WorldWideScience

Sample records for 1953-2003 orau follow-up

  1. Review of 1953-2003 ORAU Follow-Up Studies on Science Education Programs: Impacts on Participants' Education and Careers

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities

    2006-06-01

    Through sponsorship of science education programs for undergraduates and graduates, such as research participation programs and fellowships, the Department of Energy (DOE) encouraged the development of adequate numbers of qualified science and engineering (S&E) personnel to meet its current and future research and development (R&D) needs. This retrospective study summarizes impacts of selected programs on these participants. The summary data are from follow-up studies conducted from 1953 through 2003 by Oak Ridge Associated Universities and its predecessor, the Oak Ridge Institute for Nuclear Studies (ORINS).

  2. Follow-Up Testing

    Follow-up Testing Follow-up testing is conducted to ensure that antibody levels are returning to normal, indicating that the intestine is healing on the ... has entered the diet. How often should follow-up testing occur? New celiacs should receive follow-up ...

  3. CONTRACT FOLLOW UP TRAINING

    Technical Training; Tel. 74460

    2001-01-01

    SPL is organizing Training Sessions on the Contract Follow Up application. CFU is a Web based tool, developped and supported by the Administrative Information Services. It allows the creation of Divisional Requests and the follow up of their processing, from the Market Survey to the Invitation to Tender or Price Enquiry, approval by the Finance Committee, up to the actual signature of a Contract, acccording to the CERN Purchasing procedures. It includes a document management component. It also provides link with other AIS applications such as BHT and EDH. The course is primarily intended for DPOs, Contract Technical responsibles in the division and their assistants, but is beneficial to anybody involved in the follow up of such Purchasing Procedures. This course is free of charge, but application is necessary. The details of the course may be found at http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/ENSTEC/P2001/Bureautique/cfu4_f.htm General information of CFU may be found at http://ais.cern.ch/apps/cfu/ The dates of t...

  4. Refinement of graphite target production at ORAU

    The simple method of graphite target development, first presented at AMS-7 has been further developed and refined. Experiments have been performed to study the range of possible reaction conditions and the effect of these on the nature of the graphite generated. The results from these experiments have been used to make the method as robust as possible with a high success rate, a quick reaction time and very simple apparatus requirements. This paper covers the details of the experiments, the conclusions drawn from them, and the technique now employed for routine graphite sample preparation at ORAU

  5. The computerized follow up of radioactive wastes

    After a short introduction about the goals and missions of the Andra, the French agency for the management of radioactive wastes, this educational booklet describes the principle and the different steps of the computerized follow up of radioactive waste containers: labelling, identification file, control, follow up during transport, compacting and storage. (J.S.)

  6. Follow-up utterances in QA dialogue

    Schooten, van Boris; Akker, op den Rieks

    2006-01-01

    The processing of user follow-up utterances by a QA system is a topic which is still in its infant stages, but enjoys growing interest in the QA community. In this paper, we discuss the broader issues related to handling follow-up utterances in a real-life "information kiosk" setting. With help of a

  7. Strategy for NEO follow-up observations

    Tichy, Milos; Honkova, Michaela; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal

    2015-03-01

    The Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) belong to the most important small bodies in the solar system, having the capability of close approaches to the Earth and even possibility to collide with the Earth. In fact, it is impossible to calculate reliable orbit of an object from a single night observations. Therefore it is necessary to extend astrometry dataset by early follow-up astrometry. Follow-up observations of the newly discovered NEO candidate should be done over an arc of several hours after the discovery and should be repeated over several following nights. The basic service used for planning of the follow-up observations is the NEO Confirmation Page (NEOCP) maintained by the Minor Planet Center of the IAU. This service provides on-line tool for calculating geocentric and topocentic ephemerides and sky-plane uncertainty maps of these objects at the specific date and time. Uncertainty map is one of the most important information used for planning of follow-up observation strategy for given time, indicating also the estimated distance of the newly discovered object and including possibility of the impact. Moreover, observatories dealing with NEO follow-up regularly have prepared their special tools and systems for follow-up work. The system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used at the Klet Observatory are described here. Methods and techniques used at the Klet NEO follow-up CCD astrometric programme, using 1.06-m and 0.57-m telescopes, are also discussed.

  8. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently

  9. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Murdoch University (Australia); North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [North-West University (South Africa); Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [North-West University (South Africa); University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [North-West University (South Africa)

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  10. Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation

    ... Recipients Grants Home › Learn › Stages › In Treatment Follow-Up Treatment and Rehabilitation Originally published on November 10, ... to the neurosurgeon or other specialists to follow up on his or her progress. Professionals affiliated with ...

  11. Follow-up in Childhood Functional Constipation

    Modin, Line; Walsted, Anne-Mette; Rittig, Charlotte Siggaard; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Guidelines recommend close follow-up during treatment of childhood functional constipation. Only sparse evidence exists on how follow-up is best implemented. Our aim was to evaluate if follow-up by phone or self-management through web-based information improved treatment outcomes....... METHODS: In this randomized, controlled trial, conducted in secondary care, 235 children, aged 2-16 years, who fulfilled the Rome III criteria of childhood constipation, were assigned to one of three follow-up regimens: (I) control group (no scheduled contact), (II) phone group (2 scheduled phone contacts......: Improved self-management behavior caused by access to self-motivated web-based information induced faster short-term recovery during treatment of functional constipation. Patient empowerment rather than health care promoted follow-up might be a step towards more effective treatment for childhood...

  12. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  13. Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Audit Follow-up Tracking System (AFTS) is used to track, monitor, and report on audits and open recommendations of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)...

  14. Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up

    ... Stroke More Heart Valve Surgery Recovery and Follow Up Updated:May 27,2016 Surgery Recovery Checklist English | ... self-care and are soon encouraged to get up, to breathe deeply, and to resume eating, drinking ...

  15. A FOLLOW UP STUDY OF HYSTERIA1

    Wig, N.N.; Mangalwedhe, K.; Bedi, Harminder; Murthy, R. Srinivas

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study undertook to examine the outcome of a group of cases who were diagnosed as hysteria, six or more years ago in a general hospital psychiatric unit and correlate various clinical factors with good or bad outcome. Of the 81 cases selected for the study, 57 (67%) could be located and followed up after a gap of 6-8 years. Majority of the cases (74%) had either no symptoms or symptoms less than before at the time of the follow up. In only 3 cases, there was evidence of an ...

  16. Radiological follow-up of inverted papilloma

    Petit, P.; Vivarrat-Perrin, L.; Champsaur, P.; Juhan, V.; Chagnaud, C.; Vidal, V.; Gaubert, J.Y.; Bartoli, J.M.; Moulin, G. [Department of Radiology, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Dessi, P.; Zanaret, M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Groupe Hospitalier de la Timone, Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Marseille, F-13385 Marseille Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cross-sectional imaging features of recurrent papilloma of the nasal fossa and paranasal sinuses and to evaluate the role of MR and CT in the postoperative follow-up of this lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT of ten patients who presented recurrence of inverted papilloma were reviewed and correlated to initial imaging, endoscopy, and surgical reports. Imaging patterns of recurrent inverted papilloma are identical to those of initial tumors and recurrence location is closely related to the site of the former lesion. Magnetic resonance is more efficient than CT for the diagnosis and evaluation of extensions. Magnetic resonance supplies the deficiencies of endoscopy in case of extensions to the frontal sinus or the lateral recess of the antrum, especially if mucosal hyperplasia or sinusitis is associated. Magnetic resonance imaging is the first imaging modality to perform in the follow-up after removal of inverted papilloma. (orig.)

  17. Disaster Medicine : From Preparedness to Follow up

    Marres, G. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Providing optimal care for a sudden, unexpected large amount of victims from a disaster or major incident is challenging. It requires an approach different from regular traumacare. The population as a whole, rather than the individual, should be the focus of management. This thesis focuses on medical preparedness, care and follow-up for victims of a disaster or major incident, and explores new opportunities for improvement of disaster relief using the Internet as a supportive tool. The Major ...

  18. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  19. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  20. The Kepler follow-up observation program

    Gautier...[], T.N.; Batalha, N.M.; Borucki, W. J.; Buchhave, Lars C. Astrup

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched on March 6, 2009 to perform a photometric survey of more than 100,000 dwarf stars to search for terrestrial-size planets with the transit technique. Follow-up observations of planetary candidates identified by detection of transit-like events are needed both for...... identification of astrophysical phenomena that mimic planetary transits and for characterization of the true planets and planetary systems found by Kepler. We have developed techniques and protocols for detection of false planetary transits and are currently conducting observations on 177 Kepler targets that...

  1. Digital synchronous follow-up system

    This paper describes a synchronous follow-up system whose dynamic phase error is less than or equal to 200, while its steady-state phase error is less than or equal to 20, with a load torque of 5600 g.cm on the shaft of the servomotor. The digital system ensures a range of regulation of 3.10 and a factor of merit of 1200 sec-1 at a tracking speed of 200 rad/sec. This system is especially applicable to the fabrication of superconducting cables during which a high level of accuracy is required in the pitch of the twist applied to the cores of superconducting cables

  2. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  3. Follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer

    The aim of post-surgical follow-up for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the early identification of the small proportion of patients who have residual disease or develop a recurrence. When total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation have been the initial treatment, three powerful tools are available for the follow-up: basal and TSH-stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement, iodine-131 whole body scan (WBS) and neck ultrasound. Serum Tg measurement is the most sensitive and specific marker of differentiated thyroid cancer. Undetectable serum Tg levels are found in the large majority of disease-free patients, while elevated concentrations of serum Tg are associated with the presence of residual or metastatic thyroid tissue. In the last case, WBS under TSH stimulation (either after withdrawal of L-thyroxine therapy or after recombinant human TSH stimulation) and neck ultrasound are the most informative tests for the detection of distant or local metastases, respectively, that require more appropriate treatment (surgery and/or radioiodine therapy). Using this strategy, most patients will achieve definitive cure and will have a normal quality of life. (orig.)

  4. A follow up study on interstitial alveolitis

    Kamat S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To study the benefits of steroid therapy in interstitial alveolitis. Method and Materials : One hundred five adult clinic patients were studied with clinical evaluation, chest radiography, CT scan, bronchoscopic lavage, pulmonary function studies and a regular follow up. They were put on daily prednisolone (in 19 on intravenous methyl prednisolone, for several months. Results: Only a few had no cough or dypnoea; 91 cases had atleast gr. III exertional breathlessness; 61(58% had been given steroids earlier and 32(31% were on a prior antitubercular treatment. Only 16% had GERD symptoms. On radiography, interstitial deposits were seen in 102 cases. While 53 cases belonged to idiopathic variety, 41 were sarcoidosis. A majority had poor lung function with a restrictive disability; but 50% showed a significant response (10%+ to bronchodilators. On follow up in 92 cases, 14 died, 8 went in remission; 32 had a fluctuating course. At some stage 66 had showed improvement. Conclusion : A large majority of our interstitial alveolitis cases are very disabled. They show clinical, functional, and radiographic improvement to long term oral prednisolone. In nonresponsive cases, intravenous steroids show an objective response.

  5. Spectroscopic follow up of Kepler planet candidates

    Latham..[], D. W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G.W.;

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from...... spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not...... planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using...

  6. Morbidity follow-up feasibility study

    The report reviews the available sources of data within Canada for undertaking morbidity follow-up studies to both supplement and complement studies using Canadian mortality data. Such studies would permit earlier detection and more sensitive measures of differences in risk for exposures to radiation and allow timely measures to be taken to minimize any occupational and environmental health risk to radiation workers. The technical feasibility of using these sources was reviewed using the criteria of adequate personal identifying information, automation of data records, file size and the accuracy of the morbidity diagnosis information. At the present time certain of the provincial cancer registry files meet these criteria best. A work plan was prepared suggesting a morbidity pilot study to clarify the role of occupational factors in the incidence of cancer among radiation workers using the Alberta Cancer Registry file and the National Dose Registry (NDR) file of radiation workers. For the longer term a full cohort study using the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System (NCIRS) and the NDR workers as the study population would provide information on all radiation workers on a national basis. A work plan was prepared and some initial format conversion of historical data was undertaken to begin developing the NCIRS into a data base suitable for long-term health studies

  7. Load following-up operation method

    Purpose: To enable load following-up operation with neither increasing boron density excessively nor distorting axial power distribution at the full power operation. Method: Changes in the reactivity excepting that by the boron density is compensated by control rods. However, since control for the axial power distribution is made difficult if the control rod displaced greatly, the control rod position before the power-up is adjusted and power increase is effected stepwise up to the full power level, to thereby control the axial power distribution with no great distortion. After extraction of control rods and when axial offset approaches about to the stationary value (5 - 10%) at the full power level, boron content is diluted as required and control rod is maintained at that position. For the power-up, the control rods are entirely extracted to increase the power as far as possible, and maintain at that level for several hours, while the compensation for the reactivity due to decrease of xenon is compensated by the insertion of the control rods. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  9. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  10. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  11. Long-Term Follow up of Cancer Patients

    Rheaume, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The long-term follow up of cancer patients should be based on the natural history of the disease and its known recurrence rates, patterns, and timing. Information from follow-up trials should be used in the context of diagnostic capabilities and practice setting. The increased involvement of family practitioners in the follow up of cancer patients is desirable, and some recommendations for follow-up procedures are presented.

  12. Alberta Euthanasia Survey: 3-year follow-up.

    Verhoef, M J; Kinsella, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the opinions of Alberta physicians about active euthanasia had changed and to assess the determinants of potential changes in opinion. DESIGN: Follow-up survey (mailed questionnaire) of physicians included in the 1991 Alberta Euthanasia Survey. SETTING: Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 1391 physicians who participated in the 1991 survey 1291 (93%) had indicated that they were willing to take part in a follow-up survey. A follow-up questionnaire was mailed in 1994 ...

  13. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  14. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Follow-up. 1022.17 Section 1022.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in...

  15. The Preschool Behavioral Classification Project: A Follow-Up Report

    Baker, Robert P.; Dreger, Ralph Mason

    1977-01-01

    Described in the follow up report of the Preschool Behavioral Classification Project (PBCP) is the development of the PBCP instrument, a measure designed to evaluate dimensions of behavior exhibited by children with emotional difficulties. (SBH)

  16. Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Analysis reported in Post-Discharge Follow-Up Visits and Hospital Utilization by Medicare Patients, 2007-2010, published in Volume 4, Issue 2 of Medicare and...

  17. Follow-Up and Feed-Back Materials.

    Cripwell, Kenneth R.

    1968-01-01

    Presented and discussed are a series of suggestions and examples concerned with improving ETV and ITV programs through feedback and increasing their effectiveness through the use of follow-up materials in the classroom. (LS)

  18. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ2 tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the “perceived benefits” domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between

  19. The computerized follow-up of radioactive wastes

    The French national agency of radioactive waste management (ANDRA) is the organization responsible for the management of short life waste storage facilities. Therefore, the ANDRA must have a precise follow up of each waste package from its conditioning specifications to its storage emplacement. This permanent control is based on an original and unique identification procedure and on a computerized follow up system. This brochure describes the detailed itinerary of a waste package. (J.S.)

  20. Peritoneal inclusion cysts: Changes on follow-up ultrasonography

    To evaluate the volume change of peritoneal inclusion cysts on the follow-up ultrasonography (US). From March 1995 to May 1999, thirty seven women with ultrasonographically diagnosed peritoneal inclusion cysts were included in this study. Six patients underwent surgery for several reasons. Follow-up ultrasonography was performed 70-456 days (mean=191 days) after initial US examination in 12 of the remaining 31 patient with no further treatment. US was performed with a 3.5 or 4 MHz transabdominal probe in all 18 patients who underwent either surgery or follow-up US, and additional tranvaginal US examination using a 5-7 MHz probe in 15 of 18 patients. The volume change of the cysts was recorded for each US examination. Three cysts (25%) (volume=170 cm3, 61 cm3, and 38 cm3, respectively) were completely resolved on the follow-up US while the other nine cysts showed a decreased volume in seven patients (58%) and increased volume in two patients (17%). Spontaneous regression of peritoneal inclusion cysts is more common than it is believed to be, and ultrasonography may be a useful follow-up examination for peritoneal inclusion cysts.

  1. Outpatient Follow-up and Secondary Prevention for Melanoma Patients

    Ryan G. Gamble

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Health care providers and their patients jointly participate in melanoma prevention, surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment. This paper reviews screening and follow-up strategies for patients who have been diagnosed with melanoma, based on current available evidence, and focuses on methods to assess disease recurrence and second primary occurrence. Secondary prevention, including the roles of behavioral modification and chemoprevention are also reviewed. The role of follow-up dermatologist consultation, with focused physical examinations complemented by dermatoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy, and/or full-body mapping is discussed. Furthermore, we address the inclusion of routine imaging and laboratory assessment as components of follow-up and monitoring of advanced stage melanoma. The role of physicians in addressing the psychosocial stresses associated with a diagnosis of melanoma is reviewed.

  2. Urodynamic profile in myelopathies: A follow-up study

    Gupta Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the significance of filling cystometry in assessment and management of neurogenic bladder in myelopathies and correlate neurological recovery and bladder management in the follow up. Study Design: Retrospective analysis of reports of filling cystometry in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic myelopathy. Setting: Neuro-rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care university hospital. Methods: The study was carried out between September 2005 and June 2006 and included all subjects with myelopathy who underwent filling cystometry. ASIA impairment scale was used to assess neurological status during admission as well as in the follow up. Bladder management was advised based on the cystometric findings. Neurological recovery and mode of bladder management were correlated during the follow up after a minimum of 6 months. Results: Fifty-two subjects (38 males, 14 females, mean age 33.26 ± 14.66 years (10-80 underwent filling cystometry. Twenty patients had cervical, 24 had thoracic and 8 had lumbar myelopathy. Cystometric findings were overactive detrusor observed in 43 patients, (21 had detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD, 22 without DSD and areflexic/underactive detrusor in 9. Post-void residual (>15% of voided urine was significant in 27 patients. Twenty-three patients (44% reported for follow up (16 males, 7 females after a mean duration of 9.04 ± 2.44 months (6-15 months. Neurological recovery was seen in 61% cases, while 1 patient showed deterioration. Only 26% patients reported change in bladder management during follow up. Correlation between neurological recovery and bladder management was found to be insignificant ( P > 0.05 using spearman correlation co-efficient. Conclusions: Filling cystometry is valuable for assessment and management of neurogenic bladder after myelopathy. No significant relationship was observed between neurological recovery and neurogenic bladder management in the follow up in the present study.

  3. A Sensitivity Analysis of Pathfinder: A Follow-up Study

    Ng, Keung-Chi; Abramson, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    At last year?s Uncertainty in AI Conference, we reported the results of a sensitivity analysis study of Pathfinder. Our findings were quite unexpected-slight variations to Pathfinder?s parameters appeared to lead to substantial degradations in system performance. A careful look at our first analysis, together with the valuable feedback provided by the participants of last year?s conference, led us to conduct a follow-up study. Our follow-up differs from our initial study in two ways: (i) the ...

  4. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    should include evaluation of dysplasia, and if present it should be classified as low or high grade dysplasia. All patients are offered relevant antireflux treatment with PPI or surgery. Ablation or mucosal resection of metaplastic epithelia with or without low grade dysplasia is experimental and it is...... not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handled in departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the...

  5. Barrett's esophagus. Diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    Bremholm, Lasse; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Eriksen, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    should include evaluation of dysplasia, and if present it should be classified as low or high grade dysplasia. All patients are offered relevant antireflux treatment with PPI or surgery. Ablation or mucosal resection of metaplastic epithelia with or without low grade dysplasia is experimental and it is...... not recommended outside controlled studies. Treatment of high grade dysplasia and carcinoma in situ is handledin departments treating esophageal cancer. Follow-up with endoscopy and biopsy can be offered. Follow-up endoscopy with biopsy can only be recommended after thorough information to the...

  6. Exercise-Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Seven Years Follow-Up

    Gökmen Gemici

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a 7-year follow-up of a 55-year-old male who experienced ventricular fibrillation during the recovery period of exercise testing and refused implantation of an ICD. Normal left ventricular systolic function was found on echocardiographic examination, and coronary angiography revealed only a side branch disease with a vessel diameter of less than 2 millimeters. The patient was discharged on metoprolol and ASA in addition to his previous treatment with lisinopril and simvastatin. Outpatient cardiac evaluation by repeated 24-hour ECG monitorizations (Holter revealed normal findings. On follow up visits every six months for the past seven years, the patient was found to be asymptomatic.

  7. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique. PMID:2364206

  8. Danish offshore wind. Key environmental issues - a follow-up

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This follow-up to the Danish environmental monitoring programme on large-scale offshore wind power builds on the result of the former programme of 2006 and focuses on updated knowledge on harbour porpoises, water birds and fish communities, and on the cumulative effects of wind farms. The scientific quality of the projects in this follow-up has been assessed by experts from the International Advisory Panel of Experts on Marine Ecology (IAPEME), who have commented on the results in an independent evaluation which is reproduced in this publication. (LN)

  9. E.D.F. - Fish passes: follow up and efficiency

    After a brief recall on the steps of E.D.F. towards fish passes, this paper presents the different methods used for the control of fish passage facilities and the results obtained for structure conception or dimensioning. Informations on fish counting techniques, costs, efficiency and follow up of fish passage facilities are also given. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 8 photos

  10. Immunological follow-up of hydatid cyst cases

    Bulut Vedat

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. In this study, we aimed to investigate the benefit of monitoring cases with hydatid cyst by means of immune components in patients in a long-term follow-up after surgery. Eighty-four preoperative and postoperative serum samples from 14 cases undergoing surgery for hydatid disease were evaluated in terms of immune parameters, such as total and specific IgE, IgG, IgM, IgA and complement. Total and specific IgE were determined by ELISA. Specific IgG levels were measured by indirect hemaglutination.Total IgG, IgM, IgA and complement (C3 and C4 were detected by nephelometry. Imaging studies were also carried out during the follow-up. In none of the patients hydatid cysts were detected during the follow-up. Total IgE levels in the sera of the patients decreased to normal six months after surgery. Although specific IgE against echinococcal antigens decreased one year after operation, levels were still significantly high. There were no changes in the levels of anti-Echinococcus IgG and total IgG in follow-up period. Additionally, other parameters, such as IgA, IgM, C3 and C4, were not affected.

  11. Nimh Treatment Study of ADHD Follow-Up

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of changes in medication use between 14 and 24 months follow-up on effectiveness (symptom ratings and growth (height and weight measures were analyzed, comparing 4 groups of patients, in the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD (MTA reported by the MTA Cooperative Group.

  12. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B.; Kilsmark, Jannie;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:: To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients. METHODS:: Systematic literature searches according to the recommendati...

  13. Cytokeratin-based CTC counting unrelated to clinical follow up

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Machado; Rocha, Bruna Maria Malagoli; Aguiar, Caroline Motta; Abdallah, Emne Ali; Campanha, Daniel; Mingues, Natália Breve; de Oliveira, Thiago Bueno; Maciel, Macello Sampaio; Cervantes, Gustavo Marchioro; Dettino, Aldo L.A.; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been reported to be a relevant prognostic biomarker in metastatic patients. However, their clinical use and impact is still under debate. We have thus comparatively and kinetically assessed two CTC detection methods according to the patient’s clinical follow up. Methods CTC counting and characterization were repeatedly performed during follow up in a patient with metastatic undifferentiated non-small cell lung cancer by using cytokeratin (CK)-dependent immunomagnetic separation (Miltenyi) and CK-independent, size-based isolation [isolation by size of tumor cells (ISET)] (Rarecells). Results Comparison between the two methods showed a parallel increase of CTC detected by ISET and worsening of the clinical status, while CK-dependent CTC numbers were decreasing, misleadingly suggesting a response to treatment. ISET results were in agreement with the clinical follow up showing Circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) and CTC expressing a mesenchymal marker with absence of epithelial markers. Conclusions This case report study shows the interest of a comparative and kinetic analysis of different methods for CTCs detection combined with their evaluation according to the clinical follow up. Our results should open up an area for future research and validation in larger clinical cohorts. PMID:24255771

  14. The prognosis of fixed dystonia: a follow-up study.

    Ibrahim, N.M.; Martino, D.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Quinn, N.P.; Bhatia, K.P.; Brown, R.J.; Trimble, M.; Schrag, A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The syndrome of fixed dystonia includes both CRPS-dystonia and psychogenic dystonia. The underlying mechanisms are unclear, but a high prevalence of neuropsychiatric illness has previously been reported. METHODS: Clinical and neuropsychiatric follow-up study by telephone and self-adminis

  15. A formula for continued improvement: Audit follow-up

    In his book Management Audits, Allan J. Sayle states, ''QA standards stipulate that corrective action, required as a result of performing an audit, be followed up and closed out. There would, indeed, be little point in performing audits, requiring corrective action, or having a QA system at all if the auditee knows that the auditor will never verify that the corrective action has been efficaciously implemented.'' The QA auditor has an obligation to include follow-up in the overall audit planning. All too often the auditor will go to great lengths to plan and perform an audit only to have a recurring finding in the next audit. The proposed corrective action was only promissory and was not designed to stop the problem from recurring or to identify its root cause. Auditors do a disservice to the overall QA program and particularly to the customer when they fail to follow up and verify that an audit corrective action has been effectively implemented. In this paper, the techniques used by the quality assurance auditors at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) will be presented. Although PNL is a research and development laboratory, the techniques outlined in this paper could be applied to any industry conducting quality assurance audits. Most important, they provide a formula for continued improvement by assuring that audit follow-up is timely, meaningful, and permanent

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Follow-up Assessment of Sciatica

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. METHODS We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial

  17. Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy: Follow-Up and Treatment Results

    Zafer Cebeci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To report the follow-up and treatment results of cases with the diagnosis of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR in our clinic. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 19 eyes of 10 cases of FEVR that were followed up and some of them were treated in our clinic. Results: Nine male and one female patients with a mean age of 10.1 (3-30 years were included in the study. Seven patients had a family history of FEVR. Twelve eyes of 8 patients had laser photocoagulation to peripheral avascular areas, 3 patients had vitreoretinal surgery on one of their eyes three times. Unilateral total retinal detachment was determined in two patients at the initial visit and in three patients at the follow-up visits; because no improvement in the vision was expected, surgery was not done. Conclusion: FEVR is an inherited disease that can be detected in any age and can cause severe vision loss. These patients should be followed up throughout the life, and the essential treatment at the appropriate time can lead to partial visual recovery. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 370-3

  18. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  19. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  20. Eight to ten years follow-up after carotid endarterectomy

    Knudsen Rathenborg, Lisbet; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T;

    1990-01-01

    Follow-up information was obtained on 185 patients who consecutively underwent carotid endarterectomy eight to ten years previously. Doppler ultrasound examination was performed in 59 patients who were still alive and living within 100 miles of the hospital. Using lifetable analysis, the annual...

  1. MRI of penile fracture: diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up

    Uder, Michael; Gohl, Dietrich; Takahashi, Masahide; Kramann, Bernhard; Schneider, Guenther [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Derouet, Harry [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Defreyne, Luc [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Gent (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    A rupture of corpus cavernosum (CC) is a rare injury of the erect penis. The present study describes the role of MRI for diagnosis and follow-up of this injury. Four patients with clinically suspected acute penile fractures underwent MRI. Imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. In three patients, follow-up MRI was also available at 1, 6 and 16 weeks after surgical repair. In all patients pre-contrast T1-weighted images (T1WI) clearly disclosed ruptures of CC, which depicted as discontinuity of low signal intensity of the tunica albuginea (TA). Concomitant subcutaneous haematoma were well visualised both on T1-weighted (T1WI) and T2-weighted images, whereas haematoma in CC were optimally demonstrated on contrast-enhanced T1WI. On follow-up MRI all fractures presented similar healing process. Shortly after the repair, the tunical suture showed an increase in signal intensity on pre-contrast T1WI and was strongly enhanced with the administration of contrast material. Then the tear site gradually recovered low signal intensity on all spin-echo sequences by 4 months after surgery. These serial findings may suggest the formation of vascularised granulation tissue during cicatrisation. Magnetic resonance imaging is of great value for the diagnosis and follow-up in patients with penile fracture. (orig.)

  2. Swift follow-up observations of unclassified ASCA sources

    N. Degenaar; R.L.C. Starling; P.A. Evans; A.P. Beardmore; D.N. Burrows; E.M. Cackett; S. Campana; D. Grupe; J. Kennea; A. Moretti; C. Pagani; K.L. Page; V. La Parola; R. Wijnands

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift follow-up observations of a sample of 35 unclassified faint X-ray sources drawn from the ASCA Galactic centre and Galactic plane surveys. Our short, pointed XRT observations allow detections down to a limiting 0.3-10 keV flux of FX ~ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, which translates into a lumin

  3. Follow-up on CERN's OPERA Neutrino Results

    Huping, Hu

    2011-01-01

    As a follow-up to CERN's New "Information for World Transformation" ? appeared in 2012 Daily, we report here that there are scientists who have provided alternative explanations to the apparent faster-than-light neutrino speed reported by CERN and there are also scientists who are claiming victories over OPERA results supporting their theories.

  4. Challenges of loss to follow-up in tuberculosis research

    Nissen, Thomas N; Rose, Michala V; Kimaro, Godfather;

    2012-01-01

    In studies evaluating methods for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), follow-up to verify the presence or absence of active TB is crucial and high dropout rates may significantly affect the validity of the results. In a study assessing the diagnostic performance of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test...

  5. BeppoSAX attitude operations for GRB follow up

    This poster describes the attitude dynamics software, Attitude and Orbit Control Ground Support System (AOCGSS), which was developed by TELESPAZIO and integrated in the Operations Control Centre (OCC), in order to support the on ground operations of the Attitude and Orbit Control Subsystem (AOCS). In particular its involvement during the operations performed to carry out the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) Follow Up is described

  6. Urological outcome after myelomeningocele: 20 years of follow-up

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Cortes, Dina

    2011-01-01

    %) compared to those with normal function of both kidneys (24%). In total, 48% of the 52 myelomeningocele individuals were continent at follow-up. Continence surgery was performed in eight patients, nine used anticholinergica, three had regular botulinum toxin detrusor injections, and 27 used clean...

  7. Analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up

    Most Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) research and applications have so far neglected the ex post stages of the process, also called SEA follow-up. Tool kits and methodological frameworks for engaging effectively with SEA follow-up have been conspicuously missing. In particular, little has so far been learned from the much more mature evaluation literature although many aspects are similar. This paper provides an analytical framework and tool kit for SEA follow-up. It is based on insights and tools developed within programme evaluation and environmental systems analysis. It is also grounded in empirical studies into real planning and programming practices at the regional level, but should have relevance for SEA processes at all levels. The purpose of the framework is to promote a learning-oriented and integrated use of SEA follow-up in strategic decision making. It helps to identify appropriate tools and their use in the process, and to systematise the use of available data and knowledge across the planning organization and process. It distinguishes three stages in follow-up: scoping, analysis and learning, identifies the key functions and demonstrates the informational linkages to the strategic decision-making process. The associated tool kit includes specific analytical and deliberative tools. Many of these are applicable also ex ante, but are then used in a predictive mode rather than on the basis of real data. The analytical element of the framework is organized on the basis of programme theory and 'DPSIR' tools. The paper discusses three issues in the application of the framework: understanding the integration of organizations and knowledge; understanding planners' questions and analytical requirements; and understanding interests, incentives and reluctance to evaluate

  8. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  9. Pneumatic dilatation in achalasia cardia results and follow-up.

    Supe A

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic dilatation is one of the more recent methods in the management of achalasia cardia. Fifty dilatations were done in 42 patients with achalasia cardia over 5 years. There was a significant decrease in the maximum diameter of the oesophagus and a significant increase in diameter in the narrowed lower oesophageal segment in all the patients. Of the patients studied, 95.23% were relieved of their symptoms after only one to two sessions. There were no immediate complications. Out of the 38 patients on long term follow up, 8 (21.05% had recurrence of symptoms. On repeat dilatations, 4 (50% of them had good response. Late complication like reflux oesophagitis was observed in only 1 patient over a median follow up period of 22 months. It was thus concluded that pneumatic dilatation is a safe, simple and effective procedure in managing patients with achalasia cardia.

  10. [Densitometric follow-up of algodystrophy using computerized tomography].

    Lindecken, K D; Krawzak, H W; Strosche, H; Kukulies, R; Schmidt, W G

    1987-01-01

    Clinical and radiological findings obtained from diagnosis and follow-up examination of post-traumatic algodystrophy (Morbus Sudeck) are very much open to subjective interpretation. Decisive importance is attributed not only to alteration of soft tissue but also to typical distribution patterns and severity of bone demineralisation. No objectifiable and quantifiable have so far become available for proper assessment but are urgently desirable in view of the great number of therapeutic approaches. Densitometry integrated with computed tomography was applied to nine patients with algodystrophy of hand or foot in the region of spongy bones to determine absorption values which were then compared with those on the clinically intact side. Significant differences between sides proved to be objectifiable and were quantifiable measures by which demineralisation of the effected extremity could be assessed. Repeated examinations were undertaken for follow-up through a period up to nine months. PMID:3630448

  11. Radiological follow-up of uncemented knee prostheses. Preliminary study

    The preliminary results of a prospective study of 40 uncemented total knee prostheses (TKP) are presented following a radiological protocol with fluoroscopic control and follow-up of over 2 years. The prosthesis-bone interface and the components alignment were assessed. Several radiological signs were studied to assess this interface with respect to the fixing of the component, but they showed little clinical correlation. Statistical significance (p<0.05, chisquare) was found only in the observation of sclerosis in areas of support for the tibital tray as a reaction of the bone. This radiological follow-up is of interest to determine the evolution of the interface and position of the implant to prevent complications (especially loosening) in patients, particularly those under 60 years old, who represent the group that can most benefit from prosthetic systems with uncemented anchorage because of their life expectation and level of activity. Author

  12. Follow-up of the 9C survey Initial results

    Bolton, R C; Pearson, T J; Pooley, G G; Readhead, A C S; Riley, J M; Waldram, E M

    2003-01-01

    We present initial results from a follow-up of the 9C survey, complete to 25 mJy at 15 GHz, designed to assemble and investigate a sample of young radiosources. We have made radio continuum maps of 111 sources at frequencies spanning 1.4-43 GHz, and classified them according to their radio size and spectral index between 1.4 and 4.8 GHz. We find that selection at 15 GHz is twice as efficient at picking Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources as selection at 5 GHz. Optical follow-up has now begun; imaging of GPS and compact steep spectrum sources suggests that a significant fraction of the host galaxies have close companions or disturbed morphologies.

  13. Therapeutic follow-up paracoccidioidomycosis by 67 Ga images

    Paracoccidioidomycosis by P. Brasiliensis, is a systemic mycoses with chronic evolution. The main objective of this study was to determine the contribution obtained by 67 Ga images in the follow-up of its specific treatment. The definitive diagnosis was made by histological study. Reevaluation was made by clinical evolution, serological and laboratorial tests, ultra-sound (abdominal) and radiological studies, compared with whole body planar images obtained 48-72 hours after i.v. injection of 3-6 mCi(11-222 MBq) of 67 Ga citrate. The median time of therapeutical follow-up was 10 months. The 67 Ga studies a larger number of active disease sites in reevaluation under specific treatment specially in lungs and lymphonodes. This was related to: 1 to have whole body information; 2. the information is concerned to activity of disease, compared with the usual methods of investigation. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  14. Follow up of the PWRs maintenance outages in France

    This paper describes the general frame of the follow-up of the PWRs maintenance outages by the DRIREs (Regional Directorates for Industry, Research and the Environment) in France, with respect to the enforcement of several regulations (including the quality assurance order of 1984), but also to the compliance with the general operating rules for EDF plants. Maintenance as well as reactor operation activities during outages are considered by the DRIREs, and more particularly the pressure vessel regulation, the equipment important for safety, the outage preparation, the real time follow-up, the completion of outage. A few examples of recent events or incidents, involving human factors and organisation aspects, are given. They stress the importance of safety culture, training as well as experience feedback for the different actors

  15. Is follow-up capacity the current NHS bottleneck?

    Allder, Steven; Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate

    2011-02-01

    Capacity and demand theory suggests that the presence of a queue is not necessarily an indication of a shortage of capacity in a system. It is much more likely that either there is a demand and capacity variation that creates queues or there is a delay designed into the system. A shortage of capacity is only really indicated where a backlog is not stable and continues to grow. In this article, data are taken from one NHS trust that provides evidence for a continually growing backlog for follow-up outpatient services. It is believed that these data are representative of most locations within the NHS in England and therefore suggest an immediate shortage in effective follow-up capacity. To avoid compromise to patient care, the problem will have to be addressed before the situation becomes unmanageable. The paper highlights options to reduce or deflect demand or to increase effective capacity. PMID:21404781

  16. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  17. Live measles vaccine: a 21 year follow up.

    Miller, C

    1987-01-01

    21 years after receiving Schwartz strain live measles vaccine 4500 trial participants showed a continuing high level of protection compared with those who were unvaccinated. Over the last seven years of the follow up no cases of measles were reported in vaccinated participants who had had close contact with the disease. Immunity induced by the vaccine seems to survive the challenge of close contact with measles in young children, even after 21 years.

  18. Follow up of premature babies treated with artificial surfactant (ALEC).

    Morley, C J; Morley, R.

    1990-01-01

    Of 235 survivors who had taken part in a randomised trial of artificial surfactant and who were born in Cambridge, follow up information was available for 231 (98%) infants. In 12 cases information came from local doctors; all others were assessed at 9 and 18 months (n = 212) or 9 months only (n = 7). There was no difference between those who had been treated with surfactant and control babies in the incidence of neurological impairment, mental impairment, respiratory infections, allergies, o...

  19. Dutch orthopedic thromboprophylaxis: a 5-year follow-up survey

    Ettema, H.B.; Mulder, M. C.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Büller, H.R.; Verheyen, C C P M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Previous surveys in the Netherlands have revealed that guidelines regarding orthopedic thromboprophylaxis were not followed and that a wide variation in protocols exists. This survey was performed to assess the current use of thromboprophylactic modalities and to compare it with the results of a previous survey. Methods All departments of orthopedic surgery in the Netherlands were sent a follow-up survey on venous thromboprophylaxis, and the data obtained were compared ...

  20. GWASeq: targeted re-sequencing follow up to GWAS

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Li, Wai Lok Sibon; Edlund, Christopher K; MORRISON, John; Fortini, Barbara K.; Win, Aung Ko; Conti, David V; Thomas, Duncan C.; Duggan, David; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A

    2016-01-01

    Background For the last decade the conceptual framework of the Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) has dominated the investigation of human disease and other complex traits. While GWAS have been successful in identifying a large number of variants associated with various phenotypes, the overall amount of heritability explained by these variants remains small. This raises the question of how best to follow up on a GWAS, localize causal variants accounting for GWAS hits, and as a consequence e...

  1. Follow-up of prenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Lenz, K; Rabol, A;

    1996-01-01

    Based on previous experience with prenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis, we found that the primary indications for surgical intervention should be symptoms or functional impairment of the hydronephrotic kidney. Nonoperative management of neonates without symptoms and with normal function...... of the affected kidney was proposed. However, the strategy of treatment after prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis is still controversial. We studied 28 consecutive children with suspected unilateral pelviureteral junction obstruction and a normal contralateral kidney. The overall follow-up period...

  2. Radiographic follow-up study of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    Little Leaguer's shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder. A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer's shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball. At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up. The healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination. (orig.)

  3. The Doctorate in Education. Volume IV, Follow-UP Study.

    Ludlow, H. Glenn; And Others

    A study was conducted (follow-up to SP 004 600) of the 1,186 recipients of the Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees in education in the United States in 1958. Questionnaire data was collected to investigate 5-year career development and job satisfaction plus ability and achievement (as measured by high school graduating class rank, intelligence test scores,…

  4. Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries : A 10-year follow-up

    Elgmark Andersson, Elisabeth; Bedics, Beate Kärrdahl; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    Objective and design: Long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injuries were investigated based on a 10-year follow-up of patients from a previously published randomized controlled study of mild traumatic brain injuries. One aim was to describe changes over time after mild traumatic brain injuries in terms of the extent of persisting post-concussion symptoms, life satisfaction, perceived health, activities of daily living, changes in life roles and sick leave. Another aim was to identif...

  5. IAEA invited to send follow-up mission to Japan

    Full text: The IAEA is to send a follow-up mission to Tokyo and the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant from 28 January-1 February 2008, following an invitation from Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA). The purpose of the mission is to build on the preliminary findings of an IAEA international team of experts that visited the plant 6-10 August 2007, after the strong earthquake of 16 July 2007. The 12 members of the follow-up mission will hold discussions with Japanese experts and conduct an examination at the site in relation to the seismic safety of its seven units. They will also be provided the results of studies and investigations conducted since the earthquake by the owners of the plant, the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and NISA. The Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, welcomed the invitation to undertake a follow-up mission and said that lessons learned from the continuing investigations will be shared with the international nuclear community. (IAEA)

  6. Antireflux technique using teflon: ultrasonographic follow-up

    To analyze the value of ultrasound in the follow-up of patients subjected to an antireflux technique involving the use of teflon, as well as the outcome of this therapeutic approach. We reviewed 82 children treated by means of an endoscopic anterefluc procedure using teflon (125 ureters in all). The duration of the follow-up period ranged from three months to seven years (mean duration: 25 months). Ultrasound and voiding cystography were employed as imaging techniques. Ultrasound is a sensitive technique for the detection of teflon, facilitating the determination of its exact location and possible complications of the antireflux technique. The procedure was effective in 92% of the patients (96.5% success rate in grade II reflux, 94.28% in grade III reflux and 88.5% in grades IV and V). Complications were rare (one case of hemorrhagic cystitis, one case of acute obstruction and two cases of infection accompanied by fever), all of which were resolved by conservative treatment. The antireflux technique with teflon has been found to be effecting in the treatment of versicoureteral reflux. Ultrasound is a useful imaging method in the follow-up of these patients. (Author) 13 refs

  7. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  8. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    Wessels, Jan-Albert, E-mail: janalbert.wessels@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Department of Geography and Environmental Management, North-West University, C/O Hoffman and Borcherd Street, Potchefstroom, 2520 (South Africa); Environmental Assessment, School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, Australia. (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  9. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  10. Education On Prehospital Pain Management: A Follow-Up Study

    Scott C. French

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most common reason patients seek medical attention is pain. However,there may be significant delays in initiating prehospital pain therapy. In a 2001 qualityimprovement (QI study, we demonstrated improvement in paramedic knowledge,perceptions, and management of pain. This follow-up study examines the impact of thisQI program, repeated educational intervention (EI, and effectiveness of a new painmanagement standard operating procedure.Methods: 176 paramedics from 10 urban and suburban fire departments and two privateambulance services participated in a 3-hour EI. A survey was performed prior to the EI andrepeated one month after the EI. We reviewed emergency medical services (EMS runs withpain complaints prior to the EI and one month after the EI. Follow-up results were comparedto our prior study. We performed data analysis using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests.Results: The authors reviewed 352 surveys and 438 EMS runs with pain complaints. Usingthe same survey questions, even before the EI, 2007 paramedics demonstrated significantimprovement in the knowledge (18.2%; 95% CI 8.9%, 27.9%, perceptions (9.2%; 95% CI6.5%, 11.9%, and management of pain (13.8%; 95% CI 11.3%, 16.2% compared to 2001.Following EI in 2007, there were no significant improvements in the baseline knowledge (0%;95% CI 5.3%, 5.3% but significant improvements in the perceptions of pain principles (6.4%;95% CI 3.9%, 9.0% and the management of pain (14.7%; 95% CI 11.4%, 18.0%.Conclusion: In this follow up study, paramedics’ baseline knowledge, perceptions, andmanagement of pain have all improved from 6 years ago. Following a repeat educationalintervention, paramedics further improved their field management of pain suggestingparamedics will still benefit from both initial and also ongoing continuing education on thetopic of pain management.

  11. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  12. Postnatal follow-up of children having antenatal hydronephrosis

    Milošević Biljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of antenatal ultrasound for the evaluation of congenital anomalies in early pregnancy has become a common practice. Hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly observed. Antenatal interventions are experimental and done in advanced centers. Though there are defined criteria of intervention, it is still not clear as to who will benefit. Most patients will have relatively benign course, however identification of those who will have potentially serious postnatal problems permits early intervention. This study gives recommendations for the postnatal examination and follow-up of the newborns having hydronephrosis diagnosed on antenatal ultrasound.

  13. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    Ramsay, M. E.; Moffatt, D; O'Connor, M.

    1994-01-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles...

  14. Follow-up problems with fixed appliances in pediatric dentistry.

    Ari, Timucin

    2015-03-01

    Fixed appliances are commonly used in managing early orthodontic problems. Despite their widespread use, they have the potential to impinge on the soft tissues, interfere with the eruption of adjacent teeth and become dislodged or broken. These two case reports present the poor outcomes of fixed appliance treatments if the patient fails to attend follow-up appointments. A successful outcome of treatment with fixed appliances depends upon proper patient selection and the communication skills of the dentist to help patients/parents understand the importance of regular checkups. PMID:25928968

  15. The management of IMMR requires an enhanced follow-up

    The aging of industrial facilities rises concerns about security and safety. More constraining regulations have been recently implemented in France. An enhanced follow-up of the instrumented measures taken to master risks (IMMR) is now compulsory for any upgrading scheme of an industrial facility classified as Seveso-class. The industrialists can find help in the DT93 guide published by the French authority in charge of the prevention of risks. DT93 is a methodology guide based on the international IEC 61511 standard. (A.C.)

  16. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: A 13-Year Follow-Up

    Guerrero-González, Guillermo Antonio; Martínez-Cabriales, Sylvia Aideé; Hernández-Juárez, Aideé Alejandra; de Jesús Lugo-Trampe, José; Espinoza-González, Nelly Alejandra; Gómez-Flores, Minerva; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with poikiloderma and other clinical features, affecting the bones and eyes and, in type II RTS, presenting an increased risk for malignancy. With about 300 cases reported so far, we present a 13-year follow-up including clinical images, X-rays and genetic analysis. A 13-month-old female started with a facial rash with blisters on her cheeks and limbs at the age of 3 months along with congenital hypoplastic thum...

  17. Follow-up and feedback processes in the EHEA

    Pablo Del Canto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we describe the work being carried out by a group of professors so as to implement the follow-up and feedback processes of the activities students do throughout the first academic years in their Engineering studies. Not to mention, this project is within the EHEA (European Higher Education Area framework. Our results show that these processes are key to enhance students learning, they can also have an impact in their academic performance and can be optimized in such a way that professors can assume the time it requires. 

  18. A follow-up of transients. Stage 1

    A follow-up of the transients of temperature and pressure in the primary pressurized system of a nuclear power plant has been completed for the Barsebaeck-1 reactor. The investigation consists of the following steps:- the collation of transients - drawing up load data based on transients-analyses of stress - recommendations for future programs. It was found that the lifetime of the system will exceed 40 years excluding some of the pipes for feed water. The appendices give a detailed description of the transients.(G.B.)

  19. Swift Follow-up Observations of MAXI Discovered Galactic Transients

    Kennea, J. A.; Romano, P; Mangano, V.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P A; Curran, P. A.; Krimm, H.A.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the results of the first year of a program to localize new Galactic Transient sources discovered by MAXI with NASA's Swift mission. Swift is ideally suited for follow-up of MAXI discovered transients as its X-ray Telescope (XRT) field of view (~0.2 degrees radius) is closely matched to the typical MAXI error circle. The XRT is capable of localizing new sources to an accuracy of up to 1.5 arc-seconds radius (90% confidence), and the Swift Optical/UV Telescope also provides optical ...

  20. Swift follow-up observations of unclassified ASCA sources

    Degenaar, N.; Starling, R. L. C.; Evans, P A; Beardmore, A. P.; Burrows, D. N.; Cackett, E. M.; S. Campana; D. Grupe; Kennea, J.; A. Moretti(Fermilab, Batavia, IL, USA); Pagani, C; Page, K. L.; La Parola, V.; R. Wijnands(Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift follow-up observations of a sample of 35 unclassified faint X-ray sources drawn from the ASCA Galactic centre and Galactic plane surveys. Our short, pointed XRT observations allow detections down to a limiting 0.3-10 keV flux of FX ~ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, which translates into a luminosity of LX ~ 1033 erg s-1 for an assumed distance of D = 8 kpc. The brightest source in our sample reaches a maximum 0.3-10 keV luminosity of LX ~ 2 × 1036 (D/8 kpc)2 erg s-1 during our Swift obse...

  1. Heart transplantation: Follow-up with MR imaging

    MR imaging was performed in 14 patients with heart transplantation in order to evaluate the value of this technique in the detection of rejection and to assess the other complications of the postoperative period. Gated double spin-echo sequences were used in transverse scans associated with coronal and sagittal planes. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained and compared with the thickness of the septum and with the signal intensity of the myocardium. In acute rejection, an increased thickness and a high signal were observed. In subacute rejection, no signal abnormalities were noticed. This study suggests the potential value of MR imaging in the follow-up of heart transplantation

  2. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    Huang, K Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  3. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this

  4. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  5. Hybrid morphology radio sources - follow-up VLBA observations

    Ceglowski, Maciej; Gawronski, Marcin; Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sources that present FR I - like jet on the one side of the radio core and FR II - like on the other are rare class of objects that may posses key to understanding the origin of FR division. We presents information connected with the new high resolution VLBA follow-up observations of 5 recently discovered hybrid sources. We believe that sources which exhibit two different morphologies at the opposite side of the radio core are FR II type objects evolving in non-uniform high-density env...

  6. Follow up study of Alzheimer's type dementia with computed tomography

    In 54 patients who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's type dementia based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, III, cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained before and after their follow-up study ranging from 6 to 24 months (mean 15.4 +- 4.7 months). Cerebrospinal percentage and CT density in various regions of interest were examined. Six patients died during the study. Comparison of the group of the deceased (Group I) with the group of survivors (Group II) revealed: (1) there was no difference in average age and the degree of mental disorder at first presentation; (2) Group I had decreased activities of daily living; and (3) CT density was significantly decreased in the bilateral lateral and frontal lobes in Group I. As for Group II, decreased CT numbers were noticeable during the follow-up period in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and caudate nucleus in the group evaluated as aggravated, as compared with the group evaluated as unchanged. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. ESUR guidelines: ovarian cancer staging and follow-up

    Forstner, Rosemarie [Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Radiology, Landeskliniken Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Sala, Evis [University of Cambridge, Cambridge University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kinkel, Karen [Geneva University Hospital, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland); Spencer, John A. [St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer, and to provide the radiologist with a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences. Guidelines for ovarian cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 12 leading institutions and a critical review of the literature. Computed tomography (CT) with coverage of the base of the lungs to the inguinal region is regarded as the imaging technique of choice for preoperative staging. Critical diagnostic criteria are presented and the basis for a structured report for preoperative staging is outlined. Following primary treatment for ovarian cancer, clinical assessment and CA-125 are routinely used to monitor patients. For suspected recurrence, CT remains the imaging modality of choice, with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT emerging as the optimal imaging technique for suspected recurrence, particularly in patients with negative CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT is the imaging modality of choice for preoperative staging and detection of recurrence in patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  8. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  9. Serial extraction: 20 years of follow-up

    Renato Rodrigues de Almeida

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case treated by a serial extraction program at the mixed dentition stage followed by a corrective orthodontic treatment, with a long-term follow-up period. Twenty years after the interceptive treatment, a harmonious face was observed along with treatment stability in the anterior posterior direction, deep overbite (which has been mentioned as a disadvantage of the serial extraction program, and a small relapse of anterior tooth crowding. All these conditions have been regarded as normal occurrences for most orthodontic treatments with a long-term follow-up period. This case report demonstrated that the establishment of a serial extraction protocol determined relevant esthetic changes that afforded an improvement of the patient's self-esteem, with a positive social impact. Furthermore, the low cost of this protocol permits the use of this therapy with underprivileged populations. It is important to emphasize that an early correction of tooth crowding by this protocol does not guarantee stability, but small relapses do not invalidate its accomplishment.

  10. Follow-up of pulmonary perfusion recovery after embolism

    Blood flow recovery in a group of 69 patients with pulmonary embolism was followed by serial lung scans over a six month period. Each patient underwent perfusion lung scan at diagnosis then 7, 30 and 180 days later; i.v. heparin was systematically administered for one week after diagnosis, followed by oral warfarin for six months. Blood flow impairment was evaluated by assessing the total number of unperfused lung segments (ULS), as calculated on both lateral views at each scan. The number of ULS was significantly reduced at each interval (P<0.001), ranging from 8.4±3.3 at diagnosis to 3.6±2.7 six months later; most of the recovery (79%) occurred within the first month. No patient had complete restoration of pulmonary blood flow during the whole follow-up period. No difference was found between the number of ULS in right lung versus that in left lung at each interval. Recovery of blood flow was heavily affected by coexisting cardiac or pulmonary disease. In fact, those patients with underlying cardiopulmonary disease (49.2% of the total) showed significantly smaller perfusion improvement after six months (P<0.001). Eight patients (6 with and 2 without cardiopulmonary disease) had clinical and scintigraphic evidence of recurrent embolism during the follow-up period

  11. Gastric and Duodenal Stents: Follow-Up and Complications

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of self-expanding metallic stents in treating inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses during follow-up and to evaluate the complications encountered.Methods: A total of 31 patients suffering from gastroduodenal obstruction (29 malignant, 2 benign) were treated with a self-expanding metallic stent (Wallstent). In 24 cases insertion was by the peroral route, in seven cases via gastrostomy.Results: All the strictures were successfully negotiated under fluoroscopic guidance without having to resort to endoscopy. A total of 27 patients (87%) were able to resume a regular diet, a soft diet, or a liquid diet orally. Complications included one case of stent malpositioning, one case of leakage of ascitic fluid through the gastrostomy orifice, one case of perforation and fistula to the biliary tree, and two cases of hematemesis. In two patients (6%) additional stents were implanted to improve patency. In all patients follow-up was maintained until death. Recurrence of symptoms immediately before death occurred in seven cases (23%). Mean survival time of patients was 13.3 weeks (SE ± 4.6).Conclusions: The deployment of gastroduodenal stents resulted in good palliation of inoperable gastric and duodenal stenoses. Certain technical aspects, e.g., adaptation of stents to bowel morphology, is critical to proper stent function and avoidance of complications

  12. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. PMID:22440534

  13. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up.

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  14. Loss to follow up within an HIV cohort

    H Wood

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BHIVA guidelines recommend that all ARV-naïve and stable on-treatment patients are monitored at least 6 monthly [1]. Studies have shown that loss to follow up (LFU not only worsens outcomes [2] but has increased potential for onward transmission. Case notes of 1275 HIV patients registered under our care up to January 2011 were examined for attendance within the previous 6 months. 788 (61% patients had not been seen within the previous 6 months. Reasons for non attendance were identified. These are outlined below: 76% of the 130 LFU whose demographics were further examined were of Black African ethnicity, 54% female, 51% of single marital status and 48% of patients had been taking ARVs at the time of LFU. Interestingly, 53% of patients were lost to follow up within 1 year of diagnosis. The LFU patients (88 that had a local GP and a registered current address were sent recall letters. A small number of patients reengaged with care as a result of this action, some having not attended for over 5 years. Partner notification led to a number of new diagnoses in these cases. Failure to respond led to subsequent letters inviting them to clinic and finally a letter to their GP informing them of non attendance. In September 2011, a new recall system using Lillie Electronic Patient Records (EPR was introduced to promptly recognise if a patient had not attended for care as planned. Prior to this, recall was a manual process carried out by the Health Advising Team. We conclude that within our cohort we had a particularly mobile group of patients; 455 (36% transferring care to another clinic within the UK, 54 (4% moving out of UK. 76% of the LFU group being of Black African ethnicity highlights the ongoing problem of retention of care in this group. Further exploration is needed to identify additional issues besides housing and immigration that lead to LFU. Furthermore, the disportionate number of patients (53% disengaging with services within 1 year of

  15. Scintigraphic follow-up of fracture healing in animals

    Secondary bone fracture heating was analysed by scintigraphic follow-up studies in rabbits using sup(99m)Tc-HEDP. 24 hours after fracture the activity ratio between the fractured and the non-fractured lower limb was 2,2. The maximal count density in the fracture region is found during the 14th and 28th day after fracture. Concomitantly there is a significant increase of bone marrow vessels and content of copper, magnesium, sodium and water in the callus. Although roentgenographic controls and static investigations with respect to consolidation reveal a complete heating already 126 days after fracture, the complete scintigraphic normalisation of the lower limb fracture of the rabbit is found not earlier than at the 203rd day after fracture. (orig.)

  16. Course of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. A radiographic follow-up

    Mortensson, W.; Lindroth, M.

    Forty-one low weight premature infants treated with intermittent positive pressure ventilation in infancy were followed clinically and with chest radiography for 4 to 6 years. One child died during the period (sudden infantile death) and 2 others were not available for follow-up examination. The abnormal chest pattern of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) resolved completely or improved during the period; residual changes were found in 34 per cent of the cases. The main part of the resolution occurred during the first 2 years. Mild BPD was more prone to heal. The persisting parenchymal changes - interstitial fibrosis or areas of hyperinflation or both - were generally slight. The frequency of infection of the lower respiratory tract was increased during the first 2 years of life and was positively correlated to the severity of the pulmonary abnormalities. The frequency of infection dramatically decreased during the subsequent 2 years.

  17. Vertebral sarcoidosis: long-term follow-up with MRI

    Lefere, M. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Larbi, A.; Malghem, J.; Vande Berg, B.; Dallaudiere, B. [University Hospitals St Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    Vertebral involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and its clinical and imaging features are non-specific. Indeed, because the lesions are hard to differentiate from metastatic disease based on imaging alone, a histological confirmation is advised. Fatty replacement is a well-known finding indicating stabilization and healing in both benign and malignant conditions. It can be used as an indicator of a favorable disease course and response to treatment. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman with multifocal vertebral sarcoidosis lesions and long-term follow-up showing progressive and gradual fatty involution on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during 4 years of steroid treatment with a final favorable outcome. (orig.)

  18. Heart transplantation: Follow-up with MR imaging

    Eighteen patients who had undergone heart transplantation were studied with MR imaging for detection of acute or chronic rejection episodes (13 patients) and other postsurgical complications. Electrocardiographically gated spin-echo images were obtained with a 0.5-T superconductive system. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained in patients suspected of experiencing acute or chronic rejection. In two of three cases of acute rejection, there was increased signal intensity within the myocardial wall. In ten cases of subacute or chronic rejection, abnormal thickness of the right and left ventricular wall was noticed. In four other patients, MR imaging disclosed pericardial effusions (two nonhemorrhagic, one hemorrhagic) and mycotic thrombi (one patient) within the left cavity. This preliminary study suggests that MR imaging is a relevant modality for following up patients who have undergone heart transplantation

  19. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (∼1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 μm, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 μm. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 μm, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 1013 L☉. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  20. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; Weiner, Benjamin; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  1. Clinical outcome and follow-up of prenatal hydronephrosis

    Afshin Safaei Asl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydronephrosis is probably the most common congenital abnormality detected prenatally by ultrasonography This study was performed to determine the cause and outcome of prenatal hydronephrosis in our hospital. A total of 45 infants, with 57 prenatally hydronephrotic renal units, were enrolled into this study. For the purpose of this study, the degree of hydronephrosis was defined as mild, moderate or severe. Postnatal ultrasonography was performed as soon as possible in those with bilateral hyronephrosis and 3-7 days after birth in those with unilateral hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 6-8 weeks time. In the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, Diethylenetriamene penta acetate scan was performed to exclude obstructive uropathy. There were 29 males and 16 females (male:female ratio 1.8:1, and unilateral and bilateral hydronephrosis were seen in 33 (73% and 12 (27% of the cases, res-pectively. Hydronephrosis was caused by ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO in 20 (44.5%, VUR in 10 (22.2%, ureterovesical junction obstruction in four (8.9 %, posteriorurethral valves in four (8.9 %, UPJO with VUR in two (4.4% and non-VUR non-obstructive in one (2.2%. During follow-up, 16 patients (35.5% required operative intervention while seven (15.5% improved spontaneously. Fetal hydronephrosis needs close follow-up during both ante-natal and postnatal periods. In this study, the most common cause for hydronephrosis were UPJO and VUR. Also seen in this study is the noteworthy point that mild fetal hydronephrosis is relatively benign and does not require surgical intervention in most cases and surgery should be performed only if there is renal function compromise. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric nephrologist and urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management.

  2. Diagnosis, surgical treatment and follow-up of thyroid cancers

    This paper reports the activities and the results of the research carried out by the Centers participating to the JSP4 project, within the framework of the EU program on the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. The project was aimed to develop and to control the application of basic principles for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of thyroid carcinoma, with special attention to the peculiar requirement of children and adolescents. To this purpose, training in Western European Centers was offered to a number of scientists from Belarus, Ukraine and Russia. Several official meetings were organized to share views and to discuss the progress of the project. A basic protocol for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of thyroid carcinoma has been developed and approved by all participating Centers. Hopefully, it will be applied to the new cases and to those already under monitoring. A large part of the protocol is dedicated to the post-surgical treatment with thyroid hormones for the suppression of TSH and with calcitriol for the management of surgical hypoparathyroidism. A detailed protocol to asses iodine deficiency and, eventually, to introduce a program of iodine supplementation has been proposed. The collection of control cases of childhood thyroid carcinoma in non-radiation exposed European countries has been initiated in Italy, France and Germany. This data will be used as control for the post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid carcinomas. Here is reported a preliminary comparison of the clinical and epidemiological features of almost all (n=368) radiation-exposed Belarus children who developed thyroid carcinoma (age at diagnosis < 16 years), with respect to 90 children of the same age group, who, in the past 20 years, have received treatment for thyroid carcinoma in two centers in Italy (Pisa and Rome). Finally, by molecular biology, genetic mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been found in several samples of thyroid carcinomas provided by the Belarus

  3. Multicenter follow-up study of ankle fracture surgery

    XU Hai-lin; WANG Gang; WANG Guang-lin; WU Xin-bao; LIU Li-min; LI Xuan; ZHANG Dian-ying; FU Zhong-guo; WANG Tian-bing; ZHANG Pei-xun; JIANG Bao-guo; SHEN Hui-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data on ankle fractures in China from large multicenter epidemiological and clinical studies are available.The aim of this research was to evaluate the epidemiological features and surgical outcomes of ankle fractures by reviewing 235 patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five hospitals in China.Methods This study included patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five Chinese hospitals from January 2000 to July 2009.Age,gender,mechanism of injury,Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) fracture type,fracture pattern,length of hospital stay and treatment outcome were recorded.Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS software.The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale,visual analogue scale (VAS),and arthritis scale were used to evaluate outcome.Results Of 235 patients with ankle fractures,105 were male with an average age of 37.8 years and 130 were female with an average age of 47.3 years.The average follow-up period was 55.7 months.There were significant differences in the ratios of patients in different age groups between males and females,and in mechanisms of injury among different age groups.There were also significant differences in the length of hospital stay among different fracture types and mechanisms of injury.In healed fractures,the average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 95.5,with an excellence rate of 99.6%,the average VAS score was 0.17,and the average arthritis score was 0.18.Movement of the injured ankle was significantly different to that of the uninjured ankle.There were no significant differences between AO fracture types,fracture patterns or follow-up periods and AOFAS score,but there were some significant differences between these parameters and ankle joint movements,pain VAS score and arthritis score.Conclusions Ankle fractures occur most commonly in middle-aged and young males aged 20-39 years and in elderly females aged 50-69 years.The most common mechanisms of

  4. Measles vaccine: a 27-year follow-up.

    Ramsay, M E

    1994-04-01

    In 1964, the Medical Research Council undertook a trial of measles vaccine in over 36,000 United Kingdom children; 9577 of whom received live vaccine, 10,625 received inactivated followed by live vaccines, and 16,328 acted as unvaccinated controls. Participants in this study have been followed to determine the long term protection from measles vaccine and follow-up data were available on 4194, 4638 and 274 respectively. During the 5-year period 1986-90, the protective efficacy of live measles vaccine has remained high at 87%, but the 95% confidence interval was wide (-43 to 99%) due to the small numbers of cases. Between 1976 and 1990, however, the overall efficacy of the live vaccine was 92% (95% confidence interval 86 to 95%) and there was no evidence of a decline in efficacy (P = 0.13) over the 15-year period. This study suggests that the protection from live measles vaccine persists for up to 27 years after vaccination, and that no change in the current United Kingdom measles immunization policy should be made on the grounds of waning immunity.

  5. KeSeF - Kepler Self Follow-up Mission

    Ofir, Aviv

    2013-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft is currently unable to hold a steady pointing and it is slowly drifting during observations. We believe that if one has to deal with targets that drift across the CCDs, one should at least be able to track the targets well enough to correct for some -- if not most -- of the problems caused by this drift. We therefore propose to observe as many stars as possible in short cadance. We propose that at least all currently known planetary candidate host stars will be so observed, with possibly known Kepler eclipsing binaries, astroseismology targets, guest observer targets and new targets in increasingly lower priority. We also outline the modifications needed to flight software in order allow for such observations to take place, aiming to provide ample non-photometric data that should allow post-processing to recover most of the pre-failure photometric performance. In total, the KeSeF Mission will allow Kepler to follow up it's own previous discoveries in a way that is not otherwise possible....

  6. Follow-up Sonography after Sonoguided Renal Biopsy

    To assess ultrasonographic findings and clinical significance after renal biopsy. 174 cases of post-biopsy sonography were studied retrospectively. We classified post-biopsy hematoma on the basis of their size as small (thickness less than 1 cm, length less than 3cm), medium (thickness less than 1cm, length greater than 3 cm), large (thickness greater than 1 cm, length greater than 3 cm). We also compared bleeding parameters (prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time) and renal function in both cases which had hematoma or not. Total 33 hematomas were found (19%). Small hematoma was observed in 14 cases, medium hematoma in 16 cases, large hematoma in 3 cases. Severe complications requiring prompt therapy occurred in 1 case(0.6%). In 6 cases hematocrit fell by more than 4%, all of these hematomas were observed on US. Severe complications after sonoguided renal biopsy were rare. There was poor correlation between prebiopsybleeding parameter, renal function and post-biopsy hematomas. And sonography is considered as adequate method for follow up of post-biopsy hematoma

  7. Long term follow up in hemodialysis patients with parathyroidectomy

    A retrospective study was performed in 41 patients, in chronic hemodialysis with severe hyperparathyroidism (HPT), who underwent surgery during time period from 1985 to 1997. 22 females, 19 males, aged 50 and 14 years, with PTHI 1345 and 604 pg/ml were followed up 32 and 22 months. Three surgical methods we evaluated: group I) total para thyroidectomy(PTX) with Implants(n=24); group II) subtotal PTX(n=14) and group III) total PTX(n=3). It considered recurrence of HPT when PTH levels were higher than upper range of normal, after 6 months post surgery. persistence was defined when there was no standardization of PTH levels. In group I, 9 patients had normal parathyroid function, 7 had persistent hypoparathyroidism and had hyperparathyroidism (7 recurrences). Group II patients had parathyroid over function in 5 cases (4 persistence s), 5 were normal and 4 hypoparathyroidism. All patients of the third group had hypoparathyroidism. Long term normalization of parathyroid gland activity was achieved in one third of troduccion patients (34,1%) whereas 34,1% permanent hypoparathyroidism and 31,8% hyperparathyroidism. It found no differences in recurrence and histological subtype of parathyroid gland in the different groups. In conclusion, similar long term clinical results were obtained with the different groups. The surgical ideal treatment is controversial. We think that in the long run, the evolution of parathyroid status is mostly influenced by the persistence of uremic state rather than the type of surgery performed

  8. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  9. Takayasu's arteritis on steroid therapy. Seven years follow-up.

    Del Corso, L; Moruzzo, D; Agelli, M; Pentimone, F

    1999-12-01

    The authors report a 7 year follow-up of Takayasu's arteritis (TA) type III, group 1, in a young Italian woman. At diagnosis, at the age of 25, the echotomographic and angiographic studies showed narrow subclavian arteries, narrow abdominal aorta (diameter of 0.6-0.8 cm) below the renal arteries, stenotic left common carotid and renal arteries, and occluded upper mesenteric artery. With steroid therapy, (prednisone 50 mg/day per os), the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) normalized within 12 days. With a maintenance dosage of 7.5 mg/day per os, the patient achieved remission as documented by the absence of symptoms, the persistent normalization of ESR, and the improving of the diameter of the abdominal aorta (1.3-1.4 cm). On steroid therapy, the patient had a normal pregnancy and delivered a healthy baby girl. The disease has been stable for seven years. Recently, diabetes mellitus occurred and it has been treated with insulin therapy. The rising of ESR after tapering of steroid therapy (prednisone 5 mg per os on alternate days) suggests an alternative treatment with a cytotoxic agent. PMID:10705719

  10. A 22-year follow-up of an endodontic implant.

    Wolff, Jan; Sándor, George K; Forouzanfar, Tim; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Oikarinen, Kyösti S

    2015-10-01

    Root fractures in the middle and apical thirds of the root are treated by repositioning and for approximately 6 weeks of immobilization while those in the cervical third are immobilized for 3 months. Even though the results are good, some root-fractured teeth are lost and replaced by dental implants or fixed partial dentures. One historic but effective treatment option for those root fractures with unfavorable crown to root ratios is an endodontic implant in middle and apical third root fractures. This method offers immediate stable fixation of a crown and its coronal root segment to the underlying alveolar bone. This report documents the long-term survival of a tooth treated with an endodontic implant. A 25-year-old male patient presented following a bicycle accident with a dislocated unfavorable root fracture in the middle third. The crown with the coronal root segment was secured to the bone using a commercially available endodontic implant. The apical part of the root was removed. Although the clinical and radiological follow-up results of the endodontic implant demonstrated a good clinical function and little bone loss, the implant ultimately had to be removed after 22 years of service due to pain and increasing mobility. PMID:25865147

  11. The West Point Study: 40 years of follow-up.

    Clark, D A; Tolan, G D; Johnson, R; Hickman, J R; Jackson, W G; McGranahan, G M

    1994-05-01

    Completion of cardiovascular evaluations of 387 members marked the end of 40 years of follow-up in the West Point Study. Coronary artery disease (CAD) caused 4 cases of sudden death, 14 cases of myocardial infarction (MI), 13 cases of angina, and 17 cases of silent CAD. Using risk factors (serum cholesterol, estimated HDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and smoking status) measured before age 28, we derived a multivariate regression formula for predicting which members of the study, had they been pilots, would have been grounded for CAD before age 55. This derivation used data from only those subjects with CAD or with no evidence of CAD. We then used the formula to compute a risk-related score for each member of the study. In the tertile group with the highest risk-related scores, 17% manifested CAD by age 55 and the first event occurred at age 39. In the tertile group of lowest scores, 2% experienced CAD by age 55 and the first event occurred at age 51. We conclude that it is possible to select pilot candidates with the lowest risk for CAD. PMID:8018084

  12. Follow-up skeletal survey use by child abuse pediatricians.

    Harper, Nancy S; Lewis, Terri; Eddleman, Sonja; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal survey is frequently used to identify occult fractures in young children with concern for physical abuse. Because skeletal survey is relatively insensitive for some abusive fractures, a follow-up skeletal survey (FUSS) may be undertaken at least 10-14 days after the initial skeletal survey to improve sensitivity for healing fractures. This was a prospectively planned secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study of 2,890 children who underwent subspecialty evaluation for suspected child physical abuse at 1 of 19 centers. Our objective was to determine variability between sites in rates of FUSS recommendation, completion and fracture identification among the 2,049 participants who had an initial SS. Among children with an initial skeletal survey, the rate of FUSS recommendation for sites ranged from 20% to 97%; the rate of FUSS completion ranged from 10% to 100%. Among sites completing at least 10 FUSS, rates of new fracture identification ranged from 8% to 28%. Among completed FUSS, new fractures were more likely to be identified in younger children, children with higher initial level of concern for abuse, and those with a fracture or cutaneous injury identified in the initial evaluation. The current variability in FUSS utilization is not explained by variability in occult fracture prevalence. Specific guidelines for FUSS utilization are needed. PMID:26342432

  13. Infantile eczema: A long-term follow-up study.

    Musgrove, K; Morgan, J K

    1976-10-01

    A 15-17 year follow-up study was conducted on ninety-nine patients who had suffered from infantile eczema. The persistance of the eczema and the occurrence of related conditions were noted. The persistence of eczema was shown to be greater in those patients with a positive family history of eczema and in those who had developed asthma or hay-fever. An attempt was made to see if the persistence of eczema was affected by the position of the child in the family, and some factors provoking relapses were noted. The patients were also questioned with regard to their achievements in academic examinations, and to their social, artistic and sporting activities. The results showed a success rate in examinations not significantly higher than average. It was not possible to show if there is a particular type of atopic personality. There was no constant characteristic in social or artistic patterns. The group as a whole were normal at the milestones of early development, i.e. walking, talking and reading, and also normal with regard to weight and height. PMID:974022

  14. Follow-up of transplanted patients with radionuclides

    Nuclear medicine procedures have special indications in the follow-up of transplanted patients: In case of renal transplantation perfusion, function (glomerular filtration) and urinary flow measured by bolus application of 99mTc-DTPA is an important tool to detect and monitor acute tubular necrosis, rejection, urinary leakage, obstruction or vascular complications. This method is used for pancreatic grafts, too. To exclude rejection in case of heart transplantation more than one year after operation the antimyosin antibody scintigraphy is introduced avoiding biopsies. The radionuclide ventriculography is able to monitor heart function by determining the ejection fraction. Cholescintigraphy in liver transplants is sensitive to detect complications of bile flow. In case of an auxiliary liver transplantation a competition between two livers has been described. This method allows a distinction of functional performance of donor and recipient liver. The same problem is solved by ventilation-perfusion scan in lung transplants. Bone scintigraphy is of prognostic value for graft viability. Other radionuclide examinations have been developed to measure perfusion, glucose-, fat-metabolism to detect rejection episodes, abscesses or tumor recurrencies. (orig.)

  15. Intracranial idiopathic hypertension: 1-year follow-up study.

    D'Amico, D; Curone, M; Erbetta, A; Farago', G; Bianchi-Marzoli, S; Ciasca, P; Bussone, G; Chiapparini, L

    2014-05-01

    Standard guidelines for ongoing management, as well as definitive data about the long-term course of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are not available. The aim of this study was to compare several clinical and instrumental variables as assessed at the time of diagnosis and then after 1 year in a sample of IIH patients. A total of 21 patients were studied. Our results confirmed that headache and TVO are the most frequent symptoms in IIH patients, and that overweight is a very common feature. A trend towards a favorable outcome in patients followed for 1 year and treated by usual medical therapy was found: intracranial pressure was lower at follow-up; improvement of headache and transient visual obscurations, as well as of papilledema, was reported in most patients. On the other hand, neuroradiological findings (such as empty sella, perioptic subarachnoid space distension, narrowing of the transverse sinuses) were substantially stable at follow. These findings may be relevant for future research as far as understanding the role of different clinical and instrumental findings as diagnostic items as well as predictors of outcome in IIH. PMID:24867861

  16. Follow-up of obstructive sleep apnea in children

    Emília Leite de Barros

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: the evolution of snoring and OSAS in children is not well established since few studies of patients without surgical treatment have been published. OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the evolution of sleep disordered breathing in children who had not been submitted to upper airway surgery. METHOD: twenty-six children with snoring who had not undergone upper airway surgery were evaluated prospectively. Patients were evaluated by full physical examination and nocturnal polysomnography, after which they were divided into 2 groups: apnea (16 children and snoring (10 children. After 6 months following the initial evaluation, patients were submitted to a new nocturnal polysomnography, and all data were compared to those of the first examination. RESULTS: the groups did not show any differences regarding age, weight, height and airway physical examination. After 6 months of follow-up, the apnea index did not change, but the respiratory disturbance index increased in the snoring group and the number of hypopneas decreased in the group apnea. CONCLUSION: there was an increase in the percentage of N1 sleep stage and the respiratory disturbance index in the patients with primary snore. The AHI did not show significant alteration in both groups, but the number of hypopneas decreased in patients with SAOS.

  17. Follow-up CT scans for low-grade astrocytomas

    Aoyama, I.; Yamashita, J.; Handa, H.; Nakano, Y. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-seven patients with low-grade astrocytomas, including Kernohans grade 1, grade 2 astrocytoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, and giant cell astrocytoma, have been reviewed with CT scans in a serial study. The CT findings have been evaluated in terms of the density pattern, the mass effect, and the contrast enhancement (CE). Grade 1 and 2 astrocytomas show a low density in 84% of the cases and a positive CE in 13%. There are four follow-up CT types after treatment: Type 1, the disappearance of the low-density area and the mass effect after the operation; Type 2, the persistence of the low-density area without any mass effect; Type 3, a low-density area with an increasing mass effect and with a negative or minimum CE, and Type 4, a rapid increase in the mass effect and CE after a period of remission. Type 2 is the commonest change for low-grade astrocytomas in patients with a good clinical course. Six patients showed Type 4, compatible with a malignant change after a mean remission period of 34 months. CT after radiation therapy shows atrophic changes in 34%, usually three to six months after the therapy, without any further progressive changes.

  18. Follow-up CT scans for low-grade astrocytomas

    Thirty-seven patients with low-grade astrocytomas, including Kernohans grade 1, grade 2 astrocytoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, and giant cell astrocytoma, have been reviewed with CT scans in a serial study. The CT findings have been evaluated in terms of the density pattern, the mass effect, and the contrast enhancement (CE). Grade 1 and 2 astrocytomas show a low density in 84% of the cases and a positive CE in 13%. There are four follow-up CT types after treatment: Type 1, the disappearance of the low-density area and the mass effect after the operation; Type 2, the persistence of the low-density area without any mass effect; Type 3, a low-density area with an increasing mass effect and with a negative or minimum CE, and Type 4, a rapid increase in the mass effect and CE after a period of remission. Type 2 is the commonest change for low-grade astrocytomas in patients with a good clinical course. Six patients showed Type 4, compatible with a malignant change after a mean remission period of 34 months. CT after radiation therapy shows atrophic changes in 34%, usually three to six months after the therapy, without any further progressive changes. (author)

  19. Congenital hypothyroidism: follow up of a case for 13 years.

    Sudhir M Naik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Congenital hypothyroidism is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children. The prognosis of infants detected by neonatal screening and started on treatment early is excellent, with intelligence quotients similar to sibling or classmate without the disease. Setting: Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, KVG Medical College, Sullia. 1Case report: A 15 year old boy came with history of head ache, generalized body ache and lack of concentration in school. He was a case of congenital hypothyroidism and was on irregular treatment for the last 13 years. Intervention: The patient was advised strictly to continue the oral l-thyroxine 100μg one hour before food and come for regular follow-up. Conclusion: Definite intellectual deterioration is seen if oral l-thyroxine is not started within 50 days of life and the deterioration is irreversible. So in India newborn screening programs should be implemented as a national program as it is very important to diagnose and treatcongenital hypothyroidism as soon as possible and to treat it effectively.

  20. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up

    Raquel Marques

    2015-12-01

    electrodes (SPCEs were used as the transducers. These SPCEs (working volume: ~40 μL are widely employed in the construction of electrochemical (biosensors because of several reasons: simplicity and low cost, versatility of design, small dimensions and possibility of incorporation in portable systems, as well as adequate electroanalytical characteristics. These SPCEs were modified with gold nanoparticles (nAu through the electrochemical deposition of ionic gold from a solution. The developed sensors were applied to the analysis of the selected biomarkers in spiked human serum samples.Besides these immunosensors, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP sensor was developed for the analysis of HER2-ECD. In this case a gold electrode was used as the transducer. The MIP was formed by surface imprinting and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltammetry were used for detection purposes.Results: For the immunoassays the following parameters were optimized: capture and detection antibody concentration, surface blocking, reaction mixtures and incubation times. The best limits of detection obtained were below the established cut-off values (25 U/mL and 15 ng/mL for CA15-3 and HER2-ECD, respectively. For the MIP sensor the most adequate polymer was chosen and the electropolymerization, template removal, and incubation conditions were optimized. The lowest HER2-ECD concentration that was analyzed was 50 µg/mL.Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that the developed sensors could be promising tools in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. However, further studies should be conducted using patients' samples and the results of these assays should be validated with the established analysis procedures for these cancer biomarkers.-----------------------------------------Cite this article as:  Marques R, Pacheco J, Rama EC, Viswanathan S, Nouws H, Delerue-Matos C. Electrochemical sensors in breast cancer diagnostics and follow-up. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015; 3(4:34012.[This

  1. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  2. Causative factors, epidemiology, and follow-up of bilateral vestibulopathy.

    Zingler, Vera Carina; Weintz, Eva; Jahn, Klaus; Huppert, Doreen; Cnyrim, Christian; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) is characterized by impaired or lost function of both peripheral labyrinths or of the eighth nerves. In a review of 255 patients (mean age +/- SD, 62 +/- 16 years) with BV diagnosed in the authors' dizziness unit between 1988 and 2005, 62% of the patients were male. Previous vertigo attacks had occurred in 36%, indicating a sequential manifestation. The definite cause of BV was determined in 24% and the probable cause in 25%. The most common causes were ototoxic aminoglycosides (13%), Ménière's disease (7%), and meningitis (5%). Strikingly, 25% exhibited cerebellar signs. Cerebellar dysfunction was associated with peripheral polyneuropathy in 32% compared with 18% in BV patients without cerebellar signs. In a follow-up study on 82 BV-patients (mean age at the time of diagnosis 56.3 +/- 17.6 years), the frequency and degree of recovery or worsening of vestibular function over time were determined. The patients were reexamined 51 +/- 6 months after the first examination. Electronystagmography with bithermal caloric irrigation was analyzed by measurement of the mean peak slow-phase velocity (SPV) of the induced nystagmus. Statistical analysis of the mean peak SPV revealed a nonsignificant worsening over time (initial mean peak SPV 3.0 +/- 3.5 degrees/s vs. 2.1 +/- 2.8 degrees/s). Only patients with BV due to meningitis exhibited an increasing, but nonsignificant SPV (1.0 +/- 1.4 degrees/s vs. 1.9 +/- 1.6 degrees/s). Forty-three percent of patients subjectively rated the course of their disease as stable, 28% as worsened, and 29% as improved. PMID:19645958

  3. Pattern of follow-up care and early relapse detection in breast cancer patients

    Geurts, S.M.E.; Vegt, de F.; Siesling, S.; Flobbe, K.; Aben, K.K.H.; Heiden-van der Loo, van der M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Dijck, van J.A.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Routine breast cancer follow-up aims at detecting second primary breast cancers and loco regional recurrences preclinically. We studied breast cancer follow-up practice and mode of relapse detection during the first 5 years of follow-up to determine the efficiency of the follow-up schedule. The Neth

  4. Follow up your submission online: a guide for authors

    Isabel CF da Cruz

    2009-08-01

    ; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

    We appreciate your interest in Online Brazilian Journal of Nursing (OBJN. We trust that you will find this System very user friendly. To follow up your submission, read this manual.

  5. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  6. Breast cancer recurrence: follow up after treatment for primary breast cancer

    Hiramanek, N

    2004-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer will affect one in 12 Australian women in their lifetime. After potentially curative treatment, it is usual for patients to be followed up for many years. However, controversies surround follow up, and its value is uncertain.

  7. Routine follow up of breast cancer in primary care: randomised trial.

    Grunfeld, E.; Mant, D.; Yudkin, P; Adewuyi-Dalton, R; Cole, D; Stewart, J; Fitzpatrick, R.; Vessey, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect on time to diagnosis of recurrence and on quality of life of transferring primary responsibility for follow up of women with breast cancer in remission from hospital to general practice. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with 18 month follow up in which women received routine follow up either in hospital or in general practice. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: 296 women with breast cancer in remission receiving regular follow up care at district general hospitals in Eng...

  8. Patients highly value routine follow-up of skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma

    Themstrup, Lotte; Jemec, Gregor E; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Skin cancer follow-up is a substantial burden to outpatient clinics. Few studies have investigated patients' views on skin cancer follow-up and cutaneous melanoma. The objective was to investigate patients' perceived benefits and the impact of follow-up. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This...... study included an open sample of patients attending routine follow-up at the outpatient Departments of Plastic Surgery and Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital. A total of 218 follow-up patients diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM), non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or actinic keratosis (AK...

  9. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Harlan, Susan R. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Nixon, G.W.; Prince, Jeffrey S. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Campbell, Kristine A.; Hansen, Karen [University of Utah School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  10. Follow-up skeletal surveys for nonaccidental trauma: can a more limited survey be performed?

    Studies have demonstrated the value of the follow-up skeletal survey in identifying additional fractures, clarifying indeterminate findings, and improving dating of skeletal injuries in victims of physical abuse. To determine whether a more limited follow-up survey could yield the same radiologic data as a full follow-up survey. The study cohort comprised 101 children who had follow-up surveys that met our inclusion criteria. Consensus readings of both original and follow-up surveys were performed by two pediatric radiologists. These results were compared to determine additional findings from the follow-up surveys. Limited skeletal survey protocols were evaluated to determine whether they would detect the same fractures seen with a complete osseous survey. In the 101 children 244 fractures were identified on the initial osseous survey. Follow-up surveys demonstrated new information in 38 children (37.6%). A 15-view limited follow-up survey identified all additional information seen on the complete follow-up survey. Our data demonstrate that a 15-view limited follow-up skeletal survey could be performed without missing clinically significant new fractures and still allow proper identification of confirmed fractures or normal findings. A limited survey would decrease radiation dose in children. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of follow up of vesicoureteral reflux into pylon - grade II (VUR II)

    Aim: Our previous work determined that the disappearance rate of VUR II. But the probability to detect VUR II or VUR III on first follow up study at time 0 in reflux unit (RU) with previously detected VUR II was only 47%. In this study we want to find out if the disappearance rate of VUR II is the same also for RU in which VUR II was not seen on first follow up study. Material and methods: In 61 RU (in 42 children younger than 12 years) with VUR II at the time of initial cyclic radionucline cystography (CRC) the second follow up CRC was repeated in average after 810 days. On first follow up CRC performed in average 421 days after the initial study reflux was not detected. Sequences of 5 sec. images from the beginning until the completion of the study was used for initial, first and second follow up report. Results: VUR II or VUR III was detected in 8 of 61 studied RU. The probability to detect VUR II or VUR III on second follow up, if reflux was not seen on the first follow up, was: 8/61 = 13%. If the first follow up was done 421 days after initial study the probability for negative result was 67%. The probability to detect VUR II or VUR III on second follow up if reflux was not detected on the first follow up study was: 13% * 0,67 9%. Probability calculated according to the proposed model to detect VUR II or VUR III on second follow up, if VUR was not detected on the first follow up was 25.Calculated probability to detect VUR II or VUR III on second follow up done at time 0, if reflux was not seen on first follow up was 25%. Conclusion: The probability to detect VUR II or VUR III on first follow up in RU with previously detected VUR II is 47%). The probability to detect VUR II or VUR III on second follow up in RU with previously detected VUR II if VUR was not seen on first follow up is 25%

  12. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    Abbott, B.P.; et al.

    2016-04-26

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  13. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Barthelmy, S; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J C; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J C; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L C; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Castro, J M G; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, H; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; 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Greiner, J; Irwin, M; Fernandez, C G; McMahon, R G; Banerji, M; Gonzalez-Solares, E; Schulze, S; Postigo, A de U; Thoene, C C; Cano, Z; Rosswog, S

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current electromagnetic follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the electromagnetic follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  14. Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; ADAMS, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O.

    2016-01-01

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current electromagnetic follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the electromagnetic follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  15. The experiences of ICU patients during follow-up sessions : A qualitative study

    Haraldsson, Lena; Christensson, Lennart; Conlon, Lisa; Henricson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence supports the recommendation for follow-up session(s) for patients after discharge from an intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of these follow-up sessions is to allow patients to express and discuss their experiences and problems following their time in an ICU. To optimise the knowledge gained from the follow-up session experience, it is necessary to describe how patients experience these sessions. The aim of this study was to describe how ICU-patients, experience a follow-up...

  16. Long-term follow-up after embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations with detachable silicone balloons

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2007-01-01

    ) with pulmonary angiography. Fifty-four percent of the balloons were deflated at latest radiographic chest film follow-up, but at pulmonary angiographic follow-up all embolized malformations were without flow irrespective of whether or not the balloons were visible. Detachable silicone balloons are not...

  17. Men with Intellectual Disabilities Who Have Attended Sex Offender Treatment Groups: A Follow-up

    Heaton, Kathryn M.; Murphy, Glynis H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been a number of studies of treatment for men with intellectual disabilities and sexually abusive behaviour but few follow-up studies. Our aim was to follow up men with intellectual disabilities who had attended group cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for sexually abusive behaviour. Method Thirty-four men (from seven…

  18. Infantile Amnesia across the Years: A 2-Year Follow-Up of Children's Earliest Memories

    Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Short, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    Although infantile amnesia has been investigated for many years in adults, only recently has it been investigated in children. This study was a 2-year follow-up and extension of an earlier study. Children (4-13 years old) were asked initially and 2 years later for their earliest 3 memories. At follow-up, their age at the time of these memories…

  19. The RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    Fetsch, Robert J.; Yang, Raymond K.; Pettit, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    This study is the first follow-up assessment of the RETHINK Parenting and Anger Management Program. Parent participants (N = 168) reduced their anger, violence, and family conflict levels from posttest to follow-up, on average, at 2.5 months on 13 of 15 dependent variables. Current findings are consistent with a small, albeit growing body of…

  20. Follow-up after gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: volumetric and axial control rates

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Hanssens, P.E.; Haren, A.E. van; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Mulder, J.J.S.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: A prospective long-term follow-up study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. Both axial and volumetric measurements are used to determine tumor size during follow-up. STUDY DESIGN: Individual prospect

  1. European Laryngological Society : ELS recommendations for the follow-up of patients treated for laryngeal cancer

    Simo, Ricard; Bradley, Patrick; Chevalier, Dominique; Dikkers, Frederik; Eckel, Hans; Matar, Nayla; Peretti, Giorgio; Piazza, Cesare; Remacle, Mark; Quer, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    It is accepted that the follow-up of patients who had treatment for laryngeal cancer is a fundamental part of their care. The reasons of post-treatment follow-up include evaluation of treatment response, early identification of recurrence, early detection of new primary tumours, monitoring and manag

  2. Long-term follow-up after urethral injection with polyacrylamide hydrogel for female stress incontinence

    Mouritsen, Lone; Lose, Gunnar; Møller-Bek, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Urethral injection therapy for treatment of stress urinary incontinence has been in use for years, but only a few long-term follow-up studies have been published. Twenty-five women, injected with polyacrylamide hydrogel 8 years earlier, were invited for follow-up. Twenty-four could be contacted; ...

  3. Methodological guide for the follow-up and elaboration of performance assessments of a methanization plant

    This guide aims at giving indications required for a good implementation of an exploitation follow-up of a methanization plant. More precisely, it aims at foreseeing equipment necessary to the follow-up of installation construction, at preparing the operator to the follow-up and command of his installation, at elaborating operation assessments and performance interpretations, at proposing solutions and/or improvements. The described follow-up process can be applied to all the process stages (from receipt to by-product valorization), and addresses technical as well as economic aspects. Thus, four types of assessments are made: technical, energetic, environmental, and social-economic. This guide comprises five parts: a presentation of follow-up objectives (information to be looked for, benefits and drawbacks, follow-up level to be implemented), the follow-up methodology, follow-up assessments (what they are and how to elaborate them), practical sheets (practical presentation of techniques, typical Excel spreadsheets), and a glossary which explains the main technical terms

  4. A Research on Students' Needs for Follow-Up Curriculum of College English

    Jin, Jie; Liu, Hengying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Increased universities and colleges offer the undergraduates with more follow-up courses with the further reform in college English education in China. An investigation on self-evaluation, difficulty, and willingness of undergraduates in learning English further was made in order to design more appropriate and adaptable follow-up courses. This…

  5. Follow-up programs for childhood cancer survivors in Europe: a questionnaire survey

    Essig, Stefan; Skinner, Roderick; von der Weid, Nicolas; Kühni, Claudia; Michel, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    For many childhood cancer survivors follow-up care is important long after treatment completion. We aimed to describe the availability and characteristics of long-term follow-up programs (LTFU) across Europe, their content and aims, their problems, and to assess opinions on different models of LTFU.

  6. Follow-up care for breast cancer survivors: improving patient outcomes

    Chopra I

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishveen Chopra,1 Avijeet Chopra2 1Department of Pharmacy Administration, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Background: Appropriate follow-up care is important for improving health outcomes in breast cancer survivors (BCSs and requires determination of the optimum intensity of clinical examination and surveillance, assessment of models of follow-up care such as primary care-based follow-up, an understanding of the goals of follow-up care, and unique psychosocial aspects of care for these patients. The objective of this systematic review was to identify studies focusing on follow-up care in BCSs from the patient's and physician's perspective or from patterns of care and to integrate primary empirical evidence on the different aspects of follow-up care from these studies. Methods: A comprehensive literature review and evaluation was conducted for all relevant publications in English from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2013 using electronic databases. Studies were included in the final review if they focused on BCS’s preferences and perceptions, physician's perceptions, patterns of care, and effectiveness of follow-up care. Results: A total of 47 studies assessing the different aspects of follow-up care were included in the review, with a majority of studies (n=13 evaluating the pattern of follow-up care in BCSs, followed by studies focusing on BCS's perceptions (n=9 and preferences (n=9. Most of the studies reported variations in recommended frequency, duration, and intensity of follow-up care as well as frequency of mammogram screening. In addition, variations were noted in patient preferences for type of health care provider (specialist versus non-specialist. Further, BCSs perceived a lack of psychosocial support and information for management of side effects. Conclusion: The studies reviewed, conducted in a range of settings, reflect variations in

  7. Loss to follow-up in an international, multicentre observational study

    Mocroft, A; Kirk, O; Aldins, P; Chies, A; Blaxhult, A; Chentsova, N; Vetter, N; Dabis, F; Gatell, J; Lundgren, J D

    2008-01-01

    (incidence rate ratio 2.16; 95% CI 1.84-2.53; P<0.0001). A total of 2743 patients had a period of >1 year with no CD4 cell count or viral load measured during the year; 743 (27.1%) subsequently returned to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Some patients thought to be LTFU may have died, and efforts should be made to......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to assess loss to follow-up (LTFU) in EuroSIDA, an international multicentre observational cohort study. METHODS: LTFU was defined as no follow-up visit, CD4 cell count measurement or viral load measurement after 1 January 2006. Poisson regression was used to...... ascertain vital status wherever possible. A significant proportion of patients who have a year with no follow-up visit, CD4 cell count measurement or viral load measurement subsequently return to follow-up....

  8. Recurrence after surgery due to cervical cancer - An evaluation of the follow-up program

    Fuglsang, Katrine; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Blaakær, Jan

    , Aarhus University Hospital we identified 567 patients from 1996 to 2011 matching the diagnosis cervical cancer combined with a surgical procedure. From the Danish Pathology Data Bank the following information is collected: - Stage of disease - Histology - Surgical procedure - Number of follow-up visit......Objective During the last 20 years the follow-up program after surgical treatment for cervical cancer has remained unchanged. Surprisingly, little is communicated in relation to the follow-up program even though it has a huge impact on the life of the women and their relatives for five years...... consequences, but there is a need for a foundation prior to an adjustment of the follow-up program. Methods Design: retrospective study of a cohort of women attending follow-up program after surgery due to cervical cancer. Material: From the patient register at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics...

  9. Effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for discharged patients treated with chemotherapy

    Gui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nurse-led telephone follow-up is effective in meeting information and psycho-social needs. We explored the potential effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up for patients treated with chemotherapy in China. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was employed in the research. 300 cases of cancer inpatients in a cancer hospital in Beijing during July-October 2012 were selected by convenience sampling. To compare the satisfaction and response regarding to chemotherapy adverse side effects, patients who discharged on Monday and Friday were provided with telephone follow-up. Patients who discharged on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday received routine care. Results: Via telephone follow-up, patient satisfaction relating to nursing care increased. Moreover, their response to chemotherapy adverse side effects showed a significant difference. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up by specialist nurses may be a feasible option. It was well received by patients, with no physical or psychological disadvantage.

  10. Long-term adherence to follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Barken, Sidsel S; Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Erik S.; Rebolj, Matejka

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure adherence to annual follow-up among women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. DESIGN: Prospective, population-based, register study. SETTING: Denmark, 1996-2007. POPULATION: All women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with conization. METHODS: Treated...... women were routinely recommended to have follow-up with annual smears for at least 5 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Using individually linked nationwide register data on conizations and follow-up tests (smears and biopsies), we calculated the cumulative proportion of treated women undergoing the...... recommended follow-up. We measured this cumulative proportion conservatively in 15-month intervals for 5 years. RESULTS: Adherence to annual follow-up among 45 984 treated women decreased gradually. In total, 90% of these women obtained at least one smear in the first post-treatment year, but only 40...

  11. EA follow-up in the Ghanaian mining sector: Challenges and opportunities

    Environmental assessment (EA) follow-up provides a means for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of environmental impact studies. It is integral to the success or failure of a project or program. In spite of its importance, very little attention is given to the need for follow-up programs in most jurisdictions in Africa. Using a case study in the Ghanaian mining sector, this paper explores the challenges and opportunities within the country's EA process for an effective follow-up program. The paper is based on informal interviews, content analysis of relevant publications, official EA documents, and internet searches. The authors suggest a standard EA follow-up program to be formalized as an integral part of Ghana's environmental assessment policy. They also propose a follow-up process that harnesses existing opportunities within the country's EA system. This approach can be replicated in other African countries

  12. A four-year follow-up study in fibromyalgia. Relationship to chronic fatigue syndrome

    Nørregaard, J; Bülow, P M; Prescott, E;

    1993-01-01

    overlap between fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. Only in two of 91 the muscle pain was found to be caused by another somatic disease during the median 4 year follow-up period. In one of the 83 attending subjects a somatic disease associated with muscle symptoms was established at the follow......-up visit. 60 out of 83 reported increased pain, 8 reported improvement of pain. The 83 subjects showed no significant fall in muscle strength during the follow-up period. The majority reported severe fatigue but only one fifth fulfilled the proposed chronic fatigue syndrome criteria....

  13. Kyoto Conference Dinner Speech: Follow-up in the age of surveys

    Groot, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Future big surveys are going to provide many targets of rare compact binary populations that will require photometric and spectroscopic follow-up to use them to answer questions on the formation and evolution of compact binaries, their space densities and the connection to other astrophysical phenomena such as Supernovae Type Ia and the populations of gravitational wave emitters. Now is the time to start preparing efficient follow-up strategies for upcoming static and synoptic surveys. The proposal is to develop a standard photometer that will facilitate a homogeneous multi-band follow-up strategy.

  14. Optimizing breast cancer follow-up: diagnostic value and costs of additional routine breast ultrasound.

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Hirschauer, Elke; Schmidt, Werner; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2011-02-01

    A total of 2,546,325 breast cancer survivors are estimated to live in the United States. The organized breast cancer follow-up programs do not generally include breast ultrasound in asymptomatic women. The purpose of our prospective study was to investigate the efficacy of breast ultrasound in detecting previously occult recurrences. A total of 735 eligible patients with a history of breast cancer were recruited. We assessed the same patient population before (routine follow-up program) and after (study follow-up program) the introduction of an additional ultrasound examination. In the routine follow-up program 245 of 735 patients (33.3% [95% confidence-interval (CI): 29.9-36.7]) had an ultrasound due to abnormal local or mammographic findings. 490 of 735 patients (66.7% [95% CI: 63.3-70.1]) were initially considered asymptomatic and received an additional ultrasound exclusively within the study follow-up program. All positive examination results were followed by accelerated core needle biopsy. The routine follow-up program led to a biopsy in 66 of 735 patients (9.0%) revealing a recurrent cancer in 27 cases (3.7%). The study follow-up program with the additional ultrasound led to another 21 biopsies raising the total number of patients who had to undergo a biopsy from 9.0% (95% CI: 6.9-11.1) to 11.8% (95% CI: 9.5-14.2). Finally, we diagnosed a previously occult malignant lesion in an additional six patients following this protocol. Therefore, the rate of detected recurrences rose from 3.7% (95% CI: 2.3-5.0) in the routine follow-up program to 4.5% (95% CI: 3.0-6.0) in the study follow-up program (p = 0.041). Negative side effects were the additional costs (the costs per detected malignancy in the routine follow-up program were $2455.69; the costs for each additionally detected malignancy in the study follow-up program were $7580.30), the higher overall biopsy rate (9.0 vs. 11.8%) and the elevated benign biopsies rate (59.1% vs. 71.4%). Regarding these results, the

  15. Compliance with EPA guidelines for follow-up testing and mitigation after radon screening measurements

    A survey was taken of 314 individuals, 55 of whom had residences that exceeded the EPA action level of 148 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1) of radon as measured by a medical center radon testing service. The survey was designed to assess whether these individuals followed the 1986 EPA guidelines for follow-up testing and mitigation. The survey indicated 41% of respondents performed follow-up tests and 16% of the respondents performed some form of mitigation. Some respondents had performed mitigation after inadequate or no follow-up radon tests. There was a positive relationship between follow-up testing and mitigation and higher initial radon screening values

  16. Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills in Dentistry: A Follow-Up Study.

    Vann, William F., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A long-term follow-up study of an experimental method evaluated the lasting effects of that method using preclinical and clinical grades, as well as an assessment of dental students' clinical technical performance. (Author/MLW)

  17. Benefits of and barriers to SEA follow-up — Theory and practice

    If SEA is to facilitate 'strategic' changes, it needs to focus on shaping the ways in which strategic initiatives are implemented, not just formulated. This is why follow-up which refers to postdecisional activities of SEA and strategic initiatives is increasingly seen as crucial. However, to date follow-up has only received limited attention in the SEA literature, as well as in practical guidance. The key reasons for why post decision activities are often overlooked are the lack of understanding of its actual benefits and purportedly multiple problems with its accomplishment. This paper reports on the results of a comprehensive literature review and an international e-survey on the topic, as well as an in-depth analysis of six SEA follow-up cases from England and Canada. Practically encountered and perceived benefits of, and obstacles to SEA follow-up are identified and discussed.

  18. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  19. Final results of a long-term, clinical follow-up in fatty liver patients

    Dam-Larsen, Sanne; Becker, Ulrik; Franzmann, Maria-Benedicte; Larsen, Klaus; Christoffersen, Per; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is increasing focus on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of the present study was to conduct a long-term clinical follow-up of patients with biopsy-confirmed fatty liver without inflammation or significant fibrosis (pure fatty liver), to analyse for potential risk...... death. Patients with AFLD died primarily from cirrhosis and other alcohol-related disorders, whereas in patients with NAFLD the main causes of death were cardiovascular disease and cancer. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with pure non-alcoholic fatty liver, survival was good and independent of the....... All admissions, discharge diagnoses and causes of death during follow-up were collected. All surviving patients were invited to a clinical follow-up. RESULTS: The follow-up period was 20.4 and 21.0 years, respectively, for the NAFLD and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) groups. Two NAFLD patients...

  20. Health status and follow-up of the liquidators in Belarus

    This paper presents information on the organization of the follow-up of Chernobyl liquidators in Belarus. The characteristics of the liquidators cohort and results of preliminary analyses of their health status, including cancer incidence and general morbidity, are presented

  1. Strain concentration at structural discontinuities and its quantification by elastic follow-up parameter

    Elevated temperature structural design codes pay attention to strain concentration at structural discontinuities due to creep and plasticity, since it causes to enlarge creep-fatigue damage of material. One of the difficulties to predict strain concentration is its dependency on loading, constitutive equations, and relaxation time. This study investigated fundamental mechanism of strain concentration and its main factors. It was clarified that strain concentration was caused from strain redistribution between elastic and inelastic regions, which can be quantified by the elastic follow-up parameter. As a function of inelastic strain, the elastic follow-up parameter can describe variation of strain concentration during incremental loading and relaxation process, caused by transition of strain distribution from peak strain concentration to secondary stress redistribution. Structures have their own elastic follow-up characteristics as a function of inelastic strain, which is insensitive to constitutive equations. It means that application of inelastic analysis is not difficult to obtain elastic follow-up characteristics. (author)

  2. Ultrasonographic features of vascular closure devices: initial and 6-month follow-up results

    Hye Jung Choo

    2014-10-01

    Initial ultrasonographic evaluation reflected the unique structure of each VCD, with most of them being easily distinguishable. Follow-up ultrasonography revealed various changes in the affected vessels.

  3. Breast Cancer and the Environment on Long Island Follow-up Study

    A follow-up study on women with breast cancer who participated in the parent population-based case-control study of Long Island women to determine whether environmental and other lifestyle factors influence breast cancer survival.

  4. Follow-up of abnormal or inadequate test results in the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    Kristiansen, Bettina Kjær

    2014-01-01

    -up recommendation. However problems with delayed follow-up may threaten the effectiveness of the Danish Cervical Cancer Screening Program, as 20% of women are delayed and dysplasia potentially can progress into cancer. Delayed follow-up is found in situations where women either consciously or unconsciously postpone......Denmark has a higher incidence of cervical cancer than other Nordic countries, although all Danish women (aged 23–65) are screened regularly to identify possible cervical dysplasia or asymptomatic invasive cancer. Annually 40 000 women receives an abnormal or inadequate test result and a follow...... follow-up, or because of organizational aspects of the screening program, where communication regarding test results can fail either in content or with delay.This study will evaluate two interventions designed to increase follow-up: 1) A letter with the test result and potential recommendation for follow...

  5. Extended heart failure clinic follow-up in low-risk patients

    Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Videbaek, Lars; Tuxen, Chr; Keller, Niels; Handberg, Jens; Sejr Knudsen, Anne; Espersen, Geert Tschentscher; Markenvard, John; Egstrup, Kenneth; Ulriksen, Hans; Hildebrandt, Per R.; Korup, Eva; Broberg, Helle; Nielsen, Vivi Lindeborg; Pedersen, Mette Storgaard; Pedersen, Henriette P.; Dam, Anette; Christensen, Tove; Thude, Lilli; Gohr, Thomas; Madsen, Bodil S.; Nielsen, Hanne-Lis; Rosenberg, Jens; Egstrup, Michael; Jensen, Anna-Marie; Hemmingshøj, Jeanett; Bartholdy, Hanne; Groth, Susanne; Leth, Gitte; Jensen, Marianne; Sejrsen, Holger; Skaarstad, Ellen; Larsen, Ingelise; Jensen, Jannie; Borrild, Anne-Mette; Mogelhoj, Birthe; Claussen, Jimi; Jacobsen, Vibeke; Kaiser-Nielsen, Peter; Woelders, Lone; Viem, Nina; Oechsler, Louise; Knoefler, Inge-Lise; Karlsson, Kristina; Egeberg, Helle; Pedersen, Mette R.; Milton, Janne; Anker, Charlotte; Thomassen, Camilla; Koertz, Karin; Petersen, Jane; Hebsgaard, Else; Beksbo, Marianne; Frederiksen, Lene; Skoffer, Hanne; Jespersen, Camilla; Lynggaard, Jette; Brun, Karen-Birgit; Vigstrup, Lone; Kjaer-Andersen, Mogens; Godfredsen, Lone; Fauerskov, Inge; Bidstrup, Pia; Hald-Steffensen, Flemming; Zeuthen, Lise; Petersen, Elin; Gohr, Tove; Munch, Inger; Spencer, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundOutpatient follow-up in specialized heart failure clinics (HFCs) is recommended by current guidelines and implemented in most European countries, but the optimal duration of HFC programmes has not been established. Nor is it known whether all or only high-risk patients, e.g. identified by...... NT-proBNP, might benefit from an extended HFC follow-up.Methods and resultsIn a multi-centre setting, we randomly assigned 921 clinically stable systolic heart failure (HF) outpatients on optimal medical therapy to undergo either an extended follow-up in the HFC (n = 461) or referral back to their......-term follow-up in a specialized HFC in a publicly funded universal access healthcare system. Heart failure patients on optimal medical therapy with mild or moderate symptoms are safely managed by their personal GP.Trial Registration: www.Centerwatch.com: 173491 (NorthStar)....

  6. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up: An experience from Taiwan.

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the "perceived benefits" domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between groups. We

  7. Irreversible Electroporation of Malignant Hepatic Tumors--Alterations in Venous Structures at Subacute Follow-Up and Evolution at Mid-Term Follow-Up.

    Marco Dollinger

    Full Text Available To evaluate risk factors associated with alterations in venous structures adjacent to an ablation zone after percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE of hepatic malignancies at subacute follow-up (1 to 3 days after IRE and to describe evolution of these alterations at mid-term follow-up.43 patients (men/women, 32/11; mean age, 60.3 years were identified in whom venous structures were located within a perimeter of 1.0 cm of the ablation zone at subacute follow-up after IRE of 84 hepatic lesions (primary/secondary hepatic tumors, 31/53. These vessels were retrospectively evaluated by means of pre-interventional and post-interventional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography or both. Any vascular changes in flow, patency, and diameter were documented. Correlations between vascular change (yes/no and characteristics of patients, lesions, and ablation procedures were assessed by generalized linear models.191 venous structures were located within a perimeter of 1.0 cm of the ablation zone: 55 (29% were encased by the ablation zone, 78 (41% abutted the ablation zone, and 58 (30% were located between 0.1 and 1.0 cm from the border of the ablation zone. At subacute follow-up, vascular changes were found in 19 of the 191 vessels (9.9%, with partial portal vein thrombosis in 2, complete portal vein thrombosis in 3, and lumen narrowing in 14 of 19. At follow-up of patients with subacute vessel alterations (mean, 5.7 months; range, 0 to 14 months thrombosis had resolved in 2 of 5 cases; vessel narrowing had completely resolved in 8 of 14 cases, and partly resolved in 1 of 14 cases. The encasement of a vessel by ablation zone (OR = 6.36, p<0.001, ablation zone being adjacent to a portal vein (OR = 8.94, p<0.001, and the usage of more than 3 IRE probes (OR = 3.60, p = 0.035 were independently associated with post-IRE vessel alterations.Venous structures located in close proximity to an IRE ablation zone remain largely

  8. Long-term follow-up of functioning after spinal surgery in patients with Rett syndrome

    Larsson, Eva-Lena; Aaro, Stig; Ahlinder, Peter; Normelli, Helena; Tropp, Hans; Öberg, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    In a prospective study, 23 consecutive girls with Rett syndrome and neuromuscular scoliosis were evaluated for functioning at a long-term follow-up. The patients had mostly improved, which was confirmed by their parents. Rett syndrome is associated with neuromuscular scoliosis and has a typically long C-shaped thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. Prospective long-term follow-up studies related to these patients total situation are sparse. Most studies focus on the Cobb angle of the scoliosis, wherea...

  9. Long-term follow-up of functioning after spinal surgery in patients with Rett syndrome

    Larsson, Eva-Lena; Aaro, Stig; Ahlinder, Peter; Normelli, Helena; Tropp, Hans; Öberg, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    In a prospective study, 23 consecutive girls with Rett syndrome and neuromuscular scoliosis were evaluated for functioning at a long-term follow-up. The patients had mostly improved, which was confirmed by their parents. Rett syndrome is associated with neuromuscular scoliosis and has a typically long C-shaped thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. Prospective long-term follow-up studies related to these patients’ total situation are sparse. Most studies focus on the Cobb angle of the scoliosis, where...

  10. Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study

    Urrila, Anna S; Karlsson, Linnea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Pankakoski, Maiju; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Strandholm, Thea; Marttunen, Mauri; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up. Methods A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13–19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings...

  11. Polyurethane-Coated Breast Implants Revisited: A 30-Year Follow-Up

    Castel, Nikki; Soon-Sutton, Taylor; Deptula, Peter; Flaherty, Anna; Parsa, Fereydoun Don

    2015-01-01

    Background Polyurethane coating of breast implants has been shown to reduce capsular contracture in short-term follow-up studies. This 30-year study is the longest examination of the use of polyurethane-coated implants and their correlation with capsular contracture. Methods This study evaluates the senior surgeon's (F.D.P.) experience with the use of polyurethane-coated implants in aesthetic breast augmentation in 382 patients over 30 years. Follow-up evaluations were conducted for six month...

  12. Using Home Spirometry for Follow up of Lung Transplant Recipients: “A Pilot Study”

    Fadaizadeh, Lida; Najafizadeh, Katayoun; Shafaghi, Shadi; Hosseini, Mahsa Sadat; Ghoroghi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation is considered the ultimate treatment for some patients, but due to the specific condition of patients undergoing it, follow up is a major concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of home spirometry in follow up of lung transplant recipients and early detection of complications in these patients. Materials and Methods A PC-based portable spirometry set was used to evaluate the well being of two lung transplant recipients on a regular daily basis f...

  13. THE USE OF FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONS TO NO RESPONSES IN DICHOTOMOUS CHOICE CONTINGENT VALUATION SURVEYS

    Curtis, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The dichotomous choice contingent valuation survey format collects inexact information on willingness to pay (WTP), that is, whether WTP is greater or less than the bid price. Sometimes researchers make the precise conjecture that certain respondents have zero WTP using information from follow-up motive questions. But follow-up questions are designed to provide information on respondents' motives, not refined information on the magnitude of WTP. Assuming that certain respondents have WTP = $0...

  14. Relationships in couples treated with sperm donation - a national prospective follow-up study

    Sydsjö, Gunilla; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta; Bladh, Marie; Lampic, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term follow-up on relationship quality in couples who use sperm donation is scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to analyse changes over time in satisfaction with relationship in heterosexual couples who were scheduled for treatment with sperm donation and IVF couples treated with their own gametes and to compare the two groups undergoing different treatment for infertility. METHOD: A prospective follow-up study in which data were collected twice on two groups; couples receivi...

  15. An audit of follow-up chest radiography after coronary artery bypass graft

    AIM: To investigate the clinical value and audit chest radiography, which is currently undertaken as part of routine practice, in the follow-up of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six hundred and sixty-six first time CABG patients were identified from the Patient Analysis and Tracking System database representing the work of a single surgeon between February 2001 and September 2005. The data regarding the clinical and radiological findings on follow-up were collected from the follow-up clinic letters and case notes. Any need for re-admission/intervention was also noted. RESULTS: Of the 666 patients, 11 died and a further 10 either refused or failed to arrive for follow-up. Chest radiography was undertaken in 645 patients. Only 13 patients (2%) were found to have an abnormality on chest radiography. In all cases this was a pleural effusion that was confirmed on clinical examination in seven patients (53.9%) patients. Only one patient needed re-admission and intervention. In this case the effusion had been noted on clinical examination. Seven patients were discharged and the remaining five were followed up with repeat chest radiography before discharge. Seventy-four patients had a respiratory complication postoperatively, but only three had any evidence of an effusion on follow-up. CONCLUSION: The diagnostic yield of a routine chest radiography in a CABG follow-up clinic is low (2%) and the need for intervention is rare and is determined by clinical examination. The practice of routine radiography in this group of patients has now stopped and follow-up audit will be conducted in 12 months

  16. Batista Procedure for a Coronary Anomaly in an Infant: Long-Term Follow-Up.

    González-López, María-Teresa; Cuenca-Peiró, Victorio; Castillo-Martín, Rafael; Zabala-Argüelles, Juan-Ignacio; Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel

    2016-08-01

    A partial left ventriculectomy (Batista operation) is extremely unusual in infants. Follow-up data are unknown. We report the findings at long-term follow-up in an infant after the Batista procedure, following reimplantation of an anomalous coronary artery. The initial approach and options for management are discussed, along with late cardiac remodeling. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12775 (J Card Surg 2016;31:556-558). PMID:27345819

  17. Long-term follow-up of two interventional procedures for achalasia

    Objective: To observed the long-term follow-up of the two types of interventional procedure for achalasia. Methods: The study cohort was comprised of 140 patients of achalasia including 70 patients treated under fluoroscopy with pneumatic dilation (group A) and 70 with temporary partially covered metal stent dilation (group B). Results: One hundred and forty dilations were performed on the 70 patients of group A with complications of chest pain (n=35), reflux (n=18), and bleeding (n=8); 38 patients of relapsing dysphagia during a 12-month follow-up, and 50 patients out of 60 of recurrent dysphagia during a 36-month follow-up. Seventy partially covered expandable metal stents were temporarily placed in the 70 patients of group B and withdrawn after 3-7 days via gastroscopy with complications of chest pain (n=28), reflux (n=15), and bleeding (n=9); 7 patients out of 70 exhibited dysphagia relapse during a 12-month followup, and 9 out of 58 patients exhibited dysphagia relapse during a 36-month follow-up. All the stents were inserted and withdrawn successfully. The follow-up in groups A-B lasted for 12-96 months. Conclusion: Temporary partially covered metal stent dilation is one of the best methods of interventional procedure for achalasia in long-term follow-up. (authors)

  18. Comfort monitoring? Environmental assessment follow-up under community-industry negotiated environmental agreements

    Negotiated environmental agreements are becoming common practice in the mining industry. In principle, negotiated environmental agreements are said to respond to many of the shortcomings of environmental impact assessment by providing for improved follow-up of project impacts through, among other things, data provision, engaging stakeholders in the monitoring and management of project impacts, and building capacity at the local level to deal with project-induced environmental change. In practice, however, little is known about the efficacy of follow-up under negotiated environmental agreements between proponents and communities and the demonstrated value added to project impact management. This paper examines follow-up practice under negotiated environmental agreements with a view to understanding whether and how community-based monitoring under privatized agreements actually contributes to improved follow-up and impact management. Based on lessons emerging from recent experiences with environmental agreements in Canada's uranium industry, we show that follow-up under negotiated agreements may be described as 'comfort monitoring'. While such monitoring does improve community-industry relations and enhance corporate image, it does little to support effects-based management. If follow-up under negotiated agreements is to be credible over the long term, there is a need to ensure that monitoring results are useful for, and integrated with, regulatory-based monitoring and project impact management practices.

  19. Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Hansen, Niels-Christian Gerner

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to follow-up CT scans in patients with small pulmonary nodules, a retrospective study The Danish National guidelines have since 2008 suggested serial follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months for nodules between 5 and 10 mm and at 12 and 24 months for nodules less than 5 mm in...... in the four year period 2006-2009. In 72 cases, 19 in 2006-2007 and 51 in 2008-2009, one or more small nodules, with diameter ≤ 10 mm, were detected on CT in patients with no known recent malignant disease. For these patients follow-up was suggested, either with CT or PET-CT. One of the 70 patients...... from 2008 was referred to another hospital and we have insufficient data on the follow-up. Another patient – also from 2008 -never came to the suggested first follow-up. Fifty eight patients have completed the first follow-up, while 10 are waiting for the first scheduled control CT. In twelve of the 19...

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors: Four-Year Follow-Up Results in 47 Patients

    Kim, Soo Dong; Yoon, Seong Guk; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the intermediate results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of small renal masses (SRMs). Percutaneous or laparoscopic RFA was performed on 48 renal tumors in 47 patients. The follow-up studies included a physical examination, chest radiography, creatinine level, and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. To confirm the pathologic criteria of complete ablation, 35 patients underwent a follow-up biopsy. Recurrence was defined as contrast enhancement on imaging studies after 3 months, lesion growth at subsequent imaging, or viable cancer cells on follow-up biopsy. Technical success was achieved in 43 (89.6%) of 48 renal tumors. The mean tumor size was 2.3 cm and the mean follow-up period was 49.6 months. Repeated RFA was necessary in 5 tumors due to incomplete ablation. The overall complication rate was 35.8%, of which 96.2% were mild complications. Serum creatinine levels at 12 months after RFA did not differ from those before RFA (1.28 vs. 1.36 mg/dL). Four patients were found to have recurrence at various follow-up intervals, and distant metastasis was not found in any cases. RFA appears to be a useful treatment for selected patients with SRMs. Our 4-year follow-up results disclose an excellent therapeutic outcome with RFA, while achieving effective local tumor control.

  1. Optimal delivery of follow-up care following pulmonary lobectomy for lung cancer

    Chen YY

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ying-Yi Chen, Tsai-Wang Huang, Hung Chang, Shih-Chun LeeDivision of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan Introduction: The rationale for oncologic surveillance following pulmonary lobectomy is to detect recurrent disease or a second primary lung cancer early enough so that an intervention can increase survival and/or improve quality of life. Therefore, we reviewed literature for international guidelines and reorganized these useful factors associated with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC recurrence as remedies in postoperative follow-up. Method: The population of interest for this review was patients who had been treated with complete resection for primary NSCLC and were in follow-up. Result: Guidelines on follow-up care for NSCLC vary internationally. Because of the production of progressive medical modalities, the current follow-up care should be corrected. Conclusion: The specific follow-up schedule for computed tomography imaging may be more or less frequent, depending upon risk factors for recurrence. Many different predictors of postoperative recurrence may help to optimize the patient selection for specified surveillance guidelines and personalized adjuvant therapies to prevent possibly occult micrometastases and to get a better outcome. Keywords: lung cancer, follow-up, surveillance, recurrence

  2. Development of an Active Follow-up Process in a Stand-alone Medication Therapy Management (MTM) Clinic

    Keri D. Hager, Pharm.D., BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Without following-up with patients, one cannot determine the outcomes of interventions made with patients. To ensure follow-up was occurring in a stand-alone MTM clinic, a process for active follow-up and an easy-to-use way to trigger and document follow-up was developed.

  3. On-line combustion of samples for AMS and ion source developments at ORAU

    Each stage in the handling of radiocarbon samples provides an additional opportunity for contamination and increased cost. For large samples, graphitization is worthwhile since it allows precise AMS measurements to be made in a short time. Some samples, however, do not require high precision. These include small samples, for which high precision is impossible, and samples for which only an approximate date is required. In these cases, there is an advantage in burning the samples and then introducing the CO2 directly into a gas ion source. ORAU has developed a system for performing on-line combustion, which is being tested for routine use. This paper presents the performance characteristics and explains the main design features. Such systems are expected to be useful for small samples in radiocarbon dating, the pre-screening of radiocarbon ages and in biomedical applications. The hybrid (graphite and CO2) ion source at Oxford has also been upgraded to incorporate a 40-target sample changing mechanism. This can be used both for graphite samples and for the targets required for measurements on CO2

  4. Value of early follow-up CT in paediatric tuberculous meningitis

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Wieselthaler, Nicky; Smith, Bruce; Douis, Hassan [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Fieggen, A. Graham; Toorn, Ronald van; Wilmshurst, Jo [Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurosciences, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2005-11-01

    The value of CT in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in children is well reported. Follow-up CT scanning for these patients is, however, not well described and, in particular, the value of early follow-up CT has not been addressed for children with TBM. To assess the value of early follow-up CT in children with TBM in identifying diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutically relevant features of TBM. A retrospective 4-year review of CT scans performed within 1 week and 1 month of initial CT in children with proven (CSF culture-positive) and probable TBM (CSF profile-positive but culture-negative) and comparison with initial CT for the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic CT features of TBM. The CT scans of 50 children were included (19 ''definite'' TBM; 31 ''probable'' TBM). Of these, 30 had CT scans performed within 1 week of the initial CT. On initial CT, 44 patients had basal enhancement. Only 24 patients had contrast medium-enhanced follow-up scans. Important findings include: 8 of 29 patients (who were not shunted) developed new hydrocephalus. New infarcts developed in 24 patients; 45% of those who did not have infarction initially developed new infarcts. Three of the six patients who did not show basal enhancement on initial scans developed this on the follow-up scans, while in seven patients with pre-existing basal enhancement this became more pronounced. Two patients developed hyperdensity in the cisterns on non-contrast medium scans. Eight patients developed a diagnostic triad of features. Three patients developed CT features of TBM where there was none on the initial scans. Early follow-up CT is useful in making a diagnosis of TBM by demonstrating features that were not present initially and by demonstrating more sensitive, obvious or additional features of TBM. In addition, follow-up CT is valuable as a prognostic indicator as it demonstrates additional infarcts which may have developed or become more

  5. Value of early follow-up CT in paediatric tuberculous meningitis

    The value of CT in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in children is well reported. Follow-up CT scanning for these patients is, however, not well described and, in particular, the value of early follow-up CT has not been addressed for children with TBM. To assess the value of early follow-up CT in children with TBM in identifying diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutically relevant features of TBM. A retrospective 4-year review of CT scans performed within 1 week and 1 month of initial CT in children with proven (CSF culture-positive) and probable TBM (CSF profile-positive but culture-negative) and comparison with initial CT for the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic CT features of TBM. The CT scans of 50 children were included (19 ''definite'' TBM; 31 ''probable'' TBM). Of these, 30 had CT scans performed within 1 week of the initial CT. On initial CT, 44 patients had basal enhancement. Only 24 patients had contrast medium-enhanced follow-up scans. Important findings include: 8 of 29 patients (who were not shunted) developed new hydrocephalus. New infarcts developed in 24 patients; 45% of those who did not have infarction initially developed new infarcts. Three of the six patients who did not show basal enhancement on initial scans developed this on the follow-up scans, while in seven patients with pre-existing basal enhancement this became more pronounced. Two patients developed hyperdensity in the cisterns on non-contrast medium scans. Eight patients developed a diagnostic triad of features. Three patients developed CT features of TBM where there was none on the initial scans. Early follow-up CT is useful in making a diagnosis of TBM by demonstrating features that were not present initially and by demonstrating more sensitive, obvious or additional features of TBM. In addition, follow-up CT is valuable as a prognostic indicator as it demonstrates additional infarcts which may have developed or become more visible since the initial study. Lastly

  6. Determining the rate of follow-up after hospital emergency department visits for dental conditions

    Meyer, Beau; Adkins, Eric; Finnerty, Nathan M; Robinson, Fonda G

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) visits for dental reasons continue to impact EDs nationwide. This investigation determined the rate of follow-up in an emergency dental clinic (EDC) after hospital ED visits for nontraumatic dental conditions. Methods This prospective investigation reports the number of patients who presented to an ED for nontraumatic dental conditions and the rate of follow-up at an EDC. Upon ED discharge, patients were provided instructions to follow-up for low-cost care at the EDC. Telephone contact was attempted following failed referrals. Descriptive statistics were reported for comparing referral sources and demographic trends. Results Two hundred and forty-seven referrals were made and 31% followed up for definitive treatment at the EDC. More referrals were made on weekends than on weekdays. Failed referrals were unreachable by telephone in 75% of cases. Tooth extraction was the most common treatment rendered in the EDC. Of the ED patients who accessed EDC care, 14% became comprehensive patients in the EDC’s regular dental clinic. Conclusion Less than one-third of ED referrals to the EDC followed up for definitive care when provided an opportunity to do so, and 75% of referrals were unreachable by telephone in the week following the ED dental visit. PMID:27099530

  7. Congenital arterioportal fistulas: radiological treatment and color Doppler US follow-up

    Congenital intrahepatic arterioportal fistulas (APFs) are a rare cause of portal hypertension in children. Doppler US is a useful diagnostic imaging modality. Transarterial embolization is a minimally invasive and effective therapy allowing occlusion of the fistula and restoration of liver hemodynamics. To describe the clinical and radiologic findings, percutaneous treatment and role of D-US in the postembolization follow-up of children with APF. Between 2002 and 2011, four children with APF were treated. Initial diagnosis and follow-up was performed with D-US and confirmed by arteriography, followed by endovascular embolization in all patients. D-US demonstrated abnormal arterioportal communications in all patients. Six endovascular procedures were performed in these four children. In two children, no residual fistula was seen on D-US after the first procedure and symptoms resolved. In the other two children, D-US demonstrated residual flow through the fistula, with resolution of pathological D-US findings and symptoms after the second endovascular procedure. All four children were successfully treated and asymptomatic at the end of follow-up. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Interventional radiology has a key role in the treatment of congenital APF. D-US is a noninvasive and effective tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  8. Renal angiomyolipoma : superselective arterial embolization and long term follow-up

    To evaluate the effectiveness of superselective arterial embolization in symptomatic renal angiomyolipoma by assessing tumoral changes and clinical symptoms in long term follow up after embolization For the treatment of their condition, nine patients with symptomatic renal angiomyolipoma underwent ten superselective arterial embolization procedures. In all patients, angiomyolipoma had been diagnosed by computed tomography(CT), and in two, had been confirmed by ultrasonography-guided aspiration biopsy. The embolic materials used were absolute alcohol in four sessions, absolute alcohol mixed with lipiodol in three, and Giantruco coils in three. In all patients, follow-up after embolization lasted for between 12 and 54 months, and involved the use of CT. We reviewed retrospectively patients' clinical symptoms, and changes in the size and internal components of tumors, as seen on preembolization and postembolization CT scans. On postembolization angiography, devascularization of the tumor was seen in all patients; the initial symptoms disappeared and tumor size decreased during the follow up period. In nine patients, tumor size decreased after embolization by between 26 and 92%. During the long term (over 12 months) follow up of all patients, seven tumors with a considerable angiomyogenic component markedly decreased in size, but tumors in which the mature fatty component was substantial became only slightly smaller. Reembolization was performed in one patient. Superselective arterial embolization is effective in the management of symptomatic renal AML; during long-term follow-up, tumors became smaller and clinical symptoms improved. Embolization is more effective in tumors in which the angiomyogenic component is large

  9. Long-Term Ultrasound Follow-Up of Thyroid Colloid Cysts

    Dong Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to assess the interval changes of thyroid colloid cysts (TCCs by performing long-term ultrasound (US follow-up examinations. Methods. From 2007 to 2008, 437 patients underwent a lobectomy for the treatment of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Among them, 268 patients underwent 4 or more postoperative US follow-ups after surgery. This study investigated the prevalence and interval changes of TCCs ≥3 mm by using US follow-ups. Results. Among 268 patients, 35 (13.1% had TCCs ≥3 mm by a preoperative thyroid US, and 6 (2.2% had newly detected TCCs at a US follow-up. Through long-term US follow-up, the interval changes for TCCs were classified as follows: no interval change (n=8, gradual increase (n=8, gradual decrease (n=5, positive fluctuation (n=3, negative fluctuation (n=6, disappearance (n=5, and new detection (n=6. None of the TCC cases had a TCC that was ≥10 mm at its largest diameter, and no patient complained of any relevant symptoms pertaining to the TCCs. Conclusions. In this study, TCCs demonstrated various interval changes, but no abrupt increase was found or acute onset of symptoms occurred.

  10. Guidelines for the follow-up of patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    O'Kane, Mary; Parretti, Helen M; Hughes, Carly A; Sharma, Manisha; Woodcock, Sean; Puplampu, Tamara; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Clare, Kenneth; MacMillan, Iris; Joyce, Jacqueline; Sethi, Su; Barth, Julian H

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery can facilitate weight loss and improvement in medical comorbidities. It has a profound impact on nutrition, and patients need access to follow-up and aftercare. NICE CG189 Obesity emphasized the importance of a minimum of 2 years follow-up in the bariatric surgical service and recommended that following discharge from the surgical service, there should be annual monitoring as part of a shared care model of chronic disease management. NHS England Obesity Clinical Reference Group commissioned a multi-professional subgroup, which included patient representatives, to develop bariatric surgery follow-up guidelines. Terms of reference and scope were agreed upon. The group members took responsibility for different sections of the guidelines depending on their areas of expertise and experience. The quality of the evidence was rated and strength graded. Four different shared care models were proposed, taking into account the variation in access to bariatric surgical services and specialist teams across the country. The common features include annual review, ability for a GP to refer back to specialist centre, submission of follow-up data to the national data base to NBSR. Clinical commissioning groups need to ensure that a shared care model is implemented as patient safety and long-term follow-up are important. PMID:27166136

  11. Follow-up Care Education and Information: Identifying Cancer Survivors in Need of More Guidance.

    O'Malley, Denalee M; Hudson, Shawna V; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Bator, Alicja; Lee, Heather S; Gundersen, Daniel A; Miller, Suzanne M

    2016-03-01

    Cancer survivors engage in cancer screenings and protective health behaviors at suboptimal rates despite their increased risk for future illness. Survivorship care plans and other educational strategies to prepare cancer survivors to adopt engaged roles in managing long-term follow-up care and health risks are needed. In a sample of cancer survivors, we identified patient characteristics and psychosocial predictors associated with increased follow-up care informational needs. Cross-sectional surveys were administered to early-stage breast and prostate survivors (N = 278; 68 % breast) at least 2 years post treatment from four community hospital programs in New Jersey between May 2012 and July 2013. Patient demographics, medical history, psychosocial characteristics (i.e., worries about the future, fear of disease recurrence, and patient activation), and perceptions of oncology and primary care were assessed. African-American survivors (AOR = 2.69, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.68) and survivors with higher comorbidity (AOR =1.16, CI 1.01-1.33) were more likely to want additional information to guide follow-up care. Adjusting for race and comorbidities, survivors who wanted more information to guide their follow-up care reported greater worries about the future (p educational strategies that are both responsive to the needs of specific populations (e.g., African-American survivors and patients with multiple comorbidities) and the psychosocial profiles that motivate requests for more extensive follow-up guidance. PMID:25524391

  12. Optimal Control of the Lost to Follow Up in a Tuberculosis Model

    Yves Emvudu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of optimal control for the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis (TB. A TB model that considers the existence of a new class (mainly in the African context is considered: the lost to follow up individuals. Based on the model formulated and studied in the work of Plaire Tchinda Mouofo, (2009, the TB control is formulated and solved as an optimal control theory problem using the Pontryagin's maximum principle (Pontryagin et al., 1992. This control strategy indicates how the control of the lost to follow up class can considerably influence the basic reproduction ratio so as to reduce the number of lost to follow up. Numerical results show the performance of the optimization strategy.

  13. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study

  14. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    Shin, Cheol Yong; Park, Hyun Mee; Kim, So Eun; Lee, Shin Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study.

  15. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... with 4-year follow-up in general practice. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the influence of risk factors on nursing home placement. RESULTS: A total 758 non-nursing home residents aged 65 years and older consulted the General Practitioners in October and November 2002 of whom 50...... nursing home placements were observed. Subjective memory complaints were associated with an adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.59 for nursing home placement. Other statistical significant covariates were MMSE < 24 (HR = 3.95), Age (HR = 3.92 for 75-84 years and HR = 19.90 for 85 + years) and extreme anxiety...

  16. Proposed follow up programme after curative resection for lower third oesophageal cancer

    Moyes LH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has risen throughout the Western world over the last three decades. The prognosis remains poor as many patients are elderly and present with advanced disease. Those patients who are suitable for resection remain at high risk of disease recurrence. It is important that cancer patients take part in a follow up protocol to detect disease recurrence, offer psychological support, manage nutritional disorders and facilitate audit of surgical outcomes. Despite the recognition that regular postoperative follow up plays a key role in ongoing care of cancer patients, there is little consensus on the nature of the process. This paper reviews the published literature to determine the optimal timing and type of patient follow up for those after curative oesophageal resection.

  17. Giant aneurysms of the internal carotid artery: endovascular treatment and long-term follow-up

    We report the long-term follow-up of 18 patients with giant aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA) referred for endovascular occlusion of the parent vessel. There were 10 aneurysms involving the infra- and/or supraclinoid cavernous segment, six the ophthalmic segment, one the petrous segment and one the bifurcation. One patient who did not tolerate test occlusion was treated medically. Clinical and imaging follow-up were obtained in 16 patients for a mean of 30 months, range 6-80 months. Endovascular treatment led to excellent clinical outcome in 16 patients. One 34-year-old woman, who presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), died from bilateral middle cerebral artery infarcts due to severe vasospasm 4 days after treatment. The patient treated medically died from SAH. Long-term imaging follow-up in 16 patients revealed a markedly smaller aneurysm sac in all cases. (orig.)

  18. [Centralized follow-up of patients treated for head and neck cancer

    Grau, C.; Specht, Lena; Hansen, H.S.; Overgaard, M.; Overgaard, J.

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective study, the value of the clinical follow-up after treatment for head and neck cancer has been assessed. A total of 407 visits in 377 patients were recorded during a three month period in 1993 at the two major radiotherapy departments in Denmark. The results showed that 61% of follow......-up visits included one or more problems either related to treatment morbidity or tumour recurrence. About 50% of all visits included treatment related normal tissue problems, and 30% had problems that required intervention. Although the majority of problems occurred within a few years after treatment, 47...... after the end of treatment. Since effective salvage treatment improves local control significantly, early detection of possible recurrence is important. A follow-up period of four to five years is recommended-preferably by qualified experts in the management of both recurrent disease and treatment...

  19. Patient-reported outcome measures unbiased by loss of follow-up

    Højmark, Karen; Støttrup, C; Carreon, L;

    2016-01-01

    , completed before surgery and at 3 months, and at 1, 2, 5, and 10 years postoperatively. The database was launched at the Center for Spine Surgery and Research at Lillebaelt Hospital on June 1st, 2010. We performed a 1-year follow-up on non-responders during a 6-month period between the 1st of August 2013......-four patients had a second spine surgery and were re-enrolled in the database. These cases had not reached the 1-year follow-up period for the second spine surgery and were excluded from the analysis. Thus, 473 patients had reached 1-year follow-up. Of these, 57 (12 %) did not respond to postal questionnaires...... responders and non-responders. CONCLUSIONS: Missing data from 12 % of patients do not seem to bias conclusions that can be drawn from the DaneSpine database at the Center for Spine Surgery and Research at Lillebaelt Hospital....

  20. Slow-growing labyrinthine masses: contribution of MRI to diagnosis, follow-up and treatment

    Deux, J.F.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Tubiana, J.M. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France). Service de Radiology; Ouayoun, M.; Meyer, B. [Service d`ORL, Hopital Saint-Antoine, 184 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine, F-75012 Paris (France); Tran Ba Huy, P. [Service d`ORL, Hopital Lariboisiere, 2 rue Ambroise Pare, F-75010 Paris (France); Sterkers, J.M.

    1998-10-01

    We report the use of MRI in the diagnosis, follow-up and therapeutic management of three cases of intralabyrinthine Schwannoma. The diagnosis was based on the history and initial and follow-up MRI findings. The main feature suggesting the diagnosis was a nodular intralabyrinthine mass of low signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and high or isointense signal on T1-weighted images (relative to cerebrospinal fluid), which showed contrast enhancement. Follow-up imaging showed growth of the tumour in one patient. One patient underwent surgery for severe tinnitus. To detect these lesions, MRI should be focussed on the inner ear, using thin-section T2-weighted and T1-weighted images before and after contrast medium. MRI allowed informed surgical planning. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 21 refs.

  1. A predictive scoring instrument for tuberculosis lost to follow-up outcome

    Rodrigo Teresa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to tuberculosis (TB treatment is troublesome, due to long therapy duration, quick therapeutic response which allows the patient to disregard about the rest of their treatment and the lack of motivation on behalf of the patient for improved. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a scoring system to predict the probability of lost to follow-up outcome in TB patients as a way to identify patients suitable for directly observed treatments (DOT and other interventions to improve adherence. Methods Two prospective cohorts, were used to develop and validate a logistic regression model. A scoring system was constructed, based on the coefficients of factors associated with a lost to follow-up outcome. The probability of lost to follow-up outcome associated with each score was calculated. Predictions in both cohorts were tested using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC. Results The best model to predict lost to follow-up outcome included the following characteristics: immigration (1 point value, living alone (1 point or in an institution (2 points, previous anti-TB treatment (2 points, poor patient understanding (2 points, intravenous drugs use (IDU (4 points or unknown IDU status (1 point. Scores of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 points were associated with a lost to follow-up probability of 2,2% 5,4% 9,9%, 16,4%, 15%, and 28%, respectively. The ROC curve for the validation group demonstrated a good fit (AUC: 0,67 [95% CI; 0,65-0,70]. Conclusion This model has a good capacity to predict a lost to follow-up outcome. Its use could help TB Programs to determine which patients are good candidates for DOT and other strategies to improve TB treatment adherence.

  2. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  3. Emphysema Quantification Using Low Dose Chest CT: Changes in Follow-Up Examinations of Asymptomatic Smokers

    Jang, Eun Ho; Sun, Joo Sung; Kang, Doo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwang Joo; Park, Kyung Joo [Dept. of Pulmolary Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To evaluate the changes of emphysema quantification in a follow-up low dose CT compared with pulmonary function test (PFT) results in asymptomatic smokers. We selected 66 asymptomatic smokers (> 40 years old) who underwent a follow-up low dose CT at least one year after the first CT as well as PFT within the same time period. Emphysema quantification was performed using an automated measurement software and an emphysema index (EI) was calculated using multiple threshold values (-970--900 HU). The interval change of EI ({Delta} EI) was compared with the change in the PFT values. Mean follow-up %forced expiratory volume in 1 second (88.1), %forced vital capacity (FVC) (89.5) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of vital capacity (3.21) were significantly lower compared with the values of initial tests (93.3, 93.1, 3.48). The mean EIs (2.4-25.6%) increased on follow-up CTs compared with initial EIs (2.1-24.5%), though the increase was not statistically significant. In a group with a follow-up period of 2 years or more (n = 32), EI significantly increased when using -900 HU as the threshold. The ({Delta} EIs were poorly correlated with the ({Delta} PFT values, but significantly correlated with ({Delta} FVC (r = -0.32--0.27). Emphysema quantification using low dose CT was not effective for the evaluation of short-term changes in less than a 2-year period, but may be used for long term follow-up series in asymptomatic smokers.

  4. A five-year follow-up study of Swedish adults with gender identity disorder.

    Johansson, Annika; Sundbom, Elisabet; Höjerback, Torvald; Bodlund, Owe

    2010-12-01

    This follow-up study evaluated the outcome of sex reassignment as viewed by both clinicians and patients, with an additional focus on the outcome based on sex and subgroups. Of a total of 60 patients approved for sex reassignment, 42 (25 male-to-female [MF] and 17 female-to-male [FM]) transsexuals completed a follow-up assessment after 5 or more years in the process or 2 or more years after completed sex reassignment surgery. Twenty-six (62%) patients had an early onset and 16 (38%) patients had a late onset; 29 (69%) patients had a homosexual sexual orientation and 13 (31%) patients had a non-homosexual sexual orientation (relative to biological sex). At index and follow-up, a semi-structured interview was conducted. At follow-up, 32 patients had completed sex reassignment surgery, five were still in process, and five-following their own decision-had abstained from genital surgery. No one regretted their reassignment. The clinicians rated the global outcome as favorable in 62% of the cases, compared to 95% according to the patients themselves, with no differences between the subgroups. Based on the follow-up interview, more than 90% were stable or improved as regards work situation, partner relations, and sex life, but 5-15% were dissatisfied with the hormonal treatment, results of surgery, total sex reassignment procedure, or their present general health. Most outcome measures were rated positive and substantially equal for MF and FM. Late-onset transsexuals differed from those with early onset in some respects: these were mainly MF (88 vs. 42%), older when applying for sex reassignment (42 vs. 28 years), and non-homosexually oriented (56 vs. 15%). In conclusion, almost all patients were satisfied with the sex reassignment; 86% were assessed by clinicians at follow-up as stable or improved in global functioning. PMID:19816764

  5. Reappraisal of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy for follow up in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Tsukamoto, Eriko; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Nakada, Kunihiro; Nonomura, Katsuya; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Koyanagi, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Itoh, Kazuo

    1999-12-01

    We reviewed Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in order to assess whether repeated Tc-99m DMSA scans are necessary for the follow up of these patients. Ninety-seven children who were followed up for more than one year (1-7.4 years, average 2.8 years) after the first DMSA scan were included in the study. Fifty-one patients had been diagnosed as primary VUR and 46 as secondary VUR. Age at the first examination ranged from 0 to 14 years (average 5.1 years). Planar images were taken 2 hours after injection. The % renal uptake per injected dose (% RU) was calculated from posterior images. Kidneys in 11 patients (11.3%) changed morphologically during the follow up. Of these, new photon deficient areas (PD) were detected in only 4 patients (4.1%). All of these 4 patients had neurogenic bladder and were managed with self-catheterization. Of the remaining 7 patients, cortical thinning progressed in 5 patients (5.2%) and PDs resolved in 3 patients (3.1%). In one of these 7 patients, PD resolved in one kidney and cortical thinning progressed in the contralateral kidney. Of 97 patients reviewed, % RU decreased more than 20% during the follow up in 6 patients (6.2%). All were diagnosed as secondary VUR due to neurogenic bladder. % RU decreased only in the contracted kidneys at the initial scan. Two of them underwent renal transplantation because of severe renal failure. In conclusion, new PD rarely developed and % RU decreased in only a few patients during the follow up of children with VUR. Repeated Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy therefore seems to have little benefit in the follow up of children with VUR. It should be performed in selected patients with high risk of urinary tract infection or renal failure. (author)

  6. Reappraisal of Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy for follow up in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    We reviewed Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in order to assess whether repeated Tc-99m DMSA scans are necessary for the follow up of these patients. Ninety-seven children who were followed up for more than one year (1-7.4 years, average 2.8 years) after the first DMSA scan were included in the study. Fifty-one patients had been diagnosed as primary VUR and 46 as secondary VUR. Age at the first examination ranged from 0 to 14 years (average 5.1 years). Planar images were taken 2 hours after injection. The % renal uptake per injected dose (% RU) was calculated from posterior images. Kidneys in 11 patients (11.3%) changed morphologically during the follow up. Of these, new photon deficient areas (PD) were detected in only 4 patients (4.1%). All of these 4 patients had neurogenic bladder and were managed with self-catheterization. Of the remaining 7 patients, cortical thinning progressed in 5 patients (5.2%) and PDs resolved in 3 patients (3.1%). In one of these 7 patients, PD resolved in one kidney and cortical thinning progressed in the contralateral kidney. Of 97 patients reviewed, % RU decreased more than 20% during the follow up in 6 patients (6.2%). All were diagnosed as secondary VUR due to neurogenic bladder. % RU decreased only in the contracted kidneys at the initial scan. Two of them underwent renal transplantation because of severe renal failure. In conclusion, new PD rarely developed and % RU decreased in only a few patients during the follow up of children with VUR. Repeated Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy therefore seems to have little benefit in the follow up of children with VUR. It should be performed in selected patients with high risk of urinary tract infection or renal failure. (author)

  7. GRB Follow-up Observations with the Whipple Telescope and VERITAS

    GRB observations above 100 GeV promise to constrain source models decisively and may also permit to study questions in other fields such as quantum gravity. The VERITAS collaboration has been working on GRB follow-up observations for several years using the Whipple 10 m telescope on Mt. Hopkins, AZ. We present a preliminary summary of the bursts for which interesting data is available. Even though the telescope mount was not optimized for this task, GRB follow-ups within less than 5 minutes have been possible. The new telescopes of the VERITAS array (under construction) will bring a further reduction in reaction time and an improvement in sensitivity

  8. Elbow interposition arthroplasty in children and adolescents: long-term follow-up

    Fernandez-Palazzi, Federico; Rodriguez, Janeth; Oliver, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    A long-term follow-up was made of 12 elbows operated upon between 1971 and 1986, with more than 20 years’ follow-up, in nine males and three females, age at the time of surgery between 10 and 19 years . Eight right and four left elbows were involved, and there were three aetiological causes. Seven cases were sequelae of elbow fractures, of which five were supracondylar and two were of the olecranon. There were four cases of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and one was post-osteomyelitis. The sur...

  9. A importância do follow-up na auditoria interna em Portugal

    Madeira, André Aldo Dias

    2013-01-01

    Mestrado em Auditoria O trabalho do auditor interno culmina com a elaboração do seu relatório. No entanto, é importante efetuar a monitorização da implementação das recomendações, de preferência através da realização do follow-up. Este trabalho adicional nem sempre é efetuado, tanto por falta de recursos, como por falta de tempo, sendo dada prioridade à elaboração de novos trabalhos de auditoria. Pelos motivos enunciados, seria interessante apurar a verdadeira utilização do follow-up pe...

  10. Follow-up issues in children with mild traumatic brain injuries.

    Kania, Katarzyna; Shaikh, Kashif Ajaz; White, Ian Kainoa; Ackerman, Laurie L

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Concerns about mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have increased in recent years, and neurosurgical consultation is often requested for patients with radiographic abnormalities or clinical findings suspicious for mTBI. However, to the authors' knowledge, no study has used the Acute Concussion Evaluation (ACE) tool to systematically evaluate the evolution of symptoms in patients with mTBI during neurosurgical follow-up. The goal in this study was to evaluate symptom progression in pediatric patients referred for neurosurgical consultation by using the ACE, as endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of records of consecutive pediatric patients who had presented to the emergency department, were diagnosed with possible mTBI, and were referred for neurosurgical consultation. Outpatient follow-up for these patients included serial assessment using the ACE. Data collected included the mechanisms of the patients' injuries, symptoms, follow-up duration, and premorbid conditions that might potentially contribute to protracted recovery. RESULTS Of 91 patients identified with mTBI, 58 met the inclusion criteria, and 33 of these had sufficient follow-up data to be included in the study. Mechanisms of injury included sports injury (15 patients), isolated falls (10), and motor vehicle collisions (8). Ages ranged from 5 to 17 years (mean age 11.6 years), and 29 of the 33 patients were male. Six patients had preinjury developmental and/or psychiatric diagnoses such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Seventeen had negative findings on head CT scans. The first follow-up evaluation occurred at a mean of 30 days after injury. The mean number of symptoms reported on the ACE inventory at first follow-up were 3.2; 12 patients were symptom free. Patients with positive head CT findings required longer follow-up: these patients needed 14.59 weeks, versus 7.87 weeks of follow-up in patients with

  11. Importance of post-treatment follow-up to secure sufficient eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori

    Roug, Stine; Madsen, Lone Galmstrup

    2012-01-01

    To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure of eradicat......To optimize the care for Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, we wanted to evaluate the completeness of follow-up after H. pylori eradication therapy in a single Danish endoscopy unit. Furthermore, the eradication rates and possible clinical characteristics associated with failure...

  12. Scrotal approach for the correction of an abdominoscrotal hydrocele: Medium term follow-up

    Jaime Pérez,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Describe the scrotal surgical approach for abdominoscrotal hydrocele (ASH with preservation of testicular function with midterm follow-up. Two patients diagnosed with ASH and contralateral testicular abnormalities. Both had scrotal correction for ASH, one had contralateral testicular neonatal torsion and the other contralateral communicating hydrocele. Four-year follow-up no complications or recurrence, and normal Anti-Mullerian hormone level. This pathology is a clinical diagnosis and it is treated with surgery via a scrotal approach, preventing sequels, contralateral complications and preservation of testicular function.

  13. ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA WITH DISTAL TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL FISTULA: SURGERY TREATMENT AND A LONG TERM FOLLOW UP

    E. Cerchia; F. Molinaro; M. Pavone; E Bindi; R. Angotti; Ferrara, F.; Messina, M.

    2012-01-01

    A study carried out at the Paediatric Surgery Units in Siena and Toulouse evaluated the long term follow-up of patients treated for esophageal atresia (EA), between 1988 and 2007. We analyzed the long term follow-up of 57 patients with III type EA. We evaluated the residual symptoms in three time intervals: in 1st years, between 2nd to 5th year and over 5th years from surgery. The considered parameters were: feeding difficulties, respiratory problems, gastro-esophageal reflux, growth impairme...

  14. Determination of Maximum Follow-up Speed of Electrode System of Resistance Projection Welders

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2004-01-01

    weld process settings for the stable production and high quality of products. In this paper, the maximum follow-up speed of electrode system was tested by using a special designed device which can be mounted to all types of machine and easily to be applied in industry, the corresponding mathematical......The maximum follow-up speed of electrode system represents the dynamic mechanical response capacity of resistance projection welding machines, which is important to make the diffrernce from one machine to the other and to consider the individual behavior of machines in designing or optimizing the...

  15. Hepatic portocholecystostomy for biliary atresia: a 25-year follow-up and review.

    Schecter, Samuel C; Courtier, Jesse; Cho, Soo-Jin; Saadai, Payam; Hirose, Shinjiro; Mackenzie, Tippi C; Miniati, Doug

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful salvage of a patient's native liver 25 years after hepatic portocholecystostomy for biliary atresia. Our case demonstrates the effectiveness of biliary specific, high-resolution CT imaging in the diagnosis of, and operative planning for complex cases of biliary obstruction. We also report the longest-term pathologic follow-up of biliary atresia after hepatic portocholecystostomy. Life-long follow-up of patients with biliary atresia is important to prevent life-threatening complications of biliary stasis/obstruction. PMID:23331828

  16. [Diagnosis and follow-up of cerebral ventricle pathology using transfontanelle real-time echography].

    Nogués, A; Pagola, C; Rey, A; Collado, V; Gaztañaga, R; Albisu, J

    1984-01-01

    Authors evaluate 36 patients with different degrees of cerebral ventricular dilation divided in three groups according with previous clinical features. Cerebral ultrasonography demonstrated to be a more accurate method than CAT in most of cases examined by these two procedures. Real time cerebral ecography is indicated in follow-up of conditions which need repetitive controls like hydrocephalus with ventriculo-peritoneal shunts, posthemorhagic ventricular dilations or daily follow-up o acute pathology like ill-course meningitis. Finally they describe situations in which ultrasonography may have a great value as cerebral screening test. PMID:6608302

  17. Initial non-participation and loss to follow-up in a Danish youth cohort

    Winding, Trine Nøhr; Andersen, Johan H; Labriola, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    slightly better school abilities and came more often from homes with two adults, higher income or higher educational level. These differences increased at subsequent follow-ups. The effect of initial non-participation on the ORs was modest with most RORs being close to one. Loss to follow-up led to larger...... variations in the RORs ranging from 0.77 to 1.62 although for most estimates, the bias was minor. None of the measured RORs were statistically different from one indicating no significant bias. CONCLUSIONS: Although certain characteristics were related to those who initially chose to participate and...

  18. Clinical and radiological follow-up examinations following fractures of the Collum mandibulae

    All patients presented a fracture of the collum mandibulae, which had occurred between 1 and 10 years before treatment. The patients were exclusively treated conservatively. 57 of 67 patients did not indicate any subjective pain. 10 patients complained about pain and restricted movability. In only 22 cases no pathologic findings were obtained in the clinical follow-up examinations. In 33 patients the roentgenologic follow-up examination led to pathologic findings. Severe complications as disturbance of growth and formation of ankyloses, occurred only in one single case, due to a fracture of the mandibular joint in childhood. (orig./MG)

  19. Pulmonary nodules: a challenging diagnosis during the follow up of cancer patients

    Rafael Caparica Bitton; Ricardo Emanuel Oliveira Ramos; Sheila Siqueira; Olavo Feher

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary nodules (PN), frequently found on imaging studies, represent a diagnostic challenge during the follow up of cancer patients. However, published data regarding investigation of PNs incidentally found on chest imaging is scarce. The PN may be present at the time of cancer diagnosis, or arise during the treatment or follow-up periods. In the context of the oncologic patient these lesions are quite invariably considered as metastases, what impacts directly on patients treatment and prog...

  20. Imaging Techniques Used in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Follow-up of Patients with Myeloma

    Mulligan, M.E. [Univ. of Maryland, Medical School, Baltimore MD (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Radiologists play a central role in the diagnosis, initial staging, follow-up, and restaging of patients with myeloma. This review article attempts to familiarize the reader with all the various types of myeloma, their imaging appearances and useful imaging strategies. The staging system for myeloma patients has been updated and now includes findings from advanced imaging modalities. Radiologists have a vast array of imaging modalities at their disposal to aid them in diagnosis, staging, and follow-up. Currently, conventional radiographic skeletal surveys, magnetic resonance imaging, and F-18 FDG PET/CT examinations are the most useful instruments.

  1. Imaging Techniques Used in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Follow-up of Patients with Myeloma

    Radiologists play a central role in the diagnosis, initial staging, follow-up, and restaging of patients with myeloma. This review article attempts to familiarize the reader with all the various types of myeloma, their imaging appearances and useful imaging strategies. The staging system for myeloma patients has been updated and now includes findings from advanced imaging modalities. Radiologists have a vast array of imaging modalities at their disposal to aid them in diagnosis, staging, and follow-up. Currently, conventional radiographic skeletal surveys, magnetic resonance imaging, and F-18 FDG PET/CT examinations are the most useful instruments

  2. Rehabilitation after severe brain injury: a follow-up study of a behaviour modification approach.

    Eames, P.; Wood, R.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty four patients with severe brain injury who had disturbed behaviours preventing rehabilitation or care in ordinary settings were treated in a token economy. This long-term follow-up study indicates that post-traumatic behaviour disorders can be lastingly improved, and that lengthy rehabilitation can have surprisingly good effects.

  3. Quality of the environment follow up: what approach to build with local actors?

    The present report gives the principal conclusions of the inquiry about the environmental surveillance and the follow up of nuclear power plants whom objective was to define the commune actions propositions between the C.L.I., A.N.C.L.I. and I.R.S.N. (N.C.)

  4. Direct Composite Restorations to Mask Intrinsic Staining: An Eighteen-Year Follow-Up.

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Soares, Ana Flávia; Tostes, Bhenya Ottoni; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-03-01

    In this case example, the use of direct composite resin allowed for a relatively simple, conservative treatment that provided excellent function and aesthetics, while preserving healthy dental tissue. The importance of continued follow-up and a periodic maintenance and minor repair process will ensure longevity of the restorations, as aesthetics, and the occlusion. PMID:27039546

  5. Risk factors for onset of asthma: a 12-year prospective follow-up study

    Porsbjerg, C; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli;

    2006-01-01

    sensitization to aeroallergens were measured. RESULTS: Among the 281 nonasthmatic participants studied, 58 (22%) had AHR to histamine, 33 (12%) had EIB, and 82 (29%) had AHR to histamine and/or EIB. At follow-up, 37.9% of individuals with AHR to histamine and 30% of individuals with EIB had developed current...

  6. Clinical, radiological and functional follow-up after surgical decompression of double aortic arch

    Berge, Maartje ten; Laag, Johan van der; Ent, Cornelis K. van der [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Beek, Frederik J.A. [Department of Radiology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Lundlaan 6, 3584 EA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Heading AbstractBackground. Double aortic arch (DAA) is a congenital vascular anomaly that causes tracheal and oesophageal compression. It requires surgical intervention in patients with severe symptoms.Objective. To evaluate the clinical, radiological and functional follow-up after surgical relief of the compression.Materials and methods. Ten children (seven boys) with DAA were operated on at a mean age of 1.3 years (range 0.2-7.5). At a mean age of 10.1 years (range 5-18 years), a follow-up study was performed that included clinical, radiological and functional parameters.Results. Seven children reported only mild respiratory symptoms and some trouble with swallowing. Preoperative fluoroscopy with spot images showed the mean tracheal diameter at the level of stenosis to be 37{+-}23% of the maximal diameter. At the time of follow-up, this was 70{+-}13%. The mean of the oesophageal diameter was 39{+-}20% preoperatively and 47{+-}16% postoperatively. Maximal expiratory flow volume (MEFV) curves of seven children showed typical characteristics of intrathoracic upper airway obstruction. Mean peak expiratory flow was significantly reduced (77{+-}10% of predicted, P<0.0001). Bronchial hyper-reactivity, tested by methacholine challenge, was found in two patients.Conclusions. There was marked relief of clinical symptoms after surgical decompression of DAA in all patients. In spite of this, radiological narrowing of trachea and oesophagus persisted and lung function results were abnormal at long-term follow-up. (orig.)

  7. Four-Year Follow-Up of the Community Intervention "10 000 Steps Ghent"

    De Cocker, Katrien A.; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse M.; Brown, Wendy J.; Cardon, Greet M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 4-year follow-up effects of the "10 000 steps Ghent" project, which had shown increases in pedometer steps after the first year of implementation (2005-06). All adults who had participated in 2005-06 (n = 866) were recontacted in 2009 and invited to complete the International Physical Activity…

  8. Effects of Stimulant Medication on Growth Rates across 3 Years in the MTA Follow-up

    Swanson, James M.; Elliott, Glen R.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Wigal, Timothy; Arnold, L. Eugene; Vitiello, Benedetto; Hechtman, Lily; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Pelham, William E.; Abikoff, Howard B.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Wells, Karen C.; Hoza, Betsy; Jensen, Peter S.; Gibbons, Robert D.; Hur, Kwan; Stehli, Annamarie; Davies, Mark; March, John S.; Conners, C. Keith; Caron, Mark; Volkow, Nora D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hypothesis of stimulant medication effect on physical growth in the follow-up phase of the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD. Method: Naturalistic subgroups were established based on patterns of treatment with stimulant medication at baseline, 14-, 24-, and 36-month assessments: not medicated (n = 65),…

  9. Follow-up of bronchial cancer patients after treatment by surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy or combinations

    Imaging techniques are an integral element of any well defined and standardized follow-up program. The purpose of follow-up programs is to detect and treat unexpected progression or recurrence of the disease as early as possible, to identify treatment-related conditions in good time, to institute palliative measures in the incurable stage and to offer patients medical, psychological and social help after primary management. Examination techniques needed for this purpose should be evaluated for their efficiency and feasibility and minimized in their scope to what is absolutely necessary in view of the cost factor and the acceptance by the patients. In the post-treatment follow-up of bronchial cancer patients X-rays of the chest in two projections play a major role. They may be supplemented by conventional tomography and computed tomography. Ultrasonography is also a routine component of follow-up programs. Additional diagnostic studies involving complex and sophisticated technical systems are limited. Their need will depend on the patient's symptoms and the benefits that can be expected from them for secondary management should be used as a criterion for their application. (Author)

  10. Transition Follow-Up System Development for Youth with Disabilities: Stakeholders' Perspectives

    Park, Youn-Young

    2014-01-01

    In this study I examined in depth the perspectives of stakeholders in Manitoba on the development and implementation of a transition follow-up system (TFS) for youth with disabilities. I conducted focus groups and individual interviews with a total of 76 stakeholders and obtained qualitative data. The stakeholders who participated in this study…