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Sample records for 18s ribosomal rna

  1. Phylogenetic relationships within the Mysidae (Crustacea, Peracarida, Mysida) based on nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA sequences

    Remerie, T.; Bulckaen, B.; Calderon, J; Deprez, T.; Mees, J.; J. Vanfleteren; Vanreusel, A.; Vierstraete, A; Vincx, M.; Wittmann, K.J.; Wooldridge, T.

    2005-01-01

    Species of the order Mysida (Crustacea, Peracarida) are shrimp-like animals that occur in vast numbers in coastal regions of the world. The order Mysida comprises 1053 species and 165 genera. The present study covers 25 species of the well-defined Mysidae, the most speciose family within the order Mysida. 18S rRNA sequence analysis confirms that the subfamily Siriellinae is monophyletic. On the other hand the subfamily Gastrosaccinae is paraphyletic and the subfamily Mysinae, represented in t...

  2. Translation by ribosome shunting on adenovirus and hsp70 mRNAs facilitated by complementarity to 18S rRNA

    Yueh, Andrew; Schneider, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Translation initiation on eukaryotic mRNAs involves 40S ribosome association with mRNA caps (m7GpppN), mediated by initiation factor eIF4F. 40S eukaryotic ribosomes and initiation factors undergo 5′ scanning to the initiation codon, with no known role for complementarity between eukaryotic 18S rRNA and the 5′ noncoding region of mRNAs. We demonstrate that the 5′ noncoding region of human adenovirus late mRNAs, known as the tripartite leader, utilizes a striking complementarity to 18S rRNA to ...

  3. The complete nucleotide sequence of the rat 18S ribosomal RNA gene and comparison with the respective yeast and frog genes.

    Torczynski, R; Bollon, A P; Fuke, M

    1983-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the rat 18S ribosomal RNA gene has been determined. A comparison of the rat 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence with the known sequences of yeast and frog revealed three conserved (stable) regions, two unstable regions, and three large inserts. (A,T) leads to (G,C) changes were more frequent than (G,C) leads to (A,T) changes for three comparisons (yeast leads to frog, frog leads to rat, and yeast leads to rat). GC pairs were inserted preferentially over AT pair...

  4. A local role for the small ribosomal subunit primary binder rpS5 in final 18S rRNA processing in yeast.

    Andreas Neueder

    Full Text Available In vivo depletion of the yeast small ribosomal subunit (SSU protein S5 (rpS5 leads to nuclear degradation of nascent SSUs and to a perturbed global assembly state of the SSU head domain. Here, we report that rpS5 plays an additional local role at the head/platform interface in efficient SSU maturation. We find that yeast small ribosomal subunits which incorporated an rpS5 variant lacking the seven C-terminal amino acids have a largely assembled head domain and are exported to the cytoplasm. On the other hand, 3' processing of 18S rRNA precursors is inhibited in these ribosomal particles, although they associate with the putative endonuclease Nob1p and other late acting 40S biogenesis factors. We suggest that the SSU head component rpS5 and platform components as rpS14 are crucial constituents of a highly defined spatial arrangement in the head-platform interface of nascent SSUs, which is required for efficient processing of the therein predicted SSU rRNA 3' end. Positioning of rpS5 in nascent SSUs, including its relative orientation towards platform components in the head-platform cleft, will depend on the general assembly and folding state of the head domain. Therefore, the suggested model can explain 18S precursor rRNA 3' processing phenotypes observed in many eukaryotic SSU head assembly mutants.

  5. Wide genetic variations at 18S ribosomal RNA locus of Cyclospora cayetanensis isolated from Egyptian patients using high resolution melting curve.

    Hussein, Eman M; El-Moamly, Amal A; Mahmoud, Moushira A; Ateek, Nayera S

    2016-07-01

    A variable clinical picture of cyclosporiasis including gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptomatic or asymptomatic beside extraintestinal consequences suggests a possibility of heterogenicity of Cyclospora cayetanensis. The present work aimed to explore the possibility of genetic variation of C. cayetanensis using high-resolution melting (HRM) curve of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified 18S rRNA genes. DNAs extracted from the stool samples of 70 cyclosporiasis patients were amplified and scanned by PCR/HRM curve. The results showed that there are four different genotypic profiles of C. cayetanensis with presence of mixed ones. Although Tm of all profiles was within the same range, they were discerned by plotting of the temperature-shifted florescence difference between normalized melting curves (dF/dT). Genotypic profile I was found alone in 40 % of patients and mixed with genotypic profile II and/or III in 25.7 % of patients, followed by genotypic profile II in 14.3 % then genotypic profile III and IV (10 % each). A significant relation was found between genotypic profiles and GIT symptomatic status as profile I and profile II were mostly detected in patients with acute GIT symptoms without or with chronic illness, respectively, while profile IV cases only were GIT asymptomatic. Statistical significance relations between genotypic profiles and age, gender, residence and oocyst shape index were determined. In conclusion, PCR/HRM proved a wide variation on C. cayetanensis genes that could be reflected on its pathogenic effects and explaining the variability of the clinical manifestations presented by cyclosporiasis patients. PMID:27041342

  6. Systematics of Chaetognatha under the light of molecular data, using duplicated ribosomal 18S DNA sequences.

    Papillon, Daniel; Perez, Yvan; Caubit, Xavier; Le Parco, Yannick

    2006-03-01

    While the phylogenetic position of Chaetognatha has became central to the question of early bilaterian evolution, the internal systematics of the phylum are still not clear. The phylogenetic relationships of the chaetognaths were investigated using newly obtained small subunit ribosomal RNA nuclear 18S (SSU rRNA) sequences from 16 species together with 3 sequences available in GenBank. As previously shown with the large subunit ribosomal RNA 28S gene, two classes of Chaetognatha SSU rRNA gene can be identified, suggesting a duplication of the whole ribosomal cluster; allowing the rooting of one class of genes by another in phylogenetic analyses. Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses of the molecular data, and statistical tests showed (1) that there are three main monophyletic groups: Sagittidae/Krohnittidae, Spadellidae/Pterosagittidae, and Eukrohniidae/Heterokrohniidae, (2) that the group of Aphragmophora without Pterosagittidae (Sagittidae/Krohnittidae) is monophyletic, (3) the Spadellidae/Pterosagittidae and Eukrohniidae/Heterokrohniidae families are very likely clustered, (4) the Krohnittidae and Pterosagittidae groups should no longer be considered as families as they are included in other groups designated as families, (5) suborder Ctenodontina is not monophyletic and the Flabellodontina should no longer be considered as a suborder, and (6) the Syngonata/Chorismogonata and the Monophragmophora/Biphragmophora hypotheses are rejected. Such conclusions are considered in the light of morphological characters, several of which are shown to be prone to homoplasy. PMID:16434216

  7. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  8. 16S/18S ribosomal DNA clone library analysis of rumen microbial diversity

    The rumen contains a complex ecosystem where billions of bacteria, archaea, protozoa and fungi reside. This diverse microbiota is well adapted to live in the rumen and play an important role in the digestion of feed and nutrient supply to the host in the form of microbial protein and volatile fatty acids. It is estimated that the rumen microbial population consists of about 106 protozoa/ml, 103-107 fungi/ml, 1010 bacteria/ml, and 109 methanogens/ml. To better understand the complex relationships in the rumen, it is necessary to gain an insight into the diversity of the rumen microbes and how the quantity and composition of rumen micro-organisms are altered by a number of different host factors such as age, genetics and diet. In the past, the diversity of micro-organisms from the digestive tracts of domesticated ruminants has been identified by classical microbiological techniques. However, given the fastidious growth requirements of rumen micro-organisms, it is reasonable to concede that the culture-dependent methods may select against some species, or taxonomic groups, leading researchers to underestimate the microbial diversity that is actually present in the rumen. In fact, it has been speculated that 90% of micro-organisms in nature have escaped traditional cultivation methods. Therefore, a major challenge in microbial ecology has been to assess the diversity and structure of natural microbial communities. The field of molecular biology has advanced with many innovative technological breakthroughs. The ability to extract and to isolate high-molecular weight DNA from rumen digesta, PCR amplify genes from specific microbial groups and obtain gene sequence data is now a routine event. The small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, called 16S in prokaryotes and 18S in eukaryotes, is the most widely used molecular marker to presumptively identify morphologically indistinguishable species, to infer their phylogenetic relationships, and to elucidate microbial

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Plasmodium species prevalent in Yemen based on 18 s rRNA

    A Azazy Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is an endemic disease in Yemen and is responsible for 4.9 deaths per 100,000 population per year and 43,000 disability adjusted life years lost. Although malaria in Yemen is caused mainly by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, there are no sequence data available on the two species. This study was conducted to investigate the distribution of the Plasmodium species based on the molecular detection and to study the molecular phylogeny of these parasites. Methods Blood samples from 511 febrile patients were collected and a partial region of the 18 s ribosomal RNA (18 s rRNA gene was amplified using nested PCR. From the 86 positive blood samples, 13 Plasmodium falciparum and 4 Plasmodium vivax were selected and underwent cloning and, subsequently, sequencing and the sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. Results Malaria was detected by PCR in 86 samples (16.8%. The majority of the single infections were caused by P. falciparum (80.3%, followed by P. vivax (5.8%. Mixed infection rates of P. falciparum + P. vivax and P. falciparum + P. malariae were 11.6% and 2.3%, respectively. All P. falciparum isolates were grouped with the strain 3D7, while P. vivax isolates were grouped with the strain Salvador1. Phylogenetic trees based on 18 s rRNA placed the P. falciparum isolates into three sub-clusters and P. vivax into one cluster. Sequence alignment analysis showed 5-14.8% SNP in the partial sequences of the 18 s rRNA of P. falciparum. Conclusions Although P. falciparum is predominant, P. vivax, P. malariae and mixed infections are more prevalent than has been revealed by microscopy. This overlooked distribution should be considered by malaria control strategy makers. The genetic polymorphisms warrant further investigation.

  10. Gene cloning of the 18S rRNA of an ancient viable moss from the permafrost of northeastern Siberia

    Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Gilichinsky, David A.; Ng, Joseph D.

    1999-12-01

    A moss plant dating as much as 40,000 years old was collected from the permafrost of the Kolyma Lowlands of Northeastern Siberia. The plant tissue was revived and cultured for the extraction of its genomic DNA. Using the polymerase chain reaction technique, the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was cloned and its sequence studied. Comparative sequence analysis of the cloned ribosomal DNA to other known 18S RNA showed very high sequence identity and was revealed to be closest to the moss specie, Aulacomnium turgidum. The results of this study also show the ability of biological organisms to rest dormant in deep frozen environments where they can be revived and cultured under favorable conditions. This is significant in the notion that celestial icy bodies can be media to preserve biological function and genetic material during long term storage or transport.

  11. Inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid transcription by ultraviolet irradiation in mammalian cells: determination of the transcriptional linkage of the 18S and 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid genes

    The inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) transcription in mammalian cells by ultraviolet irradiation has been studied. The reduction in the rates and the amounts of total ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis and of 18S, 28S, and 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, in tissue cultured mouse L cells, were examined as functions of ultraviolet dose and time after ultraviolet irradiation. Total RNA synthesis in the ultraviolet irradiated L cell was found to decrease as a function of ultraviolet dose. The rates of synthesis for the 18S and 28S rRNAs and the 45S precursor RNA decreased exponentially with ultraviolet dose; the respective D37 values were 310 erg/mm2, 130 erg/mm2, and 90 erg/mm2. Ultraviolet inactivation kinetics of rRNA synthesis in HeLa cells indicated that, as in L cells, each 45S rRNA transcriptional unit has its own promotor, and that the 18S rRNA cistron is promotor proximal and the 28S rRNA cistron is promotor distal. All of the above findings support the hypothesis that irradiation of mammalian cells with ultraviolet light causes the formation of lesions on the DNA templates which result in premature termination of transcription. (U.S.)

  12. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IR...

  13. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions.

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide 'cap' on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES-ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES' 'hijacking' of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  14. Nucleolar dominance and ribosomal RNA gene silencing

    Tucker, Sarah; Vitins, Alexa; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon that occurs in genetic hybrids and describes the expression of 45S rRNA genes inherited from one progenitor due to the silencing of the other progenitor’s rRNA genes. Nucleolar dominance is a manifestation of rRNA gene dosage control, which also occurs in non-hybrids, regulating the number of active rRNA genes according to the cellular demand for ribosomes and protein synthesis. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing involves changes in DNA methylation an...

  15. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    Shenkar Noa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1 Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2 Appendicularia, and 3 Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models

  16. 3-Nitropropionic acid modifies neurotrophin mRNA expression in the mouse striatum:18S-rRNA is a reliable control gene for studies of the striatum

    S.Espíndola; A Vilches-Flores; E.Hernández-Echeagaray

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the changes in the mRNA levels ofneurotrophins and their receptors in the striatal tissue of mice treated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP).Methods At 1 and 48 h after the last drug administration,the mRNA expression of nerve growth factor,brain-derived neurotrophic factor,neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin-4/5 as well as their receptors p75,TrkA,TrkB and TrkC,was evaluated using semi-quantitative (semi-Q) and real-time RT-PCR.β-actin mRNA and ribosomal 18S (18S rRNA) were tested as internal controls.Results 3-NP treatment did not affect mRNA expression of all neurotrophins and their respective receptors equally.Also,differences in neurotrophin and receptor mRNA expression were observed between semi-Q and real-time RT-PCR.Real-time RT-PCR was more accurate in evaluating the mRNA expression of the neurotrophins than semi-Q,and 18S rRNA was more reliable than β-actin as an internal control.Conclusion Neurotrophins and their receptors expression is differentially affected by neuronal damage produced by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration with 3-NP treatment in low,sub-chronic doses in vivo.

  17. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny on the basis of 18S rRNA sequences.

    Winnepenninckx, B; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1996-12-01

    The 18S rRNA sequences of 12 molluscs, representing the extant classes Gastropoda, Bivalvia, Polyplacophora, Scaphopoda, and Caudofoveata, were determined and compared with selected known 18S rRNA sequences of Metazoa, including other Mollusca. These data do not provide support for a close relationship between Platyhelminthes (Turbellaria) and Mollusca, but rather suggest that the latter group belongs to a clade of eutrochozoan coelomates. The 18S rRNA data fail to recover molluscan, bivalve, or gastropod monophyly. However, the branching pattern of the eutrochozoan phyla and classes is unstable, probably due to the explosive Cambrian radiation during which these groups arose. Similarly, the 18S rRNA data do not provide a reliable signal for the molluscan interclass relationships. Nevertheless, we obtained strong preliminary support for phylogenetic inferences at more restricted taxonomic levels, such as the monophyly of Polyplacophora, Caenogastropoda, Euthyneura, Heterodonta, and Arcoida. PMID:8952075

  18. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    He, Kaiyu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  19. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  20. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  1. Physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA in three species of Agave (Asparagales, Asparagaceae

    Victor Manuel Gomez-Rodriguez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Agave Linnaeus, 1753 is endemic of America and is considered one of the most important crops in Mexico due to its key role in the country’s economy. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in A. tequilana Weber, 1902 ‘Azul’, A. cupreata Trelease et Berger, 1915 and A. angustifolia Haworth, 1812. The analysis showed that in all species the diploid chromosome number was 2n = 60, with bimodal karyotypes composed of five pairs of large chromosomes and 25 pairs of small chromosomes. Furthermore, different karyotypical formulae as well as a secondary constriction in a large chromosome pair were found in all species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was used for physical mapping of 5S and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA. All species analyzed showed that 5S rDNA was located in both arms of a small chromosome pair, while 18S rDNA was associated with the secondary constriction of a large chromosome pair. Data of FISH analysis provides new information about the position and number of rDNA loci and helps for detection of hybrids in breeding programs as well as evolutionary studies.

  2. Structure of a mitochondrial ribosome with minimal RNA

    Sharma, Manjuli R.; Booth, Timothy M.; Simpson, Larry; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.

    2009-01-01

    The Leishmania tarentolae mitochondrial ribosome (Lmr) is a minimal ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-containing ribosome. We have obtained a cryo-EM map of the Lmr. The map reveals several features that have not been seen in previously-determined structures of eubacterial or eukaryotic (cytoplasmic or organellar) ribosomes to our knowledge. Comparisons of the Lmr map with X-ray crystallographic and cryo-EM maps of the eubacterial ribosomes and a cryo-EM map of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome show th...

  3. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  4. Regulating the Ribosome: A Spotlight on RNA Dark Matter

    Lintner, Nathanael G.; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2014-01-01

    In this issue Pircher et al.(2014) show that an abundant ribosome-associated 18-nt noncoding RNA (ncRNA),derived from the open reading frame of an mRNA,acts directly on the ribosome and regulates global translation levels in response to hypertonic shock.

  5. 18S rRNA suggests that Entoprocta are protostomes, unrelated to Ectoprocta

    Mackey, L.Y.; Winnepenninckx, B.; Wachter, R.; Backeljau, T.; Emschermann, P.; Garey, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Ento- and Ectoprocta are sometimes placed together in the Bryozoa, which have variously been regarded as proto- or deuterostomes. However, Entoprocta have also been allied to the pseudocoelomates, while Ectoprocta are often united with the Brachiopoda and Phoronida in the (super)phylum Lophophorata. Hence, the phylogenetic relationships of these taxa are still much debated. We determined complete 18S rRNA sequences of two entoprocts, an ectoproct, an inarticulate brachiopod, a phoronid, t...

  6. Evolutionary History of the Chaetognaths Inferred from Actin and 18S-28S rRNA Paralogous Genes

    J.P. Casanova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The chaetognaths constitute a small and enigmatic phylum of marine invertebrates whose phylogenetic affinities remain uncertain. Our phylogenetical investigations inferred from partial paralogous 18S-28S rRNA genes suggest that the event resulting in the presence of two classes of rRNA genes would have occurred at approximately 300-400 million years and prior to the radiation of extant chaetognath, whereas the taxon, according to both molecular and paleontological data, would be dated from at least the Early Cambrian. These divergent rRNA genes could be the result of a whole ribosomal cluster duplication or of an allopolyploid event during a crisis period, since, the fossil are lacking posterioly to the post-Carboniferous period (c.a., 300 million years. In addition, actin phylogeny evidenced that the cytoplasmic chaetognath actin clustered with the cytoplasmic insect actins, while the muscular chaetognath actins are placed basal to all muscular vertebrate actins. The present study suggests that the gene conversion mechanisms could be inefficient in this taxon; this could explain the conservation of extremely divergent paralogous sequences in the chaetognath genomes which could be correlated to the difficulties to identify a sister group between chaetognaths and other taxa among metazoans.

  7. Characterization of Hydrocortisone Biometabolites and 18S rRNA Gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Cultures

    Seyed Bagher Mosavi-Azam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A unicellular microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was isolated from rice paddy-field soil and water samples and used in the biotransformation of hydrocortisone (1. This strain has not been previously tested for steroid bioconversion. Fermentation was carried out in BG-11 medium supplemented with 0.05% substrate at 25ºC for 14 days of incubation. The products obtained were chromatographically purified and characterized using spectroscopic methods. 11b,17b-Dihydroxyandrost-4-en-3-one (2, 11b-hydroxyandrost-4-en-3,17-dione (3, 11b,17a,20b,21-tetrahydroxypregn-4-en-3-one (4 and prednisolone (5 were the main products of the bioconversion. The observed bioreaction features were the side chain degradation of the substrate to give compounds 2 and 3 and the 20-ketone reduction and 1,2-dehydrogenation affording compounds 4 and 5, respectively. A time course study showed the accumulation of product 2 from the second day of the fermentation and of compounds 3, 4 and 5 from the third day. All the metabolites reached their maximum concentration in seven days. Microalgal 18S rRNA gene was also amplified by PCR. PCR products were sequenced to confirm their authenticity as 18S rRNA gene of microalgae. The result of PCR blasted with other sequenced microalgae in NCBI showed 100% homology to the 18S small subunit rRNA of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii spp.

  8. Details of gastropod phylogeny inferred from 18S rRNA sequences.

    Winnepenninckx, B; Steiner, G; Backeljau, T; De Wachter, R

    1998-02-01

    Some generally accepted viewpoints on the phylogenetic relationships within the molluscan class Gastropoda are reassessed by comparing complete 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods. The previously suggested basal position of Archaeogastropoda, including Neritimorpha and Vetigastropoda, in the gastropod clade is confirmed. The present study also provides new molecular evidence for the monophyly of both Caenogastropoda and Euthyneura (Pulmonata and Opisthobranchia), making Prosobranchia paraphyletic. The relationships within Caenogastropoda and Euthyneura data turn out to be very unstable on the basis of the present 18S rRNA sequences. The present 18S rRNA data question, but are insufficient to decide on, muricacean (Neogastropoda), neotaenioglossan, pulmonate, or stylommatophoran monophyly. The analyses also focus on two systellommatophoran families, namely, Veronicellidae and Onchidiidae. It is suggested that Systellommatophora are not a monophyletic unit but, due to the lack of stability in the euthyneuran clade, their affinity to either Opisthobranchia or Pulmonata could not be determined. PMID:9479694

  9. Molecular systematics of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) based on exhaustive 18S rRNA phylogenetic analyses.

    Nakada, Takashi; Misawa, Kazuharu; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-07-01

    The taxonomy of Volvocales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) was traditionally based solely on morphological characteristics. However, because recent molecular phylogeny largely contradicts the traditional subordinal and familial classifications, no classification system has yet been established that describes the subdivision of Volvocales in a manner consistent with the phylogenetic relationships. Towards development of a natural classification system at and above the generic level, identification and sorting of hundreds of sequences based on subjective phylogenetic definitions is a significant step. We constructed an 18S rRNA gene phylogeny based on 449 volvocalean sequences collected using exhaustive BLAST searches of the GenBank database. Many chimeric sequences, which can cause fallacious phylogenetic trees, were detected and excluded during data collection. The results revealed 21 strongly supported primary clades within phylogenetically redefined Volvocales. Phylogenetic classification following PhyloCode was proposed based on the presented 18S rRNA gene phylogeny along with the results of previous combined 18S and 26S rRNA and chloroplast multigene analyses. PMID:18430591

  10. Structure of a mitochondrial ribosome with minimal RNA.

    Sharma, Manjuli R; Booth, Timothy M; Simpson, Larry; Maslov, Dmitri A; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2009-06-16

    The Leishmania tarentolae mitochondrial ribosome (Lmr) is a minimal ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-containing ribosome. We have obtained a cryo-EM map of the Lmr. The map reveals several features that have not been seen in previously-determined structures of eubacterial or eukaryotic (cytoplasmic or organellar) ribosomes to our knowledge. Comparisons of the Lmr map with X-ray crystallographic and cryo-EM maps of the eubacterial ribosomes and a cryo-EM map of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome show that (i) the overall structure of the Lmr is considerably more porous, (ii) the topology of the intersubunit space is significantly different, with fewer intersubunit bridges, but more tunnels, and (iii) several of the functionally-important rRNA regions, including the alpha-sarcin-ricin loop, have different relative positions within the structure. Furthermore, the major portions of the mRNA channel, the tRNA passage, and the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel contain Lmr-specific proteins, suggesting that the mechanisms for mRNA recruitment, tRNA interaction, and exiting of the nascent polypeptide in Lmr must differ markedly from the mechanisms deduced for ribosomes in other organisms. Our study identifies certain structural features that are characteristic solely of mitochondrial ribosomes and other features that are characteristic of both mitochondrial and chloroplast ribosomes (i.e., organellar ribosomes). PMID:19497863

  11. An overview of pre-ribosomal RNA processing in eukaryotes

    Henras, Anthony K.; Plisson-Chastang, Célia; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Chakraborty, Anirban; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are the most abundant and universal noncoding RNAs in living organisms. In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs forming the 40S and 60S subunits are borne by a long polycistronic pre-ribosomal RNA. A complex sequence of processing steps is required to gradually release the mature RNAs from this precursor, concomitant with the assembly of the 79 ribosomal proteins. A large set of trans-acting factors chaperone this process, including small nucleolar ribonucleoparticles. ...

  12. ITS-2 and 18S rRNA gene phylogeny of Aplysinidae (Verongida, Demospongiae).

    Schmitt, Susanne; Hentschel, Ute; Zea, Sven; Dandekar, Thomas; Wolf, Matthias

    2005-03-01

    18S ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2) full-length sequences, each of which was sequenced three times, were used to construct phylogenetic trees with alignments based on secondary structures, in order to elucidate genealogical relationships within the Aplysinidae (Verongida). The first poriferan ITS-2 secondary structures are reported. Altogether 11 Aplysina sponges and 3 additional sponges (Verongula gigantea, Aiolochroia crassa, Smenospongia aurea) from tropical and subtropical oceans were analyzed. Based on these molecular studies, S. aurea, which is currently affiliated with the Dictyoceratida, should be reclassified to the Verongida. Aplysina appears as monophyletic. A soft form of Aplysina lacunosa was separated from other Aplysina and stands at a basal position in both 18S and ITS-2 trees. Based on ITS-2 sequence information, the Aplysina sponges could be distinguished into a single Caribbean-Eastern Pacific cluster and a Mediterranean cluster. The species concept for Aplysina sponges as well as a phylogenetic history with a possibly Tethyan origin is discussed. PMID:15871043

  13. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)

    Stenger, B.L.S.; Clark, M.E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, E.; Giddings, C.W.; Dyer, N.W.; Schultz, J.L.; McEvoy, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, JUN 2015 (2015), s. 113-123. ISSN 1567-1348 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11061 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * Paralogy * 18S rRNA * 18S rDNA Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 3.015, year: 2014

  14. Structural and Functional Studies of Ribosome-inactivating Proteins and Ribosomal RNA

    LIU Wangyi; ZHANG Jinsong; LIU Renshui; HE Wenjun; LING Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ A plant's ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a group of toxic proteins. Theoretically, they can be employed as a tool enzyme in the exploration of the structure and function of the ribosomal RNA; in practical application, they can be used as an insecticide in agriculture, for preparation of immuno-toxic protein to kill cancer cells or against viral infection in medicine.

  15. Characterization of three different clusters of 18S-26S ribosomal DNA genes in the sea urchin P. lividus: Genetic and epigenetic regulation synchronous to 5S rDNA.

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Caradonna, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    We previously reported the characterization 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) clusters in the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and demonstrated the presence of DNA methylation-dependent silencing of embryo specific 5S rDNA cluster in adult tissue. In this work, we show genetic and epigenetic characterization of 18S-26S rDNA clusters in this specie. The results indicate the presence of three different 18S-26S rDNA clusters with different Non-Transcribed Spacer (NTS) regions that have different chromosomal localizations. Moreover, we show that the two largest clusters are hyper-methylated in the promoter-containing NTS regions in adult tissues, as in the 5S rDNA. These findings demonstrate an analogous epigenetic regulation in small and large rDNA clusters and support the logical synchronism in building ribosomes. In fact, all the ribosomal RNA genes must be synchronously and equally transcribed to perform their unique final product. PMID:26789074

  16. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequen...

  17. Nematode 18S rRNA gene is a reliable tool for environmental biosafety assessment of transgenic banana in confined field trials.

    Nakacwa, R; Kiggundu, A; Talwana, H; Namaganda, J; Lilley, C; Tushemereirwe, W; Atkinson, H

    2013-10-01

    Information on relatedness in nematodes is commonly obtained by DNA sequencing of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region. However, the level of diversity at this locus is often insufficient for reliable species differentiation. Recent findings suggest that the sequences of a fragment of the small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (18S rRNA or SSU), identify genera of soil nematodes and can also distinguish between species in some cases. A database of soil nematode genera in a Ugandan soil was developed using 18S rRNA sequences of individual nematodes from a GM banana confined field trial site at the National Agricultural Research Laboratories, Kawanda in Uganda. The trial was planted to evaluate transgenic bananas for resistance to black Sigatoka disease. Search for relatedness of the sequences gained with entries in a public genomic database identified a range of 20 different genera and sometimes distinguished species. Molecular markers were designed from the sequence information to underpin nematode faunal analysis. This approach provides bio-indicators for disturbance of the soil environment and the condition of the soil food web. It is being developed to support environmental biosafety analysis by detecting any perturbance by transgenic banana or other GM crops on the soil environment. PMID:23661261

  18. Eukaryotic ribosomes that lack a 5.8S RNA

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The 5.8S ribosomal RNA is believed to be a universal eukaryotic characteristic. It has no (size) counterpart among the prokaryotes, although its sequence is homologous with the first 150 or so nucleotides of the prokaryotic large subunit (23S) ribosomal RNA. An exception to this rule is reported here. The microsporidian Vairimorpha necatrix is a eukaryote that has no 5.8S rRNA. As in the prokaryotes, it has a single large subunit rRNA, whose 5-prime region corresponds to the 5.8S rRNA.

  19. Translation with frameshifting of ribosome along mRNA transcript

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Translation is an important process for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to produce necessary proteins for cell growth. Numerious experiments have been performed to explore the translational properties. Diverse models have also been developed to determine the biochemical mechanism of translation. However, to simplify the majority of the existing models, the frameshifting of ribosome along the mRNA transcript is neglected, which actually occurs in real cells and has been extensively experimentally studied. The frameshifting of ribosome evidently influences the efficiency and speed of translation, considering that the peptide chains synthesized by shifted ribosomes will not fold into functional proteins and will degrade rapidly. In this study, a theoretical model is presented to describe the translational process based on the model for totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In this model, the frameshifting of the ribosome along the mRNA transcript and the attachment/detachment of the ribosome to/from the ...

  20. The role of human ribosomal proteins in the maturation of rRNA and ribosome production

    Robledo, Sara; Rachel A Idol; Crimmins, Dan L.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Production of ribosomes is a fundamental process that occurs in all dividing cells. It is a complex process consisting of the coordinated synthesis and assembly of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) with about 80 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) involving more than 150 nonribosomal proteins and other factors. Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited red cell aplasia caused by mutations in one of several r-proteins. How defects in r-proteins, essential for proliferation in all cells, lead to a hum...

  1. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly.

    Rackham, Oliver; Busch, Jakob D; Matic, Stanka; Siira, Stefan J; Kuznetsova, Irina; Atanassov, Ilian; Ermer, Judith A; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Richman, Tara R; Stewart, James B; Mourier, Arnaud; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2016-08-16

    The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE) and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5' tRNA cleavage precedes 3' tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome. PMID:27498866

  2. An evolutionary conserved pattern of 18S rRNA sequence complementarity to mRNA 5 ' UTRs and its implications for eukaryotic gene translation regulation

    Pánek, J. (Josef); Kolář, M. (Michal); Vohradský, J; Valášek, L. (Leoš)

    2013-01-01

    There are several key mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the level of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the least explored mechanisms of translational control are those that involve the translating ribosome per se, mediated for example via predicted interactions between the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and mRNAs. Here, we took advantage of robustly growing large-scale data sets of mRNA sequences for numerous organisms, solved ribosomal structures and computational power to computat...

  3. Filling a gap in the phylogeny of flatworms: relationships within the Rhabdocoela (Platyhelminthes), inferred from 18S ribosomal DNA sequences

    Willems, Wim; Walberg, A.; Jondelius, U.; Littlewood, D.; Backeljau, T.; Schockaert, Ernest; Artois, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The phylogeny of the Rhabdocoela, a species-rich taxon of free-living flatworms, is reconstructed based on complete 18S rDNA sequences. The analysis includes 62 rhabdocoels and 102 representatives of all major flatworm taxa. In total, 46 new sequences are used, 41 of them from rhabdocoel species, five from proseriates. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Clade support was evaluated with parsimony jackknifing, Bremer support indice...

  4. The utility of diversity profiling using Illumina 18S rRNA gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect and discriminate Toxoplasma gondii among the cyst-forming coccidia.

    Cooper, Madalyn K; Phalen, David N; Donahoe, Shannon L; Rose, Karrie; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-01-30

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has the capacity to screen a single DNA sample and detect pathogen DNA from thousands of host DNA sequence reads, making it a versatile and informative tool for investigation of pathogens in diseased animals. The technique is effective and labor saving in the initial identification of pathogens, and will complement conventional diagnostic tests to associate the candidate pathogen with a disease process. In this report, we investigated the utility of the diversity profiling NGS approach using Illumina small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene amplicon deep sequencing to detect Toxoplasma gondii in previously confirmed cases of toxoplasmosis. We then tested the diagnostic approach with species-specific PCR genotyping, histopathology and immunohistochemistry of toxoplasmosis in a Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) to systematically characterise the disease and associate causality. We show that the Euk7A/Euk570R primer set targeting the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene can be used as a species-specific assay for cyst-forming coccidia and discriminate T. gondii. Overall, the approach is cost-effective and improves diagnostic decision support by narrowing the differential diagnosis list with more certainty than was previously possible. Furthermore, it supplements the limitations of cryptic protozoan morphology and surpasses the need for species-specific PCR primer combinations. PMID:26801593

  5. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome

    Xabier Agirrezabala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation.

  6. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome.

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Valle, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation. PMID:25941930

  7. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome

    Xabier Agirrezabala; Mikel Valle

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation.

  8. Taxonomy of the genus Rhexinema (Ulvophyceae) based on phylogeny of the 18S rRNA and morphology

    Caisová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2009), s. 15-15. ISSN 0031-8884. [International Phycological Congress /9./. 02.08.2009-08.08.2009, Tokyo] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Rhexinema * 18S rRNA * morphology Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  9. Phylogeny of the sundews, Drosera (Droseraceae), based on chloroplast rbcL and nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA Sequences.

    Rivadavia, Fernando; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Kato, Masahiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2003-01-01

    The sundew genus Drosera consists of carnivorous plants with active flypaper traps and includes nearly 150 species distributed mainly in Australia, Africa, and South America, with some Northern Hemisphere species. In addition to confused intrageneric classification of Drosera, the intergeneric relationships among the Drosera and two other genera in the Droseraceae with snap traps, Dionaea and Aldrovanda, are problematic. We conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of the chloroplast rbcL gene for 59 species of Drosera, covering all sections except one. These analyses revealed that five of 11 sections, including three monotypic sections, are polyphyletic. Combined rbcL and 18S rDNA sequence data were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among Drosera, Dionaea, and Aldrovanda. This analysis revealed that all Drosera species form a clade sister to a clade including Dionaea and Aldrovanda, suggesting that the snap traps of Aldrovanda and Dionaea are homologous despite their morphological differences. MacClade reconstructions indicated that multiple episodes of aneuploidy occurred in a clade that includes mainly Australian species, while the chromosome numbers in the other clades are not as variable. Drosera regia, which is native to South Africa, and most species native to Australia, were clustered basally, suggesting that Drosera originated in Africa or Australia. The rbcL tree indicates that Australian species expanded their distribution to South America and then to Africa. Expansion of distribution to the Northern Hemisphere from the Southern Hemispere occurred in a few different lineages. PMID:21659087

  10. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  11. PCR amplification of a multi-copy mitochondrial gene (cox3) improves detection of Cytauxzoon felis infection as compared to a ribosomal gene (18S).

    Schreeg, Megan E; Marr, Henry S; Griffith, Emily H; Tarigo, Jaime L; Bird, David M; Reichard, Mason V; Cohn, Leah A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2016-07-30

    Cytauxzoon felis is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that infects felids. Clinical disease caused by acute C. felis infection rapidly progresses in domestic cats, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Accurately diagnosing cytauxzoonosis as soon as possible during acute infection would allow for earlier initiation of antiprotozoal therapy which could lead to higher survival rates. Molecular detection of parasite rRNA genes (18S) by PCR has previously been shown to be a sensitive method of diagnosing C. felis infections. Based on evidence from related apicomplexan species, we hypothesized that C. felis mitochondrial genes would exist at higher copy numbers than 18S and would be a more sensitive diagnostic target. In this study we have designed a PCR assay targeting the C. felis mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). Herein we demonstrate that (1) the cox3 PCR can detect as low as 1 copy of DNA target and can detect C. felis in samples with known mitochondrial sequence heterogeneity, (2) cox3 copy number is increased relative to 18S in blood and tissue samples from acutely infected cats, and (3) the cox3 PCR is more sensitive than 18S PCR for detection of C. felis during early infections. PMID:27369587

  12. Visualization of ribosomal RNA operon copy number distribution

    DasGupta Indrani; Wu Martin; Rastogi Rajat; Fox George E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Results of microbial ecology studies using 16S rRNA sequence information can be deceiving due to differences in rRNA operon copy number and genome size of the detected organisms. It therefore will be useful for investigators to have a better understanding of how these two parameters differ in various organism types. In this study, the number of ribosomal operons and genome size were separately mapped onto a Bacterial phylogenetic tree. Results A representative Bacterial tr...

  13. The use of 125iodine-labeled RNA for detection of the RNA binding to ribosomes

    The in vitro labeling of RNA with radioactive iodine is the efficient method to obtain the RNA with high specific activity. The present paper reports on the application of this technique to the production of iodine-labeled RNA for use in the experiment of binding RNA to ribosomes. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA was used as natural mRNA, and E. coli S-30 preparation was used as a source of ribosomes. The TMV-RNA was prepared by bentonite-phenol extraction from TMV, and the method used for the iodation of RNA was based on the procedure described by Getz et al. The iodine-labeled RNA was incubated in a cell-free protein synthesizing system (S-30) prepared from E. coli K-12. After the incubation, the reaction mixture was layered onto sucrose gradient, centrifuged, and fractionated into 18 fractions. Optical density at 260 nm was measured, and radioactivity was counted, for each fraction. The binding of mRNA to ribosomes occurred even at 0 deg C, and the occurrence of the nonspecific binding was also shown. Consequently, the specific binding, i.e. the formation of the initiation complex being involved in amino acid incorporation, may be estimated by subtracting the radioactivity associated with monosomes in the presence of both rRNA and ATA from that in the presence of rRNA only. It was shown that the iodine-labeled RNA can be used for the studies of binding RNA to ribosomes. (Kako, I.)

  14. Epigeneitc silencing of ribosomal RNA genes by Mybbp1a

    Tan Bertrand

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription of the ribosomal RNA gene repeats by Pol I occurs in the nucleolus and is a fundamental step in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. Due to tight coordination between ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation, transcription of rRNA and stable maintenance of rDNA clusters are thought to be under intricate control by intercalated mechanisms, particularly at the epigenetic level. Methods and Results Here we identify the nucleolar protein Myb-binding protein 1a (Mybbp1a as a novel negative regulator of rRNA expression. Suppression of rDNA transcription by Mybbp1a was linked to promoter regulation as illustrated by its binding to the chromatin around the hypermethylated, inactive rDNA gene promoters. Our data further showed that downregulation of Mybbp1a abrogated the local DNA methylation levels and histone marks associated with gene silencing, and altered the promoter occupancy of various factors such UBF and HDACs, consequently leading to elevated rRNA expression. Mechanistically, we propose that Mybbp1a maintains rDNA repeats in a silenced state while in association with the negative epigenetic modifiers HDAC1/2. Conclusions Results from our present work reveal a previously unrecognized co-repressor role of Mybbp1a in rRNA expression. They are further consistent with the scenario that Mybbp1a is an integral constituent of the rDNA epigenetic regulation that underlies the balanced state of rDNA clusters.

  15. The effect of trichloroethylene and acrylonitrile on RNA and ribosome synthesis and ribosome content in Saccharomyces cells.

    Lochmann, E R; Ehrlich, W; Mangir, M

    1984-04-01

    The effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and acrylonitrile (ACN) on growth, RNA synthesis, ribosome synthesis, and ribosome content were tested in yeast cells. TCE causes a delay of the growth of a cell culture (prolongation of the lag phase), but does not cause inhibition. Cells exposed to increasing concentrations of ACN show increasing damage, so that, at a certain point of the growth curve, cell division stops altogether. Similar results were obtained when RNA synthesis was investigated: After treatment with TCE, the maximum RNA synthesis of the cell culture was retarded, but subsequently reached the same level as the untreated control cells. In the presence of ACN, however, the rate of RNA synthesis was lowered with increasing ACN concentrations. The same effect was observed upon investigation of ribosome synthesis: Whereas TCE produces only a slight effect, treatment with increasing concentrations of ACN leads to a substantial decrease in ribosome synthesis, and finally to total inhibition. Parallel to this, the content of free and membrane-bound ribosomes is diminished. Obviously, the decrease in ribosome content is caused not only by an inhibition of ribosome synthesis, but also by a degradation of existing ribosomes, as well as by induction of a ribosome-associated RNase. PMID:6714140

  16. PFR²: a curated database of planktonic foraminifera 18S ribosomal DNA as a resource for studies of plankton ecology, biogeography and evolution.

    Morard, Raphaël; Darling, Kate F; Mahé, Frédéric; Audic, Stéphane; Ujiié, Yurika; Weiner, Agnes K M; André, Aurore; Seears, Heidi A; Wade, Christopher M; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Douady, Christophe J; Escarguel, Gilles; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; de Vargas, Colomban

    2015-11-01

    Planktonic foraminifera (Rhizaria) are ubiquitous marine pelagic protists producing calcareous shells with conspicuous morphology. They play an important role in the marine carbon cycle, and their exceptional fossil record serves as the basis for biochronostratigraphy and past climate reconstructions. A major worldwide sampling effort over the last two decades has resulted in the establishment of multiple large collections of cryopreserved individual planktonic foraminifera samples. Thousands of 18S rDNA partial sequences have been generated, representing all major known morphological taxa across their worldwide oceanic range. This comprehensive data coverage provides an opportunity to assess patterns of molecular ecology and evolution in a holistic way for an entire group of planktonic protists. We combined all available published and unpublished genetic data to build PFR(2), the Planktonic foraminifera Ribosomal Reference database. The first version of the database includes 3322 reference 18S rDNA sequences belonging to 32 of the 47 known morphospecies of extant planktonic foraminifera, collected from 460 oceanic stations. All sequences have been rigorously taxonomically curated using a six-rank annotation system fully resolved to the morphological species level and linked to a series of metadata. The PFR(2) website, available at http://pfr2.sb-roscoff.fr, allows downloading the entire database or specific sections, as well as the identification of new planktonic foraminiferal sequences. Its novel, fully documented curation process integrates advances in morphological and molecular taxonomy. It allows for an increase in its taxonomic resolution and assures that integrity is maintained by including a complete contingency tracking of annotations and assuring that the annotations remain internally consistent. PMID:25828689

  17. An 18S ribosomal DNA barcode for the study of Isomermis lairdi, a parasite of the blackfly Simulium damnosum s.l.

    Crainey, J L; Wilson, M D; Post, R J

    2009-09-01

    The mermithid parasite, Isomermis lairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou (Nematoda: Mermithidae), is known to have a major impact on populations of Simulium damnosum s.l. Theobald (Diptera: Simuliidae) and on their efficiency as vectors of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart) (Nematoda: Filarioidea). However, the value of I. lairdi and other mermithid parasites as potential means of integrated vector control has not been fully realized. This is partly because traditional taxonomic approaches have been insufficient for describing and analysing important aspects of their biology and host range. In total, rDNA barcode sequences have been obtained from over 70 I. lairdi mermithids found parasitizing S. damnosum s.l. larvae in three different rivers. No two sequences were found to vary by more than 0.5%, and cytospecies identification of mermithid hosts revealed that I. lairdi with identical rDNA barcodes can parasitize multiple cytoforms of the S. damnosum complex, including S. squamosum (Enderlein). Phylogenetic analysis using a partial sequence from the 18S ribosomal DNA barcode, grouped I. lairdi in a monophyletic group with Gastromermis viridis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae) and Isomermis wisconsinensis Welch (Nematoda: Mermithidae). PMID:19712154

  18. The effect of secondary compounds on the rumen microbial population structure measured by 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA

    Full text: Plant secondary compounds in the forages have an important role in determining forage quality. A method for evaluating their effects on microbial population structure was carried out using the in vitro gas syringe system followed by extraction of RNA and gel separation of 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA. Quantification of 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA bands indicated the prokaryote and eukaryote populations, respectively. Five types of plant materials, i.e. Nothopanax scutellarium (Mangkokan) leaves, Morinda citrifolia (Mengkudu) fruit, Sapindus rarak (lerak) fruit and two types of Sesbania sesban leaves (hgh saponin and low saponin) were tested and Pennisetum purpureum (rumput gajah, Indonesian name) was used as a control roughage. Presence of saponin in these plant materials was determined qualitatively by thin layer chromatography. Eukaryote population was found to be significantly affected by the above plant materials. Both types of S. sesban leaves caused total elimination of eukaryotes. S. rarak reduced both eukaryote and prokaryote populations. The observed inhibition of eukaryote population might be due to the presence of saponin in these plant materials. In another experiment, a methanol extract of S. rarak which contained saponin was included and its effect on in vitro fermentation of P. purpureum was evaluated. The results showed that at higher levels of inclusion of S. rarak methanol extract, eukaroytes were totally eliminated. Comparison was made between microbial mass calculated based on difference between apparent undigested residue and true undigested residue and microbial mass calculations based on 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA. Microbial mass calculated by difference method was much higher than the microbial mass calculated on the basis of 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA. The quantification of RNA can be a useful and rapid technique for an accurate assessment of the effect of new forage materials on the microbial population structure. Other parameters from in vitro

  19. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

    Martins Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement.

  20. Limitations of metazoan 18S rRNA sequence data : implications for reconstructing a phylogeny of the animal kingdom and inferring the reality of the cambrian explosion

    Abouheif, Ehab; Zardoya, Rafael; Meyer, Axel

    1998-01-01

    We document the phylogenetic behavior of the 18S rRNA molecule in 67 taxa from 28 metazoan phyla and assess the effects of among-site rate variation on reconstructing phylogenies of the animal kingdom. This empirical assessment was undertaken to clarify further the limits of resolution of the 18S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker and to address the question of whether 18S rRNA phylogenies can be used as a source of evidence to infer the reality of a Cambrian explosion. A notable degree of am...

  1. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna (Cornell); (UCB); (Duke)

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  2. Heritability and Variability in Ribosomal RNA Genes of Vicia faba

    Rogers, Scott O; Bendich, Arnold J.

    1987-01-01

    We have compared the restriction patterns and copy numbers of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) between and within individuals of Vicia faba . While the EcoRI blot-hybridization patterns changed only after one to two generations, copy number changes were found among different tissues of the same plant. Copy number differences among individuals in the population were as great as 95-fold, whereas as much as a 12-fold variation was seen among tissues of the same plant. Among individual F1 progeny from ...

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of the spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae (Acari: Tetranychidae based on the mitochondrial COI gene and the 18S and the 5' end of the 28S rRNA genes indicates that several genera are polyphyletic.

    Tomoko Matsuda

    Full Text Available The spider mite sub-family Tetranychinae includes many agricultural pests. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene of mitochondrial DNA have been used for species identification and phylogenetic reconstruction within the sub-family Tetranychinae, although they have not always been successful. The 18S and 28S rRNA genes should be more suitable for resolving higher levels of phylogeny, such as tribes or genera of Tetranychinae because these genes evolve more slowly and are made up of conserved regions and divergent domains. Therefore, we used both the 18S (1,825-1,901 bp and 28S (the 5' end of 646-743 bp rRNA genes to infer phylogenetic relationships within the sub-family Tetranychinae with a focus on the tribe Tetranychini. Then, we compared the phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes with that of the mitochondrial COI gene (618 bp. As observed in previous studies, our phylogeny based on the COI gene was not resolved because of the low bootstrap values for most nodes of the tree. On the other hand, our phylogenetic tree of the 18S and 28S genes revealed several well-supported clades within the sub-family Tetranychinae. The 18S and 28S phylogenetic trees suggest that the tribes Bryobiini, Petrobiini and Eurytetranychini are monophyletic and that the tribe Tetranychini is polyphyletic. At the genus level, six genera for which more than two species were sampled appear to be monophyletic, while four genera (Oligonychus, Tetranychus, Schizotetranychus and Eotetranychus appear to be polyphyletic. The topology presented here does not fully agree with the current morphology-based taxonomy, so that the diagnostic morphological characters of Tetranychinae need to be reconsidered.

  4. Recovery from ultraviolet light-induced depression of ribosomal RNA synthesis in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum and cockayne syndrome cells

    The rate of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis was analyzed at different times after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation in normal human, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells. In normal cells, the rate of rRNA synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of 3H-uridine into 18S and 28S rRNAs, decreased immediately after UV irradiation to about half of that of unirradiated cells, and then recovered significantly at 24h after UV. However, the rate of synthesis continued to decrease during post-UV incubation in XP cells belonging to groups A, D, E, F and G, as well as in CS cells of groups A and B. In contrast, group C XP cells showed a slight recovery at 24h after UV, suggesting that they have the capacity to repair UV lesions in rRNA genes. (author)

  5. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis. PMID:27084467

  6. Footprinting of ribosomal RNA genes by transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I.

    Bateman, E.; Iida, C T; Kownin, P; Paule, M R

    1985-01-01

    The binding of a species-specific transcription initiation factor (TIF) and purified RNA polymerase I to the promoter region of the 39S ribosomal RNA gene from Acanthamoeba were studied by using DNase I "footprinting." Conditions were chosen such that the footprints obtained could be correlated with the transcriptional activity of the TIF-containing fractions used and that the labeled DNA present would itself serve as a template for transcription. The transcription factor binds upstream from ...

  7. 16S ribosomal RNA methylation: emerging resistance mechanism against aminoglycosides.

    Doi, Yohei; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2007-07-01

    Methylation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) has recently emerged as a new mechanism of resistance against aminoglycosides among gram-negative pathogens belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and glucose-nonfermentative microbes, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species. This event is mediated by a newly recognized group of 16S rRNA methylases, which share modest similarity to those produced by aminoglycoside-producing actinomycetes. Their presence confers a high level of resistance to all parenterally administered aminoglycosides that are currently in clinical use. The responsible genes are mostly located on transposons within transferable plasmids, which provides them with the potential to spread horizontally and may in part explain the already worldwide distribution of this novel resistance mechanism. Some of these organisms have been found to coproduce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or metallo-beta-lactamases, contributing to their multidrug-resistant phenotypes. A 2-tiered approach, consisting of disk diffusion tests followed by confirmation with polymerase chain reaction, is recommended for detection of 16S rRNA methylase-mediated resistance. PMID:17554708

  8. Mimicking Ribosomal Unfolding of RNA Pseudoknot in a Protein Channel.

    Zhang, Xinyue; Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Zhiyu; Burcke, Andrew J; Gates, Kent S; Chen, Shi-Jie; Gu, Li-Qun

    2015-12-23

    Pseudoknots are a fundamental RNA tertiary structure with important roles in regulation of mRNA translation. Molecular force spectroscopic approaches such as optical tweezers can track the pseudoknot's unfolding intermediate states by pulling the RNA chain from both ends, but the kinetic unfolding pathway induced by this method may be different from that in vivo, which occurs during translation and proceeds from the 5' to 3' end. Here we developed a ribosome-mimicking, nanopore pulling assay for dissecting the vectorial unfolding mechanism of pseudoknots. The pseudoknot unfolding pathway in the nanopore, either from the 5' to 3' end or in the reverse direction, can be controlled by a DNA leader that is attached to the pseudoknot at the 5' or 3' ends. The different nanopore conductance between DNA and RNA translocation serves as a marker for the position and structure of the unfolding RNA in the pore. With this design, we provided evidence that the pseudoknot unfolding is a two-step, multistate, metal ion-regulated process depending on the pulling direction. Most notably, unfolding in both directions is rate-limited by the unzipping of the first helix domain (first step), which is Helix-1 in the 5' → 3' direction and Helix-2 in the 3' → 5' direction, suggesting that the initial unfolding step in either pulling direction needs to overcome an energy barrier contributed by the noncanonical triplex base-pairs and coaxial stacking interactions for the tertiary structure stabilization. These findings provide new insights into RNA vectorial unfolding mechanisms, which play an important role in biological functions including frameshifting. PMID:26595106

  9. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  10. An RNA-binding complex involved in ribosome biogenesis contains a protein with homology to tRNA CCA-adding enzyme.

    Jinzhong Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of proteins and small nucleolar RNAs transiently associate with eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs to direct their modification and processing and the assembly of ribosomal proteins. Utp22 and Rrp7, two interacting proteins with no recognizable domain, are components of the 90S preribosome or the small subunit processome that conducts early processing of 18S rRNA. Here, we determine the cocrystal structure of Utp22 and Rrp7 complex at 1.97 Å resolution and the NMR structure of a C-terminal fragment of Rrp7, which is not visible in the crystal structure. The structure reveals that Utp22 surprisingly resembles a dimeric class I tRNA CCA-adding enzyme yet with degenerate active sites, raising an interesting evolutionary connection between tRNA and rRNA processing machineries. Rrp7 binds extensively to Utp22 using a deviant RNA recognition motif and an extended linker. Functional sites on the two proteins were identified by structure-based mutagenesis in yeast. We show that Rrp7 contains a flexible RNA-binding C-terminal tail that is essential for association with preribosomes. RNA-protein crosslinking shows that Rrp7 binds at the central domain of 18S rRNA and shares a neighborhood with two processing H/ACA snoRNAs snR30 and snR10. Depletion of snR30 prevents the stable assembly of Rrp7 into preribosomes. Our results provide insight into the evolutionary origin and functional context of Utp22 and Rrp7.

  11. Visualization of ribosomal RNA operon copy number distribution

    DasGupta Indrani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of microbial ecology studies using 16S rRNA sequence information can be deceiving due to differences in rRNA operon copy number and genome size of the detected organisms. It therefore will be useful for investigators to have a better understanding of how these two parameters differ in various organism types. In this study, the number of ribosomal operons and genome size were separately mapped onto a Bacterial phylogenetic tree. Results A representative Bacterial tree was constructed using 31 marker genes found in 578 bacterial genome sequences. Organism names are displayed on the trees using graduations of color such that similar colors indicate similar numbers of operons or genome size. The resulting images provide an intuitive understanding of how copy number and genome size vary in different Bacterial phyla. Conclusion Once the phylogenetic position of a novel organism is known the number of rRNA operons, and to a lesser extent the genome size, can be estimated by examination of the colored maps. Further detail can then be obtained for members of relevant taxa from the rrnDB database.

  12. Mechanism of translocation: relative arrangement of tRNA and mRNA on the ribosome.

    Matzke, A J; Barta, A; Kuechler, E

    1980-01-01

    AcPhe-tRNAPhe from yeast can be photocross-linked to poly(U) on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The photoreaction occurs at the wybutine base situated next to the 3' side of the anticodon. The kinetics and efficiency of crosslinking of AcPhe-Phe-tRNA are the same at both the acceptor site and the peptidyl site. Therefore, the orientation of wybutine with respect to the mRNA is similar in both the pretranslocational and posttranslocational states. AcPhe-Phe-tRNA crosslinked at the acceptor site ca...

  13. Controlling translation elongation efficiency: tRNA regulation of ribosome flux on the mRNA.

    Gorgoni, Barbara; Marshall, Elizabeth; McFarland, Matthew R; Romano, M Carmen; Stansfield, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Gene expression can be regulated by a wide variety of mechanisms. One example concerns the growing body of evidence that the protein-production rate can be regulated at the level of translation elongation by controlling ribosome flux across the mRNA. Variations in the abundance of tRNA molecules cause different rates of translation of their counterpart codons. This, in turn, produces a variable landscape of translational rate across each and every mRNA, with the dynamic formation and deformation of ribosomal queues being regulated by both tRNA availability and the rates of translation initiation and termination. In the present article, a range of examples of tRNA control of gene expression are reviewed, and the use of mathematical modelling to develop a predictive understanding of the consequences of that regulation is discussed and explained. These findings encourage a view that predicting the protein-synthesis rate of each mRNA requires a holistic understanding of how each stage of translation, including elongation, contributes to the overall protein-production rate. PMID:24450645

  14. Direct ribosome isolation from soil to extract bacterial rRNA for community analysis.

    Felske, A; B. Engelen; Nübel, U; Backhaus, H

    1996-01-01

    A simple method that combines an adapted ribosome isolation method and a common RNA extraction step has been developed for selective recovery of intact rRNA from natural microbial communities in soil. After mechanical cell lysis, ribosomes are separated by centrifugation steps, avoiding massive humic acid contamination and RNA degradation. The protocol accommodates the complex composition of soils by blocking adsorbing surfaces and humic acids with polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumi...

  15. Structural Basis for Ribosome Recruitment and Manipulation by a Viral IRES RNA

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Costantino, David A.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Canonical cap-dependent translation initiation requires a large number of protein factors that act in a stepwise assembly process. In contrast, internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs) are cis-acting RNAs that in some cases completely supplant these factors by recruiting and activating the ribosome using a single structured RNA. Here we present the crystal structures of the ribosome-binding domain from a Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRES at 3.1 angstrom resolution, providing a view of the ...

  16. Localization of ribosomal genes in three Pimelodus species (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae of the São Francisco River: 5S genes as species markers and conservation of the 18S rDNA sites

    Caroline Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pimelodidae is one of the most representative of Neotropical catfish families. However, these fish are still poorly studied in terms of cytogenetics, especially regarding the application of more accurate techniques such as the chromosomal localization of ribosomal genes. In the present work, fluorescent in situ hybridization with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was employed for rDNA site mapping in Pimelodus sp., P. fur and P. maculatus from the São Francisco River in the Três Marias municipality - MG. The results from the application of the 18S probe confirmed the previous data obtained by silver nitrate staining, identifying a simple nucleolar organizing region system for these species. However, the labeling results from the 5S rDNA probe demonstrated a difference in the number and localization of these sites between the analyzed species. The obtained data allowed inferences on the possible processes involved in the karyotypic evolution of this genus.

  17. Translation by polysome: theory of ribosome profile on a single mRNA transcript

    Sharma, Ajeet K

    2011-01-01

    The process of polymerizing a protein by a ribosome, using a messenger RNA (mRNA) as the corresponding template, is called {\\it translation}. Ribosome may be regarded as a molecular motor for which the mRNA template serves also as the track. Often several ribosomes may translate the same (mRNA) simultaneously. The ribosomes bound simultaneously to a single mRNA transcript are the members of a polyribosome (or, simply, {\\it polysome}). Experimentally measured {\\it polysome profile} gives the distribution of polysome {\\it sizes}. Recently a breakthrough in determining the instantaneous {\\it positions} of the ribosomes on a given mRNA track has been achieved and the technique is called {\\it ribosome profiling} \\cite{ingolia10,guo10}. Motivated by the success of these techniques, we have studied the spatio-temporal organization of ribosomes by extending a theoretical model that we have reported elsewhere \\cite{sharma11}. This extended version of our model incorporates not only (i) mechano-chemical cycle of indivi...

  18. Localization of ribosomal genes in three Pimelodus species (Siluriformes, Pimelodidae) of the São Francisco River: 5S genes as species markers and conservation of the 18S rDNA sites

    Caroline Garcia; Orlando Moreira Filho

    2008-01-01

    Pimelodidae is one of the most representative of Neotropical catfish families. However, these fish are still poorly studied in terms of cytogenetics, especially regarding the application of more accurate techniques such as the chromosomal localization of ribosomal genes. In the present work, fluorescent in situ hybridization with 5S and 18S rDNA probes was employed for rDNA site mapping in Pimelodus sp., P. fur and P. maculatus from the São Francisco River in the Três Marias municipality - MG...

  19. “Silencing the ribosomal locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of RNA polymerase I transcription and chromatin acetylation”

    Cesarini, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    During my PhD I investigated the transcriptional silencing occurring at the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast the ribosomal locus (rDNA) is transcribed with high efficiency by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and III to synthetize ribosomal RNAs. It has been discovered that RNA polymerase Pol II (Pol II) can also transcribe the ribosomal locus, at low level, starting from cryptic promoters and generating non coding RNAs (ncRNAs). ncRNA transcription leads to genome...

  20. Modeling of ribosome dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an external load

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Dayeri, Maryam; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-07-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to the recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force and the translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  1. Modeling of Ribosome Dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an External Load

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force, and translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  2. Translation Initiation is Controlled by RNA Folding Kinetics via a Ribosome Drafting Mechanism.

    Espah Borujeni, Amin; Salis, Howard M

    2016-06-01

    RNA folding plays an important role in controlling protein synthesis as well as other cellular processes. Existing models have focused on how RNA folding energetics control translation initiation rate under equilibrium conditions but have largely ignored the effects of nonequilibrium RNA folding. We introduce a new mechanism, called "ribosome drafting", that explains how a mRNA's folding kinetics and the ribosome's binding rate collectively control its translation initiation rate. During cycles of translation, ribosome drafting emerges whenever successive ribosomes bind to a mRNA faster than the mRNA can refold, maintaining it in a nonequilibrium state with an acceleration of protein synthesis. Using computational design, time-correlated single photon counting, and expression measurements, we demonstrate that slow-folding and fast-folding RNA structures with equivalent folding energetics can vary protein synthesis rates by 1000-fold. We determine the necessary conditions for ribosome drafting by characterizing mRNAs with rationally designed ribosome binding rates, folding kinetics, and folding energetics, confirming the predictions of a nonequilibrium Markov model of translation. Our results have widespread implications, illustrating how competitive folding and assembly kinetics can shape the gene expression machinery's sequence-structure-function relationship inside cells. PMID:27199273

  3. Localization of 18S ribosomal genes in suckermouth armoured catfishes Loricariidae (Teleostei, Siluriformes with discussion on the Ag-NOR evolution

    Anderson Alves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The family Loricariidae with about 690 species divided into six subfamilies, is one of the world’s largest fish families. Cytogenetic studies conducted in the family showed that among 90 species analyzed the diploid number ranges from 2n=38 in Ancistrus sp. to 2n=96 in Hemipsilichthys gobio Luetken, 1874. In the present study, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was employed to determine the chromosomal localization of the 18S rDNA gene in four suckermouth armoured catfishes: Kronichthys lacerta (Nichols, 1919, Pareiorhaphis splendens (Bizerril, 1995, Liposarcus multiradiatus (Hancock, 1828 and Hypostomus prope plecostomus (Linnaeus, 1758. All species analyzed showed one chromosome pair with 18S rDNA sequences, as observed in the previous Ag-NORs analyses. The presence of size and numerical polymorphism was observed and discussed, with proposing a hypothesis of the Ag-NOR evolution in Loricariidae.

  4. Ribosome collisions and Translation efficiency: Optimization by codon usage and mRNA destabilization

    Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    collisions and queues are inevitable consequences of a stochastic translation mechanism that reduce the translation efficiency substantially on natural mRNAs. The cells minimize collisions by having its mRNAs being unstable and by a highly selected codon usage in the start of the mRNA. The cost of m......Individual mRNAs are translated by multiple ribosomes that initiate translation with an interval of a few seconds. The ribosome speed is codon dependent, and ribosome queuing has been suggested to explain specific data for translation of some mRNAs in vivo. By modeling the stochastic translation...... process as a traffic problem, we here analyze conditions and consequences of collisions and queuing. The model allowed us to determine the on-rate (0.8 to 1.1 initiations/s) and the time (1 s) the preceding ribosome occludes initiation for Escherichia coli lacZ mRNA in vivo. We find that ribosome...

  5. Hyperaccurate and error-prone ribosomes exploit distinct mechanisms during tRNA selection

    Zaher, Hani S.; Green, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains displaying hyper-accurate (restrictive) and ribosomal ambiguity (ram) phenotypes have long been associated with alterations in rpsL and rpsD/rpsE, respectively. Crystallographic evidence shows the ribosomal proteins S12 and S4/S5 (corresponding to these genes) to be located in separate regions of the small ribosomal subunit that are important for domain-closure thought to take place during tRNA selection. Mechanistically, the process of tRNA selection is separated int...

  6. Transcription-independent role for human mitochondrial RNA polymerase in mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis

    Surovtseva, Yulia V; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT, is required for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transcription and forms initiation complexes with human mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (h-mtTFB2). However, POLRMT also interacts with the paralogue of h-mtTFB2, h-mtTFB1, which is a 12S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase required for small (28S) mitochondrial ribosome subunit assembly. Herein, we show that POLRMT associates with h-mtTFB1 in 28S mitochondrial ribosome complexes that are stable in the abs...

  7. Fungal community analysis in the deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean assessed by comparison of ITS, 18S and 28S ribosomal DNA regions

    Xu, Wei; Luo, Zhu-Hua; Guo, Shuangshuang; Pang, Ka-Lai

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the diversity of fungal communities in 6 different deep-sea sediment samples of the Pacific Ocean based on three different types of clone libraries, including internal transcribed spacer (ITS), 18S rDNA, and 28S rDNA regions. A total of 1978 clones were generated from 18 environmental clone libraries, resulting in 140 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including 18 OTUs from ITS, 44 OTUs from 18S rDNA, and 78 OTUs from 28S rDNA gene primer sets. The majority of the recovered sequences belonged to diverse phylotypes of the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. Additionally, our study revealed a total of 46 novel fungal phylotypes, which showed low similarities (<97%) with available fungal sequences in the GenBank, including a novel Zygomycete lineage, suggesting possible new fungal taxa occurring in the deep-sea sediments. The results suggested that 28S rDNA is an efficient target gene to describe fungal community in deep-sea environment.

  8. Yeast 18 S rRNA Is Directly Involved in the Ribosomal Response to Stringent AUG Selection during Translation Initiation

    Nemoto, N.; Singh, Ch. R.; Udagawa, T.; Wang, S.; Thorson, E.; Winter, Z.; Ohira, T.; Li, M.; Valášek, Leoš; Brown, S. J.; Asano, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 285, č. 42 (2010), s. 32200-32212. ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : START CODON SELECTION * SACCHAROMYCES - CEREVISIAE * IN-VIVO Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.328, year: 2010

  9. The ribosome structure controls and directs mRNA entry, translocation and exit dynamics

    The protein-synthesizing ribosome undergoes large motions to effect the translocation of tRNAs and mRNA; here, the domain motions of this system are explored with a coarse-grained elastic network model using normal mode analysis. Crystal structures are used to construct various model systems of the 70S complex with/without tRNA, elongation factor Tu and the ribosomal proteins. Computed motions reveal the well-known ratchet-like rotational motion of the large subunits, as well as the head rotation of the small subunit and the high flexibility of the L1 and L7/L12 stalks, even in the absence of ribosomal proteins. This result indicates that these experimentally observed motions during translocation are inherently controlled by the ribosomal shape and only partially dependent upon GTP hydrolysis. Normal mode analysis further reveals the mobility of A- and P-tRNAs to increase in the absence of the E-tRNA. In addition, the dynamics of the E-tRNA is affected by the absence of the ribosomal protein L1. The mRNA in the entrance tunnel interacts directly with helicase proteins S3 and S4, which constrain the mRNA in a clamp-like fashion, as well as with protein S5, which likely orients the mRNA to ensure correct translation. The ribosomal proteins S7, S11 and S18 may also be involved in assuring translation fidelity by constraining the mRNA at the exit site of the channel. The mRNA also interacts with the 16S 3' end forming the Shine–Dalgarno complex at the initiation step; the 3' end may act as a 'hook' to reel in the mRNA to facilitate its exit

  10. Multiplex RT-PCR detection of Cucumber mosaic virus subgroups and Tobamoviruses infecting Tomato using 18S rRNA as an internal control

    Shaoning Chen; Hao Gu; Xiaoming Wang; Jishuang Chen; Weimin Zhu

    2011-01-01

    A multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for simultaneous detection and discrimination of subgroups of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), including its satellite RNA, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV),using 18S rRNA as an internal control.Species- and subgroups-specific primers designed to differentiate CMV subgroups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, ToMV and TMV, were assessed using the cDNA clones of viral genomes, CMV satellite RNA and 18S rRNA gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) or tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum).Using total RNA extracted from artificial mixture of tomato leaf tissues infected by each virus, the reaction components and cycling parmeters were optimized and a multiplex RT-PCR procedure was established.Six fragments of 704, 593, 512, 421,385, 255 bp, specific to CMV subgroup ll, CMV subgroup I, ToMV, TMV, satellite RNA and 18S rRNA, respectively, were sinultaneously amplified.The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR method for detecting CMV was 100 times higher than that of double-antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA).This method was successfully used for field detection.Among 141 samples collected from East China through tomato growth seasons, 106 single infections with one of the above isolates were detected and 13 mixed infections were found.The results showed the potential use of this method for investigating the epidemiology of viral diseases infecting tomato.

  11. RNA-DNA differences in human mitochondria restore ancestral form of 16S ribosomal RNA.

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Avital, Gal; Levin, Liron; Richards, Allison L; Hachen, Naomi; Rebolledo Jaramillo, Boris; Nekrutenko, Anton; Zarivach, Raz; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-11-01

    RNA transcripts are generally identical to the underlying DNA sequences. Nevertheless, RNA-DNA differences (RDDs) were found in the nuclear human genome and in plants and animals but not in human mitochondria. Here, by deep sequencing of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and RNA, we identified three RDD sites at mtDNA positions 295 (C-to-U), 13710 (A-to-U, A-to-G), and 2617 (A-to-U, A-to-G). Position 2617, within the 16S rRNA, harbored the most prevalent RDDs (>30% A-to-U and ∼15% A-to-G of the reads in all tested samples). The 2617 RDDs appeared already at the precursor polycistrone mitochondrial transcript. By using traditional Sanger sequencing, we identified the A-to-U RDD in six different cell lines and representative primates (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pigmaeus, and Macaca mulatta), suggesting conservation of the mechanism generating such RDD. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 1700 vertebrate mtDNA sequences supported a thymine as the primate ancestral allele at position 2617, suggesting that the 2617 RDD recapitulates the ancestral 16S rRNA. Modeling U or G (the RDDs) at position 2617 stabilized the large ribosomal subunit structure in contrast to destabilization by an A (the pre-RDDs). Hence, these mitochondrial RDDs are likely functional. PMID:23913925

  12. Genetic variation and identification of cultivated Fallopia multiflora and its wild relatives by using chloroplast matK and 18S rRNA gene sequences.

    Yan, Ping; Pang, Qi-Hua; Jiao, Xu-Wen; Zhao, Xuan; Shen, Yan-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Jin

    2008-10-01

    FALLOPIA MULTIFLORA (Thunb.) Harald . has been widely and discriminatingly used in China for the study and treatment of anemia, swirl, deobstruent, pyrosis, insomnia, amnesia, atheroma and also for regulating immune functions. However, there is still confusion about the herbal drug's botanical origins and the phylogenetic relationship between the cultivars and the wild relatives. In order to develop an efficient method for identification, a molecular analysis was performed based on 18 S rRNA gene and partial MATK gene sequences. The 18 S rRNA gene sequences of F. MULTIFLORA were 1809 bp in length and were highly conserved, indicating that the cultivars and the wild F. MULTIFLORA have the same botanical origin. Based on our 18 S rRNA gene sequences analysis, F. MULTIFLORA could be easily distinguished at the DNA level from adulterants and some herbs with similar components. The MATK gene partial sequences were found to span 1271 bp. The phylogenetic relation of F. MULTIFLORA based on the MATK gene showed that all samples in this paper were divided into four clades. The sequences of the partial MATK gene had many permutations, which were related to the geographical distributions of the samples. MATK gene sequences provided valuable information for the identification of F. MULTIFLORA. New taxonomic information could be obtained to authenticate the botanical origin of the F. MULTIFLORA, the species and the medicines made of it. PMID:18759218

  13. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recrui...

  14. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of nonstop mRNA

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3′ end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA. PMID:27312062

  15. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis.

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip C; Maddock, Janine R; Woolford, John L

    2016-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. PMID:27036125

  16. Phylogenetic position of the yeast-like symbiotes of Tagosodes orizicolus (Homoptera: Delphacidae) based on 18S ribosomal DNA partial sequences.

    Xet-Mull, Ana M; Quesada, Tania; Espinoza, Ana M

    2004-09-01

    Tagosodes orizicolus Muir (Homoptera: Delphacidae), the endemic delphacid species of tropical America carries yeast-like symbiotes (YLS) in the abdominal fat bodies and the ovarial tissues, like other rice planthoppers of Asia. These YLS are obligate symbiotes, which are transmitted transovarially, and maintain a mutualistic relationship with the insect host. This characteristic has made in vitro culture and classification of YLS rather difficult using conventional methods. Nevertheless, microorganisms of similar characteristics have been successfully classified by using molecular taxonomy. In the present work, the YLS of Tagosodes orizicolus (YLSTo) were purified on Percoll gradients, and specific segments of 18S rDNA were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. Sequences were aligned by means of the CLUSTAL V (DNASTAR) program; phylogenetic trees were constructed with the Phylogeny Inference Package (PHYLIP), showing that YLSTo belong to the fungi class Pyrenomycetes, phylum Ascomycota. Similarities between 98% and 100% were observed among YLS of the rice delphacids Tagosodes orizicolus, Nilaparvata lugens, Laodelphax striatellus and Sogatella fur cifera, and between 89.8% and 90.8% when comparing the above to YLS of the aphid Hamiltonaphis styraci. These comparisons revealed that delphacid YLS are a highly conserved monophyletic group within the Pyrenomycetes and are closely related to Hypomyces chrysospermus. PMID:17361570

  17. Accommodation of tmRNA-SmpB into stalled ribosomes: a cryo-EM study.

    Weis, Felix; Bron, Patrick; Rolland, Jean-Paul; Thomas, Daniel; Felden, Brice; Gillet, Reynald

    2010-02-01

    In eubacteria, translation of defective messenger RNAs (mRNAs) produces truncated polypeptides that stall on the ribosome. A quality control mechanism referred to as trans-translation is performed by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), a specialized RNA acting as both a tRNA and an mRNA, associated with small protein B (SmpB). So far, a clear view of the structural movements of both the protein and RNA necessary to perform accommodation is still lacking. By using a construct containing the tRNA-like domain as well as the extended helix H2 of tmRNA, we present a cryo-electron microscopy study of the process of accommodation. The structure suggests how tmRNA and SmpB move into the ribosome decoding site after the release of EF-Tu.GDP. While two SmpB molecules are bound per ribosome in a preaccommodated state, our results show that during accommodation the SmpB protein interacting with the small subunit decoding site stays in place while the one interacting with the large subunit moves away. Relative to canonical translation, an additional movement is observed due to the rotation of H2. This suggests that the larger movement required to resume translation on a tmRNA internal open reading frame starts during accommodation. PMID:20038631

  18. Utility of 18S rDNA and ITS sequences as population markers for Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Copepoda: Caligidae) parasitising Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Scotland

    Shinn, A.P.; Banks, B.A.; Tange, N.; Bron, J.E.; Sommerville, C.; Aoki, T.; Wootten, R.

    2000-01-01

    Genetic differentiation within the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), was investigated by the sequencing of specific nucleotide regions. Partial sequences of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region from single sea lice were amplified

  19. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development. PMID:26902128

  20. Mutations in the leader region of ribosomal RNA operons cause structurally defective 30 S ribosomes as revealed by in vivo structural probing.

    Balzer, M; Wagner, R

    1998-02-27

    The biogenesis of functional ribosomes is regulated in a very complex manner, involving different proteins and RNA molecules. RNAs are not only essential components of both ribosomal subunits but also transiently interacting factors during particle formation. In eukaryotes snoRNAs act as molecular chaperones to assist maturation, modification and assembly. In a very similar way highly conserved leader sequences of bacterial rRNA operons are involved in the correct formation of 30 S ribosomal subunits. Certain mutations in the rRNA leader region cause severe growth defects due to malfunction of ribosomes which are assembled from such transcription units. To understand how the leader sequences act to facilitate the formation of the correct 30 S subunits we performed in vivo chemical probing to assess structural differences between ribosomes assembled either from rRNA transcribed from wild-type operons or from operons which contain mutations in the rRNA leader region. Cells transformed with plasmids containing the respective rRNA operons were reacted with dimethylsulphate (DMS). Ribosomes were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation and modified nucleotides within the 16 S rRNA were identified by primer extension reaction. Structural differences between ribosomes from wild-type and mutant rRNA operons occur in several clusters within the 16 S rRNA secondary structure. The most prominent differences are located in the central domain including the universally conserved pseudoknot structure which connects the 5', the central and the 3' domain of 16 S rRNA. Two other clusters with structural differences fall in the 5' domain where the leader had been shown to interact with mature 16 S rRNA and within the ribosomal protein S4 binding site. The other differences in structure are located in sites which are also known as sites for the action of several antibiotics. The data explain the functional defects of ribosomes from rRNA operons with leader mutations and help to

  1. A Long Noncoding RNA on the Ribosome Is Required for Lifespan Extension

    Paul B. Essers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis of ribosomes and their coordination of protein translation consume an enormous amount of cellular energy. As such, it has been established that the inhibition of either process can extend eukaryotic lifespan. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to compare ribosome-associated RNAs from normal strains of Caenorhabditis elegans to those carrying the life-extending daf-2 mutation. We found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, transcribed telomeric sequence 1 (tts-1, on ribosomes of the daf-2 mutant. Depleting tts-1 in daf-2 mutants increases ribosome levels and significantly shortens their extended lifespan. We find tts-1 is also required for the longer lifespan of the mitochondrial clk-1 mutants but not the feeding-defective eat-2 mutants. In line with this, the clk-1 mutants express more tts-1 and fewer ribosomes than the eat-2 mutants. Our results suggest that the expression of tts-1 functions in different longevity pathways to reduce ribosome levels in a way that promotes life extension.

  2. Impact of P-Site tRNA and antibiotics on ribosome mediated protein folding: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Surojit Mondal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ribosome, which acts as a platform for mRNA encoded polypeptide synthesis, is also capable of assisting in folding of polypeptide chains. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC that catalyzes peptide bond formation resides in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome. Proper positioning of the 3' -CCA ends of the A- and P-site tRNAs via specific interactions with the nucleotides of the PTC are crucial for peptidyl transferase activity. This RNA domain is also the center for ribosomal chaperoning activity. The unfolded polypeptide chains interact with the specific nucleotides of the PTC and are released in a folding competent form. In vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to this domain (bDV RNA also displays chaperoning activity. RESULTS: The present study explores the effects of tRNAs, antibiotics that are A- and P-site PTC substrate analogs (puromycin and blasticidin and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and josamycin on the chaperoning ability of the E. coli ribosome and bDV RNA. Our studies using mRNA programmed ribosomes show that a tRNA positioned at the P-site effectively inhibits the ribosome's chaperoning function. We also show that the antibiotic blasticidin (that mimics the interaction between 3'-CCA end of P/P-site tRNA with the PTC is more effective in inhibiting ribosome and bDV RNA chaperoning ability than either puromycin or the macrolide antibiotics. Mutational studies of the bDV RNA could identify the nucleotides U2585 and G2252 (both of which interact with P-site tRNA to be important for its chaperoning ability. CONCLUSION: Both protein synthesis and their proper folding are crucial for maintenance of a functional cellular proteome. The PTC of the ribosome is attributed with both these abilities. The silencing of the chaperoning ability of the ribosome in the presence of P-site bound tRNA might be a way to segregate these two important functions.

  3. Development of 18S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes for specific detection of Hartmannella and Naegleria in Legionella-positive environmental samples.

    Grimm, D; Ludwig, W F; Brandt, B C; Michel, R; Schleifer, K H; Hacker, J; Steinert, M

    2001-04-01

    Aquatic protozoa are natural hosts of the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. The fluorescence labeled 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe LEGPNE1 has recently been shown to specifically detect extracellular legionellae as well as intracellular legionellae parasitizing protozoa. In this study we designed oligonucleotide probes which are complementary to distinct regions of the 18S rRNA of the Legionella host organisms of the genera Hartmannella and Naegleria. The specificity of the probes, HART498 and NAEG1088, was tested by in situ hybridization of various laboratory reference strains. In order to evaluate the fluorescent probes for environmental studies three selected Legionella-positive cold water habitats were examined for the presence of these protozoa. Traditional culture methods followed by morphological identification revealed an almost consistent presence of Naegleria spp. in cold water habitats. Other protozoa species including Acanthamoeba spp., Echinamoeba spp., Hartmannella spp., Platyamoeba placida, Saccamoeba spp., Thecamoeba quadrilineata, and Vexillifera spp. were found sporadically. Concomitant analysis of the pH, conductivity and temperature of the water samples revealed no preference of Legionella or the respective protozoa for certain environmental conditions. The specificity of the newly designed 18S rRNA probes demonstrates that they are valuable and rapid tools for the identification of culturable environmental protozoa. PMID:11403402

  4. Early life stress inhibits expression of ribosomal RNA in the developing hippocampus.

    Lan Wei

    Full Text Available Children that are exposed to abuse or neglect show abnormal hippocampal function. However, the developmental mechanisms by which early life stress (ELS impairs normal hippocampal development have not been elucidated. Here we propose that exposure to ELS blunts normal hippocampal growth by inhibiting the availability of ribosomal RNA (rRNA. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the normal mouse hippocampus undergoes a growth-spurt during the second week of life, followed by a gradual decrease in DNA and RNA content that persists into adulthood. This developmental pattern is associated with accelerated ribosomal RNA (rRNA synthesis during the second week of life, followed by a gradual decline in rRNA levels that continue into adulthood. Levels of DNA methylation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA promoter are lower during the second week of life compared to earlier development or adulthood. Exposure to brief daily separation (BDS, a mouse model of early life stress, increased DNA methylation at the ribosomal DNA promoter, decreased rRNA levels, and blunted hippocampal growth during the second week of life. Exposure to acute (3 hrs maternal separation decreased rRNA and increased DNA methylation at the rDNA proximal promoter, suggesting that exposure to stress early in life can rapidly regulate the availability of rRNA levels in the developing hippocampus. Given the critical role that rRNA plays in supporting normal growth and development, these findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism to explain how stress early in life impairs hippocampus development in the mouse.

  5. Ribosome collisions and translation efficiency: optimization by codon usage and mRNA destabilization.

    Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2008-09-26

    Individual mRNAs are translated by multiple ribosomes that initiate translation with an interval of a few seconds. The ribosome speed is codon dependent, and ribosome queuing has been suggested to explain specific data for translation of some mRNAs in vivo. By modeling the stochastic translation process as a traffic problem, we here analyze conditions and consequences of collisions and queuing. The model allowed us to determine the on-rate (0.8 to 1.1 initiations/s) and the time (1 s) the preceding ribosome occludes initiation for Escherichia coli lacZ mRNA in vivo. We find that ribosome collisions and queues are inevitable consequences of a stochastic translation mechanism that reduce the translation efficiency substantially on natural mRNAs. The cells minimize collisions by having its mRNAs being unstable and by a highly selected codon usage in the start of the mRNA. The cost of mRNA breakdown is offset by the concomitant increase in translation efficiency. PMID:18619977

  6. Cultivation-independent analysis reveals a shift in ciliate 18S rRNA gene diversity in a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-polluted soil

    Lara, Enrique; Berney, Cédric; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Using cultivation-independent methods the ciliate communities of a clay-rich soil with a 90-year record of pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (4.5 g kg−1 PAH) were compared with that of a nonpolluted soil collected in its vicinity and with similar properties. A ciliate-specific set of 18S rRNA gene targeting primers was designed and used to amplify DNA extracted from both soils (surface and 20 cm depth). Four clone libraries were generated with PCR products that covered an 18...

  7. Identification of the methyltransferase targeting C2499 in Deinococcus radiodurans 23S ribosomal RNA

    Nielsen, Julie Mundus; Flyvbjerg, Karen Freund; Kirpekar, Finn

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans-like all other organisms-introduces nucleotide modifications into its ribosomal RNA. We have previously found that the bacterium contains a Carbon-5 methylation on cytidine 2499 of its 23S ribosomal RNA, which is so far the only modified version of cytidine 2...

  8. Locus-specific ribosomal RNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance.

    Michelle S Lewis

    Full Text Available The silencing of one parental set of rRNA genes in a genetic hybrid is an epigenetic phenomenon known as nucleolar dominance. We showed previously that silencing is restricted to the nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, the loci where rRNA genes are tandemly arrayed, and does not spread to or from neighboring protein-coding genes. One hypothesis is that nucleolar dominance is the net result of hundreds of silencing events acting one rRNA gene at a time. A prediction of this hypothesis is that rRNA gene silencing should occur independent of chromosomal location. An alternative hypothesis is that the regulatory unit in nucleolar dominance is the NOR, rather than each individual rRNA gene, in which case NOR localization may be essential for rRNA gene silencing. To test these alternative hypotheses, we examined the fates of rRNA transgenes integrated at ectopic locations. The transgenes were accurately transcribed in all independent transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines tested, indicating that NOR localization is not required for rRNA gene expression. Upon crossing the transgenic A. thaliana lines as ovule parents with A. lyrata to form F1 hybrids, a new system for the study of nucleolar dominance, the endogenous rRNA genes located within the A. thaliana NORs are silenced. However, rRNA transgenes escaped silencing in multiple independent hybrids. Collectively, our data suggest that rRNA gene activation can occur in a gene-autonomous fashion, independent of chromosomal location, whereas rRNA gene silencing in nucleolar dominance is locus-dependent.

  9. Interaction of the antibiotics clindamycin and lincomycin with Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA

    Douthwaite, S

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of the antibiotics clindamycin and lincomycin with Escherichia coli ribosomes has been compared by chemical footprinting. The protection afforded by both drugs is limited to the peptidyl transferase loop of 23S rRNA. Under conditions of stoichiometric binding at 1 mM drug concentration...... in vitro, both drugs strongly protect 23S rRNA bases A2058 and A2451 from dimethyl sulphate and G2505 from kethoxal modification; G2061 is also weakly protected from kethoxal. The modification patterns differ in that A2059 is additionally protected by clindamycin but not by lincomycin. The affinity...... of the two drugs for the ribosome, estimated by footprinting, is approximately the same, giving Kdiss values of 5 microM for lincomycin and 8 microM for clindamycin. The results show that in vitro the drugs are equally potent in blocking their ribosomal target site. Their inhibitory effects on...

  10. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Nerea Irigoyen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV, are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59, a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the

  11. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling

    Jones, Joshua D.; Chung, Betty Y.-W.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global “snap-shot” of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  12. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Irigoyen, Nerea; Firth, Andrew E; Jones, Joshua D; Chung, Betty Y-W; Siddell, Stuart G; Brierley, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  13. The nucleotide sequence of 5S ribosomal RNA from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Hori, H.; Osawa, S; Murao, K.; Ishikura, H

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of ribosomal 5S RNA from Micrococcus lysodeikticus is pGUUACGGCGGCUAUAGCGUGGGGGAAACGCCCGGCCGUAUAUCGAACCCGGAAGCUAAGCCCCAUAGCGCCGAUGGUUACUGUAACCGGGAGGUUGUGGGAGAGUAGGUCGCCGCCGUGAOH. When compared to other 5S RNAs, the sequence homology is greatest with Thermus aquaticus, and these two 5S RNAs reveal several features intermediate between those of typical gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria.

  14. An unusual mechanism for EF-Tu activation during tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue

    Miller, Mickey R; Buskirk, Allen R.

    2014-01-01

    When ribosomes are stalled on truncated mRNAs in prokaryotes, they are rescued by the tmRNA/SmpB complex. It has been unclear how EF-Tu is activated by this complex. This manuscript analyzes this problem, and the results indicate that the normal EF-Tu GTPase cycle does not appear to apply in this specialized situation.

  15. Competing pathways control host resistance to virus via tRNA modification and programmed ribosomal frameshifting

    Maynard, Nathaniel D.; Macklin, Derek N.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Covert, Markus W

    2012-01-01

    Viral infection depends on a complex interplay between host and viral factors. Here, we link host susceptibility to viral infection to a network encompassing sulfur metabolism, tRNA modification, competitive binding, and programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF). We first demonstrate that the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli exerts a protective effect during lambda phage infection, while a tRNA thiolation pathway enhances viral infection. We show that tRNALys uridin...

  16. The human insulin receptor mRNA contains a functional internal ribosome entry segment

    Spriggs, Keith A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Ridley, Simon H.; Coldwell, Mark; Bottley, Andrew; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.; Siddle, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation is an important mechanism determining the level of expression of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Translation is most commonly initiated by cap-dependent scanning, but many eukaryotic mRNAs contain internal ribosome entry segments (IRESs), providing an alternative means of initiation capable of independent regulation. Here, we show by using dicistronic luciferase reporter vectors that the 5'-UTR of the mRNA encoding human insulin receptor (hIR) contains a functiona...

  17. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: Lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5′ end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by m...

  18. 罗氏沼虾18S rRNA基因生物素标记探针的制备及应用%Preparation and application of the biotin-labeled probe of 18S rRNA gene in Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    高风英; 叶星; 白俊杰; 吴锐全; 劳海华; 简清; 罗建仁

    2005-01-01

    Probes are essential for study of gene expression and regulation. In this study, a method was established to prepare the biotin-labeled probe for 18S rRNA gene of freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. And the labeled method was used to produce a lysozyme gene probe, then applied in analysis of lysozyme gene expression. Primers were designed according to the nucleotide sequences of 18S rRNA of Decalxxta in order to isolate the 18S rRNA gene sequences of M. rosenbergii. Total genomic DNA was isolated from hepatopancreas of the freshwater prawn. A specific DNA fragment with desired size was amplified by PCR using the total DNA as templates. The DNA fragment was inserted into pGEM-T Easy vector and sequenced. The result of BLAST and alignment analysis confirmed that the DNA fragment isolated was the 18S rRNA gene of M. rosenbergii, which was 418 nt in length.Biotin-labeled probe of the 18S rRNA was then produced by PCR using the recombinant plasmid as templates. The biotin-21-dTTP and the non-labeled dNTP were added to the PCR reaction system. Ratio of the biotin-21-dTTP and the non-labeled dTFP was 3 to 1.The yield of the labeled probe is 300 ng·μL-1. The detection limit of the probe is 60 pg. A biotin-labeled probe of lysozyme gene was prepared by the same label method, and the yield of the lysozyme gene probe is 500 ng·μL-1. These biotin-labeled probes were applied in Northern dot blotting analysis of tissue distribution of lysoyzme mRNA of M. rosenbergii. Signals were scanned and quantified by Analysis System of Biology Image. The signal intensity ratio of the lysozyme to 18S rRNA represents the relative expression level of lysozyme mRNA. The results showed that the lysozyme mRNA existed in all the tissues checked, including eye,muscle, gill, hepatopancreas, haemocytes and intestine. But lysoyzme mRNA levels varied among different tissues. The highest level was found in the intestine, and the second was in the hepatopancreas and the lowest was in the

  19. Molecular analysis of 18S rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium parasites from patients living in Iran, Malawi, Nigeria and Vietnam.

    Ghaffari, Salman; Kalantari, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species are one of the most common causes of gastrointestinal infection in humans around the world. This study has aimed to investigate the hyper variable region of the 18S rRNA gene in Cryptosporidium for exact parasite identification. DNA was extracted from 26 fecal samples from which initially Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast , Auramine phenol and ELISA techniques. Nested PCR, targeting the most polymorphic region of the 18S rRNA gene and genotyping was performed by restriction endonuclease digestion of the PCR product followed by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenic analysis. Among 26 isolates analyzed, three species of Cryptosporidium were identified; 38.5% of the isolates were C. hominis while 53.8% of the isolates were C. parvum and 7.7% of the isolates were C. meleagridis, which the last two species have the potentially zoonotic transmission. The only 11T subtype of C. hominis was demonstrated. These strains clustered distinctly into either human or animal origin regardless of the geographical origin, age, or immunity status of the patients. In summary, this work is the first report of C. meleagridis infecting human in Iran. Moreover, it suggested that multi-locus study of Cryptosporidium species in developing countries would be necessary to determine the extent of transmission of cryptosporidiosis in the populations. PMID:24551771

  20. Intragenomic sequence variation at the ITS1 - ITS2 region and at the 18S and 28S nuclear ribosomal DNA genes of the New Zealand mud snail, Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae: mollusca)

    Hoy, Marshal S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was conducted on two populations of the invasive non-native New Zealand mud snail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), one from a freshwater ecosystem in Devil's Lake (Oregon, USA) and the other from an ecosystem of higher salinity in the Columbia River estuary (Hammond Harbor, Oregon, USA). To elucidate potential genetic differences between the two populations, three segments of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), the ITS1-ITS2 regions and the 18S and 28S rDNA genes were cloned and sequenced. Variant sequences within each individual were found in all three rDNA segments. Folding models were utilized for secondary structure analysis and results indicated that there were many sequences which contained structure-altering polymorphisms, which suggests they could be nonfunctional pseudogenes. In addition, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was used for hierarchical analysis of genetic variance to estimate variation within and among populations and within individuals. AMOVA revealed significant variation in the ITS region between the populations and among clones within individuals, while in the 5.8S rDNA significant variation was revealed among individuals within the two populations. High levels of intragenomic variation were found in the ITS regions, which are known to be highly variable in many organisms. More interestingly, intragenomic variation was also found in the 18S and 28S rDNA, which has rarely been observed in animals and is so far unreported in Mollusca. We postulate that in these P. antipodarum populations the effects of concerted evolution are diminished due to the fact that not all of the rDNA genes in their polyploid genome should be essential for sustaining cellular function. This could lead to a lessening of selection pressures, allowing mutations to accumulate in some copies, changing them into variant sequences.                   

  1. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes.

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-07-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5' end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by many viruses of medical and economic importance. In this review, we briefly describe and compare mechanistic and structural groups of viral IRES RNAs, focusing on those IRESes that are capable of direct ribosome recruitment using specific RNA structures. We then discuss in greater detail some recent advances in our understanding of the intergenic region IRESes of the Dicistroviridae, which use the most streamlined ribosome-recruitment mechanism yet discovered. By combining these findings with knowledge of canonical translation and the behavior of other IRESes, mechanistic models of this RNA structure-based process are emerging. PMID:18515544

  2. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  3. Rapid identification of Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) using ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1.

    Perera, Omaththage P; Allen, Kerry C; Jain, Devendra; Purcell, Matthew; Little, Nathan S; Luttrell, Randall G

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of invasive species is crucial for deploying management strategies to prevent establishment. Recent Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) invasions and subsequent establishment in South America has increased the risk of this species invading North America. Morphological similarities make differentiation of H. armigera from the native Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) difficult. Characteristics of adult male genitalia and nucleotide sequence differences in mitochondrial DNA are two of the currently available methods to differentiate these two species. However, current methods are likely too slow to be employed as rapid detection methods. In this study, conserved differences in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the ribosomal RNA genes were used to develop species-specific oligonucleotide primers that amplified ITS1 fragments of 147 and 334 bp from H. armigera and H. zea, respectively. An amplicon (83 bp) from a conserved region of 18S ribosomal RNA subunit served as a positive control. Melting temperature differences in ITS1 amplicons yielded species-specific dissociation curves that could be used in high resolution melt analysis to differentiate the two Helicoverpa species. In addition, a rapid and inexpensive procedure for obtaining amplifiable genomic DNA from a small amount of tissue was identified. Under optimal conditions, the process was able to detect DNA from one H. armigera leg in a pool of 25 legs. The high resolution melt analysis combined with rapid DNA extraction could be used as an inexpensive method to genetically differentiate large numbers of H. armigera and H. zea using readily available reagents. PMID:26516166

  4. An evolutionary conserved pattern of 18S rRNA sequence complementarity to mRNA 5 ' UTRs and its implications for eukaryotic gene translation regulation

    Pánek, Josef; Kolář, Michal; Vohradský, Jiří; Valášek, Leoš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 16 (2013), s. 7625-7634. ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : 80S RIBOSOME * UNTRANSLATED REGION * ANGSTROM RESOLUTION Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 8.808, year: 2013

  5. RNase II is important for A-site mRNA cleavage during ribosome pausing

    Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Shoji, Shinichiro; Fredrick, Kurt; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, translational arrest can elicit cleavage of codons within the ribosomal A site. This A-site mRNA cleavage is independent of RelE, and has been proposed to be an endonucleolytic activity of the ribosome. Here, we show that the 3′→5′ exonuclease RNase II plays an important role in RelE-independent A-site cleavage. Instead of A-site cleavage, translational pausing in ΔRNase II cells produces transcripts that are truncated +12 and +28 nucleotides downstream of the A-site codo...

  6. Avian malaria in captive psittacine birds: detection by microscopy and 18S rRNA gene amplification.

    Belo, N O; Passos, L F; Júnior, L M C; Goulart, C E; Sherlock, T M; Braga, E M

    2009-03-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to estimate the occurrence of malaria infection among captive psittacine birds (n=127) from three zoological gardens in Brazil. Malaria infection was evaluated by the association of direct examination of blood smears with amplification of the 18SSU rRNA gene of the Plasmodium genus, demonstrating an overall occurrence of 36%. Most infected bird species were Amazona aestiva (28/73), Ara ararauna (6/10), and Amazona amazonica (3/10). The low parasitemias observed among the infected birds suggest a chronic infection. The sequence analyses of 10 isolates indicate a potential occurrence of four distinct Plasmodium lineages. These findings provide new data on malarial infection in captive psittacine birds, and emphasize the need for better control of importation and exportation of these birds. PMID:18937986

  7. Validation of two ribosomal RNA removal methods for microbial metatranscriptomics

    He, Shaomei; Wurtzel, Omri; Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff L; Yilmaz, Suzan; Tringe, Susannah G; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Feng; Lindquist, Erika A; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-10-01

    The predominance of rRNAs in the transcriptome is a major technical challenge in sequence-based analysis of cDNAs from microbial isolates and communities. Several approaches have been applied to deplete rRNAs from (meta)transcriptomes, but no systematic investigation of potential biases introduced by any of these approaches has been reported. Here we validated the effectiveness and fidelity of the two most commonly used approaches, subtractive hybridization and exonuclease digestion, as well as combinations of these treatments, on two synthetic five-microorganism metatranscriptomes using massively parallel sequencing. We found that the effectiveness of rRNA removal was a function of community composition and RNA integrity for these treatments. Subtractive hybridization alone introduced the least bias in relative transcript abundance, whereas exonuclease and in particular combined treatments greatly compromised mRNA abundance fidelity. Illumina sequencing itself also can compromise quantitative data analysis by introducing a G+C bias between runs.

  8. Reconstruction of ribosomal RNA genes from metagenomic data.

    Lu Fan

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics has a great potential for describing the 16S rRNA gene diversity of microbial communities. However current approaches using this 16S rRNA gene information to describe community diversity suffer from low taxonomic resolution or chimera problems. Here we describe a new strategy that involves stringent assembly and data filtering to reconstruct full-length 16S rRNA genes from metagenomicpyrosequencing data. Simulations showed that reconstructed 16S rRNA genes provided a true picture of the community diversity, had minimal rates of chimera formation and gave taxonomic resolution down to genus level. The strategy was furthermore compared to PCR-based methods to determine the microbial diversity in two marine sponges. This showed that about 30% of the abundant phylotypes reconstructed from metagenomic data failed to be amplified by PCR. Our approach is readily applicable to existing metagenomic datasets and is expected to lead to the discovery of new microbial phylotypes.

  9. Nutritional and growth control of ribosomal protein mRNA and rRNA in Neurospora crassa.

    Cujec, T P; Tyler, B M

    1996-01-01

    The effects of changing growth rates on the levels of 40S pre-rRNA and two r-protein mRNAs were examined to gain insight into the coordinate transcriptional regulation of ribosomal genes in the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa. Growth rates were varied either by altering carbon nutritional conditions, or by subjecting the isolates to inositol-limiting conditions. During carbon up- or down-shifts, r-protein mRNA levels were stoichiometrically coordinated. Changes in 40S pre-rRNA levels para...

  10. Effect of secondary compounds in forages on rumen micro-organisms quantified by 16S and 18S rRNA

    A gas syringe method was used to evaluate the effect of secondary compounds from plant materials on in vitro fermentation products and microbial biomass. The experiment used Pennisetum purpureum, Morinda citrifolia fruit, Nothopanax scutellarium leaves, Sesbania sesban LS (low saponins type), Sesbania sesban HS (high saponins type) and Sapindus rarak fruit as substrates. The incubation was conducted with and without polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG) addition for 24 hours. Gas production and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were analysed. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic concentrations were measured by quantifying 16S and 18S rRNA. The percentage increase in gas production due to PEG was very small (<5%) for all plant materials, which indicated that the biological effect of tannin in these plant materials is limited. TLC analysis revealed that all materials contained saponin, but only S. rarak, followed by S. sesban, contained a high diversity of saponins. S. sesban gave the highest (234 ml/g) while S. rarak gave the lowest gas production (115 ml/g). S. rarak gave the lowest SCFA production (3.57 mmole/g) and also the lowest ratio of acetate to propionate (1.76), indicating a change in pattern of SCFA production. Total elimination of eukaryotic concentration was evident from the absence of the 18S rRNA band when S. rarak and S. sesban were used as sole substrates. S. rarak also reduced the prokaryotic concentration. To use S. rarak as a defaunating agent without affecting prokaryotes, a crude saponin extract was prepared from S. rarak for further experiment. Different concentrations of crude saponins in a methanol extract of S. rarak fruit dissolved in rumen buffer were added to a substrate consisting of elephant grass and wheat bran (7:3 w/w). Microbial biomass yield was quantified by gravimetry and using rRNA as a marker. Addition of crude saponin extract from S. rarak to a high-roughage diet increased microbial biomass (MB) yield to 1.07 and 1.14 times MB yield of the

  11. [Precursors of ribosomal RNA in freely suspended callus cells of parsley (Petroselinum sativum)].

    Richter, G

    1973-03-01

    Six high molecular weight, rapidly labelled RNA species were detected in freely suspended callus cells of Petroselinum sativum by means of isotope labelling and electrophoretic separation in agarose-polyacrylamide gels. On the basis of their migration in the latter the RNA species were calculated to have the following molecular weights: 2.9×10(6), 2,4×10(6), 1.9×10(6), 1.4×10(6), 1.0×10(6) and 0.75×10(6) daltons. Thus they can clearly be distinguished from the two ribosomal RNA species (1.3×10(6) and 0.7×10(6) daltons). During incubation of the cells with [(3)H]methyl-methionine as a methyl donator all six components incorporated radioactivity rapidly. With [(3)H]nucleosides or [(3)H]orotic acid as precursors the 2.9×10(6) and the 2.4×10(6) daltons RNA were labelled within 10 min, while the other high molecular weight species appeared after about 20 min of labelling.Prolongation to 45-120 min resulted in accumulation of radioactivity preferentially in the 1.4×10(6) and 0.75×10(6) daltons RNA and in the ribosomal RNA species. The results of cell fractionation experiments provide evidence that these rapidly labelled high molecular weight RNA species are synthesized in the cell nucleus. The kinetics of their synthesis together with the other data obtained strongly support the suggestion that these RNA species function as precursors in the processing of ribosomal RNA. The possible mechanism of this process is discussed. PMID:24468848

  12. Unusual transcription termination of the ribosomal RNA genes in Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Müller, E; Neuhaus, H; Tobler, H; Müller, F.

    1990-01-01

    We studied termination of transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes in Ascaris lumbricoides, the first representative in the phylum of nemathelminthes analysed so far. RNase protection experiments in vivo reveal that the 3' end of the precursor rRNA coincides with the end of mature 26S rRNA. Promoter-containing miniplasmids are able to direct unique 3' end formation in vitro at a site identical to that observed in vivo, whereas deletion of these sequences abolishes 3' end formation throughout ...

  13. Ribosomal RNA gene sequences confirm that protistan endoparasite of larval cod Gadus morhua is Ichthyodinium sp

    Skovgaard, Alf; Meyer, Stefan; Overton, Julia Lynne; Støttrup, Josianne; Buchmann, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    An enigmatic protistan endoparasite found in eggs and larvae of cod Gadus morhua and turbot Psetta maxima was isolated from Baltic cod larvae, and DNA was extracted for sequencing of the parasite's small Subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. The endoparasite has previously been suggested to be...... related to Ichthyodinium chabelardi, a dinoflagellate-like protist that parasitizes yolk sacs of embryos and larvae of a variety of fish species. Comparison of a 1535 bp long fragment of the SSU rRNA gene of the cod endoparasite showed absolute identify with I. chabelardi, demonstrating that the 2...

  14. Fragmentation of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene in oyster mitochondrial genomes

    Milbury Coren A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discontinuous genes have been observed in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Gene discontinuity occurs in multiple forms: the two most frequent forms result from introns that are spliced out of the RNA and the resulting exons are spliced together to form a single transcript, and fragmented gene transcripts that are not covalently attached post-transcriptionally. Within the past few years, fragmented ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes have been discovered in bilateral metazoan mitochondria, all within a group of related oysters. Results In this study, we have characterized this fragmentation with comparative analysis and experimentation. We present secondary structures, modeled using comparative sequence analysis of the discontinuous mitochondrial large subunit rRNA genes of the cupped oysters C. virginica, C. gigas, and C. hongkongensis. Comparative structure models for the large subunit rRNA in each of the three oyster species are generally similar to those for other bilateral metazoans. We also used RT-PCR and analyzed ESTs to determine if the two fragmented LSU rRNAs are spliced together. The two segments are transcribed separately, and not spliced together although they still form functional rRNAs and ribosomes. Conclusions Although many examples of discontinuous ribosomal genes have been documented in bacteria and archaea, as well as the nuclei, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotes, oysters are some of the first characterized examples of fragmented bilateral animal mitochondrial rRNA genes. The secondary structures of the oyster LSU rRNA fragments have been predicted on the basis of previous comparative metazoan mitochondrial LSU rRNA structure models.

  15. Expanded versions of the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA mutation databases (16SMDBexp and 23SMDBexp)

    Triman, K L; Peister, A; R. A. Goel

    1998-01-01

    Expanded versions of the Ribosomal RNA Mutation Databases provide lists of mutated positions in 16S and 16S-like ribosomal RNA (16SMDBexp) and 23S and 23S-like ribosomal RNA (23SMDBexp) and the identity of each alteration. Alterations from organisms other than Escherichia coli are reported at positions according to the E.coli numbering system. Information provided for each mutation includes: (i) a brief description of the phenotype(s) associated with each mutation, (ii) whether a mutant pheno...

  16. Structure and Function of the Ribosomal Frameshifting Pseudoknot RNA from Beet Western Yellow Virus

    Egli, M.; Sarkhel, S.; Minasov, G.; Rich, A.

    2010-03-05

    Many viruses reprogram ribosomes to produce two different proteins from two different reading frames. So-called -1 frameshifting often involves pairwise alignment of two adjacent tRNAs at a 'slippery' sequence in the ribosomal A and P sites such that an overlapping codon is shifted upstream by one base relative to the zero frame. In the majority of cases, an RNA pseudoknot located downstream stimulates this type of frameshift. Crystal structures of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) have provided a detailed picture of the tertiary interactions stabilizing this folding motif, including a minor-groove triplex and quadruple-base interactions. The structure determined at atomic resolution revealed the locations of several magnesium ions and provided insights into the role of structured water stabilizing the RNA. Systematic in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses based on the structural results revealed specific tertiary interactions and regions in the pseudoknot that drastically change frameshifting efficiency. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of pseudoknot-mediated ribosomal frameshifting on the basis of the insights gained from structural and functional studies of the RNA pseudoknot from BWYV.

  17. Protist 18S rRNA gene Sequence Analysis Reveals Multiple Sources of Organic Matter Contributing to Turbidity Maxima of the Columbia River Estuary

    Herfort, Lydie; Peterson, Tawnya D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Zuber, Peter A.

    2011-10-05

    The Columbia River estuary is traditionally considered a detritus-based ecosystem fueled in summer by organic matter (OM) from expired freshwater diatoms. Since Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM) are sites of accumulation and transformation of this phytoplankton-derived OM, to further characterize the ETM protist assemblage, we collected in August 2007 bottom waters throughout an ETM event, as well as surface water during the peak of bottom turbidity, and performed biogeochemical, microscopic and molecular (18S rRNA gene clone libraries) analyses. These data confirmed that the majority of the particulate OM in ETMs is derived from chlorophyll a-poor particulate organic carbon tagged by DNA too damaged to be detected by molecular analysis.

  18. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D;

    1999-01-01

    Decoding of genetic information occurs upon interaction of an mRNA codon-tRNA anticodon complex with the small subunit of the ribosome. The ribosomal decoding region is associated with highly conserved sequences near the 3' end of 16 S rRNA. The decoding process is perturbed by the aminoglycoside...... of universally conserved nucleotides at 1406 to 1408 and 1494 to 1495 in the decoding region of plasmid-encoded bacterial 16 S rRNA. Phenotypic changes range from the benign effect of U1406-->A or A1408-->G substitutions, to the highly deleterious 1406G and 1495 mutations that assemble into 30 S subunits...... but are defective in forming functional ribosomes. Changes in the local conformation of the decoding region caused by these mutations were identified by chemical probing of isolated 30 S subunits. Ribosomes containing 16 S rRNA with mutations at positions 1408, 1407+1494, or 1495 had reduced affinity...

  19. Reduced expression of ribosomal proteins relieves microRNA-mediated repression.

    Janas, Maja M; Wang, Eric; Love, Tara; Harris, Abigail S; Stevenson, Kristen; Semmelmann, Karlheinz; Shaffer, Jonathan M; Chen, Po-Hao; Doench, John G; Yerramilli, Subrahmanyam V B K; Neuberg, Donna S; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Housman, David E; Burge, Christopher B; Novina, Carl D

    2012-04-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate physiological and pathological processes by inducing posttranscriptional repression of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) via incompletely understood mechanisms. To discover factors required for human miRNA activity, we performed an RNAi screen using a reporter cell line of miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. We report that reduced expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) dissociated miRNA complexes from target mRNAs, leading to increased polysome association, translation, and stability of miRNA-targeted mRNAs relative to untargeted mRNAs. RNA sequencing of polysomes indicated substantial overlap in sets of genes exhibiting increased or decreased polysomal association after Argonaute or RPG knockdowns, suggesting similarity in affected pathways. miRNA profiling of monosomes and polysomes demonstrated that miRNAs cosediment with ribosomes. RPG knockdowns decreased miRNAs in monosomes and increased their target mRNAs in polysomes. Our data show that most miRNAs repress translation and that the levels of RPGs modulate miRNA-mediated repression of translation initiation. PMID:22541556

  20. Protein-RNA cross-linking in the ribosomes of yeast under oxidative stress.

    Mirzaei, Hamid; Regnier, Fred

    2006-12-01

    Living systems have efficient degradative pathways for dealing with the fact that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from cellular metabolism and the environment oxidatively damage proteins and DNA. But aggregation and cross-linking can occur as well, leading to a series of problems including disruption of cellular regulation, mutations, and even cell death. The mechanism(s) by which protein aggregation occurs and the macromolecular species involved are poorly understood. In the study reported here, evidence is provided for a new type of aggregate between proteins and RNA in ribosomes. While studying the effect of oxidative stress induced in the yeast proteome it was noted that ribosomal proteins were widely oxidized. Eighty six percent of the proteins in yeast ribosomes were found to be carbonylated after stressing yeast cell cultures with hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, many of these proteins appeared to be cross-linked based on their coelution patterns during RPC separation. Since they were not in direct contact, it was not clear how this could occur unless it was through the RNA separating them in the ribosome. This was confirmed in a multiple-step process, the first being derivatization of all carbonylated proteins in cell lysates with biotin hydrazide through Schiff base formation. Following reduction of Schiff bases with sodium cyanoborohydride, biotinylated proteins were selected from cell lysates with avidin affinity chromatography. Oxidized proteins thus captured were then selected again using boronate affinity chromatography to capture vicinal diol-containing proteins. This would include proteins cross-linked to an RNA fragment containing a ribose residue with 2',3'-hydroxyl groups. Some glycoproteins would also be selected by this process. LC/MS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides derived from proteins captured by this process along with MASCOT searches resulted in the identification of 37 ribosomal proteins that appear to be cross-linked to RNA

  1. A pathogenic non-coding RNA induces changes in dynamic DNA methylation of ribosomal RNA genes in host plants.

    Martinez, German; Castellano, Mayte; Tortosa, Maria; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic non-coding RNAs able to interfere with as yet poorly known host-regulatory pathways and to cause alterations recognized as diseases. The way in which these RNAs coerce the host to express symptoms remains to be totally deciphered. In recent years, diverse studies have proposed a close interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing, supporting the belief that viroid-derived small RNAs mediate the post-transcriptional cleavage of endogenous mRNAs by acting as elicitors of symptoms expression. Although the evidence supporting the role of viroid-derived small RNAs in pathogenesis is robust, the possibility that this phenomenon can be a more complex process, also involving viroid-induced alterations in plant gene expression at transcriptional levels, has been considered. Here we show that plants infected with the 'Hop stunt viroid' accumulate high levels of sRNAs derived from ribosomal transcripts. This effect was correlated with an increase in the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors during infection. We observed that the transcriptional reactivation of rRNA genes correlates with a modification of DNA methylation in their promoter region and revealed that some rRNA genes are demethylated and transcriptionally reactivated during infection. This study reports a previously unknown mechanism associated with viroid (or any other pathogenic RNA) infection in plants providing new insights into aspects of host alterations induced by the viroid infectious cycle. PMID:24178032

  2. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome.

    Fraser, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5' UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5' UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome. PMID:25742741

  3. Possible genetic consequences of epigenetic interactions between ribosomal RNA loci in Nicotiana allopolyploids

    Kovařík, Aleš; Nešpor Dadejová, Martina; Lim, K.Y.; Součková Skalická, Kamila; Matyášek, Roman; Grandbastien, M.-A.; Leitch, A.

    Clermont-Ferrand, 2007. s. 1-1. [Réunion du Groupe de travail Cytogénétique & Polyploidie du DGAP. 18.04.2007-20.04.2007, Clermont-Ferrand] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/07/0116; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/0687 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : allopolyploidy * epigenetic silencing * ribosomal RNA gene Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. Promoter-wide hypermethylation of the ribosomal RNA gene promoter in the suicide brain.

    Patrick O McGowan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in gene expression in the suicide brain have been reported and for several genes DNA methylation as an epigenetic regulator is thought to play a role. rRNA genes, that encode ribosomal RNA, are the backbone of the protein synthesis machinery and levels of rRNA gene promoter methylation determine rRNA transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We test here by sodium bisulfite mapping of the rRNA promoter and quantitative real-time PCR of rRNA expression the hypothesis that epigenetic differences in critical loci in the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of suicide. Suicide subjects in this study were selected for a history of early childhood neglect/abuse, which is associated with decreased hippocampal volume and cognitive impairments. rRNA was significantly hypermethylated throughout the promoter and 5' regulatory region in the brain of suicide subjects, consistent with reduced rRNA expression in the hippocampus. This difference in rRNA methylation was not evident in the cerebellum and occurred in the absence of genome-wide changes in methylation, as assessed by nearest neighbor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to show aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery in the suicide brain. The data implicate the epigenetic modulation of rRNA in the pathophysiology of suicide.

  5. The functional half-life of an mRNA depends on the ribosome spacing in an early coding region.

    Pedersen, Margit; Nissen, Søren; Mitarai, Namiko; Lo Svenningsen, Sine; Sneppen, Kim; Pedersen, Steen

    2011-03-18

    Bacterial mRNAs are translated by closely spaced ribosomes and degraded from the 5'-end, with half-lives of around 2 min at 37 °C in most cases. Ribosome-free or "naked" mRNA is known to be readily degraded, but the initial event that inactivates the mRNA functionally has not been fully described. Here, we characterize a determinant of the functional stability of an mRNA, which is located in the early coding region. Using literature values for the mRNA half-lives of variant lacZ mRNAs in Escherichia coli, we modeled how the ribosome spacing is affected by the translation rate of the individual codons. When comparing the ribosome spacing at various segments of the mRNA to its functional half-life, we found a clear correlation between the functional mRNA half-life and the ribosome spacing in the mRNA region approximately between codon 20 and codon 45. From this finding, we predicted that inserts of slowly translated codons before codon 20 or after codon 45 should shorten or prolong, respectively, the functional mRNA half-life by altering the ribosome density in the important region. These predictions were tested on eight new lacZ variants, and their experimentally determined mRNA half-lives all supported the model. We thus suggest that translation-rate-mediated differences in the spacing between ribosomes in this early coding region is a parameter that determines the mRNAs functional half-life. We present a model that is in accordance with many earlier observations and that allows a prediction of the functional half-life of a given mRNA sequence. PMID:21255584

  6. Phylogenetic relationships of the green alga Volvox carteri deduced from small-subunit ribosomal RNA comparisons.

    Rausch, H; Larsen, N; Schmitt, R

    1989-09-01

    The 1788-nucleotide sequence of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) coding region from the chlorophyte Volvox carteri was determined. The secondary structure bears features typical of the universal model of srRNA, including about 40 helices and a division into four domains. Phylogenetic relationships to 17 other eukaryotes, including two other chlorophytes, were explored by comparing srRNA sequences. Similarity values and the inspection of phylogenetic trees derived by distance matrix methods revealed a close relationship between V. carteri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results are consistent with the view that these Volvocales, and the third green alga, Nanochlorum eucaryotum, are more closely related to higher plants than to any other major eukaryotic group, but constitute a distinct lineage that has long been separated from the line leading to the higher plants. PMID:2506359

  7. Ribosomal pausing at a frameshifter RNA pseudoknot is sensitive to reading phase but shows little correlation with frameshift efficiency.

    Kontos, H; Napthine, S; Brierley, I

    2001-12-01

    Here we investigated ribosomal pausing at sites of programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, using translational elongation and ribosome heelprint assays. The site of pausing at the frameshift signal of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was determined and was consistent with an RNA pseudoknot-induced pause that placed the ribosomal P- and A-sites over the slippery sequence. Similarly, pausing at the simian retrovirus 1 gag/pol signal, which contains a different kind of frameshifter pseudoknot, also placed the ribosome over the slippery sequence, supporting a role for pausing in frameshifting. However, a simple correlation between pausing and frameshifting was lacking. Firstly, a stem-loop structure closely related to the IBV pseudoknot, although unable to stimulate efficient frameshifting, paused ribosomes to a similar extent and at the same place on the mRNA as a parental pseudoknot. Secondly, an identical pausing pattern was induced by two pseudoknots differing only by a single loop 2 nucleotide yet with different functionalities in frameshifting. The final observation arose from an assessment of the impact of reading phase on pausing. Given that ribosomes advance in triplet fashion, we tested whether the reading frame in which ribosomes encounter an RNA structure (the reading phase) would influence pausing. We found that the reading phase did influence pausing but unexpectedly, the mRNA with the pseudoknot in the phase which gave the least pausing was found to promote frameshifting more efficiently than the other variants. Overall, these experiments support the view that pausing alone is insufficient to mediate frameshifting and additional events are required. The phase dependence of pausing may be indicative of an activity in the ribosome that requires an optimal contact with mRNA secondary structures for efficient unwinding. PMID:11713298

  8. Exploring accessibility of structural elements of the mammalian 40S ribosomal mRNA entry channel at various steps of translation initiation.

    Sharifulin, Dmitri E; Bartuli, Yulia S; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Graifer, Dmitri M; Karpova, Galina G

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we studied how the accessibility of structural elements of the mammalian 40S ribosomal mRNA entry channel, ribosomal protein (rp) uS3 and helix (h) 16 of the 18S rRNA, changes upon the translation initiation. In particular, we examined the accessibility of rp uS3 for binding of unstructured RNAs and of riboses in h16 towards attack with benzoyl cyanide (BzCN) in complexes assembled in rabbit reticulocyte lysate utilizing synthetic oligoribonucleotides as well as full-length and truncated up to the initiation AUG codon hepatitis C virus IRES as model mRNAs. With both mRNA types, the rp uS3 peptide recognizing single-stranded RNAs was shown to become shielded only in those 48S preinitiation complexes (PICs) that contained eIF3j bound to 40S subunit in the area between the decoding site and the mRNA entry channel. Chemical probing with BzCN revealed that h16 in the 48S PICs containing eIF3j or scanning factor DHX29 is strongly shielded; the effect was observed with all the mRNAs used, and h16 remained protected as well in 80S post-initiation complexes lacking these factors. Altogether, the obtained results allowed us to suggest that eIF3j bound at the 48S PICs makes the rp uS3 inaccessible for binding of RNAs and this factor subunit is responsible for the decrease of h16 conformational flexibility; the latter is manifested as reduced accessibility of h16 to BzCN. Thus, our findings provide new insights into how eIF3j is implicated in ensuring the proper conformation of the mRNA entry channel, thereby facilitating mRNA loading. PMID:27346718

  9. The functional half-life of an mRNA depends on the ribosome spacing in an early coding region

    Pedersen, Margit; Nissen, Søren; Mitarai, Namiko;

    2011-01-01

    codons. When comparing the ribosome spacing at various segments of the mRNA to its functional half-life, we found a clear correlation between the functional mRNA half-life and the ribosome spacing in the mRNA region approximately between codon 20 and codon 45. From this finding, we predicted that inserts......Bacterial mRNAs are translated by closely spaced ribosomes and degraded from the 5'-end, with half-lives of around 2 min at 37 °C in most cases. Ribosome-free or "naked" mRNA is known to be readily degraded, but the initial event that inactivates the mRNA functionally has not been fully described....... Here, we characterize a determinant of the functional stability of an mRNA, which is located in the early coding region. Using literature values for the mRNA half-lives of variant lacZ mRNAs in Escherichia coli, we modeled how the ribosome spacing is affected by the translation rate of the individual...

  10. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium xiaoi in goat kids in Bangladesh by nested PCR amplification of 18S rRNA gene

    AMAM; Zonaed; Siddiki; Sohana; Akter; Mina; Zinat; Farzana; Bibi; Ayesa; Rasel; Das; Mohammad; Alamgir; Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp.in goat kids in selected areas of Bangladesh and to elucidate the potential zoonotic hazards.Methods:In the present study,we have used Ziehl-Neelsen staining and nested PCR approach to identify and characterize the Cryptosporidium sp.from diarrhoeic feces of goat kids.A total of 100 diarrhoeic feces samples were collected from Chittagong region in Southern Bangladesh.For nested PCR analysis,specific primers for amplification of 581 base pair fragments of 18 S rRNA gene were used.Results:A total of 15%and 3%samples were found positive in microscopic study and in nested PCR analysis respectively.Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data showed similarity with that of Cryptosporidium xiaoi recorded from sheep and goat.Conclusions:To our knowledge,this is the first report of Cryptosporidium xiaoi responsible for diarrhoea in goat kids in Bangladesh.Further study can highlight their zoonotic significance along with genetic diversity in other host species inside the country.

  11. Phylogeny and classification of the Litostomatea (Protista, Ciliophora), with emphasis on free-living taxa and the 18S rRNA gene.

    Vd'ačný, Peter; Bourland, William A; Orsi, William; Epstein, Slava S; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2011-05-01

    The class Litostomatea is a highly diverse ciliate taxon comprising hundreds of species ranging from aerobic, free-living predators to anaerobic endocommensals. This is traditionally reflected by classifying the Litostomatea into the subclasses Haptoria and Trichostomatia. The morphological classifications of the Haptoria conflict with the molecular phylogenies, which indicate polyphyly and numerous homoplasies. Thus, we analyzed the genealogy of 53 in-group species with morphological and molecular methods, including 12 new sequences from free-living taxa. The phylogenetic analyses and some strong morphological traits show: (i) body polarization and simplification of the oral apparatus as main evolutionary trends in the Litostomatea and (ii) three distinct lineages (subclasses): the Rhynchostomatia comprising Tracheliida and Dileptida; the Haptoria comprising Lacrymariida, Haptorida, Didiniida, Pleurostomatida and Spathidiida; and the Trichostomatia. The curious Homalozoon cannot be assigned to any of the haptorian orders, but is basal to a clade containing the Didiniida and Pleurostomatida. The internal relationships of the Spathidiida remain obscure because many of them and some "traditional" haptorids form separate branches within the basal polytomy of the order, indicating one or several radiations and convergent evolution. Due to the high divergence in the 18S rRNA gene, the chaeneids and cyclotrichiids are classified incertae sedis. PMID:21333743

  12. Human Ribosomal RNA-Derived Resident MicroRNAs as the Transmitter of Information upon the Cytoplasmic Cancer Stress

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of ribosome biogenesis induces divergent ribosome-related diseases including ribosomopathy and occasionally results in carcinogenesis. Although many defects in ribosome-related genes have been investigated, little is known about contribution of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome-related disorders. Meanwhile, microRNA (miRNA), an important regulator of gene expression, is derived from both coding and noncoding region of the genome and is implicated in various diseases. Therefore, we performed in silico analyses using M-fold, TargetScan, GeneCoDia3, and so forth to investigate RNA relationships between rRNA and miRNA against cellular stresses. We have previously shown that miRNA synergism is significantly correlated with disease and the miRNA package is implicated in memory for diseases; therefore, quantum Dynamic Nexus Score (DNS) was also calculated using MESer program. As a result, seventeen RNA sequences identical with known miRNAs were detected in the human rRNA and termed as rRNA-hosted miRNA analogs (rmiRNAs). Eleven of them were predicted to form stem-loop structures as pre-miRNAs, and especially one stem-loop was completely identical with hsa-pre-miR-3678 located in the non-rDNA region. Thus, these rmiRNAs showed significantly high DNS values, participation in regulation of cancer-related pathways, and interaction with nucleolar RNAs, suggesting that rmiRNAs may be stress-responsible resident miRNAs which transmit stress-tuning information in multiple levels.

  13. Human Ribosomal RNA-Derived Resident MicroRNAs as the Transmitter of Information upon the Cytoplasmic Cancer Stress.

    Yoshikawa, Masaru; Fujii, Yoichi Robertus

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of ribosome biogenesis induces divergent ribosome-related diseases including ribosomopathy and occasionally results in carcinogenesis. Although many defects in ribosome-related genes have been investigated, little is known about contribution of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome-related disorders. Meanwhile, microRNA (miRNA), an important regulator of gene expression, is derived from both coding and noncoding region of the genome and is implicated in various diseases. Therefore, we performed in silico analyses using M-fold, TargetScan, GeneCoDia3, and so forth to investigate RNA relationships between rRNA and miRNA against cellular stresses. We have previously shown that miRNA synergism is significantly correlated with disease and the miRNA package is implicated in memory for diseases; therefore, quantum Dynamic Nexus Score (DNS) was also calculated using MESer program. As a result, seventeen RNA sequences identical with known miRNAs were detected in the human rRNA and termed as rRNA-hosted miRNA analogs (rmiRNAs). Eleven of them were predicted to form stem-loop structures as pre-miRNAs, and especially one stem-loop was completely identical with hsa-pre-miR-3678 located in the non-rDNA region. Thus, these rmiRNAs showed significantly high DNS values, participation in regulation of cancer-related pathways, and interaction with nucleolar RNAs, suggesting that rmiRNAs may be stress-responsible resident miRNAs which transmit stress-tuning information in multiple levels. PMID:27517048

  14. Sequence and organization of 5S ribosomal RNA-encoding genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Campell, B R; Song, Y; Posch, T E; Cullis, C A; Town, C D

    1992-03-15

    We have isolated a genomic clone containing Arabidopsis thaliana 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding genes (rDNA) by screening an A. thaliana library with a 5S rDNA probe from flax. The clone isolated contains seven repeat units of 497 bp, plus 11 kb of flanking genomic sequence at one border. Sequencing of individual subcloned repeat units shows that the sequence of the 5S rRNA coding region is very similar to that reported for other flowering plants. Four A. thaliana ecotypes were found to contain approx. 1000 copies of 5S rDNA per haploid genome. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA indicates that 5S rDNA occurs in long tandem arrays, and shows the presence of numerous restriction-site polymorphisms among the six ecotypes studied. PMID:1348233

  15. A rapid and simple pipeline for synthesis of mRNA-ribosome-V(H)H complexes used in single-domain antibody ribosome display.

    Bencurova, Elena; Pulzova, Lucia; Flachbartova, Zuzana; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    The single-domain antibody (VHH) is a promising building block for a number of antibody-based applications. Ribosome display can successfully be used in the production of VHH. However, the construction of the expression cassette, confirmation of the translation and proper folding of the nascent chain, and the purification of the ribosome complexes, remain cumbersome tasks. Additionally, selection of the most suitable expression system can be challenging. We have designed primers that will amplify virtually all Camelidae VHH. With the help of a double-overlap extension (OE) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we have fused VHH with the F1 fragment (T7 promoter and species-independent translation sequence) and the F2 fragment (mCherry, Myc-tag, tether, SecM arrest sequence and 3' stem loop) to generate a full-length DNA cassette. OE-PCR generated fragments were incubated directly with cell-free lysates (Leishmania torentolae, rabbit reticulocyte or E. coli) for the synthesis of mRNA-VHH-mCherry-ribosome complexes in vitro. Alternatively, the cassette was ligated in pQE-30 vector and transformed into E. coli to produce ribosome complexes in vivo. The results showed that the same expression cassette could be used to synthesize ribosome complexes with different expression systems. mCherry reporter served to confirm the synthesis and proper folding of the nascent chain, Myc-tag was useful in the rapid purification of ribosome complexes, and combination of the SecM sequence and 3' stem loop made the cassette universal, both for cells-free and E. coli in vivo. This rapid and universal pipeline can effectively be used in antibody ribosome display and VHH production. PMID:25902394

  16. Epigenetic repression of ribosomal RNA transcription by ROCK-dependent aberrant cytoskeletal organization

    Wu, Tse-Hsiang; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis is regulated by cellular energy and proliferation status. In this study, we investigated rRNA gene transcription in response to cytoskeletal stress. Our data revealed that the cell shape constrained by isotropic but not elongated micropatterns in HeLa cells led to a significant reduction in rRNA transcription dependent on ROCK. Expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK also repressed rRNA transcription. Isotropic constraint and ROCK over-activation led to different types of aberrant F-actin organization, but their suppression effects on rRNA transcription were similarly reversed by inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) or overexpression of a dominant negative form of Nesprin, which shields the signal transmitted from actin filament to the nuclear interior. We further showed that the binding of HDAC1 to the active fraction of rDNA genes is increased by ROCK over-activation, thus reducing H3K9/14 acetylation and suppressing transcription. Our results demonstrate an epigenetic control of active rDNA genes that represses rRNA transcription in response to the cytoskeletal stress. PMID:27350000

  17. An approach to analyse the specific impact of rapamycin on mRNA-ribosome association

    Jaquier-Gubler Pascale

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work, using both cell culture model systems and tumour derived cell lines, suggests that the differential recruitment into polysomes of mRNA populations may be sufficient to initiate and maintain tumour formation. Consequently, a major effort is underway to use high density microarray profiles to establish molecular fingerprints for cells exposed to defined drug regimes. The aim of these pharmacogenomic approaches is to provide new information on how drugs can impact on the translational read-out within a defined cellular background. Methods We describe an approach that permits the analysis of de-novo mRNA-ribosome association in-vivo during short drug exposures. It combines hypertonic shock, polysome fractionation and high-throughput analysis to provide a molecular phenotype of translationally responsive transcripts. Compared to previous translational profiling studies, the procedure offers increased specificity due to the elimination of the drugs secondary effects (e.g. on the transcriptional read-out. For this pilot "proof-of-principle" assay we selected the drug rapamycin because of its extensively studied impact on translation initiation. Results High throughput analysis on both the light and heavy polysomal fractions has identified mRNAs whose re-recruitment onto free ribosomes responded to short exposure to the drug rapamycin. The results of the microarray have been confirmed using real-time RT-PCR. The selective down-regulation of TOP transcripts is also consistent with previous translational profiling studies using this drug. Conclusion The technical advance outlined in this manuscript offers the possibility of new insights into mRNA features that impact on translation initiation and provides a molecular fingerprint for transcript-ribosome association in any cell type and in the presence of a range of drugs of interest. Such molecular phenotypes defined pre-clinically may ultimately impact on the evaluation of

  18. Mechanical insights into ribosomal progression overcoming RNA G-quadruplex from periodical translation suppression in cells

    Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    G-quadruplexes formed on DNA and RNA can be roadblocks to movement of polymerases and ribosome on template nucleotides. Although folding and unfolding processes of the G-quadruplexes are deliberately studied in vitro, how the mechanical and physical properties of the G-quadruplexes affect intracellular biological systems is still unclear. In this study, mRNAs with G-quadruplex forming sequences located either in the 5‧ untranslated region (UTR) or in the open reading frame (ORF) were constructed to evaluate positional effects of the G-quadruplex on translation suppression in cells. Periodic fluctuation of translation suppression was observed at every three nucleotides within the ORF but not within the 5‧ UTR. The results suggested that difference in motion of ribosome at the 5‧ UTR and the ORF determined the ability of the G-quadruplex structure to act as a roadblock to translation in cells and provided mechanical insights into ribosomal progression to overcome the roadblock.

  19. The trypanosome Pumilio-domain protein PUF7 associates with a nuclear cyclophilin and is involved in ribosomal RNA maturation.

    Droll, Dorothea; Archer, Stuart; Fenn, Katelyn; Delhi, Praveen; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2010-03-19

    Proteins with Pumilio RNA binding domains (Puf proteins) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Some Puf proteins bind to the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, acting to repress translation and promote degradation; others are involved in ribosomal RNA maturation. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei encodes eleven Puf proteins whose function cannot be predicted by sequence analysis. We show here that epitope-tagged TbPUF7 is located in the nucleolus, and associated with a nuclear cyclophilin-like protein, TbNCP1. RNAi targeting PUF7 reduced trypanosome growth and inhibited two steps in ribosomal RNA processing. PMID:20153321

  20. 河南猪株旋毛虫18S rRNA基因的同源性序列分析%18S rRNA sequence analysis and construction of phylogenetic tree of Trichinella from swine in Henan Province

    王丽娜; 路国兵; 杨晓东; 高云; 陈晓宁

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过分析18S rRNA基因序列同源性,对河南猪株旋毛虫进行分子鉴定及分类. 方法 收集河南猪株旋毛虫成虫,提取总RNA,反转录合成cDNA,经特异引物扩增获得18S rRNA基因片段.将此目的基因与pMD18-T载体连接,转化大肠埃希菌感受态细胞,阳性克隆经PCR及酶切鉴定后进行序列测定及分析,构建系统发育树. 结果 构建的重组质粒酶切片段大小分别为2 700和1 800 bp,与预期值相符.根据18S rRNA碱基序列构建系统发生树,河南猪株旋毛虫与虫株Trichinella nativa (AY487254.1)的亲缘关系较近,同源性为99.1%. 结论 河南猪株旋毛虫归属于T2.%Objective To identify and classify Trichinella from swine in Henan Province at the molecular level by sequence homology analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. Methods Total RNA was extracted from adult Trichinella collected from swine in Henan. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription. The 18S rRNA gene was amplified with a specific primer. The fragments of PCR products were ligated to pMD18-T. This was then transformed into E. Coli competent cells. After identification by PCR and restrictive endonuclease digestion, the positive clone was sequenced and analyzed and then a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Results The fragments of the constructed recombinant plasmid were a-bout 2 700 bp and 1 800 bp, which were consistent with expected values. In the phylogenetic tree based on the base sequence of the 18S rRNA gene, Trichinella from swine in Henan Province was the closest relative to T. Nativa (AY487254. 1) with sequence similarity of more than 99. 1%. Conclusion Trichinella from swine in Henan Province was Trichinella nativa (T2).

  1. Sequence and Taxonomy Analysis of Arctium lappa 18S rRNA Gene%牛蒡18S核糖体RNA基因分析和分类学研究

    蔡侃; 孔文刚; 夏红剑; 侯进慧

    2011-01-01

    Arctium lappa 18S rRNA gene was amplified,and a 1636bp DNA were sequenced with its Genbank accession number JF509958.The gene sequence of Arctium lappa 18Sr RNA was analyzed with related species in GenBank.The result shows,Arctium lappa 18S rRNA gene has a high homology with many families within Dicotyledoneae,such as Asteraceae and Caprifoliaceae.This study provides reference for further study of Arctium lappa in molecular level.%扩增牛蒡18S rRNA基因,测序获得1 636bp的DNA序列,GenBank登录号是JF703098。利用牛蒡18S rDNA序列和GenBank相关序列构建系统发育树,结果表明,牛蒡18S rRNA基因与双子叶纲的菊科、忍冬科的一些物种序列相似度高。对在分子水平上牛蒡的研究提供了资料。

  2. The nucleotide sequence of 4.5S ribosomal RNA from tobacco chloroplasts.

    Takaiwa, F; Sugiura, M

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of tobacco chloroplast 4.5S ribosomal RNA has been determined to be: OHG-A-A-G-G-U-C-A-C-G-G-C-G-A-G-A-C-G-A-G-C-C-G-U-U-U-A-U-C-A-U-U-A-C-G-A-U-A-G-G-U-G-U-C-A-A-G-U-G-G-A-A-G-U-G-C-A-G-U-G-A-U-G-U-A-U-G-C-(G-A)-C-U-G-A-G-G-C-A-U-C-C-U-A-A-C-A-G-A-C-C-G-G-U-A-G-A-C-U-U-G-A-A-COH. The 4.5S RNA is 103 nucleotides long and its 5'-terminus is not phosphorylated.

  3. Selection of mRNA 5'-untranslated region sequence with high translation efficiency through ribosome display

    The 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of mRNAs functions as a translation enhancer, promoting translation efficiency. Many in vitro translation systems exhibit a reduced efficiency in protein translation due to decreased translation initiation. The use of a 5'-UTR sequence with high translation efficiency greatly enhances protein production in these systems. In this study, we have developed an in vitro selection system that favors 5'-UTRs with high translation efficiency using a ribosome display technique. A 5'-UTR random library, comprised of 5'-UTRs tagged with a His-tag and Renilla luciferase (R-luc) fusion, were in vitro translated in rabbit reticulocytes. By limiting the translation period, only mRNAs with high translation efficiency were translated. During translation, mRNA, ribosome and translated R-luc with His-tag formed ternary complexes. They were collected with translated His-tag using Ni-particles. Extracted mRNA from ternary complex was amplified using RT-PCR and sequenced. Finally, 5'-UTR with high translation efficiency was obtained from random 5'-UTR library

  4. Label- and amplification-free electrochemical detection of bacterial ribosomal RNA.

    Henihan, Grace; Schulze, Holger; Corrigan, Damion K; Giraud, Gerard; Terry, Jonathan G; Hardie, Alison; Campbell, Colin J; Walton, Anthony J; Crain, Jason; Pethig, Ronald; Templeton, Kate E; Mount, Andrew R; Bachmann, Till T

    2016-07-15

    Current approaches to molecular diagnostics rely heavily on PCR amplification and optical detection methods which have restrictions when applied to point of care (POC) applications. Herein we describe the development of a label-free and amplification-free method of pathogen detection applied to Escherichia coli which overcomes the bottleneck of complex sample preparation and has the potential to be implemented as a rapid, cost effective test suitable for point of care use. Ribosomal RNA is naturally amplified in bacterial cells, which makes it a promising target for sensitive detection without the necessity for prior in vitro amplification. Using fluorescent microarray methods with rRNA targets from a range of pathogens, an optimal probe was selected from a pool of probe candidates identified in silico. The specificity of probes was investigated on DNA microarray using fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA target. The probe yielding highest specificity performance was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and a LOD of 20 pM was achieved on fluorescent glass microarray. This probe was transferred to an EIS end point format and specificity which correlated to microarray data was demonstrated. Excellent sensitivity was facilitated by the use of uncharged PNA probes and large 16S rRNA target and investigations resulted in an LOD of 50 pM. An alternative kinetic EIS assay format was demonstrated with which rRNA could be detected in a species specific manner within 10-40min at room temperature without wash steps. PMID:27016627

  5. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

  6. The ribosome triggers the stringent response by RelA via a highly distorted tRNA.

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Fernández, Israel S; Kelley, Ann C; Cartón, David Gil; Ramakrishnan, Venki; Valle, Mikel

    2013-09-01

    The bacterial stringent response links nutrient starvation with the transcriptional control of genes. This process is initiated by the stringent factor RelA, which senses the presence of deacylated tRNA in the ribosome as a symptom of amino-acid starvation to synthesize the alarmone (p)ppGpp. Here we report a cryo-EM study of RelA bound to ribosomes bearing cognate, deacylated tRNA in the A-site. The data show that RelA on the ribosome stabilizes an unusual distorted form of the tRNA, with the acceptor arm making contact with RelA and far from its normal location in the peptidyl transferase centre. PMID:23877429

  7. Phylogenetic evidence for the acquisition of ribosomal RNA introns subsequent to the divergence of some of the major Tetrahymena groups

    Sogin, M L; Ingold, A; Karlok, M;

    1986-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of a self-splicing intron in the large subunit ribosomal RNA coding region in some strains of the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena. Sequence comparisons of the intron regions from six Tetrahymena species showed these to fall into three homology groups. In an...... attempt to evaluate the evolutionary origins of the intervening sequences, we have now determined complete small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences from 13 species of Tetrahymena and the absolute number of nucleotide differences between the sequences was used to construct a phylogenetic tree. This...

  8. Slow formation of stable complexes during coincubation of a minimal rRNA and ribosomal protein S4

    Mayerle, Megan; Bellur, Deepti L.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S4 binds and stabilizes a five-helix junction in the 5’ domain of the 16S rRNA, and is one of two proteins responsible for nucleating 30S ribosome assembly. Upon binding, both protein S4 and the five-helix junction reorganize their structures. We show that labile S4 complexes rearrange to stable complexes within a few minutes at 42°C, with longer coincubation leading to an increased population of stable complexes. In contrast, prefolding the rRNA has a smaller effect on stab...

  9. Model of EF4-induced ribosomal state transitions and mRNA translocation

    EF4, a highly conserved protein present in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts, can bind to both the posttranslocation and pretranslocation ribosomal complexes. When binding to the posttranslocation state, it catalyzes backward translocation to a pretranslocation state. When binding to the pretranslocation state, it catalyzes transition to another pretranslocation state that is similar and possibly identical to that resulting from the posttranslocation state bound by EF4, and competes with EF-G to regulate the elongation cycle. However, the molecular mechanism on how EF4 induces state transitions and mRNA translocation remains unclear. Here, we present both the model for state transitions induced by EF4 binding to the posttranslocation state and that by EF4 binding to the pretranslocation state, based on which we study the kinetics of EF4-induced state transitions and mRNA translocation, giving quantitative explanations of the available experimental data. Moreover, we present some predicted results on state transitions and mRNA translocation induced by EF4 binding to the pretranslocation state complexed with the mRNA containing a duplex region. (paper)

  10. The human insulin receptor mRNA contains a functional internal ribosome entry segment

    Spriggs, Keith A.; Cobbold, Laura C.; Ridley, Simon H.; Coldwell, Mark; Bottley, Andrew; Bushell, Martin; Willis, Anne E.; Siddle, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation is an important mechanism determining the level of expression of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Translation is most commonly initiated by cap-dependent scanning, but many eukaryotic mRNAs contain internal ribosome entry segments (IRESs), providing an alternative means of initiation capable of independent regulation. Here, we show by using dicistronic luciferase reporter vectors that the 5′-UTR of the mRNA encoding human insulin receptor (hIR) contains a functional IRES. RNAi-mediated knockdown showed that the protein PTB was required for maximum IRES activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that PTB1, PTB2 and nPTB, but not unr or PTB4, bound to hIR mRNA, and deletion mapping implicated a CCU motif 448 nt upstream of the initiator AUG in PTB binding. The IR-IRES was functional in a number of cell lines, and most active in cells of neuronal origin, as assessed by luciferase reporter assays. The IRES was more active in confluent than sub-confluent cells, but activity did not change during differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes. IRES activity was stimulated by insulin in sub-confluent cells. The IRES may function to maintain expression of IR protein in tissues such as the brain where mRNA translation by cap-dependent scanning is less effective. PMID:19654240

  11. One step engineering of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Kannan, Krishna; Tsvetanova, Billyana; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Noskov, Vladimir N; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Ma, Li; Hutchison Iii, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Glass, John I; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J Craig; Gibson, Daniel G

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are indispensable for the study of fundamental molecular biology processes due to their relatively simple gene and genome architecture. The ability to engineer bacterial chromosomes is quintessential for understanding gene functions. Here we demonstrate the engineering of the small-ribosomal subunit (16S) RNA of Mycoplasma mycoides, by combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and the yeast recombination machinery. We cloned the entire genome of M. mycoides in yeast and used constitutively expressed Cas9 together with in vitro transcribed guide-RNAs to introduce engineered 16S rRNA genes. By testing the function of the engineered 16S rRNA genes through genome transplantation, we observed surprising resilience of this gene to addition of genetic elements or helix substitutions with phylogenetically-distant bacteria. While this system could be further used to study the function of the 16S rRNA, one could envision the "simple" M. mycoides genome being used in this setting to study other genetic structures and functions to answer fundamental questions of life. PMID:27489041

  12. One step engineering of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA using CRISPR/Cas9

    Kannan, Krishna; Tsvetanova, Billyana; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Ma, Li; Hutchison III, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J. Craig; Gibson, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are indispensable for the study of fundamental molecular biology processes due to their relatively simple gene and genome architecture. The ability to engineer bacterial chromosomes is quintessential for understanding gene functions. Here we demonstrate the engineering of the small-ribosomal subunit (16S) RNA of Mycoplasma mycoides, by combining the CRISPR/Cas9 system and the yeast recombination machinery. We cloned the entire genome of M. mycoides in yeast and used constitutively expressed Cas9 together with in vitro transcribed guide-RNAs to introduce engineered 16S rRNA genes. By testing the function of the engineered 16S rRNA genes through genome transplantation, we observed surprising resilience of this gene to addition of genetic elements or helix substitutions with phylogenetically-distant bacteria. While this system could be further used to study the function of the 16S rRNA, one could envision the “simple” M. mycoides genome being used in this setting to study other genetic structures and functions to answer fundamental questions of life. PMID:27489041

  13. Regulation of ribosomal RNA expression across the lifespan is fine-tuned by maternal diet before implantation.

    Denisenko, Oleg; Lucas, Emma S; Sun, Congshan; Watkins, Adam J; Mar, Daniel; Bomsztyk, Karol; Fleming, Tom P

    2016-07-01

    Cells and organisms respond to nutrient deprivation by decreasing global rates of transcription, translation and DNA replication. To what extent such changes can be reversed is largely unknown. We examined the effect of maternal dietary restriction on RNA synthesis in the offspring. Low protein diet fed either throughout gestation or for the preimplantation period alone reduced cellular RNA content across fetal somatic tissues during challenge and increased it beyond controls in fetal and adult tissues after challenge release. Changes in transcription of ribosomal RNA, the major component of cellular RNA, were responsible for this phenotype as evidenced by matching alterations in RNA polymerase I density and DNA methylation at ribosomal DNA loci. Cellular levels of the ribosomal transcription factor Rrn3 mirrored the rRNA expression pattern. In cell culture experiments, Rrn3 overexpression reduced rDNA methylation and increased rRNA expression; the converse occurred after inhibition of Rrn3 activity. These observations define novel mechanism where poor nutrition before implantation irreversibly alters basal rates of rRNA transcription thereafter in a process mediated by rDNA methylation and Rrn3 factor. PMID:27060415

  14. Low levels of ribosomal RNA partly account for the very high photosynthetic phosphorus-use efficiency of Proteaceae species.

    Sulpice, Ronan; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Schlereth, Armin; Cawthray, Gregory R; Encke, Beatrice; Giavalisco, Patrick; Ivakov, Alexander; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Jost, Ricarda; Krohn, Nicole; Kuo, John; Laliberté, Etienne; Pearse, Stuart J; Raven, John A; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Teste, François; Veneklaas, Erik J; Stitt, Mark; Lambers, Hans

    2014-06-01

    Proteaceae species in south-western Australia occur on phosphorus- (P) impoverished soils. Their leaves contain very low P levels, but have relatively high rates of photosynthesis. We measured ribosomal RNA (rRNA) abundance, soluble protein, activities of several enzymes and glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) levels in expanding and mature leaves of six Proteaceae species in their natural habitat. The results were compared with those for Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared with A. thaliana, immature leaves of Proteaceae species contained very low levels of rRNA, especially plastidic rRNA. Proteaceae species showed slow development of the photosynthetic apparatus (‘delayed greening’), with young leaves having very low levels of chlorophyll and Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes. In mature leaves, soluble protein and Calvin-Benson cycle enzyme activities were low, but Glc6P levels were similar to those in A. thaliana. We propose that low ribosome abundance contributes to the high P efficiency of these Proteaceae species in three ways: (1) less P is invested in ribosomes; (2) the rate of growth and, hence, demand for P is low; and (3) the especially low plastidic ribosome abundance in young leaves delays formation of the photosynthetic machinery, spreading investment of P in rRNA. Although Calvin-Benson cycle enzyme activities are low, Glc6P levels are maintained, allowing their effective use. PMID:24895754

  15. Purification and properties of new ribosome-inactivating proteins with RNA N-glycosidase activity.

    Bolognesi, A; Barbieri, L; Abbondanza, A; Falasca, A I; Carnicelli, D; Battelli, M G; Stirpe, F

    1990-11-30

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) similar to those already known (Stirpe & Barbieri (1986) FEBS Lett. 195, 1-8) were purified from the seeds of Asparagus officinalis (two proteins, asparin 1 and 2), of Citrullus colocynthis (two proteins, colocin 1 and 2), of Lychnis chalcedonica (lychnin) and of Manihot palmata (mapalmin), from the roots of Phytolacca americana (pokeweed antiviral protein from roots, PAP-R) and from the leaves of Bryonia dioica (bryodin-L). The two latter proteins can be considered as isoforms, respectively, of previously purified PAP, from the leaves of P. americana, and of bryodin-R, from the roots of B. dioica. All proteins have an Mr at approx, 30,000, and an alkaline isoelectric point. Bryodin-L, colocins, lychnin and mapalmin are glycoproteins. All RIPs inhibit protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate and phenylalanine polymerization by isolated ribosomes and alter rRNA in a similar manner as the A-chain of ricin and related toxins (Endo et al. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 5908-5912). PMID:2248976

  16. Biodiversity characterization of cellulolytic bacteria present on native Chaco soil by comparison of ribosomal RNA genes.

    Talia, Paola; Sede, Silvana M; Campos, Eleonora; Rorig, Marcela; Principi, Dario; Tosto, Daniela; Hopp, H Esteban; Grasso, Daniel; Cataldi, Angel

    2012-04-01

    Sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was used to study bacterial diversity of a pristine forest soil and of two cultures of the same soil enriched with cellulolytic bacteria. Our analysis revealed high bacterial diversity in the native soil sample, evidencing at least 10 phyla, in which Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria accounted for more than 76% of all sequences. In both enriched samples, members of Proteobacteria were the most frequently represented. The majority of bacterial genera in both enriched samples were identified as Brevundimonas and Caulobacter, but members of Devosia, Sphingomonas, Variovorax, Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter and Delftia were also found. In addition, it was possible to identify cellulolytic taxa such as Acidothermus, Micromonospora, Streptomyces, Paenibacillus and Pseudomonas, which indicates that this ecosystem could be an attractive source for study of novel enzymes for cellulose degradation. PMID:22202170

  17. Competing pathways control host resistance to virus via tRNA modification and programmed ribosomal frameshifting.

    Maynard, Nathaniel D; Macklin, Derek N; Kirkegaard, Karla; Covert, Markus W

    2012-01-01

    Viral infection depends on a complex interplay between host and viral factors. Here, we link host susceptibility to viral infection to a network encompassing sulfur metabolism, tRNA modification, competitive binding, and programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF). We first demonstrate that the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway in Escherichia coli exerts a protective effect during lambda phage infection, while a tRNA thiolation pathway enhances viral infection. We show that tRNA(Lys) uridine 34 modification inhibits PRF to influence the ratio of lambda phage proteins gpG and gpGT. Computational modeling and experiments suggest that the role of the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway in infection is indirect, via competitive binding of the shared sulfur donor IscS. Based on the universality of many key components of this network, in both the host and the virus, we anticipate that these findings may have broad relevance to understanding other infections, including viral infection of humans. PMID:22294093

  18. [Characterization of Black and Dichothrix Cyanobacteria Based on the 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    Ortega, Maya

    2010-01-01

    My project focuses on characterizing different cyanobacteria in thrombolitic mats found on the island of Highborn Cay, Bahamas. Thrombolites are interesting ecosystems because of the ability of bacteria in these mats to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and mineralize it as calcium carbonate. In the future they may be used as models to develop carbon sequestration technologies, which could be used as part of regenerative life systems in space. These thrombolitic communities are also significant because of their similarities to early communities of life on Earth. I targeted two cyanobacteria in my research, Dichothrix spp. and whatever black is, since they are believed to be important to carbon sequestration in these thrombolitic mats. The goal of my summer research project was to molecularly identify these two cyanobacteria. DNA was isolated from each organism through mat dissections and DNA extractions. I ran Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) to amplify the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene in each cyanobacteria. This specific gene is found in almost all bacteria and is highly conserved, meaning any changes in the sequence are most likely due to evolution. As a result, the 16S rRNA gene can be used for bacterial identification of different species based on the sequence of their 16S rRNA gene. Since the exact sequence of the Dichothrix gene was unknown, I designed different primers that flanked the gene based on the known sequences from other taxonomically similar cyanobacteria. Once the 16S rRNA gene was amplified, I cloned the gene into specialized Escherichia coli cells and sent the gene products for sequencing. Once the sequence is obtained, it will be added to a genetic database for future reference to and classification of other Dichothrix sp.

  19. The ribosome triggers the stringent response by RelA via a highly distorted tRNA

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Fernández, Israel S.; Kelley, Ann C.; Cartón, David Gil; Ramakrishnan, Venki; Valle, Mikel

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is initiated by RelA and links nutrient starvation with the transcriptional control of genes. Cryo-EM now shows that RelA on the ribosome stabilizes an unusual distorted form of cognate, deacylated tRNA.

  20. Evidence for functional interaction between domains II and V of 23S ribosomal RNA from an erythromycin-resistant mutant

    Douthwaite, S; Prince, J B; Noller, H F

    1985-01-01

    A mutation affording low levels of erythromycin resistance has been obtained by in vitro hydroxylamine mutagenesis of a cloned ribosomal RNA operon from Escherichia coli. The site of the mutational event responsible for antibiotic resistance was localized to the gene region encoding domain II of ...

  1. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  2. The trypanosome Pumilio-domain protein PUF7 associates with a nuclear cyclophilin and is involved in ribosomal RNA maturation

    Droll, Dorothea; Archer, Stuart; Fenn, Katelyn; Delhi, Praveen; Matthews, Keith; Clayton, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with Pumilio RNA binding domains (Puf proteins) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Some Puf proteins bind to the 3′-untranslated regions of mRNAs, acting to repress translation and promote degradation; others are involved in ribosomal RNA maturation. The genome of Trypanosoma brucei encodes eleven Puf proteins whose function cannot be predicted by sequence analysis. We show here that epitope-tagged TbPUF7 is located in the nucleolus, and associated with a nuclear cyclophilin-like protein,...

  3. Global shape mimicry of tRNA within a viral internal ribosome entry site mediates translational reading frame selection

    Au, Hilda H.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Mouzakis, Kathryn D.; Ren, Qian; Burke, Jordan E.; Lee, Seonghoon; Butcher, Samuel E.; Jan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Viruses use alternate mechanisms to increase the coding capacity of their viral genomes. The dicistrovirus intergenic region internal ribosome entry site (IRES) adopts an RNA structure that can direct translation in 0 and +1 reading frames to produce the viral structural proteins and an overlapping ORFx product. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that the PKI domain of the IRES mimics a complete tRNA-like structure to facilitate reading frame selection and allows the viral IR...

  4. Direct relationship between the level of p53 stabilization induced by rRNA synthesis-inhibiting drugs and the cell ribosome biogenesis rate.

    Scala, F; Brighenti, E; Govoni, M; Imbrogno, E; Fornari, F; Treré, D; Montanaro, L; Derenzini, M

    2016-02-25

    Many drugs currently used in chemotherapy work by hindering the process of ribosome biogenesis. In tumors with functional p53, the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis may contribute to the efficacy of this treatment by inducing p53 stabilization. As the level of stabilized p53 is critical for the induction of cytotoxic effects, it seems useful to highlight those cancer cell characteristics that can predict the degree of p53 stabilization following the treatment with inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis. In the present study we exposed a series of p53 wild-type human cancer cell lines to drugs such as actinomycin D (ActD), doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and CX-5461, which hinder ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis. We found that the amount of stabilized p53 was directly related to the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells before the drug treatment. This was due to different levels of inactivation of the ribosomal proteins-MDM2 pathway of p53 digestion. Inhibition of rRNA synthesis always caused cell cycle arrest, independent of the ribosome biogenesis rate of the cells, whereas apoptosis occurred only in cells with a high rDNA transcription rate. The level of p53 stabilization induced by drugs acting in different ways from the inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, such as hydroxyurea (HU) and nutlin-3, was independent of the level of ribosome biogenesis in cells and always lower than that occurring after the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. Interestingly, in cells with a low ribosome biogenesis rate, the combined treatment with ActD and HU exerted an additive effect on p53 stabilization. These results indicated that (i) drugs inhibiting ribosome biogenesis may be highly effective in p53 wild-type cancers with a high ribosome biogenesis rate, as they induce apoptotic cell death, and (ii) the combination of drugs capable of stabilizing p53 through different mechanisms may be useful for treating cancers with a low ribosome biogenesis rate. PMID:25961931

  5. A mutation in the 530 loop of Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal RNA causes resistance to streptomycin.

    Melançon, P; Lemieux, C; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1988-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce an A to C transversion at position 523 in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Escherichia coli rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. E. coli cells transformed with the mutated plasmid were resistant to streptomycin. The mutated ribosomes isolated from these cells were not stimulated by streptomycin to misread the message in a poly(U)-directed assay. They were also restrictive to the stimulation of misreading by other error-promoting relate...

  6. Chromosomal organization of the ribosomal RNA genes in the genus Chironomus (Diptera, Chironomidae

    Larisa Gunderina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal localization of ribosomal RNA coding genes has been studied by using FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization in 21 species from the genus Chironomus Meigen, 1803. Analysis of the data has shown intra- and interspecific variation in number and location of 5.8S rDNA hybridization sites in 17 species from the subgenus Chironomus and 4 species from the subgenus Camptochironomus Kieffer, 1914. In the majority of studied species the location of rDNA sites coincided with the sites where active NORs (nucleolus organizer regions were found. The number of hybridization sites in karyotypes of studied chironomids varied from 1 to 6. More than half of the species possessed only one NOR (12 out of 21. Two rDNA hybridization sites were found in karyotypes of five species, three – in two species, and five and six sites – in one species each. NORs were found in all chromosomal arms of species from the subgenus Chironomus with one of them always located on arm G. On the other hand, no hybridization sites were found on arm G in four studied species from the subgenus Camptochironomus. Two species from the subgenus Chironomus – Ch. balatonicus Devai, Wuelker & Scholl, 1983 and Ch. “annularius” sensu Strenzke, 1959 – showed intraspecific variability in the number of hybridization signals. Possible mechanisms of origin of variability in number and location of rRNA genes in the karyotypes of species from the genus Chironomus are discussed.

  7. 8-Methoxypsoralen DNA interstrand cross-linking of the ribosomal RNA genes in Tetrahymena thermophila. Distribution, repair and effect on rRNA synthesis

    Fengquin, X; Nielsen, Henrik; Zhen, W;

    1993-01-01

    The distribution and repair of 8-methoxypsoralen-DNA interstrand cross-links in the ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) in Tetrahymena thermophila have been studied in vivo by Southern blot analysis. It is found that the cross-links at a density of < or = 1/2 x 10(4) base pairs (bp) are distributed equall...

  8. 多浆旱生植物霸王18SrRNA基因的克隆及序列分析%Cloning and sequence analysis of 18S rRNA gene fragment from succulent xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum

    胡静; 谢俊仁; 王锁民

    2012-01-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between succulent xerophyte Zygophyllum xanthoxylum and other plants and to provide evidences for the biologically evolution, total DNA was extracted from leaves of Z. xanthoxylurn seedlings, and the 18S rRNA gene was cloned by PCR using general primers and cloned into pGEM-T vector. The positive clone identified by PCR was sequenced. The sequencing result revealed that the 18S rRNA gene fragment from Z. xanthoxylum contains 1808 bp. Homology comparison with other plants 18S rRNA gene sequences in the GenBank showed that it shared over 96% nucleotide sequence homology, so it is concluded that 18S rRNA is very conservative gene in plants. However, Homology matrix and Blast showed that Z. xanthoxylurn shared high similarity (98%) with the identified 18S rRNA in Galearia fili formis , Cnidoscolus aconiti folius and Hevea brasiliensis. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that Z. xanthoxylum and Panax notoginseng were most consanguineously grouped.%为探讨多浆旱生植物霸王(Zygophyllum xanthoxylum)的生物进化历程及与其他植物的亲缘关系,本研究以霸王叶基因组DNA为模板,使用通用引物扩增其18SrRNA基因片段,并克隆到pGEM—T载体,阳性克隆经鉴定后进行测序。核苷酸序列分析结果表明,该片段长1808bp,所得序列与GenBank中注册的18SrRNA基因序列的同源性均在96%以上。可见,高等植物18SrRNA的基因非常保守。同源性分析与Blast比较结果表明,霸王与小盘木(Galearia filiformis)、驱虫苋(Cnidoscolus aconitifolius)及橡胶树(Herera brasiliensis)同源性最高。系统进化树分析表明,霸王与三七(Panax notoginseng)的亲缘关系最近。

  9. Designed Regular Tetragon-Shaped RNA-Protein Complexes with Ribosomal Protein L1 for Bionanotechnology and Synthetic Biology.

    Ohno, Hirohisa; Inoue, Tan

    2015-05-26

    RNA nanotechnology has been established by employing the molecular architecture of RNA structural motifs. Here, we report two designed RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) composed of ribosomal protein L1 (RPL1) and its RNA-binding motif that are square-shaped nano-objects. The formation and the shape of the objects were confirmed by gel electrophoresis analysis and atomic force microscopy, respectively. Any protein can be attached to the RNA via a fusion protein with RPL1, indicating that it can be used as a scaffold for loading a variety of functional proteins or for building higher-order structures. In summary, the RNP object will serve as a useful tool in the fields of bionanotechnology and synthetic biology. Moreover, the RNP interaction enhances the RNA stability against nucleases, rendering these complexes stable in cells. PMID:25933202

  10. Engineering the rRNA decoding site of eukaryotic cytosolic ribosomes in bacteria

    Hobbie, S N; Kalapala, S K; Akshay, S.; Bruell, C M; S. Schmidt; Dabow, S; Vasella, A; Sander, P; Böttger, E C

    2007-01-01

    Structural and genetic studies on prokaryotic ribosomes have provided important insights into fundamental aspects of protein synthesis and translational control and its interaction with ribosomal drugs. Comparable mechanistic studies in eukaryotes are mainly hampered by the absence of both high-resolution crystal structures and efficient genetic models. To study the interaction of aminoglycoside antibiotics with selected eukaryotic ribosomes, we replaced the bacterial drug binding site in 16S...

  11. A phylogeny of the Passerida (Aves:Passeriformes) based on mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene

    Lina Wu; Yanfeng Sun; Juyong Li; Yaqing Li; Yuefeng Wu; and Dongming Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Passerida is the largest avian radiation within the order Passeriformes. Current understanding of the high-level relationships within Passerida is based on DNA–DNA hybridizations;however, the phylogenetic relationships within this assemblage have been the subject of many debates. Methods:We analyzed the 12S ribosomal RNA gene from 49 species of Passerida, representing 14 currently recognized families, to outline the phylogenetic relationships within this group. Results:Our results identified the monophyly of the three superfamilies in Passerida:Sylvioidea, Muscicapoidea and Passeroidea. However, current delimitation of some species is at variance with our phylogeny estimate. First, the Parus major, which had been placed as a distinct clade sister to Sylvioidea was identified as a member of the super family;second, the genus Regulus was united with the Sturnidae and nested in the Muscicapoidea clade instead of being a clade of Passerida. Conclusion:Our results were consistent with Johansson’s study of the three superfamilies except for the al ocation of two families, Paridae and Regulidae.

  12. Cyanobacterial ribosomal RNA genes with multiple, endonuclease-encoding group I introns

    Turner Seán

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group I introns are one of the four major classes of introns as defined by their distinct splicing mechanisms. Because they catalyze their own removal from precursor transcripts, group I introns are referred to as autocatalytic introns. Group I introns are common in fungal and protist nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and in organellar genomes. In contrast, they are rare in all other organisms and genomes, including bacteria. Results Here we report five group I introns, each containing a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene (HEG, in large subunit (LSU rRNA genes of cyanobacteria. Three of the introns are located in the LSU gene of Synechococcus sp. C9, and the other two are in the LSU gene of Synechococcus lividus strain C1. Phylogenetic analyses show that these introns and their HEGs are closely related to introns and HEGs located at homologous insertion sites in organellar and bacterial rDNA genes. We also present a compilation of group I introns with homing endonuclease genes in bacteria. Conclusion We have discovered multiple HEG-containing group I introns in a single bacterial gene. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of multiple group I introns in the same bacterial gene (multiple group I introns have been reported in at least one phage gene and one prophage gene. The HEGs each contain one copy of the LAGLIDADG motif and presumably function as homodimers. Phylogenetic analysis, in conjunction with their patchy taxonomic distribution, suggests that these intron-HEG elements have been transferred horizontally among organelles and bacteria. However, the mode of transfer and the nature of the biological connections among the intron-containing organisms are unknown.

  13. Ribosomal proteins L11 and L10.(L12)4 and the antibiotic thiostrepton interact with overlapping regions of the 23 S rRNA backbone in the ribosomal GTPase centre

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1993-01-01

    23 S rRNA. Within the ribosome, L11 also interacts with this rRNA region, although the protection effects are subtly different and extend to nucleotide 1098. The pentameric r-protein complex L10.(L12)4 binds to an adjacent site on the rRNA, protecting riboses at positions 1043, 1046 to 1049, 1053 to...... by L10.(L12)4 and other proteins within the ribosome. The antibiotics thiostrepton and micrococcin inhibit the catalytic functions of this region by slotting in between the accessible loops and interacting with nucleotides there....

  14. Casein Kinase 2 Associates with Initiation-Competent RNA Polymerase I and Has Multiple Roles in Ribosomal DNA Transcription

    Panova, Tatiana B; Panov, Kostya I.; Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian RNA polymerase I (Pol I) complexes contain a number of associated factors, some with undefined regulatory roles in transcription. We demonstrate that casein kinase 2 (CK2) in human cells is associated specifically only with the initiation-competent Pol Iβ isoform and not with Pol Iα. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis places CK2 at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter in vivo. Pol Iβ-associated CK2 can phosphorylate topoisomerase IIα in Pol Iβ, activator upstream binding factor (UB...

  15. The complete nucleotide sequence of a 16S ribosomal RNA gene from a blue-green alga, Anacystis nidulans.

    Tomioka, N; Sugiura, M

    1983-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 16S ribosomal RNA gene from a blue-green alga, Anacystis nidulans, has been determined. Its coding region is estimated to be 1,487 base pairs long, which is nearly identical to those reported for chloroplast 16S rRNA genes and is about 4% shorter than that of the Escherichia coli gene. The 16S rRNA sequence of A. nidulans has 83% homology with that of tobacco chloroplast and 74% homology with that of E. coli. Possible stem and loop structures of A. nidulans 16S rRNA sequences resemble more closely those of chloroplast 16S rRNAs than those of E. coli 16S rRNA. These observations support the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast origin. PMID:6412038

  16. Molecular phylogeny of silk-producing insects based on 16S ribosomal RNA and cytochrome oxidase subunit I genes

    B. Mahendran; S. K. Ghosh; S. C. Kundu

    2006-04-01

    We have examined the molecular-phylogenetic relationships between nonmulberry and mulberry silkwormspecies that belong to the families Saturniidae, Bombycidae and Lasiocampidae using 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (coxI) gene sequences. Aligned nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA and coxI from 14 silk-producing species were used for construction of phylogenetic trees by maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony methods. The tree topology on the basis of 16S rRNA supports monophyly for members of Saturniidae and Bombycidae. Weighted parsimony analysis weighted towards transversions relative to transitions (ts, tv4) for coxI resulted in more robust bootstrap support over unweighted parsimony and favours the 16S rRNA tree topology. Combined analysis reflected clear biogeographic pattern, and agrees with morphological and cytological data.

  17. Peptidyl transferase antibiotics perturb the relative positioning of the 3'-terminal adenosine of P/P'-site-bound tRNA and 23S rRNA in the ribosome

    Kirillov, S V; Porse, B T; Garrett, R A

    1999-01-01

    A range of antibiotic inhibitors that act within the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome were examined for their capacity to perturb the relative positioning of the 3' end of P/P'-site-bound tRNA and the Escherichia coli ribosome. The 3'-terminal adenosines of deacylated tRNA and N......-ribosome complexes. It is concluded that the antibiotics perturb the relative positioning of the 3' end of the P/P'-site-bound tRNA and the peptidyl transferase loop region of 23S rRNA....

  18. A Long Noncoding RNA on the Ribosome Is Required for Lifespan Extension

    Essers, Paul B; Nonnekens, Julie; Goos, Yvonne J; Betist, Marco C; Viester, Marjon D; Mossink, Britt; Lansu, Nico; Korswagen, Hendrik C; Jelier, Rob; Brenkman, Arjan B; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes and their coordination of protein translation consume an enormous amount of cellular energy. As such, it has been established that the inhibition of either process can extend eukaryotic lifespan. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to compare ribosome-associated RNAs

  19. A transgenic mouse line for collecting ribosome-bound mRNA using the tetracycline transactivator system

    Laurel Drane

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring the gene expression profiles of specific neuronal cell-types is important for understanding their molecular identities. Genome-wide gene expression profiles of genetically defined cell-types can be acquired by collecting and sequencing mRNA that is bound to epitope-tagged ribosomes (TRAP; Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification. Here, we introduce a transgenic mouse model that combines the TRAP technique with the tetracycline transactivator (tTA system by expressing EGFP-tagged ribosomal protein L10a (EGFP-L10a under control of the tetracycline response element (tetO-TRAP. This allows both spatial control of EGFP-L10a expression through cell-type specific tTA expression, as well as temporal regulation by inhibiting transgene expression through the administration of doxycycline. We show that crossing tetO-TRAP mice with transgenic mice expressing tTA under the Camk2a promoter (Camk2a-tTA results in offspring with cell-type specific expression of EGFP-L10a in CA1 pyramidal neurons and medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that EGFP-L10a integrates into a functional ribosomal complex. In addition, collection of ribosome-bound mRNA from the hippocampus yielded the expected enrichment of genes expressed in CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as a depletion of genes expressed in other hippocampal cell-types. Finally, we show that crossing tetO-TRAP mice with transgenic Fos-tTA mice enables the expression of EGFP-L10a in CA1 pyramidal neurons that are activated during a fear conditioning trial. The tetO-TRAP mouse can be combined with other tTA mouse lines to enable gene expression profiling of a variety of different cell-types.

  20. ColE1 cloning of a ribosomal RNA promoter region from lambdarifsup(d)18 by selection for lambda integration and excision functions

    The expression of the ribosomal RNA gene carried by the lambda transducing phage lambdarifsup(d)18 is shown to be subject to stringent amino acid control. lambdarifsup(d)18 DNA was digested with endonuclease EcoRI and ligated to similarly restricted ColE1 plasmid DNA. Selection for expression of lambda integration and excision gene activity carried by the same DNA fragment results in cloning of the promoter proximal portion of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The resulting chimera expresses lambda integration and excision functions as well as encoding the promoter proximal half of a 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of ultraviolet dose on stringent control of phage lambdarifsup(d)18 dependent ribosomal RNA synthesis is included in the investigation. (Auth.)

  1. The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II): sequences and tools for high-throughput rRNA analysis

    Cole, J. R.; Chai, B.; Farris, R. J.; Wang, Q; Kulam, S. A.; McGarrell, D. M.; Garrity, G M; Tiedje, J M

    2004-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II) provides the research community with aligned and annotated rRNA gene sequences, along with analysis services and a phylogenetically consistent taxonomic framework for these data. Updated monthly, these services are made available through the RDP-II website (http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/). RDP-II release 9.21 (August 2004) contains 101 632 bacterial small subunit rRNA gene sequences in aligned and annotated format. High-throughput tools for initial taxonomic p...

  2. NMR structure of the A. aeolicus tmRNA pseudoknot PK1: new insights into the recoding event of the ribosomal trans-translation.

    Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Felden, Brice; Dardel, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) pseudoknot PK1 is essential for bacterial trans-translation, a ribosomal rescue mechanism. We report the solution structure of PK1 from Aquifex aeolicus, which despite an unprecedented small number of nucleotides and thus an unprecented compact size, displays a very high thermal stability. Several unusual structural features account for these properties and indicate that PK1 belongs to the class of ribosomal frameshift pseudoknots. This suggests a similarity...

  3. Seasonal succession leads to habitat-dependent differentiation in ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios among freshwater lake bacteria

    Vincent J Denef

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP. Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. However, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors.

  4. Seasonal Succession Leads to Habitat-Dependent Differentiation in Ribosomal RNA:DNA Ratios among Freshwater Lake Bacteria

    Denef, Vincent J.; Fujimoto, Masanori; Berry, Michelle A.; Schmidt, Marian L.

    2016-01-01

    Relative abundance profiles of bacterial populations measured by sequencing DNA or RNA of marker genes can widely differ. These differences, made apparent when calculating ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios, have been interpreted as variable activities of bacterial populations. However, inconsistent correlations between ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios and metabolic activity or growth rates have led to a more conservative interpretation of this metric as the cellular protein synthesis potential (PSP). Little is known, particularly in freshwater systems, about how PSP varies for specific taxa across temporal and spatial environmental gradients and how conserved PSP is across bacterial phylogeny. Here, we generated 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using simultaneously extracted DNA and RNA from fractionated (free-living and particulate) water samples taken seasonally along a eutrophic freshwater estuary to oligotrophic pelagic transect in Lake Michigan. In contrast to previous reports, we observed frequent clustering of DNA and RNA data from the same sample. Analysis of the overlap in taxa detected at the RNA and DNA level indicated that microbial dormancy may be more common in the estuary, the particulate fraction, and during the stratified period. Across spatiotemporal gradients, PSP was often conserved at the phylum and class levels. PSPs for specific taxa were more similar across habitats in spring than in summer and fall. This was most notable for PSPs of the same taxa when located in the free-living or particulate fractions, but also when contrasting surface to deep, and estuary to Lake Michigan communities. Our results show that community composition assessed by RNA and DNA measurements are more similar than previously assumed in freshwater systems. However, the similarity between RNA and DNA measurements and taxa-specific PSPs that drive community-level similarities are conditional on spatiotemporal factors. PMID:27199936

  5. Elongation in translation as a dynamic interaction among the ribosome, tRNA, and elongation factors EF-G and EF-Tu

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    The ribosome is a complex macromolecular machine that translates the message encoded in the messenger RNA and synthesizes polypeptides by linking the individual amino acids carried by the cognate transfer RNAs (tRNAs). The protein elongation cycle, during which the tRNAs traverse the ribosome in a coordinated manner along a path of more than 100 Å, is facilitated by large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome. These rearrangements go hand in hand with conformational changes of tRNA as well as ...

  6. De novo Synthesis and Assembly of rRNA into Ribosomal Subunits during Cold Acclimation in Escherichia coli.

    Piersimoni, Lolita; Giangrossi, Mara; Marchi, Paolo; Brandi, Anna; Gualerzi, Claudio O; Pon, Cynthia L

    2016-04-24

    During the cold adaptation that follows a cold stress, bacterial cells undergo many physiological changes and extensive reprogramming of their gene expression pattern. Bulk gene expression is drastically reduced, while a set of cold shock genes is selectively and transiently expressed. The initial stage of cold acclimation is characterized by the establishment of a stoichiometric imbalance of the translation initiation factors (IFs)/ribosomes ratio that contributes to the preferential translation of cold shock transcripts. Whereas de novo synthesis of the IFs following cold stress has been documented, nothing was known concerning the activity of the rrn operons during the cold acclimation period. In this work, we focus on the expression of the rrn operons and the fate of rRNA after temperature downshift. We demonstrate that in Escherichia coli, rRNA synthesis does not stop during the cold acclimation phase, but continues with greater contribution of the P2 compared to the P1 promoter and all seven rrn operons are active, although their expression levels change with respect to pre-stress conditions. Eight hours after the 37°→10°C temperature downshift, the newly transcribed rRNA represents up to 20% of total rRNA and is preferentially found in the polysomes. However, with respect to the de novo synthesis of the IFs, both rRNA transcription and maturation are slowed down drastically by cold stress, thereby accounting in part for the stoichiometric imbalance of the IFs/ribosomes. Overall, our data indicate that new ribosomes, which are possibly suitable to function at low temperature, are slowly assembled during cold acclimation. PMID:26953262

  7. Activation of ribosomal RNA genes in porcine embryos produced in vitro or by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Pedersen, Hanne Gervi; Jakobsen, Anne Sørig;

    2007-01-01

    The onset of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis occurs during the second half of the third cell cycle, that is, at the four-cell stage, in porcine embryos developed in vivo. In the present study the onset of rRNA synthesis was investigated in porcine embryos produced in vitro (IVP) or by somatic cell...... were equal proportions of transcriptionally active and inactive embryos and essentially all embryos that developed to the 16-cell stage (n = 21) and further to the blastocyst stage (n = 19) contained only transcriptionally active cells. In conclusion, porcine embryos produced in vitro had an......-cell stage (n = 45), 38% of the embryos contained 1-3 nuclei with signs of rRNA transcription, indicating an asynchronous transcription initiation. This pattern continued in the following stages, as 78% (n = 47), 47% (n = 42) and 83% (n = 37) of the embryos revealed a mixture of transcriptionally inactive...

  8. Elongation in translation as a dynamic interaction among the ribosome, tRNA, and elongation factors EF-G and EF-Tu.

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Frank, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    The ribosome is a complex macromolecular machine that translates the message encoded in the messenger RNA and synthesizes polypeptides by linking the individual amino acids carried by the cognate transfer RNAs (tRNAs). The protein elongation cycle, during which the tRNAs traverse the ribosome in a coordinated manner along a path of more than 100 A, is facilitated by large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome. These rearrangements go hand in hand with conformational changes of tRNA as well as elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-G - GTPases that catalyze tRNA delivery and translocation, respectively. This review focuses on the structural data related to the dynamics of the ribosomal machinery, which are the basis, in conjunction with existing biochemical, kinetic, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer data, of our knowledge of the decoding and translocation steps of protein elongation. PMID:20025795

  9. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on 30-S ribosomal subunits. Identification of the RNA region crosslinked to protein S7

    The effects of ultraviolet irradiation on Escherichia coli 30-S ribosomal subunits were studied. At the doses of radiation used in this work (0-4.5 x 105 quanta/30-S subunit), only protein S7 was found to be significantly crosslinked to the 16-S RNA. In conditions where 25% of the protein was covalently crosslinked, the ability of the irradiated 30-S subunits to reassociate with 50-S subunits and their activity in polyphenylalanine synthesis decreased strongly. Similar results were obtained by irradiation with a germicide lamp (254 nm) or with a monochromatic ultraviolet light at 248 nm. No additional proteins were crosslinked to the 16-S RNA by irradiating 30-S subunits depleted in protein S1 or 70-S ribosomes. The covalent complex of 16-S RNA and protein S7 was isolated and digested by T1 ribonuclease. The oligonucleotide remaining attached to the crosslinked protein was characterised as A-C-C-U-C-G (position 1261-1266, see the sequence published by Carbon et al. (1979) Eur. J. Biochem. 160, 399-410). Analysis of this fragment suggests that protein S7 was linked to the cytosine at position 1265 in the RNA sequence. (orig.)

  10. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B;

    2001-01-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs are...... strong inhibitors of peptidyl transferase and interact with domain V of 23S RNA, giving clear chemical footprints at nucleotides A2058-9, U2506 and U2584-5. Most of these nucleotides are highly conserved phylogenetically and functionally important, and all of them are at or near the peptidyl transferase...... centre and have been associated with binding of several antibiotics. Competitive footprinting shows that tiamulin and valnemulin can bind concurrently with the macrolide erythromycin but compete with the macrolide carbomycin, which is a peptidyl transferase inhibitor. We infer from these and previous...

  11. Slow formation of stable complexes during coincubation of minimal rRNA and ribosomal protein S4.

    Mayerle, Megan; Bellur, Deepti L; Woodson, Sarah A

    2011-09-23

    Ribosomal protein S4 binds and stabilizes a five-helix junction or five-way junction (5WJ) in the 5' domain of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and is one of two proteins responsible for nucleating 30S ribosome assembly. Upon binding, both protein S4 and 5WJ reorganize their structures. We show that labile S4 complexes rearrange into stable complexes within a few minutes at 42 °C, with longer coincubation leading to an increased population of stable complexes. In contrast, prefolding the rRNA has a smaller effect on stable S4 binding. Experiments with minimal rRNA fragments show that this structural change depends only on 16S residues within the S4 binding site. SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) chemical probing experiments showed that S4 strongly stabilizes 5WJ and the helix (H) 18 pseudoknot, which become tightly folded within the first minute of S4 binding. However, a kink in H16 that makes specific contacts with the S4 N-terminal extension, as well as a right-angle motif between H3, H4, and H18, requires a minute or more to become fully structured. Surprisingly, S4 structurally reorganizes the 530-loop and increases the flexibility of H3, which is proposed to undergo a conformational switch during 30S assembly. These elements of the S4 binding site may require other 30S proteins to reach a stable conformation. PMID:21821049

  12. Conservation and loss of ribosomal RNA gene sites in diploid and polyploid Fragaria (Rosaceae

    Liu Bo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Fragaria comprises species at ploidy levels ranging from diploid (2n = 2x = 14 to decaploid (2n = 10x = 70. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with 5S and 25S rDNA probes was performed to gather cytogenetic information that illuminates genomic divergence among different taxa at multiple ploidy levels, as well as to explore the evolution of ribosomal RNA genes during polyploidization in Fragaria. Results Root tip cells of diploid taxa were typified by two 5S and six 25S rDNA hybridization signals of varying intensities, providing a baseline for comparisons within the genus. In three exceptional diploid genotypes, F. nilgerrensis (CFRA 1358 and CFRA 1825 and F. vesca 'Yellow Wonder', two 5S but only four 25S rDNA sites were found but with differing site losses. The numbers of 5S and 25S rDNA signals, respectively were three and nine in a triploid F. ×bifera accession, and were four and twelve in three tetraploids, thus occurring in proportional 1.5× and 2× multiples of the typical diploid pattern. In hexaploid F. moschata, a proportional multiple of six 5S rDNA sites was observed, but the number of 25S rDNA sites was one or two less than the proportionate prediction of eighteen. This apparent tendency toward rDNA site loss at higher ploidy was markedly expanded in octoploids, which displayed only two 5S and ten 25S rDNA sites. In the two decaploids examined, the numbers of 5S and 25S rDNA signals, respectively, were four and fifteen in F. virginiana subsp. platypetala, and six and twelve in F. iturupensis. Conclusions Among diploid Fragaria species, a general consistency of rDNA site numbers implies conserved genomic organization, but highly variable 25S signal sizes and intensities and two instances of site loss suggest concurrent high dynamics of rDNA copy numbers among both homologs and non-homologs. General conservation of rDNA site numbers in lower ploidy, but marked site number reductions at higher ploidy

  13. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus pulmonary fungal infections in mice with 99mTc-labeled MORF oligomers targeting ribosomal RNA

    Purpose: Invasive aspergillosis is a major cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is the primary causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. However, A. fumigatus infections remain difficult to diagnose particularly in the early stages due to the lack of a rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic approach. In this study, we investigated 99mTc labeled MORF oligomers targeting fungal ribosomal RNA (rRNA) for the imaging detection of fungal infections. Procedures: Three phosphorodiamidate morpholino (MORF) oligomer (a DNA analogue) probes were designed: AGEN, complementary to a sequence of the fungal 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of Aspergillus, as a genus-specific probe; AFUM, complementary to the 28S rRNA sequence of A. fumigatus, as a fungus species-specific probe; and cMORF, irrelevant to all fungal species, as a control probe. The probes were conjugated with Alexa Fluor 633 carboxylic acid succinimidyl ester (AF633) for fluorescence imaging or with NHS-mercaptoacetyl triglycine (NHS-MAG3) for nuclear imaging with 99mTc and then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Results: The specific binding of AGEN and AFUM to fungal total RNA was confirmed by dot blot hybridization while specific binding of AGEN and AFUM in fixed and live A. fumigatus was demonstrated by both fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and accumulation in live cells. SPECT imaging of BALB/c mice with pulmonary A. fumigatus infections and administered 99mTc labeled AGEN and AFUM showed immediate and obvious accumulation in the infected lungs, while no significant accumulation of the control 99mTc-cMORF in the infected lung was observed. Compared to non-infected mice, with sacrifice at 1 h, the accumulation of 99mTc-AGEN and 99mTc-AFUM in the lungs of mice infected with A. fumigatus was 2 and 2.7 fold higher respectively. Conclusions: In vivo targeting fungal ribosomal RNA with 99mTc labeled MORF probes AGEN and AFUM

  14. Slow formation of stable complexes during coincubation of a minimal rRNA and ribosomal protein S4

    Mayerle, Megan; Bellur, Deepti L.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S4 binds and stabilizes a five-helix junction in the 5’ domain of the 16S rRNA, and is one of two proteins responsible for nucleating 30S ribosome assembly. Upon binding, both protein S4 and the five-helix junction reorganize their structures. We show that labile S4 complexes rearrange to stable complexes within a few minutes at 42°C, with longer coincubation leading to an increased population of stable complexes. In contrast, prefolding the rRNA has a smaller effect on stable S4 binding. Experiments with minimal rRNA fragments show this structural change depends only on 16S residues within the S4 binding site. SHAPE chemical-probing experiments showed that S4 strongly stabilizes the five-helix junction and helix 18 pseudoknot, which become tightly folded within the first minute of S4 binding. However, a kink in helix 16 that makes specific contacts with the S4 N-terminal extension, and a right angle motif between helices 3, 4 and 18, require a minute or more to become fully structured. Surprisingly, S4 structurally reorganizes the 530-loop and increases the flexibility of helix 3, which is proposed to undergo a conformational switch during 30S assembly. These elements of the S4 binding site may require other 30S proteins to reach a stable conformation. PMID:21821049

  15. Quinacrine impairs enterovirus 71 RNA replication by preventing binding of polypyrimidine-tract binding protein with internal ribosome entry sites.

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, epidemics of enterovirus 71 (EV71 and other enteroviruses have occurred in Asian countries and regions, causing a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs are indispensable for the initiation of translation in enteroviruses. Several cellular factors, as well as the ribosome, are recruited to the conserved IRES during this process. Quinacrine intercalates into the RNA architecture and inhibits RNA transcription and protein synthesis, and a recent study showed that quinacrine inhibited encephalomyocarditis virus and poliovirus IRES-mediated translation in vitro without disrupting internal cellular IRES. Here, we report that quinacrine was highly active against EV71, protecting cells from EV71 infection. Replication of viral RNA, expression of viral capsid protein, and production of virus were all strongly inhibited by quinacrine. Interaction of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB with the conserved IRES was prevented by quinacrine. Coxsackieviruses and echovirus were also inhibited by quinacrine in cultured cells. These results indicate that quinacrine may serve as a potential protective agent for use in the treatment of patients with chronic enterovirus infection.

  16. Physical Mapping of the 5S Ribosomal RNA Gene in Citreae of Aurantioideae Species using Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Asad Asadi Abkenar; Matsumoto, Ryoji; KUBO, Tatsuya; TOMINAGA, Shigeto; ヤマモト, マサシ; マツモト, リョウジ; クボ, タツヤ; トミナガ, シゲト; 山本, 雅史; 松本, 亮司; 久保, 達也; 冨永, 茂人

    2009-01-01

    The location of the 5S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) in species from six genera of the Citreae of Aurantioideae was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A 5S rDNA probe was labeled with biotin-16-dUTP. The probe was detected using a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-avidin conjugate with chromosomes counterstained with propidium iodide (PI). When the chromosomes were observed under a G filter, PI-stained chromosomes were classified into the following five types based on the...

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Invariant Residue G791 in Escherichia coli 16S rRNA Implicates RelA in Ribosome Function▿

    Kim, Hong-Man; Ryou, Sang-Mi; Song, Woo-Seok; Sim, Se-Hoon; Cha, Chang-Jun; Han, Seung Hyun; Ha, Nam-Chul; Kim, Jae-Hong; BAE, Jeehyeon; Cunningham, Philip R.; Lee, Kangseok

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies identified G791 in Escherichia coli 16S rRNA as an invariant residue for ribosome function. In order to establish the functional role of this residue in protein synthesis, we searched for multicopy suppressors of the mutant ribosomes that bear a G-to-U substitution at position 791. We identified relA, a gene whose product has been known to interact with ribosomes and trigger a stringent response. Overexpression of RelA resulted in the synthesis of approximately 1.5 times more...

  18. Dysfunction in Ribosomal Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus following Chronic Social Defeat Stress in Male Mice as Revealed by RNA-Seq

    Smagin, Dmitry A.; Kovalenko, Irina L.; Galyamina, Anna G.; Bragin, Anatoly O.; Orlov, Yuriy L.; Natalia N. Kudryavtseva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic social defeat stress leads to the development of anxiety- and depression-like states in male mice and is accompanied by numerous molecular changes in brain. The influence of 21-day period of social stress on ribosomal gene expression in five brain regions was studied using the RNA-Seq database. Most Rps, Rpl, Mprs, and Mprl genes were upregulated in the hypothalamus and downregulated in the hippocampus, which may indicate ribosomal dysfunction following chronic social defeat stress. T...

  19. Repeated reunions and splits feature the highly dynamic evolution of 5S and 35S ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA in the Asteraceae family

    Garcia Sònia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants and animals the most common ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA organisation is that in which 35S (encoding 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA and 5S genes are physically separated occupying different chromosomal loci. However, recent observations established that both genes have been unified to a single 35S-5S unit in the genus Artemisia (Asteraceae, a genomic arrangement typical of primitive eukaryotes such as yeast, among others. Here we aim to reveal the origin, distribution and mechanisms leading to the linked organisation of rDNA in the Asteraceae by analysing unit structure (PCR, Southern blot, sequencing, gene copy number (quantitative PCR and chromosomal position (FISH of 5S and 35S rRNA genes in ~200 species representing the family diversity and other closely related groups. Results Dominant linked rDNA genotype was found within three large groups in subfamily Asteroideae: tribe Anthemideae (93% of the studied cases, tribe Gnaphalieae (100% and in the "Heliantheae alliance" (23%. The remaining five tribes of the Asteroideae displayed canonical non linked arrangement of rDNA, as did the other groups in the Asteraceae. Nevertheless, low copy linked genes were identified among several species that amplified unlinked units. The conserved position of functional 5S insertions downstream from the 26S gene suggests a unique, perhaps retrotransposon-mediated integration event at the base of subfamily Asteroideae. Further evolution likely involved divergence of 26S-5S intergenic spacers, amplification and homogenisation of units across the chromosomes and concomitant elimination of unlinked arrays. However, the opposite trend, from linked towards unlinked arrangement was also surmised in few species indicating possible reversibility of these processes. Conclusions Our results indicate that nearly 25% of Asteraceae species may have evolved unusual linked arrangement of rRNA genes. Thus, in plants, fundamental changes in intrinsic

  20. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    Mishra, Bhavya; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-01-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special "slippery" sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating -1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obt...

  1. Ribosome recycling induces optimal translation rate at low ribosomal availability

    Marshall, E.; Stansfield, I; Romano, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    During eukaryotic cellular protein synthesis, ribosomal translation is made more efficient through interaction between the two ends of the messenger RNA (mRNA). Ribosomes reaching the 3′ end of the mRNA can thus recycle and begin translation again on the same mRNA, the so-called ‘closed-loop’ model. Using a driven diffusion lattice model of translation, we study the effects of ribosome recycling on the dynamics of ribosome flow and density on the mRNA. We show that ribosome recycling induces ...

  2. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  3. Stem–loop structures can effectively substitute for an RNA pseudoknot in −1 ribosomal frameshifting

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Noteborn, Mathieu H.; Pleij, Cornelis W. A.; Olsthoorn, René C. L.

    2011-01-01

    −1 Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) in synthesizing the gag-pro precursor polyprotein of Simian retrovirus type-1 (SRV-1) is stimulated by a classical H-type pseudoknot which forms an extended triple helix involving base–base and base–sugar interactions between loop and stem nucleotides. Recently, we showed that mutation of bases involved in triple helix formation affected frameshifting, again emphasizing the role of the triple helix in −1 PRF. Here, we investigated the efficiency of ...

  4. The majority of total nuclear-encoded non-ribosomal RNA in a human cell is 'dark matter' un-annotated RNA

    Milos Patrice

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery that the transcriptional output of the human genome is far more complex than predicted by the current set of protein-coding annotations and that most RNAs produced do not appear to encode proteins has transformed our understanding of genome complexity and suggests new paradigms of genome regulation. However, the fraction of all cellular RNA whose function we do not understand and the fraction of the genome that is utilized to produce that RNA remain controversial. This is not simply a bookkeeping issue because the degree to which this un-annotated transcription is present has important implications with respect to its biologic function and to the general architecture of genome regulation. For example, efforts to elucidate how non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs regulate genome function will be compromised if that class of RNAs is dismissed as simply 'transcriptional noise'. Results We show that the relative mass of RNA whose function and/or structure we do not understand (the so called 'dark matter' RNAs, as a proportion of all non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial human RNA (mt-RNA, can be greater than that of protein-encoding transcripts. This observation is obscured in studies that focus only on polyA-selected RNA, a method that enriches for protein coding RNAs and at the same time discards the vast majority of RNA prior to analysis. We further show the presence of a large number of very long, abundantly-transcribed regions (100's of kb in intergenic space and further show that expression of these regions is associated with neoplastic transformation. These overlap some regions found previously in normal human embryonic tissues and raises an interesting hypothesis as to the function of these ncRNAs in both early development and neoplastic transformation. Conclusions We conclude that 'dark matter' RNA can constitute the majority of non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial-RNA and a significant fraction arises from numerous very long

  5. The Structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ribosomal Protein S8 Reveals a Unique Subdomain That Contributes to Extremely-Tight Association With 16S rRNA

    Menichelli, Elena; Edgcomb, Stephen P.; Recht, Michael I.; Williamson, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribonucleoprotein complexes occurs in a broad range of conditions, but the principles that promote assembly and allow function at high temperature are poorly understood. The ribosomal protein S8 from the hyperthemophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus (AS8) is unique in that there is a 41 residue insertion in the consensus S8 sequence. In addition, AS8 exhibits an unusually-high affinity for the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), characterized by a picomolar dissociation constant that is a...

  6. The importance of highly conserved nucleotides in the binding region of chloramphenicol at the peptidyl transfer centre of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA

    Vester, Birte; Garrett, Roger Antony

    1988-01-01

    The peptidyl transfer site has been localized at the centre of domain V of 23S-like ribosomal RNA (rRNA) primarily on the basis of a chloramphenicol binding site. The implicated region constitutes an unstructured circle in the current secondary structural model which contains several universally....... In addition, a G2502----A transition caused a decreased growth rate, probably due to a partial selection against mutant ribosome incorporation into polysomes, while an A2503----C transversion produced a decreased growth rate and conferred resistance to chloramphenicol. All of the mutant RNAs were...

  7. Complete Sequence Construction of the Highly Repetitive Ribosomal RNA Gene Repeats in Eukaryotes Using Whole Genome Sequence Data.

    Agrawal, Saumya; Ganley, Austen R D

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) encode the major rRNA species of the ribosome, and thus are essential across life. These genes are highly repetitive in most eukaryotes, forming blocks of tandem repeats that form the core of nucleoli. The primary role of the rDNA in encoding rRNA has been long understood, but more recently the rDNA has been implicated in a number of other important biological phenomena, including genome stability, cell cycle, and epigenetic silencing. Noncoding elements, primarily located in the intergenic spacer region, appear to mediate many of these phenomena. Although sequence information is available for the genomes of many organisms, in almost all cases rDNA repeat sequences are lacking, primarily due to problems in assembling these intriguing regions during whole genome assemblies. Here, we present a method to obtain complete rDNA repeat unit sequences from whole genome assemblies. Limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) data make them unsuitable for assembling complete rDNA unit sequences; therefore, the method we present relies on the use of Sanger whole genome sequence data. Our method makes use of the Arachne assembler, which can assemble highly repetitive regions such as the rDNA in a memory-efficient way. We provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for generating rDNA sequences from whole genome Sanger sequence data using Arachne, for refining complete rDNA unit sequences, and for validating the sequences obtained. In principle, our method will work for any species where the rDNA is organized into tandem repeats. This will help researchers working on species without a complete rDNA sequence, those working on evolutionary aspects of the rDNA, and those interested in conducting phylogenetic footprinting studies with the rDNA. PMID:27576718

  8. Dysfunction in Ribosomal Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus following Chronic Social Defeat Stress in Male Mice as Revealed by RNA-Seq.

    Smagin, Dmitry A; Kovalenko, Irina L; Galyamina, Anna G; Bragin, Anatoly O; Orlov, Yuriy L; Kudryavtseva, Natalia N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic social defeat stress leads to the development of anxiety- and depression-like states in male mice and is accompanied by numerous molecular changes in brain. The influence of 21-day period of social stress on ribosomal gene expression in five brain regions was studied using the RNA-Seq database. Most Rps, Rpl, Mprs, and Mprl genes were upregulated in the hypothalamus and downregulated in the hippocampus, which may indicate ribosomal dysfunction following chronic social defeat stress. There were no differentially expressed ribosomal genes in the ventral tegmental area, midbrain raphe nuclei, or striatum. This approach may be used to identify a pharmacological treatment of ribosome biogenesis abnormalities in the brain of patients with "ribosomopathies." PMID:26839715

  9. Physical and biochemical nature of the bacterial cytoplasm: movement and localization of mRNA and the 30S subunits of ribosomes.

    Trevors, J T

    2012-05-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on how mRNA transcripts in the spatially crowded, but molecularly organized bacterial cytoplasm contact the 30S ribosomal subunits. Does simple diffusion in the cytoplasm account for transcript-ribosome interactions given that a large number of ribosomes (e.g., about 72,000 in Escherichia coli during exponential growth) can be present in the cytoplasm? Or are undiscovered mechanisms present where specific transcripts are directed to specific ribosomes at specific cytoplasmic locations, while others are mobilized in a random manner? Moreover, is it possible that cytoplasmic mobilization occurs in bacteria, driven possibly by thermal infrared (IR) radiation and the generation of exclusion zone (EZ) water? These aspects will be discussed in this article and hypotheses presented. PMID:22710107

  10. Photochemical cross-linking of tRNA/sup Phe/ modified at A76 and A73 to the Escherichia coli ribosome

    [5'-32P]-8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate ([5'-32P]p(N3)Ap) has been prepared using a simple two-step procedure: alkaline hydrolysis of 8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate followed by labeling of the resulting 3'-mononucleotide with 32P at the 5' position using [γ-32P]ATP and T4 polynucleotide kinase. [5'-32P]p(N3)Ap has proven to be an excellent substrate for T4 RNA ligase. To study the environment of the 3' end of tRNA on bacterial ribosomes, nucleosides A76 and A73 in yeast tRNA/sup Phe/ were replaced with their 8-azido derivatives. This was achieved by stepwise removal of 3'-terminal nucleosides from the tRNA using the Whitfield procedure, incorporation of [5'-32P]p(N3)Ap into appropriately degraded tRNA with T4 RNA ligase, and restoration of the CCA/sub OH/ terminus with yeast nucleotidyl transferase. The modified tRNAs were bound to the A or P site of Escherichia coli ribosomes programmed with poly(U). UV irradiation produced covalent, zero-length cross-links between the tRNA and neighboring ribosomal components. The tRNA derivative containing (N3)A73 became attached exclusively to proteins of the 50S subunit whose identity is currently under investigation

  11. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  12. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  13. The sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA of the crustacean Artemia salina

    Diels, Ludo; De Baere, Raymond; Vandenberghe, Antoon; De Wachter, Rupert

    1981-01-01

    The primary structure of the 5 S rRNA isolated from the cryptobiotic cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia salina is pACCAACGGCCAUACCACGUUGAAAGUACCCAGUCUCGUCAGAUCCUGGAAGUCACACAACGUCGGGCCCGGUCAGUACUUGGAUGGGUGACCGCCUGGGAACACCGGGUGCUGUUGGCAU OH.

  14. A new fungal large subunit ribosomal RNA primer for high-throughput sequencing surveys.

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2016-02-01

    The inclusion of phylogenetic metrics in community ecology has provided insights into important ecological processes, particularly when combined with high-throughput sequencing methods; however, these approaches have not been widely used in studies of fungal communities relative to other microbial groups. Two obstacles have been considered: (1) the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has limited utility for constructing phylogenies and (2) most PCR primers that target the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal unit generate amplicons that exceed current limits of high-throughput sequencing platforms. We designed and tested a PCR primer (LR22R) to target approximately 300-400 bp region of the D2 hypervariable region of the fungal LSU for use with the Illumina MiSeq platform. Both in silico and empirical analyses showed that the LR22R-LR3 pair captured a broad range of fungal taxonomic groups with a small fraction of non-fungal groups. Phylogenetic placement of publically available LSU D2 sequences showed broad agreement with taxonomic classification. Comparisons of the LSU D2 and the ITS2 ribosomal regions from environmental samples and known communities showed similar discriminatory abilities of the two primer sets. Together, these findings show that the LR22R-LR3 primer pair has utility for phylogenetic analyses of fungal communities using high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:26656064

  15. Prokaryote phylogeny based on ribosomal proteins and aminoacyl tRNA synthetases by using the compositional distance approach

    WEI; Haibin; QI; Ji; HAO; Bailin

    2004-01-01

    In order to show that the newly developed K-string composition distance method,based on counting oligopeptide frequencies,for inferring phylogenetic relations of prokaryotes works equally well without requiring the whole proteome data,we used all ribosomal proteins and the set of aminoacyl tRNA synthetases for each species.The latter group has been known to yield inconsistent trees if used individually.Our trees are obtained without making any sequence alignment.Altogether 16 Archaea,105 Bacteria and 2 Eucarya are represented on the tree.Most of the lower branchings agree well with the latest,2003,Outline of the second edition of the Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology and the trees also suggest some relationships among higher taxa.

  16. Requirement for a conserved, tertiary interaction in the core of 23S ribosomal RNA

    Aagaard, C; Douthwaite, S

    1994-01-01

    A putative base-pairing interaction that determines the folding of the central region of 23S rRNA has been investigated by mutagenesis. Each of the possible base substitutions has been made at the phylogenetically covariant positions adenine-1262 (A1262) and U2017 in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. Ev...

  17. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  18. Structural Studies of RNA Helicases Involved in Eukaryotic Pre-mRNA Splicing, Ribosome Biogenesis, and Translation Initiation

    He, Yangzi

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) take centre stage in gene expression. In eukaryotes, most RNAs are transcribed as precursors, and these precursors are co- or post-transcriptionally processed and assemble with particular proteins to form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Mature RNPs participate in various gene...... expression events, are then subject to recycling, disassembly or degradation. RNA helicases are highly conserved enzymes that use ATP to bind or remodel RNA or RNPs. They function in nearly every aspect of eukaryotic RNA metabolism. The spliceosome catalyzes pre-mRNAs splicing, which removes introns and...

  19. Macrolide-ketolide inhibition of MLS-resistant ribosomes is improved by alternative drug interaction with domain II of 23S rRNA

    Douthwaite, S; Hansen, L H; Mauvais, P

    2000-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and its 6-O-methyl derivative (clarithromycin) bind to bacterial ribosomes primarily through interactions with nucleotides in domains II and V of 23S rRNA. The domain II interaction occurs between nucleotide A752 and the macrolide 3-cladinose moiety. Removal ...

  20. Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal RNA A1555G Mutation Associated with Cardiomyopathy and Hearing Loss following High-Dose Chemotherapy and Repeated Aminoglycoside Exposure

    Skou, Anne-Sofie; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Jensen, Tim;

    2014-01-01

    A 19-month-old girl with the A1555G mitochondrial mutation in the 12S ribosomal RNA gene and acute myelogenous leukemia developed dilated cardiomyopathy and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss before undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. She had received gentamicin during episodes of ...... febrile neutropenia. Testing for the A1555G mutation is recommended in patients frequently treated with aminoglycosides....

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene of Trichinella from cat in Heilongjiang province%黑龙江省猫旋毛虫18S rRNA基因分子克隆及序列分析

    李冬梅; 王秀荣; 董小波; 路义鑫; 宋铭忻

    2007-01-01

    本文利用GenBank中发表的( Trichinella spiralis )18S rRNA序列为参考设计引物,对分离自黑龙江省猫体内的旋毛虫及本地毛形线虫( Trichinella nativa )的18S rRNA基因进行扩增,克隆后测序,序列分析结果表明:猫旋毛虫与旋毛形线虫基因同源性更高.

  2. RNA–DNA differences in human mitochondria restore ancestral form of 16S ribosomal RNA

    Bar-Yaacov, Dan; Avital, Gal; Levin, Liron; Richards, Allison L.; Hachen, Naomi; Rebolledo Jaramillo, Boris; Nekrutenko, Anton; Zarivach, Raz; Mishmar, Dan

    2013-01-01

    RNA transcripts are generally identical to the underlying DNA sequences. Nevertheless, RNA–DNA differences (RDDs) were found in the nuclear human genome and in plants and animals but not in human mitochondria. Here, by deep sequencing of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and RNA, we identified three RDD sites at mtDNA positions 295 (C-to-U), 13710 (A-to-U, A-to-G), and 2617 (A-to-U, A-to-G). Position 2617, within the 16S rRNA, harbored the most prevalent RDDs (>30% A-to-U and ∼15% A-to-G of the...

  3. Activation of the ribosomal RNA genes late in the third cell cycle of porcine embryos

    Viuff, Dorthe; Greve, Torben; Holm, Peter; Callesen, Henrik; Hyttel, Poul; Thomsen, Preben D

    2002-01-01

    In porcine embryos, nucleoli are first observed during the third postfertilization cell cycle, i.e., at the 4-cell stage. However, direct studies of the initiation of rRNA transcription have not been reported. This transcription was investigated in the present study by simultaneous visualization of...... electron microscopy. In general, the 2-cell and 4-cell embryos fixed at 10 and 20 h postcleavage (hpc) showed no signs of rRNA transcription. Four small clusters of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling were visible in interphase nuclei, consistent with hybridization to the rRNA gene clusters only...... phase during the third cell cycle....

  4. Sequence requirements for self-splicing of the Tetrahymena thermophila pre-ribosomal RNA.

    Price, J V; Kieft, G L; Kent, J R; Sievers, E L; Cech, T R

    1985-01-01

    The sequence requirements for splicing of the Tetrahymena pre-rRNA have been examined by altering the rRNA gene to produce versions that contain insertions and deletions within the intervening sequence (IVS). The altered genes were transcribed and the RNA tested for self-splicing in vitro. A number of insertions (8-54 nucleotides) at three locations had no effect on self-splicing activity. Two of these insertions, located at a site 5 nucleotides preceding the 3'-end of the IVS, did not alter ...

  5. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; Khan, Samiullah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relat...

  6. A new set of primers directed to 18S rRNA gene for molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. and their performance in the detection and differentiation of oocysts shed by synanthropic rodents.

    Silva, Sheila O S; Richtzenhain, Leonardo J; Barros, Iracema N; Gomes, Alessandra M M C; Silva, Aristeu V; Kozerski, Noemila D; de Araújo Ceranto, Jaqueline B; Keid, Lara B; Soares, Rodrigo M

    2013-11-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are cosmopolitan protozoa that infect fishes, reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals. More than 20 species are recognized within this genus. Rodents are a group of abundant and ubiquitous organisms that have been considered reservoirs of Cryptosporidium for humans and livestock. The aim of this study was to design specific primers for the gene encoding 18S rRNA, potentially capable of amplifying any species or genotype of Cryptosporidium spp. and evaluate the diagnostic attributes of the nested-PCR based on such probes. The primers were designed to amplify the shortest segment as possible to maximize the sensitivity of the test, but preserving the discriminatory potential of the amplified sequences for phylogenetic inferences. The nested-PCR standardized in this study (nPCR-SH) was compared in terms of sensitivity with another similar assay (nPCR-XIAO) that has been largely used for the detection and identification of Cryptosporidium spp. worldwide. We also aimed to molecularly characterize samples of Cryptosporidum spp. isolated from synanthropic rodents using these probes. Forty-five rodents were captured in urban areas of the municipality of Umuarama, Paraná State, Brazil. Fecal samples were submitted to three molecular tests (nested-PCRs), two of them targeted to the 18S rDNA gene (nPCR-SH and nPCR-XIAO) and the third targeted to the gene encoding actin (nPCR-actin). The nPCR-SH was tested positive on samples of Cryptosporidum parvum, Cryptosporidum andersoni, Cryptosporidum meleagridis, Cryptosporidum hominis, Cryptosporidum canis, and Cryptosporidum serpentis. Sixteen samples of rodents were positive by nPCR-SH, six by nPCR-XIAO and five by nPCR-actin. Sequencing of amplified fragments allowed the identification of Cryptosporidum muris in three samples of Rattus rattus, and two genotypes of Cryptosporidium, the genotypes mouse II and III. Cryptosporidium genotype mouse II was found in one sample of Mus musculus and genotype mouse III

  7. FRET Characterization of Complex Conformational Changes in a Large 16S Ribosomal RNA Fragment Site-Specifically Labeled Using Unnatural Base Pairs.

    Lavergne, Thomas; Lamichhane, Rajan; Malyshev, Denis A; Li, Zhengtao; Li, Lingjun; Sperling, Edit; Williamson, James R; Millar, David P; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2016-05-20

    Ribosome assembly has been studied intensively using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) with fluorophore-labeled fragments of RNA produced by chemical synthesis. However, these studies are limited by the size of the accessible RNA fragments. We have developed a replicable unnatural base pair (UBP) formed between (d)5SICS and (d)MMO2 or (d)NaM, which efficiently directs the transcription of RNA containing unnatural nucleotides. We now report the synthesis and evaluation of several of the corresponding ribotriphosphates bearing linkers that enable the chemoselective attachment of different functionalities. We found that the RNA polymerase from T7 bacteriophage does not incorporate NaM derivatives but does efficiently incorporate 5SICS(CO), whose linker enables functional group conjugation via Click chemistry, and when combined with the previously identified MMO2(A), whose amine side chains permits conjugation via NHS coupling chemistry, enables site-specific double labeling of transcribed RNA. To study ribosome assembly, we transcribed RNA corresponding to a 243-nt fragment of the central domain of Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA containing 5SICS(CO) and MMO2(A) at defined locations and then site-specifically attached the fluorophores Cy3 and Cy5. FRET was characterized using single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (smTIRF) microscopy in the presence of various combinations of added ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that each of the fragment's two three-helix junctions exist in open and closed states, with the latter favored by sequential protein binding. These results elucidate early and previously uncharacterized folding events underlying ribosome assembly and demonstrate the applicability of UBPs for biochemical, structural, and functional studies of RNAs. PMID:26942998

  8. Non-FG mediated transport of the large pre-ribosomal subunit through the nuclear pore complex by the mRNA export factor Gle2

    Occhipinti, L.; Chang, Y.; Altvater, M.; Menet, A. M.; Kemmler, S.; Panse, V. G.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple export receptors passage bound pre-ribosomes through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) by transiently interacting with the Phe-Gly (FG) meshwork of their transport channels. Here, we reveal how the non-FG interacting yeast mRNA export factor Gly-Leu-FG lethal 2 (Gle2) functions in the export of the large pre-ribosomal subunit (pre-60S). Structure-guided studies uncovered conserved platforms used by Gle2 to export pre-60S: an uncharacterized basic patch required to bind pre-60S, and a sec...

  9. Mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for forensic identification of crocodile species.

    Naga Jogayya, K; Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, I

    2013-05-01

    All crocodilians are under various threats due to over exploitation and these species have been listed in Appendix I or II of CITES. Lack of molecular techniques for the forensic identification of confiscated samples makes it difficult to enforce the law. Therefore, we herein present a molecular method developed on the basis on 16S rRNA gene of mitochondrial DNA for identification of crocodile species. We have developed a set of 16S rRNA primers for PCR based identification of crocodilian species. These novel primers amplify partial 16S rRNA sequences of six crocodile species which can be later combined to obtain a larger region (1290 bp) of 16S rRNA gene. This 16S rRNA gene could be used as an effective tool for forensic authentication of crocodiles. The described primers hold great promise in forensic identification of crocodile species, which can aid in the effective enforcement of law and conservation of these species. PMID:23622485

  10. Interactions of the TnaC nascent peptide with rRNA in the exit tunnel enable the ribosome to respond to free tryptophan.

    Martínez, Allyson K; Gordon, Emily; Sengupta, Arnab; Shirole, Nitin; Klepacki, Dorota; Martinez-Garriga, Blanca; Brown, Lewis M; Benedik, Michael J; Yanofsky, Charles; Mankin, Alexander S; Vazquez-Laslop, Nora; Sachs, Matthew S; Cruz-Vera, Luis R

    2014-01-01

    A transcriptional attenuation mechanism regulates expression of the bacterial tnaCAB operon. This mechanism requires ribosomal arrest induced by the regulatory nascent TnaC peptide in response to free L-tryptophan (L-Trp). In this study we demonstrate, using genetic and biochemical analyses, that in Escherichia coli, TnaC residue I19 and 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 are essential for the ribosome's ability to sense free L-Trp. We show that the mutational change A2058U in 23S rRNA reduces the concentration dependence of L-Trp-mediated tna operon induction, whereas the TnaC I19L change suppresses this phenotype, restoring the sensitivity of the translating A2058U mutant ribosome to free L-Trp. These findings suggest that interactions between TnaC residue I19 and 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 contribute to the creation of a regulatory L-Trp binding site within the translating ribosome. PMID:24137004