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Sample records for 192ir brachytherapy source

  1. In vivo dosimetry thermoluminescence dosimeters during brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source

    Cuepers, S.; Piessens, M.; Verbeke, L.; Roelstraete, A. [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw Hospitaal, Aalst (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    1995-12-01

    When using LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters in brachytherapy, we have to take into account the properties of a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir source (energy spectrum ranging form 9 to 885 keV, steep dose gradient in the vicinity of the source) and these of the dosimeters themselves (supralinearity, reproducibility, size). All these characteristics combine into a set of correction factors which have been determined during in phantom measurements. These results have then been used to measure the dose delivered to organs at risk (e.g. rectum, bladder, etc.) during high dose rate brachytherapy with a 370 GBq {sup 192}Ir source for patients with gynaecological tumors.

  2. Audit on source strength determination for HDR and PDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Sweden

    Background and purpose: To investigate the status of source strength determination in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) for HDR and PDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Sweden. Materials and methods: RAKR was determined in each of the 14 Swedish afterloaders, using calibrated equipment from the Swedish Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. Results: Values of RAKR from the external audit, the hospitals and vendors agreed within the uncertainty limits guaranteed by the vendors. Conclusions: The accuracy in RAKR determination has increased over the last years as a result of increased availability of interpolation standards for HDR 192Ir and the increased use of robust well-type ion chambers designed for brachytherapy. It is recommended to establish a ratio between the RAKR value from own measurements at the hospital and that of the vendor since such a ratio embeds constant systematic differences due to e.g. varying traceability and therefore has the potential of being less uncertain than the RAKR alone. Traceability to primary standards for HDR 192Ir sources will in the future significantly decrease the uncertainty in RAKR of 192Ir brachytherapy

  3. Enhancement and validation of Geant4 Brachytherapy application on clinical HDR 192Ir source

    The Geant4 Monte Carlo MC associated Brachytherapy example was adapted, enhanced and several analysis techniques have been developed. The simulation studies the isodose distribution of the total, primary and scattered doses around a Nucletron microSelectron 192Ir source. Different phantom materials were used (water, tissue and bone) and the calculation was conducted at various depths and planes. The work provides an early estimate of the required number of primary events to ultimately achieve a given uncertainty at a given distance, in the otherwise CPU and time consuming clinical MC calculation. The adaptation of the Geant4 toolkit and the enhancements introduced to the code are all validated including the comprehensive decay of the 192Ir source, the materials used to build the geometry, the geometry itself and the calculated scatter to primary dose ratio. The simulation quantitatively illustrates that the scattered dose in the bone medium is larger than its value in water and tissue. As the distance away from the source increases, scatter contribution to dose becomes more significant as the primary dose decreases. The developed code could be viewed as a platform that contains detailed dose calculation model for clinical application of HDR 192Ir in Brachytherapy. - Highlights: • We enhanced and validated the Geant4 associated Brachytherapy code. • Primary and scattered doses from an actual 192Ir source are separated. • Different phantom materials are investigated. • The number of primary events to achieve a given uncertainty is provided. • A platform for detailed dose for clinical HDR Brachytherapy is established

  4. Dosimetry experience of 192IR sources used In HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Purpose/Objective: The 192IR Sources are the most commonly used in radiotherapy treatments HDR worldwide. According to international recommendations on quality assurance in HDR brachytherapy, an acceptance test based on the determination of the source strength of any new source shall be carried out before first application to verify the manufacturer’s calibration data. The present paper gives the experimental determination of the source strength for our brachytherapy sources used until now in brachytherapy treatments. Materials/Methods: At Mother Teresa University Hospital we have a cost-effective gynecological brachytherapy unit from Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG named GyneSource® that is a five channel HDR after loader equipped with an 192IR source. The software used is HDR plus™ 2.5 that delivers an optimized treatment plan and makes the process especially fast and we use intracavitary BEBIG applicators. From April 2009 up to December 2012, we have imported nine HDR 192IR Sources. The exchange of the source and acceptance test is done by the physicist of the clinic once the source is imported. The measurements are done with a Well-type ionization chamber HDR1000 Plus and the electrometer used is MAX4000. Only seven sources are compared as we miss the dosimetry data of the first source, and the forth source was not measured and not used because the machine was not working in that time. Results/Conclusions: Eight sources were accepted for clinically use as the measurement were within the tolerance. The source number four with e deviation of -1.92% has been double checked compared with a free in-air measurement with farmer type chamber that gave a deviation to source certificate of 4% that is still inside the tolerance to accept a source for clinical use. The deviations of measured Air Kerma rate to the value of the sources certificates of all our used 192IR sources are less than 2%, which are within the tolerance. The checked value of updated source strength in

  5. Dosimetry audit on the accuracy of 192Ir brachytherapy source strength determinations in Sweden

    The absorbed dose delivered to the patient in brachytherapy is directly proportional to the source strength in terms of the reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Verification of this quantity by the hospitals is widely recognized as an important part of a quality assurance program. An external audit was performed on behalf of the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory at the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The aim was to investigate how accurately the source-strength in 192Ir brachytherapy is determined at Swedish hospitals. The SSI reference well-type ion chamber and calibrated equipment were used to measure the RAKR of an 192Ir source in each of the 14 Swedish afterloading units. Comparisons with values determined by vendors and hospitals were made. Agreement in values of RAKR as determined by SSI, hospitals and vendors were in all cases within the ±3% uncertainty (at a coverage factor of k=2), typically guaranteed by the vendors. The good agreement reflects the robustness and easy handling of well-type chambers designed for brachytherapy in use by all Swedish hospitals. The 192Ir calibration service planned at SSI will solve the hospitals current problem with recalibration of equipment. SSI can also advise hospitals to follow the IAEA recommendations for measurement techniques and maintenance of equipment. It is worthwhile for the hospitals to establish their own ratio (or deviation) with the vendor and follow it as function of time. Such a mean-ratio embeds systematic differences of various origins and have a lower uncertainty than has the RAKR alone, making it useful for early detection of problems with equipment or routines. SSI could also define requirements for the agreement between source strengths as determined by hospitals and vendors and couple this to an action plan, dependent on level of disagreement, and some kind of reporting to SSI

  6. Verification of high dose rate 192Ir source position during brachytherapy treatment

    A system for in vivo tracking of 1 Ci 192Ir source during brachytherapy treatment has been built using high resistivity silicon pad detectors as image sensors and knife-edge lead pinholes as collimators. The sensors consist of 256 pads arranged in 32 x8 grid with pad size 1.4x1.4mm2 and 1 mm thickness. The sensors have two metal layers, enabling connection of readout electronics (VATAGP31 chips) at the edge of the detector. With source self-images obtained from a dual-pinhole system, location of the source can be reconstructed in three dimensions in real time, allowing on-line detection of deviations from planned treatment. The system was tested with 1 Ci 192Ir clinical source in air and plexi-glass phantom. The movements of the source could be tracked in a field of view of approximately 20x20x20cm3 with absolute precision of about 5 mm. Positions of the source, relative to the first measured source position, could be mapped with precision of around 3 mm.

  7. Monte Carlo angular dose distribution of the microselectron HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Polar dose profiles around the Nucletron MicroSelectron high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N Particle) version 4A. The geometry modeled consisted of an identical simulation of the construction of the MicroSelectron HDR source located at the centre of a spherical water phantom of 100cm radius. Doses were calculated using a spherical coordinate system at 5 degree intervals (measured relative to the cable) at radii of 0.25, 0.5,1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0cm. These polar doses were compared to equivalent profiles from the Nucletron PLATO Brachytherapy Planning System (BPS) version 13.X. At 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0cm radii, the Monte Carlo and BPS profiles are generally within 3%. The near field polar dose profiles however, are in significant disagreement. At 1.0cm radius, the discrepancy can exceed 5%. At 0.5cm this figure rises to 15%, and even 60% at 0.25cm radius

  8. Comparison of calibration procedures for 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of different calibration procedures for 192Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources and to determine their suitability in clinical practice. In addition the manufacturer's calibration is compared with our experimental measurements so that the accuracy of the source strength on the manufacturer certificate which is supplied with each new 192Ir source can be accessed. Methods and Materials: We compared three types of calibration system: well-type chambers (HDR-1000 and SDS), cylindrical phantom, and plate phantom. The total number of measurements we obtained was 365. The number of sources used for the calibration procedure comparison was 20 and the number used for comparison with the manufacturer's calibration was 46. This study was made during the period 1989-1997. Also, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) calibrated one of our sources using their PTB protocol so that the results could be compared with our own. Results: The sensitivity of each system on scattering from the room walls was studied. It was found that different minimum lateral distances from the walls were required for the different systems tested: 15 cm and 25 cm for the well-type chambers, 75 cm for the cylindrical phantom, and 13 cm for the plate phantom. The minimum thickness required to reach phantom scattering saturation for the plate phantom setup is 24 cm. The influence of the applicator material used in the calibration setup was found to be 1.7% for the stainless steel dosimetry applicator compared to the plastic 5F applicator. The accuracy of source positioning within the applicator can lead to dosimetric errors of ±1.2% for the radial distance of 8.0 cm used with both solid phantoms. The change in the response for both well-type chambers was only 0.1% for changes in the source position within ±7.5 mm around the response peak. Good agreement was found between all dosimetry systems included in our study. Taking the HDR-1000 well-type chamber

  9. Calibration of a 192Ir source for high dose brachytherapy using various techniques

    In this research we studied three experimental procedures for calibration of a source of 192Ir to high dose rate for clinical brachytherapy use, and thus were compared and analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each. For this study we quantified the value of the current kerma rate reference in air by three procedures: source calibration using a well chamber, with an cylindrical ionization chamber in air, and a cylindrical ionization chamber on a phantom, and this magnitude was compared with the value provided by the manufacturer of the source and thereby obtaining the deviation corresponding . Thus, it was found that the deviation corresponding to the source calibration making use of a well chamber, remained within tolerance, while the cylindrical ionization chamber in air and on phantom exceeded the standards established in some documents. However, although both the measurement in air and in the phantom are the procedures for the final calibration source, these can be used to verify that the delivered dose are in tolerance.

  10. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. - Author-Highlights: • The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. • FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. • The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. • The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus

  11. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources.

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D; Sharma, S D; Chourasiya, G; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2014-04-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm(3) is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR (192)Ir source strength measurement. PMID:24872605

  12. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    Kumar, Sudhir; Datta, D.; Sharma, S. D.; Chourasiya, G.; Babu, D. A. R.; Sharma, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm3 is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR 192Ir source strength measurement. PMID:24872605

  13. Estimation of distance error by fuzzy set theory required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    Verification of the strength of high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of institutional quality assurance program. Either reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) or air-kerma strength (AKS) is the recommended quantity to specify the strength of gamma-emitting brachytherapy sources. The use of Farmer-type cylindrical ionization chamber of sensitive volume 0.6 cm3 is one of the recommended methods for measuring RAKR of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. While using the cylindrical chamber method, it is required to determine the positioning error of the ionization chamber with respect to the source which is called the distance error. An attempt has been made to apply the fuzzy set theory to estimate the subjective uncertainty associated with the distance error. A simplified approach of applying this fuzzy set theory has been proposed in the quantification of uncertainty associated with the distance error. In order to express the uncertainty in the framework of fuzzy sets, the uncertainty index was estimated and was found to be within 2.5%, which further indicates that the possibility of error in measuring such distance may be of this order. It is observed that the relative distance li estimated by analytical method and fuzzy set theoretic approach are consistent with each other. The crisp values of li estimated using analytical method lie within the bounds computed using fuzzy set theory. This indicates that li values estimated using analytical methods are within 2.5% uncertainty. This value of uncertainty in distance measurement should be incorporated in the uncertainty budget, while estimating the expanded uncertainty in HDR 192Ir source strength measurement. (author)

  14. Microdosimetric evaluation of relative biological effectiveness for 103PD, 125I, 241AM, and 192IR brachytherapy sources

    Purpose: To determine the microdosimetric-derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 103Pd, 125I, 241Am, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources at low doses and/or low dose rates. Methods and Materials: The Theory of Dual Radiation Action can be used to predict expected RBE values based on the spatial distribution of energy deposition at microscopic levels from these sources. Single-event lineal energy spectra for these isotopes have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically. A grid-defined wall-less proportional counter was used to measure the lineal energy distributions. Unlike conventional Rossi proportional counters, the counter used in these measurements has a conducting nylon fiber as the central collecting anode and has no metal parts. Thus, the Z-dependence of the photoelectric effect is eliminated as a source of measurement error. Single-event spectra for these brachytherapy sources have been also calculated by: (a) the Monte Carlo code MCNP to generate the electron slowing down spectrum, (b) transport of monoenergetic electron tracks, event by event, with our Monte Carlo code DELTA, (c) using the concept of associated volume to obtain the lineal energy distribution f(y) for each monoenergetic electron, and (d) obtaining the composite lineal energy spectrum for a given brachytherapy source based on the electron spectrum calculated at step (a). Results: Relative to 60Co, the RBE values obtained from this study are: 2.3 for 103Pd, 2.1 for 125I, 2.1 for 241Am, and 1.3 for 192Ir. Conclusions: These values are consistent with available data from in vitro cell survival experiments. We suggest that, at least for these brachytherapy sources, microdosimetry may be used as a credible alternative to time-consuming (and often uncertain) radiobiological experiments to obtain information on radition quality and make reliable predictions of RBE in low dose rate brachytherapy

  15. On source models for (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy dosimetry using model based algorithms.

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Zourari, Kyveli; Zoros, Emmanouil; Lahanas, Vasileios; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    A source model is a prerequisite of all model based dose calculation algorithms. Besides direct simulation, the use of pre-calculated phase space files (phsp source models) and parameterized phsp source models has been proposed for Monte Carlo (MC) to promote efficiency and ease of implementation in obtaining photon energy, position and direction. In this work, a phsp file for a generic (192)Ir source design (Ballester et al 2015) is obtained from MC simulation. This is used to configure a parameterized phsp source model comprising appropriate probability density functions (PDFs) and a sampling procedure. According to phsp data analysis 15.6% of the generated photons are absorbed within the source, and 90.4% of the emergent photons are primary. The PDFs for sampling photon energy and direction relative to the source long axis, depend on the position of photon emergence. Photons emerge mainly from the cylindrical source surface with a constant probability over  ±0.1 cm from the center of the 0.35 cm long source core, and only 1.7% and 0.2% emerge from the source tip and drive wire, respectively. Based on these findings, an analytical parameterized source model is prepared for the calculation of the PDFs from data of source geometry and materials, without the need for a phsp file. The PDFs from the analytical parameterized source model are in close agreement with those employed in the parameterized phsp source model. This agreement prompted the proposal of a purely analytical source model based on isotropic emission of photons generated homogeneously within the source core with energy sampled from the (192)Ir spectrum, and the assignment of a weight according to attenuation within the source. Comparison of single source dosimetry data obtained from detailed MC simulation and the proposed analytical source model show agreement better than 2% except for points lying close to the source longitudinal axis. PMID:27191179

  16. On source models for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy dosimetry using model based algorithms

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Zourari, Kyveli; Zoros, Emmanouil; Lahanas, Vasileios; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    A source model is a prerequisite of all model based dose calculation algorithms. Besides direct simulation, the use of pre-calculated phase space files (phsp source models) and parameterized phsp source models has been proposed for Monte Carlo (MC) to promote efficiency and ease of implementation in obtaining photon energy, position and direction. In this work, a phsp file for a generic 192Ir source design (Ballester et al 2015) is obtained from MC simulation. This is used to configure a parameterized phsp source model comprising appropriate probability density functions (PDFs) and a sampling procedure. According to phsp data analysis 15.6% of the generated photons are absorbed within the source, and 90.4% of the emergent photons are primary. The PDFs for sampling photon energy and direction relative to the source long axis, depend on the position of photon emergence. Photons emerge mainly from the cylindrical source surface with a constant probability over  ±0.1 cm from the center of the 0.35 cm long source core, and only 1.7% and 0.2% emerge from the source tip and drive wire, respectively. Based on these findings, an analytical parameterized source model is prepared for the calculation of the PDFs from data of source geometry and materials, without the need for a phsp file. The PDFs from the analytical parameterized source model are in close agreement with those employed in the parameterized phsp source model. This agreement prompted the proposal of a purely analytical source model based on isotropic emission of photons generated homogeneously within the source core with energy sampled from the 192Ir spectrum, and the assignment of a weight according to attenuation within the source. Comparison of single source dosimetry data obtained from detailed MC simulation and the proposed analytical source model show agreement better than 2% except for points lying close to the source longitudinal axis.

  17. Investigation of Dosimetric Parameters of $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR Brachytherapy Source Using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code

    Naeem, Hamza; Zheng, Huaqing; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Hu, Liqin; Wu, Yican

    2016-01-01

    The $^{192}$Ir sources are widely used for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. The aim of this study is to simulate $^{192}$Ir MicroSelectron v2 HDR brachytherapy source and calculate the air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function established in the updated AAPM Task Group 43 protocol. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code package is used to calculate these dosimetric parameters, including dose contribution from secondary electron source and also contribution of bremsstrahlung photons to air kerma strength. The Air kerma strength, dose rate constant and radial dose function while anisotropy functions for the distance greater than 0.5 cm away from the source center are in good agreement with previous published studies. Obtained value from MC simulation for air kerma strength is $9.762\\times 10^{-8} \\textrm{UBq}^{-1}$and dose rate constant is $1.108\\pm 0.13\\%\\textrm{cGyh}^{-1} \\textrm{U}^{-1}$.

  18. The history of brachytherapy in Russia: comparison of 60Co vs. 192Ir sources

    Brachytherapy is known as the first historical method of radiotherapy. At the beginning of its development it was used only as manual applications of liquid solutions of nuclides. Only from the middle of 1950-th specialized machines for automatic afterloading have been designed. The first types of the machines were those with pneumatically driven pellets of 137Cs. The main advantage of this nuclide is its long half-life time of about 30 years resulting in long periods between source replacements. But due to the same reason, it is impossible to provide high source activity within small pellets. So those machines can be defined as those of low dose rate (less than 2 Gy/hr.). Patients had to spend up to 1-3 days with applicators inserted to obtain the full therapeutic dose of 24 Gy

  19. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR 192Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) 192Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR 192Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR 192Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR 192Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of ∼1.4 smaller than for HDR 192Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were ∼28 and ∼11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also improved with eBx. However, the maximum dose to the closest rib

  20. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and Ms. The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and Ms. Analytically calculated values of Ms were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (Ksc). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and Ksc to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of Ksc were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations. - Highlights: ► RAKR measurement of a brachytherapy source by 7 distance method requires the evaluation of ‘f’. ► A simplified analytical approach based on least square method to evaluate ‘f’ and ‘Ms’ was developed. ► Parameter ‘f’ calculated by proposed analytical approach was verified using the Monte Carlo method. ► Proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use to estimate ‘f’.

  1. Cost effective method of manual afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy

    Full text: In radiotherapy, brachytherapy mode of treatment has equal importance like the external beam radiotherapy. In our hospital we have manual afterloading 137Cs kit supplied by BRIT for intracavitary treatment of carcinoma cervix and vaginal cases. In July 1999, we also started afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy. For a hospital like ours, where funds are minimal, it is impossible to procure remote afterloading brachytherapy unit, which is very costly. So we have developed the cost-effective 192Ir manual brachytherapy and so far we have done 60 cases which include intraluminal and interstitial cases

  2. A practical implementation of the 2010 IPEM high dose rate brachytherapy code of practice for the calibration of {sup 192}Ir sources

    Awunor, O A; Lecomber, A R; Richmond, N; Walker, C, E-mail: Onuora.Awunor@stees.nhs.uk [Regional Medical Physics Department, James Cook University Hospital, Marton Road, Middlesbrough, TS4 3BW (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-21

    This paper details a practical method for deriving the reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient for Farmer NE2571 chambers using the UK Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) code of practice for the determination of the reference air kerma rate for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources based on the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) air kerma standard. The reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient was derived using pressure, temperature and source decay corrected ionization chamber response measurements over three successive {sup 192}Ir source clinical cycles. A secondary standard instrument (a Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber) and four tertiary standard instruments (one additional Standard Imaging 1000 Plus well chamber and three Farmer NE2571 chambers housed in a perspex phantom) were used to provide traceability to the NPL primary standard and enable comparison of performance between the chambers. Conservative and optimized estimates on the expanded uncertainties (k = 2) associated with chamber response, ion recombination and reference air kerma rate calibration coefficient were determined. This was seen to be 2.3% and 0.4% respectively for chamber response, 0.2% and 0.08% respectively for ion recombination and 2.6% and 1.2% respectively for the calibration coefficient. No significant change in ion recombination with source decay was observed over the duration of clinical use of the respective {sup 192}Ir sources.

  3. Using LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around an 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Purpose: The absorbed dose to water is the fundamental reference quantity for brachytherapy treatment planning systems and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have been recognized as the most validated detectors for measurement of such a dosimetric descriptor. The detector response in a wide energy spectrum as that of an192Ir brachytherapy source as well as the specific measurement medium which surrounds the TLD need to be accounted for when estimating the absorbed dose. This paper develops a methodology based on highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to directly estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source. Methods: Different experimental designs in liquid water and air were constructed to study the response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs when irradiated in several standard photon beams of the LNE-LNHB (French national metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation). Measurement strategies and Monte Carlo techniques were developed to calibrate the LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in the energy interval characteristic of that found when TLDs are immersed in water around an192Ir source. Finally, an experimental system was designed to irradiate TLDs at different angles between 1 and 11 cm away from an 192Ir source in liquid water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to correct measured results to provide estimates of the absorbed dose to water in water around the 192Ir source. Results: The dose response dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs with the linear energy transfer of secondary electrons followed the same variations as those of published results. The calibration strategy which used TLDs in air exposed to a standard N-250 ISO x-ray beam and TLDs in water irradiated with a standard137Cs beam provided an estimated mean uncertainty of 2.8% (k = 1) in the TLD calibration coefficient for irradiations by the 192Ir source in water. The 3D TLD measurements performed in liquid water were obtained with a maximum uncertainty of 11% (k = 1) found

  4. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of 192 Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water Dw for the energy of: 60Co, 137Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the 192Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of 192Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the 60Co for Dw, using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in Dw by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for Dw in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the 137Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for Dw start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: RTLD vs Dw: For the energy of 60Co, 137Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (Fs) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The Fs for the two 192Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of capsules were sent to two hospitals that have the HDR Brachytherapy with sources of 192Ir and that

  5. Evaluation of Gafchromic EBT2 film for the measurement of anisotropy function for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source with respect to thermoluminescent dosimetry

    Aim: The aim of this work was to assess the suitability of the use of a Gafchromic EBT2 film for the measurement of anisotropy function for micro Selectron HDR 192Ir (classic) source with a comparative dosimetry method using a Gafchromic EBT2 film and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). Background: Sealed linear radiation sources are commonly used for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatments. Due to self-absorption and oblique filtration of radiation in the source capsule material, an inherent anisotropy is present in the dose distribution around the source which can be described by a measurable two-dimensional anisotropy function, F(γ, Θ ). Materials and methods: Measurements were carried out in a specially designed and locally fabricated PMMA phantom with provisions to accommodate miniature LiF TLD rods and EBT2 film dosimeters at identical radial distances with respect to the 192Ir source. Results: The data of anisotropy function generated by the use of the Gafchromic EBT2 film method are in agreement with their TLD measured values within 4%. The produced data are also consistent with their experimental and Monte Carlo calculated results for this source available in the literature. Conclusion: Gafchromic EBT2 film was found to be a feasible dosimeter in determining anisotropy in the dose distribution of 192Ir source. It offers high resolution and is a viable alternative to TLD dosimetry at discrete points. The method described in this paper is useful for comparing the performances of detectors and can be applied for other brachytherapy sources as well. (authors)

  6. An absorbed dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on water calorimetry: Numerical and experimental proof-of-principle

    Water calorimetry is an established technique for absorbed dose to water measurements in external beams. In this paper, the feasibility of direct absorbed dose measurements for high dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 (192Ir) sources using water calorimetry is established. Feasibility is determined primarily by a balance between the need to obtain sufficient signal to perform a reproducible measurement, the effect of heat loss on the measured signal, and the positioning uncertainty affecting the source-detector distance. The heat conduction pattern generated in water by the Nucletron microSelectron-HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source was simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICSTM software. Source heating due to radiation self-absorption was calculated using EGSnrcMP. A heat-loss correction kc was calculated as the ratio of the temperature rise under ideal conditions to temperature rise under realistic conditions. The calorimeter setup used a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel of 79 mm diameter and 1.12 mm thick front and rear glass windows located 24 mm apart. Absorbed dose was measured with two sources with nominal air kerma strengths of 38 000 and 21 000 U, at source-detector separations ranging from 24.7 to 27.6 mm and irradiation times of 36.0 to 80.0 s. The preliminary measured dose rate per unit air kerma strength of (0.502±0.007) μGy/(s U) compares well with the TG-43 derived 0.505 μGy/(s U). This work shows that combined dose uncertainties of significantly less than 5% can be achieved with only modest modifications of current water calorimetry techniques and instruments. This work forms the basis of a potential future absolute dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

  7. An absorbed dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on water calorimetry: numerical and experimental proof-of-principle.

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Stewart, Kristin; Seuntjens, Jan

    2007-12-01

    Water calorimetry is an established technique for absorbed dose to water measurements in external beams. In this paper, the feasibility of direct absorbed dose measurements for high dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 (192Ir) sources using water calorimetry is established. Feasibility is determined primarily by a balance between the need to obtain sufficient signal to perform a reproducible measurement, the effect of heat loss on the measured signal, and the positioning uncertainty affecting the source-detector distance. The heat conduction pattern generated in water by the Nucletron microSelectron-HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source was simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software. Source heating due to radiation self-absorption was calculated using EGSnrcMP. A heat-loss correction k(c) was calculated as the ratio of the temperature rise under ideal conditions to temperature rise under realistic conditions. The calorimeter setup used a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel of 79 mm diameter and 1.12 mm thick front and rear glass windows located 24 mm apart. Absorbed dose was measured with two sources with nominal air kerma strengths of 38 000 and 21 000 U, at source-detector separations ranging from 24.7 to 27.6 mm and irradiation times of 36.0 to 80.0 s. The preliminary measured dose rate per unit air kerma strength of (0.502 +/- 0.007) microGy/(s U) compares well with the TG-43 derived 0.505 microGy/(s U). This work shows that combined dose uncertainties of significantly less than 5% can be achieved with only modest modifications of current water calorimetry techniques and instruments. This work forms the basis of a potential future absolute dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. PMID:18196821

  8. Sealed 192 Ir sources for industrial radiography

    This work presents the results obtained by the Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory (LEPI) of INR Pitesti in production and selling of sealed 192 Ir sources for industrial radiography. The sealed 192 Ir sources are obtained by encapsulating iridium disks in stainless steel capsules by TIG welding. The iridium disks have the characteristics: - radionuclidic purity, at least 95% Ir; - density, at least 12 g/cm3; - height, 0.5 mm; - diameter, 3 mm. Tests for radioactive tightness of the capsules containing the 192 Ir sources are done by immersing the sealed source in water at 323 K temperature for 4 h and measuring the radioactivity of immersion water samples. The source is accepted as tightly enclosed if the water activity is less than 0.2 kBq (5 nCi). Six types of sealed 192 Ir sources are produced with maximum activity 4.4 TBq (120 Ci); 2.310 TBq (70 Ci); 1.155 TBq (35 Ci); 0.555 TBq (15 Ci); 0.185 TBq (5 Ci) and 0.037 TBq (1 Ci), with focal spots varying between 3 x 3 mm and 0.5 x 0.5 mm. The technological flux is described. In the period 1993-2000 LEPI has produced 350 sealed 192 Ir sources for industrial radiography with a total activity of 518 TBq (14,000 Ci) which were delivered to about 100 users of national industry

  9. SU-E-T-102: Determination of Dose Distributions and Water-Equivalence of MAGIC-F Polymer Gel for 60Co and 192Ir Brachytherapy Sources

    Quevedo, A; Nicolucci, P [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f polymer gel for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir clinical brachytherapy sources, through dose distributions simulated with PENELOPE Monte Carlo code. Methods: The real geometry of {sup 60} (BEBIG, modelo Co0.A86) and {sup 192}192Ir (Varian, model GammaMed Plus) clinical brachytherapy sources were modelled on PENELOPE Monte Carlo simulation code. The most probable emission lines of photons were used for both sources: 17 emission lines for {sup 192}Ir and 12 lines for {sup 60}. The dose distributions were obtained in a cubic water or gel homogeneous phantom (30 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}), with the source positioned in the middle of the phantom. In all cases the number of simulation showers remained constant at 10{sup 9} particles. A specific material for gel was constructed in PENELOPE using weight fraction components of MAGIC-f: wH = 0,1062, wC = 0,0751, wN = 0,0139, wO = 0,8021, wS = 2,58×10{sup −6} e wCu = 5,08 × 10{sup −6}. The voxel size in the dose distributions was 0.6 mm. Dose distribution maps on the longitudinal and radial direction through the centre of the source were used to analyse the water-equivalence of MAGIC-f. Results: For the {sup 60} source, the maximum diferences in relative doses obtained in the gel and water were 0,65% and 1,90%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. For {sup 192}Ir, the maximum difereces in relative doses were 0,30% and 1,05%, for radial and longitudinal direction, respectively. The materials equivalence can also be verified through the effective atomic number and density of each material: Zef-MAGIC-f = 7,07 e .MAGIC-f = 1,060 g/cm{sup 3} and Zef-water = 7,22. Conclusion: The results showed that MAGIC-f is water equivalent, consequently being suitable to simulate soft tissue, for Cobalt and Iridium energies. Hence, gel can be used as a dosimeter in clinical applications. Further investigation to its use in a clinical protocol is needed.

  10. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources. (paper)

  11. Dosimetric impact of an 192Ir brachytherapy source cable length modeled using a grid-based Boltzmann transport equation solver

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distributions of an 192Ir source (model VS2000) in homogeneous water geometry calculated using a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann transport equation solver (GBBS) in the commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (BRACHYVISION-ACUROS v8.8). Methods: Using percent dose differences (%ΔD), the GBBS (BV-ACUROS) was compared to the (1) published TG-43 data, (2) MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the 192Ir source centered in a 15 cm radius water sphere, and (3) TG-43 output from the TPS using vendor supplied (BV-TG43-vendor) and user extended (BV-TG43-extended) 2D anisotropy functions F(r,θ). BV-ACUROS assumes 1 mm of NiTi cable, while the TPS TG-43 algorithm uses data based on a 15 cm cable. MC models of various cable lengths were simulated. Results: The MC simulations resulted in >20% dose deviations along the cable for 1, 2, and 3 mm cable lengths relative to 15 cm. BV-ACUROS comparisons with BV-TG43-vendor and BV-TG43-extended yielded magnitude of differences, consistent with those seen in MC simulations. However, differences >20% extended further (θ≤10 deg.) when using the vendor supplied anisotropy function Fven(r,θ). These differences were also seen in comparisons of F(r,θ) derived from the TPS output. Conclusions: The results suggest that %ΔD near the cable region is larger than previously estimated. The spatial distribution of the dose deviation is highly dependent on the reference TG-43 data used to compare to GBBS. The differences observed, while important to realize, should not have an impact on clinical dosimetry in homogeneous water.

  12. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  13. Primary standardization of the HDR 192Ir source in terms of air kerma strength

    Establishing a primary standard of AKS at the Standards Laboratory and offering traceable calibration to all the hospitals that make use of HDR 192Ir, in brachytherapy is important. With this objective, the primary standardization of the HDR 192Ir source was undertaken. Details of the work are presented

  14. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  15. Water equivalent phantom materials for (192)Ir brachytherapy.

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-21

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with (192)Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading (192)Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm.The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm.As suggested

  16. Tumor dose enhancement by nanoparticles during high dose rate 192 Ir brachytherapy

    Mansour Zabihzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Injecting of high-Z gold NPs into tumor increases the absorbed dose of tumor irradiated with 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy source. Size, geometry, concentration, and distribution model of NPs and tumor depth are crucial factors to accurately estimate the DEF.

  17. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part I: Single sources and bounded homogeneous geometries

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to validate a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (TPS) for single 192Ir brachytherapy source dosimetry in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS results were obtained using the deterministic radiation transport option of a BRACHYVISION v. 8.8 system for three characteristic source designs (VS2000, GMPlus HDR, and GMPlus PDR) with each source either centered in a 15 cm radius spherical water phantom, or positioned at varying distance away from the phantom center. Corresponding MC simulations were performed using the MCNPX code v.2.5.0 and source geometry models prepared using information provided by the manufacturers. Results: Comparison in terms of the AAPM TG-43 dosimetric formalism quantities, as well as dose rate distributions per unit air kerma strength with a spatial resolution of 0.1 cm, yielded close agreement between TPS and MC results for the sources centered in the phantom. Besides some regions close to the source longitudinal axes where discrepancies could be characterized as systematic, overall agreement for all three sources studied is comparable to the statistical (type A) uncertainty of MC simulations (1% at the majority of points in the geometry increasing to 2%-3% at points lying both away from the source center and close to the source longitudinal axis). A corresponding good agreement was also found between TPS and MC results for the sources positioned away from the phantom center. Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions regardless of the size or shape of a given geometry of dosimetric interest, and the position of a source within it. This is important since, as shown in the literature and summarized also in this work, these factors could introduce a significant dosimetric effect that is currently ignored in clinical treatment planning. It is concluded that the implementation of the deterministic radiation

  18. Verification of the dose from an Iridium-192 (192Ir) sealed source absorbed by an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) during uterine intracavitary brachytherapy

    The purpose of this study was to verify the dose absorbed by an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) from an 192Ir sealed source during uterine intracavitary brachytherapy, and to confirm its immunity to radiation effects. First, prior to treatment, the doses around the ICD position of an anthromorphic phantom were evaluated. Next, we also measured the dose at the ICD position using a fluorescent glass dosimeter and silicon diode dosimeter during the treatment of intracavitary brachytherapy of a patient implanted with an ICD. The results of the phantom study showed the dose percentage at the ICD location, 2 cm deep, to be 0.074% of the prescribed dose. The results of a treatment study similarly showed the dose, measured using a fluorescent glass dosimeter in the ICD position, to be 0.071% of the prescribed dose. During the application of the total prescribed dose, 30 Gy/5 fraction, the dose at the surface of the ICD position was estimated to be 21.2 mGy, well below the 1 Gy maximum recommended in the JASTRO guidelines. We regard dose verification and monitoring during treatment to be both necessary and useful in the treatment of individual cases. (author)

  19. The non-uniformity correction factor for the cylindrical ionization chambers in dosimetry of an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source

    Majumdar Bishnu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to derive the non-uniformity correction factor for the two therapy ionization chambers for the dose measurement near the brachytherapy source. The two ionization chambers of 0.6 cc and 0.1 cc volume were used. The measurement in air was performed for distances between 0.8 cm and 20 cm from the source in specially designed measurement jig. The non-uniformity correction factors were derived from the measured values. The experimentally derived factors were compared with the theoretically calculated non-uniformity correction factors and a close agreement was found between these two studies. The experimentally derived non-uniformity correction factor supports the anisotropic theory.

  20. Qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the 192Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania

  1. High beta and electron dose from 192Ir: implications for 'gamma' intravascular brachytherapy

    Purpose: Trains of multiple 192Ir seeds are used in many clinical trials for intravascular brachytherapy. 192Ir source is commonly considered as a gamma emitter, despite the understanding that this radionuclide also emits a wide range of electron and beta energies, with a similar range of energy. The high dose from betas and electrons in the submillimeter range due to unsealed ends of seed sources should be precisely quantified to fully understand the backdrop for complications associated with 192Ir coronary artery brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4C code) were performed for a model 5-seed 192Ir train used in SCRIPPS, GAMMA, and the Washington Radiation for In-Stent Restenosis (WRIST) randomized clinical trials. A stack of radiochromic films was also used to measure the dose distributions for an actual 6-seed train. Results: In the submillimeter range very close to the source, Monte Carlo results show that betas and electrons deposit a higher dose than 192Ir photons (gamma and X-rays) over the interseed gap. A high luminal dose from the combined effects of betas, electrons, and photons emitted from 192Ir can be deposited, particularly between seeds. When prescribing 15 Gy at 2 mm, the combined dose can be as high as 160 Gy at 0.5 mm. Different peak doses near the interseed gaps were noted, which may be due to variability of seed-end surfaces and nonuniformity of seed activity within a real multiseed train. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of lumen surfaces were evaluated for an eccentric seed train. The DVH parameters indicating the extent of hot spots in the lumen wall, DV10, DV5, DV2, and DV1 (dose received by 10, 5, 2, 1% respectively of the total lumen surface), can be as high as 55, 76, 81, and 155 Gy for a lumen with 3-mm diameter, and 75, 80, 110, and 158 Gy for a narrow 2-mm lumen. Conclusion: 192Ir multiple seed trains used in the SCRIPPS, GAMMA, and WRIST trials can deposit a very high dose to the luminal wall. A particularly

  2. Optimization of deterministic transport parameters for the calculation of the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number of energy groups, Sn (angular order), Pn (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within ±3% and ±5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S12 was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P2 expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source

  3. Development on Monte Carlo methodology with scatter correction factor of afterloading 192 Ir source

    Objective: To facilitate activity measurement by using the thimble ionization chamber in hospitals, to obtain air kerma scatter correction factor of medical afterloading of 192Ir source by developing an available and convenient calculation method. Methods: According to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) 1079 Report to calculate the scatter correction factor of 192Ir source, to measure air kerma of 192Ir source with and without lead shield using thimble ionization chamber. Simulation measurement conditions were used to calculate scatter correction factor of 192Ir source and comparison was made between experimental results and literature records. At the same time, the different ionization chamber models were simulated at different room sizes to obtain scattering correction factor of 192 Ir source. Results: Comparison was made between the simulation scatter correction factors of 192Ir source and experiment by the shadow shield, and the relative deviation was 0.8%. The deviation of the 192Ir activity calculated according to the simulated scatter correction factor and measured by well type ionization chamber was 2.4%. By comparison between the calculated results by using two kinds of spherical ionization chamber and those ones deduced by IAEA 1079 Report,the relative deviations ranged within 0.3%-0.4%. Five different types of thimble ionization chamber and different room sizes were simulated and calculated by MC simulation, with the relative deviation within 3%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulation method for calculating afterloading 192Ir source's scatter correction factor is feasible, and this method is convenient for use in the thimble chamber for brachytherapy QA work in the hospital. (authors)

  4. Calibration of well-type chambers in Brazil using 192Ir HDR sources

    The results obtained by performing of a traceable calibration service for well-type reentrant ionization chamber for HDR 192Ir sources used in brachytherapy physical procedures at the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas from Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro -LCR/UERJ are described. (author)

  5. Determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference point D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) for an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source using a Fricke system

    Austerlitz, C.; Mota, H. C.; Sempau, J.; Benhabib, S. M.; Campos, D.; Allison, R.; Almeida, C. E. de; Zhu, D.; Sibata, C. H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Laboratorio de Cie circumflex ncias Radiologicas, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Department of Radiation Oncology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    A ring-shaped Fricke device was developed to measure the absolute dose on the transverse bisector of a {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source at 1 cm from its center in water, D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}). It consists of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod (axial axis) with a cylindrical cavity at its center to insert the {sup 192}Ir radioactive source. A ring cavity around the source with 1.5 mm thickness and 5 mm height is centered at 1 cm from the central axis of the source. This ring cavity is etched in a disk shaped base with 2.65 cm diameter and 0.90 cm thickness. The cavity has a wall around it 0.25 cm thick. This ring is filled with Fricke solution, sealed, and the whole assembly is immersed in water during irradiations. The device takes advantage of the cylindrical geometry to measure D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}). Irradiations were performed with a Nucletron microselectron HDR unit loaded with an {sup 192}Ir Alpha Omega radioactive source. A Spectronic 1001 spectrophotometer was used to measure the optical absorbance using a 1 mL quartz cuvette with 1.00 cm light pathlength. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code (MC) was utilized to simulate the Fricke device and the {sup 192}Ir Alpha Omega source in detail to calculate the perturbation introduced by the PMMA material. A NIST traceable calibrated well type ionization chamber was used to determine the air-kerma strength, and a published dose-rate constant was used to determine the dose rate at the reference point. The time to deliver 30.00 Gy to the reference point was calculated. This absorbed dose was then compared to the absorbed dose measured by the Fricke solution. Based on MC simulation, the PMMA of the Fricke device increases the D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) by 2.0%. Applying the corresponding correction factor, the D(r{sub 0},{theta}{sub 0}) value assessed with the Fricke device agrees within 2.0% with the expected value with a total combined uncertainty of 3.43%(k=1). The Fricke device provides a promising

  6. Real-size CT slices to optimize brachytherapy treatments in vaginal moulds using 192-IR

    INTRODUCTION. We use individualized vaginal moulds with 192-Ir as radioactive source. This technique of treatment allows us to perform a previous dosimetric study and the knowledge of the sources spatial distribution. Their elaboration is slow but it offers an individualized treatment of each patient. To optimize the treatment we perform a CT the day after of the application. METHODS. The patients are referred to the Radiology Dp. with hyperdense dummy sources in the plastic tubes of the vaginal mould. After the selection of the central perpendicular plane to the dummy sources, some real size CT slices (RSCTS) are obtained every 5 mm (2mm. of thickness). Then, the dosimetric study is performed. RESULTS. RSCTS give us information about the localization of the sources and a more precise knowledge of the dose received by the bladder, rectum, vaginal vault and the tumor in each plane of interest. However, in some cases the fat plane between the vaginal vault and the rectum and bladder doesn't exist; this is a limitation in the identification of both structures. Likewise, in the cases that the rectum is collapsed when the CT is performed we lost this information too. CONCLUSIONS. 1- Probably this technique will allow us to correlate the dose received by the different structures and the late toxicity. 2- RSCTS allow us a good optimization of the brachytherapy in the plastic tube technique in centers without sophisticated planning systems. 3- RSCTS is a good system of quality control in the vaginal moulds with 192-IR

  7. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple 192Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within ±2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications employing multiple source dwell positions and partially

  8. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.; Georgiou, E.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 2nd Building of Preclinical Section, University Campus, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple {sup 192}Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within {+-}2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications

  9. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and occupational exposures during manual 192Ir intracoronary brachytherapy

    Intracoronary brachytherapy is a new modality of radiation therapy and is being used to reduce the rate of restenosis after angioplasty. Clinical trials for evaluation of safety and efficacy of manually implanted 192Ir seed ribbons are underway at various cardiology centres in India. 192Ir emits high energy gamma rays (0.136 -1.06 MeV), which causes concern regarding safety of the personnel when these sources are manually used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab) for intracoronary irradiation. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and exposures to personnel have been measured at 6 different cardiology centres in the country during 8 different clinical trials using radiation survey meter, personnel monitoring badges and pocket dosimeters. Activities of 192Ir seed ribbons used in these clinical trials were in the range of 5.55 - 14.8 GBq. Measured radiation levels behind the mobile lead shields, at the top of lead shields, near the patient head, near the patient toes and at the main door of the Cath Lab were in the range of 2.6-20, 50-256, 385-450, 22-225 and 2-16 μSv/hr/3.7GBq, respectively. Measured effective doses to occupational workers were in range of 14-100 μSv/procedure/3.7GBq. Based on these measurements, user institutions have been advised to use lead glass mounted L-shaped mobile lead shields with proper orientation during clinical trials, avoid unwanted occupancy in the Cath Lab and around the patient during irradiation and use conveniently long forceps or tongs for implantation and removal of sources. (author)

  10. Dosimetric characterization of round HDR {sup 192}Ir AccuBoost applicators for breast brachytherapy

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Wazer, David E.; Bricault, Raymond J. Jr. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Advanced Radiation Therapy, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The AccuBoost brachytherapy system applies HDR {sup 192}Ir beams peripherally to the breast using collimating applicators. The purpose of this study was to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations of the HDR {sup 192}Ir source, to dosimetrically characterize the round applicators using established Monte Carlo simulation and radiation measurement techniques and to gather data for clinical use. Methods: Dosimetric measurements were performed in a polystyrene phantom, while simulations estimated dose in air, liquid water, polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. Dose distribution characterization of the 4-8 cm diameter collimators was performed using radiochromic EBT film and air ionization chambers. Results: The central axis dose falloff was steeper for the 4 cm diameter applicator in comparison to the 8 cm diameter applicator, with surface to 3 cm depth-dose ratios of 3.65 and 2.44, respectively. These ratios did not considerably change when varying the phantom composition from breast tissue to polystyrene, phantom thickness from 4 to 8 cm, or phantom radius from 8 to 15 cm. Dose distributions on the central axis were fitted to sixth-order polynomials for clinical use in a hand calculation spreadsheet (i.e., nomogram). Dose uniformity within the useful applicator apertures decreased as depth-dose increased. Conclusions: Monte Carlo benchmarking simulations of the HDR {sup 192}Ir source using the MCNP5 radiation transport code indicated agreement within 1% of the published results over the radial/angular region of interest. Changes in phantom size and radius did not cause noteworthy changes in the central axis depth-dose. Polynomial fit depth-dose curves provide a simple and accurate basis for a nomogram.

  11. Dosimetric characterization of round HDR 192Ir AccuBoost applicators for breast brachytherapy

    Purpose: The AccuBoost brachytherapy system applies HDR 192Ir beams peripherally to the breast using collimating applicators. The purpose of this study was to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations of the HDR 192Ir source, to dosimetrically characterize the round applicators using established Monte Carlo simulation and radiation measurement techniques and to gather data for clinical use. Methods: Dosimetric measurements were performed in a polystyrene phantom, while simulations estimated dose in air, liquid water, polystyrene and ICRU 44 breast tissue. Dose distribution characterization of the 4-8 cm diameter collimators was performed using radiochromic EBT film and air ionization chambers. Results: The central axis dose falloff was steeper for the 4 cm diameter applicator in comparison to the 8 cm diameter applicator, with surface to 3 cm depth-dose ratios of 3.65 and 2.44, respectively. These ratios did not considerably change when varying the phantom composition from breast tissue to polystyrene, phantom thickness from 4 to 8 cm, or phantom radius from 8 to 15 cm. Dose distributions on the central axis were fitted to sixth-order polynomials for clinical use in a hand calculation spreadsheet (i.e., nomogram). Dose uniformity within the useful applicator apertures decreased as depth-dose increased. Conclusions: Monte Carlo benchmarking simulations of the HDR 192Ir source using the MCNP5 radiation transport code indicated agreement within 1% of the published results over the radial/angular region of interest. Changes in phantom size and radius did not cause noteworthy changes in the central axis depth-dose. Polynomial fit depth-dose curves provide a simple and accurate basis for a nomogram.

  12. Stem effect of a Ce3+ doped SiO2 optical dosimeter irradiated with a 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source

    Fiber-optic-coupled scintillation dosimeters are characterized by their small active volume if compared to other existing systems. However, they potentially show a greater stem effect, especially in external beam radiotherapy where the Cerenkov effect is not negligible. In brachytherapy, due to the lower energies and the shorter high dose range of the employed sources, the impact of the stem effect to the detector accuracy might be low. In this work, the stem effect of a Ce3+ doped SiO2 scintillation detector coupled to a SiO2 optical fiber was studied for high dose rate brachytherapy applications. Measurements were performed in a water phantom at changing source-detector mutual positions. The same irradiations were performed with a passive optical fiber, which doesn't have the dosimeter at its end. The relative contribution of the passive fiber with respect to the uncorrected readings of the detector in each one of the investigated source dwell positions was evaluated. Furthermore, the dosimeter was calibrated both neglecting and correcting its response for the passive fiber readings. The obtained absolute dose measurements were then compared to the dose calculations resulting from the treatment planning system. Dosimeter uncertainties with and without taking into account the passive fiber readings were generally below 2.8% and 4.3%, respectively. However, a particular exception results when the source is positioned near to the optical fiber, where the detector underestimates the dose (−8%) or at source-detector longitudinal distances higher than 3 cm. The obtained results show that the proposed dosimeter might be adopted in high dose rate prostate brachytherapy with satisfactory accuracy, without the need for any stem effect correction. However, accuracy further improves by subtraction of the noise signal produced by the passive optical fiber. - Highlights: • A scintillation detector with 0.9 mm diameter was developed for in vivo dosimetry in

  13. Determination of the Fricke G value for HDR 192Ir sources using ionometric measurements

    High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy using 192Ir is widely accepted as an important treatment option, and it thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of absolute dose to water is currently not available. The dose to water conversion is calculated via the dose rate constant Λ and several correction factors accounting for the scatter, attenuation, and anisotropy of the dose distribution, among other effects. Two potentially useful procedures have been reported, including one by Sarfehnia et al. [3,4], which used a water-based calorimeter with an uncertainty of 1.9% for k=1, and a second by Austerlitz et al. and de Almeida et al., which used Fricke dosimetry with estimated uncertainties of 3.9% for k=1 and 1.4% for k=1, respectively. Chemical dosimetry using a standard FeSO4 solution has shown potential to be a reliable standard of absorbed dose for the HDR 192Ir source. A major uncertainty is associated with the G values reported by Fregene, which had a numerical value of 1.1 %. However, that reference provided very little detail of the experimental procedures for the 192Ir source. The G value may be obtained by using a calorimeter or ionometric measurements. In the absence of calorimetric data, this paper makes an attempt to measure the G value for the HDR 192Ir sources using ionometric measurements and recommendations from dosimetry protocols. (author)

  14. Determination of the Fricke G value for HDR {sup 192}Ir sources using ionometric measurements

    Franco, L.; Coelho, M.; Almeida, C.E. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Gavazza, S. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy using {sup 192}Ir is widely accepted as an important treatment option, and it thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of absolute dose to water is currently not available. The dose to water conversion is calculated via the dose rate constant {Lambda} and several correction factors accounting for the scatter, attenuation, and anisotropy of the dose distribution, among other effects. Two potentially useful procedures have been reported, including one by Sarfehnia et al. [3,4], which used a water-based calorimeter with an uncertainty of 1.9% for k=1, and a second by Austerlitz et al. and de Almeida et al., which used Fricke dosimetry with estimated uncertainties of 3.9% for k=1 and 1.4% for k=1, respectively. Chemical dosimetry using a standard FeSO{sub 4} solution has shown potential to be a reliable standard of absorbed dose for the HDR {sup 192}Ir source. A major uncertainty is associated with the G values reported by Fregene, which had a numerical value of 1.1 %. However, that reference provided very little detail of the experimental procedures for the {sup 192}Ir source. The G value may be obtained by using a calorimeter or ionometric measurements. In the absence of calorimetric data, this paper makes an attempt to measure the G value for the HDR {sup 192}Ir sources using ionometric measurements and recommendations from dosimetry protocols. (author)

  15. Traceable calibration of hospital 192Ir HDR sources

    A HDR 1000 PLUS well type ionization chamber, procured from Standard Imaging, USA, and maintained by medical Physics and Safety Section (MPSS), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India, as a reference well chamber 1 (RWCH1), was traceably calibrated against the primary standard established by Radiological Standards Laboratory (RSL), BARC for 192Ir HDR source, in terms of air kerma strength (AKS). An indigenously developed well-type ionization chamber, reference well chamber 2 (RWCH2) and electrometer system, fabricated by CD High Tech (CDHT) Instruments Private Ltd., Bangalore, India, was in turn calibrated against RWCH1. The CDHT system (i.e. RWCH2 and CDHT electrometer system) was taken to several hospitals, in different regions of the country, to check the calibration status of 192Ir HDR sources. The result of this calibration audit work is reported here. (author)

  16. Calibration of a {sup 19} {sup 2}Ir source for high dose brachytherapy using various techniques; Calibracion de una fuente de {sup 192} Ir para braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis mediante diversas tecnicas

    Montilla Prieto, Tedicel C., E-mail: tcdicel@gmaiLcam [Instituto de Oncologia Dr. Miguel Perez Carreno, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Departamento de Fisica y Dosimetria; Padron Rivero, Alvaro D., E-mail: alvarodpadronr@yahoo.com.ve [Universidad de Carabobo, Barbula (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2013-10-01

    In this research we studied three experimental procedures for calibration of a source of {sup 192}Ir to high dose rate for clinical brachytherapy use, and thus were compared and analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each. For this study we quantified the value of the current kerma rate reference in air by three procedures: source calibration using a well chamber, with an cylindrical ionization chamber in air, and a cylindrical ionization chamber on a phantom, and this magnitude was compared with the value provided by the manufacturer of the source and thereby obtaining the deviation corresponding . Thus, it was found that the deviation corresponding to the source calibration making use of a well chamber, remained within tolerance, while the cylindrical ionization chamber in air and on phantom exceeded the standards established in some documents. However, although both the measurement in air and in the phantom are the procedures for the final calibration source, these can be used to verify that the delivered dose are in tolerance.

  17. Development of a water calorimetry-based standard for absorbed dose to water in HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to develop and evaluate a primary standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy based on 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimetry. Methods: The absolute absorbed dose to water was directly measured for several different Nucletron microSelectron 192Ir sources of air kerma strength ranging between 21 000 and 38 000 U and for source-to-detector separations ranging between 25 and 70 mm. The COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software was used to accurately calculate the heat transport in a detailed model geometry. Through a coupling of the ''conduction and convection'' module with the ''Navier-Stokes incompressible fluid'' module in the software, both the conductive and convective effects were modeled. Results: A detailed uncertainty analysis resulted in an overall uncertainty in the absorbed dose of 1.90%(1σ). However, this includes a 1.5% uncertainty associated with a nonlinear predrift correction which can be substantially reduced if sufficient time is provided for the system to come to a new equilibrium in between successive calorimetric runs, an opportunity not available to the authors in their clinical setting due to time constraints on the machine. An average normalized dose rate of 361±7 μGy/(h U) at a source-to-detector separation of 55 mm was measured for the microSelectron 192Ir source based on water calorimetry. The measured absorbed dose per air kerma strength agreed to better than 0.8%(1σ) with independent ionization chamber and EBT-1 Gafchromic film reference dosimetry as well as with the currently accepted AAPM TG-43 protocol measurements. Conclusions: This work paves the way toward a primary absorbed dose to water standard in 192Ir brachytherapy.

  18. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

    Purpose: This article presents an analytical dose calculation method for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, taking into account the effects of inhomogeneities and reduced photon backscatter near the skin. The adequacy of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) two-dimensional formalism for treatment planning is also assessed. Methods: The proposed method uses material composition and density data derived from computed tomography images. The primary and scatter dose distributions for each dwell position are calculated first as if the patient is an infinite water phantom. This is done using either TG-43 or a database of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions. The latter can be used to account for the effects of shielding in water. Subsequently, corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and spectral variations along medium- or low-Z inhomogeneities are made according to the radiological paths determined by ray tracing. The scatter dose is then scaled by a correction factor that depends on the distances between the point of interest, the body contour, and the source position. Dose calculations are done for phantoms with tissue and lead inserts, as well as patient plans for head-and-neck, esophagus, and MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy treatments. Gamma indices are evaluated using a dose-difference criterion of 3% and a distance-to-agreement criterion of 2 mm. PTRANCT MC calculations are used as the reference dose distributions. Results: For the phantom with tissue and lead inserts, the percentages of the voxels of interest passing the gamma criteria (Pγ≥1) are 100% for the analytical calculation and 91% for TG-43. For the breast patient plan, TG-43 overestimates the target volume receiving the prescribed dose by 4% and the dose to the hottest 0.1 cm3 of the skin by 9%, whereas the analytical and MC results agree within 0.4%. Pγ≥1 are 100% and 48% for the analytical and TG-43 calculations, respectively. For the head-and-neck and esophagus patient plans, Pγ≥1 are ≥99

  19. Vascular brachytherapy with 90Sr/Y versus 192Ir: A health physics perspective

    Purpose: Currently there are two ongoing trials of catheter based radiation therapy in the United States, the BERT Trial (Emory University, Atlanta, GA) and the SCRIPPS Trial (Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA). The BERT method involved the use of a treatment system to manually deliver a source train consisting of 12, encapsulated 90Sr/Y seeds of 3 cm total active length. The total activity of the source train was approximately 3.7 GBq. The SCRIPPS trial involved the use of a hand delivered 192Ir (BEST Industries) source train of either 5 or 9 sources with 1 mm spacing between the sources. The average total activity of the source train was 3.6 GBq ± 1.08 GBq. It is the purpose of this study to compare the patient dose and staff exposures from the above source trains. A comparison with exposures from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory will also be made. Materials and Methods: Measurements made with a GM meter at specified locations around the BERT patients during the insertion of the seeds were compared with published information from the SCRIPPS Trial. Monte Carlo modeled measurements of the equivalent dose in humans from insertion of the source trains were also compared for both methods. The above were contrasted with GM measurements from use of fluoroscopy in the catheterization laboratory. Results: Average exposure rates recorded at the patient's chest and groin from the BERT method were 4.9x10-4 and 1.29x10-4 C/kg·hr respectively. Average exposures to the operator from the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 8.6x10-6 and 1.03x10-3 C/kg respectively. A typical exposure rate for conventional cardiac fluoroscopy is 3.9x10-3 C/kg·hr. Monte Carlo modeled calculations of patient dose equivalent for the BERT method and the SCRIPPS method were 0.43 μSv and 6.41 mSv respectively. Conclusions: Vascular brachytherapy performed with 90Sr/Y sources resulted in staff exposures of at least a factor of 120 less and patient doses of a factor of nearly 15

  20. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment.  PMID:25679174

  1. Qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources

    Iancso, Georgeta, E-mail: georgetaiancso@yahoo.com; Iliescu, Elena, E-mail: georgetaiancso@yahoo.com; Iancu, Rodica, E-mail: georgetaiancso@yahoo.com [National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering Horia Hulubei, Magurele (Romania)

    2013-12-16

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for {sup 192}Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the {sup 192}Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  2. The contribution from transit dose for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatments

    Fonseca, G. P.; Landry, G.; Reniers, B.; Hoffmann, A.; Rubo, R. A.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.; Verhaegen, F.

    2014-04-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems that use model-based dose calculation algorithms employ a more accurate approach that replaces the TG43-U1 water dose formalism and adopt the TG-186 recommendations regarding composition and geometry of patients and other relevant effects. However, no recommendations were provided on the transit dose due to the source traveling inside the patient. This study describes a methodology to calculate the transit dose using information from the treatment planning system (TPS) and considering the source's instantaneous and average speed for two prostate and two gynecological cases. The trajectory of the 192Ir HDR source was defined by importing applicator contour points and dwell positions from the TPS. The transit dose distribution was calculated using the maximum speed, the average speed and uniform accelerations obtained from the literature to obtain an approximate continuous source distribution simulated with a Monte Carlo code. The transit component can be negligible or significant depending on the speed profile adopted, which is not clearly reported in the literature. The significance of the transit dose can also be due to the treatment modality; in our study interstitial treatments exhibited the largest effects. Considering the worst case scenario the transit dose can reach 3% of the prescribed dose in a gynecological case with four catheters and up to 11.1% when comparing the average prostate dose for a case with 16 catheters. The transit dose component increases by increasing the number of catheters used for HDR brachytherapy, reducing the total dwell time per catheter or increasing the number of dwell positions with low dwell times. This contribution may become significant (>5%) if it is not corrected appropriately. The transit dose cannot be completely compensated using simple dwell time corrections since it may have a non-uniform distribution. An accurate measurement of the source acceleration and maximum speed should be

  3. The contribution from transit dose for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatments

    Brachytherapy treatment planning systems that use model-based dose calculation algorithms employ a more accurate approach that replaces the TG43-U1 water dose formalism and adopt the TG-186 recommendations regarding composition and geometry of patients and other relevant effects. However, no recommendations were provided on the transit dose due to the source traveling inside the patient. This study describes a methodology to calculate the transit dose using information from the treatment planning system (TPS) and considering the source's instantaneous and average speed for two prostate and two gynecological cases. The trajectory of the 192Ir HDR source was defined by importing applicator contour points and dwell positions from the TPS. The transit dose distribution was calculated using the maximum speed, the average speed and uniform accelerations obtained from the literature to obtain an approximate continuous source distribution simulated with a Monte Carlo code. The transit component can be negligible or significant depending on the speed profile adopted, which is not clearly reported in the literature. The significance of the transit dose can also be due to the treatment modality; in our study interstitial treatments exhibited the largest effects. Considering the worst case scenario the transit dose can reach 3% of the prescribed dose in a gynecological case with four catheters and up to 11.1% when comparing the average prostate dose for a case with 16 catheters. The transit dose component increases by increasing the number of catheters used for HDR brachytherapy, reducing the total dwell time per catheter or increasing the number of dwell positions with low dwell times. This contribution may become significant (>5%) if it is not corrected appropriately. The transit dose cannot be completely compensated using simple dwell time corrections since it may have a non-uniform distribution. An accurate measurement of the source acceleration and maximum speed

  4. Monte Carlo estimation of dose difference in lung from 192Ir brachytherapy due to tissue inhomogeneity

    Lung brachytherapy using high-dose rate 192Ir technique is a well-established technique of radiation therapy. However, many commercial treatment planning systems do not have the ability to consider the inhomogeneity of lung in relation to normal tissue. Under such circumstances dose calculations for tissues and organs at risk close to the target are inaccurate. The purpose of the current study was to estimate the dose difference due to tissue inhomogeneity using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP-5. Results showed that there was a relative sub dosage by treatment planning systems calculations in neighbouring tissues around the radioactive source due to inhomogeneity ignorance. The presence of lung instead of normal tissue resulted in an increase in relative dose, which approached 8 % at 4-cm distance from the source. Additionally, the relative increase was small for the lung (2.1 %) and larger for organs at risk such as the heart (6.8 %) and bone marrow (7.6 %). (authors)

  5. Influence of the 192Ir source decay on biological effect

    Biological effect of the 192Ir high activity source on LA795 tumor of mice and HCT-8 cells have been investigated when decay of the source power from 340.4 GBq to 81.4 GBq no marked difference was found between the two cell survival curves of HCT-8 cells and both of them compared with that of the X-ray irradiation the value of relative biological effect (0.1 survival) was 0.43. On the experiment of tumor LA795 of mice, when the source power was 293.3 GBq and 96.2 GBq, no different biological effect can be seen between the two series of figures. The relative biological effect was 0.55-0.60 (tumor growth delay) comparing with those of X-ray irradiation

  6. Calculation of dose decrease in a finite phantom of a 192Ir point source

    The purpose of this study was to calculate the dose decrease in a finite phantom of a 192Ir-point source by using a new algorithm based on field theory. The methods used included the phenomenological application of the principle ''mirror image of an electric point source in front of a dielectric semi-plateau'' to a radioactive source in a finite phantom results in a function to calculate the dose decrease near the surface. Measurements were done in a water phantom in three different experimental setups. To verify the calculated results Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of dose distribution of a 192Ir point source in 34x40x40 cm3 water were carried out. The strength of mirror source was found -0.103 of the real source. A lack scatter function was necessary to handle the dose decrease very close to surface. The measured and calculated dose values differed less than 0.9%. Both MC simulations and the new algorithm show the dose decrease near phantom surface with differences less than 2% between each other. The new algorithm based on field theory calculated the dose decrease of a 192Ir point source in a finite phantom with a very good agreement to measured and simulated data. A clinical example, which affects only a single planar boundary, is given by using molds in the treatment of skin tumors. This was calculated with the new algorithm presented in this article. The comparison with the common algorithm demonstrates the differences that might cause an overestimation of the dose, which probably leads an underdosing of the tumor. The general use of the new algorithm in brachytherapy where a variety of boundary shapes are encountered has to be verified seriously

  7. Air kerma rate measurements of 192Ir source in Gammamed 12i HDR/PDR unit using well type ionization chamber

    The use of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in radiotherapy department has increased nowadays. The initial activity of 192Ir sources, used in high dose rate brachytherapy unit is approximately 10 Ci. About 3 to 4 times per year, a replacement is made of these sources, because of the decay half-life of 192Ir with 73.83 days. It is recommended that each time a new HDR source is installed for use in clinical routine, a source calibration in the hospital should be carried out

  8. Microdosimetric spread for cell-sized targets exposed to 60Co, 192Ir and 125I sources

    The magnitude of the spread in specific energy deposition per cell may be a confounding factor in dose- response analysis motivating derivation of explicit data for the most common brachytherapy isotopes 125I and 192Ir, and for 60Co radiation frequently used as reference in RBE studies. The aim of this study is to analyse the microdosimetric spread as given by the frequency distribution of specific energy for a range of doses imparted by 125I, 192Ir and 60Co sources. An upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used for scoring energy deposition distributions in liquid water for each of the radiation qualities. Frequency distributions of specific energy were calculated according to the formalism of Kellerer and Chmelevsky. Results indicate that the magnitude of the microdosimetric spread increases with decreasing target size and decreasing energy of the radiation quality. Within the clinical relevant dose range (1 to 100 Gy), the spread does not exceed 4 % for 60Co, 5 % for 192Ir and 6 % for 125I. The frequency distributions can be accurately approximated with symmetrical normal distributions at doses down to 0.2 Gy for 60Co, 0.1 Gy for 192Ir and 0.08 Gy for 125I. (authors)

  9. HDR 192Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR 192Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a 192Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases

  10. HDR {sup 192}Ir source speed measurements using a high speed video camera

    Fonseca, Gabriel P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Viana, Rodrigo S. S.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Podesta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Rubo, Rodrigo A.; Sales, Camila P. de [Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo—HC/FMUSP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Reniers, Brigitte [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Research Group NuTeC, CMK, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw H, Diepenbeek B-3590 (Belgium); Verhaegen, Frank, E-mail: frank.verhaegen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology - MAASTRO, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The dose delivered with a HDR {sup 192}Ir afterloader can be separated into a dwell component, and a transit component resulting from the source movement. The transit component is directly dependent on the source speed profile and it is the goal of this study to measure accurate source speed profiles. Methods: A high speed video camera was used to record the movement of a {sup 192}Ir source (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Stockholm, Sweden) for interdwell distances of 0.25–5 cm with dwell times of 0.1, 1, and 2 s. Transit dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the source movement. Results: The source stops at each dwell position oscillating around the desired position for a duration up to (0.026 ± 0.005) s. The source speed profile shows variations between 0 and 81 cm/s with average speed of ∼33 cm/s for most of the interdwell distances. The source stops for up to (0.005 ± 0.001) s at nonprogrammed positions in between two programmed dwell positions. The dwell time correction applied by the manufacturer compensates the transit dose between the dwell positions leading to a maximum overdose of 41 mGy for the considered cases and assuming an air-kerma strength of 48 000 U. The transit dose component is not uniformly distributed leading to over and underdoses, which is within 1.4% for commonly prescribed doses (3–10 Gy). Conclusions: The source maintains its speed even for the short interdwell distances. Dose variations due to the transit dose component are much lower than the prescribed treatment doses for brachytherapy, although transit dose component should be evaluated individually for clinical cases.

  11. Air kerma strength calibration of 0.6 cc Farmer chamber for 192Ir HDR source

    One of the methods adopted by hospitals for the calibration of the HDR 192Ir source, in terms of Air Kerma Strength (AKS) is to use 0.6cc chamber at short source to chamber distances for measuring the air kerma rate at the chamber position and then compute the AKS using the appropriate correction factors. However, the 0.6 cc Farmer type chambers purchased by the users for the calibration of the HDR 192Ir source, are not generally provided with an HDR 192Ir calibration factor. With the result, many hospitals that have purchased the Farmer type chamber for the calibration of 192Ir HDR sources, use the 60Co calibration factor for this purpose. The use of 60Co calibration factor for the 192Ir HDR source would unnecessarily increase the uncertainty of the measured AKS. Again, because of the low chamber sensitivity, hospitals often use, source to chamber distances as small as a few cm for calibrating the 192Ir HDR source. In the absence of a rigid source-chamber positioning system, this can lead to several percent errors in AKS determination. Also, hospitals often don't take into account corrections for the room scatter or the fluence non-uniformity across the chamber, which further increase the uncertainty of the measured AKS

  12. Comparison of air-kerma strength determinations for HDR 192Ir sources

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of the interim air-kerma strength standard for high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources maintained by University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL) with measurements of the various source models using modified techniques from the literature. The current interim standard was established by Goetsch et al. in 1991 and has remained unchanged to date. Methods: The improved, laser-aligned seven-distance apparatus of University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC) was used to perform air-kerma strength measurements of five different HDR 192Ir source models. The results of these measurements were compared with those from well chambers traceable to the original standard. Alternative methodologies for interpolating the 192Ir air-kerma calibration coefficient from the NIST air-kerma standards at 137Cs and 250 kVp x rays (M250) were investigated and intercompared. As part of the interpolation method comparison, the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc was used to calculate updated values of Awall for the Exradin A3 chamber used for air-kerma strength measurements. The effects of air attenuation and scatter, room scatter, as well as the solution method were investigated in detail. Results: The average measurements when using the inverse NK interpolation method for the Classic Nucletron, Nucletron microSelectron, VariSource VS2000, GammaMed Plus, and Flexisource were found to be 0.47%, -0.10%, -1.13%, -0.20%, and 0.89% different than the existing standard, respectively. A further investigation of the differences observed between the sources was performed using MCNP5 Monte Carlo simulations of each source model inside a full model of an HDR 1000 Plus well chamber. Conclusions: Although the differences between the source models were found to be statistically significant, the equally weighted average difference between the seven-distance measurements and the well chambers was 0.01%, confirming that it is

  13. High-Dose-Rate 192Ir Brachytherapy Dose Verification: A Phantom Study

    Alireza Nikoofar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy might be an effective tool for palliation of dysphagia. Because of some concerns about adverse effects due to absorbed radiation dose, it is important to estimate absorbed dose in risky organs during this treatment. Objectives: This study aimed to measure the absorbed dose in the parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, eye, trachea, spinal cord, and manubrium of sternum in brachytherapy in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: To measure radiation dose, eye, parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, spine, and sternum, an anthropomorphic phantom was considered with applicators to set thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs. A specific target volume of about 23 cm3 in the upper thoracic esophagus was considered as target, and phantom planned computed tomography (CT for HDR brachytherapy, then with a micro-Selectron HDR (192Ir remote after-loading unit. Results: Absorbed doses were measured with calibrated TLDs and were expressed in centi-Gray (cGy. In regions far from target (≥ 16 cm such as submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands, mean measured dose ranged from 1.65 to 5.5 cGy. In closer regions (≤ 16 cm, the absorbed dose might be as high as 113 cGy. Conclusions: Our study showed similar depth and surface doses; in closer regions, the surface and depth doses differed significantly due to the role of primary radiation that had imposed a high-dose gradient and difference between the plan and measurement, which was more severe because of simplifications in tissue inhomogeneity, considered in TPS relative to phantom.

  14. Evaluation of radiation dose on people adjacent to implant patients during brachytherapy for prostate cancer using {sup 192}Ir

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo [Catholic University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The incidence of prostate cancer is rapidly increasing due to aging of the population and westernization of dietary habits, etc. As a result, the frequency of prostate cancer has become the fifth highest among all male cancers and the first among urological cancers. Brachytherapy is commonly used for locally progressing prostate cancers. Since the mid 1980s, therapies using radio-isotopes, such as low-invasive {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd and {sup 192}Ir, have been widely performed in the U.S. and Europe. However, brachytherapy involves implanting radio-isotopes into the human body which is of concern because it may expose the health care professionals administering the therapy to unnecessary radiation. Accordingly, this study intends to predict the radiation dose that people adjacent to patients implanted with a radio-isotope are exposed to during prostate cancer radiation therapy by using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and {sup 192}Ir.

  15. Evaluation of radiation dose on people adjacent to implant patients during brachytherapy for prostate cancer using 192Ir

    The incidence of prostate cancer is rapidly increasing due to aging of the population and westernization of dietary habits, etc. As a result, the frequency of prostate cancer has become the fifth highest among all male cancers and the first among urological cancers. Brachytherapy is commonly used for locally progressing prostate cancers. Since the mid 1980s, therapies using radio-isotopes, such as low-invasive 125I, 103Pd and 192Ir, have been widely performed in the U.S. and Europe. However, brachytherapy involves implanting radio-isotopes into the human body which is of concern because it may expose the health care professionals administering the therapy to unnecessary radiation. Accordingly, this study intends to predict the radiation dose that people adjacent to patients implanted with a radio-isotope are exposed to during prostate cancer radiation therapy by using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and 192Ir

  16. Assessment of Absorbed Dose in Persons close to the Patients during 192Ir brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    According to the 2007 Annual Report of the National Cancer Registry, cervical cancer showed an occurring frequency of 7th in female cancers and 4rd in females with an age of 35-64 years. Both radiotherapy and chemotherapy are mainly used for the treatment of cervical cancer. In case of radiotherapy, brachytherapy using radioisotopes in conjunction with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) using a linear accelerator is used in most cases to improve the outcome of cancer treatment. Brachytherapy, one of the cervical cancer radiotherapies, is a method that can minimize the damage of normal tissues restricting absorbed dose to uterus. It is, however, necessary to conduct a quantitative assessment on brachytherapy because it may cause radiation exposure to medical care providers during the radiotherapy. Therefore, the study provides the basic research data regarding brachytherapy for cervical cancer, estimating the absorbed dose in persons close to the patients using a mathematical phantom during 192Ir brachytherapy for cervical cancer

  17. Characterization of TLD-100 in powders for dosimetric quality control of {sup 192} Ir sources used in brachytherapy of high dose rate; Caracterizacion de TLD-100 en polvo para control de calidad dosimetrico de fuentes de Ir{sup 192} usadas en braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Loaiza C, S.P

    2007-07-01

    The Secondary Standard Dosimetric at the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) calibrated a lot of powdered TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in terms of absorbed dose to water D{sub w} for the energy of: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137C}s, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Later on, it is carried out an interpolation of the calibration for the energy of the {sup 192}Ir. This calibration is part of a dosimetric quality control program, to solve the problems of traceability for the measurements carried out by the users of {sup 192}Ir sources employed in the treatments of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR) at the Mexican Republic. The calibrations of the radiation beams are made with the following protocols: IAEA TRS-398 for the {sup 60}Co for D{sub w}, using a secondary standard ionization chamber PTW N30013 calibrated in D{sub w} by the National Research Council (NRC, Canada). AAPM TG-43 for D{sub w} in terms of the strength kerma Sk, calibrating this last one quantity for the {sup 137}Cs radioactive source, with a well chamber HDR 1000 PLUS traceable to the University of Wisconsin (US). AAPM TG-61 for X ray of 250 and 50 kVp for D{sub w} start to Ka using field standard a Farmer chamber PTW 30001 traceable to K for the Central Laboratory of Electric Industries (CLEI, France). The calibration curves (CC) they built for the response of the powder TLD: R{sub TLD} vs D{sub w}: For the energy of {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, X rays of 250 and 50 kVp. Fitting them with the least square method weighed by means of a polynomial of second grade that corrects the supra linearity of the response. iii. Each one of the curves was validated with a test by lack of fitting and for the Anderson Darling normality test, using the software MINITAB in both cases. iv. The sensibility factor (F{sub s}) for each energy corresponds to the slope of the CC, v. The F{sub s} for the two {sup 192}Ir sources used are interpolated: one for a Micro Selectron source and the other one a Vari Source source. Finally, a couple of

  18. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue using a high dose rate 192Ir remote afterloader

    We have applied an interstitial brachytherapy employing a high dose rate 192Ir remote afterloader to five patients with cancer of the base of tongue since December 1994. Insertion of applicators was carried out with tracheotomy under general anesthesia. Brachytherapy was delivered twice a day with a 6-hour interval. Irradiation dose was estimated at the point of 5 mm from outer applicators. HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated for 4-5 days in all patients and acute radiation reaction was minimal. Local control were observed in two cases. In conclusion, our preliminary experience suggests that HDR brachytherapy may be an option in the radiotherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue. Optimal dose-fractionation protocol should be established. (author)

  19. Calibration of Gammamed 12i 192Ir high dose rate source

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been used in our department for cancer treatment for about three years. The HDR 192Ir source is usually calibrated using a well-type ionisation chamber or a thimble chamber free in air. This paper presents the calibration of 11 sources using Standard Imaging HDR1000 well chamber. We investigated the effect of location of the chamber in the room and scatter environment on output ionisation current and determined the most sensitive measurement point in the chamber. The largest discrepancy between the measured air kerma rate (AKR) and manufacturer's specification was 3.4%.These results were compared with calibration in the air done using the 0.6 ccm Farmer-type chamber, attached to a special lightweight holder. Instead of interpolative techniques recommended by either the IAEA or authorised laboratories, we used a calibration coefficient for 60Co quality only. Beside the conventional electrometer/chamber corrections, the exposure gradient corrections due to the finite dimensions of the chamber were employed. The influence of room scatter was also estimated. Preliminary results of calibration in air indicated that well chamber calibration and Farmer chamber calibration with 60Co calibration factor were within 2%.(author)

  20. Correction factors for Farmer-type chambers for absorbed dose determination in 60Co and 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry

    This paper presents experimentally determined correction factors for Farmer-type chambers for absorbed dose determination in 60Co and 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry. The correction factors were determined from measurements made in a PMMA phantom and calculation of ratios of measured charges. The ratios were corrected for the different volumes of the ionization chambers, determined in external high-energy electron beams. The correction factors for the central electrode effect and the wall material dependency in 60Co brachytherapy dosimetry agree with those used in external 60Co beam dosimetry. In 192Ir dosimetry, the central aluminium electrode increases the response of an NE2571 chamber compared with that of a chamber with a central graphite electrode. The increase is 1.1 and 2.1% at 1.5 and 5.0 g cm-2 distance, respectively. Similar values are obtained with an NE2577 chamber. The wall correction factor in 192Ir dosimetry for a chamber with an A-150 wall has been determined to be 1.018, independent of the measurement distance. For a graphite walled chamber, the correction factor is 0.996 and 1.001 at 1.5 and 5.0 g cm-2 distance, respectively. The values of the wall correction factors are evaluated by a theory presented. If the chamber is used according to the 'large cavity' principle, the correction factor to account for the replacement of the phantom material by the ionization chamber was determined to be 0.982 for an NE2571 chamber when used with a Delrin cap, and 0.978 for an NE2581 when used with a polystyrene cap. The correction factors for the 'large cavity' principle are valid at both 60Co and 192Ir qualities. (author)

  1. Effects of Endovascular Brachytherapy with 192Ir Afterloading System on Expression of Type Ⅰ Collagen after Angioplasty

    向定成; 杨传红; 候友贤; 龚志华; 易绍东; 邱建

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investi-gate the effect and mechanism of endovascularbrachytherapy with 192Ir on expression of type Ⅰ collagen, metalloproteinases - 1 (MMP - 1) and the tissueinhibitor (TIMP- 1 ) after angioplasty. MethodsRestenotic model of domestic microswine was em-ployed and the iliac arteries were randomized to radi-ation group ( n = 12), which were treated with 20 ~ 25Gy of 192Ir, and non - radiation group ( n = 36) afterangioplasty. The target vessels were harvested in theend of 3 months and 6 months after angioplasty. Im-munohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were usedto detect proteins of type Ⅰ collagen, MMP-1 andTIMP- 1, and mRNA expression of type Ⅰ collagen.Results The protein and mRNA of type Ⅰ collagen,the ratios of TIMP-1/MMP-1 were significantlylower iu radiation group than in non- radiation group( P < 0.05 or 0.01 ). The peak of transcription of typeⅠ collagen mRNA was at 6 months and 3 months in non-radiation group and radiation group respectively.Conclusions Endovascular brachytherapy with192Ir might modify the metabolism of extracellular ma-trix after angioplasty by inhibiting the synthesis of typeⅠ collagen and the activities of MMP - 1 and TIMP - 1.

  2. Production of 198Au and 192Ir sources for cancer therapy

    Radiation sources of 198Au and 192Ir in various types have been developed for cancer therapy, which are '198Au grains' and 'hairpin, single pin, thin wire, seed and seed assembly of 192Ir'. The products are being supplied to a number of cancer clinics in Japan. As target materials, gold metal and iridium/platinum alloy were used; iridium/platinum alloy gives flexibility to products and reduces pains in the patients. Grains and wires of the target materials were of platinum covered, and irradiated in the JRR-2 or JRR-4 reactor. The platinum cover absorbs the β rays of 198Au and 192Ir, which are not effective for cancer therapy. The neutron irradiation conditions were controlled to produce the following radioactivities: The 198Au grains are 185 MBq each at the time to be used in clinics, the 192Ir source radioactivities were, assayed at the time of shipment, 740 MBq each for the hairpin, 370 MBq for the single pin, 37 MBq for the seed, a radioactivity equivalent to 37 MBq multiplied by the number of seeds loaded for the seed assembly, and 148 MBq, 222 MBq or 370 MBq for the thin wire. There has been confirmed neither significant contamination of other radioactivities nor ununiformity of the radioactivity in the wire source. The radioactivities of products have been kept within ± 5% of an averaged value, except for the seed. For producing the seed assemblies, neutron irradiated seed and spacer teflon wires are loaded one by one into a teflon tube. This loading process and the measurement of radioactivities were automated to meet increased demands. In fiscal year 1989, the 198Au grains were produced in 48 batches and 2570 pieces were shipped and the 192Ir sources were produced in 39 batches and 4852 pieces were delivered, meeting all domestic demands. Being accompanied with the documents related to the production process, the present report is also usable as a production manual. (author)

  3. Dosimetric verification of source strength for HDR afterloading units with 192Ir- and 60Co- photon sources: comparison of three different international protocols

    Before clinical use of a brachytherapy source, regulations or recommendations by medical physics societies require an independent measurement of its air kerma strength by a qualified medical physicist. Currently, in addition to 192Ir, also HDR-60Co sources are increasingly coming into operation. However, the existing dosimetry protocols do not provide any guidelines for 60Co sources. The purpose of this work was therefore to compare air Kerma rate measurements as recommended by different dosimetry protocols for 192Ir HDR sources and to test their applicability to 60Co sources. Dosimetric verification of HDR afterloading source specification was performed according to three protocols, DIN 6809-2 (1993) in combination with DGMP-Report 13 (2006), IAEA-TECDOC-1274 (2002) and AAPM Report 41 (1993) for the nuclides 192Ir and 60Co. Measurements of the sources reference air kerma rate were performed with 3 different methods (with a cylindrical chamber both in a solid phantom and in free air, and with a well chamber) and evaluated using all three protocols for each type of source and method of measurement. The measurements with all protocols and methods show deviations from the certified specification smaller than about 1.2% for 192Ir and 2.5% for 60Co sources. The measurements with the well chamber showed the lowest deviations from the certificate value. Air kerma rate measurements for 60Co HDR sources using the existing protocols are possible with accuracy sufficient to verify source calibration as provided by the source certificate. However, extension of the protocols by correction factors for measurement with 60Co sources would be helpful. (author)

  4. The mean photon energy ĒF at the point of measurement determines the detector-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ,M in (192)Ir brachytherapy dosimetry.

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Poppe, Björn

    2016-09-01

    The application of various radiation detectors for brachytherapy dosimetry has motivated this study of the energy dependence of radiation quality correction factor kQ,M, the quotient of the detector responses under calibration conditions at a (60)Co unit and under the given non-reference conditions at the point of measurement, M, occurring in photon brachytherapy. The investigated detectors comprise TLD, radiochromic film, ESR, Si diode, plastic scintillator and diamond crystal detectors as well as ionization chambers of various sizes, whose measured response-energy relationships, taken from the literature, served as input data. Brachytherapy photon fields were Monte-Carlo simulated for an ideal isotropic (192)Ir point source, a model spherical (192)Ir source with steel encapsulation and a commercial HDR GammaMed Plus source. The radial source distance was varied within cylindrical water phantoms with outer radii ranging from 10 to 30cm and heights from 20 to 60cm. By application of this semiempirical method - originally developed for teletherapy dosimetry - it has been shown that factor kQ,M is closely correlated with a single variable, the fluence-weighted mean photon energy ĒF at the point of measurement. The radial profiles of ĒF obtained with either the commercial (192)Ir source or the two simplified source variants show little variation. The observed correlations between parameters kQ,M and ĒF are represented by fitting formulae for all investigated detectors, and further variation of the detector type is foreseen. The herewith established close correlation of radiation quality correction factor kQ,M with local mean photon energy ĒF can be regarded as a simple regularity, facilitating the practical application of correction factor kQ,M for in-phantom dosimetry around (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. ĒF values can be assessed by Monte Carlo simulation or measurement. A technique describing the local measurement of ĒF will be published separately. PMID

  5. The influence of different 192Ir sources geometries to the energy deposition

    In this paper, various simplifications of the HDR source Varian VariSource Classic model, in which 192Ir as a radionuclide is used, were compared. These simplifications were carried out by the simulation of Monte Carlo, using the MCNPX code. The different sources were compared through a distribution of energy deposition in a water phantom. Our results indicated that small simplifications will present no influence on the source response, and the removal of the entire capsule surrounding the radionuclide will present a difference of just 0.51% in the final response. (author)

  6. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR 192Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable Sk calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361±7 μGy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR 192Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  7. Experimental 3D dosimetry around a high-dose-rate clinical 192Ir source using a polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter

    It is well known that the experimental dosimetry of brachytherapy sources presents a challenge. Depending on the particular dosimeter used, measurements can suffer from poor spatial resolution (ion chambers), lack of 3D information (film) or errors due to the presence of the dosimeter itself distorting the radiation flux. To avoid these problems, we have investigated the dosimetry of a clinical 192Ir source using a polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter. Experimental measurements of dose versus radial distance from the centre of the source (cross-line plots) were compared with calculations produced with a Nucletron NPS planning system. Good agreement was found between the planning system and gel measurements in planes selected for analysis. Gel dosimeter measurements in a coronal plane through the phantom showed a mean difference between measured absorbed dose and calculated dose of 0.17 Gy with SD=0.13Gy. Spatially, the errors at the reference point remain within one image pixel (1.0 mm). The use of polymer gel dosimetry shows promise for brachytherapy applications, offering complete, three-dimensional dose information, good spatial resolution and small measurement errors. Measurements close to the source, however, are difficult, due to some of the limiting properties of the polyacrylamide gel. (author)

  8. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Reniers, Brigitte; Nilsson, Josef; Persson, Maria; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for 192Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources.

  9. Accuracy of applicator tip reconstruction in MRI-guided interstitial 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy of liver tumors

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy of brachytherapy (BT) applicators tips in vitro and in vivo in MRI-guided 192Ir-high-dose-rate (HDR)-BT of inoperable liver tumors. Materials and methods: Reconstruction accuracy of plastic BT applicators, visualized by nitinol inserts, was assessed in MRI phantom measurements and in MRI 192Ir-HDR-BT treatment planning datasets of 45 patients employing CT co-registration and vector decomposition. Conspicuity, short-term dislocation, and reconstruction errors were assessed in the clinical data. The clinical effect of applicator reconstruction accuracy was determined in follow-up MRI data. Results: Applicator reconstruction accuracy was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm in the phantom measurements. In the clinical MRI datasets applicator conspicuity was rated good/optimal in ⩾72% of cases. 16/129 applicators showed not time dependent deviation in between MRI/CT acquisition (p > 0.1). Reconstruction accuracy was 5.5 ± 2.8 mm, and the average image co-registration error was 3.1 ± 0.9 mm. Vector decomposition revealed no preferred direction of reconstruction errors. In the follow-up data deviation of planned dose distribution and irradiation effect was 6.9 ± 3.3 mm matching the mean co-registration error (6.5 ± 2.5 mm; p > 0.1). Conclusion: Applicator reconstruction accuracy in vitro conforms to AAPM TG 56 standard. Nitinol-inserts are feasible for applicator visualization and yield good conspicuity in MRI treatment planning data. No preferred direction of reconstruction errors were found in vivo

  10. Stem signal suppression in fiber-coupled Al2O3:C dosimetry for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Andersen, Claus Erik; Edmund, J.M.;

    2011-01-01

    was adapted for on-line in-vivo dosimetry using fiber-coupled carbon doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C). The technique involved a two-channel optical filtration of the radioluminescence (RL) emitted from a pre-irradiated Al2O3:C crystal with enhanced sensitivity. The system responded linearly in the...... absorbed dose range 0.05–50 Gy, as needed under high dose rate (HDR) conditions. The dosimeter was irradiated in a water phantom using a 37 GBq 192Ir source at source-to-crystal distances ranging from 0.5 cm to 6.7 cm. For irradiation conditions that generated a stem component in the range 4%–15% in the...

  11. Determination of the G value for HDR 192Ir sources using ionometric measurements

    A dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of absolute dose to water for 192Ir source is currently still under development. For the time being, the dose to water conversion is done via a dose rate constant Λ and several correction factors accounting for scatter, attenuation, and anisotropy of the dose distribution among other effects. Recently a report has been published on a water-based calorimeter with an overall uncertainties of 1.9 % k=1. Chemical dosimetry using a standard FeS04 solution has shown to be a reliable absorbed dose standard. Absolute absorbed dose to water measurement has been explored using Fricke for 192Ir HDR sources with uncertainties estimated of 3.9 % k=1 and very recently similar work has reported improved results with much lower uncertainties of 1.24% k=1. The G values previously reported is the major uncertainty associated to this technique and this paper presents new G values measured with ion chambers using recent dosimetry protocols. For this study, the source was positioned in a PMMA holder with its center coinciding with the center of a Framer type the ion chamber and the Fricke solution holder. The solution container was constructed with the same volume and dimensions of the ion chamber. The measurements were taken with the ion chamber placed in one of the holders and the Fricke solutions in the other three holders. The chamber and the Fricke were irradiated in all four times around the source in order to minimize the positioning uncertainties and the average reading values for each one were taken. For the 60Co and 6 MV, the beam measurements were made with the chamber at the center and the solutions on each side

  12. Anisotropy measurement of {sup 192} Ir sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy; Medida da anisotropia de fontes de Ir-192 utilizadas em braquiterapia de altas taxa de dose

    Henn, Keli Cristina; Khoury, Helen J.; Luz, Lidia Cristina P. da [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the dose distribution around the Ir-192 source used in MicroSelectron-HDR remote after loader system. The measurements were made in air with the source stationary, positioned at the position 1, from the indexer of the microSelectron-HDR. Measurements were made using TLD and for radial distances of 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 cm, for values of the angle from 0 deg c to 360 deg C in steps of 15 deg C. (author)

  13. Dose specification for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-in-medium (Dm,m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (Dw,m). The relation between Dm,m and Dw,m for 192Ir is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of Dw,m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: Dm,m, Dw,m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. Dw,m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (<1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between Dw,m (SCT) and Dw,m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between Dm,m and Dw,m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources. (paper)

  14. Interstitial brachytherapy with 192-IR in treatment of recurrent malignant primary brain tumors. Braquiterapia intersticial con iridio-192 en el tratamiento de recidivas de tumores cerebrales tras cirugia y radioterapia

    Cardenes, R.; Martinez, R.; Victoria, C.; Nuez, L.; Clavo, B.; Sancedo, G. (Clinica Puerta de Hierro. Madrid (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Seven patients with recurrent malignant primary brain tumors after surgery and radiation therapy were treated at the Clinica Puerta de Hierro (Madrid) by interstitial brachytherapy with 192-Ir sources. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography and dose prescription were determined following the Paris system rules for interstitial implants. The means dose deliberated was 50 to 65 Gy to the reference isodoses. At the last follow-up all patients except for one are alive and without evidence of progression of the disease. (Author) 35 refs.

  15. The correlation between DVH at CT-image based 192Ir intracavitary brachytherapy and effects or complications for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between dose volume histogram (DVH) of tumor targets and organs at risk (OAR) at CT-image based 192Ir brachytherapy and effects and complications for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods: Ten patients with FIGO stage IIIB cervical cancer received CT image-based 192Ir intracavitary brachytherapy after 54 Gy of three-dimensional four-field pelvic external beam radiotherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy. Before each brachytherapy, CT images were acquired with applicators in place. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and OAR were contoured and inverse treatment planning was designed and optimized by using PLATO treatment planning system. Conventional two-dimensional plans were also designed for comparison.The total intracavitary brachytherapy dose was 30-42 Gy in 5-7 fractions. The patients were followed, and the local control and complications were analyzed. The biologically equivalent dose (BED) and biologically equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (BED2) for GTV, CTV and OAR were calculated. The minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume 2 cm3 (D2cm3)adjacent to the applicator of the sigmoid colon, rectum,bladder and small bowel was determined from the DVH. Results: The 1-year local pelvic control rate was 90% and grade 1-2 late complication of sigmoid colon and rectum was 50%. No grade 3 or more complications developed. On CT-image based planning, the BED and BED2 to 90% of the CTV (D90) were 95.50 Gy ± 7. 81 Gy and 79. 73 Gy ± 6. 57 Gy. The BED and BED2 to 90% of the GTV (D90) were 101.86 Gy ± 7.27 Gy and 84. 95 Gy ± 6. 1 Gy. The volume enclosed by 90% of prescribed dose (V90) for GTV and CTV were 92% ±4% and 87% ±7% respectively. The D2cm3 for rectum and sigmoid colon were 74. 97 Gy ±1.64 Gy and 67. 93 Gy ± 4. 30 Gy(EQD2, α/β = 3). Comparing with 2D brachytherapy plans , CT - image based planning has improved D90 and V90 for GTV and CTV with similar dose

  16. Calibration of 192Ir high-dose-rate afterloading systems

    A method is described for calibration of 192Ir high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy afterloading systems. Since NIST does not offer calibration of ionization chambers with the gamma-ray spectrum of iridium-192, an interpolation procedure is employed, using calibrations above (137Cs, 662 keV) and below (250 kVcp, 146-keV x rays) the exposure-weighted average 192Ir energy of 397 keV. The same total wall + cap thickness must be used for both calibrations, and for the 192Ir measurements. A wall + cap thickness of 0.3 g/cm2 is recommended to assure charged particle equilibrium and to exclude secondary electrons emitted from the source encapsulation. Procedures are described for determining the corrections for source-chamber distance and room scatter during the source calibration in inverse-square-law geometry. A new well-type ionization chamber has been designed specifically for convenient routine use with the HDR afterloading system. It can be calibrated by means of a previously calibrated 192Ir source, and offers a simple means for verifying the decay rate and for calibrating 192Ir replacement sources

  17. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate 192 Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for 192 Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the Nk for a Farmer type ionization chamber for 192 Ir energy by interpolating from a 60 Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within ± 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the Nk values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  18. Differentiation between radionecrosis and malignant brain tumor recurrence in patients treated by 192Ir HDR brachytherapy: 1H - MRS analysis of the brain metabolic spectrum

    Computerized tomography (CT) with contrast infusion and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) do not differentiate radionecrosis and malignant tumor recurrence. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy seems to be a new radiological method that could solve this problem. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usability of 1H - MRS in patients after brachytherapy. Sixty patients were treated by 192Ir HDR brachytherapy because of malignant brain tumors (gliomas and brain metastases). Prospectively, 4 months after brachytherapy, 24 patients underwent MRI and 1H - MRS examinations. All patients qualified for the prospective study were in good general condition before and after the brachytherapy (Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) > 60%). Combined assessment of MRI and 1H - MRS gave us the possibility to differentiate the observed pathological changes. In 18 cases (75%) there was a decrease in tumor volume. The tumor infiltration area was larger than the necrotic area in 5 cases. An isolated recurrence mass was observed in only one case. Neurosurgical brain decompression with pathological mass resection was needed in 6 patients with increased intracranial pressure and enhanced neurological deficits. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis revealed in the 1H - MRS examination in each case. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is helpful in evaluating the influence of radiation on the tumor and the surrounding brain tissue. Moreover, it solves the problem of differentiating between radionecrosis and tumor recurrence. (author)

  19. Proposal of a postal system for Ir-192 sources calibration used in high dose rate brachytherapy with LiF:Mn:Ti thermoluminescent dosemeters; Proposta de um sistema postal para a calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir, utilizadas em braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose, com dosimetros termoluminescentes de LiF: Mn: Ti

    Vieira, W.S.; Borges, J.C.; Almeida, C.E.V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria. CNEN Caixa Postal 37750, 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    A proposal in order to improve the brachytherapy quality control and to allow postal intercomparison of Ir-192 sources used in high dose rate brachytherapy has been presented. The LiF: Mn: Ti (TLD 100) detector has been selected for such purpose. The experimental array and the TLDs irradiation and calibration techniques, at the treatment units, have been specified in the light of more recent methodology of Ir-192 calibration sources. (Author)

  20. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas) by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001, respectively), as were the shifts between 6 and 12 weeks examinations (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the

  1. Fractionated intraluminal HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy as palliative treatment in patients with endobronchial metastases from non-bronchogenic primaries

    Stranzl, H.; Gabor, S.; Mayer, R.; Prettenhofer, U.; Wurzinger, G.; Hackl, A. [University Medical School of Graz (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of iridium-192 high-dose rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy for the palliation of symptoms caused by endobronchial metastases of non-bronchogenic primaries. Patients and method: Between 1991 and 1998, eleven patients (female n=3, male n=8; age: median 66 years, range 44-81 years) underwent intraluminal HDR brachytherapy for histologically confirmed endobronchial metastases from non-pulmonary primary tumors of various sites like urogenital tract (n=5), gastrointestinal tract (n=3), ear/nose/throat (n=2) and breast (n=1). The median time between diagnosis of the primary non-bronchogenic tumor and histopathological diagnosis of the endobronchial metastases was 39 months, range 1-99 months. A total dose of 15-20 Gy was delivered in three to four fractions of 5-6 Gy once a week. No palliative chemotherapy was added. Results: Median follow-up after palliative brachytherapy was 15 months (range 1.4-59 months). Objectively, complete endoscopic response was observed in three (27%) patients, and in five (46%) others partial opening of the initially obstructed airway was achieved. Treatment was judged unsuccessful in three (27%) patients. No patient showed up with local progression. At date of analysis five patients were alive with documented residual tumor (80%) or complete response (20%). Relief of symptoms occurred in the vast majority of patients (n=8, 73%). Conclusion: HDR intraluminal brachytherapy palliates symptoms in patients suffering from endobronchial metastases of nonpulmonary primary tumors. The applied treatment is a safe, effective and well tolerated palliative procedure leading to an improved patient quality of life. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Untersuchung des palliativen Effektes einer fraktionierten intraluminalen Iridium-192-High-Dose-Rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie bei Patienten mit endobronchialen Metastasen eines primaer nicht bronchogenen Tumors. Patienten und Methode: Zwischen April 1991 und September 1998 wurden elf

  2. Standardization of 192Ir

    Two 192Ir solutions were standardized by NPL and CBNM within the framework of EUROMET project no. 219. The 4 πβ-γ-coincidence method was used for these measurements, a 4πCsI(Tl) detector for gamma-ray spectrometry, and a NaI(Tl) well counter for 4π-gamma integral counting. The uncertainty of the result was 0.3%, corresponding to one standard deviation. Traceability was established to BIPM for the 192Ir activity measurements. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of two different methods to determine the air kerma calibration factor (NK) for 192Ir

    In brachytherapy, encapsulated radioactive Low Dose Rate (LDR) and High Dose Rate (HDR) sources are used to deliver a dose to tissue near the source. One of the nuclides used in LDR as well as in HDR brachytherapy sources is 192Ir. In document IAEA-TECDOC-1079, Calibration of Brachytherapy Sources, recommendations on standardized procedures for the calibration of brachytherapy sources at SSDLs and hospitals are given. One of these recommendations is the use of an ionisation chamber with an air-kerma calibration factor for 192lr sources. The problem to derive a calibration factor for 192Ir is that the most important part of the spectrum of an 192lr brachytherapy source falls in an energy gap between the standards for x-rays and the standards for gamma-rays established at primary laboratories. It is therefore unavoidable to obtain the air kerma calibration for the ionisation chamber using an indirect method. The method recommended by IAEA for the determination of the air-kerma calibration factors is based on a technique developed by Goetsch et al. In the Netherlands a different method is recommended. This method is based on a weighting procedure of the 192Ir energy spectrum over the response curve of an ionisation chamber and differs with the procedure recommended by IAEA for a NE2561 ionisation chamber by about 0.9 %

  4. High dose rate 192Ir calibration: Indonesia experiences

    Indonesia with a population of more than 200 Million people which spread on about 5000 islands, up to now only has 23 radiotherapy centers and some not active anymore. As mention by Parkin et al that Cervix/Utery and breast cancer are the most estimated numbers of new cases of cancers in women for developing countries, stomach and lung cancers in men. Indonesia as a developing country is likely similar to other developing countries on numbers of new cases of cancers in women. But quite different in men, in Indonesia the most common cancers are nasopharynx and thyroid cancers. The use of lr-192 sources in high dose-rate (HDR) remotely afterloaded brachytherapy treatments have greatly increased in recent years and variety of such sources are commercially available. Nine radiotherapy centers in Indonesia installed Nucletron microSelectron HDR remote afterloader. Based on the data of CiptoMangunkusurno Hospital, Jakarta that the most common cancers are the cervix, breast, nasopharynx and thyroid cancers which of percentage are about 31%, 25 %, 13%, and 6 % respectively. It means that the use of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy has to be an effective tool in the treatments. Two methods have been studied and applied to calibrate HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Indonesia, especially for Nucletron microSelectron HDR 192lr remote afterloader brachytherapy. Calibration of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source has been done by Cavity lonization Chamber and with Well Type lonization Chamber. First, 0.6 cc of NE Farmer type dosimeter that was calibrated to 60Co and 250 kV of x-rays in air kerma was used in this experiment. Position of measurement (detector and source) at the center of the room and about 1 meter from the floor. Eight variation of distances from 10 cm to 40 cms have been carried out measurement as recommended by IAEA-TECDOC-1079. Correction have been given for scatters, non-uniformity, and attenuation. To solve the problem of scatter correction factor was used Matlab programming. A

  5. Cuban laboratory proficiency test for calibration of well-type chambers using two types of HDR 192Ir sources

    The proficiency test by inter-laboratory comparisons is the commonly accepted procedure both for validation of the testing methods and assuring the quality of the calibration undertaken by the competence laboratories. The Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) of Cuba is located at the Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones (CPHR). The SSDL has recently implemented the calibration methodology of well-type chambers using the High Dose Rate 192Ir sources under activities of the technical co-operation project with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The reference standard of CPHR is traceable to the primary standard of the German National Metrology Institute (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt - PTB). The method used by the secondary laboratory follows the Technical Document 1274. On this method the source available is measured in a well-type chamber calibrated against the primary standard. Because there is no HDR afterloader at the SSDL, the calibration of the client source can be done only in the hospital set-up. The user's chamber is calibrated by means of a calibrated source. This method has the advantage that the measurement set-up is simplified but problems can arise from the use of different source designs during calibration of the secondary standard at the primary laboratory and calibration of the user's chambers at the hospital set-up. The variation of the calibration coefficient of the PTW 33004 chamber due to the use of different sources and adapters has already been measured experimentally. The larger differences can be found near 4%. All those facts reinforced the idea to conduct a proficiency test to demonstrate that the calibration procedure used by SSDL can be applied in practice and will not lead to the incorrect calibration coefficient within the stated uncertainty

  6. 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brain implant: optimisation

    The new modality of stepping source dosimetry system (SSDs) illustrates a remarkable improvement in attaining the uniform and homogeneous dose distribution within the target volume. The technique enables the physicist to correct for a certain amount of misplacement or curvature of implant geometry. The short course of brachytherapy provides good palliation in terms of functional improvements with low and acceptable toxicity in high-grade glioma. With continual refinements of the technique, brachytherapy performed by a skilled brachytherapy team offers an opportunity to improve patient survival and quality of life. Since 1997, micro selectron HDR 192Ir treatments are done including gynecological, oesophageal, breast, surface mould, soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and brain in our hospital. In this paper, procedure of interstitial brain implant in glioma as implant technique, simulation and treatment planning will be discussed

  7. SU-E-T-580: On the Significance of Model Based Dosimetry for Breast and Head and Neck 192Ir HDR Brachytherapy

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E; Pantelis, E; Papagiannis, P [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Major, T; Polgar, C [National Institute of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric and radiobiological differences between TG43-based and model-based dosimetry in the treatment planning of {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy for breast and head and neck cancer. Methods: Two cohorts of 57 Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) and 22 head and neck (H&N) patients with oral cavity carcinoma were studied. Dosimetry for the treatment plans was performed using the TG43 algorithm of the Oncentra Brachy v4.4 treatment planning system (TPS). Corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using MCNP6 with input files automatically prepared by the BrachyGuide software tool from DICOM RT plan data. TG43 and MC data were compared in terms of % dose differences, Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) and related indices of clinical interest for the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and the Organs-At-Risk (OARs). A radiobiological analysis was also performed using the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD), mean survival fraction (S) and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) for the PTV, and the Normal Tissue Control Probability (N TCP) and the generalized EUD (gEUD) for the OARs. Significance testing of the observed differences performed using the Wilcoxon paired sample test. Results: Differences between TG43 and MC DVH indices, associated with the increased corresponding local % dose differences observed, were statistically significant. This is mainly attributed to their consistency however, since TG43 agrees closely with MC for the majority of DVH and radiobiological parameters in both patient cohorts. Differences varied considerably among patients only for the ipsilateral lung and ribs in the APBI cohort, with a strong correlation to target location. Conclusion: While the consistency and magnitude of differences in the majority of clinically relevant DVH indices imply that no change is needed in the treatment planning practice, individualized dosimetry improves accuracy and addresses instances of inter-patient variability observed. Research

  8. An innovative method for 192Ir HDR calibration by farmer chamber, V-film, and solid phantom

    A simple, practical and economical technique was proposed to calibrate an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source in terms of air kerma strength. This technique makes use of the 0.6 cm3 Farmer type ion chamber, radiographic film and polystyrene phantom. These tools are commonly used for dosimetry quality assurance of the clinical linear accelerator. In this study, the Exradin A19, PTW N30004 and TM30001 Farmer type ion chambers were used for the calibration of the 192Ir HDR source. To perform the calibration, a 25.4x30.5 cm2 radiographic film was taped on a piece of polystyrene plate, and a straight applicator probe of a HDR brachytherapy unit and the Farmer type ion chamber were affixed to the film envelope. The film was irradiated by the 192Ir source, followed by an exposure in the simulator X-ray beam. The film set with the film removed was then placed on a 5 cm thick polystyrene phantom for calibration measurement. Based on the electrometer reading from the Farmer type ion chamber irradiated by 192Ir and the measured source-to-chamber distance by means of the images on the developed film, we can calculate the air kerma strength of the 192Ir using the new technique. Our calibration results were compared to the data provided by the manufacturer and that of five different well type ion chambers, namely, Sun Nuclear cooperation (SNC) 1008, Nucletron SDS 077.091, SDS 077.094, PTW TN33004 and Standard Imaging (SI) HDR-1000 Plus. The differences were all within 1.6%. Relative to the '7-distance measurement technique' by Stump et al., 2002, our method is more efficient if our empirical formula was used. In summary, our method is simpler and cost-effective to calibrate an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source for those hospitals without a calibration jig or a well type ion chamber.

  9. Comparison of 60Cobalt and 192Iridium sources in high dose rate afterloading brachytherapy

    Purpose: 60Co sources with dimensions identical to those of 192Ir have recently been made available in clinical brachytherapy. A longer half time reduces demands on logistics and quality assurance and perhaps costs. Material and Methods: Comparison of the physical properties of 60Co and 192Ir with regard to brachytherapy. Results: Required activities for the same air kerma rate are lower by a factor of 2.8 for 60Co. Differential absorption in tissues of different densities can be neglected. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that integral dose due to radial dose fall off is higher for 192Ir in comparison to 60Co within the first 22 cm from the source (normalization at 1 cm). At larger distances this relationship is reversed. Conclusion: Clinical examples for intracavitary and interstitial applications however, show practically identical dose distributions in the treatment volume. (orig.)

  10. Intercomparison of calibration procedures of high dose rate {sup 192} Ir sources in Brazil and a proposal of a new methodology; Intercomparacao de procedimientos de calibracao de fontes de {sup 192} Ir de alta taxa de dose no Brasil e proposta de uma nova metodologia

    Marechal, M.H.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes IRD/CNEN. Caixa Postal 37750 CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to report the results of an intercomparison of the calibration procedures for {sup 192} Ir sources presently in use in Brazil and to proposal a calibration procedure to derive the N{sub k} for a Farmer type ionization chamber for {sup 192} Ir energy by interpolating from a {sup 60} Co gamma-rays and 250 kV x-rays calibration factors. the intercomparison results were all within {+-} 3.0 % except one case where 4.6 % was observed and latter identified as a problem with N-k value for X-rays. The method proposed by the present work make possible the improvement of the metrological coherence among the calibration laboratories and their users once the N{sub k} values could then provided by any of the members of SSDL network. (Author)

  11. Traceable calibration of a reference well chamber at HDR 192Ir energy

    With the increasing use of the remote afterloading HDR 192Ir equipment in the country, an urgent need was felt to establish a Standard for the HDR 192Ir source. The objective of the programme was to offer traceable calibration to all the hospital well chambers, at HDR 192Ir energy

  12. Response of an implantable MOSFET dosimeter to 192Ir HDR radiation.

    Fagerstrom, Jessica M; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2008-12-01

    New in vivo dosimetry methods would be useful for clinical HDR brachytherapy. An implantable MOSFET Dose Verification System designed by Sicel Technologies, Inc. was examined for use with 192Ir HDR applications. This investigation demonstrated that varying the dose rate from 22 to 84 cGy/min did not change detector response. The detectors exhibited a higher sensitivity to 192Ir energies than 60Co energies. A nonlinear accumulated dose effect was characterized by three third-order polynomials fit to data from detectors placed at three different distances from the source. The detectors were found to have minimal rotational angular dependence. A strong longitudinal angular dependence was found when the detector's copper coil and electronics assembly were aligned between the MOSFETs and incident radiation. This orientation showed a 16% decrease in response relative to other orientations tested. PMID:19175130

  13. Response of an implantable MOSFET dosimeter to {sup 192}Ir HDR radiation

    Fagerstrom, Jessica M.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    New in vivo dosimetry methods would be useful for clinical HDR brachytherapy. An implantable MOSFET Dose Verification System designed by Sicel Technologies, Inc. was examined for use with {sup 192}Ir HDR applications. This investigation demonstrated that varying the dose rate from 22 to 84 cGy/min did not change detector response. The detectors exhibited a higher sensitivity to {sup 192}Ir energies than {sup 60}Co energies. A nonlinear accumulated dose effect was characterized by three third-order polynomials fit to data from detectors placed at three different distances from the source. The detectors were found to have minimal rotational angular dependence. A strong longitudinal angular dependence was found when the detector's copper coil and electronics assembly were aligned between the MOSFETs and incident radiation. This orientation showed a 16% decrease in response relative to other orientations tested.

  14. Standardization of sup 192 Ir

    Reher, D.F.G.; Roost, E. de; Sibbens, G.; Denecke, B.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Ballaux, C. (CEC-JRC Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium)); Woods, M.J. (National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom)); Funck, E. (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany))

    1992-02-01

    Two {sup 192}Ir solutions were standardized by NPL and CBNM within the framework of EUROMET project no. 219. The 4 {pi}{beta}-{gamma}-coincidence method was used for these measurements, a 4{pi}CsI(Tl) detector for gamma-ray spectrometry, and a NaI(Tl) well counter for 4{pi}-gamma integral counting. The uncertainty of the result was 0.3%, corresponding to one standard deviation. Traceability was established to BIPM for the {sup 192}Ir activity measurements. (orig.).

  15. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR)192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose

  16. An innovative method for {sup 192}Ir HDR calibration by farmer chamber, V-film, and solid phantom

    Chang, Liyun; Ding, Hueisch-Jy [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Sheng-Yow, E-mail: shengho@seed.net.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sinlau Christian Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    A simple, practical and economical technique was proposed to calibrate an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source in terms of air kerma strength. This technique makes use of the 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type ion chamber, radiographic film and polystyrene phantom. These tools are commonly used for dosimetry quality assurance of the clinical linear accelerator. In this study, the Exradin A19, PTW N30004 and TM30001 Farmer type ion chambers were used for the calibration of the {sup 192}Ir HDR source. To perform the calibration, a 25.4x30.5 cm{sup 2} radiographic film was taped on a piece of polystyrene plate, and a straight applicator probe of a HDR brachytherapy unit and the Farmer type ion chamber were affixed to the film envelope. The film was irradiated by the {sup 192}Ir source, followed by an exposure in the simulator X-ray beam. The film set with the film removed was then placed on a 5 cm thick polystyrene phantom for calibration measurement. Based on the electrometer reading from the Farmer type ion chamber irradiated by {sup 192}Ir and the measured source-to-chamber distance by means of the images on the developed film, we can calculate the air kerma strength of the {sup 192}Ir using the new technique. Our calibration results were compared to the data provided by the manufacturer and that of five different well type ion chambers, namely, Sun Nuclear cooperation (SNC) 1008, Nucletron SDS 077.091, SDS 077.094, PTW TN33004 and Standard Imaging (SI) HDR-1000 Plus. The differences were all within 1.6%. Relative to the '7-distance measurement technique' by Stump et al., 2002, our method is more efficient if our empirical formula was used. In summary, our method is simpler and cost-effective to calibrate an {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source for those hospitals without a calibration jig or a well type ion chamber.

  17. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  18. The production of Iridium-192 (192-Ir) sealed source by Nuclear Malaysia for non-destruction testing (NDT)

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) has been engaged in the production of a few radioisotopes that can be used in agriculture, medicine, industries and further more to be used in other applications, such as teaching, training and calibration. These radioisotopes are produced by using our TRIGA MARK II research reactor which provides a maximum neutron flux at the central thimble irradiation position about 10E12 ncm-2s-1. The achievable quantity of radioactivity of radioisotope produced by this reactor is relatively low for most of the applications due to limitation of neutron flux available. This limitation is seen to exist for quiet some time until a higher neutron flux is available in the future. In addition to this, our reactor is approaching toward the end of their operational performance. In order to sustain Nuclear Malaysia active involvement in radioisotope production and considering the current production facilities available, other possible mode of radioisotope production are developed. In line with this, a joint venture project between Nuclear Malaysia and a NDT company in Malaysia has been established to produce the Ir-192 Sealed Source. The project consists of technology transfer from Korean Atomic Energy Agency Research Institute (KAERI) /Ho Jin Industry Ltd. to Nuclear Malaysia. Series of production equipment are installed in our 10 cm thickness lead (Pb) shielded box known as hot-cell. The irradiated double encapsulated Ir-192 disc imported from KAERI will undergo final assembly. Decay sources from Gamma Projector is removed, cut and stored in a waste container. Steps of production include source changing, cutting, cramping, dimension test and Go/No Go testing. The Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) has issued the above production facility for manufacturing of Ir-192 pigtail for Gamma Projector types Tech-ops. (Author)

  19. Fast 3D 192Ir-afterloading quality assurance a new general dosimetric concept applying tissue substituting scintillators

    Problems of brachytherapy: The steep dose gradient demands high precision in dosimetry, localization, planning and quality assurance. 192Ir-Dosimetry: The broad, depth dependent, low energy photon spectrum, requires dosemeter probes with a wide linear range and high spatial resolution, being independent of energy, incidence and temperature, to overcome the disadvantages of common detectors. Tissue substituting plastic scintillators are optimal for brachytherapy dosimetry. Tiny (1-10 mm3) NE 102A detectors, connected by thin multi-fibre plastic light guides (Cerenkov compensated) to photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) of high sensitivity and stability allow fast measurements of all basic absorbed dose data within ≤2% precision up to 10 cm depth with high spatial resolution. Afterloading quality assurance: Multi-detector arrays and multi-channel PMTs, open new possibilities of fast 3D-quality assurance by simultaneous measurement at many points. In tissue equivalent phantoms this allows fast systematic checks of stepping source hard-and software, as well as individual dosimetric treatment planning, optimization, simulation, and verification. Afterloading dose monitor: Integrated into the applicator, the really delivered distribution of absorbed dose to water is monitored directly during stepping source afterloading brachytherapy with high spatial (≤0.1 mm) or temporal resolution (≤0.1 s). It indicates errors of planning or application, of step position or step size, of dwell time or travel time. In combination with on-line 3D treatment planning the distribution of dose really delivered can be visualized. Verification: The tiny plastic scintillator array is the ideal probe for192 Ir-afterloading in-vivo dosimetry, also in IORT. Conclusion: Plastic scintillation dosimetry enables versatile and fast 3D-quality assurance of 192Ir-afterloading with high precision

  20. The theoretical basis and clinical methodology for stereotactic interstitial brain tumor irradiation using iododeoxyuridine as a radiation sensitizer and samarium-145 as a brachytherapy source

    High grade astrocytomas have proven resistant to all conventional therapy. A technique to produce radiation enhancement during interstitial brain tumor irradiation by using a radiation sensitizer (IdUrd) and by stimulation of Auger electron cascades through absorption of low energy photons in iodine (Photon activation) is described. Clinical studies using IdUrd, 192Ir as a brachytherapy source, and external radiation have produced promising results. Substituting samarium-145 for 192Ir in this protocol is expected to produce enhanced results. 15 refs

  1. The air-kerma rate constant of 192Ir.

    Ninković, M M; Raiĉevìć, J J

    1993-01-01

    The air-kerma rate constant gamma delta (and its precursors), as one of the basic radiation characteristics of 192Ir, was determined by many authors. Analysis of accessible data on this quantity led us to the conclusion that published data strongly disagree. That is the reason we calculated this quantity on the basis of our and many other authors' gamma-ray spectral data and the latest data for mass energy-transfer coefficients for air. In this way, a value was obtained for gamma delta of 30.0 +/- 0.9 a Gy m2 s-1 Bq-1 for an unshielded 192Ir source and 27.8 +/- 0.9 a Gy m2s -1Bq-1 for a standard packaged radioactive source taking into account attenuation of gamma rays in the platinum source wall. PMID:8416220

  2. A comparison of dosimetric parameters and dose distribution around CF -252 and IR-192 LDR Brachytherapy Sources

    Full text: The purpose of this work is the evaluation and comparison of the dose rate distributions around a 252Cf Applicator Tube (AT) and 192Ir LDR sources. The dosimetric parameters were determined for both sources according to the updated AAPM TG-43U1 protocol. The calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle MCNP code, version 5C. To validate the results of this study, they were compared to experimental and analytical dosimetric data available in the literature for similar source configurations. After validation, the Monte Carlo computer code was applied to investigate the difference between dose rate distributions around the two brachytherapy sources, with the purpose of comparing their efficiency in treatment. The data so obtained also provide further information about spatial dose distributions and are important for detailed treatment planning with 252 Cf or 192Ir LDR sources for interstitial and intracavitary therapy

  3. Broad-beam transmission data for new brachytherapy sources, Tm-170 and Yb-169

    The characteristics of the radionuclides 170Tm and 169Yb are highly interesting for their use as high dose-rate brachytherapy sources. The introduction of brachytherapy equipment containing these sources will lead to smaller required thicknesses of the materials used in radiation protection barriers compared with the use of conventional sources such as 192Ir and 137Cs. The purpose of this study is to determine the required thicknesses of protection material for the design of the protecting walls. Using the Monte Carlo method, transmission data were derived for broad-beam geometries through lead and concrete barriers, from which the first half value layer and tenth value layer are obtained. In addition, the dose reduction in a simulated patient was studied to determine whether transmission in the patient is a relevant factor in radiation protection calculations. (authors)

  4. Application of the Cavity theory in the calibration of the powder TLD-100 for energies of 60 Co, 137 Cs, 192 Ir and RX 50, 250 k Vp

    A powder lot TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) in absorbed dose terms in water Dw for the following radiation sources: 60 Co, 137 Cs and RX 50 and 250 k Vp is calibrated; to continuation is made a lineal interpolation of the TLD response in function of the effective energy of the sources to calibrate a source of 192 Ir. The calibration of those fields in Dw are carried out with aid of the Bragg-Gray cavity theory, the one which finds implicit in the following protocols: IAEA-TRS 398 for the 60 Co and the AAPM TG61 for X Rays of 50 and 250 k Vp. Additionally the AAPM protocol TG43 to determine the Dw in function of the kerma intensity Sk in the case of the 137 Cs is used. The calibration curves for the response of the TLD-100 RTLD vs Dw, corresponding to each one of the sources already mentioned are constructed. The RTLD vs Dw by least heavy square by means of a second order polynomial that corrects the supralineality of the response is adjusted. The curves are validated by lack of LOF adjustment and by the Anderson Darling normality test. Later the factors of sensitivity (Fs) for the sources of 192 Ir: Micro Selectron and Vari Source are interpolated, used respectively in the A and B hospitals for treatments of brachytherapy of high dose rate (HDR), the expanded uncertainties associated to the Dw and Fs are also determined. Finally, an acrylic phantom and a couple of capsules are already sent to the hospitals mentioned, to verify a nominal Dw of 2 Gy, in a case an underestimate in 5.5% in the imparted Dw and in other an overestimation in a range of -1.5 to -8.0% was obtained. The obtained results in this work establish the bases for the development of a national dosimetric quality control program for brachytherapy of HDR with sources of 192 Ir. (Author)

  5. Determination of exit skin dose for 192Ir intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation with thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Raffi, Julie A.; Stephen D. Davis; Hammer, Cliff G.; Micka, John A.; Kunugi, Keith A.; Musgrove, Jana E.; Winston, John W.; Ricci-Ott, Terresa J.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has become a popular treatment for early stage breast cancer in recent years due to its shortened course of treatment and simplified treatment planning compared to traditional external beam breast conservation therapy. However, the exit dose to the skin is a major concern and can be a limiting factor for these treatments. Most treatment planning systems (TPSs) currently used for high dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy overe...

  6. Evaluation and test of 192Ir air kerma strength for afterloading systems

    Objective: To study the method of measuring air kerma strength of afterloading units with 192Ir source by using well type ionization chamber. Methods: The air kerma strength of 30 afterloading units with 192Ir source was measured using 2000A electrometer and 1000 plus well type ionization chamber, and apparent activity of the source was calculated with the air kerma strength and apparent activity conversion factor. The measured activity of the source was compared with the original value of the source provided by the manufacturer, and the relevant deviation should be within ±5%. Results: The air kerma strength of afterloading units with 192Ir sources was tested. The relevant deviation of the measured activity and the original value was within -0.1%-4.4%. Conclusions: The measurement method with a well type ionization chamber is convenient and highly accurate which can be used for the test of quality control in hospitals. (authors)

  7. Determination of the tissue inhomogeneity correction in high dose rate Brachytherapy for Iridium-192 source

    Barlanka Ravikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brachytherapy treatment planning, the effects of tissue heterogeneities are commonly neglected due to lack of accurate, general and fast three-dimensional (3D dose-computational algorithms. In performing dose calculations, it is assumed that the tumor and surrounding tissues constitute a uniform, homogeneous medium equivalent to water. In the recent past, three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT based treatment planning for Brachytherapy applications has been popularly adopted. However, most of the current commercially available planning systems do not provide the heterogeneity corrections for Brachytherapy dosimetry. In the present study, we have measured and quantified the impact of inhomogeneity caused by different tissues with a 0.015 cc ion chamber. Measurements were carried out in wax phantom which was employed to measure the heterogeneity. Iridium-192 (192 Ir source from high dose rate (HDR Brachytherapy machine was used as the radiation source. The reduction of dose due to tissue inhomogeneity was measured as the ratio of dose measured with different types of inhomogeneity (bone, spleen, liver, muscle and lung to dose measured with homogeneous medium for different distances. It was observed that different tissues attenuate differently, with bone tissue showing maximum attenuation value and lung tissue resulting minimum value and rest of the tissues giving values lying in between those of bone and lung. It was also found that inhomogeneity at short distance is considerably more than that at larger distances.

  8. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an 192Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an 192Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been developed. The

  9. Direct measurement of instantaneous source speed for a HDR brachytherapy unit using an optical fiber based detector

    Minamisawa, R. A.; Rubo, R. A.; Seraide, R. M.; Rocha, J. R. O.; Almeida, A. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, FFCLRP, University of Sao Paulo, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); INRAD, Medical School - University of Sao Paulo, Clinical Hospital (HCUSP), 05403-001, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); CAISM Radiotherapy Service, CEB, State University of Campinas, 13083-881, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Department of Physics and Mathematics, FFCLRP, University of Sao Paulo, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Several attempts to determine the transit time of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit have been reported in the literature with controversial results. The determination of the source speed is necessary to accurately calculate the transient dose in brachytherapy treatments. In these studies, only the average speed of the source was measured as a parameter for transit dose calculation, which does not account for the realistic movement of the source, and is therefore inaccurate for numerical simulations. The purpose of this work is to report the implementation and technical design of an optical fiber based detector to directly measure the instantaneous speed profile of a {sup 192}Ir source in a Nucletron HDR brachytherapy unit. Methods: To accomplish this task, we have developed a setup that uses the Cerenkov light induced in optical fibers as a detection signal for the radiation source moving inside the HDR catheter. As the {sup 192}Ir source travels between two optical fibers with known distance, the threshold of the induced signals are used to extract the transit time and thus the velocity. The high resolution of the detector enables the measurement of the transit time at short separation distance of the fibers, providing the instantaneous speed. Results: Accurate and high resolution speed profiles of the {sup 192}Ir radiation source traveling from the safe to the end of the catheter and between dwell positions are presented. The maximum and minimum velocities of the source were found to be 52.0{+-}1.0 and 17.3{+-}1.2 cm/s. The authors demonstrate that the radiation source follows a uniformly accelerated linear motion with acceleration of |a|=113 cm/s{sup 2}. In addition, the authors compare the average speed measured using the optical fiber detector to those obtained in the literature, showing deviation up to 265%. Conclusions: To the best of the authors' knowledge, the authors directly measured for the first time the instantaneous speed

  10. Direct measurement of instantaneous source speed for a HDR brachytherapy unit using an optical fiber based detector

    Purpose: Several attempts to determine the transit time of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit have been reported in the literature with controversial results. The determination of the source speed is necessary to accurately calculate the transient dose in brachytherapy treatments. In these studies, only the average speed of the source was measured as a parameter for transit dose calculation, which does not account for the realistic movement of the source, and is therefore inaccurate for numerical simulations. The purpose of this work is to report the implementation and technical design of an optical fiber based detector to directly measure the instantaneous speed profile of a 192Ir source in a Nucletron HDR brachytherapy unit. Methods: To accomplish this task, we have developed a setup that uses the Cerenkov light induced in optical fibers as a detection signal for the radiation source moving inside the HDR catheter. As the 192Ir source travels between two optical fibers with known distance, the threshold of the induced signals are used to extract the transit time and thus the velocity. The high resolution of the detector enables the measurement of the transit time at short separation distance of the fibers, providing the instantaneous speed. Results: Accurate and high resolution speed profiles of the 192Ir radiation source traveling from the safe to the end of the catheter and between dwell positions are presented. The maximum and minimum velocities of the source were found to be 52.0±1.0 and 17.3±1.2 cm/s. The authors demonstrate that the radiation source follows a uniformly accelerated linear motion with acceleration of |a|=113 cm/s2. In addition, the authors compare the average speed measured using the optical fiber detector to those obtained in the literature, showing deviation up to 265%. Conclusions: To the best of the authors' knowledge, the authors directly measured for the first time the instantaneous speed profile of a radiation source in a HDR

  11. Intraluminal hyperthermia and radiotherapy using {sup 192}Ir remote after loading system in the treatment of unresectable hilar bile duct cancer

    Tsuchida, Akira; Itoh, Masaki; Fujii, Tohru [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of combined therapy of intraluminal hyperthermia and radiotherapy using remote after loading system (RALS) was compared with that of percutaneous transhepatic biliary endoprosthesis (PTBE) alone. The subjects were 60 patients having unresectable hilar bile duct cancer. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) was performed in the all patients, and additionally PTBE in 39, local infusion of bleomycin and intraluminal hyperthermia in 11, and internal irradiation (RALS) in 10. Four fractionated irradiation (4 Gy x 4) was performed on the site 10 mm from the source using {sup 192}Ir high dose RALS, and subsequently two fractionated brachytherapy of 10 Gy and 20 fractionated external irradiation of 40 Gy. The outcome was significantly improved in the RALS group, showing 50% survival time of 444.8 days (PTBE group, 228.7 days; hyperthermia group, 472 days). (S.Y.).

  12. Fricke gel-layer dosimetry in high dose-rate brachytherapy

    Carrara, M. [Medical Physics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Fallai, C. [Radiotherapy Unit, Fondazione IRCCS ' Istituto Nazionale Tumori' , Via Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Gambarini, G. [Physics Department of the Universita degli Studi and INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it; Negri, A. [Physics Department of the Universita degli Studi and INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of Fricke gel-layer dosimeters for the measurement of in-phantom dose distributions produced by a {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source. The doses obtained were compared to measurements performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters and treatment planning calculations. Fricke gel-layer dosimeters have proven to be a promising tool to measure three-dimensional dose distributions in high dose-rate brachytherapy.

  13. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  14. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between {sup 99m}Tc and HDR {sup 192}Ir

    Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Lima, Carla Flavia de; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with {sup 99m}Tc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and methods: simulations of implants with {sup 99m}Tc-filled and HDR {sup 192}Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results: the {sup 99m}Tc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1} and 0.190 cGyh{sup -1} at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh{sup -1}.mCi{sup -1}, respectively, for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the {sup 99m}Tc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion: temporary {sup 99m}Tc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR {sup 192}Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. (author)

  15. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the VSL and the BIPM

    Alvarez, J.T.; De Pooter, J.A.; Andersen, Claus E.;

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), The Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the VSL in November 2009. The comparison resu...

  16. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  17. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra

  18. A brachytherapy procedure for carcinoma of the mobile tongue with small source high dose rate remote afterloading method

    Interstitial brachytherapy was conducted for mobile tongue carcinoma using a new high dose rate remote afterloading machine (microSelectron-HDR) with small 192Ir source. A detailed method was described, approaching from submandibular skin by open-ended stainless steel needles to the tongue lesion, and replacing each needle into flexible nylon tube from the oral cavity. We deal with a new Linked Double-Button technique and treatment policy in this paper. Complete local control was obtained in all 7 patients applied as of February 1992, up to 9-months follow-up, and quality of life of patients after this method was proved as good as that in low dose rate procedure. (author)

  19. Endovascular brachytherapy: dosimetry and dose-area analysis of various radiation sources

    With the increase in popularity of endovascular brachytherapy for prevention of restenosis following coronary angioplasty, it remains to be determined which isotope and isotope form is the most ideal. An issue concerning the use of wire sources is the influence of the centering of the wire on dose uniformity across the artery wall and the potential problems this can lead to in terms of underdosage of the target tissues. In this investigation, the dosimetric characteristics of three currently used sources (γ-emitting 192Ir wire; β-emitting 32P wire; and β-emitting 188Re solution) were determined with EGS4 Monte Carlo. The dose results were then used to determine the dose-area relationships for the three sources in arteries with concentric and non-concentric lumens/walls, including situations in which the wire sources are moved away from the centre of the artery. It is found that, in order to ensure dose uniformity, centering is substantially more important for β-emitting wire sources. This is highlighted most significantly in the case of an example large irregular artery. Although the suitability of a source depends on many criteria (e.g., cost, availability, radiation protection, possible radiation-induced late effects), the problem of centering a wire source in possibly large and/or irregular arteries is greatly eased by the use of a γ-emitting source. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  20. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with 192Ir and 60Co sources, and permanent seed implants with 125I, 103Pd and 131Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with 125I, 106Ru, 90Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  1. Near-catheter dosimetry of a HDR brachytherapy source using Gafchromic film

    High dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy treatments can be delivered using as few as one or two afterloading catheters, delivering doses of up to 10 Gy at 10 mm, leading to high dose gradients and extreme hot spots close to the catheter. These conditions have the potential to damage the patient's health tissues, possibly leading to necrosis, or even death from uncontrolled bleeding. Ionisation chambers and solid state detectors are limited in their usefulness for near-catheter dosimetry because of their physical size and in some cases energy and dose rate dependence. In contrast, radiochromic film has a large dose–response range, excellent spatial resolution, near-energy independence for megavoltage photons and the ability to measure dose in two dimensions, making it ideal for this application. The aim of this study was to measure the location and relative magnitude of any dosimetric hot spots produced by a typical endobronchial treatment plan. The study also investigated the effect of the step size of the 192Ir source on both the dose hot spots and dose distribution. Our measurements show that for a typical single catheter treatment with 2.5 mm step size the maximum dose hot spots at the catheter surface are up to 37 times the prescription dose, up to 40 times for a 5 mm step size, and up to 46 times for a 10 mm step size. It is important that brachytherapy clinicians and physicists understand that hot spot magnitude increases with source step sizes and are aware of the risks associated with this form of brachytherapy treatment.

  2. RESULTS OF 192IR CONTACT RADIATION THERAPY FOR CERVIX UTERI CANCER

    O. A. Kravets

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of treatment for locally advanced cervix uteri cancer, by applying a 192Ir radioactive source for contact radiation. Three- and five-year overall and relapse-free survival rates have been obtained for stages: 82.5 and 82.5%; 78.4 and 78.4% for Stage IIb; 57 and 52.3%; 41.6 and 41.6 for IIIb; 53.3 and 47.3%; 42.4 and 37.7% for IVb, respectively.

  3. Study of dose distributions in voxel phantoms for brachytherapy sources using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit

    This work studies the effects of corrections in the calculation of dose distribution for brachytherapy sources when they are inserted in a male human voxel phantom. The sources studied here are the Best Industries 125I 2301 model for low dose rate and the Amersham Buchler G0814 model 192Ir seed for high dose rate, in the simulation of prostate treatments. The presence of organs around the interest point scatters radiation in a different form than a water cube, the situation that is usually configured in these calculations. The insertion of the sources in an anthropomorphic phantom brings results closer to the real situation. The chosen phantom was the head and torso voxel phantom created by Zubal. The Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used to simulate the radiation transportation along the source shielding and the human organs of the voxel phantom. After inserting the source in the phantom, the energy deposition in each voxel is computed, allowing the construction of isodose curves. The source insertion in the anthropomorphic phantom aims also at a further knowledge about the brachytherapy treatment planning and additional information such as the target volume dose and in neighbor organs, data that will be useful for medical staff working with this technique. (author)

  4. Procedures for calibration of brachytherapy sources

    Brachytherapy source strength verification is a responsibility of the user of these source, in fact of the Medical Physicists in charge of this issue in a Radiotherapy Service. The calibration procedures in the users conditions are shown. Specifics methods for source strength determination are recommended, both for High Dose Rate (HDR) sources with Remote Afterloading equipment and for Low Dose Rate sources. The The results of the calibration of HDR Remote After loaders are indicated

  5. Monte Carlo and experimental dosimetric study of the mHDR-v2 brachytherapy source

    Chandola Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional treatment planning system (TPS gives analytical calculations with ± 15 to 20% dose, which may lead to over exposure of critical organs or under dose of target. It is to obtain dose distribution parameters of nucletron high dose rate (HDR microselectron v2 (mHDR-v2 192 Ir brachytherapy source by experiment and by calculated study using Monte Carlo (MC EGSnrc code, and to find the similarity between them, and with any past study. To validate data, another MC GEANT4 study done in this work on the same source is also presented. Different software of the computer e.g. paint, excel, etc are employed for preparation of figures and graphs. The measured study of the source was done using an in-air ionization chamber, water phantom, and measurement set-up, while the calculated study was done by modeling the set up of the measured study by using the MC EGSnrc and GEANT4. Mean and probability are used in calculation of average values, and calculation of the uncertainties in result and discussion. The measured and calculated values of dose rate constant, radial dose function, and 2D anisotropy function were found to be in agreement with each other as well as with published data. The results of this study can be used as input to TPS.

  6. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  7. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  8. Guidelines for the calibration of low energy photon sources at beta-ray brachytherapy sources

    With the development of improved methods of implanting brachytherapy sources in a precise manner for treating prostate cancer and other disease processes, there has been a tremendous growth in the use of low energy photon sources, such as 125I and 103Pd brachytherapy seeds. Low energy photon sources have the advantage of easier shielding and also lowering the dose to normal tissue. However, the dose distributions around these sources are affected by the details in construction of the source and its encapsulation more than other sources used for brachytherapy treatments, such as 192Ir. With increasing number of new low energy photon sources on the market, care should be taken with regard to its traceability to primary standards. It cannot be assumed that a calibration factor for an ionization chamber that is valid for one type of low energy photon source, automatically is valid for another source even if both would use the same isotope. Moreover, the method used to calculate the dose must also take into account the structure of the source and the encapsulation. The dose calculation algorithm that is valid for one type of low energy source may not be valid for another source even if in both cases the same radionuclide is used. Simple ''point source'' approximations, i.e. where the source is modeled as a point, should be avoided, as such methods do not account for any details in the source construction. In this document, the dose calculation formalism adopted for low energy photon sources is that recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) as outlined by Task Group-43 (TG-43). This method accounts for the source and capsule geometry. The AAPM recommends brachytherapy photon sources to be specified in terms of 'Air Kerma Strength' that is also used in the formalism mentioned above. On the other hand, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends that the specification be done in terms of Reference Air

  9. Assessment of radiation dose for surrounding organs and persons approaching implanted patients upon brachytherapy of prostate cancer with Iridium-192

    To assess a proper dose for radiation therapy fitting the typical physical characteristics of male Korean bodies, a mathematical phantom was prepared based on standard Korean male measurements. Upon brachytherapy of prostate cancer by implanting 192Ir into the prostate gland (the source organ), the absorbed dose of the prostate gland and surrounding organs and the expected dose of people within the vicinity were assessed. 192Ir, which has been the radionuclide of choice for prostate cancer brachytherapy, was selected for the simulation. It was assumed that 1 Ci of initial radioactivity would be administered. As a result, 1.28 E-02 Gy/Ci was exhibited in the prostate gland of the source organ, and the dose to which persons within the vicinity were exposed was exhibited to be 9.19 E-06 Sv at a distance of 30 cm from the front. (authors)

  10. Dosimetry of iridium-192 sources used in brachytherapy; Dosimetria de fontes de iridio-192 utilizadas em braquiterapia

    Henn, Keli Cristina

    1999-09-01

    The use of high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) has been increasing in recent years, due to several advantages relative to conventional low dose rate brachytherapy, such as: shorter treatment times, the ability to fractionate treatment (and thus perform many treatments on an outpatient basis) and reduced worker exposures. Most HDR equipment uses small, high activity {sup 192} Ir sources, which are introduced into the patient using a remote system. The dose distribution around these sources is strongly dependent on the size and shape of the active volume and on the encapsulation of the source. The objective of this work is to compare two methods of calibrating sources of {sup 192} Ir, mamely, measurements in air with an ionization thimble chamber or with a well-type ionization chamber. In addition, we measured the anisotropy of the sources and made comparisons with values supplied by the manufacturer, since this factor is taken into account in the planning system algorithm when dose distributions are calculated. The dose was also evaluated at points of clinical interest (i.e. in the rectum and bladder) and compared to values obtained with the Nucletron PLATO-BPS planning system. The use of lead for rectal protection was evaluated in a cylindrical applicator, aiming the further development of a gynecological applicator. The results of the calibration of seven sources showed that the uncertainty in the calibration in a 'jig' system is smaller than 1%, compared to the value supplied by the source manufacturer. The differences between the results obtained with the well-type ionization camera and the 'jig' system were around 2%. The anisotropy showed good agreement with the values supplied by the manufacturer. The results show that the anisotropy factors, in air and water, are approximately constant and equal to 1.0, for angles between 70 deg and 150 deg. For angles smaller than 70 deg the anisotropy factor in water is larger than in air. Results are

  11. The use of TLDs for brachytherapy dosimetry

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are routinely used to measure the dose around brachytherapy sources due to their small size and high precision. This work presents a concise overview of the use of LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs for brachytherapy dosimetry including the experimental procedures required to achieve high-precision measurements as well as new results regarding the intrinsic energy dependence with some of the commonly used brachytherapy sources. Equations to correct TLD light output to air kerma are outlined and a description of the method to determine the intrinsic energy dependence is presented. For the intrinsic energy dependence investigation, a review of previously published results is presented as well as new experimental results using 125I, 103Pd, 192Ir, and miniature x-ray brachytherapy sources at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The results of these experiments are consistent with previous work and give valuable insight to investigators using TLDs for brachytherapy measurements. - Highlights: • Brachytherapy measurements with LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs performed. • Intrinsic energy dependence for several brachytherapy sources determined. • New LiF:Mg,Ti energy dependence results compared with previous data for x-ray beams. • Uncertainty of LiF:Mg,Ti TLD measurements reviewed

  12. Brachytherapy

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Brachytherapy What is Brachytherapy and how is it used? ... will I feel during this procedure? What is brachytherapy and how is it used? Brachytherapy is a ...

  13. Samarium-145: a new brachytherapy source

    A new radiation source has been produced for brachytherapy, with radiation energies slightly above those of 125I, and a Tsub(1/2) of 340 d. This source, 145Sm, is produced by neutron irradiation of 144Sm (96.5% enriched). Decay is by electron capture with 140 K x-rays per 100 disintergrations in the energy region between 38-45 keV, plus 13 γ-rays at 61 keV. These sources are encapsulated in Ti tubes, approx. 0.8 mm x 4.5 mm, and have been developed for temporary implantation in brain and ocular tumours. The 38-61 keV photons should make such sources easy to shield, while providing a dose distribution from source arrays somewhat more homogeneous than that from 125I. In addition, the 340 d half life of 145Sm permits its use for times significantly longer than that of 60 d 125I. While the 145Sm sources have been designed primarily for implantation in a brain tumour, they should be useful for almost any conventional brachytherapy application. (author)

  14. The reference isodose length (RIL) in endovascular brachytherapy: physical aspects

    Full text: In a forthcoming recommendation of the endovascular GEC ESTRO (European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology) working group terms and concepts are defined for prescribing, reporting and recording lengths (volumes) for endovascular brachytherapy. Following these recommendation the reference isodose length (RIL) is one of the most important parameter for treatment planning. It is defined as the vessel length at the reference depth (1 or 2 mm) enclosed by the 90 % isodose. The RIL is thus a physical parameter to characterize a source configuration and depends on active source length (ASL), nuclide, source design, and reference depth. RILs are determined by (i) Monte Carlo calculations (EGSnrc code) and (ii) film dosimetry (radiochromic films + special phantom) for three endovascular brachytherapy devices currently in clinical use (192Ir: 23 mm ASL, 32P: 40 mm ASL, 90Sr: 40 mm ASL). The calculated RIL at 2 mm distance from the source axis are 15.4 mm, 36.8 mm and 35.8 mm for the 192Ir, 32P, 90Sr sources, respectively. The results obtained with EGSnrc are in very good agreement with the measured longitudinal dose profiles. The reference isodose length (RIL) is a useful and essential parameter in endovascular brachytherapy treatment planning, which critically depends on source design. Monte Carlo methods are a valuable tool to calculate/verify the RIL of different devices at the respective reference depth. (author)

  15. Performance assessment of the BEBIG MultiSource high dose rate brachytherapy treatment unit.

    Palmer, Antony; Mzenda, Bongile

    2009-12-21

    A comprehensive system characterisation was performed of the Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG GmbH MultiSource High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment unit with an (192)Ir source. The unit is relatively new to the UK market, with the first installation in the country having been made in the summer of 2009. A detailed commissioning programme was devised and is reported including checks of the fundamental parameters of source positioning, dwell timing, transit doses and absolute dosimetry of the source. Well chamber measurements, autoradiography and video camera analysis techniques were all employed. The absolute dosimetry was verified by the National Physical Laboratory, UK, and compared to a measurement based on a calibration from PTB, Germany, and the supplied source certificate, as well as an independent assessment by a visiting UK centre. The use of the 'Krieger' dosimetry phantom has also been evaluated. Users of the BEBIG HDR system should take care to avoid any significant bend in the transfer tube, as this will lead to positioning errors of the source, of up to 1.0 mm for slight bends, 2.0 mm for moderate bends and 5.0 mm for extreme curvature (depending on applicators and transfer tube used) for the situations reported in this study. The reason for these errors and the potential clinical impact are discussed. Users should also note the methodology employed by the system for correction of transit doses, and that no correction is made for the initial and final transit doses. The results of this investigation found that the uncorrected transit doses lead to small errors in the delivered dose at the first dwell position, of up to 2.5 cGy at 2 cm (5.6 cGy at 1 cm) from a 10 Ci source, but the transit dose correction for other dwells was accurate within 0.2 cGy. The unit has been mechanically reliable, and source positioning accuracy and dwell timing have been reproducible, with overall performance similar to other existing HDR equipment. The unit is capable of high

  16. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories

    It has generally been recognized that international harmonization in radiotherapy dosimetry is essential. Consequently, the IAEA has given much effort to this, for example by publishing a number of reports in the Technical Reports Series (TRS) for external beam dosimetry, most notably TRS-277 and more recently TRS-398. Both of these reports describe in detail the steps to be taken for absorbed dose determination in water and they are often referred to as 'dosimetry protocols'. Similar to TRS-277, it is expected that TRS-398 will be adopted or used as a model by a large number of countries as their national protocol. In 1996, the IAEA established a calibration service for low dose rate (LDR) 137 Cs brachytherapy sources, which is the most widely used source for treatment of gynecological cancer. To further enhance harmonization in brachytherapy dosimetry, the IAEA published in 1999 IAEA-TECDOC-1079 entitled 'Calibration of Brachytherapy Sources. Guidelines on Standardized Procedures for the Calibration of Brachytherapy Sources at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and Hospitals'. The report was well received and was distributed in a large number of copies to the members of the IAEA/WHO network of SSDLs and to medical physicists working with brachytherapy. The present report is an update of the aforementioned TECDOC. Whereas TECDOC-1079 described methods for calibrating brachytherapy sources with photon energies at or above those of 192Ir, the current report has a wider scope in that it deals with standardization of calibration of all the most commonly used brachytherapy sources, including both photon and beta emitting sources. The latter sources have been in use for a few decades already, but their calibration methods have been unclear. Methods are also described for calibrating sources used in the rapidly growing field of cardiovascular angioplasty. In this application, irradiation of the vessel wall is done in an attempt to prevent restenosis after

  17. Comparison of TG-43 dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources obtained by three different versions of MCNP codes.

    Zaker, Neda; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Sina, Sedigheh; Koontz, Craig; S Meigooni, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used for calculation of the dosimetric param-eters of brachytherapy sources. MCNP4C2, MCNP5, MCNPX, EGS4, EGSnrc, PTRAN, and GEANT4 are among the most commonly used codes in this field. Each of these codes utilizes a cross-sectional library for the purpose of simulat-ing different elements and materials with complex chemical compositions. The accuracies of the final outcomes of these simulations are very sensitive to the accuracies of the cross-sectional libraries. Several investigators have shown that inaccuracies of some of the cross section files have led to errors in 125I and 103Pd parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare the dosimetric parameters of sample brachytherapy sources, calculated with three different versions of the MCNP code - MCNP4C, MCNP5, and MCNPX. In these simulations for each source type, the source and phantom geometries, as well as the number of the photons, were kept identical, thus eliminating the possible uncertainties. The results of these investigations indicate that for low-energy sources such as 125I and 103Pd there are discrepancies in gL(r) values. Discrepancies up to 21.7% and 28% are observed between MCNP4C and other codes at a distance of 6 cm for 103Pd and 10 cm for 125I from the source, respectively. However, for higher energy sources, the discrepancies in gL(r) values are less than 1.1% for 192Ir and less than 1.2% for 137Cs between the three codes. PMID:27074460

  18. OER and RBE for 125I and 192Ir at low dose rate on mammalian cells

    The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for 125I and 192Ir as well as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at low dose rates (40-80 cGy h-1) were determined for B16 melanoma cells in culture. The OER was found to be 2.1±0.03 for 125I and 2.7±0.04 for 192Ir. The RBE for 125I relative to 192Ir was determined as 1.8±0.03 under aerated conditions and as 2.4±0.03 under hypoxia. 18 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  19. Iridium-192 sources production for brachytherapy use

    The incidence of cancer increases every year in Brazil and turns out to be one of the most important causes of mortality. Some of the patients are treated with brachytherapy, a form of lesion treatment which is based on the insertion of sources into tumors, in this particular case, activated iridium wires. During this process, the ionizing radiation efficiently destroys the malignant cells. These iridium wires have a nucleus made out of an iridium-platinum alloy 20-30/70-80 of 0,1 mm in diameter either coated by platinum or encased in a platinum tube. The technique consists in irradiating the wire in the reactor neutron flux in order to produce iridium-192. The linear activity goes from 1 mCi/cm to 4 mCi/cm and the basic characteristic, which is required, is the homogeneity of the activation along the wire. It should not present a dispersion exceeding 5% on a wire measuring 50 cm in length, 0.5 mm or 0.3 mm in diameter. Several experiments were carried out in order to define the activation parameters. Wires from different origins were analyzed. It was concluded that United States of America and France wires were found to be perfectly adequate for brachytherapy purposes and have therefore been sent to specialized hospitals and successfully applied to cancer patients. Considering that the major purpose of this work is to make this product more accessible in Brazil, at a cost reflecting the Brazilian reality, the IPEN is promoting the preparation of iridium-192 sources to be used in brachytherapy, on a national level. (author)

  20. Dosimetric study for characterization of a postal system of quality control in brachytherapy; Estudo dosimetrico para caracterizacao de um sistema postal de controle de qualidade em braquiterapia

    Alves, Victor Gabriel Leandro, E-mail: vgalves@inca.gov.b [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco de; Santos, Denison de Souza, E-mail: queiroz@ird.gov.b, E-mail: santosd@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Begalli, Marcia, E-mail: begalli@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IF/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    This work presents a dosimetric study of a postal system, to be developed for measurements of brachytherapy. It was projected a PMMA phantom with orifices for insertion of the high dose {sup 192}Ir source and the T L dosemeters. The system was characterized with using of Monte Carlo simulations, using the dosimetric magnitudes defined at the T G-43 of AAPM, as function of radial dose g(f)

  1. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  2. Effect of chemical composition and density of the pelvic structure in intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetry

    High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapies dosimetry in clinical practice are typically performed by commercial treatment planning systems. However, these systems do not fully consider the heterogeneities present in the real structure of the patient. The aim of this work is to obtain isodose curves and surfaces around the usual array of sources used in LDR (137Cs) and HDR (192Ir) intracavitary brachytherapy by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the real anatomic structure, density and chemical composition of media and tissues from the female pelvic region. The structural information was obtained from computed tomography images in the DICOM format. A voxel phantom (VP) was developed to perform ionizing radiation transport, considering the gamma spectrum of 137Cs and 192Ir. The absorbed dose was computed within each voxel of 2x2x3 mm3. Four materials were considered in the VP-air, fat, muscle tissue and bone; however, one material per voxel was defined. Results show and quantify the effect of density and chemical composition of the medium on the absorbed dose distribution. According to them, the treatment planning systems underestimate the absorbed dose by 8% approximately for both radionuclides. In a heterogeneous medium, the absorbed dose distribution of 192Ir is more irregular than that of 137Cs but spatially better defined.

  3. Effect of chemical composition and density of the pelvic structure in intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetry

    Chavez-Aguilera, N. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica Medica, Instituto Estatal de Cancerologia ' Dr. Arturo Beltran Ortega' , Acapulco, Guerrero (Mexico); Torres-Garcia, E., E-mail: etorresg@uaemex.m [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan s/n Esquina con Jesus Carranza, 50180 Toluca (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    High dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapies dosimetry in clinical practice are typically performed by commercial treatment planning systems. However, these systems do not fully consider the heterogeneities present in the real structure of the patient. The aim of this work is to obtain isodose curves and surfaces around the usual array of sources used in LDR ({sup 137}Cs) and HDR ({sup 192}Ir) intracavitary brachytherapy by Monte Carlo simulation, considering the real anatomic structure, density and chemical composition of media and tissues from the female pelvic region. The structural information was obtained from computed tomography images in the DICOM format. A voxel phantom (VP) was developed to perform ionizing radiation transport, considering the gamma spectrum of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 192}Ir. The absorbed dose was computed within each voxel of 2x2x3 mm{sup 3}. Four materials were considered in the VP-air, fat, muscle tissue and bone; however, one material per voxel was defined. Results show and quantify the effect of density and chemical composition of the medium on the absorbed dose distribution. According to them, the treatment planning systems underestimate the absorbed dose by 8% approximately for both radionuclides. In a heterogeneous medium, the absorbed dose distribution of {sup 192}Ir is more irregular than that of {sup 137}Cs but spatially better defined.

  4. Calibration procedure for thermoluminescent dosemeters in water absorbed doses for Iridium-192 high dose rate sources

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters are used in brachytherapy services quality assurance programs, with the aim of guaranteeing the correct radiation dose supplied to cancer patients, as well as with the purpose of evaluating new clinical procedures. This work describes a methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water for 192Ir high dose rate sources. The reference dose used is measured with an ionization chamber previously calibrated for 192Ir energy quality, applying the methodology proposed by Toelli. This methodology aims to standardizing the procedure, in a similar form to that used for external radiotherapy. The work evolves the adaptation of the TRS-277 Code of the International Atomic Energy Agency, for small and big cavities, through the introduction for non-uniform experimental factor, for the absorbed dose in the neighborhood of small brachytherapy sources. In order to simulate a water medium around the source during the experimental work, an acrylic phantom was used. It guarantees the reproducibility of the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeter's location in relation to the radiation source. The values obtained with the ionization chamber and the thermoluminescent dosimeters, exposed to a 192Ir high dose rate source, were compared and correction factors for different source-detector distances were determined for the thermoluminescent dosimeters. A numeric function was generated relating the correction factors and the source-detector distance. These correction factors are in fact the thermoluminescent dosimeter calibration factors for the 192Ir source considered. As a possible application of this calibration methodology for thermoluminescent dosimeters, a practical range of source-detector distances is proposed for quality control of 192Ir high dose rate sources. (author)

  5. Detection of 192Ir in ground level air in Ursvik 20 September 2004, with Quarterly report on measurements of radionuclides in ground level air in Sweden. Fourth quarter 2004

    The radioisotope 192Ir was found in the filter from Ursvik, Monday 20 September 2004. There were no indications of 192Ir in filters from any of the other national stations during that period. The measured activity concentration of 192Ir was about 50 μBq/m, corresponding to a total collected activity of 2.36 Bq of 192Ir in the filter. The source of the release was the Studsvik Nuclear AB production site about 80 km south of Ursvik and the preliminary estimation of released activity was 58 kBq. Locally performed measurements and dispersion calculations show that the released amount of 192Ir was in the order of 1 GBq. This is in agreement both with the measurements at the filter station in Ursvik, and with the dispersion calculations performed by FOI. Filtering of ground level air is performed weekly at six different locations in Sweden: Kiruna, Umeaa, Gaevle, Ursvik, Visby and Ljungbyhed. The filters are pressed and the contents of different radionuclides are measured by gamma spectroscopy. Precipitation is also collected at four of the stations: Kiruna, Gaevle, Ursvik and Ljungbyhed, the samples are ashed and the contents of radionuclides are measured. The levels of Be-7 and Cs-137 in air and precipitation are presented for the different stations. Other anthropogenic radionuclides detected, if any are also presented

  6. Establishment of in vitro 192Ir γ-ray dose-response relationship for dose assessment by the lymphocyte dicentric assay

    Kowalska, Maria; Meronka, Katarzyna; Szewczak, Kamil

    2012-03-01

    In vitro dose-response relationships are used to describe the relation between dicentric chromosomes and radiation dose for human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The dicentric yield depends on both the dose and the radiation quality. Thus, for reliable dose estimation in vitro dose responses must be determined for different radiation qualities. This paper reports the work for setting up the relationship for the dicentric production in the lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 192Ir g-rays at Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLOR). In a case of a radiation accident in industrial radiography using 192Ir sealed sources, this will be the basis for the indirect evaluation of the g-ray dose to which an accidental victim was exposed.

  7. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D90 for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and 192Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D2cc of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci192Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D90 was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D90 of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D90 above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively.Conclusions: For cervical cancer patients, D

  8. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  9. Comment on ‘Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation’

    Lindborg, Lennart; Lillhök, Jan; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2015-11-01

    The relative standard deviation, σr,D, of calculated multi-event distributions of specific energy for 60Co ϒ rays was reported by the authors F Villegas, N Tilly and A Ahnesjö (Phys. Med. Biol. 58 6149-62). The calculations were made with an upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. When the results were compared to results derived from experiments with the variance method and simulated tissue equivalent volumes in the micrometre range a difference of about 50% was found. Villegas et al suggest wall-effects as the likely explanation for the difference. In this comment we review some publications on wall-effects and conclude that wall-effects are not a likely explanation.

  10. Reply to the comment on ‘Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation’

    Villegas, F.; Ahnesjö, A.

    2016-07-01

    A discrepancy between the Monte Carlo derived relative standard deviation σ z\\text{rel} (microdosimetric spread) and experimental data was reported by Villegas et al (2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 6149–62) suggesting wall effects as a plausible explanation. The comment by Lindborg et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 8621–4) concludes that this is not a likely explanation. A thorough investigation of the Monte Carlo (MC) transport code used for track simulation revealed a critical bug. The corrected MC version yielded σ z\\text{rel} values that are now within experimental uncertainty. Other microdosimetric findings are hereby communicated.

  11. Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy. Guidelines on standardized procedures at Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    It has generally been recognized that international harmonization in radiotherapy dosimetry is essential. Consequently, the IAEA has given much effort to this, for example by publishing a number of reports in the Technical Reports Series (TRS) for external beam dosimetry, most notably TRS-277 and more recently TRS-398. Both of these reports describe in detail the steps to be taken for absorbed dose determination in water and they are often referred to as 'dosimetry protocols'. Similar to TRS-277, it is expected that TRS-398 will be adopted or used as a model by a large number of countries as their national protocol. In 1996, the IAEA established a calibration service for low dose rate (LDR) 137 Cs brachytherapy sources, which is the most widely used source for treatment of gynecological cancer. To further enhance harmonization in brachytherapy dosimetry, the IAEA published in 1999 IAEA-TECDOC-1079 entitled 'Calibration of Brachytherapy Sources. Guidelines on Standardized Procedures for the Calibration of Brachytherapy Sources at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and Hospitals'. The report was well received and was distributed in a large number of copies to the members of the IAEA/WHO network of SSDLs and to medical physicists working with brachytherapy. The present report is an update of the aforementioned TECDOC. Whereas TECDOC-1079 described methods for calibrating brachytherapy sources with photon energies at or above those of 192Ir, the current report has a wider scope in that it deals with standardization of calibration of all the most commonly used brachytherapy sources, including both photon and beta emitting sources. The latter sources have been in use for a few decades already, but their calibration methods have been unclear. Methods are also described for calibrating sources used in the rapidly growing field of cardiovascular angioplasty. In this application, irradiation of the vessel wall is done in an attempt to prevent restenosis after

  12. External beam irradiation plus 192Ir implant after breast-preserving surgery in women with early breast cancer

    Purpose: To provide more information for the clinician and to analyze the impact of the boost with brachytherapy on the local disease-free survival (LDFS), disease-free survival (DFS), specific overall survival (OS), and cosmesis, a retrospective study of external radiation therapy and 192Ir implantation in early breast cancer at Institut Catala d'Oncologia has been undertaken. Patients and Methods: From 1986 to 1996, 530 patients were selected for this study with a median follow-up period of 39.5 months (range, 10-115 months). External radiation therapy (combined with brachytherapy) was administered postoperatively to the breast in all patients. Mean given dose was 48.7 Gy (range, 42-52 Gy) with external radiation therapy to the breast, and 16.8 Gy (range, 10-27 Gy) was the mean dose with brachytherapy. Variables have been tested for cosmesis. Univariate and multivariate analysis have also been carried out. Results: Mean age of the patients was 54 years (range, 28-81 years). Stages were distributed as follows: 350 patients (66%) in Stage I, 173 in Stage II (32.8%), and 7 in Stage III (1.1%). Pathologic distribution was 445 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma (84%), 20 patients with infiltrating lobular carcinoma (4%), and 65 patients (12%) of a miscellaneous group. OS for the entire group was 89.4% and 85.9% at 5 and 7 years respectively. Probability of DFS was 81.7% and 70.1% at 5 and 7 years. The LDFS was 94.9% and 91.7% at 5 and 7 years. The MFS probability was 85.5% and 76.9% at 5 and 7 years, respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated that age (older than 52 years), premenopausal status, moderate and high histologic grades (Grades II-III), and presence of intraductal comedocarcinoma were prognostic factors for local relapse. Multivariate analysis for local disease-free survival demonstrated that only perineural or muscular infiltration remain as prognostic factors. Tumor dose bed of 70 Gy or higher had a negative impact in breast subcutaneous

  13. Characterization of a Ce3+ doped SiO2 optical dosimeter for dose measurements in HDR brachytherapy

    Aim of this work was to study the application of a new miniaturized Ce3+ doped SiO2 scintillation detector to in vivo dosimetry in high dose rate brachytherapy. Energy, dose-rate, temperature and angular dependences of the detector response to 192Ir HDR brachytherapy fields were investigated, as well as sensitivity reproducibility and linearity. To this aim, two ad hoc phantoms were designed and developed to perform measurements in water. Intra-session reproducibility resulted to be very high, however inter-session reproducibility showed too high statistical variation. Detector response resulted to increase linearly with dose (R2 = 0.997), with no evidence of energy and dose-rate dependence. Sensitivity resulted to increase linearly with temperature (R2 = 0.995), with a 0.2% increase each °C. Finally, no significant angular dependence for the source moving around a circle in the azimuthal plane centered at the scintillator was observed. The obtained results show that the proposed detector is suitable for in vivo real-time dosimetry in high dose rate brachytherapy. -- Highlights: •A Ce3+ doped SiO2 scintillation detector was applied to 192Ir HDR brachytherapy. •Detector response resulted to be linear with the delivered dose. •No evidence of energy and dose rate dependence resulted from the study

  14. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning. (paper)

  15. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  16. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  18. [Brachytherapy].

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  19. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  20. Loss and recovery of an 192Ir gamma radiography exposure device

    A radiography exposure device containing 88.8 GBq (2.4 Ci) of 192Ir is inadvertently left in a taxi cab which has sped off before the equipment could be unloaded. The joint effort between the licensee and Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) utilizing the tri-media in searching for the missing device resulted in its recovery 32 days later. The regulatory actions taken by the PNRI during and after the accident are discussed. (author). 3 refs

  1. Implementation of microsource high dose rate (mHDR) brachytherapy in developing countries

    Brachytherapy using remote afterloading of a single high dose rate 192Ir microsource was developed in the 1970s. After its introduction to clinics, this system has spread rapidly among developed Member States and has become a highly desirable modality in cancer treatment. This technique is now gradually being introduced to the developing Member States. The 192Ir sources are produced with a high specific activity. This results in a high dose rate (HDR) to the tumour and shorter treatment times. The high specific activity simultaneously results in a much smaller source (so-called micro source, around I mm in diameter) which may be easily inserted into tissue through a thin delivery tube, the so-called interstitial treatment, as well as easily inserted into body cavities, the so-called intracavitary or endoluminal treatment. Another advantage is the ability to change dwell time (the time a source remains in one position) of the stepping source which allows dose distribution to match the target volume more closely. The purpose of this TECDOC is to advise radiation oncologists, medical physicists and hospital administrators in hospitals which are planning to introduce 192Ir microsource HDR (mHDR) remote afterloading systems. The document supplements IAEA-TECDOC-1040, Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, and will facilitate implementation of this new brachytherapy technology, especially in developing countries. The operation of the system, 'how to use the system', is not within the scope of this document. This TECDOC is based on the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting held in Vienna in April 1999

  2. Size Effects of Gold and Iron Nanoparticles on Radiation Dose Enhancement in Brachytherapy and Teletherapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    Ahad Ollah Ezzati

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to calculate dose enhancement factor (DEF for gold (Au and iron (Fe nanoparticles (NPs in brachytherapy and teletherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC method. Materials and Methods In this study, a new algorithm was introduced to calculate dose enhancement by AuNPs and FeNPs for Iridium-192 (Ir-192 brachytherapy and Cobalt-60 (Co-60 teletherapy sources, using the MC method. In this algorithm, the semi-random distribution of NPs was used instead of the regular distribution. Diameters were assumed to be 15, 30, and 100 nm in brachytherapy and 15 and 30 nm in teletherapy. Monte Carlo MCNP4C code was used for simulations, and NP density values were 0.107 mg/ml and 0.112 mg/ml in brachytherapy and teletherapy, respectively. Results AuNPs significantly enhanced the radiation dose in brachytherapy (approximately 60%, and 100 nm diameter NPs showed the most uniform dose distribution. AuNPs had an insignificant effect on teletherapy radiation field, with a dose enhancement ratio of 3% (about the calculation uncertainty or less. In addition, FeNPs had an insignificant effect on both brachytherapy and teletherapy radiation fields. FeNPs dose enhancement was 3% in brachytherapy and 6% (about the calculation uncertainty or less in teletherapy. Conclusion It can be concluded that AuNPs can significantly increase the absorbed dose in brachytherapy; however, FeNPs do not have a noticeable effect on the absorbed dose

  3. Experiences in Recycling and Reuse of Radioactive Sources in BRIT

    The Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), a unit of the Department of Atomic Energy in India, produces and supplies various types of sealed radiation sources in India. The sealed sources include teletherapy sources using 60Co, industrial radiography sources using 60Co and 192Ir, nucleonic gauging sources using 60Co, 137Cs, among others, and 137Cs brachytherapy sources. BRIT has acquired considerable experience in the reuse and recycling of these sealed sources. This has proved to be very useful in continuous control of these sources over the life cycle. (author)

  4. MAGIC with formaldehyde applied to dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy source

    The use of polymer gel dosimeters in brachytherapy can allow the determination of three-dimensional dose distributions in large volumes and with high spatial resolution if an adequate calibration process is performed. One of the major issues in these experiments is the polymer gel response dependence on dose rate when high dose rate sources are used and the doses in the vicinity of the sources are to be determinated. In this study, the response of a modified MAGIC polymer gel with formaldehyde around an Iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy source is presented. Experimental results obtained with this polymer gel were compared with ionization chamber measurements and with Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE. A maximum difference of 3.10% was found between gel dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulation at a radial distance of 18 mm from the source. The results obtained show that the gel's response is strongly influenced by dose rate and that a different calibration should be used for the vicinity of the source and for regions of lower dose rates. The results obtained in this study show that, provided the proper calibration is performed, MAGIC with formaldehyde can be successfully used to accurate determinate dose distributions form high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

  5. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  6. Potential brachytherapy nuclides of future

    In the past there were relatively few radionuclides available for brachytherapy. But the situation is rapidly changing with the development of many new sources with properties that may be advantageous in certain clinical situations. In the choice of an acceptable, rather than an ideal radionuclide, it is important to consider the physical dose distribution, radiobiological effectiveness, ease of radiation protection, logistics and cost. Taking into account these factors, a number of radionuclides have been tried and more are being considered for specific type of applications. Presently, 137Cs is the most commonly used radionuclide for intracavitary therapy and 192Ir for interstitial therapy. 125I has more or less replaced 198Au for permanent implants. Clinical studies are being carried out to assess the feasibility of replacing 137Cs with 241Am for intracavitary applications and 125I with 103Pd and/or 169Yb for interstitial permanent implants. Other radionuclides being considered are 75Fe and 145Sm. Neutron induced brachytherapy is a new technique being tried to ensure complete radiation safety. (author). 1 tab

  7. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined

  8. SU-F-19A-10: Recalculation and Reporting Clinical HDR 192-Ir Head and Neck Dose Distributions Using Model Based Dose Calculation

    Carlsson Tedgren, A [Linkoping University, Linkoping, Linkoping (Sweden); Persson, M; Nilsson, J [Karolinska hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively re-calculate dose distributions for selected head and neck cancer patients, earlier treated with HDR 192Ir brachytherapy, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and compare results to distributions from the planning system derived using TG43 formalism. To study differences between dose to medium (as obtained with the MC code) and dose to water in medium as obtained through (1) ratios of stopping powers and (2) ratios of mass energy absorption coefficients between water and medium. Methods: The MC code Algebra was used to calculate dose distributions according to earlier actual treatment plans using anonymized plan data and CT images in DICOM format. Ratios of stopping power and mass energy absorption coefficients for water with various media obtained from 192-Ir spectra were used in toggling between dose to water and dose to media. Results: Differences between initial planned TG43 dose distributions and the doses to media calculated by MC are insignificant in the target volume. Differences are moderate (within 4–5 % at distances of 3–4 cm) but increase with distance and are most notable in bone and at the patient surface. Differences between dose to water and dose to medium are within 1-2% when using mass energy absorption coefficients to toggle between the two quantities but increase to above 10% for bone using stopping power ratios. Conclusion: MC predicts target doses for head and neck cancer patients in close agreement with TG43. MC yields improved dose estimations outside the target where a larger fraction of dose is from scattered photons. It is important with awareness and a clear reporting of absorbed dose values in using model based algorithms. Differences in bone media can exceed 10% depending on how dose to water in medium is defined.

  9. Development and implementation of a remote audit tool for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 brachytherapy using optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to create a mailable phantom with measurement accuracy suitable for Radiological Physics Center (RPC) audits of high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources at institutions participating in National Cancer Institute-funded cooperative clinical trials. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) were chosen as the dosimeter to be used with the phantom.Methods: The authors designed and built an 8 × 8 × 10 cm3 prototype phantom that had two slots capable of holding Al2O3:C OSLDs (nanoDots; Landauer, Glenwood, IL) and a single channel capable of accepting all 192Ir HDR brachytherapy sources in current clinical use in the United States. The authors irradiated the phantom with Nucletron and Varian 192Ir HDR sources in order to determine correction factors for linearity with dose and the combined effects of irradiation energy and phantom characteristics. The phantom was then sent to eight institutions which volunteered to perform trial remote audits.Results: The linearity correction factor was kL= (−9.43 × 10−5× dose) + 1.009, where dose is in cGy, which differed from that determined by the RPC for the same batch of dosimeters using 60Co irradiation. Separate block correction factors were determined for current versions of both Nucletron and Varian 192Ir HDR sources and these vendor-specific correction factors differed by almost 2.6%. For the Nucletron source, the correction factor was 1.026 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.023–1.028], and for the Varian source, it was 1.000 (95% CI = 0.995–1.005). Variations in lateral source positioning up to 0.8 mm and distal/proximal source positioning up to 10 mm had minimal effect on dose measurement accuracy. The overall dose measurement uncertainty of the system was estimated to be 2.4% and 2.5% for the Nucletron and Varian sources, respectively (95% CI). This uncertainty was sufficient to establish a ±5% acceptance criterion for source strength audits under a formal RPC audit

  10. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  11. Cs-137 brachytherapy sources calibration with well chamber

    This work describes the procedures and actions developed for the identification and reference air kerma rate (Sk) verification of Cs-137 sources used in gynecological brachytherapy practices. Following the IAEA TECDOC 1151 recommendations, the first stage consisted in designing the documentation required for the inventory and shipping registry of sources, along with the digital spreadsheets for calculating the decay and Sk of the sources at the moment of implantation. As a second stage, the Sk of sources was measured, following the low dose rate sources protocol advise, with a Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber calibrated at the University of Wisconsin SSDL. The documentation generated through this procedure allows identify each source clearly and uni-vocally. No significant differences were found between the Sk values obtained from the well chamber calibration procedure and those reported by the manufacturer in the corresponding certificates. The highest percent difference found was 2.3%. (author)

  12. Independent verification of the delivered dose in High-Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    An important aspect of a Quality Assurance program in Clinical Dosimetry is an independent verification of the dosimetric calculation done by the Treatment Planning System for each radiation treatment. The present paper is aimed at creating a spreadsheet for the verification of the dose recorded at a point of an implant with radioactive sources and HDR in gynecological injuries. An 192Ir source automatic differed loading equipment, GammaMedplus model, Varian Medical System with HDR installed at the Angel H. Roffo Oncology Institute has been used. The planning system implemented for getting the dose distribution is the BraquiVision. The sources coordinates as well as those of the calculation point (Rectum) are entered into the Excel-devised verification program by assuming the existence of a point source in each one of the applicators' positions. Such calculation point has been selected as the rectum is an organ at risk, therefore determining the treatment planning. The dose verification is performed at points standing at a sources distance having at least twice the active length of such sources, so they may be regarded as point sources. Most of the sources used in HDR brachytherapy with 192Ir have a 5 mm active length for all equipment brands. Consequently, the dose verification distance must be at least of 10 mm. (author)

  13. Dose effects of guide wires for catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy

    Purpose: Guide wires with high torquability and steerability are commonly used to navigate through a tortuous and/or branching arterial tree in a catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy procedure. The dosimetric effects due to the presence of metallic guide wires have not been addressed. This work investigates these dose effects for the three most commonly used β and γ sources (90Sr, 32P, and 192Ir). Methods and Materials: The EGS4 Monte Carlo codes were used to calculate the dose distributions for the 90Sr(NOVOSTE), 32P (Guidant), and 192Ir (BEST Ind.) with and without a guide wire in place. Energy spectra for particles exiting the sources were calculated from the full phase-space data obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations of the source constructions. Guide wires of various thicknesses and compositions were studied. Results: The dose perturbations due to the presence of guide wires were found to be far more significant for the 90Sr/90Y and 32P beta sources than those for the 192Ir gamma source. Because of the attenuation by the guide wires, a dose reduction of up to 60% behind a guide wire was observed for the beta sources, whereas the dose perturbation was found to be negligible for the γ source. For a β source, the dose perturbations depend on the thickness and the material of the guide wire. When the region behind a guide wire is part of an intravascular brachytherapy target, the presence of the guide wire results in a significant underdosing for β sources. The underdosed region can extend a few mm behind the guide wire and up to 1 mm in other directions. Conclusion: Significant dose perturbations by the presence of a metallic guide wire have been found in catheter-based intravascular brachytherapy using β sources. The dose effects should be considered in the dose prescription and/or in analyzing the treatment outcome for β sources. Such precautions are not necessary if using a gamma source

  14. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226Ra or 137Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94% (18

  15. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  16. Calibration of brachytherapy sources. Guidelines on standardized procedures for the calibration of brachytherapy sources at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and hospitals

    Today, irradiation by brachytherapy is considered an essential part of the treatment for almost all the sites of cancer. With the improved localization techniques and treatment planning systems, it is now possible to have precise and reproducible dose delivery. However, the desired clinical results can only be achieved with a good clinical and dosimetric practice, i.e. with the implementation of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme which includes detailed quality control procedures. As summarized in the present report, accidents in brachytherapy treatments have been caused due to the lack of traceable calibration of the sources, due to the incorrect use of quantities and units, or errors made in the dose calculation procedure. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources has established a requirement on the calibration of sources used for medical exposure. For sources used in brachytherapy treatments, a calibration traceable to a standards dosimetry laboratory is required. The present report deals with the calibration of brachytherapy sources and related quality control (QC) measurements, QC of ionization chambers and safety aspects related to the calibration procedures. It does not include safety aspects related to the clinical use of brachytherapy sources, which have been addressed in a recent IAEA publication, IAEA-TECDOC-1040, 'Design and Implementation of a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects'. The procedures recommended in this report yield traceability to internationally accepted standards. It must be realized, however, that a comprehensive QA programme for brachytherapy cannot rest on source calibration alone, but must ensure QC of all the equipment and techniques that are used for the dose delivery to the patient. The present publication incorporates the reports of several consultants meetings in the field of

  17. Brachytherapy surface mould: a treatment modality for some typical sites

    Brachytherapy techniques generally used are interstitial implants, intracavitary/intraluminal applications and surface mould therapy. At M.D. Oswal Cancer Hospital surface moulds with remote after-moulding system with 192Ir wires for treatment of some typical sites have been used

  18. Retreatment of recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck by afterloading interstitial 192Ir implant

    Emami, B.; Marks, J.E.

    1983-10-01

    From January 1975 to December 1980, 25 patients with persistent or recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were retreated for palliation at the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. These patients had all undergone extensive previous treatment by surgery and/or radiation. All were retreated with 192Ir interstitial implant with or without external radiation and/or surgical excision. Of 25 patients, 13 had complete response (CR) and 6 had partial response for a follow-up period of 1 to 7 years. Of 13 patients with CR, 6 are alive with no evidence of disease (NED) and two died NED. Detailed results are presented and the new strategy for such patients is discussed.

  19. Retreatment of recurrent carcinoma of the head and neck by afterloading interstitial 192Ir implant

    From January 1975 to December 1980, 25 patients with persistent or recurrent carcinomas of the head and neck were retreated for palliation at the Division of Radiation Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. These patients had all undergone extensive previous treatment by surgery and/or radiation. All were retreated with 192Ir interstitial implant with or without external radiation and/or surgical excision. Of 25 patients, 13 had complete response (CR) and 6 had partial response for a follow-up period of 1 to 7 years. Of 13 patients with CR, 6 are alive with no evidence of disease (NED) and two died NED. Detailed results are presented and the new strategy for such patients is discussed

  20. Dosimetric characterization of low dose rate Iridium 192 wires used in interstitial brachytherapy, produced by Brachytherapy Sources Laboratory the CTRS/IPEN/CNEN-SP, Brazil

    In this work they were some dosimetric parameters established by the dosimetry protocol AAPM TG-43 for the thread of 192Ir with the purpose of complementing the dosimetric specifications of an original source produced at the country. For so much quantities such as the constant of dose rate, A , function of radial dose, g(r), and anisotropy function, F(r,θ), they were experimentally determined and the geometry function, G(r,θ), it was calculated. Measurements with TLD of LiF, with dimensions of 1 mm X 1 mm X 1 mm, was made in a phantom made of 5 plates of solid water RW3 material with dimensions of 300 mm X 300 mm X 10 mm, where it was obtained values of dose rate for some radial distances of the source, between 10 and 100 mm, to for an angle of 90 deg, for g(r), and also for other angles between 0 deg and 180 deg for F(r,θ). Threads of 192Ir were studied in the lengths of 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm, 50 mm and 100 mm. The stored energy on the thermoluminescent dosimeters was integrated by means of a TLD reader Harshaw 2000 meantime into a cycle of thermal treatment to which the thermoluminescent dosimeters was submitted being, 400 C in an interval of time of 1 hour proceeded immediately for more 2 hours to 105 C, after this treatment the thermoluminescent dosimeters was irradiated; even so, before the reading the detectors was still warm to 105 deg C for 10 minutes. The constant of dose rate for the threads of 192Ir of 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm, 50 mm and 100 mm are (1,076 =- 3,7%); (0,931 =- 3,7%); (0,714 =- 3,7%); (0,589 =-3,7%) and (0,271 =- 3,7%) cGyh-1 U-1, respectively (1U = unit of kerma intensity in the air = 1mGy m2 h-1 = 1cGy cm2 h-1). The results obtained for g(r) and F(r,θ) have uncertainties of (=- 4,5%) and they are compared with values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and also for other values presented in the literature. (author)

  1. Synthesis of phosphosilicate matrix for application to brachytherapy sources

    Brachytherapy with beta sources can be useful for in situ radiotherapy of cancers where tiny radioactive seeds are injected directly into the tumor. Phosphorus 31P can be activated to b-emitter 32P by neutron activation with a half-life of 14.3 days. In this work, phosphosilicate matrices were synthesized through sol-gel process by hydrolysis and condensation of the tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) under two different conditions of synthesis. In both conditions the phosphoric acid and drying control chemical additives (DCCA's) were the same. Three drying control chemical additives were utilized: propylene carbonate, N,N-dimethylformamide and ethylene glycol. The casting solutions were prepared with phosphorus content of 3.2 wt.% and xerogels were thermally treated at 900 deg C. Different microstructures were observed under different conditions of synthesis. The microstructures of phosphosilicate matrices obtained with ethylene glycol and without DCCA's have shown the presence of a globular structure regions with large amount of phosphorous. (author)

  2. Brachytherapy with 125-Iodine sources: transport and radiation protection

    The estimates for the year 2009 show that 466,730 new cancer cases will occur in Brazil. Prostate cancer is the second most incident type. Brachytherapy, a type of radiotherapy, with Iodine-125 sources are an important form of treatment for this kind of cancer. The Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) created a project to develop a national prototype of these sources and is implementing a facility for local production. The seeds manufacture in Brazil will allow to diminish the treatment cost and make it possible for a larger number of patients. While the laboratory is not ready, the IPEN import and it distributes seeds. This work aim is to present and evaluate the transport procedures and the radiological protection applied to imported sources in order to assist the procedures for the new laboratory implementation. Before sending to hospitals, the seeds are packed by a radioprotector supervisor, in accordance with CNEN NE 5.01 standard 'Radioactive Material Transport'. Despite Iodine-125 presents low energy photons, around 29 keV, local and personal dosimeters are used during the transport process, as described in CNEN NN 3.01 standard 'Radiological Protection Basic Guideline'. All the results show no contamination and very low exposure, proving the method to be valid. The transport procedure used is correct, according to the regulations. As an result of this work, a new dosimeter should be installed and evaluate in future study. (author)

  3. Holmium-166-DTPA as a liquid source for endovascular brachytherapy

    Liquid radiation sources with β emitters have advantages of accurate positioning and uniform dose distribution to the vessel walls to prevent the restenosis of coronary artery. As a liquid radiation source, 166Ho-DTPA was prepared and evaluated its in-vivo pharmacokinetic behavior through animal studies. 166Ho-DTPA was prepared by simple mixing the Holmium with DTPA at room temperature. The radiolabelling yield was 100% when the DTPA/Holmium molar ratio was >2. Radiolabelling of 166Ho-DTPA was not dependent on the pH range of 1.7-7.5. High radiochemical stability (>98%) was maintained over a period of 6 hours even with a radioactivity (∼11.1 GBq/12 mg of DTPA) stored at room temperature. Biodistribution of 166Ho-DTPA in rats and gamma camera images in rabbits showed that 166Ho-DTPA was quickly excreted via the urinary system. The average of Tmax and T1/2 of 166Ho-DTPA in the kidneys of rabbits were 3.71 ± 1.18 min and 9.15 ± 3.15 min. 166Ho-DTPA is a potential liquid radiation source for radiation brachytherapy to prevent the restenosis of the coronary artery using a liquid-filled balloon

  4. Evaluation of organ doses in brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer using mathematical reference Indian adult phantom

    Quantifying organ dose to healthy organs during radiotherapy is essential to estimate the radiation risk. Dose factors are generated by simulating radiation transport through an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing a reference Indian adult using the Monte Carlo method. The mean organ dose factors (in mGy min-1 GBq-1) are obtained considering the Micro Selectron 192Ir source and BEBIG 60Co sources in the uterus of a reference Indian adult female phantom. The present study provides the factors for mean absorbed dose to organs applicable to the Indian female patient population undergoing brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer. This study also includes a comparison of the dimension of organs in the phantom model with measured values of organs in the various investigated patients. (author)

  5. A Scintillating Fiber Dosimeter for Radiology and Brachytherapy with photodiode readout

    Rêgo, Florbela; Abreu, Maria da Conceição

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: For more than a decade that plastic optical fiber based dosimeters have been developed for medical applications. The feasibility of dosimeters using optical fibers that are almost Cherenkov light free has been demonstrated in some prototypes, particularly suitable for photon high-energy beams. In the energy range up to a few hundred keV, where the production of Cherenkov light by secondary electrons is negligible or small, the largest source of background are the fluorescence mechanisms. Methods: In recent years our group has developed an optical fiber dosimeter with photodiode readout named DosFib, which has small energy dependence in the range below 100 keV relevant for radiology. Photodiodes are robust photodetectors, presenting good stability over time and enough sensitivity to allow the use of an electrometer as a measuring device without extra electronics. Results: In-vitro tests using a High Dose Rate 192Ir source have demonstrated its suitability for brachytherapy applications using this impo...

  6. Progress and review of brachytherapy for cancer of the oral region

    Radiation therapy contributes greatly to the treatment of head and neck cancer, because it maintains the normal anatomy, minimizes functional loss, and facilitates a patient's return to work. Brachytherapy using small radiation sources is an indispensable modality for the treatment of cancer of the oral region, in which emphasis should be laid on the maintenance of normal anatomy and function and a high quality of life. Brachytherapy was performed in 62% of the radiation therapy patients with cancer of the oral region. Interstitial brachytherapy with radium, 192Ir-hairpin was administered to more than 80% of the patients with tongue cancer and 198Au-grain was frequently used for other site of the oral region. Introduction of the remote afterloading system (RALS) has completely eliminated the possibility of personnel exposure and increased the indication for brachytherapy. There is a lot of work to be done in the near future, including the establishment of dose-time relationship for RALS and the development of related apparatus and instruments and the standardization of dose assessment. (author)

  7. Dose-rate to water calibrations for brachytherapy sources from the end-user perspective

    Independent primary standards for brachytherapy photon-emitting source calibration in terms of dose-rate to water have been developed within the framework of the Euramet T2.J06 project. The introduction of dose-rate to water calibration presents an important change in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry that is expected to result to improved dosimetric accuracy. Nevertheless, as with any change in dosimetry for radiation therapy purposes, a phase-in period of well concerted actions aimed at precluding ambiguities and accidents at the end-user level is necessary. The overall uncertainty budget of clinical brachytherapy applications, as well as current trends in brachytherapy treatment planning system dose-calculation algorithms, also need to be considered for a realistic assessment of the net benefit of improving source calibration accuracy. (authors)

  8. Studies on the development of 169Yb-brachytherapy seeds: New generation brachytherapy sources for the management of cancer

    This paper describes development of 169Yb-seeds by encapsulating 0.6–0.65 mm (ϕ) sized 169Yb2O3 microspheres in titanium capsules. Microspheres synthesized by a sol–gel route were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDS and ICP-AES. Optimization of neutron irradiation was accomplished and 169Yb-seeds up to 74 MBq of 169Yb could be produced from natural Yb2O3 microspheres, which have the potential for use in prostate brachytherapy. A protocol to prepare 169Yb-brachytherapy sources (2.96–3.7 TBq of 169Yb) with the use of enriched targets was also formulated

  9. Brachytherapy: Physical and clinical aspects

    take advantage of published results. The use of uniform models and methods in brachytherapy treatments simplifies comparison of treatment results. A typical treatment in which a model may be used is, for example, the treatment of cancer of the cervix, in which the dose is given to a specific point A, or low dose rate (LDR) treatments of head and neck cancers using 192Ir wires. In this latter case the Paris model provides suitable guidelines for calculation of the treatment dose and time. For treatments in which dose optimization techniques are used, the treatment times depend on how the sources are positioned relative to the dose calculation points and on the source strength. In situations in which the system to be used is not obvious, the scientific literature should be consulted in order to take full advantage of already existing experience. With the use of a specific method for the brachytherapy treatment and a model for the dose distribution calculation, comparison of results is simplified. The use of a well established dosimetric system for the treatment of cancer gives a common point for such comparisons. However, the use of a model alone is not sufficient to validate results; it is necessary to have a reliable method for determination of the source strength in order for the dose calculation to be accurate. This means that it is necessary for brachytherapy sources to be calibrated, with the calibration traceable to a national or international standards laboratory. The important aspects of any brachytherapy treatment are: Use of a suitable dosimetric model for the treatment time and dose calculation; Use of calibrated sources. These are by no means all the necessary components. A treatment does not reach its goals if the source misses its aimed positions by a large margin; that is, if there are severe geographical misses in placing the sources relative to their intended positions. Owing to the steep dose gradient that characterizes brachytherapy, such geometrical

  10. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source

  11. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    Purwaningsih, Anik [Center for development of nuclear informatics, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Banten 15310 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  12. Development of a well- type chamber for measurement of source activation in brachytherapy

    Objective: To develop a well-type chamber for measuring air kerma strength of source and improve accuracy for source activity. Methods: By drawing advanced experience from abroad and combining the condition of our country, the authors designed a plan, drew the blueprint, selected the material, processed and assembled the well- type chamber, and carried out a performance test. Result: The imported and self-made well- type chambers were measured in the same condition for comparison. The results should be that the long- term stability of the self-made well- type chamber is 0.4 %, and the technique index is 2%; the recombination rate of ionized charges is 0.9995% and the technique index is 1.000; the measurement accuracy of the well-type chamber is 0.02%, and the technique index is 0.5%. For the self-made well-type chamber, the flat response of peak sensitivity is fixed while for imported one the flat response changes around 0.1% within 5 mm of peak sensitivity. Conclusions: The strong points of the self-made well-type chamber are quick speed and accuracy in measurement and can measure for 192Ir, 125I and 103 Pd sources. Its measurement range is from 3. 7 MBq to 7. 4 x 105 MBq. The development of the well-type chamber fills the gaps of on -site measurement instruments and becomes a product with independent intellectual property right in our country. (authors)

  13. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  14. Production of 125I seed sources for brachytherapy uses

    The production of radioactive sources of 125I, used mainly for the brachytherapy of prostate and ocular cancer, is a work that is being carried out in the plant of production of radioisotopes (PPR) of the Nuclear Center Racso of the IPEN. The employed methodology is based on the 125I physical-chemistry adsorption at silver wires coated with palladium. In the realization of the tests, it has been considered the procedure used by India and Iran participants of this CRP. In the execution of this work, the 131I radioisotope is been used simulating the 125I, because in the PPR-IPEN we produce the 131I. In total 50 samples were used, they were divided in ten groups. In first place with nine working groups, the optimum conditions for work for the coating of the silver wires with palladium were obtained, these being the following: simple method, employing PdCl2 0.1 m, pH of 5.5 to 6.5 and a temperature of 100 deg. C. Later on, a series of tests were carried out to determine the appropriate parameters for the adsorption of 131I in the previously treated wires, these being the following: carrier concentration of Ki 0.03 m, time of adsorption of 6 hours, and temperature of 70 deg. C. Finally, the percentage of 131I adsorption was obtained in the silver wires tried previously with palladium chloride solution of 98.24%. The control of leachability was made, having very good results. To confirm these previously mentioned parameters, a test was made with ten pieces of silver wires, corresponding to the group 10, giving the confirmation as a result of these. Also, samples of the titanium tube have been sent for test with microplasma welding to a French company: air welding liquidates export. With these results obtained, subsequently the production of these radioactive sources will be carried out employing 125I as a radioisotope. (author)

  15. Identification of 192Ir seeds in localization images using a novel statistical pattern recognition approach and a priori information

    Purpose / Objective: Manual labeling of individual 192Ir seeds in localization images for dosimetry of multi-strand low-dose-rate (LDR) implants is labor intensive, tedious and prone to error. The objective of this investigation is to develop computer-based methods that analyze digitized localization images, improve dosimetric efficiency, and reduce labeling errors. Materials and Methods: 192Ir localization films were digitized with a scanned-laser system and analyzed using Multiscale, Geometric, Statistical Pattern Recognition (MGSPR), a technique that recognizes and classifies pixels in gray-scale images based on their surrounding, neighborhood geometry. To 'teach' MGSPR how to recognize specific objects, a Gaussian-based mathematical filter set is applied to training images containing user-labeled examples of the desired objects. The filters capture a broad range of descriptive geometric information at multiple spatial scales. Principled mathematical analysis is used to determine the linear combination of filters from a large base set that yields the best discrimination between object types. Thus the sensitivity of the filters can be 'tuned' to detect specific objects such as192 Ir seeds. For a given pixel, the output of the filter is a multi-component feature vector that uniquely describes the pixel's geometric characteristics. Pixels with similar geometric attributes have feature vectors that naturally 'cluster', or group, in the multidimensional space called 'feature space'. After statistically quantifying the training-set clusters in feature space, pixels found in new images are automatically labeled by correlation with the nearest cluster, e.g., the cluster representing 192Ir seeds. One of the greatest challenges in statistical pattern recognition is to determine which filters result in the best labeling. Good discrimination is achieved when clusters are compact and well isolated from one another in feature space. The filters used in this study are unique

  16. Factors affecting radiation injury after interstitial brachytherapy for brain tumors

    The effects of brachytherapy on normal brain tissue are not easily delineated in the clinical setting because of the presence of concurrent radiation-induced changes in the coexistent brain tumor. Sequential morphologic studies performed after the implantation of radioactive sources into the brains of experimental animals have provided a better understanding of the character and magnitude of the structural changes produced by interstitial irradiation on normal brain tissue. Furthermore, the clinical experience accumulated thus far provides not only relevant information, but also some guidelines for future treatment policies. In this paper, the authors summarize the experimental findings and review the pathologic and clinical features of brain injury caused by interstitial brachytherapy. A number of studies in the older literature examined the effects of radioisotopes such as radium-226 (38--43), radon-22 (44--46), gold-198 (29,47--50), tantalum-182 (29,51,52) yttrium-9- (50,53,54), and cobalt-60 (29,50,55). This review is restricted to low- and high-activity encapsulated iodine-125 (125I) and iridium-192 (192Ir), the isotopes that are most commonly used in current clinical practice

  17. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR 192Ir brachytherapy

  18. COMS eye plaque brachytherapy dosimetric sensitivity to source photon energy and seed design

    This study explores the influence of source photon energy on eye plaque brachytherapy dose distributions for a 16 mm COMS plaque filled with 103Pd, 125I, or 131Cs sources or monoenergetic photon emissions ranging from 12 keV to 100 keV. Dose distributions were similarly created for all permutations of three common brachytherapy seed designs. Within this range, sources with average energy ≤22 keV may reduce dose to the opposite eye wall by more than a factor of 2 while maintaining tolerable proximal sclera doses when prescribing to depths of 9 mm or less. Current commercially-available brachytherapy sources can exhibit up to 15% relative dosimetric sensitivity to seed design at regions within the eye. - Highlights: • Episcleral eye plaque brachytherapy utilizes low-energy photon-emitting sources. • Dose distribution sensitivity to source photon energy and seed design was examined. • Tumor dose conformity and critical structure sparing from ≤22 keV photons is preferred. • Ocular dose distributions varied by up to 15% with seed design permutations

  19. Metal stent and endoluminal high-dose rate 192iridium brachytherapy in palliative treatment of malignant biliary tract obstruction

    Since December 1989, 9 patients with inoperable malignant biliary tract obstruction were treated palliatively by a combined modality treatment consisting of placement of a permanent biliary endoprosthesis followed by intraluminal high dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy. A dose of 10 Gy was delivered in a hyperfractionated schedule at the point of reference in a distance of 7.5 mm of centre of the source. External small field radiotherapy (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week) was also given in six cases (M/O, Karnofsky >60%). In 9/9 cases an unrestrained bile flow and an interruption of pruritus was achieved, in 78% (7/9) of cases the duration of palliation was as long as the survival time (median survival time 7.5 months). (orig.)

  20. In-phantom dosimetric measurements as quality control for brachytherapy. System check and constancy check; Messungen im Festkoerperphantom als Qualitaetskontrolle in der Brachytherapie. Systempruefung und Konstanzpruefung

    Kollefrath, Michael; Bruggmoser, Gregor; Nanko, Norbert; Gainey, Mark [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2015-09-01

    In brachytherapy dosimetric measurements are difficult due to the inherent dose-inhomogeneities. Typically in routine clinical practice only the nominal dose rate is determined for computer controlled afterloading systems. The region of interest lies close to the source when measuring the spatial dose distribution. In this region small errors in the positioning of the detector, and its finite size, lead to large measurement uncertainties that exacerbate the routine dosimetric control of the system in the clinic. The size of the measurement chamber, its energy dependence, and the directional dependence of the measurement apparatus are the factors which have a significant influence on dosimetry. Although ionisation chambers are relatively large, they are employed since similar chambers are commonly found on clinical brachytherapy units. The dose is determined using DIN 6800 [11] since DIN 6809-2 [12], which deals with dosimetry in brachytherapy, is antiquated and is currently in the process of revision. Further information regarding dosimetry for brachytherapy can be found in textbooks [1] and [2]. The measurements for this work were performed with a HDR (High-Dose-Rate) {sup 192}Ir source, type mHDR V2, and a Microselectron Afterloader V2 both from Nucletron/Elekta. In this work two dosimetric procedures are presented which, despite the aforemention difficulties, should assist in performing checks of the proper operation of the system. The first is a system check that measures the dose distribution along a line and is to be performed when first bringing the afterloader into operation, or after significant changes to the system. The other is a dosimetric constancy check, which with little effort can be performed monthly or weekly. It simultaneously verifies the positioning of the source at two positions, the functionality of the system clock and the automatic re-calculation of the source activity.

  1. Establishment of the RSS reentrant chamber as a reference standard for brachytherapy sources

    Re-entrant chambers provide a reliable, sensitive and easy method for calibrating the brachytherapy sources, at the hospital site. This work reports on the establishment of the RSS well chamber, as a reference chamber, for the routine calibration of the hospital well chambers

  2. Clinical Practice and Quality Assurance Challenges in Modern Brachytherapy Sources and Dosimetry

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either 'systematic' or 'stochastic' in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist

  3. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  4. Establishment of Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence dosimeters for brachytherapy

    Issa, Fatma, E-mail: f.issa@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Radiotherapy, Tripoli Medical Centre (TMC), Tripoli (Libya); Abdul Rahman, A.T. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Hugtenburg, Richard P. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg UHB and School of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bradley, David A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Radiological Sciences, King Saud University, P.O. Box 10219, Riyadh 11432 (Saudi Arabia); Nisbet, Andrew [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford, GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    This study aims to establish the sensitive, {approx}120 {mu}m high spatial resolution, high dynamic range Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence (TL) dosimeters for brachytherapy dose distribution. This requires investigation to accommodate sensitivity of detection, both for the possibility of short range dose deposition from beta components as well as gamma/x-mediated dose. In-air measurements are made at distances close to radionuclide sources, evaluating the fall off in dose along the transverse axis of {sup 133}Ba and {sup 60}Co radioactive sources, at distances from 2 mm up to 20 mm from their midpoints. Measurements have been compared with Monte Carlo code DOSRZnrc simulations for photon-mediated dose only, agreement being obtained to within 3% and 1% for the {sup 133}Ba and {sup 60}Co sources, respectively. As such, in both cases it is determined that as intended, beta dose has been filtered out by source encapsulation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We seek to establish Ge-doped optical fibres as TLDs for brachytherapy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dose was evaluated along the central axis of {sup 133}Ba and {sup 60}Co, at 2 mm-20 mm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We verify values using DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement is between dose measurements and calculation to within 3% and 1%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methodology is to be used in obtaining doses around {sup 125}I and {sup 192}Ir sources.

  5. Measurement of disintegration rate and decay branching ratio for nuclide 192Ir with β-, EC mixing decays by using 4πβ-γ coincidence counting

    The absolute disintegration rates for nuclide 192Ir were measured with a 4πβ-γ (HPGe) coincidence apparatus by using parameter method and extrapolation method. The final uncertainties obtained were 0.4% and 0.5% respectively for a confidence level of 99.7%. The method with which both the disintegration rate and the decay branching ratio can be measured for nuclides with β- and EC mixing decays was proposed and described. The β- branching ratio in 192Ir decays was measured being 0.9572. The final uncertainties of disintegration rates and β- decay branching ratio with this method were 1.5% and 1.8% respectively

  6. Measurement of air kerma rate and absorbed dose for brachytherapy sources with secondary standard dosimeter

    The air kerma measurements for brachytherapy sources are generally recommended to be done at one meter using large volume chambers. These measurements pose problems due to low signal from brachytherapy sources. Non-availability of calibrated large volume chambers at a hospital adds to the problem of air kerma measurements. Therefore, the use of commonly available secondary standard dosimeter having 0.6 cc chambers has been examined. Correction factors to be applied at small source to chamber distances have been determined. Measurements from 137Cs source of nominal activity as low as 1.11 GBq (30 mCi) could be carried out using an integration time of about 20 minutes at minimum distance of 1.5 cm. For source to chamber distance beyond 5 cm, the correction factor approaches unity. (author)

  7. Measurement of anisotropic angular distributions of photon energy spectra for I-125 brachytherapy sources

    The angular distribution of photon energy spectra emitted from an I-125 brachytherapy source was measured using a specially designed jig in the range of ±70° in the plane of the long axis of the source. It is important to investigate the angular dependence of photon emissions from these sources for the calibration of the air kerma rate. The results show that the influence of the distributions between 0° and ±8° is small enough to allow a calibration using current primary instruments which have a large entrance window. - Highlights: ► Angular energy distribution for an I-125 brachytherapy source was measured. ► Variation of the distribution is sufficiently small. ► It is acceptable for primary calibration of the source strength. ► Distributions should be taken into consideration in some instruments.

  8. Dosimetric and clinical comparison between MammoSite and interstitial HDR brachytherapy in treatment of early stage breast cancer after conserving surgery

    Objective: To comparatively study dosimetric evaluation, side effects in early and late stage, and cosmetic outcome between MammoSite and interstitial using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in early stage breast cancer patient after conserving surgery. Methods: From January 2004 to December 2004, 10 breast cancer cases were treated with HDR 192Ir APBI after Lumpectomy surgery, 6 cases with interstitial brachytherapy, 4 cases with MammoSite. Sources were placed during the operation in all patients, distance from cavity to skin > 5-7 mm in interstitial brachytherapy group, one case is 6.5 mm, 3 cases > 10 mm in MammoSite group. Treatment Target area is 20 mm away from cavity in interstitial brachytherapy group with DHI 0.77, 10 mm away from Balloon margin in MammoSite with DHI 0.73. Results: Follow up 12-24 months while median follow-up was 18 months for the whole group (100%). During the treatment, grade III acute reactions were not seen in both group, grade I or II were seen including: erythema, edema, tenderness and infection. More late toxicity reaction including skin fibrosis, breast tenderness and fat necrosis were observed in interstitial brachytherapy group than that of MammoSite group. Cosmetic outcome evaluation were excellent in 12 months 100% (patient) and 83% (doctor) in interstitial brachytherapy, 100% in MammoSite group, respectively, none recurrence. Conclusions: Interstitial brachytherapy shows more uniformity in dose distribution as well as larger treatment volume, while MammoSite tends to be stable in repeatability and easy in use. Both groups show excellent cosmetic results, with same acute and late reactions. (authors)

  9. Deterministic calculations of radiation doses from brachytherapy seeds

    Brachytherapy is used for treating certain types of cancer by inserting radioactive sources into tumours. CDTN/CNEN is developing brachytherapy seeds to be used mainly in prostate cancer treatment. Dose calculations play a very significant role in the characterization of the developed seeds. The current state-of-the-art of computation dosimetry relies on Monte Carlo methods using, for instance, MCNP codes. However, deterministic calculations have some advantages, as, for example, short computer time to find solutions. This paper presents a software developed to calculate doses in a two-dimensional space surrounding the seed, using a deterministic algorithm. The analysed seeds consist of capsules similar to IMC6711 (OncoSeed), that are commercially available. The exposure rates and absorbed doses are computed using the Sievert integral and the Meisberger third order polynomial, respectively. The software also allows the isodose visualization at the surface plan. The user can choose between four different radionuclides (192Ir, 198Au, 137Cs and 60Co). He also have to enter as input data: the exposure rate constant; the source activity; the active length of the source; the number of segments in which the source will be divided; the total source length; the source diameter; and the actual and effective source thickness. The computed results were benchmarked against results from literature and developed software will be used to support the characterization process of the source that is being developed at CDTN. The software was implemented using Borland Delphi in Windows environment and is an alternative to Monte Carlo based codes. (author)

  10. In-phantom dosimetric measurements as quality control for brachytherapy. System check and constancy check

    In brachytherapy dosimetric measurements are difficult due to the inherent dose-inhomogeneities. Typically in routine clinical practice only the nominal dose rate is determined for computer controlled afterloading systems. The region of interest lies close to the source when measuring the spatial dose distribution. In this region small errors in the positioning of the detector, and its finite size, lead to large measurement uncertainties that exacerbate the routine dosimetric control of the system in the clinic. The size of the measurement chamber, its energy dependence, and the directional dependence of the measurement apparatus are the factors which have a significant influence on dosimetry. Although ionisation chambers are relatively large, they are employed since similar chambers are commonly found on clinical brachytherapy units. The dose is determined using DIN 6800 [11] since DIN 6809-2 [12], which deals with dosimetry in brachytherapy, is antiquated and is currently in the process of revision. Further information regarding dosimetry for brachytherapy can be found in textbooks [1] and [2]. The measurements for this work were performed with a HDR (High-Dose-Rate) 192Ir source, type mHDR V2, and a Microselectron Afterloader V2 both from Nucletron/Elekta. In this work two dosimetric procedures are presented which, despite the aforemention difficulties, should assist in performing checks of the proper operation of the system. The first is a system check that measures the dose distribution along a line and is to be performed when first bringing the afterloader into operation, or after significant changes to the system. The other is a dosimetric constancy check, which with little effort can be performed monthly or weekly. It simultaneously verifies the positioning of the source at two positions, the functionality of the system clock and the automatic re-calculation of the source activity.

  11. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.; Anderson, James H.

    1999-01-01

    We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of manimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program....... Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of dosimetric parameters for hybrid PdI source in brachytherapy

    According to dose calculation formula recommended by AAPM TG-43U1, dose rate constant of' Model 6711 125I brachytherapy source was calculated by Monte Carlo method. The calculation results were in good agreement with TG-43U1. Then, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function of new hybrid PdI source were calculated by Monte Carlo method. Empiric equations were obtained for radial dose function. (authors)

  13. A brachytherapy model-based dose calculation algorithm -AMIGOBrachy

    performed using an HDR 192Ir source. (author)

  14. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the NMIJ and the BIPM

    Kessler, C.; Kurosawa, T.; Mikamoto, T.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources of the National Metrology Institute of Japan (AIST-NMIJ), Japan, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) in April 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for a transfer standard and expressed as a ratio of the NMIJ and the BIPM standards for reference air kerma rate, is 1.0036 with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.0054. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  16. Novel high resolution 125I brachytherapy source dosimetry using Ge-doped optical fibres

    The steep dose gradients close to brachytherapy sources limit the ability to obtain accurate measurements of dose. Here we use a novel high spatial resolution dosimeter to measure dose around a 125I source and compare against simulations. Ge-doped optical fibres, used as thermoluminescent dosimeters, offer sub-mm spatial resolution, linear response from 10 cGy to >1 kGy and dose-rate independence. For a 125I brachytherapy seed in a PMMA phantom, doses were obtained for source-dosimeter separations from 0.1 cm up to several cm, supported by EGSnrc/DOSRZznrc Monte Carlo simulations and treatment planning system data. The measurements agree with simulations to within 2.3%±0.3% along the transverse and perpendicular axes and within 3.0%±0.5% for measurements investigating anisotropy in angular dose distribution. Measured and Veriseed™ brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) values agreed to within 2.7%±0.5%. Ge-doped optical fibre dosimeters allow detailed dose mapping around brachytherapy sources, not least in situations of high dose gradient. - Highlights: • We evaluate fall-off in dose for distances from an 125I source of 1 mm to 60 mm. • The TL of optical fibres accommodate high dose gradients and doses that reduce by a factor of 103 across the range of separations. • We verify measured values using DOSRZnrc Monte Carlo code simulations and the Variseed™ Treatment Planning System. • Measured radial and angular dose are obtained with ≤3% uncertainty

  17. CT-guided brachytherapy. A novel percutaneous technique for interstitial ablation of liver malignancies; CT-gesteuerte Brachytherapie. Eine neue perkutane Technik zur interstitiellen Ablation von Lebermetastasen

    Ricke, J.; Wust, P.; Stohlmann, A.; Beck, A.; Cho, C.H.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Spors, B.; Werk, M.; Rosner, C.; Haenninen, E.L.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess safety and efficacy of CT-guided brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Patients and methods: 21 patients with 21 liver malignancies (19 metastases, two primary liver tumors) were treated with interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy applying a {sup 192}Ir source. In all patients, the use of image-guided thermal tumor ablation such as by radiofrequency or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) was impeded either by tumor size {>=} 5 cm in seven, adjacent portal or hepatic vein in ten, or adjacent bile duct bifurcation in four patients. Dosimetry was performed using three-dimensional CT data sets acquired after CT-guided positioning of the brachytherapy catheters. Results: the mean tumor diameter was 4.6 cm (2.5-11 cm). The mean minimal tumor dose inside the tumor margin amounted to 17 Gy (12-20 Gy). The proportion of the liver parenchyma exposed to > 5 gy was 18% (5-39%) of total liver parenchyma minus tumor volume. Nausea and vomiting were observed in six patients after brachytherapy (28%). One patient demonstrated obstructive jaundice due to tumor edema after irradiation of a metastasis adjacent to the bile duct bifurcation. We commonly encountered asymptomatic increases of liver enzymes. Local control rates after 6 and 12 months were 87% and 70%, respectively. Conclusion: CT-guided brachytherapy is safe and effective. This technique displays broader indications compared to image-guided thermal ablation by radiofrequency or LITT with respect to tumor size or localization. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Analyse der Sicherheit und Effektivitaet CT-gesteuerter Brachytherapie zur Ablation von Lebermalignomen. Patienten und Methodik: 21 Patienten mit 21 Lebermalignomen (19 Metastasen, zwei primaere Lebermalignome) wurden mit perkutaner, CT-gesteuerter interstitieller Brachytherapie mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. Alle Patienten wiesen Umstaende auf, die eine bildgefuehrte thermische Ablation mit Radiofrequenz oder laserinduzierter Thermotherapie (LITT) einschraenkten

  18. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite porous matrixes for application as radiation sources in brachytherapy

    Porous ceramic materials based on calcium phosphate compounds (CPC) have been studied aiming at different biomedical applications such as implants, drug delivery systems and radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Two kinds of hydroxyapatite (HAp) powders and their ceramic bodies were characterized by a combination of different techniques (X-rays diffraction and fluorescence, infrared spectrophotometry, BET method, thermal analysis, and scanning electron microscopy) to evaluate their physico-chemical and microstructural characteristics in terms of chemical composition, segregated phases, microstructure, porosity, and chemical and thermal stability. The results revealed that these systems presented potential for use as porous biodegradable radioactive sources able to be loaded with a wide range of radionuclides for cancer treatment by the brachytherapy technique. (author)

  19. Radiation-induced light in optical fibers and plastic scintillators: Application to brachytherapy dosimetry

    A small plastic scintillator bonded to an optical fiber has several characteristics that make it promising as a brachytherapy dosimeter. In these dosimeters, scintillation light represents signal, whereas Cerenkov and luminescence light from the optical fiber stem is noise that must be subtracted. The dosimeter accuracy can be improved by optically filtering part of the fiber stem light. Spectral measurements were performed to guide the choice of scintillator, fiber, and filter. Spectral signatures and total luminescence of three scintillators and five different silica optical fibers, excited by a 8 Ci 192Ir source, were measured. The total radiation-induced light from the various optical fibers differed by up to a factor of 5.6. The percentage of fiber-produced light due to luminescence varied between 15 and 79%. A fiber with weak emission was used in the dosimeter with BC408S, a scintillator with minimum emission wavelength of 400 nm. A 400-nm cutoff UV filter gave a factor of two increase in signal-to-noise. The dosimeter response was linear for dose rates varying by at least three orders of magnitude, representing source-to-probe distances of 0.2--10 cm. Measurement errors of the dosimeter compare favorably with other brachytherapy dosimeters

  20. A design of brachytherapy source calibration template for air kerma rate/activity measurement

    This simple template can be used for the purpose of calibration of brachytherapy source, if the department does not have the calibration-track stand. One can design this template in the hospital itself as per the requirement, availability and facility, and the expenses also will be less. It is fully made up of a very thin 0.75 mm thickness of paper cardboard and this is the speciality. Currently this template is being utilized for accurate and easy calibration purposes

  1. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for 252Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect.

  2. Metal stent and endoluminal high-dose rate [sup 192]iridium brachytherapy in palliative treatment of malignant biliary tract obstruction. First experiences. Metallgeflecht-Endoprothese und intraluminare High-dose-rate-[sup 192]Iridium-Brachytherapie zur palliativen Behandlung maligner Gallengangsobstruktionen. Erste Erfahrungen

    Pakisch, B.; Stuecklschweiger, G.; Poier, E.; Leitner, H.; Poschauko, J.; Hackl, A. (Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Graz (Austria)); Klein, G.E.; Lammer, J.; Hausegger, K.A. (Universitaets-Klinik fuer Radiologie, Abt. fuer Spezielle Roentgendiagnostik und Digitale Bilddiagnostische Verfahren, Graz (Austria))

    1992-06-01

    Since December 1989, 9 patients with inoperable malignant biliary tract obstruction were treated palliatively by a combined modality treatment consisting of placement of a permanent biliary endoprosthesis followed by intraluminal high dose-rate [sup 192]Ir brachytherapy. A dose of 10 Gy was delivered in a hyperfractionated schedule at the point of reference in a distance of 7.5 mm of centre of the source. External small field radiotherapy (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per day, 5 fractions per week) was also given in six cases (M/O, Karnofsky >60%). In 9/9 cases an unrestrained bile flow and an interruption of pruritus was achieved, in 78% (7/9) of cases the duration of palliation was as long as the survival time (median survival time 7.5 months). (orig.).

  3. Verification of I-125 brachytherapy source strength for use in radioactive seed localization procedures.

    Metyko, John; Erwin, William; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2016-06-01

    A general-purpose nuclear medicine dose calibrator was assessed as a potential replacement for a dedicated air-communicating well-type ionization chamber (brachytherapy source strength verification instrument) for (125)I seed source strength verification for radioactive seed localization, where less stringent accuracy tolerances may be acceptable. The accuracy, precision and reproducibility of the dose calibrator were measured and compared to regulatory requirements. The results of this work indicate that a dose calibrator can be used for (125)I seed source strength verification for radioactive seed localization. PMID:27015651

  4. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using 198Au grains and 137Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  5. Clinical implementation of AAPM Task Group 32 recommendations on brachytherapy source strength specification

    Historically the strength of sealed brachytherapy sources has been described by many physical quantities, including true activity, apparent activity, and equivalent mass of radium. Recently, the AAPM Task Group 32 recommended that these quantities be replaced by a single quantity, air-kerma strength, with units of μGy m2 h-1. A set of equations has been developed for unambiguously converting source strength estimates and renormalizing published dose-rate tables, which assume traditional quantities and units, into forms consistent with air-kerma strength. For commonly used brachytherapy sources, multiplicative conversion factors for each source-strength formalism and set of units are given. To convert equivalent mass of radium to air-kerma strength requires a single multiplicative factor, 7.23 μGy m2 h-1/mgRaEq, applicable to all sources. Based upon a review of vendor source specification practices, the factors for converting source strength of 198Au, 103Pd, and 125I seeds from apparent mCi to air-kerma strength are 2.06, 1.29, and 1.27 μGy m2 h-1/mCi(apparent), respectively. These factors are independent of source geometry but depend on the nominal exposure rate constant value selected by the vendor. Conversion factors applicable to mass of radium or true activity depend upon both source geometry and radionuclide identity. Because many of these conversion factors depend upon vendor choices of physical constants and exposure rate constants, readers are cautioned to carefully review vendor source strength specification practices before adopting these values clinically. Finally, the relationships between the various source strength quantities and absorbed dose rate in the medium surrounding the source are elucidated

  6. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels

  7. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    Dinkla, Anna M., E-mail: a.m.dinkla@amc.uva.nl; Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  8. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space. PMID:23965939

  9. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    Souza, Daiane C.B.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.; Vicente, Roberto; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Costa, Osvaldo L.; Souza, Carla D.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Anderson S.; Batista, Talita Q.; Melo, Emerson R.; Camargo, Anderson R., E-mail: dcsouza@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Karam Junior, Dib, E-mail: dib.karam@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)

  10. Assessment of the risks associated with Iodine-125 handling production sources for brachytherapy

    In Brazil, prostate cancer is the second most frequent disease, with an estimated 68,800 new cases in 2013. This type of cancer can be treated with brachytherapy, which uses sealed sources of Iodine-125 implanted permanently in the prostate. These sources are currently imported at a high cost, making public treatment in large scale impractical. To reduce costs and to meet domestic demand, the laboratory for production of brachytherapy sources at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is currently nationalizing the production of this radioisotope. Iodine is quite volatile making the handling of its radioactive isotopes potentially dangerous. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks to which workers are exposed during the production and handling of the sources. The research method consisted initially of a literature review on the toxicity of iodine, intake limits, related physical risks, handling of accidents, generation of radioactive wastes, etc. The results allowed for establishing safety and radioprotection policies in order to ensure efficient and safe production in all stages and the implementation of good laboratory practices. (author)