitride

    Liu, Haoling; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Borel, Peter Ingo;

    visible wavelengths they absorb light very strongly. In contrary, silicon oxynitride (SiON) glasses offer high transparency down to blue and ultraviolet wavelengths. Thus, SiON photonic crystal waveguides can open for new possibilities, e.g., within sensing and life sciences. We have fabricated Si...

  9. All-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Vannahme, Christoph;

    2015-01-01

    An all-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor is presented, and shown to exhibit narrow resonant reflection with a FWHM of less than 1 nm and a sensitivity of 31 nm/RIU when sensing media with refractive indices around that of water. This results in a detection limit of 4.5x10-6 RIU when measured...

  10. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Claudia Pacholski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  11. Finite element analysis of photonic crystal fibers

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Groesen, van E.

    2005-01-01

    A finite-element-based vectorial optical mode solver, furnished with Bayliss-Gunzburger-Turkel-like transparent boundary conditions, is used to rigorously analyze photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). Both the real and imaginary part of the modal indices can be computed in a relatively small computational

  12. Photonic crystal fibres - novel fibres, new applications

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Riishede, Jesper; Libori, Stig E. Barkou; Broeng, Jes

    Photonic crystal fibres with an air-silica micro-structured cross-section, offer novel fibre designs and new fibre characteristics, compared to standard silica fibres, such as new guiding mechanisms, different group velocity dispersion characteristics and new possibilities when designed as non...

  13. Vectorial analysis of dielectric photonic crystal VCSEL

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    A new vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure employing a dielectric photonic crystal mirror has been suggested and been numerically investigated. The new structure has a smaller threshold gain, a moderate strength of single-transverse-mode operation, a high quality of emission beam free...

  14. Quantum Electrodynamics in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup

    In this thesis we have performed quantum electrodynamics (QED) experiments in photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides and cavity QED in the Anderson localized regime in disordered PhC waveguides. Decay rate measurements of quantum dots embedded in PhC waveguides has been used to map out the variations in...

  15. Photonic crystal waveguides in PECVD glass

    Liu, Haoling; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Têtu, Amélie; Borel, Peter Ingo; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob

    Silicon oxynitride (SiON) on silicon has found wide use as a robust and versatileplatform for integrated, optical devices. With plasma-enhanced chemical vapourdeposition (PECVD) the refractive index can be varied all the way from 1.5 (pure silica,SiO2) to 2.0 (pure silicon nitride, Si3N4). We have...... fabricated glasses with refractive indexup to approximately 1.75, with which value it is possible to fabricate photonic crystalwaveguides. These structures have the advantage of being transparent in the whole of thevisible region, which makes them different from photonic crystals made in...... semiconductormaterials, and attractive in, e.g., biological applications. For operation in the visibleregion, the photonic crystal waveguide must be realized with a 2D lattice of air holes thatare spaced with a period of ~ 300 nm. In this poster, we report on simulations of theoptical guiding in these structures and...

  16. Controlling Anderson localization in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    Smolka, Stephan; Garcia, Pedro D.; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We prove Anderson localization in the slow-light regime of a photonic crystal waveguide by measuring the ensemble-averaged localization length which is controlled by the dispersion of the disordered photonic crystal waveguide.......We prove Anderson localization in the slow-light regime of a photonic crystal waveguide by measuring the ensemble-averaged localization length which is controlled by the dispersion of the disordered photonic crystal waveguide....

  17. Photonics and lasing in liquid crystals

    Alison D. Ford

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Lasers were invented some 40 years ago and are now used in a plethora of applications. Stable liquid crystals were discovered at about the same time, and are now the basis of a large display industry. Both technologies involve photonics, the former in the creation and use of light and the latter in the control and manipulation of light. However, it is only recently that these two mature technologies have been combined to form liquid-crystal lasers, heralding a new era for these photonic materials and the potential for novel applications. We summarize the characteristics of liquid crystals that lead to laser devices, the wide diversity of possible laser systems, and the properties of the light produced.

  18. Tunable defect mode realized by graphene-based photonic crystal

    Fu, Jiahui; Chen, Wan; Lv, Bo

    2016-04-01

    In this literature, we propose an active terahertz 1D photonic crystal, which consists of silicon layers and air layers. A graphene sheet is embedded at the interface between dielectric and air. Tunable photonic band gap is realized by changing the Fermi level of graphene. Transmission Matrix Method is utilized to explain the influence of the graphene layer. We also demonstrate that a dielectric slab attached with a thin sheet made of single-negative metamaterial acts like a pure dielectric slab with a thinner thickness. A tunable blue shift of the band gap can be realized by simply applying different chemical potentials on the graphene sheet. This feature can be utilized for the design of tunable high-gain antenna array and force generator in terahertz band.

  19. Achieving omnidirectional photonic band gap in sputter deposited TiO2/SiO2 one dimensional photonic crystal

    The multilayer structure of TiO2/SiO2 (11 layers) as one dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) has been designed and then fabricated by using asymmetric bipolar pulse DC magnetron sputtering technique for omnidirectional photonic band gap. The experimentally measured photonic band gap (PBG) in the visible region is well matched with the theoretically calculated band structure (ω vs. k) diagram. The experimentally measured omnidirectional reflection band of 44 nm over the incident angle range of 0°-70° is found almost matching within the theoretically calculated band

  20. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an all......-spliced laser cavity based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040-1065nm by applying...

  1. Output couplers for 3D photonic crystal waveguides

    Full text: One crucial practical problem facing 3D photonic crystal applications is finding a way to couple electromagnetic energy efficiently into and out of a 3D photonic crystal waveguide. We investigate two approaches for solving this problem: the photonic crystal horn antenna; and the conventional waveguide to 3D photonic crystal waveguide mode coupler. We demonstrate both approaches theoretically using numerical simulations, and experimentally using prototypes operating at microwave frequencies. Both methods succeed in providing highly efficient coupling into and out of the 3D photonic crystal waveguide over a wide bandwidth, thereby demonstrating two solutions to the output coupling problem. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  2. Study on temperature property of band structures in onedimensional photonic crystals

    2007-01-01

    Using transfer matrix method, the optical transmission properties in one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal is analyzed.When the temperature varies, not only the refractive index of the optical medium is changed because of the thermo-optical effect, but also the thickness of the optical medium is changed due to the thermal-expansion effect. Thus, the structure of 1/4 wave-plate stack in original photonic crystal is destroyed and the band structure varies. In this work, the effects of the temperature variation on the first and second band gap in a 1-D photonic crystal are analyzed in detail. It is found that the changes of the starting wavelength, the cut-off wavelength and the forbidden band width depend linearly on the temperature.

  3. Photonic density of states maps for design of photonic crystal devices

    Sukhoivanov, I. A.; Guryev, I. V.; Lucio, J. A. Andrade; Mendez, E. Alvarado; Trejo-Duran, M.; Torres-Cisneros, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, it has been investigated whether photonic density of states maps can be applied to the design of photonic crystal-based devices. For this reason, comparison between photonic density of states maps and transmittance maps was carried out. Results of comparison show full correspondence between these characteristics. Photonic density of states maps appear to be preferable for the design of photonic crystal devices, than photonic band gap maps presented earlier and than transmittance...

  4. Photonic crystal fibres - a variety of applications

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Riishede, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    bandgap fibers. These fibers have today reached a level of maturity where they may be used as building blocks for a variety of new applications. Today's research is focusing increasingly on applications of the fibres, thus redirecting earlier focus on crystal fibers themselves and their unique guiding...... mechanisms. Some of the new applications that are receiving a significant amount of attention are based on nonlinear effects-super continuum generation and applications of such being highly studied examples. In this presentation, we will discuss the basic properties of photonic crystal fibers and highlight...

  5. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  6. Energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of energy flow in photonic crystal waveguides made of line defects and branching points are presented. It is shown that vortices of energy flow may occur, and the net energy flow along: the line defect is described via the effective propagation velocity....... Single-mode and multimode operations are studied, and dispersion relations are computed for different waveguide widths. Both strong positive, strong negative, and zero dispersion an possible. It is shown that geometric parameters such as the nature of the lattice, the line defect orientation, the defect...... width, and the branching-point geometry have a significant influence on the electrodynamics. These are important issues for the fabrication of photonic crystal structures....

  7. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A. [Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  8. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  9. "Wandering" soliton in a nonlinear photonic crystal

    Lysak, T. M.; Trofimov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of computer simulation, we demonstrate the possibility of a new type of "wandering" solitons implementation in nonlinear periodic layered structures. "Wandering" soliton moves across the layers, repeatedly changing its direction of motion due to the reflection from the photonic crystal (PC) boundaries with the ambient medium. The initial soliton is located inside a PC and occupies several of its layers. Its profile can be found as the solution of the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem. "Wandering" solitons are formed as a result of a large perturbation of the wave vector, which leads to the soliton motion across photonic crystal layers. In the process of reflection from the boundary with the ambient medium, the soliton partly penetrates into the ambient medium at a depth equal to the width of several PC layers. A slow return of light energy, which previously left the PC, can take place at this moment.

  10. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density

  11. Dynamically Reconfigurable Photonic Crystal Nanobeam Cavities

    Frank, Ian W; McCutcheon, Murray W; Loncar, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Wavelength-scale, high Q-factor photonic crystal cavities have emerged as a platform of choice for on-chip manipulation of optical signals, with applications ranging from low-power optical signal processing and cavity quantum electrodynamics, to biochemical sensing. Many of these applications, however, are limited by the fabrication tolerances and the inability to precisely control the resonant wavelength of fabricated structures. Various techniques for post-fabrication wavelength trimming and dynamical wavelength control -- using, for example, thermal effects, free carrier injection, low temperature gas condensation, and immersion in fluids -- have been explored. However, these methods are often limited by small tuning ranges, high power consumption, or the inability to tune continuously or reversibly. In this letter, by combining nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) and nanophotonics, we demonstrate reconfigurable photonic crystal nanobeam cavities that can be continuously and dynamically tuned using elec...

  12. Nanoimprinted polymer photonic crystal dye lasers

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Smith, Cameron; Buss, Thomas;

    2010-01-01

    Optically pumped polymer photonic crystal band-edge dye lasers are presented. The photonic crystal is a rectangular lattice providing laser feedback as well as an optical resonance for the pump light. The lasers are defined in a thin film of photodefinable Ormocore hybrid polymer, doped with the...... laser dye Pyrromethene 597. A compact frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (352 nm, 5 ns pulses) is used to pump the lasers from above the chip. The laser devices are 450 nm thick slab waveguides with a rectangular lattice of 100 nm deep air holes imprinted into the surface. The 2-dimensional rectangular...... lattice is described by two orthogonal unit vectors of length a and b, defining the P and X directions. The frequency of the laser can be tuned via the lattice constant a (187 nm - 215 nm) while pump light is resonantly coupled into the laser from an angle () depending on the lattice constant b (355 nm...

  13. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings. PMID:27139857

  14. Liquid Crystals and Photonic Bandgap Fiber Components

    Weirich, Johannes; Wei, Lei; Scolari, Lara;

    Liquid Crystal(LC)filled Photonic Crystal Fibers(PCFs) represent a promising platform for the design and the fabrication of tunable all-in fiber devices. Tunability is achieved by varying the refractive index of the LC thermally, optically or electrically. In this contribution we present important...... parts of the LC theory as well as an application of a LC infiltrated PCF subject to an external electrostatic field. The fiber is placed between two electrodes and the voltage is increased step by step leading to the reorientation of the LC in the fiber capillaries. This mechanism can be used to produce...... a swichable polarizer, and an on chip LC photonic bandgap fiber polarimeter is presented, which admits strong attenuation of one polarization direction while the other one is nearly unaffected....

  15. Coherent single-photon absorption by single emitters coupled to 1D nanophotonic waveguides

    Chen, Yuntian; Wubs, Martijn; Mørk, Jesper;

    2012-01-01

    We have derived an efficient model that allows calculating the dynamical single-photon absorption of an emitter coupled to a waveguide. We suggest a novel and simple structure that leads to strong single-photon absorption.......We have derived an efficient model that allows calculating the dynamical single-photon absorption of an emitter coupled to a waveguide. We suggest a novel and simple structure that leads to strong single-photon absorption....

  16. Photonic crystal fibres in the market

    Broeng, Jes; Laurila, Marko; Noordegraaf, Danny;

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) emerged as a research topic in the mid 1990'ies [1]. Today, 15 years later, these fibres are increasing deployed in various commercial markets. Here, we will address three of these markets; medical imaging, materials processing and sensors. We will describe how the...... PCFs provide radical improvements and illustrate the strong diversity in the evolution of PCFs to serve these different markets....

  17. Solitons in quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals

    Corney, Joel Frederick; Bang, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We study solitons in one-dimensional quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals with modulation of both the linear and nonlinear susceptibilities. We derive averaged equations that include induced cubic nonlinearities, which can be defocusing, and we numerically find previously unknown soliton families....... Because of these induced cubic terms, solitons still exist even when the effective quadratic nonlinearity vanishes and conventional theory predicts that there can be no soliton. We demonstrate that both bright and dark forms of these solitons can propagate stably....

  18. Supercontinuum noise in tapered photonic crystal fibers

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Moselund, Peter Morten;

    Supercontinuum generation (SCG) in highly nonlinear photonic crystal fibers (PCF) has drawn a lot of attention for the last decade. Pumping such PCFs with high-power picosecond laser pulses enables the creation of broadband and intense light. Picosecond SCG is initiated by modulation instability...... and as such contains some noise. It is thus of significant interest to reduce the noise. Here we focus on the noise properties of such supercontinuum (SC) generated in tapered PCFs....

  19. Dynamically Reconfigurable Photonic Crystal Nanobeam Cavities

    Frank, Ian W.; Deotare, Parag B.; McCutcheon, Murray W.; Loncar, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Wavelength-scale, high Q-factor photonic crystal cavities have emerged as a platform of choice for on-chip manipulation of optical signals, with applications ranging from low-power optical signal processing and cavity quantum electrodynamics, to biochemical sensing. Many of these applications, however, are limited by the fabrication tolerances and the inability to precisely control the resonant wavelength of fabricated structures. Various techniques for post-fabrication wavelength trimming an...

  20. Photonic crystal slabs for optical micro electro mechanical systems (OMEMS)

    2010-01-01

    Photonic crystals are materials with a periodic variation of composition in one, two or three directions. For some optical frequency intervals, they behave as homogeneous transparent materials where optical waves are allowed to travel without scattering, but these frequency intervals are intervened by photonic band gaps in which the propagation of light is forbidden. Photonic crystals are the photonic analogue to traditional crystals, where the periodic arrangement of atoms allows electrons a...

  1. Fabrication of Metarodielectric Photonic Crystals for Microwave Control

    Takinami, Yohei; Kirihara, Soshu, E-mail: y-takinami@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Smart Processing Reserch Center, Joining and Welding Reserch Institute, Osaka University (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Photonic crystals have inspired a great deal of interests as key platforms for effective control of electromagnetic wave. They can suppress incident waves at a certain frequency by Bragg diffraction and exhibit photonic band gap. Photonic band gap structures can be applied for effective and compact wave control equipments. In this investigation, metal photonic crystals were fabricated by stereolithography and heat treatment process. Furthermore, metal-dielectric crystal was created through impregnation process of dielectric media. This concept of metal-dielectric photonic crystal is expected to contribute for not only the downsizing of electromagnetic wave devices, but also thermal flow control.

  2. Degeneracy and Split of Defect States in Photonic Crystals

    黄晓琴; 崔一平

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional photonic crystals with two or more structural defects are studied. We observed an interesting characteristic of transmission band structure of photonic crystals with defects using the transmission-matrixmethod simulation. The transmission states in the wide photonic band gap caused by defects revealdegeneracy and split in certain conditions. Every split state is contributed by coupling of all defects in a photonic crystal.Using the tight-binding method, we obtain an approximate analytic expression for the split frequency of photonic crystals with two structural defects.

  3. Fabrication of Metarodielectric Photonic Crystals for Microwave Control

    Photonic crystals have inspired a great deal of interests as key platforms for effective control of electromagnetic wave. They can suppress incident waves at a certain frequency by Bragg diffraction and exhibit photonic band gap. Photonic band gap structures can be applied for effective and compact wave control equipments. In this investigation, metal photonic crystals were fabricated by stereolithography and heat treatment process. Furthermore, metal-dielectric crystal was created through impregnation process of dielectric media. This concept of metal-dielectric photonic crystal is expected to contribute for not only the downsizing of electromagnetic wave devices, but also thermal flow control.

  4. FEM Modelling of 3D Photonic Crystals and Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Burger, S; Schaedle, A; Schmidt, F; Zschiedrich, L

    2005-01-01

    We present a finite-element simulation tool for calculating light fields in 3D nano-optical devices. This allows to solve challenging problems on a standard personal computer. We present solutions to eigenvalue problems, like Bloch-type eigenvalues in photonic crystals and photonic crystal waveguides, and to scattering problems, like the transmission through finite photonic crystals. The discretization is based on unstructured tetrahedral grids with an adaptive grid refinement controlled and steered by an error-estimator. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec, edge elements). For a fast convergence of the solution we make use of advanced multi-grid algorithms adapted for the vectorial Maxwell's equations.

  5. Experimental investigation of photonic band gap in one-dimensional photonic crystals with metamaterials

    Composite right/left-handed transmission lines with lumped element series capacitors and shunt inductors are used to experimentally realize the one-dimensional photonic crystals composed of single-negative metamaterials. The simulated and experimental results show that a special photonic band gap corresponding to zero-effective-phase (zero-φeff) may appear in the microwave regime. In contrast to the Bragg gap, by changing the length ratio of the two component materials, the width and depth of the zero-φeff gap can be conveniently adjusted while keeping the center frequency constant. Furthermore, the zero-φeff gap vanishes when both the phase-matching and impedance-matching conditions are satisfied simultaneously. These transmission line structures provide a good way for realizing microwave devices based on the zero-φeff gap. -- Highlights: ► 1D photonic crystals with metamaterials were investigated experimentally. ► Both Bragg gap and zero-φeff gap were observed in the microwave regime. ► The width and depth of the zero-φeff gap were experimentally adjusted. ► Zero-φeff gap was observed to be close when two match conditions were satisfied.

  6. Distributed optical fibre devices based on liquid crystal infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes; Hermann, D.S.; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new class of hybrid photonic crystal fibers, which are liquid crystal infiltrated fibers. Using these fibers, we demonstrate 'distributed' tunable filter and switching functionalities operating by the photonic bandgap effect.

  7. Feasibility of tunable MEMS photonic crystal devices

    Periodic photonic crystal structures channel electromagnetic waves much as semiconductors (quantum) wells channel electrons. Photonic bandgap crystals (PBC) are fabricated by arranging sub-wavelength alternating materials with high and low dielectric constants to produce a desired effective bandgap. Photons with energy within this bandgap cannot propagate through the structure. This property has made these structures useful for microwave applications such as frequency-selective surfaces, narrowband filters, and antenna substrates when the dimensions are on the order of millimeters. They are also potentially very useful, albeit much more difficult to fabricate, in the visible-near-infrared region for various applications when the smallest dimensions are at the edge of current micro-lithography fabrication tools. We micro-fabricated suspended free standing micro-structure bridge waveguides to serve as substrates for PBC features. These micro-bridges were fabricated onto commercial silicon-on-insulator wafers. Nanoscale periodic features were fabricated onto these micro-structure bridges to form a tunable system. When this combined structure is perturbed, such as mechanical deflection of the suspended composite structure at resonance, there can be a realtime shift in the material effective bandgap due to slight geometric alterations due to the induced mechanical stress. Extremely high resonance frequencies device speeds are possible with these very small dimension MEMS

  8. Silicon Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal and its Applications; TOPICAL

    Photonic crystals are periodically engineered ''materials'' which are the photonic analogues of electronic crystals. Much like electronic crystal, photonic crystal materials can have a variety of crystal symmetries, such as simple-cubic, closed-packed, Wurtzite and diamond-like crystals. These structures were first proposed in late 1980's. However, due mainly to fabrication difficulties, working photonic crystals in the near-infrared and visible wavelengths are only just emerging. In this article, we review the construction of two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals of different symmetries at infrared and optical wavelengths using advanced semiconductor processing. We further demonstrate that this process lends itself to the creation of line defects (linear waveguides) and point defects (micro-cavities), which are the most basic building blocks for optical signal processing, filtering and routing

  9. Properties of photonic bandgap in one-dimensional multicomponent photonic crystal

    ZHANG Yi; WANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    Properties of photonic band gap and light propagation in one-dimensional multicomponent photonic crystal have been studied with the optical transfer matrix method.We mainly analyze the relation of photonic band-gap property with the arrangement of components,the refractive index and the geometrical thickness.In this study,the methods to change the width and the location of the existing photonic band-gaps in multicomponent photonic crystal are proposed.

  10. Fractional decay of quantum dots in real photonic crystals

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Koenderink, A. Femius; Lodahl, Peter; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We show that fractional decay may be observable in experiments using quantum dots and photonic crystals with parameters that are currently achievable. We focus on the case of inverse opal photonic crystals and locate the position in the crystal where the effect is most pronounced. Furthermore, we...

  11. Lead-Tungstate Crystal of the ALICE Photon Spectrometer (PHOS)

    2003-01-01

    The photon spectrometer (PHOS) is designed to measure the temperature of collisions by detecting photons emerging from them. It will be made of lead tungstate crystals like these. When high-energy photons strike lead tungstate, they make it glow, or scintillate, and this glow can be measured. Lead tungstate is extremely dense (denser than iron), stopping most photons that reach it.

  12. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra;

    2009-01-01

    demonstrate a PhC cavity with a quality factor of Q15 000 that exhibits a temperature-independent resonance. Temperature-stable cavities constitute a major building block in the development of a large suite of applications from high-sensitivity sensor systems for chemical and biomedical applications to......We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally...

  13. Progress towards photonic crystal quantum cascade laser

    Walker, C L; Farmer, C. D.; Stanley, C. R.; Ironside, C. N.

    2004-01-01

    The work describes recent progress in the design, simulation, implementation and characterisation of photonic crystal (PhC) GaAs-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The benefits of applying active PhC confinement around a QCL cavity are explained, highlighting a route to reduced threshold current operation. Design of a suitable PhC has been performed using published bandgap maps; simulation results of this PhC show a wide, high reflectivity stopband. Implementation of the PhC for the device ...

  14. Fused combiners for photonic crystal bers

    Noordegraaf, Danny

    The work presented in this Ph.D. thesis focuses on the fabrication of fused combiners for high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers. The main focus of the Ph.D. project was to further develop the fused pump combiners for airclad photonic crystal bers (PCFs), and implement a signal feed-through in...... tapered fiber bundle approach and was tested up to 2.5 kW of combined output power. Two components for the field of astrophotonics have also been developed. The first was a fused fiber bundle, designed to be placed in the focal plane of a telescope. By measuring the spectral content out of the individual...

  15. Supercontinuum Generation in a Photonic Crystal Fibre

    YAN Pei-Guang; RUAN Shuang-Chen; LIN Hao-Jia; DU Chen-Lin; YU Yong-Qin; LU Ke-Cheng; YAO Jian-Quan

    2004-01-01

    @@ Nearly 1000-nm broad continuum from 390nm to 1370nm is generated in a 2-m long photonic crystal fibre. The maximum total power of supercontinuum is measured to be 60mW with the pumping power of 800mW output from a 200-fs Ti:sapphire laser. The evolution of the pumping light into supercontinuum is experimentally studied in detail. It is found that the mechanism for supercontinuum generation has direct relations with Raman effect and soliton effect, and the four-wave mixing plays an important role in the last phase of the supercontinuum generation.

  16. Gaussian Filtering with Tapered Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    We present a device based on a tapered Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fiber that allows active all-in-fiber filtering. The resulting Photonic Bandgap Fiber device provides a Gaussian filter covering the wavelength range 1200-1600 nm......We present a device based on a tapered Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fiber that allows active all-in-fiber filtering. The resulting Photonic Bandgap Fiber device provides a Gaussian filter covering the wavelength range 1200-1600 nm...

  17. Band Structure Based Analysis of Certain Photonic Crystal Structures

    Wolff, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures that may exhibit a complete photonic band gap. First, I discuss geometric properties of the band structure such as band edges. In a second part, I present work on photonic Wannier functions and their use for solving the wave equation. The third part is devoted to applications of the presented methods: A polarization resolved transmission experiment of opel films and an analogy experiment for spontaneous emission inside a photonic crystal.

  18. Electrical Control of Silicon Photonic Crystal Cavity by Graphene

    Majumdar, Arka; Kim, Jonghwan; Vuckovic, Jelena; Wang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Efficient conversion of electrical signal to optical signal in nano-photonics enables solid state integration of electronics and photonics. Combination of graphene with photonic crystals is promising for electro-optic modulation. In this paper, we demonstrate that by electrostatic gating a single layer of graphene on top of a photonic crystal cavity, the cavity resonance can be changed significantly. A ~2nm change in the cavity resonance linewidth and almost 400% (6 dB) change in resonance re...

  19. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  20. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  1. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  2. Add-drop filter based on dual photonic crystal nanobeam cavities in push-pull mode

    Poulton, Christopher V; Wade, Mark T; Popovic, Milos A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an add-drop filter based on a dual photonic crystal nanobeam cavity system that emulates the operation of a traveling-wave resonator and drops light on resonance to a single output port. Realized on an advanced SOI CMOS (IBM 45nm SOI) chip without any foundry process modifications, the device shows 16dB extinction in through port and 1dB loss in drop port with a 3dB bandwidth of 64GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of a four-port add-drop filter based on photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

  3. Terahertz wave attenuation analysis of silicon photonic crystal fiber

    Finite element method is employed to analyze terahertz wave transmission characteristic in hexagonal photonic crystal fiber. We compared the terahertz field distribution and attenuation of the proposed photonic crystal fiber for different air-hole diameter. When d/ equals to 0.95, the lowest of transmission loss is 0.0012dB/m. The simulated results show that the performance of the presented photonic crystal fiber meets with the demand of terahertz transmission.

  4. Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Organic Photonic Crystal Microcavity

    JIANG Ping; HU Xiao-Yong; YANG Hong; GONG Qi-Huang

    2006-01-01

    @@ A two-dimensional polystyrene photonic crystal microcavity is fabricated by the method of focused ion beam etching. The scanning electron microscopy and the transmittance spectrum are used to characterize the properties of the photonic crystal microcavity. The quality factor and the transmittance of the photonic crystal microcavity is more than 530 and 90%, respectively. The measured results are in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Superlens Biosensor with Photonic Crystals in Negative Refraction

    Zohreh Dorrani; Mohammad Ali Mansouri-Birjandi

    2012-01-01

    We have presented the study on one structure fabricated with photonic crystals for use as biosensors with superlensing property in dimensions of nano and micro with negative refractive index. In a special frequency, this type of photonic crystal acts as Left-Handed Metamaterial (LHM). It is shown that by a suitable choice of design parameters, such as, dimensions of bars, it is possible to reach sensing property by this structure in two-dimensional triangular photonic crystals. The structure ...

  6. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two subwavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths. The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young's experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  7. Few-quantum-dot lasing in photonic crystal nanocavities

    Liu, Jin; Ates, Serkan; Stobbe, Søren; Lorke, Michael; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal nanolasers have attracted great interest both for fundamental research and applications in the past decade. In photonic crystal cavities, the leakage to optical modes is strongly reduced, which increases the spontaneous emission coupling factor, β. This is a crucial parameter for...... and more advanced semiconductor models of photonic crystal nanolasers is still missing [2]. The goal of this work is to get a deep understanding of the quantum dots based nanocavity lasers by comparing experiments to theory....

  8. Photonic crystal waveguides by direct writing of e-beam on self-assembled photonic crystals

    Sunita Kedia; R Vijaya

    2011-04-01

    Direct electron beam lithography technique is used for writing a variety of waveguide structures on thin films of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and self-assembled three-dimensionally ordered photonic crystals made up of PMMA colloidal spheres. The waveguide structures fabricated on both these type of samples are characterized by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope images.

  9. Superlens Biosensor with Photonic Crystals in Negative Refraction

    Zohreh Dorrani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have presented the study on one structure fabricated with photonic crystals for use as biosensors with superlensing property in dimensions of nano and micro with negative refractive index. In a special frequency, this type of photonic crystal acts as Left-Handed Metamaterial (LHM. It is shown that by a suitable choice of design parameters, such as, dimensions of bars, it is possible to reach sensing property by this structure in two-dimensional triangular photonic crystals. The structure investigated in three size and results shows the slab of photonic crystals prosperous process that, with sensing applications can has imaging applications.

  10. Rare-Earth Doped Photonic Crystal Fibre Lasers and Amplifiers

    Hougaard, Kristian G.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a theoretical and numerical study of the use of rare-earthdoped photonic crystal fibres as optical amplifiers and lasers, has been performed. Photonic crystal fibres or microstructured optical fibres is a new kind of optical fibre in which the cladding region typically consist of a....... The thesis also presents the basic properties of optical amplification, and describes the numerical model developed to model the behaviour of lasers and amplifiers based on photonic crystal fibres. The developed numerical tools are then used to investigate specific applications of photonic crystal...