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Sample records for 18f-fdg pet imaging

  1. (18)F-FDG PET imaging of murine atherosclerosis

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Christoffersen, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice.......To study whether (18)F-FDG can be used for in vivo imaging of atherogenesis by examining the correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and gene expression of key molecular markers of atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice....

  2. Artifacts and pitfalls in oncologic {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-CT imaging; Artefakte und Fallstricke in der onkologischen {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-CT-Diagnostik

    Falck, Christian von [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Schwerpunkt multimodale Bildgebung; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen [Charite Berlin (Germany). Radiologie; Bengel, Frank M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Hybrid imaging such as {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT synergistically combines the advantages of metabolic and morphologic imaging. Due to its increasing role in the imaging of oncologic disease there is a growing demand for the general radiologists to have a basic unterstanding of the method and its limitations. Therefore, the objective of this review is to explain und illustrate the typical artifacts and pitfalls of oncologic PET-CT imaging using {sup 18}F-FDG. (orig.)

  3. Preliminary investigation of brain 18F-FDG PET imaging in neonate

    Objective: To study brain 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging and to understand its metabolic function in neonate with pneumonia and premature infants. Methods: Nine neonate with pneumonia and seven premature infants were examined with routine 18F-FDG PET brain scan. Results: The brain 18F-FDG PET image of neonate was significantly different from that of adult and child. The structure of whole brain was not clearly demarcated. The active glucose metabolic areas were in thalamus, cerebellum, sensorimotor cortex and basal ganglia. The 18F-FDG uptake was most in thalamus, while least in cerebral cortex. The image quality showed no significant difference among 1, 2 and 3 min transmission scan for attenuation correction. Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET brain imaging may be one of effective methods to study cerebral function and metabolism in neonate. But the CT transmission time should reduce to be the shortest. (authors)

  4. Brown adipose tissue {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in pediatric PET/CT imaging

    Hong, Terence S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Shammas, Amer; Charron, Martin [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Zukotynski, Katherine A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Drubach, Laura A. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine/PET, Boston, MA (United States); Lim, Ruth [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) fused with CT ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) has been widely adopted in oncological imaging. However, it is known that benign lesions and other metabolically active tissues, such as brown adipose tissue (BAT), can accumulate {sup 18}F-FDG, potentially resulting in false-positive interpretation. Previous studies have reported that {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in BAT is more common in children than in adults. We illustrate BAT FDG uptake in various anatomical locations in children and adolescents. We also review what is known about the effects of patient-related physical attributes and environmental temperatures on BAT FDG uptake, and discuss methods used to reduce BAT FDG uptake on {sup 18}F-FDG PET. (orig.)

  5. Brown adipose tissue 18F-FDG uptake in pediatric PET/CT imaging

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) fused with CT (18F-FDG PET/CT) has been widely adopted in oncological imaging. However, it is known that benign lesions and other metabolically active tissues, such as brown adipose tissue (BAT), can accumulate 18F-FDG, potentially resulting in false-positive interpretation. Previous studies have reported that 18F-FDG uptake in BAT is more common in children than in adults. We illustrate BAT FDG uptake in various anatomical locations in children and adolescents. We also review what is known about the effects of patient-related physical attributes and environmental temperatures on BAT FDG uptake, and discuss methods used to reduce BAT FDG uptake on 18F-FDG PET. (orig.)

  6. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.;

    2008-01-01

    tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in paediatric oncology. The Oncology Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) has published excellent procedure guidelines on tumour imaging with (18)F-FDG PET (Bombardieri et al., Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 30:BP115-24, 2003). These guidelines, published by...... Association of Nuclear Medicine. They should be taken in the context of "good practice" of nuclear medicine and of any national rules, which may apply to nuclear medicine examinations. The recommendations of these guidelines cannot be applied to all patients in all practice settings. The guidelines should not...

  7. Canine study on myocardial ischemic memory with 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging

    Objective: To explore whether the existence and duration of ischemia measured by dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging correlated with the extent of myocardial ischemia in a canine model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Canine coronary artery occlusion was carried out for 20 min (n=4) and for 40 min (n=4) followed by 24 h of open-artery reperfusion. All dogs underwent dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT and 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT imaging at baseline and 1 h and 24 h after reperfusion.Quantitative analysis of myocardial 18F-FDG uptake was performed using Carimas Core software,and the extraction ratio of 18F-FDG (K) was calculated by the ratio of 18F-FDG uptake rate in the ischemic area (kischemia) and normoperfused region (knormoperfused). Echocardiographic data were also acquired between each PET/CT imaging study to detect the wall motion in the ischemic and normoperfused myocardium. Paired t test and non-parametric statistical tests, measured by SPSS 19.0, were used to analyze the data. Results: Coronary occlusion produced sustained, abnormal wall motion in the ischemic region for more than 1 h. Similar K values were demonstrated between the 20 min and 40 min groups at baseline (1.02 ±0.06 and 1.03 ±0.05, Z=-0.29, P>0.05). At 1 h after reperfusion, the reperfusion regions showed normal perfusion but with increased 18F-FDG uptake, which was higher in the 40 min ischemic group than in the 20 min ischemic group (2.31 ±0.13 and 1.87 ±0.09, Z=-2.31, P<0.05). At 24 h after reperfusion, however, only the 40 min ischemic group showed slightly higher 18F-FDG uptake than baseline (1.15 ± 0.02 and 1.03 ±0.05, t=4.32, P<0.05), whereas no significant difference was found in the 20 min ischemic group (1.05 ± 0.04 and 1.02 ± 0.06, t=0.87, P>0.05). Histological examination of the ischemic myocardium from both groups revealed neatly arranged cells without interstitial edema, hemorrhage nor inflammatory response. Conclusions: Myocardial 'ischemic memory' was correlated with the

  8. Anesthesia condition for {sup 18}F-FDG imaging of lung metastasis tumors using small animal PET

    Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, June-Youp; Jung, Jae Ho; Kang, Joo Hyun [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Gi Jeong [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: larry@kcch.re.kr; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Division of Nuclear Medicine and RI Application, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-FDG has been increasingly used for tumor imaging in the murine model. The aim of this study was to establish the anesthesia condition for imaging of lung metastasis tumor using small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET. Methods: To determine the impact of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG distribution in normal mice, five groups were studied under the following conditions: no anesthesia, ketamine and xylazine (Ke/Xy), 0.5% isoflurane (Iso 0.5), 1% isoflurane (Iso 1) and 2% isoflurane (Iso 2). The ex vivo counting, standard uptake value (SUV) image and glucose SUV of {sup 18}F-FDG in various tissues were evaluated. The {sup 18}F-FDG images in the lung metastasis tumor model were obtained under no anesthesia, Ke/Xy and Iso 0.5, and registered with CT image to clarify the tumor region. Results: Blood glucose concentration and muscle uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the Ke/Xy group markedly increased more than in the other groups. The Iso 2 group increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart compared with the other groups. The Iso 0.5 anesthesized group showed the lowest {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in heart and chest wall. The small size of lung metastasis tumor (2 mm) was clearly visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG image with the Iso 0.5 anesthesia. Conclusion: Small animal {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging with Iso 0.5 anesthesia was appropriate for the detection of lung metastasis tumor. To acquire {sup 18}F-FDG PET images with small animal PET, the type and level of anesthetic should be carefully considered to be suitable for the visualization of target tissue in the experimental model.

  9. Does Delayed-Time-Point Imaging Improve 18F-FDG-PET in Patients With MALT Lymphoma?

    Mayerhoefer, Marius E.; Giraudo, Chiara; Senn, Daniela; Hartenbach, Markus; Weber, Michael; Rausch, Ivo; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Herold, Christian J.; Hacker, Marcus; Pones, Matthias; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Müllauer, Leonhard; Dolak, Werner; Lukas, Julius; Raderer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether in patients with extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT), delayed–time-point 2-18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) performs better than standard–time-point 18F-FDG-PET. Materials and Methods Patients with untreated histologically verified MALT lymphoma, who were undergoing pretherapeutic 18F-FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) and consecutive 18F-FDG-PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using a single 18F-FDG injection, in the course of a larger-scale prospective trial, were included. Region-based sensitivity and specificity, and patient-based sensitivity of the respective 18F-FDG-PET scans at time points 1 (45–60 minutes after tracer injection, TP1) and 2 (100–150 minutes after tracer injection, TP2), relative to the reference standard, were calculated. Lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-blood SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake values) ratios were also assessed. Results 18F-FDG-PET at TP1 was true positive in 15 o f 23 involved regions, and 18F-FDG-PET at TP2 was true-positive in 20 of 23 involved regions; no false-positive regions were noted. Accordingly, region-based sensitivities and specificities were 65.2% (confidence interval [CI], 45.73%–84.67%) and 100% (CI, 100%-100%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP1; and 87.0% (CI, 73.26%–100%) and 100% (CI, 100%-100%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP2, respectively. FDG-PET at TP1 detected lymphoma in at least one nodal or extranodal region in 7 of 13 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET at TP2 in 10 of 13 patients; accordingly, patient-based sensitivity was 53.8% (CI, 26.7%–80.9%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP1, and 76.9% (CI, 54.0%–99.8%) for 18F-FDG-PET at TP2. Lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-blood maximum standardized uptake value ratios were significantly lower at TP1 (ratios, 1.05 ± 0.40 and 1.52 ± 0.62) than at TP2 (ratios, 1.67 ± 0.74 and 2.56 ± 1.10; P = 0.003 and P = 0.001). Conclusions Delayed–time-point imaging

  10. Input functions derived from 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in canines

    Objective: The input functions are of necessity in quantitative PET imaging. In this study the authors tried to derive non-invasively the input functions from canine 18F-FDG PET/CT scans, as compared with standardized input functions determined invasively from serial arterial plasma sampling. Methods: Five dogs underwent serial PET/CT scans using dynamic scanning protocol after 18F-FDG administration. Meanwhile, continuous arteries blood samples were collected through catheters inserted into femoral arteries of the dogs. Image derived input functions (IDIF) were obtained using ROI defined on dynamic PET/CT images over various cardiovascular structures such as left ventricle (LV), right ventricle (RV), right atria (RA), aortic arch (AC), ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA). Area under curve (AUC) method was used to calculate each input function from arterial plasma sampling. Canine myocardial inhibition constant (Ki) values were estimated using Patlak graphical analyses. Results: IDIF from 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were significantly correlated with input functions derived from arterial plasma sampling using AUC (r≥0.97). When AC and DA regions were chosen for the calculation, the mean Ki estimated thereby using IDIF were almost identical to those using input functions from artery blood sampling analyses (the ratios between two sets of Ki being 1.0 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.1 respectively). Conclusion: It might be feasible to use IDIF derived from ROIs over AC and DA on a dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, as a non-invasive procedure, for quantitative analyses. (authors)

  11. PET imaging of cerebral metabolic change in tinnitus using 18F-FDG

    Tinnitus is an auditory disorder hardly assessable by clinical technology. PET imaging of the brain in 13 cases with and 10 without tinnitus was undertaken at 40 min after injection of 280-440 MBq 18F-FDG. To ensure the quality of the PET study, all cases followed a normalized procedure with visual and auditory blockage. CT/MRI imaging and routine acoustic tests were carried out in all subjects. PET revealed that an increased uptake of 18F-FDG at left med-temporal lobe (primary auditory center, PAC) present exclusively in tinnitus, regardless the side of hearing hallucination. Significant asymmetry was noted between left and right PAC, but not at other cortex area. While control cases showed no asymmetric uptake between two hemispheres. The abnormal PAC uptake did not respond to external pure sound stimulus, nor did it relate to the severity of hearing loss assessed by acoustic tests. No anatomical or morphological alteration could be proven on CT/MRI. In conclusion, PET/18F-FDG objectively revealed an increased metabolic change at left PAC in tinnitus, which is of diagnostic value; and there is evidence suggesting tinnitus is most likely induced by a functional change in the brain

  12. 123I-Mibg scintigraphy and 18F-Fdg-Pet imaging for diagnosing neuroblastoma

    Bleeker, Gitta; Tytgat, Godelieve Am; Adam, Judit A; Caron, Huib N; Kremer, Leontien Cm; Hooft, Lotty; van Dalen, Elvira C

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumour of childhood that originates in the neural crest. It is the second most common extracranial malignant solid tumour of childhood. Neuroblastoma cells have the unique capacity to accumulate Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG), which can be used for imaging the tumour. Moreover, 123I-MIBG scintigraphy is not only important for the diagnosis of neuroblastoma, but also for staging and localization of skeletal lesions. If these are present, MIBG follow-up scans are used to assess the patient's response to therapy. However, the sensitivity and specificity of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy to detect neuroblastoma varies according to the literature. Prognosis, treatment and response to therapy of patients with neuroblastoma are currently based on extension scoring of 123I-MIBG scans. Due to its clinical use and importance, it is necessary to determine the exact diagnostic accuracy of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy. In case the tumour is not MIBG avid, fluorine-18-fluorodeoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is often used and the diagnostic accuracy of this test should also be assessed. Objectives Primary objectives: 1.1 To determine the diagnostic accuracy of 123I-MIBG (single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), with or without computed tomography (CT)) scintigraphy for detecting a neuroblastoma and its metastases at first diagnosis or at recurrence in children from 0 to 18 years old. 1.2 To determine the diagnostic accuracy of negative 123I-MIBG scintigraphy in combination with 18F-FDG-PET(-CT) imaging for detecting a neuroblastoma and its metastases at first diagnosis or at recurrence in children from 0 to 18 years old, i.e. an add-on test. Secondary objectives: 2.1 To determine the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET(-CT) imaging for detecting a neuroblastoma and its metastases at first diagnosis or at recurrence in children from 0 to 18 years old. 2.2 To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 123I

  13. Imaging findings and literature review of 18F-FDG PET/CT in primary systemic AL amyloidosis

    Although several case reports and case series have described 18F-FDG PET/CT in amyloidosis, the value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosing amyloidosis has not been clarified. We investigated the imaging findings of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with primary systemic AL amyloidosis. Subjects were 15 patients (M:F = 12:3; age, 61.5 ± 7.4 years) with histologically confirmed primary systemic AL amyloidosis who underwent pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT to rule out the possibility of malignancy or for initial workup of alleged cancer. For involved organs, visual and semiquantitative analyses were performed on 18F-FDG PET/CT images. In total, 22 organs (10 hearts, 5 kidneys, 2 stomachs, 2 colons, 1 ileum, 1 pancreas, and 1 liver) were histologically confirmed to have primary systemic AL amyloidosis. F-FDG uptake was significantly increased in 15 of the 22 organs (68.2 %; 10 hearts, 2 kidneys, 1 colon, 1 ileum, and 1 liver; SUVmax = 7.0 ± 3.2, range 2.1–14.1). However, in 11 of 15 PET-positive organs (78.6 %; 10 hearts and the ileum), it was difficult to differentiate pathological uptake from physiological uptake. Definitely abnormal 18F-FDG uptake was found in only 4 of the 22 organs (18.2 %; 2 kidneys, 1 colon, and the liver). 18F-FDG uptake was negative for pancreas and gastric lesions. Although 18F-FDG PET/CT showed high uptake in two-thirds of the organs involving primary systemic AL amyloidosis, its sensitivity appeared to be low to make differentiation of pathological uptake from physiological uptake. However, due to the small number of cases, further study for the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in amyloidosis will be warranted

  14. Adrenal tuberculosis masquerading as disseminated malignancy: A pitfall of (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    Gorla, A K R; Gupta, K; Sood, A; Biswal, C K; Bhansali, A; Mittal, B R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of adrenal lesions is a commonly encountered diagnostic challenge. Characteristic clinical and correlative imaging findings may assist in only arriving at a probable diagnosis. Currently, (18)F-FDG PET/CT is considered to provide the most comprehensive imaging information. We here present a case of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis that highlights the need for caution during the interpretation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and also the need to suggest histopathological correlation. PMID:26853485

  15. Typical cerebral metabolic patterns in various types of dementia: an SPM analysis of 18F-FDG PET images

    Cui, Rui-Xue; Niu, Na; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Jing; Li, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To delineate the cerebral metabolic patterns presented in 18F-FDG PET images in various types of dementia with SPM analysis.  Methods Patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET scanning with a retrospectively confirmed diagnosis according to strictly defined clinical research criteria were studied. Clinical follow-up enabled appropriate patient inclusion. A total of 62 patients were included, of which 20 patients were diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD), 20 frontotemporal dementia ...

  16. Analysis of 18F-FDG PET images of patients with sarcoidosis

    Objective: To analyse 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images of patients with sarcoidosis, make an abstract of image characteristics. Methods: Twenty-four cases with sarcoidosis underwent both PET and CT. Among them, 5 were with pathologic evidence and had clinical symptoms, 19 were with positive Kveim test but asymptomatic. All 24 cases kept a fast of 6 h and the blood glucose was controlled below 6.7 mmol/L before injection of FDG. 40 min after administration, PET scan was performed with Siemens ECAT 47. After getting images through reconstruction by computer, the location and contour of the lesions were reviewed; the sizes and standardized uptake value (SUV) were measured. Results: For all 24 cases, strings of nodules were observed along the hili of lungs and the mediastinum, one of them had a nodule with high uptake of 18F-FDG in the left axilla in addition to the nodules along the hili of lungs and mediastinum. Sizes of nodules of 5 cases with symptoms and of 19 without symptoms were (2.16±0.67) and (1.55±0.21) cm, respectively; SUV were 2.68 ± 0.58 and 1.46±0.24, respectively. There was significant difference in the sizes and SUV of nodules between 5 with symptoms and 19 without symptoms (P 18F-FDG PET image characteristics of sarcoidosis i. e. strings of nodules distributing along the lung hili and mediastinum. Sizes of nodules were bigger and uptakes of 18F-FDG were higher for cases with symptoms than those for the asymptomatic cases

  17. Automatic extraction analysis of the anatomical functional area for normal brain 18F-FDG PET imaging

    Using self-designed automatic extraction software of brain functional area, the grey scale distribution of 18F-FDG imaging and the relationship between the 18F-FDG accumulation of brain anatomic function area and the 18F-FDG injected dose, the level of glucose, the age, etc., were studied. According to the Talairach coordinate system, after rotation, drift and plastic deformation, the 18F-FDG PET imaging was registered into the Talairach coordinate atlas, and then the average gray value scale ratios between individual brain anatomic functional area and whole brain area was calculated. Further more the statistics of the relationship between the 18F-FDG accumulation of every brain anatomic function area and the 18F-FDG injected dose, the level of glucose and the age were tested by using multiple stepwise regression model. After images' registration, smoothing and extraction, main cerebral cortex of the 18F-FDG PET brain imaging can be successfully localized and extracted, such as frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, temporal lobe, cerebellum, brain ventricle, thalamus and hippocampus. The average ratios to the inner reference of every brain anatomic functional area were 1.01 ± 0.15. By multiple stepwise regression with the exception of thalamus and hippocampus, the grey scale of all the brain functional area was negatively correlated to the ages, but with no correlation to blood sugar and dose in all areas. To the 18F-FDG PET imaging, the brain functional area extraction program could automatically delineate most of the cerebral cortical area, and also successfully reflect the brain blood and metabolic study, but extraction of the more detailed area needs further investigation

  18. Pitfalls in [18F]FDG PET imaging in gynecological malignancies.

    Hernandez Pampaloni, Miguel; Facchetti, Luca; Nardo, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the leading causes of cancer in women and they represent about 10 to 20% of all solid tumors. During the past few decades, technological advancements in the detection and staging have gained a pivotal role in all oncological processes, including the gynecological ones. Beyond ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that are conventionally used for anatomical imaging, [18F]FDG imaging and its hybrid further development as PET/CT has become a crucial tool due of its ability to combine functional metabolic and anatomic information, and the ability to image the entire whole body in a single examination. Since the introduction of integrated hybrid PET/CT systems into clinical practice the accurate analysis of the images has detected a number of limitations and pitfalls. The purpose of this review was to describe in detail the different pitfalls related to the use of [18F]FDG PET/CT in the gynecological malignancies, providing imaging examples and discussing possible ways to avoid misinterpretations. PMID:26937887

  19. Novel synthesis and initial preclinical evaluation of 18F-[FDG] labeled rhodamine: a potential PET myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    Myocardial perfusion imaging is one of the most commonly performed investigations in nuclear medicine studies. Due to the clinical importance of [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) and its availability in almost every PET center, a new radiofluorinated [18F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate was synthesized using [18F]-FDG as a prosthetic group. In a convenient and simple one-step radiosynthesis, [18F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate was prepared in quantitative radiochemical yields, with total synthesis time of nearly 20 min and radiochemical purity of greater than 98%, without the need for HPLC purification, which make these approaches amenable for automation. Biodistribution studies in normal rats at 60 min post-injection demonstrated a high uptake in the heart (> 11% ID/g) and favorable pharmacokinetics. Additionally, [18F]-FDG-rhodamine showed an extraction value of 27.63% ± 5.12% in rat hearts. These results demonstrate that [18F]-FDG-rhodamine conjugate may be useful as an imaging agent for the positron emission tomography evaluation of myocardial perfusion. - Highlights: • Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston • Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston • Harvard Medical School, Boston

  20. Imaging findings and literature review of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in primary systemic AL amyloidosis

    Lee, Joo Hee; Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jeon, Eun Seok; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Choi, Joon Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Although several case reports and case series have described {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in amyloidosis, the value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for diagnosing amyloidosis has not been clarified. We investigated the imaging findings of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with primary systemic AL amyloidosis. Subjects were 15 patients (M:F = 12:3; age, 61.5 ± 7.4 years) with histologically confirmed primary systemic AL amyloidosis who underwent pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to rule out the possibility of malignancy or for initial workup of alleged cancer. For involved organs, visual and semiquantitative analyses were performed on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images. In total, 22 organs (10 hearts, 5 kidneys, 2 stomachs, 2 colons, 1 ileum, 1 pancreas, and 1 liver) were histologically confirmed to have primary systemic AL amyloidosis. F-FDG uptake was significantly increased in 15 of the 22 organs (68.2 %; 10 hearts, 2 kidneys, 1 colon, 1 ileum, and 1 liver; SUV{sub max} = 7.0 ± 3.2, range 2.1–14.1). However, in 11 of 15 PET-positive organs (78.6 %; 10 hearts and the ileum), it was difficult to differentiate pathological uptake from physiological uptake. Definitely abnormal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was found in only 4 of the 22 organs (18.2 %; 2 kidneys, 1 colon, and the liver). {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was negative for pancreas and gastric lesions. Although {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed high uptake in two-thirds of the organs involving primary systemic AL amyloidosis, its sensitivity appeared to be low to make differentiation of pathological uptake from physiological uptake. However, due to the small number of cases, further study for the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in amyloidosis will be warranted.

  1. 18F-FDG PET imaging of postoperative and post radiotherapeutic intracranial glioma compared with CT, MRI in 16 cases

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of 18F-FDG PET imaging in postoperative and post radiotherapeutic intracranial glioma during follow up study. Methods: 18F-FDG PET imaging in 16 cases of postoperative and post radiotherapeutic intracranial glioma was compared with CT and/or MRI. Results: Contrast CT or MRI showed prominent irregular circular or nodular enhancement in 14 of 16 cases (64%), can not distinguished from postoperative changes, radioactive injury, tumor residue or recurrence. Among them, 9 cases showed tumor residue or recurrence based on significantly increased FDG uptake, 5 were confirmed by pathologic study. The other 5 cases of cerebral necrosis and 2 cases with postoperative cerebral malacia demonstrated FDG uptake defects. Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET imaging has significant dominance in characterizing lesions for differentiating residue or recurrent disease from radioactive injury in intracranial glioma. Combined with CT and MRI can provide both anatomical and functional information

  2. Basic principles and applications of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in oral and maxillofacial imaging: A pictorial essay

    A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) has increasingly become a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer. On the basis of both recent literature and our professional experience, we present a set of principles with pictorial illustrations and clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation and management planning of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We feel that this paper will be of interest and will aid the learning of oral and maxillofacial radiology trainees and practitioners.

  3. Recognition of fibrous dysplasia of bone mimicking skeletal metastasis on 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging

    Fibrous dysplasia of bone (FDB) reveals intense 18F-FDG uptake mimicking metastases on 18F-FDG PET/CT. We reviewed sites of FDB revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging to allow identification of this abnormality. Eleven patients (7 male, 4 female, aged 16-78 years) were evaluated after 55 MBq (0.15 mCi)/kg 18F-FDG utilizing a 16-slice multiple detector CT (MDCT) whole-body PET scanner, with LOR algorithm 3D reconstruction. One- and 2-h imaging was performed in 9 patients. Standard uptake value (SUV) for each lesion, on early and delayed imaging, was calculated. Lesions were confirmed in 6 patients by biopsy. The PET images correlated with MDCT to establish the imaging characteristics. Solitary lesions were found in 4 patients, two lesions in 1 patient, and in 6 patients there were multiple bone lesions. The SUVearly ranged from 1.23 to 9.64 with an average of 3.76 ± 2.40. The SUVdelayed ranged from 1.76 to 11.42 with an average of 4.51 ± 3.07. The SUVdelayed decreased or increased slightly (-31% to 5%) in 6 of our patients, and increased significantly (11% to 39%) in 3. There was a negative correlation between SUVs and age, as well as the number of affected bones. In our study, FDB had wide skeletal distribution with variability of 18F-FDG uptake and CT appearance. SUV in the delayed stage was seen to either decrease or increase on dual-time 18F-FDG PET scanning. It is very important to recognize the characteristics of this skeletal dysplasia to allow differentiation from skeletal metastasis. (orig.)

  4. Recognition of fibrous dysplasia of bone mimicking skeletal metastasis on 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging

    Su, Ming Gang; Tian, Rong; Fan, Qiu Ping; Tian, Ye; Li, Fang Lan; Li, Lin; Kuang, An Ren [Sichuan University School of Medicine, National Key Discipline of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, West China Hospital, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Miller, John Howard [Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Fibrous dysplasia of bone (FDB) reveals intense 18F-FDG uptake mimicking metastases on 18F-FDG PET/CT. We reviewed sites of FDB revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging to allow identification of this abnormality. Eleven patients (7 male, 4 female, aged 16-78 years) were evaluated after 55 MBq (0.15 mCi)/kg 18F-FDG utilizing a 16-slice multiple detector CT (MDCT) whole-body PET scanner, with LOR algorithm 3D reconstruction. One- and 2-h imaging was performed in 9 patients. Standard uptake value (SUV) for each lesion, on early and delayed imaging, was calculated. Lesions were confirmed in 6 patients by biopsy. The PET images correlated with MDCT to establish the imaging characteristics. Solitary lesions were found in 4 patients, two lesions in 1 patient, and in 6 patients there were multiple bone lesions. The SUV{sub early} ranged from 1.23 to 9.64 with an average of 3.76 {+-} 2.40. The SUV{sub delayed} ranged from 1.76 to 11.42 with an average of 4.51 {+-} 3.07. The SUV{sub delayed} decreased or increased slightly (-31% to 5%) in 6 of our patients, and increased significantly (11% to 39%) in 3. There was a negative correlation between SUVs and age, as well as the number of affected bones. In our study, FDB had wide skeletal distribution with variability of 18F-FDG uptake and CT appearance. SUV in the delayed stage was seen to either decrease or increase on dual-time 18F-FDG PET scanning. It is very important to recognize the characteristics of this skeletal dysplasia to allow differentiation from skeletal metastasis. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of lung metastasis tumor mouse model using [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET and CT

    Kim, June Youp; Woo, Sang Keun; Lee, Tae Sup [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to image metastaic lung melanoma model with optimal pre-conditions for animal handling by using [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET and clinical CT. The pre-conditions for lung region tumor imaging were 16-22 h fasting and warming temperature at 30 .deg. C. Small animal PET image was obtained at 60 min postinjection of 7.4 MBq [{sup 18}F]FDG and compared pattern of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake and glucose standard uptake value (SUVG) of lung region between Ketamine/Xylazine (Ke/Xy) and Isoflurane (Iso) anesthetized group in normal mice. Metastasis tumor mouse model to lung was established by intravenous injection of B16-F10 cells in C57BL/6 mice. In lung metastasis tumor model, [{sup 18}F]FDG image was obtained and fused with anatomical clinical CT image. Average blood glucose concentration in normal mice were 128.0 {+-} 22.87 and 86.0 {+-} 21.65 mg/dL in Ke/Xy group and Iso group, respectively. Ke/Xy group showed 1.5 fold higher blood glucose concentration than Iso group. Lung to Background ratio (L/B) in SUVG image was 8.6 {+-} 0.48 and 12.1 {+-}0.63 in Ke/Xy group and Iso group, respectively. In tumor detection in lung region, [{sup 18}F]FDG image of Iso group was better than that of Ke/Xy group, because of high L/B ratio. Metastatic tumor location in [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET image was confirmed by fusion image using clinical CT. Tumor imaging in small animal lung region with [{sup 18}F]FDG small animal PET should be considered pre-conditions which fasting, warming and an anesthesia during [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. Fused imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of metastatic tumor in lung region.

  6. Predicting future morphological changes of lesions from radiotracer uptake in 18F-FDG-PET images.

    Bagci, Ulas; Yao, Jianhua; Miller-Jaster, Kirsten; Chen, Xinjian; Mollura, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel computational framework to enable automated identification of texture and shape features of lesions on (18)F-FDG-PET images through a graph-based image segmentation method. The proposed framework predicts future morphological changes of lesions with high accuracy. The presented methodology has several benefits over conventional qualitative and semi-quantitative methods, due to its fully quantitative nature and high accuracy in each step of (i) detection, (ii) segmentation, and (iii) feature extraction. To evaluate our proposed computational framework, thirty patients received 2 (18)F-FDG-PET scans (60 scans total), at two different time points. Metastatic papillary renal cell carcinoma, cerebellar hemongioblastoma, non-small cell lung cancer, neurofibroma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, lung neoplasm, neuroendocrine tumor, soft tissue thoracic mass, nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation, renal cell carcinoma with papillary and cystic features, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma, and small cell lung cancer were included in this analysis. The radiotracer accumulation in patients' scans was automatically detected and segmented by the proposed segmentation algorithm. Delineated regions were used to extract shape and textural features, with the proposed adaptive feature extraction framework, as well as standardized uptake values (SUV) of uptake regions, to conduct a broad quantitative analysis. Evaluation of segmentation results indicates that our proposed segmentation algorithm has a mean dice similarity coefficient of 85.75 ± 1.75%. We found that 28 of 68 extracted imaging features were correlated well with SUV(max) (p<0.05), and some of the textural features (such as entropy and maximum probability) were superior in predicting morphological changes of radiotracer uptake regions longitudinally, compared to single intensity feature such as SUV(max). We also found that integrating textural features with SUV

  7. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in diagnosing and prognosticating Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    In order to evaluate the importance of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in diagnosing and prognosticating Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM), The clinical 18F-FDG PET/CT images of nineteen patients, treated in this hospital from October, 2006 to March, 2010, were reviewed. The patients' plasma carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was measured, and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was determined from the most active pleural lesion in each patient, MPM was histologically confirmed in 17 patients while 2 patients were diagnosed to have benign pleural diseases. The coincidence rate of PET/CT was 89%. Significant differences in SUVmax were found between patients with MPM (11.88±5.39) and those with benign pleural lesions (4.1±0.85) (P=0.0058, P 18F-FDG PET/CT is an sensitive technique for diagnosing malignant pleural mesothelioma and the SUVmax is correlated histologically with clinical grades, update types and CEA levels. Poor prognosis was observed for the following cases: non- epithelial sub- type; Grad Ⅳ, encasing updated group, and the group with CEA ≥ 5 μg/L. In summary, 18F-FDG PET/CT should play important roles in diagnosing and prognosticating malignant pleural mesothelioma. (authors)

  8. Longitudinal imaging of Alzheimer pathology using [11C]PIB, [18F]FDDNP and [18F]FDG PET

    [11C]PIB and [18F]FDDNP are PET tracers for in vivo detection of the neuropathology underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). [18F]FDG is a glucose analogue and its uptake reflects metabolic activity. The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinal changes in these tracers in patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in healthy controls. Longitudinal, paired, dynamic [11C]PIB and [18F]FDDNP (90 min each) and static [18F]FDG (15 min) PET scans were obtained in 11 controls, 12 MCI patients and 8 AD patients. The mean interval between baseline and follow-up was 2.5 years (range 2.0-4.0 years). Parametric [11C]PIB and [18F]FDDNP images of binding potential (BPND) and [18F]FDG standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) images were generated. A significant increase in global cortical [11C]PIB BPND was found in MCI patients, but no changes were observed in AD patients or controls. Subsequent regional analysis revealed that this increase in [11C]PIB BPND in MCI patients was most prominent in the lateral temporal lobe (p 18F]FDDNP, no changes in global BPND were found. [18F]FDG uptake was reduced at follow-up in the AD group only, especially in frontal, parietal and lateral temporal lobes (all p 11C]PIB binding (ρ = -0.42, p 18F]FDG uptake (ρ = 0.54, p 18F]FDDNP binding (ρ = -0.18, p = 0.35) were not. [11C]PIB and [18F]FDG track molecular changes in different stages of AD. We found increased amyloid load in MCI patients and progressive metabolic impairment in AD patients. [18F]FDDNP seems to be less useful for examining disease progression. (orig.)

  9. Significance of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of the efficacy of lymphoma

    CHEN Chengcheng; WANG Zhengguang; CHENG Nan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the 18F-labeled deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of the efficacy of ly-mphoma significance.Methods:42 cases of our hospital patients with malignant lymphoma for 2-5 times 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging results in the treatment process, and the treatment process simple CT results were compared and analyzed, the final results were confirmed by pathology and clinical. Results:The lesions were found in153,including 141 malignant, benign 12, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy evaluating of lymphoma treatment effect of 18F-FDG PET/CT were, 99.30%, 91.67%, 98.70%, were significantly better than CT examination (P18F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of ly-mphoma treatment was superior to CT scan purely, it is an effective means of monitoring the efficacy of lymphoma, it can provide the basis for effective treatment programs in clinical work.

  10. Experimental study of the molecular mechanisms of myocardial ischemic memory with 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging

    This study was aimed to explore whether the changes of mRNA and the existence and duration of ischemic 18F-FDG uptake correlate with the extent of myocardial ischemia in ischemia-reperfusion canine model. The 20-minute (n= 4) and 40-minute (n=4) coronary artery occlusion followed by 24 h of open-artery reperfusion in canine model were per- formed. All dogs underwent fasting (>12 h) dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT and 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT imaging at baseline, 1 h and 24 h after reperfusion. When all imaging were completed, myocardial samples from the ischemic and nonischemic region were obtained, and the mRNA expression of glucose transporter-l (GLUT-1), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), and heart-fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) were estimated by Real Time PCR. There was no difference in the ratio of hypoperfused region/nomoperfused region of 18F-FDG up- take between the 20-minute group and 40-minute group at baseline. When examined at 1 h, increased 18F-FDG uptake was observed in the 40-minute group. When estimated at 24 h, only the 40-minute group showed slightly higher 18F-FDG uptake than baseline, whereas no such difference was demonstrated in the 20-minute group. Similar mRNA expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-4 and H-FABP were demonstrated in the nonischemic regions between the 2 groups, whereas increased expressions of GLUT-1 and GLUT-4, and decreased H-FABP mRNA were demonstrated in the ischemic regions. The changes of mRNA expression were more obvious in the 40 minute group than in the 20-minute group. The results showed that the existence and persistent period of ischemic 18F-FDG uptake (ischemic memory) was correlated with the extent of myocardial ischemia. (authors)

  11. Metabolic Super Scan in 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Chang Guhn; Park, Soon-Ah; Jung, Sang-Ah; Yang, Sei-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    A 50-yr-old man presented with intermittent hemoptysis and was diagnosed small cell lung cancer. 18F-FDG PET/CT for staging demonstrated extensive hypermetabolic lesions throughout the skeleton and liver. Interestingly, skeletal muscles of limbs, mediastinum, bowel, and especially brain showed very low FDG uptake. Because of some characteristics in common with super scan on skeletal scintigraphy, this case could be considered as 'metabolic super scan'.

  12. Differentiation of cardiac thrombus from cardiac tumor combining cardiac MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    Rinuncini, Massimo; Zuin, Marco; Scaranello, Fiorenzo; Fejzo, Majlinda; Rampin, Lucia; Rubello, Domenico; Faggian, Giuseppe; Roncon, Loris

    2016-06-01

    Radiological differentiation of an unknown cardiac masse is often a challenging issue. 18F-FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed to evaluate a left ventricle mass visualized on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in a patient with an history of ischemic heart disease. The metabolically inert area on the PET/CT, corresponding to the relatively homogenous hypodensity in the LV, was thought to represent an old organized LV thrombus. Histopathological examination confirmed the imaging diagnosis. PMID:27038712

  13. (18)F-FDG PET patterns and BAL cell profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    Keijsers, R.G.; Grutters, J.C.; Velzen-Blad, H. van; Bosch, J.M. van den; Oyen, W.J.G.; Verzijlbergen, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET can both demonstrate sarcoid activity. To assess whether metabolic activity imaged by (18)F-FDG PET represents signs of disease activity as reflected by BAL, (18)F-FDG PET patterns were compared with BAL cell profiles

  14. Basic principles and applications of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in oral and maxillofacial imaging: A pictorial essay

    Omami, Galal [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The Hong Kong University, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Tamimi, Dania [BeamReaders Inc., Orlando (United States); Branstette, Barton F. [Dept. of Otolaryngology and Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) has increasingly become a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer. On the basis of both recent literature and our professional experience, we present a set of principles with pictorial illustrations and clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation and management planning of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We feel that this paper will be of interest and will aid the learning of oral and maxillofacial radiology trainees and practitioners.

  15. [18F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [18F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [18F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [18F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [18F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [18F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [18F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [18F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [18F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [18F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [18F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast agent is contraindicated. (orig.)

  16. Metabolic brain networks in patients with Parkinson's disease based on 18F-FDG PET imaging

    Objective: To validate PD-related pattern (PDRP) network as a measure of PD by 18F-FDG PET imaging. Methods: Thirty-two PD patients with different severities and 32 healthy controls matched by age and gender were recruited in studies of resting-state brain 18F-FDG PET imaging. To obtain the PDRP, principal component analysis (PCA) was used. The correlations between PDRP expression and the severities of PD (classified by unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) motor scores and Hoehn and Yahr stages) were investigated. The two-sample t test and Pearson correlation analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: PDRP was characterized by relative metabolic increases in the putamen, globus pallidus (GP), thalamus, pons, cerebellum and primary motor cortex, and was associated with decreases in the premotor and posterior parietal areas. The value of PDRP expression in PD group (1.605±0.655) was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (0.000±0.523; t=10.829, P<0.001). The value of PDRP expression also correlated significantly with UPDRS motor scores (r=0.760, P<0.001) and Hoehn and Yahr stages in PD group (r=0.736, P<0.001). Conclusion: The PDRP based on 18F-FDG PET imaging can be useful for identification of PD patients from healthy controls and correlates well with the severity of the disease. (authors)

  17. Typical cerebral metabolic patterns in various types of dementia: an SPM analysis of 18F-FDG PET images

    Rui-xue CUI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To delineate the cerebral metabolic patterns presented in 18F-FDG PET images in various types of dementia with SPM analysis.  Methods Patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET scanning with a retrospectively confirmed diagnosis according to strictly defined clinical research criteria were studied. Clinical follow-up enabled appropriate patient inclusion. A total of 62 patients were included, of which 20 patients were diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease (AD, 20 frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 10 dementia with Lewy body (DLB, 7 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 3 primary progressive aphasia (PPA, 1 corticobasal ganglionic degeneration (CBD, 1 multiple system atrophy (MSA. 18F-FDG PET images of each group were analyzed and compared to 20 healthy controls using SPM5. Results Disease-specific patterns of relatively decreased metabolic activity were found in AD (bilateral parietotemporal regions and frontal regions sparing sensorimotor cortex, FTD (asymmetric frontotemporal regions, DLB (occipital lobe, visual cortex and bilateral superior temporal gyrus, PSP (bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterolateral temporal regions, caudate nucleus and mesencephalon, PPA (Broca's area in left frontal lobe, left temporal cortex excepting posterior superior temporal gyrus, CBD (asymmetricly involved cortical regions, prodominately on right side, around bilateral central sulcus and right basal ganglia, MSA (bilateral cerebellum dorsolateral cortex and left putamen, and right medial temporal cortex.  Conclusions Specific dementia related cerebral metabolic patterns in 18F-FDG PET might assist in early differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.04.008

  18. Assessment of aortitis by semiquantitative analysis of 180-min 18F-FDG PET/CT acquisition images

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of semiquantitative analysis of 180-min 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the assessment of aortitis in cases of suspected large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and to establish a threshold index for application in the clinical setting. This prospective study included 43 patients (mean age 67.5 ± 12.9 years) with suspicion of LVV (25 with a final diagnosis of aortitis). 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was acquired 180 min after injection of 7 MBq/kg of 18F-FDG. A semiquantitative analysis was performed calculating the aortic wall maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) (T), the lumen SUVmax (B) and the target to background ratio (TBR). These results were also compared with those obtained in a control population. The mean aortic wall SUVmax was 2.00 ± 0.62 for patients with aortitis and 1.45 ± 0.31 for patients without aortitis (p max (0.997 vs 0.871). The highest sensitivity and specificity was obtained for a TBR of 1.34 (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 94.4 %). Semiquantitative analysis of PET/CT images acquired 180 min after 18F-FDG injection and the TBR index of 1.34 show very high accuracy and, therefore, are strongly recommended for the diagnosis of aortitis in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  19. Improved characterization of molecular phenotypes in breast lesions using 18F-FDG PET image homogeneity

    Cao, Kunlin; Bhagalia, Roshni; Sood, Anup; Brogi, Edi; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using uorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is commonly used in the assessment of breast lesions by computing voxel-wise standardized uptake value (SUV) maps. Simple metrics derived from ensemble properties of SUVs within each identified breast lesion are routinely used for disease diagnosis. The maximum SUV within the lesion (SUVmax) is the most popular of these metrics. However these simple metrics are known to be error-prone and are susceptible to image noise. Finding reliable SUV map-based features that correlate to established molecular phenotypes of breast cancer (viz. estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression) will enable non-invasive disease management. This study investigated 36 SUV features based on first and second order statistics, local histograms and texture of segmented lesions to predict ER and PR expression in 51 breast cancer patients. True ER and PR expression was obtained via immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tissue samples from each lesion. A supervised learning, adaptive boosting-support vector machine (AdaBoost-SVM), framework was used to select a subset of features to classify breast lesions into distinct phenotypes. Performance of the trained multi-feature classifier was compared against the baseline single-feature SUVmax classifier using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results show that texture features encoding local lesion homogeneity extracted from gray-level co-occurrence matrices are the strongest discriminator of lesion ER expression. In particular, classifiers including these features increased prediction accuracy from 0.75 (baseline) to 0.82 and the area under the ROC curve from 0.64 (baseline) to 0.75.

  20. Fever of unknown origin: A value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT with integrated full diagnostic isotropic CT imaging

    Aim: The aim of presented work is to evaluate the clinical value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and to compare PET/CT finding with the results of the following investigation. Material and method: 48 patients (24 men, 24 women, mean age 57.6 years with range 15-89 years) underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT due to the fever of unknown origin. All examinations were performed using complex PET/CT protocol combined PET and whole diagnostic contrast enhanced CT with sub-millimeter spatial resolution (except patient with history of iodine hypersensitivity or sever renal impairment). CT data contained diagnostic images reconstructed with soft tissue and high-resolution algorithm. PET/CT finding were compared with results of biopsies, immunology, microbiology or autopsy. Results: The cause of FUO was explained according to the PET/CT findings and followed investigations in 44 of 48 cases-18 cases of microbial infections, nine cases of autoimmune inflammations, four cases of non-infectious granulomatous diseases, eight cases of malignancies and five cases of proved immunity disorders were found. In 46 cases, the PET/CT interpretation was correct. Only in one case, the cause was overlooked and the uptake in atherosclerotic changes of arteries was misinterpreted as vasculitis in the other. The reached sensitivity was 97% (43/44), and specificity 75% (3/4) respectively. Conclusion: In patients with fever of unknown origin, 18F-FDG-PET/CT might enable the detection of its cause.

  1. 放射性核素标记胆碱与18F-FDG PET肿瘤显像的对比研究%Comparison choline with 18F-FDG PET in various tumors imaging

    李亚军; 张慧娟

    2010-01-01

    18F-FDG PET has become the preferred method of staging and restaging of many malignant neoplasms. Its application has increased diagnostic accuracy and exerted a considerable impact on the treatment of patients. 18F-FDG PET has also become extremely valuable in therapy efficacy monitoring of many malignant neoplasms. Choline is critical for cellular membrane structures and function. Choline metabolism increases in malignant neoplasms. 11C-/18F-choline PET has been used in diagnosis and detection of many malignant neoplasms and metastases. This paper reviews the value of 18F-FDG and 11C-/18F-choline PET in tumors imaging and compares their advantages and limitations.%18F-FDG PET是目前临床上许多恶性肿瘤分期和再分期的首选检查方法,可明显提高恶性肿瘤的诊断准确性,对患者的治疗方案的选择产生了很大影响,而且在恶性肿瘤的疗效监测中也有很大价值.胆碱是保持细胞膜结构和功能完整性的重要成分,恶性肿瘤的胆碱代谢增高.11C-/18F-胴碱PET在临床上已用于许多恶性肿瘤的诊断及转移瘤的检出.该文回顾了18F-FDG和11C-/18F-胆碱PET在肿瘤显像中的应用价值,并比较了其优势和限度.

  2. Assessment of Tumor Response to Therapy in Lymphoma Using 18F-FDG PET: Diagnostic Performance of 18F-FDG PET and Interval Likelihood Ratio

    In this paper, the authors intended to summarize briefly the features of lymphoma with regard to 18F-FDG PET for assessment of tumor response to therapy, to describe why assessment of treatment response should be performed, to review what method so far has been used in monitoring treatment response, to discuss what limitations of morphologic imaging criteria for assessing tumor response are, in compared with 18F-FDG PET, and to introduce recently proposed criteria for assessing tumor response in malignant lymphoma. And also the authors emphasize the need to understand the characteristics of diagnostic performance of 18F-FDG PET in several clinical settings in order to interpret 18F-FDG PET results appropriately, and to encourage the use of interval likelihood ratio to enhance clinical implications of test results which, in turns, allows referring physicians to understand the meaning of interpretation with easy. Until recently, treatment response has been assessed according to the morphologic criteria. Metabolic imaging with 18F-FDG PET was adopted to have important role for treatment assessment in IWC+PET criteria proposed recently by IHP. To accomplish this role, we should perform and interpret 18F-FDG PET according to IWC+PET criteria. It is important for referring physicians to understand the various limitations of 18F-FDG PET and pitfalls in PET interpretation, and to understand that clinical information are needed by nuclear medicine physicians to optimize the interpretation of 18F-FDG PET

  3. Assessment of aortitis by semiquantitative analysis of 180-min {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT acquisition images

    Martinez-Rodriguez, Isabel [University of Cantabria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander (Spain); Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, S. Medicina Nuclear, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Amador, N.; Banzo, I.; Quirce, R.; Jimenez-Bonilla, J.; Arcocha-Torres, M. de; Ibanez-Bravo, S.; Lavado-Perez, C.; Bravo-Ferrer, Z.; Carril, J.M. [University of Cantabria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander (Spain); Blanco, R.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A. [University of Cantabria, Department of Rheumatology, Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital, Santander (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of semiquantitative analysis of 180-min {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the assessment of aortitis in cases of suspected large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and to establish a threshold index for application in the clinical setting. This prospective study included 43 patients (mean age 67.5 ± 12.9 years) with suspicion of LVV (25 with a final diagnosis of aortitis). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan was acquired 180 min after injection of 7 MBq/kg of {sup 18}F-FDG. A semiquantitative analysis was performed calculating the aortic wall maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) (T), the lumen SUV{sub max} (B) and the target to background ratio (TBR). These results were also compared with those obtained in a control population. The mean aortic wall SUV{sub max} was 2.00 ± 0.62 for patients with aortitis and 1.45 ± 0.31 for patients without aortitis (p < 0.0001). The TBR was 1.66 ± 0.26 for patients with aortitis and 1.24 ± 0.08 for patients without aortitis (p < 0.0001). The differences were also statistically significant when the patients with aortitis and controls were compared. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that the area under the curve was greater for the TBR than for the aortic wall SUV{sub max} (0.997 vs 0.871). The highest sensitivity and specificity was obtained for a TBR of 1.34 (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 94.4 %). Semiquantitative analysis of PET/CT images acquired 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG injection and the TBR index of 1.34 show very high accuracy and, therefore, are strongly recommended for the diagnosis of aortitis in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  4. Role of 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging for the detection of an unknown primary tumour: preliminary results in 21 patients

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary origin is a syndrome characterised by a poor prognosis, with a typical survival rate from diagnosis of no longer than 1 year. Only 20-27% of primary tumours are identified by conventional radiological imaging. By contrast, it has been reported that 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) allows the identification of 24-40% of otherwise unrecognised primary tumours. To our knowledge, the studies on this topic have been conducted using 18F-FDG PET imaging alone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential additional diagnostic role of fused 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging for the detection of metastatic occult primary tumours. The study population consisted of 21 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven metastatic disease and negative conventional diagnostic procedures. Each patient underwent a PET scan, carried out according to a standard procedure (6 h of fasting, i.v. injection of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG and image acquisition with a dedicated PET-CT scanner for 4 min per bed position). 18F-FDG PET-CT detected the occult primary tumour in 12 patients (57% of cases), providing a detection rate higher than that reported with any other imaging modality, including conventional 18F-FDG PET. The favourable results of this study need to be confirmed in larger patient populations with long-term follow-up. (orig.)

  5. Large-Vessel Vasculitis: Interobserver Agreement and Diagnostic Accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    K. D. F. Lensen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. 18F-FDG-PET visualises inflammation. Both atherosclerosis and giant cell arteritis cause vascular inflammation, but distinguishing the two may be difficult. The goal of this study was to assess interobserver agreement and diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET for the detection of large artery involvement in giant cell arteritis (GCA. Methods. 31 18F-FDG-PET/CT scans were selected from 2 databases. Four observers assessed vascular wall 18F-FDG uptake, initially without and subsequently with predefined observer criteria (i.e., vascular wall 18F-FDG uptake compared to liver or femoral artery 18F-FDG uptake. External validation was performed by two additional observers. Sensitivity and specificity of 18F-FDG-PET were determined by comparing scan results to a consensus diagnosis. Results. The highest interobserver agreement (kappa: 0.96 in initial study and 0.79 in external validation was observed when vascular wall 18F-FDG uptake higher than liver uptake was used as a diagnostic criterion, although agreement was also good without predefined criteria (kappa: 0.68 and 0.85. Sensitivity and specificity were comparable for these methods. The criterion of vascular wall 18F-FDG uptake equal to liver 18F-FDG uptake had low specificity. Conclusion. Standardization of image assessment for vascular wall 18F-FDG uptake promotes observer agreement, enables comparative studies, and does not appear to result in loss of diagnostic accuracy compared to nonstandardized assessment.

  6. {sup 18F}-FDG PET imaging with dual head gamma camera and co-incidence detection

    Quach, T.; Camden, B.M.; Chu, J.M.G. [Liverpool Health Services, Liverpool, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Ultrasound

    1998-06-01

    Full text: {sup 18F}-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron tomography is based on the detection of two 511 keV photons which are produced 180 deg apart as a result of an annihilation of a positron and an electron. Apart from the dedicated PET scanner, dual head gamma camera designed for Co-incidence Detection (CD) can now perform `{sup 18}F-FDG PET studies. CD imaging involves using a dual head gamma camera to detect those photons which are 180 deg apart and fall within a timing window of 15 nsec. No collimators are required as a timing gate of 15 nsec is used. {sup 18}F-FDG studies are performed using an ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) dual head gamma camera. The patients are fasted from midnight but well hydrated before the scan. Prior to injection, the blood sugar levels (BSL) are measured. For optimal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, the BSL should be less than 8.9 mmol/L. A dose of 200MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG is intravenously injected via a cannula. Scanning commences at 1 hour post injection. To perform a wholebody tomography of the torso, the patient must void before scanning to reduce bladder activity. Excessive bladder activity leads to significant image degradation, therefore the wholebody tomography is started from the pelvis. Depending on the patient torso length, either 2 or 3 tomographies are collected with a 50% overlap. Each tomography is collected for 40 seconds per step for 32 steps. To avoid attenuation from the upper limbs, the patient is positioned supine with the arms above the head. If a patient cannot tolerate this position, scanning with the arms by the side may be necessary since the scanning time may take up to 50 minutes. If the area of interest is the neck, scanning with the patient`s arms down by their sides is preferred, although attenuation will occur. To scan the brain, a circular tomography is performed using 32 steps at 80 seconds per step. For processing purposes, the Singles count rate for each detector must be between 800K and

  7. 18F-fluoride PET imaging in a nude rat model of bone metastasis from breast cancer: Comparison with 18F-FDG and bioluminescence imaging

    Introduction: Clinically-relevant animal models and appropriate imaging diagnostic tools are essential to study cancer and develop novel therapeutics. We evaluated a model of bone metastasis in nude rats by micro-PET and bioluminescence imaging. Methods: A bone metastasis model was produced by intracardiac injection of osteotropic MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc human breast cancer cells into nude rats. Bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET scans using 18F-FDG and 18F-fluoride were acquired serially for 5 weeks. We correlated bioluminescence imaging, 18F-FDG and 18F-fluoride PET images, and histological slides. Results: Multiple bone metastases were successfully evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and 18F-FDG and 18F-fluoride PET scans. Bioluminescence photon flux increased exponentially on weekly follow-up. 18F-FDG PET revealed increased FDG uptake at the spine and bilaterally in the hind legs in week 2 images, and showed a progressive pattern up to 4 weeks that correlated with bioluminescence imaging. 18F-fluoride PET showed minimal abnormal findings in week 2 images, but it showed an irregular pattern at the spine from week 3 or 4 images. On quantitative analysis with standardized uptake values, a pattern of gradual increase was observed from week 2 to week 4 in both 18F-FDG PET and fluoride PET. Histopathological examination confirmed the formation of osteolytic metastasis and necrosis of the distal femur, which appeared as a photon defect on PET scans. Conclusion: Developing bone metastasis from breast cancer in a nude rat model was successfully evaluated with an animal PET imaging system and bioluminescence imaging. This nude rat model of bone metastasis, which can be evaluated by PET imaging, may be a valuable tool for evaluating early responses to novel therapeutics

  8. The applications of 18F-FDG combined with 11C-acetate PET-CT imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic cancer

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma which threatens our health and life seriously ranks third in all the tumors in developing countries. Though most of the disease can be diagnosed by traditional imaging method such as CT, MRI, ultrasonography, for primary hepatocellular cartinoma that diagnoses hard with traditional method, PET-CT can be used as an effective supplement methods. The positive rate of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of primary hepato carcinoma was low. But when combined with 11C-acetate PET-CT, the sensitivity and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of primary hepato carcinoma could be improved. (authors)

  9. PET/CT imaging analysis of 18 F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue%18F-FDG PET/CT棕色脂肪摄取的影像学分析

    张建; 程超; 左长京; 王少雁; 刘庆华; 孔令山

    2012-01-01

    目的:分析18F-FDG PET/CT检查中棕色脂肪组织(BAT)摄取的规律和特点,以避免不必要的误诊.方法:回顾性分析行PET/CT全身检查的2350例受检者的图像.结果:34例(1.44%)有不同程度BAT摄取,其中恶性肿瘤患者9例(甲状腺癌术后4例).BAT显影主要在寒冷季节出现,女性比例(2.57%)高于男性(0.76%);特征性表现为对称性分布于肩颈部、锁骨上区、脊柱两旁、纵隔、肾上腺及肾周区的高摄取灶,SUVmax为7.18±4.27.BAT显影部位的数目与摄取的SUVmax呈正相关(r=0.78,P<o.05);5例检查者进行了延迟扫描,延迟后BAT分布、形态无明显变化,SUVmax显著升高(P<0.05).4例甲状腺癌术后复查病例的BAT摄取不同程度影响了对区域淋巴结的观察.结论:BAT摄取的分布及影像表现具有一定的特征性,显影部位越多,SUVmax越大,延迟扫描后SUVmax显著升高,容易干扰对显影区域病灶的观察.%Objective:To analysis the characteristics and the pattern of 18F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) on PET/CT imaging,in order to prevent unnecessary misdiagnosis. Methods:The clinical data of 2350 patients who received whole-body PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. Results:Of the 2350 patients,there were 34 patients (1. 44%) had various degrees of 18F-FDG uptake in BAT including 11 patients with malignant tumor (4 patients had previous thyroid carcinoma operation). 18F-FDG uptake in BAT was mainly seen in cold season,the proportion of female (2. 57%) was far more than that of male (0. 76%). The PET/CT characteristic appearances were symmetrically distributed high uptake in shoulder,neck,supraclavicular area,both sides of spinal columne, mediastinum, adrenal and peri-renal areas, with SUVmax as 7. 18±4. 27. The number of 18-FDG uptake areas were positively correlated with SUVmax value CR = 0. 78,P<0. 05). 5 cases had delay scan,the distribution sites and pattern of uptake showed no apparent change,but the SUVmax

  10. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on suspected cervical cancer recurrence

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on patients with suspected cervical cancer recurrence. Methods: Fifty-one cervical cancer patients, clinically suspected to have tumor recurrence during follow-up, underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination. 18F-FDG PET/CT results were compared with those of conventional images, as referred to histopathology or clinical follow-up. Impacts of 18F-FDG PET/CT were evaluated based on documented changes of clinical management. Results: In total, 43 patients were found to have positive lesions by 18F-FDG PET/CT, in which 40 were true recurrence,but 2 were pelvic abscess and 1 was radiation enterocolitis. Other 8 patients were found negative by 18F-FDG PET/CT and confirmed by pathology or follow-up. In patient-based analyses, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of tumor recurrence were 100% (40/40), 72.73% (8/11), and 94.12% (48/51) respectively. In 7 patients, the clinical management was changed due to 18F-FDG PET/CT findings. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT is an efficient tool for determining the recurrence of cervical cancer and instructing the clinical management. (authors)

  11. Comparative studies of '18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging and EEG in preoperative localization of temporal lobe epileptic focus

    Objective: To compare the value of 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging and EEG in preoperative localization of the epileptic focus at the temporal lobe. Methods: A total of 152 patients (108 males, 44 females, age ranged from 3 to 59 years old) with past history of temporal lobe epilepsy were included.All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging and long-range or video EEG, and 29 patients underwent intracranial electrode EEG due to the failure to localize the disease focus by non-invasive methods.Histopathologic findings after operative treatment were considered the gold standard for disease localization. All patients were followed up for at least six months after the operation. The accuracy of the 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging and long-range or video EEG examination were compared using χ2 test. Results: The accuracy of locating the epileptic focus was 80.92% (123/152) for 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging and 43.42% (66/152) for long-range or video EEG (χ2=22.72, P<0.01). The accuracy of locating the epileptic focus for the 29 cases with intracranial electrode EEG was 100%. Conclusions: Interictal 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging is a sensitive and effective method to locate the temporal lobe epileptic focus and is better than long-range or video EEG. The combination of 18F-FDG PET/CT brain imaging and intracranial electrode EEG examination can further improve the accuracy of locating the epileptic focus. (authors)

  12. 18F-FDG PET and 67Ga-Citrate imaging in the evaluation of HIV positive patients

    Full text: A 32-year-old HIV positive man presented with a four-day history of fever, sweats and chills, a one-week history of mild cough and shortness of breath, and a one-month history of intermittent epigastric pain. Clinical examination showed fever, mild hepatosplenomegaly and bibasal chest crepitations. A chest X-ray showed bilateral upper lobe non-cavitating lesions, confirmed on a CT scan. Upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy showed multiple nodules on the gastric mucosa. Biopsy of the nodules revealed large cell non-Hodgkin''s Iymphoma. As part of the staging procedure, the patient was referred for a gallium scan. The patient was injected with 67Ga-citrate and imaged on a Trionix BIAD gamma camera. Anterior and posterior whole body studies were performed at 48 hours and static views at 72 hours. Intense uptake of gallium in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen was found to be consistent with gastric Iymphoma. There was also marked pericardial uptake thought to be due to either Iymphomatous involvement or pericarditis. Foci of increased uptake in the apex of each lung were also noted. A fluorine-18-FDG PET scan was then performed to further evaluate the pericardial and lung uptake. The patient was injected with 370 MBq of 18F-FDG and imaged 40 minutes post-injection on the Siemens PET scanner. A whole body study was acquired consisting of eight 10 cm bed positions at eight minutes each. FDG accumulation was noted in the upper abdomen and correlated with the site of gallium uptake by the gastric Iymphoma. Two focal areas of increased glucose uptake was demonstrated at both lung apices due to metabolically active tumour. There was no glucose uptake in the pericardium to suggest tumour infiltration. CT scans and clinical follow up confirmed pericarditis as the cause of 67Ga uptake. Gallium scanning in HIV patients is complicated by increased uptake in both inflammatory and some neoplastic conditions.18F- FDG PET was able to differentiate Iymphoma from

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and diagnosis method of small intestine primary malignant neoplasms

    18F-FDG PET/CT data of 44 patients with small intestine disease (malignant, 25; benign, 19) were analyzed retrospectively. All results were proved by pathological, or diagnostic therapy and/or clinical follow-up. Visual and quantitative [intestinal wall thickness (IWT)] and semiquantitative methods [standardized uptake value (SUV)] were used to analyze the imaging features. The SUVmean and IWT were taken as the diagnostic threshold value for malignant when the Youden's index (YI) was maximum. The diagnostic test evaluation was compared with the final diagnostic results. The following results were obtained. (1) The 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging signs of small intestine carcinoma presented as intestinal local mass formation (84.00%), local wall thickening (76.00%), stenosis (25.00%), obstruction (32.00%) and enlargement of mesenteric lymph nodes (72.00%). But the incidence rates of these signs in the benign lesions were 31.58%, 42.11%, 10.53%, 15.79% and 52.63%, respectively. Only the signs of intestinal local mass formation (χ2=10.40, p2=3.90, pmax =0.589, the diagnostic threshold of IWT was 9.5 mm. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80.00%, 78.95% and 79.55%, respectively. (3) The SUVmean of intestinal malignant and benign lesions was 3.55±1.84 and 6.98±3.62 (t=3.77, pmax =0.379,the diagnostic threshold of SUVmean was 3.65. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80.00%, 57.89% and 70.48%, respectively. (4) Taking the intestinal mass formation as the diagnostic standard of malignant lesions, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 84.00%, 78.95% and 81.82%, respectively. The YImax was 0.630. (5) Taking the intestinal mass formation and SUVmean of max was 0.855. It can be used as the main evidence to differentiate the small intestine primary malignant and benign lesion with the 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging qualitative and quantitative signs for the intestinal mass formation, at SUVmean <3.65, and local wall thickening or IWT <9.50 mm. (authors)

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis of interictal 18F-FDG PET images for presurgical evaluation of epileptic foci in extratemporal lobe epilepsy

    Interictal 18F-FDG PET is beneficial to patients with epilepsy to define the epileptic foci before operation, especially to decide the laterality of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However usefulness has not been clearly established in extra TLE. We retrospectively applied Z-score analysis to interictal preoperative 18F-FDG PET images for detection of the epileptic foci in order to achieve better performance. Seventeen epileptic patients (women/men; 8/9, age; 11-55 yrs) underwent resection of epileptic foci with good outcome (Engel's stage of I or II) even after more than a year from operation. Presurgical 18F-FDG PET images were spatially normalized using statistical parametric mapping 99 (SPM99) with an original Japanese template for 18F-FDG and compared with normal database constructed from 31 healthy volunteers (women/men; 14/17, age; 19-59 yrs). A software program, easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS), for analysis of patient data was developed by calculating Z-score in each voxel and visualizing the score in a standardized stereotactic space; Z-score=(normal mean-patient's value)/a standard deviation of normal data. Detectability of epileptic foci for this computer-aided analysis was compared with visual inspection of original 18F-FDG PET images by five radiologists without any clinical information. In all cases, there was significant reduction of glucose metabolism in the operated area. The sensitivities of the detection of epileptic foci obtained from visual inspection were 47-59%. In contrast to, computer analysis by eZIS showed 71% sensitivity when we defined the highest Z-score in the cerebrum to be the focus diagnosed by eZIS. Computer-aided diagnosis with eZIS for 18F-FDG PET study is useful for detecting epileptic foci in extra TLE. (author)

  15. Diuretic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging for detection and locoregional staging of urinary bladder cancer: prospective evaluation of a novel technique

    Nayak, Brusabhanu; Dogra, Prem Nath [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, New Delhi (India); Naswa, Niraj [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Rakesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); New Delhi (India)

    2013-03-15

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been used with limited success in the past in primary diagnosis and locoregional staging of urinary bladder cancer, mainly because of the pharmacokinetics of renal excretion of {sup 18}F-FDG. In the present prospective study, we have evaluated the potential application of diuretic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in improving detection and locoregional staging of urinary bladder tumours. Twenty-five patients suspected of having primary carcinoma of the urinary bladder were evaluated prospectively for diagnosis and staging. All of these 25 patients underwent conventional contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of the abdomen/pelvis and whole-body diuretic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. In addition, pelvic PET/CT images were obtained using the special technique of forced diuresis using intravenous furosemide (20-40 mg). Of the 25 patients, 10 underwent radical cystectomy and 15 underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT). Results of CECT and diuretic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were compared considering histopathology as a reference standard. Of the 25 patients, CECT detected a primary tumour in 23 (sensitivity 92 %), while {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 24 patients (sensitivity 96 %). Mean size and maximum standardized uptake value of the bladder tumours were 3.33 cm (range 1.6-6.2) and 5.3 (range 1.3-11.7), respectively. Of the 25 patients, only 10 patients underwent radical cystectomy based on disease status on TURBT. Among those ten patients, nine had locoregional metastases. Among the nine patients who had positive lymph nodes for metastasis on histopathology, CECT and PET/CT scan had a sensitivity of 44 and 78 %, respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was found to be superior to CECT in the detection of the primary tumour and locoregional staging (p < 0.05). Diuretic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is highly sensitive and specific and plays an important role in improving

  16. Comparison of 18F-FDG and 68Ga PET imaging in the assessment of experimental osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus

    Although positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) is a promising imaging modality for bone infections, the technique may still give false-positive results due to unspecific uptake in healing bone. This experimental study compared 18F-FDG and 68Ga in PET imaging of osteomyelitis and normal bone healing. A diffuse osteomyelitis model of the tibia was applied in the rat (n=50). Two weeks after operation, PET imaging with 18F-FDG and 68Ga was performed, followed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and radiography. Osteomyelitis was verified by quantitative bacteriology. In addition to in vivo imaging, ex vivo measurements of tissue radioactivity were performed to verify uptake of the tracers. Compared with controls with normal bone healing, the osteomyelitic tibias showed increased SUV ratios (i.e. radioactivity ratios between the operated and non-operated sides) for both 18F-FDG (1.74±0.37) and 68Ga (1.62±0.28) (P18F-FDG and P68Ga). The intensity of 68Ga uptake reflected pathological changes of osteomyelitic bones measured by pQCT. The uptake of 18F-FDG, however, did not show as close a correlation with the anatomical changes. The healing bones without infection exhibited slightly elevated uptake of 18F-FDG (SUV ratio 1.16±0.06), but 68Ga did not accumulate in the healing bone, as judged on the basis of both in vivo imaging (SUV ratio 1.02±0.05) and ex vivo measurements (SUV 0.92±0.21) (P=0.003 and P=0.022 compared with 18F-FDG uptake, respectively). This study suggests the feasibility of 68Ga PET imaging of bone infections. However, further studies are needed to clarify the value of 68Ga PET for clinical purposes. (orig.)

  17. Reproducibility of 18F-FDG microPET Studies in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    Dandekar, Mangal; Tseng, Jeffrey R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2007-01-01

    18F-FDG has been used to image mouse xenograft models with small-animal PET for therapy response. However, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of 18F-FDG small-animal PET studies.

  18. [18F]FDG-PET in lung cancer: current status

    Jane Dobbs, H; Quint, Leslie Eisenbud; Miles, K A

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, evidence of safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is required to support funding of new diagnostic technologies. However, diagnostic imaging is a rapidly changing speciality with new data constantly being added to the evidence base. This article aims to review the evidence base for the application of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) in lung cancer and to identify areas in which the evidence base is evolving. Currently, there is strong evidenc...

  19. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT in Adrenal Tumor

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choi, Duck Joo; Lee, Min Kyung; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Adrenal tumors are increasingly detected by widespread use of anatomical imaging such as CT, MRI, etc. For these adrenal tumors, differentiation between malignancy and benignancy is very important. In diagnostic assessment of adrenal tumor, {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT have been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very excellent performance in evaluation of adrenal metastasis in the oncologic patient. In cases of adrenal incidentalomas, {sup 18}F-FDG PET or PET-CT is helpful if CT or chemical-shift MRI is inconclusive. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT may be applied to the patients with MIBG-negative pheochromocytomas. In summary, {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT are expected to be effective diagnostic tools in the management of adrenal tumor.

  20. Stereotactic Comparison Study of 18F-Alfatide and 18F-FDG PET Imaging in an LLC Tumor-Bearing C57BL/6 Mouse Model

    Wei, Yu-Chun; Gao, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jianbo; Fu, Zheng; Zheng, Jinsong; Liu, Ning; Hu, Xudong; Hou, Wenhong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to stereotactically compare the PET imaging performance of 18F-Alfatide (18F-ALF-NOTA-PRGD2, denoted as 18F-Alfatide) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mouse model. 18F-FDG standard uptake values (SUVs) were higher than 18F-Alfatide SUVs in tumors, most of the normal tissues and organs except for the bladder. Tumor-to-brain, tumor-to-lung, and tumor-to-heart ratios of 18F-Alfatide PET were significantly higher than those of 18F-FDG PET (P SUV and GLUT-1 (R = 0.895, P SUV and αvβ3 (R = 0.595, P = 0.019), 18F-FDG SUV and 18F-Alfatide SUV (R = 0.917, P < 0.001), and GLUT-1 and αvβ3 (R = 0.637, P = 0.011). Therefore, 18F-Alfatide PET may be an effective tracer for tumor detection, spatial heterogeneity imaging and an alternative supplement to 18F-FDG PET, particularly for patients with enhanced characteristics in the brain, chest tumors or diabetes, meriting further study. PMID:27350554

  1. Stereotactic Comparison Study of (18)F-Alfatide and (18)F-FDG PET Imaging in an LLC Tumor-Bearing C57BL/6 Mouse Model.

    Wei, Yu-Chun; Gao, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jianbo; Fu, Zheng; Zheng, Jinsong; Liu, Ning; Hu, Xudong; Hou, Wenhong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to stereotactically compare the PET imaging performance of (18)F-Alfatide ((18)F-ALF-NOTA-PRGD2, denoted as (18)F-Alfatide) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mouse model. (18)F-FDG standard uptake values (SUVs) were higher than (18)F-Alfatide SUVs in tumors, most of the normal tissues and organs except for the bladder. Tumor-to-brain, tumor-to-lung, and tumor-to-heart ratios of (18)F-Alfatide PET were significantly higher than those of (18)F-FDG PET (P SUV and GLUT-1 (R = 0.895, P SUV and αvβ3 (R = 0.595, P = 0.019), (18)F-FDG SUV and (18)F-Alfatide SUV (R = 0.917, P < 0.001), and GLUT-1 and αvβ3 (R = 0.637, P = 0.011). Therefore, (18)F-Alfatide PET may be an effective tracer for tumor detection, spatial heterogeneity imaging and an alternative supplement to (18)F-FDG PET, particularly for patients with enhanced characteristics in the brain, chest tumors or diabetes, meriting further study. PMID:27350554

  2. Calibrated image-derived input functions for the determination of the metabolic uptake rate of glucose with [18F]-FDG PET

    Christensen, Anders Nymark; Reichkendler, Michala H.; Larsen, Rasmus; Auerbach, Pernille; Højgaard, Liselotte; Nielsen, Henning B.; Ploug, Thorkil; Stallknecht, Bente; Holm, Søren

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the use of a simple calibration method to remove bias in previously proposed approaches to image-derived input functions (IDIFs) when used to calculate the metabolic uptake rate of glucose (Km) from dynamic [18F]-FDG PET scans of the thigh. Our objective was to obtain nonbiased, low...

  3. Functional imaging of infection: conventional nuclear medicine agents and the expanding role of {sup 18-}F-FDG PET

    Parisi, Marguerite T. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology R-5417, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A growing body of literature suggests that 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), particularly when combined with CT, is a useful tool for the detection of infectious and inflammatory disease processes. This article will briefly review the data to date on the use of FDG PET in diagnosing musculoskeletal infections and fever of unknown origin, comparing it to conventional scintigraphic techniques in both adults and, when available, in children. (orig.)

  4. Functional imaging of infection: conventional nuclear medicine agents and the expanding role of 18-F-FDG PET

    A growing body of literature suggests that 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET), particularly when combined with CT, is a useful tool for the detection of infectious and inflammatory disease processes. This article will briefly review the data to date on the use of FDG PET in diagnosing musculoskeletal infections and fever of unknown origin, comparing it to conventional scintigraphic techniques in both adults and, when available, in children. (orig.)

  5. Targeting post-infarct inflammation by PET imaging: comparison of 68Ga-citrate and 68Ga-DOTATATE with 18F-FDG in a mouse model

    Imaging of inflammation early after myocardial infarction (MI) is a promising approach to the guidance of novel molecular interventions that support endogenous healing processes. 18F-FDG PET has been used, but may be complicated by physiological myocyte uptake. We evaluated the potential of two alternative imaging targets: lactoferrin binding by 68Ga-citrate and somatostatin receptor binding by 68Ga-DOTATATE. C57Bl/6 mice underwent permanent coronary artery ligation. Serial PET imaging was performed 3 - 7 days after MI using 68Ga-citrate, 68Ga-DOTATATE, or 18F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of myocyte glucose uptake. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by 13N-ammonia PET and cardiac geometry by contrast-enhanced ECG-gated CT. Mice exhibited a perfusion defect of 30 - 40 % (of the total left ventricle) with apical anterolateral wall akinesia and thinning on day 7 after MI. 18F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression demonstrated distinct uptake in the infarct region, as well as in the border zone and remote myocardium. The myocardial standardized uptake value in MI mice was significantly higher than in healthy mice under ketamine/xylazine anaesthesia (1.9 ± 0.4 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1). 68Ga images exhibited high blood pool activity with no specific myocardial uptake up to 90 min after injection (tissue-to-blood contrast 0.9). 68Ga-DOTATATE was rapidly cleared from the blood, but myocardial SUV was very low (0.10 ± 0.03). Neither 68Ga nor 68Ga-DOTATATE is a useful alternative to 18F-FDG for PET imaging of myocardial inflammation after MI in mice. Among the three tested approaches, 18F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of cardiomyocyte uptake remains the most practical imaging marker of post-infarct inflammation. (orig.)

  6. Multimodality approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging, intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection, and intraoperative ultrasound for tumor localization and verification of resection of all sites of hypermetabolic activity in a case of occult recurrent metastatic melanoma

    Walker Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of diagnostic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging for the staging, restaging, and treatment monitoring of melanoma patients has become a well-recognized standard of care. It plays a key role in detecting sites of occult disease and is widely utilized in the medical and surgical planning of such patients. In the current report, we describe an innovative multimodality approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging, intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection, and intraoperative ultrasound for tumor localization and verification of resection of all sites of hypermetabolic tumor foci in a case of occult recurrent metastatic melanoma. Case presentation This report discusses a case of occult recurrent metastatic melanoma, isolated to three separate sites within the subcutaneous tissues of the left thigh region, which was not clinically apparent but was found on diagnostic restaging whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan utilizing an intravenous injection of 14.8 mCi 18F-FDG. Then, on the day of surgery, the patient received an intravenous injection of 12.8 mCi 18F-FDG. A multimodality approach of intraoperative handheld gamma probe detection, intraoperative ultrasound tumor localization, specimen PET/CT imaging, and postoperative PET/CT imaging was utilized for accomplishing and verifying the excision of all three sites of occult recurrent metastatic melanoma within the left thigh region. Conclusion This innovative multimodality approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging, intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection, and intraoperative ultrasound is promising combined technology for aiding in tumor localization and verification of excision and may ultimately impact positively upon long-term outcome of selected patients.

  7. 18F-FDG PET/CT in paediatric lymphoma: comparison with conventional imaging

    In children with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the ability of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT and conventional imaging (CI) to detect malignant lesions and predict poor lesion response to therapy was assessed and compared. A retrospective review of findings reported on PET/CT and CI was performed using a lesion-based analysis of 16 lymph node and 8 extra-nodal regions. Lesions were defined by histopathological findings or follow-up > 6 months. The study included 209 PET/CT scans with a valid CI comparator. A total of 5,014 regions (3,342 lymph node, 1,672 extra-nodal) were analysed. PET/CT performed significantly better than CI in the detection of malignant lesions with sensitivity and specificity of 95.9 and 99.7% compared to 70.1 and 99.0%, respectively. For predicting poor lesion response to therapy, PET/CT had fewer false-positive lesions than CI. The specificity for predicting poor lesion response to treatment for PET/CT was 99.2% compared to 96.9% for CI. PET/CT was the correct modality in 86% of lesions with discordant findings. PET/CT is more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood lymphoma and in predicting poor lesion response to treatment. In lesions with discordant findings, PET/CT results are more likely to be correct. (orig.)

  8. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in paediatric lymphoma: comparison with conventional imaging

    London, Kevin [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Oncology Unit, Sydney (Australia); Onikul, Ella [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Medical Imaging, Sydney (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Imaging, Sydney Medical School, Sydney (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    In children with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the ability of {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT and conventional imaging (CI) to detect malignant lesions and predict poor lesion response to therapy was assessed and compared. A retrospective review of findings reported on PET/CT and CI was performed using a lesion-based analysis of 16 lymph node and 8 extra-nodal regions. Lesions were defined by histopathological findings or follow-up > 6 months. The study included 209 PET/CT scans with a valid CI comparator. A total of 5,014 regions (3,342 lymph node, 1,672 extra-nodal) were analysed. PET/CT performed significantly better than CI in the detection of malignant lesions with sensitivity and specificity of 95.9 and 99.7% compared to 70.1 and 99.0%, respectively. For predicting poor lesion response to therapy, PET/CT had fewer false-positive lesions than CI. The specificity for predicting poor lesion response to treatment for PET/CT was 99.2% compared to 96.9% for CI. PET/CT was the correct modality in 86% of lesions with discordant findings. PET/CT is more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood lymphoma and in predicting poor lesion response to treatment. In lesions with discordant findings, PET/CT results are more likely to be correct. (orig.)

  9. Optimization of whole-body PET imaging protocol for the detection of 18F-FDG overlappings in oncology

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging modality that allows studying in vivo cellular metabolic and biochemical processes. During the 90's, there has been a growing interest in the applications of PET in oncology related to the use of a glucose analog (FDG) labeled with the positron emitter 18F. This tracer of the glucose metabolism is trapped in the cancer cells characterized by a deregulated glycolytic activity. This allows detecting tumors and metastases. The interest of PET in oncology has lead to develop imaging systems and protocols to perform whole-body acquisitions of the patient. Whole-body PET imaging has been limited in practice by the high level of statistical noise that affects the detection of small lesions due to limited radioactive dose injected to the patient and short acquisition time. In this context, our work focused on the optimization of detection performances in whole-body 18F-FDG PET images. We have first developed an original method to evaluate detectability based on the psychophysical approach of the ROC methodology and adapted to the specificity of whole-body PET images. This method was used to evaluate detection performances of different reconstruction algorithms used for whole-body imaging. We have also studied the influence of the acquisition mode, namely the 2D and the 3D modes. To that purpose, we have used the NEC index to select relevant statistical acquisition conditions in both acquisition modes as a function of the injected dose to the patient. Then, we have compared the detection performances of these different acquisition conditions based on our psychophysical evaluation technique. (author)

  10. PET imaging of inflammation and adenocarcinoma xenografts using vascular adhesion protein 1 targeting peptide 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1: comparison with 18F-FDG

    The aim of this study was to evaluate inflammation and tumour imaging with a vascular adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1) targeting peptide 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 in comparison with 18F-FDG. Rats with both subcutaneous human pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts and turpentine oil-induced acute sterile inflammation were evaluated by dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) and by digital autoradiography of tissue cryosections. Subsequently, the autoradiographs were combined with histological and immunohistological analysis of the sections. 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 delineated acute, sterile inflammation comparable with 18F-FDG. However, the tumour uptake of 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 was low in contrast to prominent 18F-FDG uptake. The standardised uptake values of inflammation and tumours by PET were 1.1 ± 0.4 (mean ± SEM) and 0.4 ± 0.1 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 2.0 ± 0.5 and 1.6 ± 0.8 for 18F-FDG, respectively. In addition, PET studies showed inflammation to muscle and tumour to muscle ratios of 5.1 ± 3.1 and 1.7 ± 0.3 for 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 and 6.2 ± 0.7 and 4.6 ± 2.2 for 18F-FDG, respectively. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of luminal VAP-1 on the endothelium at the site of inflammation and low expression in the tumour The 68Ga-DOTAVAP-P1 PET was able to visualise inflammation better than tumour, which was in accordance with the luminal expression of VAP-1 on vasculature in these experimental models. (orig.)

  11. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for cancer pain of peripheral nerves

    Fang, Lei; Jian-ping AN; Hui ZHAO; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Jun-feng MAO; Li, Yun; Dai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the characteristics of cancer pain of the peripheral nerves on 18F-FDG PET/CT images, and explore the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for cancer pain of the peripheral nerves. Methods Imaging data of 18F-FDG PET/CT of 10 patients with cancer pain of the peripheral nerves confirmed by histopathology or long-term follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. The similarities and differences in PET/CT manifestations between the diseased side peripheral nerves and contralateral...

  12. Extraosseous Osteosarcoma of the Liver Demonstrated on 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    Jiang, Lei; Luan, Lijuan; Yun, Hong; Hou, Yingyong; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-08-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain for 1 month. Ultrasonography displayed multiple hepatic masses that were thought as metastases. FDG PET/CT was performed to assess the nature of these masses and to search primary malignancy. The images showed elevated FDG activity in the partially calcified hypodense lesions in the liver without abnormality elsewhere. The lesions were subsequently confirmed as primary extraosseous osteosarcoma in the liver. The patient received liver transplantation. Six months later, her CA-125 was significantly increased. The follow-up PET/CT scan demonstrated the widespread metastases. PMID:27055145

  13. Clinical studies of 18F-FDG and 18F-FP-β-CIT PET imaging in hemi-Parkinson's disease

    Objective: To study the characteristics of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18F-N-3-fluoro-propyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (18F-FP-β-CIT) PET imaging in patients with hemi-Parkinson's disease (hemi-PD) and to assess their value in early diagnosis. Methods: 34 cases of hemi-PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II) and 16 normal control subjects were selected for this study. 16 patients were performed with 18F-FDG PET imaging, 18 patients with 18F-FP-β-CIF, while 6 patients of them both 18F-FDG and 18F-FP-β-CIT. 30 min after injection of 185-259 MBq 18F-FDG, 3D brain scans were acquired. Region of interest (ROI) analysis and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) were applied. 18F-FP-β-CIT PET imaging was carried out 2-3 h post injection, and (ROI-cerebellum)/cerebellum ratio was calculated. Results: In right hemi-PD, reductions in 18F-FDG metabolism were observed in the left basal ganglia compared with control group, but with no significant difference (P>0.05). The results of SPM analysis showed that a significant reduction in FDG uptake in the left superior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and left middle temporal gyrus, whereas a significant increase in the bilateral precentral gyrus , superior parietal lobule, left middle occipital gyrus and left thalamus as compared with the control group. There was a significant reduction in 18F-FP-β-CIT uptake in putamen, its reduction was found not only in the contralateral putamen, but also in the ipsilateral ones, and more pronounced in the contralateral posterior putamen. Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET imaging is non-specific for the early diagnosis of PD. 18F-FP-β-CIT PET imaging could find the changes of striatum dopamine transporter at early stage, therefore it was helpful for early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of PD. Combined with 18F-FDG PET imaging, the changes of local cerebral glucose metabolism in PD could also be evaluated

  14. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  15. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Westfaelische Wilhelms University Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging, Muenster (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [{sup 18}F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast

  16. Quantitative assessment of small animal cardiac 18F-FDG PET and MRI image

    Cardiac disease research relies increasingly on small animal models and non-invasive imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) using gadolinium-based contrast agents appear to be a visualizing infracted myocardium with high spatial resolution. Polar map (or bull's-eye image) was used to determination of the myocardial infarction area. Polar map is a comprehensive interpretation of the left ventricle. The infarct size was computed as the fraction of the total polar map areas. The threshold was computed as the percentage of mean intensity of the normal region. In other study, 50% predefined threshold value in varying range (30∼70%) was most commonly use. However, predefined threshold value isn't acceptance in all case. The purpose of this study was to investigate methodological approach for automatic measurement of rat myocardial infarct size using PET and MRI polar map with adaptive threshold value driven from Multi gaussian mixture model (MGMM)

  17. Comparison of 131I whole-body imaging, 131I SPECT/CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of metastatic thyroid cancer

    The aim of this study was to compare 131I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), WBS with 131I single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). A total of 140 patients with 258 foci of suspected distant metastases were evaluated. 131I WBS, 131I SPECT/CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT images were interpreted separately. The final diagnosis was obtained from histopathologic study, serum thyroglobulin level, other imaging modalities, and/or clinical follow-up. Of the 140 patients with 258 foci, 46 patients with 166 foci were diagnosed as positive for distant metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each imaging modality were 65, 55, and 59%, respectively, for 131I WBS; 65, 95, and 85% for 131I SPECT/CT, respectively; and 61, 98, and 86%, respectively, for 18F-FDG PET/CT in patient-based analyses. Lesion-based analyses demonstrated that both SPECT/CT and PET/CT were superior to WBS (p18F-FDG PET/CT presented the highest diagnostic performance in patients who underwent multiple challenges of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  18. Appropriate uptake period for myocardial PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG after oral glucose loading; Optimaler Akquisitionszeitpunkt fuer die Herz-PET mit {sup 18}F-FDG nach oraler Glukosebelastung

    Brink, I.; Hentschell, M.; Hoegerle, S.; Moser, E. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Radiologische, Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin und PET, Universitaetsklink Basel (Switzerland); Mix, M.; Schindler, T. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Biophysics, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Aim: Identification of a rationale for the appropriate uptake period for myocardial {sup 18}F-FDG-PET imaging of patients with and without diabetes mellitus. Methods: In a subset of 27 patients, static 2D-PET examination was performed of patients with chronic coronary artery disease and known myocardial infarction. The patients fasted (at least 4 h) before examination. {sup 18}F-FDG (330 {+-} 20 MBq) was injected intravenously. The image quality was semiquantitativly determined by ROI-analysis and the myocardium-to-blood pool activity ratio (M/B) was calculated. I.) Scans 30, 60, and 90 min p. i. of 10 non-diabetic patients (60 g oral glucose loading one hour before FDG-injection, low-dose intravenous insulin bolus if necessary). II.) Scans 30, 60, and 90 min p. i. of 10 patients with known non-insulin dependent diabetes (20 g glucose, insulin bolus). III.) Scans 90 min p. i. of 7 patients with known non-insulin dependent diabetes and elevated fasting serum glucose level (140-200 mg/dl; insulin bolus, no glucose). Results: I.) The M/B ratio significantly increases in non-diabetic patients with the uptake time (30 min 1.95 {+-} 0.20; 60 min 2.96 {+-} 0.36; 90 min 3.78 {+-} 0.43). II.) In patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes the M/B ratio also significantly increases with uptake time. Compared to non-diabetic patients group II reached smaller M/B values (30 min 1.56 {+-} 0.10; 60 min 2.15 {+-} 0.14; 90 min 2.71 {+-} 0.19). III.) In the group of patients with elevated fasting serum glucose level (who only got insulin but no glucose loading) the M/B activity ratio 90 min p. i. was clearly inferior compared with diabetic patients after oral glucose loading and insulin administration (M/B 2.71 {+-} 0.19 versus 2.16 {+-} 0.07). Conclusions: In static myocardial viability PET studies with {sup 18}F-FDG an uptake time of 90 min yields image quality superior to that obtained after shorter uptake time. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Definition eines optimalen

  19. Prognostic Value of Dual-Time-Point 18F-FDG PET for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Umeda, Yukihiro; DEMURA, Yoshiki; Morikawa, Miwa; Anzai, Masaki; Kadowaki, Maiko; Ameshima, Shingo; TSUCHIDA, Tatsuro; TSUJIKAWA, Tetsuya; Kiyono, Yasushi; OKAZAWA, Hidehiko; Ishizaki, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to clarify whether dual-time-point (18)F-FDG PET imaging results are useful to predict long-term survival of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients.METHODS:Fifty IPF patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET examinations at 2 time points: 60 min (early imaging) and 180 min (delayed imaging) after (18)F-FDG injection. The standardized uptake value (SUV) at each point and retention index value (RI-SUV) calculated from those were evaluated, and then the results...

  20. Estimation of patient radiation dose from whole body 18F- FDG PET/CT examination in cancer imaging: a preliminary study

    This study aims to estimate the radiation effective dose resulting from whole body fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F-FDG PET) scanning as compared to conservative Computed Tomography (CT) techniques in evaluating oncology patients. We reviewed 19 oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT at our centre for cancer staging. Internal and external doses were estimated using radioactivity of injected FDG and volume CT Dose Index (CTDIvol), respectively with employment of the published and modified dose coefficients. The median differences of dose among the conservative CT and PET protocols were determined using Kruskal Wallis test with p < 0.05 considered as significant. The median (interquartile range, IQR) effective doses of non-contrasted CT, contrasted CT and PET scanning protocols were 7.50 (9.35) mSv, 9.76 (3.67) mSv and 6.30 (1.20) mSv, respectively, resulting in the total dose of 21.46 (8.58) mSv. Statistically significant difference was observed in the median effective dose between the three protocols (p < 0.01). The effective doses of whole body 18F-FDG PET technique may be effective the lowest amongst the conventional CT imaging techniques

  1. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with breast cancer and rising Ca 15-3 with negative conventional imaging: A multicentre study

    Objectives: Breast cancer is the second cause of death in women in Europe and North America. The mortality of this disease can be reduced with effective therapy and regular follow up to detect early recurrence. Tumor markers are sensitive in detecting recurrent or residual disease but imaging is required to customize the therapeutic option. Rising tumor markers and negative conventional imaging (US, X-mammography, CT and MR) poses a management problem. Our aim is to assess the role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the management of post-therapy patients with rising markers but negative conventional imaging. Materials and methods: In the period from January 2008 to September 2009, 89 female patients with breast cancer who developed post-therapy rising markers (serum Ca 15-3 levels = 64.8 ± 16.3 U/mL) but negative clinical examination and conventional imaging were investigated with 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Results: Tumor deposits were detected in 40/89 patients in chest wall, internal mammary nodes, lungs, liver and skeleton. The mean SUVmax value calculated in these lesions was 6.6 ± 1.7 (range 3.1–12.8). In 23/40 patients solitary small lesion were amenable to radical therapy. In 7 out of these 23 patients a complete disease remission lasting more than 1 year was observed. Conclusions: 18F-FDG-PET/CT may have a potential role in asymptomatic patients with rising markers and negative conventional imaging. Our findings agree with other studies in promoting regular investigations such as tumor markers and 18F-FDG-PET/CT rather than awaiting the developments of physical symptoms as suggested by current guidelines since the timely detection of early recurrence may have a major impact on therapy and survival.

  2. Correlation between combined imaging modalities of 18F-FDG PET/CT and 3.0T MRI and expression of Ki-67 in breast cancer

    Objective: To explore the correlation between combined imaging modalities of 18F-FDG PET/CT and 3.0T MRI and expression of Ki-67 (proliferating cell nuclear antigen)in breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out in eighteen patients with pathologically confirmed primary breast cancer,who underwent both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 3.0T MRI examinations before operation. The interval between immunohistochemistry and combined imaging examinations was not more than one week after operation. The correlations between maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) as well as the score of combined imaging modalities and the expression level of Ki-67 were analyzed. Results: (1) A positive correlation between SUVmax and expression level of Ki-67 was demonstrated in breast cancer lesions (r=0.473, P<0.05). (2) A significantly positive correlation between the score of combined imaging modalities and the expression level of Ki-67 was also noted (r=0.674, P<0.01). Conclusion: Tumor proliferation can be reflected by the combined imaging modalities of 18F-FDG PET/CT and 3.0T MRI, indicating a potential role in predicting prognosis of breast cancer. (authors)

  3. Staging of cervical cancer based on tumor heterogeneity characterized by texture features on 18F-FDG PET images

    Mu, Wei; Chen, Zhe; Liang, Ying; Shen, Wei; Yang, Feng; Dai, Ruwei; Wu, Ning; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the staging value of the tumor heterogeneity characterized by texture features and other commonly used semi-quantitative indices extracted from 18F-FDG PET images of cervical cancer (CC) patients. Forty-two patients suffering CC at different stages were enrolled in this study. Firstly, we proposed a new tumor segmentation method by combining the intensity and gradient field information in a level set framework. Secondly, fifty-four 3D texture features were studied besides of SUVs (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV). Through correlation analysis, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves analysis, some independent indices showed statistically significant differences between the early stage (ES, stages I and II) and the advanced stage (AS, stages III and IV). Then the tumors represented by those independent indices could be automatically classified into ES and AS, and the most discriminative feature could be chosen. Finally, the robustness of the optimal index with respect to sampling schemes and the quality of the PET images were validated. Using the proposed segmentation method, the dice similarity coefficient and Hausdorff distance were 91.78   ±   1.66% and 7.94   ±   1.99 mm, respectively. According to the correlation analysis, all the fifty-eight indices could be divided into 20 groups. Six independent indices were selected for their highest areas under the ROC curves (AUROC), and showed significant differences between ES and AS (P  Pearson correlation of RP under different sampling schemes is 0.9991   ±   0.0011. RP is a highly stable feature and well correlated with tumor stage in CC, which suggests it could differentiate ES and AS with high accuracy.

  4. Clinical significance of MRI/{sup 18}F-FDG PET fusion imaging of the spinal cord in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy

    Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Watanabe, Shuji; Yoshida, Ai; Baba, Hisatoshi [University of Fukui, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Eiheiji, Fukui (Japan); Okazawa, Hidehiko [University of Fukui, Department of Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Eiheiji, Fukui (Japan); Kimura, Hirohiko [University of Fukui, Departments of Radiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Eiheiji, Fukui (Japan); Kudo, Takashi [Nagasaki University, Department of Radioisotope Medicine, Atomic Bomb Disease and Hibakusha Medicine Unit, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is used to investigate the metabolic activity of neural tissue. MRI is used to visualize morphological changes, but the relationship between intramedullary signal changes and clinical outcome remains controversial. The present study was designed to evaluate the use of 3-D MRI/{sup 18}F-FDG PET fusion imaging for defining intramedullary signal changes on MRI scans and local glucose metabolic rate measured on {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans in relation to clinical outcome and prognosis. We studied 24 patients undergoing decompressive surgery for cervical compressive myelopathy. All patients underwent 3-D MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET before surgery. Quantitative analysis of intramedullary signal changes on MRI scans included calculation of the signal intensity ratio (SIR) as the ratio between the increased lesional signal intensity and the signal intensity at the level of the C7/T1 disc. Using an Advantage workstation, the same slices of cervical 3-D MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET images were fused. On the fused images, the maximal count of the lesion was adopted as the standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). In a similar manner to SIR, the SUV ratio (SUVR) was also calculated. Neurological assessment was conducted using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system for cervical myelopathy. The SIR on T1-weighted (T1-W) images, but not SIR on T2-W images, was significantly correlated with preoperative JOA score and postoperative neurological improvement. Lesion SUV{sub max} was significantly correlated with SIR on T1-W images, but not with SIR on T2-W images, and also with postoperative neurological outcome. The SUVR correlated better than SIR on T1-W images and lesion SUV{sub max} with neurological improvement. Longer symptom duration was correlated negatively with SIR on T1-W images, positively with SIR on T2-W images, and negatively with SUV{sub max}. Our results suggest that low-intensity signal on T1-W images, but not on T2-W images, is correlated

  5. Clinical significance of MRI/18F-FDG PET fusion imaging of the spinal cord in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy

    18F-FDG PET is used to investigate the metabolic activity of neural tissue. MRI is used to visualize morphological changes, but the relationship between intramedullary signal changes and clinical outcome remains controversial. The present study was designed to evaluate the use of 3-D MRI/18F-FDG PET fusion imaging for defining intramedullary signal changes on MRI scans and local glucose metabolic rate measured on 18F-FDG PET scans in relation to clinical outcome and prognosis. We studied 24 patients undergoing decompressive surgery for cervical compressive myelopathy. All patients underwent 3-D MRI and 18F-FDG PET before surgery. Quantitative analysis of intramedullary signal changes on MRI scans included calculation of the signal intensity ratio (SIR) as the ratio between the increased lesional signal intensity and the signal intensity at the level of the C7/T1 disc. Using an Advantage workstation, the same slices of cervical 3-D MRI and 18F-FDG PET images were fused. On the fused images, the maximal count of the lesion was adopted as the standardized uptake value (SUVmax). In a similar manner to SIR, the SUV ratio (SUVR) was also calculated. Neurological assessment was conducted using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system for cervical myelopathy. The SIR on T1-weighted (T1-W) images, but not SIR on T2-W images, was significantly correlated with preoperative JOA score and postoperative neurological improvement. Lesion SUVmax was significantly correlated with SIR on T1-W images, but not with SIR on T2-W images, and also with postoperative neurological outcome. The SUVR correlated better than SIR on T1-W images and lesion SUVmax with neurological improvement. Longer symptom duration was correlated negatively with SIR on T1-W images, positively with SIR on T2-W images, and negatively with SUVmax. Our results suggest that low-intensity signal on T1-W images, but not on T2-W images, is correlated with a poor postoperative neurological outcome. SUVmax

  6. Evaluation of thymic tumors with 18F-FDG PET-CT - A pictorial review

    Sharma, Punit; Singhal, Abhinav; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)], e-mail: rkphulia@yahoo.com; Kumar, Arvind [Dept. of Surgical Disciplines, All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2013-02-15

    Thymic tumors represent a broad spectrum of neoplastic disorders and pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A non-invasive imaging study to determine the nature of thymic lesions can have significant impact on management of such tumors. 18F-flurorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has shown promising results in characterization of thymic tumors. The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in patients with thymic tumors. We have pictorially depicted the 18F-FDG PET-CT salient imaging characteristics of various thymic tumors, both epithelial and non-epithelial. Also discussed is the dynamic physiology of thymus gland which is to be kept in mind when evaluating thymic pathology on 18F-FDG PET-CT, as it can lead to interpretative pitfalls.

  7. Evaluation of thymic tumors with 18F-FDG PET-CT - A pictorial review

    Thymic tumors represent a broad spectrum of neoplastic disorders and pose considerable diagnostic difficulties. A non-invasive imaging study to determine the nature of thymic lesions can have significant impact on management of such tumors. 18F-flurorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has shown promising results in characterization of thymic tumors. The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in patients with thymic tumors. We have pictorially depicted the 18F-FDG PET-CT salient imaging characteristics of various thymic tumors, both epithelial and non-epithelial. Also discussed is the dynamic physiology of thymus gland which is to be kept in mind when evaluating thymic pathology on 18F-FDG PET-CT, as it can lead to interpretative pitfalls

  8. 18F-FDG-PET-CT imaging findings of recurrent intracranial haemangiopericytoma with distant metastases

    Chan, W S W; Zhang, J; Khong, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with local recurrence and distant lung and liver metastases 7 years after resection of a primary intracranial haemangiopericytoma. Whole-body 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scan showed no increased uptake in local recurrence or distant metastases except for a focus of increased FDG uptake within a hepatic metastasis. The hypermetabolic area correlated with an intratumoral hypoenhancing area on the CT scan. PET-CT scan may...

  9. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting With Unusual Muscle Involvement.

    Dirlik Serim, Burcu; Gurleyen Eren, Tuba; Oz Puyan, Fulya; Durmus Altun, Gülay

    2016-08-01

    Extranodal involvement is more common with Burkitt lymphoma (BL) than other subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood. According to our knowledge, there are rare cases in the literature about muscle involvement of BL, and its F-FDG PET/CT findings were not well defined. We report a 6-year-old girl with a histopathologic diagnosis of BL and referred for staging with PET/CT. FDG-avid abdominal lymph nodes and diffuse involvements of right quadriceps muscle were demonstrated. PMID:27124681

  10. Longitudinal imaging of Alzheimer pathology using [{sup 11}C]PIB, [{sup 18}F]FDDNP and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Adriaanse, Sofie F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Foster-Dingley, Jessica C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Yaqub, Maqsood; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Center, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDDNP are PET tracers for in vivo detection of the neuropathology underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). [{sup 18}F]FDG is a glucose analogue and its uptake reflects metabolic activity. The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinal changes in these tracers in patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in healthy controls. Longitudinal, paired, dynamic [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDDNP (90 min each) and static [{sup 18}F]FDG (15 min) PET scans were obtained in 11 controls, 12 MCI patients and 8 AD patients. The mean interval between baseline and follow-up was 2.5 years (range 2.0-4.0 years). Parametric [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDDNP images of binding potential (BP{sub ND}) and [{sup 18}F]FDG standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) images were generated. A significant increase in global cortical [{sup 11}C]PIB BP{sub ND} was found in MCI patients, but no changes were observed in AD patients or controls. Subsequent regional analysis revealed that this increase in [{sup 11}C]PIB BP{sub ND} in MCI patients was most prominent in the lateral temporal lobe (p < 0.05). For [{sup 18}F]FDDNP, no changes in global BP{sub ND} were found. [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was reduced at follow-up in the AD group only, especially in frontal, parietal and lateral temporal lobes (all p < 0.01). Changes in global [{sup 11}C]PIB binding ({rho} = -0.42, p < 0.05) and posterior cingulate [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake ({rho} = 0.54, p < 0.01) were correlated with changes in Mini-Mental-State Examination score over time across groups, whilst changes in [{sup 18}F]FDDNP binding ({rho} = -0.18, p = 0.35) were not. [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDG track molecular changes in different stages of AD. We found increased amyloid load in MCI patients and progressive metabolic impairment in AD patients. [{sup 18}F]FDDNP seems to be less useful for examining disease progression. (orig.)

  11. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Moisés Mera Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets.

  12. Thymic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Displayed on 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    Jiang, Lei; Li, Yanli; Luan, Lijuan; Zhang, Yongxing; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-05-01

    A 52-year-old man presented with chest distress and low back pain for 1 month. CT examination displayed a thymic tumor with the metastases to bilateral lungs as well as mediastinal and bilateral hilar lymph nodes. To evaluate the involved extent of the disease, F-FDG PET/CT scan was carried out, which showed that in addition to the thymic mass, multiple foci of abnormally increased FDG activity in the bilateral lungs, neck and chest lymph nodes, and bones were observed. Finally, the biopsy of the mass confirmed the diagnosis of thymic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:26673232

  13. Diagnostic value of combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI for staging and restaging in paediatric oncology

    Pfluger, Thomas; Melzer, Henriette I.; Mueller, Wolfgang P.; Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Albert, Michael H.; Schmid, Irene [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Munich (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    The present study compares the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI to combined/registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI for staging and restaging in paediatric oncology. Over 8 years and 2 months, 270 {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 270 MRI examinations (mean interval 5 days) were performed in 132 patients with proven (n = 117) or suspected (n = 15) malignant disease: solid tumours (n = 64), systemic malignancy (n = 53) and benign disease (n = 15). A total of 259 suspected tumour lesions were analysed retrospectively during primary diagnosis and 554 lesions during follow-up. Image analysis was performed separately on each modality, followed by analysis of combined and registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI imaging. A total of 813 lesions were evaluated and confirmed by histopathology (n = 158) and/or imaging follow-up (n = 655) after 6 months. In the separate analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI, sensitivity was 86 %/94 % and specificity 85 %/38 %. Combined/registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI led to a sensitivity of 97 %/97 % and specificity of 81 %/82 %. False-positive results ({sup 18}F-FDG PET n = 69, MRI n = 281, combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 85, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 80) were due to physiological uptake or post-therapeutic changes. False-negative results ({sup 18}F-FDG PET n = 50, MRI n = 20, combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 11, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI n = 11) were based on low uptake or minimal morphological changes. Examination-based evaluation during follow-up showed a sensitivity/specificity of 91 %/81 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET, 93 %/30 % for MRI and 96 %/72 % for combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI. For the detection of single tumour lesions, registered {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI proved to be the methodology of choice for adequate tumour staging. In the examination-based evaluation, MRI alone performed better than {sup 18}F-FDG PET and combined/registered imaging during primary diagnosis. At follow

  14. Quantitative parameters of dual time 18F-FDG PET imaging can improve the PET diagnostic value in differentiating malignant and benign lesions

    Objectives: To determine the diagnostic value of duel time images, maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) in early and delayed whole body 18F-FDG PET images (40min and 3 hour after injection), and retention index in differentiating malignant and benign lesions. Methods: Among 336 whole-body FDG PET scans, 66 patients (in their early PET scans, definite FDG uptake lesions were detected) underwent delayed PET scan. 18F-FDG of 0.0035MBq/Kg was injected, and Philips C-PET was used. The SUVmax of early and delayed images were calculated, and the retention index (RI%) were calculated according the formula: 100% multiply (delayed SUVmax - early SUVmax)/early SUVmax. All the PET results were compared by the follow-ups (surgery, CT and MR). Results: In 20 patients, the doubtful lesions both in early and delayed images were confirmed as physiological FDG uptakes in colorectal, kidney, pelvis, urinary tract and nasopharengeal. In total of 46 patients including 9 gastric, 8 lung, 5 liver, 4 colorectal, 3 pelvic and 17 other kinds of tumor, 32 were malignant lesions and 14 were benign ones. Choosing SUVmax >3 as a cutoff value, the sensitivity of early PET scan was 88%, the specificity was 71%. Using RI >10% as cutoff value, the sensitivity was 75%, the specificity was 71%. Combined these two criteria, the sensitivity was 100%, the specificity was 93%. The accuracy of PET in these three criteria was 83%, 74% and 98% respectively. Conclusions: Early and delayed FDG PET images are very helpful to distinguish the physical and abnormal FDG uptake. The criteria of quantitative parameters such as early SUVmax >3 combined with RI% >10% can improve the FDG PET diagnostic value in differentiating malignant and benign lesions. (authors)

  15. Comparative study of 99Tcm-ciprofloxacin scintigraphy, 18F-FDG PET and diffusion weighted imaging for detecting secondary infection associated with severe acute pancreatitis

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic values of 99Tcm-ciprofloxacin SPECT, 18F-FDG PET and MR diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) for detecting secondary infection associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in swine. Methods: Swine models were constructed and grouped, including control group (normal swine, n=6), non-infected SAP group (inoculated with inactivation Escherichia coli, n=6)and infected SAP group (inoculated with Escherichia coli, n=16). At 7 d after inoculation,a series of 99Tcmciprofloxacin SPECT, 18F-FDG PET and MR DWI scans were performed. The imaging findings were visually evaluated and semi-quantitative analyzed. Lesion-background radioactive counts ratio (L/B), SUVmax and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated. The image results were compared with histopathological and bacteriological results, and the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated. Bonferroni test, the least significant difference t test and χ2 test were used for statistical data analysis. Results: (1) The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 99Tcm-ciprofloxacin SPECT via visual analysis were 93.8% (15/16), 5/6, 90.9% (20/22), 93.8%(15/16) and 5/6, whereas 81.2% (13/16), 2/6, 68.2% (15/22), 76.5%(13/17) and 2/5 for 18F-FDG PET, and 15.4% (2/13), 5/6, 36.8%(7/19), 2/3 and 31.3% (5/16) for MRI DWI respectively. Both 99Tcm-ciprofloxacin SPECT and 18F-FDG PET had higher sensitivities (both P>0.05), but the specificity of 18F-FDG PET was lower. (2)99Tcm-ciprofloxacin imaging showed the changes of L/B for the infected SAP swine were significantly different from those of the non-infected and normal swine (F=95.66, P<0.001). 18F-FDG PET early-phase images showed SUVmax was not significantly different between infected SAP (2.61±1.07) and non-infected SAP (1.87±0.76) groups (P>0.05), but the SUVmax of infected SAP group was higher than that of non

  16. 18F-FDG PET in children with lymphomas

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages of their disease. Twenty-eight children (mean age 12.5 years, 14 girls, 14 boys) with Hodgkin's disease (HD, n=17) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n=11) were evaluated. Patients were investigated at initial staging (n=19), early in the course of treatment (n=19), at the end of treatment (n=16) and during long-term follow-up (n=19). A total of 113 whole-body PET studies were performed on dedicated scanners. PET results were compared with the results of conventional methods (CMs) such as physical examination, laboratory studies, chest X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and bone scan when available. At initial evaluation (group 1), PET changed the disease stage and treatment in 10.5% of the cases. In early evaluation of the response to treatment (group 2), PET failed to predict two relapses and one incomplete response to treatment. In this group, however, PET did not show any false positive results. There were only 4/75 false positive results for PET among patients studied at the end of treatment (group 3, specificity 94%) or during the systematic follow-up (group 4, specificity 95%), as compared with 27/75 for CMs (specificity 54% and 66%, respectively). 18F-FDG-PET is a useful tool for evaluating children with lymphomas. Large prospective studies are needed to appreciate its real impact on patient management. (orig.)

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET in children with lymphomas

    Depas, Gisele; Barsy, Caroline De; Foidart, Jacqueline; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Liege (Belgium); Jerusalem, Guy [University Hospital, Division of Medical Oncology, Liege (Belgium); Hoyoux, Claire; Dresse, Marie-Francoise [CHR Citadelle, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Liege (Belgium); Fassotte, Marie-France [University Hospital, Division of Hematology, Liege (Belgium); Paquet, Nancy [Hotel de Dieu, Levis, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Quebec (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages of their disease. Twenty-eight children (mean age 12.5 years, 14 girls, 14 boys) with Hodgkin's disease (HD, n=17) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n=11) were evaluated. Patients were investigated at initial staging (n=19), early in the course of treatment (n=19), at the end of treatment (n=16) and during long-term follow-up (n=19). A total of 113 whole-body PET studies were performed on dedicated scanners. PET results were compared with the results of conventional methods (CMs) such as physical examination, laboratory studies, chest X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and bone scan when available. At initial evaluation (group 1), PET changed the disease stage and treatment in 10.5% of the cases. In early evaluation of the response to treatment (group 2), PET failed to predict two relapses and one incomplete response to treatment. In this group, however, PET did not show any false positive results. There were only 4/75 false positive results for PET among patients studied at the end of treatment (group 3, specificity 94%) or during the systematic follow-up (group 4, specificity 95%), as compared with 27/75 for CMs (specificity 54% and 66%, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG-PET is a useful tool for evaluating children with lymphomas. Large prospective studies are needed to appreciate its real impact on patient management. (orig.)

  18. Characteristics of Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT in Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    Chung-Jen Huang; Li-Han Hsu (Div. of Pulmonary and Intensive Care Medicine, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)); Dong-Ling You; Pei-Ing Lee (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)); Chia-Chuan Liu; Chih-Shiun Shih (Div. of Thoracic Surgery, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)); Chiang-Ching Shih; Hsiu-Chin Tseng (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China))

    2009-05-15

    Background: Pulmonary cryptococcosis is an uncommon cause of pulmonary nodules found by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) scans. It is rarely reported but may mislead interpretation. Purpose: To describe the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings of pulmonary cryptococcosis. Material and Methods: The 18F-FDG PET/CT images of seven patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis were evaluated. Results: The 18F-FDG PET/CT exams showed single or multiple nodular lesions. The standardized uptake values (SUV) in early images varied significantly for the seven patients (ranging from 2.2 to 11.6). Delayed SUVs showed significant increases in four patients. Conclusion: Pulmonary cryptococcosis mimics primary or metastatic lung cancer on 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. Tissue confirmation should be considered for any suspicious pulmonary nodules found on 18F-FDG PET/CT scan with an SUV score higher than 2.5, in order to avoid overdiagnosis or overstaging.

  19. Characteristics of Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT in Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    Background: Pulmonary cryptococcosis is an uncommon cause of pulmonary nodules found by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) scans. It is rarely reported but may mislead interpretation. Purpose: To describe the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings of pulmonary cryptococcosis. Material and Methods: The 18F-FDG PET/CT images of seven patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis were evaluated. Results: The 18F-FDG PET/CT exams showed single or multiple nodular lesions. The standardized uptake values (SUV) in early images varied significantly for the seven patients (ranging from 2.2 to 11.6). Delayed SUVs showed significant increases in four patients. Conclusion: Pulmonary cryptococcosis mimics primary or metastatic lung cancer on 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. Tissue confirmation should be considered for any suspicious pulmonary nodules found on 18F-FDG PET/CT scan with an SUV score higher than 2.5, in order to avoid overdiagnosis or overstaging

  20. 123I-Mibg scintigraphy and 18F-Fdg-Pet imaging for diagnosing neuroblastoma

    Bleeker, Gitta; Tytgat, Godelieve Am; Adam, Judit A; Caron, Huib N.; Kremer, Leontien Cm; Hooft, Lotty; van Dalen, Elvira C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumour of childhood that originates in the neural crest. It is the second most common extracranial malignant solid tumour of childhood. Neuroblastoma cells have the unique capacity to accumulate Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG), which can be used for imaging the tumour. Moreover, 123I-MIBG scintigraphy is not only important for the diagnosis of neuroblastoma, but also for staging and localization of skeletal lesions. If these are present,...

  1. Optimizing 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of 18F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    18F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values (meanSUVmax), target-to-background ratios (meanTBRmax) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aorticmeanSUVmax values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotidmeanTBRmax values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotidmeanTBRmax and carotidmeanSUVmax values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol/l should be preferred in this setting. (orig.)

  2. Fever of unknown origin: A value of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT with integrated full diagnostic isotropic CT imaging

    Ferda, Jiri [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Radiodiagnostic Clinic, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic)], E-mail: ferda@fnplzen.cz; Ferdova, Eva [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Radiodiagnostic Clinic, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Zahlava, Jan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Matejovic, Martin [Ist Internal Department, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic); Kreuzberg, Boris [Radiodiagnostic Clinic, Charles University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Aim: The aim of presented work is to evaluate the clinical value of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and to compare PET/CT finding with the results of the following investigation. Material and method: 48 patients (24 men, 24 women, mean age 57.6 years with range 15-89 years) underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT due to the fever of unknown origin. All examinations were performed using complex PET/CT protocol combined PET and whole diagnostic contrast enhanced CT with sub-millimeter spatial resolution (except patient with history of iodine hypersensitivity or sever renal impairment). CT data contained diagnostic images reconstructed with soft tissue and high-resolution algorithm. PET/CT finding were compared with results of biopsies, immunology, microbiology or autopsy. Results: The cause of FUO was explained according to the PET/CT findings and followed investigations in 44 of 48 cases-18 cases of microbial infections, nine cases of autoimmune inflammations, four cases of non-infectious granulomatous diseases, eight cases of malignancies and five cases of proved immunity disorders were found. In 46 cases, the PET/CT interpretation was correct. Only in one case, the cause was overlooked and the uptake in atherosclerotic changes of arteries was misinterpreted as vasculitis in the other. The reached sensitivity was 97% (43/44), and specificity 75% (3/4) respectively. Conclusion: In patients with fever of unknown origin, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT might enable the detection of its cause.

  3. Dual-time-point {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging for diagnosis of disease type and disease activity in patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia

    Umeda, Yukihiro; Demura, Yoshiki; Ishizaki, Takeshi; Ameshima, Shingo [University of Fukui, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Miyamori, Isamu [University of Fukui, Third Department of Internal Medicine, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Saito, Yuji [Fujita Health University, Division of Respirology and Allergology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi (Japan); Tsuchida, Tatsuro [University of Fukui, Department of Radiology, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Okazawa, Hidehiko [University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Yoshida-gun, Fukui (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Individual clinical courses of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) are variable and difficult to predict because the pathology and disease activity are contingent, and chest computed tomography (CT) provides little information about disease activity. In this study, we applied dual-time-point [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), commonly used for diagnosis of malignant tumours, to the differential diagnosis and prediction of disease progression in IIP patients. Fifty patients with IIP, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, n = 21), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, n = 18) and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP, n = 11), underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET examinations at two time points: scan 1 at 60 min (early imaging) and scan 2 at 180 min (delayed imaging) after {sup 18}F-FDG injection. The standardized uptake values (SUV) at the two points and the retention index (RI-SUV) calculated from them were evaluated and compared with chest CT findings, disease progression and disease types. To evaluate short-term disease progression, all patients were examined by pulmonary function test every 3 months for 1 year after {sup 18}F-FDG PET scanning. The early SUV for COP (2.47 {+-} 0.74) was significantly higher than that for IPF (0.99 {+-} 0.29, p = 0.0002) or NSIP (1.22 {+-} 0.44, p= 0.0025). When an early SUV cut-off value of 1.5 and greater was used to distinguish COP from IPF and NSIP, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 90.9, 94.3 and 93.5%, respectively. The RI-SUV for IPF and NSIP lesions was significantly greater in patients with deteriorated pulmonary function after 1 year of follow-up (progressive group, 13.0 {+-} 8.9%) than in cases without deterioration during the 1-year observation period (stable group, -16.8 {+-} 5.9%, p < 0.0001). However, the early SUV for all IIP types provided no additional information of disease progression. When an RI-SUV cut-off value of 0% and greater was

  4. Dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET imaging for diagnosis of disease type and disease activity in patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia

    Individual clinical courses of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) are variable and difficult to predict because the pathology and disease activity are contingent, and chest computed tomography (CT) provides little information about disease activity. In this study, we applied dual-time-point [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), commonly used for diagnosis of malignant tumours, to the differential diagnosis and prediction of disease progression in IIP patients. Fifty patients with IIP, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, n = 21), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, n = 18) and cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP, n = 11), underwent 18F-FDG PET examinations at two time points: scan 1 at 60 min (early imaging) and scan 2 at 180 min (delayed imaging) after 18F-FDG injection. The standardized uptake values (SUV) at the two points and the retention index (RI-SUV) calculated from them were evaluated and compared with chest CT findings, disease progression and disease types. To evaluate short-term disease progression, all patients were examined by pulmonary function test every 3 months for 1 year after 18F-FDG PET scanning. The early SUV for COP (2.47 ± 0.74) was significantly higher than that for IPF (0.99 ± 0.29, p = 0.0002) or NSIP (1.22 ± 0.44, p= 0.0025). When an early SUV cut-off value of 1.5 and greater was used to distinguish COP from IPF and NSIP, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 90.9, 94.3 and 93.5%, respectively. The RI-SUV for IPF and NSIP lesions was significantly greater in patients with deteriorated pulmonary function after 1 year of follow-up (progressive group, 13.0 ± 8.9%) than in cases without deterioration during the 1-year observation period (stable group, -16.8 ± 5.9%, p 18F-FDG PET are useful parameters for the differential diagnosis and prediction of disease progression in patients with IIP. (orig.)

  5. Staging of cervical cancer based on tumor heterogeneity characterized by texture features on 18F-FDG PET images

    The aim of the study is to assess the staging value of the tumor heterogeneity characterized by texture features and other commonly used semi-quantitative indices extracted from 18F-FDG PET images of cervical cancer (CC) patients. Forty-two patients suffering CC at different stages were enrolled in this study. Firstly, we proposed a new tumor segmentation method by combining the intensity and gradient field information in a level set framework. Secondly, fifty-four 3D texture features were studied besides of SUVs (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV). Through correlation analysis, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves analysis, some independent indices showed statistically significant differences between the early stage (ES, stages I and II) and the advanced stage (AS, stages III and IV). Then the tumors represented by those independent indices could be automatically classified into ES and AS, and the most discriminative feature could be chosen. Finally, the robustness of the optimal index with respect to sampling schemes and the quality of the PET images were validated. Using the proposed segmentation method, the dice similarity coefficient and Hausdorff distance were 91.78   ±   1.66% and 7.94   ±   1.99 mm, respectively. According to the correlation analysis, all the fifty-eight indices could be divided into 20 groups. Six independent indices were selected for their highest areas under the ROC curves (AUROC), and showed significant differences between ES and AS (P  <  0.05). Through automatic classification with the support vector machine (SVM) Classifier, run percentage (RP) was the most discriminative index with the higher accuracy (88.10%) and larger AUROC (0.88). The Pearson correlation of RP under different sampling schemes is 0.9991   ±   0.0011. RP is a highly stable feature and well correlated with tumor stage in CC, which suggests it could differentiate ES and AS with high

  6. Comparison of 18F-FET and 18F-FDG PET in brain tumors

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) in patients with brain lesions suspicious of cerebral gliomas. Methods: Fifty-two patients with suspicion of cerebral glioma were included in this study. From 30 to 50 min after injection of 180 MBq 18F-FET, a first PET scan (18F-FET scan) was performed. Thereafter, 240 MBq 18F-FDG was injected and a second PET scan was acquired from 30 to 60 min after the second injection (18F-FET/18F-FDG scan). The cerebral accumulation of 18F-FDG was calculated by decay corrected subtraction of the 18F-FET scan from the 18F-FET/18F-FDG scan. Tracer uptake was evaluated by visual scoring and by lesion-to-background (L/B) ratios. The imaging results were compared with the histological results and prognosis. Results: Histology revealed 24 low-grade gliomas (LGG) of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II and 19 high-grade gliomas (HGG) of WHO Grade III or IV, as well as nine others, mainly benign histologies. The gliomas showed increased 18F-FET uptake (>normal brain) in 86% and increased 18F-FDG uptake (>white matter) in 35%. 18F-FET PET provided diagnostically useful delineation of tumor extent while this was impractical with 18F-FDG due to high tracer uptake in the gray matter. A local maximum in the tumor area for biopsy guidance could be identified with 18F-FET in 76% and with 18F-FDG in 28%. The L/B ratios showed significant differences between LGG and HGG for both tracers but considerable overlap so that reliable preoperative grading was not possible. A significant correlation of tracer uptake with overall survival was found with 18F-FDG only. In some benign lesions like abscesses, increased uptake was observed for both tracers indicating a limited specificity of both techniques. Conclusions: 18F-FET PET is superior to 18F-FDG for biopsy guidance and treatment planning of cerebral gliomas

  7. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET in acute ischemic stroke. Assessment of hyper accumulation around the lesion

    Although pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease has been reported previously, few clinical studies of glucose metabolism in acute stroke have been published. Purpose of this study is to evaluate glucose metabolism in acute stroke patients by 18F-FDG PET. Twenty-four patients with acute ischemic stroke were involved in this study. All subjects underwent MRI (conventional T1- and T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MR angiography), CT and 18F-FDG PET. 18F-FDG PET was performed within 1 to 7 days after the first episode. 18F-FDG PET images were visually evaluated as well as MRI and CT images. Four patients out of 24 showed no abnormal 18F-FDG accumulation, while MRI demonstrated abnormal signal area and abnormal vascular findings that suggested acute stroke. Decreased 18F-FDG accumulation corresponding with abnormal signal area on MR images was noted in 20 cases. In 7 cases among these 20 with decreased 18F-FDG, hyper accumulation of 18F-FDG was recognized around the decreased accumulation area. Increased 18F-FDG accumulation (increased glucose metabolization) around the lesion may be due to: acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis, activated repair process of damaged brain tissue, i.e., phagocytosis and gliosis, and neuronal excitation by excito-toxic amino acids which can be released after ischemia. (author)

  8. Analysis of Imaging Characteristics of18F-FDG PET/CT in Misdiagnosed Bone Tuberculosis:A Report of 12 Cases

    DING Qi-yong; LI Tian-nyu; CHEN Jian-wei; LIU Lian-ke

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the imaging characteristics of18F-lfuorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in 12 cases of misdiagnosed bone tuberculosis so as to explore the differential diagnostic method with metastatic bone tumors. Methods: The images of 12 patients with bone tuberculosis diagnosed by18F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. Distribution of lesion locations in the whole body and characteristics of glucose metabolism were analyzed by qualitative and semi-quantitative methods, especially for bone lesion location, number and range, glucose uptake form and CT imaging characteristics, and the maximum of standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was measured and recorded. Results: Of 12 patients, 1 showed increased glucose uptake of diffuse bone marrow in the whole body, whereas the rest suffered from 19 bone lesions, in which each one had 1 bone lesion in 9 cases, accounting for 75.0%. The images of PET/CT in 12 patients primarily manifested annular or nonuniform increase of glucose uptake (63.2%), sequestrum within osteolytic lesions (31.6%), injured intervertebral disc caused by vertebral lesions (61.5%) and cold abscesses around the lesions (68.4%). The glucose uptake rate of cold abscesses was higher than that of bone lesion locations. The tuberculosis complicated with other parts included lymphatic tuberculosis (100.0%), pulmonary tuberculosis (66.7%), pericardial or pleural tuberculosis (25.0%) and hepatolienal tuberculosis (8.3%). Conclusion: The characteristics of bone tuberculosis lesions are prominent in18F-FDG PET/CT imaging, which could contribute to diagnosis of whole body tuberculosis and has a greater value in the differentiation of bone tuberculosis and metastatic bone tumors.

  9. Correlation of perfusion MRI and 18F-FDG PET imaging biomarkers for monitoring regorafenib therapy in experimental colon carcinomas with immunohistochemical validation.

    Ralf S Eschbach

    Full Text Available To investigate a multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI / 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose-(18F-FDG-PET imaging protocol for monitoring regorafenib therapy effects on experimental colorectal adenocarcinomas in rats with immunohistochemical validation.Human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts (HT-29 were implanted subcutaneously in n = 17 (n = 10 therapy group; n = 7 control group female athymic nude rats (Hsd:RH-Foxn1rnu. Animals were imaged at baseline and after a one-week daily treatment protocol with regorafenib (10 mg/kg bodyweight using a multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI/18F-FDG-PET imaging protocol. In perfusion MRI, quantitative parameters of plasma flow (PF, mL/100 mL/min, plasma volume (PV, % and endothelial permeability-surface area product (PS, mL/100 mL/min were calculated. In 18F-FDG-PET, tumor-to-background-ratio (TTB was calculated. Perfusion MRI parameters were correlated with TTB and immunohistochemical assessments of tumor microvascular density (CD-31 and cell proliferation (Ki-67.Regorafenib significantly (p<0.01 suppressed PF (81.1±7.5 to 50.6±16.0 mL/100mL/min, PV (12.1±3.6 to 7.5±1.6% and PS (13.6±3.2 to 7.9±2.3 mL/100mL/min as well as TTB (3.4±0.6 to 1.9±1.1 between baseline and day 7. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly (p<0.03 lower tumor microvascular density (CD-31, 7.0±2.4 vs. 16.1±5.9 and tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67, 434.0 ± 62.9 vs. 663.0 ± 98.3 in the therapy group. Perfusion MRI parameters ΔPF, ΔPV and ΔPS showed strong and significant (r = 0.67-0.78; p<0.01 correlations to the PET parameter ΔTTB and significant correlations (r = 0.57-0.67; p<0.03 to immunohistochemical Ki-67 as well as to CD-31-stainings (r = 0.49-0.55; p<0.05.A multimodal, multiparametric perfusion MRI/PET imaging protocol allowed for non-invasive monitoring of regorafenib therapy effects on experimental colorectal adenocarcinomas in vivo with significant correlations between perfusion MRI parameters and 18F-FDG-PET

  10. [18F] FDG PET in gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    The possibility of using [18F] FDG PET for assessment of tumor extension in primary gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was studied in 8 patients (6 high-grade and 2 low-grade, one of the MALT type) and in a control group of 7 patients (5 patients with NHL without clinical signs of gastric involvement, 1 patient with NHL and benign gastric ulcer and 1 patient with adenocarcinoma of the stomach). All patients with gastric NHL and the two with benign gastric ulcer and adenocarcinoma, respectively, underwent endoscopy including multiple biopsies for histopathological diagnosis. All patients with high-grade and one of the two with low-grade NHL and the patient with adenocarcinoma displayed high gastric uptake of [18F] FDG corresponding to the pathological findings at endoscopy and/or CT. No pathological tracer uptake was seen in the patient with low-grade gastric NHL of the MALT type. In 6/8 patients with gastric NHL, [18F] FDG PET demonstrated larger tumor extension in the stomach than was found at endoscopy, and there was high tracer uptake in the stomach in two patients who were evaluated as normal on CT. [18F] FDG PET correctly excluded gastric NHL in the patient with a benign gastric ulcer and in the patients with NHL without clinical signs of gastric involvement. Although the experience is as yet limited, [18F] FDG PET affords a novel possibility for evaluation of gastric NHL and would seem valuable as a complement to endoscopy and CT in selected patients, where the technique can yield additional information decisive for the choice of therapy. (orig.)

  11. Optimizing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    Bucerius, Jan [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Moncrieff, Colin [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Machac, Josef [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Clinical Trials Unit, New York, NY (United States); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [Cambridge University, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values ({sub mean}SUV{sub max}), target-to-background ratios ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aortic{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} and carotid{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol

  12. Performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a postoperative surveillance imaging modality for asymptomatic advanced gastric cancer patients

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of postoperative fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as a surveillance modality for advanced gastric cancer patients who were asymptomatic and negative by conventional follow-up. We retrospectively collected 46 advanced gastric cancer patients who received approximately 1-year-postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT surveillance following curative resection (mean age 60.6 ± 11.5 years). 18F-FDG PET/CT was interpreted by nuclear medicine physicians who were blind to the clinical information. Final confirmation was determined by clinical follow-up using tumor markers, conventional CT scan, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and with/without subsequent histopathologic diagnosis. Four patients developed recurrence (8.7%; 1 local and 3 distant recurrences). For local recurrence, 18F-FDG PET/CT found four hypermetabolic lesions and one was local recurrence. For distant recurrence, seven hypermetabolic lesions were found in six patients and true-positive was three lesions. False-positive cases were mainly turned out to be physiologic small bowel uptake. Regardless of the recurrence site, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 100% (4/4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 39.6-100%), 88.1% (37/42, 95% CI 73.6-95.5%), 44.4% (4/9, 95% CI 15.3-77.3%) and 100% (37/37, 95% CI 88.3-100%), respectively in the patient-based analysis. Our study showed good specificity of postoperative surveillance 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting recurrence. Careful caution should be made for interpreting some false-positive hypermetabolic lesions in postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT, especially at the local anastomosis site. (author)

  13. Analysis of 18F-FDG PET mapping in malignant tumor patients with depression by SPM

    Objective: To investigate brain 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET mapping in malignant tumor patients with depressive emotion. Methods: 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed in 21 malignant tumor patients (tumor group) and 21 healthy controls (control group). All were evaluated by self-rating depression scale (SDS)and 24 questions Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD). Results: (1) The standard total score of SDS and HAMD of the tumor group were higher than those of the control group (P18F-FDG PET imagings. The abnormalities of glucose metabolism might be related to their depressive emotion. (authors)

  14. A Cochrane review on brain [18F]FDG PET in dementia: limitations and future perspectives

    Based on a large body of evidence on its diagnostic sensitivity for the identification of AD, in 2004 [18F]FDG PET imaging was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS, USA) as a routine examination tool for early and differential diagnosis of AD. Since then, large amounts of additional [18F]FDG PET data have become available showing that the addition of [18F]FDG PET to clinical examinations increases diagnostic accuracy in identifying AD patients even in the predementia stage. Of course, new opportunities and new challenges are coming up, which require the definition of the specific role of [18F]FDG PET in the era of AD biomarkers (i.e. relationship with other biomarkers and role as a marker of progression in AD [46, 48]). Meanwhile, in daily clinical practice, nuclear medicine experts should continue to perform high-quality [18F]FDG PET scans, constantly improving the standard through continuous education and the use of appropriate tools, knowing that it is one of the most informative biomarkers currently available for the prediction of dementia at the MCI stage.

  15. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal inverted papilloma with or without coexistent malignancy: comparison with MR imaging findings in eight patients

    Yeon Jeon, Tae; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, In Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha; Byun, Hong Sik [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Joon Young [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-04-15

    Sinonasal inverted papilloma (IP) is known for high rate of associated malignancy. The purpose of this study was to identify {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT findings of sinonasal IPs. We also tried to compare the PET/CT findings with the MR imaging findings. We retrospectively reviewed PET/CT and MR images of eight patients with sinonasal IP with (n = 6) or without (n = 2) coexistent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Particular attention was paid to correlate the PET/CT findings with the MR imaging findings in terms of area distribution of standard uptake values (SUVs) and a convoluted cerebriform pattern (CCP). In two benign IPs, the maximum SUVs measured 8.2 and 7.8, respectively (mean, 8.0). In both tumors, MR images demonstrated a diffuse CCP. In six IPs with coexistent SCC, the maximum SUVs ranged from 13.3 to 31.9 (mean {+-} SD, 20.2 {+-} 6.6). In these tumors, MR images demonstrated a diffuse CCP in two, a partial CCP in three, and no CCP in one. A wide discrepancy was noted between MR imaging and PET/CT in terms of area distribution of a CCP and SUVs. In sinonasal lesions with MR imaging features of IP, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT demonstrating avid FDG uptake does not necessarily imply the presence of coexistent malignancy. In our small series, although IPs containing foci of SCC had consistently higher SUVs than IPs without SCC, the limited literature on this subject suggests that PET cannot be used reliably to make the distinction. (orig.)

  16. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT versus {sup 18}F-FDG PET in paediatric neuroblastoma

    Melzer, Henriette Ingrid; Bartenstein, Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Schmid, Irene; Albert, Michael H. [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Munich (Germany); Schweinitz, Dietrich von [Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Munich (Germany); Tudball, Coral [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    To analyse different uptake patterns in {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG PET in paediatric neuroblastoma patients. We compared 23 {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy scans and 23 {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans (mean interval 10 days) in 19 patients with a suspected neuroblastic tumour (16 neuroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroma and 1 opsomyoclonus syndrome). SPECT images of the abdomen or other tumour-affected regions were available in all patients. Indications for {sup 18}F-FDG PET were a {sup 123}I-MIBG-negative tumour, a discrepancy in {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake compared to the morphological imaging or imaging results inconsistent with clinical findings. A lesion was found by {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and/or {sup 18}F-FDG PET and/or morphological imaging. A total of 58 suspicious lesions (mean lesion diameter 3.8 cm) were evaluated and 18 were confirmed by histology and 40 by clinical follow-up. The sensitivities of {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-FDG PET were 50% and 78% and the specificities were 75% and 92%, respectively. False-positive results (three {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy, one {sup 18}F-FDG PET) were due to physiological uptake or posttherapy changes. False-negative results (23 {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy, 10 {sup 18}F-FDG PET) were due to low uptake and small lesion size. Combined {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy/{sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging showed the highest sensitivity of 85%. In 34 lesions the {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and morphological imaging findings were discrepant. {sup 18}F-FDG PET correctly identified 32 of the discrepant findings. Two bone/bone marrow metastases were missed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-FDG PET showed noticeable differences in their uptake patterns. {sup 18}F-FDG PET was more sensitive and specific for the detection of neuroblastoma lesions. Our findings suggest that a {sup 18}F-FDG PET scan may be useful in the event of discrepant or inconclusive

  17. Quantitative carotid PET/MR imaging: clinical evaluation of MR-Attenuation correction versus CT-Attenuation correction in 18F-FDG PET/MR emission data and comparison to PET/CT

    Bini, Jason; Robson, Philip M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2015-01-01

    Current PET/MR systems employ segmentation of MR images and subsequent assignment of empirical attenuation coefficients for quantitative PET reconstruction. In this study we examine the differences in the quantification of 18F-FDG uptake in the carotid arteries between PET/MR and PET/CT scanners. Five comparisons were performed to asses differences in PET quantification: i) PET/MR MR-based AC (MRAC) versus PET/MR CTAC, ii) PET/MR MRAC versus PET/CT, iii) PET/MR MRAC with carotid coil versus P...

  18. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p18F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  19. In Vivo Phenotyping of Tumor Metabolism in a Canine Cancer Patient with Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET and Hyperpolarized 13C-Pyruvate Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (hyperPET: Mismatch Demonstrates that FDG may not Always Reflect the Warburg Effect

    Henrik Gutte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this communication the mismatch between simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET and a 13C-lactate imaging (hyperPET in a biopsy verified squamous cell carcinoma in the right tonsil of a canine cancer patient is shown. The results demonstrate that 18F-FDG-PET may not always reflect the Warburg effect in all tumors.

  20. The clinical application of 18F-FDG PET/CT scan in the thyroid carcinoma

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is the top ranking among endocrine carcinoma worldwide. Many imaging modalities have been applied in diagnosing, characterization of the biological behaviors and predicting the outcomes of various thyroid carcinoma. Over the years, 18F-FDG PET/CT has been largely used to identify undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma cells in thyroid carcinoma patients with or without 131I avid lesion. The purpose of this mini-review was to update the clinical role and positive impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in various thyroid carcinoma patients. (authors)

  1. (18F) FDG PET/CT in patients with fever of unknown origin: AIIMS experience

    Full text: The aim of this study was to assess the value of (18F) FDG PET/CT in evaluation of patients with Fever of Unknown Origin (FUO). We retrospectively analysed clinical data and (18F) FDG PET scan of 48 patients over a period of 1 year. These patients met the revised definition criteria of FUO (febrile illness of greater than 3 weeks duration, temperature greater than 38.3 C and no diagnosis after appropriate in-patient or out-patient evaluation). Most of the patients recruited in this study had normal clinical and radiological examination. (18F) FDG PET was helpful in making a diagnosis in 24 patients. An infective/inflammatory cause of FUO was found in thirteen (27%) patients, a neoplasm in six (12.5%) patients, autoimmune cause in five (10.4%) patients. A definitive diagnosis could not be made in twenty four (50%) patients. Out of these 24 patients, 15 had normal PET/CT study, 9 had positive PET/CT findings but they lost in follow up and 2 died within 1 month of PET/CT study without any diagnosis. (18F) FDG PET/CT is a useful tool for evaluation of patients with FUO. It provides important diagnostic clues not suggested by other conventional imaging modalities. Patients with positive PET/CT findings but no definitive diagnosis should be followed up further to improve utility of PET/CT

  2. Disseminated osteomyelitis or bone metastases of breast cancer. 18F-FDG-PET/CT helps unravel an unusual presentation

    We present a case wherein striking 18F-FDG-PET/CT findings initially considered consistent with recurrent disseminated skeletal metastases of breast cancer were later identified as an unusual presentation of disseminated chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis with Staphylococcus aureus and warneri identified on microbiological culture. A 76-year-old female with previous history of breast cancer presented with a 6-month history of pyrexia, myalgia and weight loss. Besides neutrophilia and elevated C-reactive protein, other blood indices, cultures and conventional imaging failed to identify the cause of pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). 18F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated multiple widespread foci of intense FDG uptake in lytic lesions throughout the skeleton. Coupled with previous history of malignancy, findings were strongly suggestive of disseminated metastases of breast cancer. Through targeting an FDG avid lesion, 18F-FDG-PET/CT aided CT-guided biopsy, which instead identified the lesions as chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis. Following prolonged antibiotic therapy, repeat 18F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated significant resolution of lesions. This case demonstrated an unusual presentation of disseminated osteomyelitis on 18F-FDG-PET/CT and highlighted the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT as a trouble shooter in PUO but demonstrated that unusual presentations of benign or malignant pathologies cannot always reliably be differentiated on imaging alone without aid of tissue sampling. Furthermore, this case highlights the potential role 18F-FDG-PET/CT could provide in assessing response to antibiotic therapy. (author)

  3. 68Ga-AMBA and 18 F-FDG for preclinical PET imaging of breast cancer: effect of tamoxifen treatment on tracer uptake by tumor

    Introduction: AMBA is a bombesin analogue that binds to GRPr. In a mouse model of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer, we tested whether 68Ga-AMBA can be used for PET detection of GRPr-expressing tumors and could be more accurate than 18F-FDG to monitor tumor response to hormone therapy. Methods: The radiolabeling of 68Ga-AMBA was automated using a R and D Synchrom module. ZR75-1, a breast cancer cell line, was xenografted in nude mice. 68Ga-AMBA tumor uptake was compared with that of 18F-FDG before and after treatment with tamoxifen. Results: AMBA was 68Ga-radiolabelled in 30 min with 95.3% yield and purity ≥ 98%. Prior to treatment, 68Ga-AMBA was highly concentrated into tumors (tumor to non-tumor ratio = 2.4 vs. 1.3 with 18F-FDG). With tamoxifen treatment (n = 6) 68Ga-AMBA uptake plateaued after 1 week and decreased after 2 weeks, with a significant reduction compared to controls (n = 4). In contrast the effect of tamoxifen treatment could not be appreciated using 18F-FDG. Conclusions: 68Ga-AMBA appeared better than 18F-FDG to visualize and monitor the response to hormone treatment in this breast cancer model

  4. The usefulness of 18F-FDG PET in patients with head and neck tumors

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in patients with head and neck tumors. Methods: Thirty-nine patients (56 studies) with pathologically confirmed head and neck tumors underwent whole body 18F-FDG PET imaging for staging (5 cases) or for post-therapeutic monitoring and restaging. The results of whole body 18F-FDG PET imaging were evaluated with both visual and semiquantitative analyses (standardized uptake value, SUV). Results: (1) 18F-FDG PET helped to define the extent of lesions in 3 patients and downstage another patient before treatment, and accurately detected residual or recurrent lesions in 6, local lymph node metastasis in 11, lung and bone metastases in 4 and 3 cases after treatment. (2) Of 22 positive 18F-FDG PET imaging, 20 were true positive confirmed by surgeries or follow-up studies. All of 17 patients with negative 18F-FDG PET findings remained disease-free during follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET imaging in detecting residual, recurrent and metastatic lesions were 100%, 89.5%, and 94.9% respectively. (3) 18F-FDG PET imaging detected more lesions than CT or MRI in 3 of 21 cases, and corrected another 6 CT or MRI false-positive findings. (4) Consecutive PET studies were carried out in 9 patients. Remission was found in 5 patients and progression in 3. In one patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, PET imaging showed complete response of primary lesion and metastatic lymph nodes to treatment, but found another high uptake focus in the middle part of descending colon which was confirmed to be an adenoma by colonoscopy. Conclusion: Due to its high sensitivity and accuracy in the detection of residual, recurrent, metastatic lesions and of second primary tumor, FDG PET imaging is a useful modality for staging and post-therapeutic follow-up in patients with head and neck tumors. (authors)

  5. A False Positive 18F-FDG PET/CT Scan Caused by Breast Silicone Injection

    Chen, Chao-Jung; Lee, Bi-Fang; Yao, Wei-Jen; Wu, Pei-Shan; Chen, Wen-Chung; Peng, Shu-Lin; Chiu, Nan-Tsing

    2009-01-01

    We present here the case of a 40-year-old woman with a greater than 10 year prior history of bilateral breast silicone injection and saline bag implantation. Bilateral palpable breast nodules were observed, but the ultrasound scan was suboptimal and the magnetic resonance imaging showed no gadolinium-enhanced tumor. The 18F-FDG PET/CT scan showed a hypermetabolic nodule in the left breast with a 30% increase of 18F-FDG uptake on the delayed imaging, and this mimicked breast cancer. She underw...

  6. A False Positive 18F-FDG PET/CT Scan Caused by Breast Silicone Injection

    We present here the case of a 40-year-old woman with a greater than 10 year prior history of bilateral breast silicone injection and saline bag implantation. Bilateral palpable breast nodules were observed, but the ultrasound scan was suboptimal and the magnetic resonance imaging showed no gadolinium enhanced tumor. The 18F-FDG PET/CT scan showed a hypermetabolic nodule in the left breast with a 30% increase of 18F-FDG uptake on the delayed imaging, and this mimicked breast cancer. She underwent a left partial mastectomy and the pathology demonstrated a siliconoma

  7. Prospective comparison of 18F-FDG PET with conventional imaging modalities (CT, MRI, US) in lymph node staging of head and neck cancer

    The aims of this study were to investigate the detection of cervical lymph node metastases of head and neck cancer by positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to perform a prospective comparison with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), sonographic and histopathological findings. Sixty patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma were studied by PET imaging before surgery. Preoperative endoscopy (including biopsy), CT, MRI and sonography of the cervical region were performed in all patients within 2 weeks preceding 18F-FDG whole-body PET. FDG PET images were analysed visually and quantitatively for objective assessment of regional tracer uptake. Histopathology of the resected neck specimens revealed a total of 1284 lymph nodes, 117 of which showed metastatic involvement. Based on histopathological findings, FDG PET correctly identified lymph node metastases with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 94% (P-6). CT and MRI visualized histologically proven lymph node metastases with a sensitivity of 82% (specificity 85%) and 80% (specificity 79%), respectively (P-6). Sonography revealed a sensitivity of 72% (P-6). The comparison of 18F-FDG PET with conventional imaging modalities demonstrated statistically significant correlations (PET vs CT, P = 0.017; PET vs MRI, P = 0.012; PET vs sonography, P = 0.0001). Quantitative analysis of FDG uptake in lymph node metastases using body weight-based standardized uptake values (SUVBW) showed no significant correlation between FDG uptake (3.7±2.0) and histological grading of tumour-involved lymph nodes (P = 0.9). Interestingly, benign lymph nodes had increased FDG uptake as a result of inflammatory reactions (SUVBW-range: 2-15.8). This prospective, histopathologically controlled study confirms FDG PET as the procedure with the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting lymph node metastases of head and neck cancer and has become a

  8. 18F-FDG PET/CT in fever and inflammation of unknown origin

    J.J.M. Balink

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the role and the interpretation of imaging results with hybrid 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with non-localizing or non-specific signs and symptoms like fever, weight loss, malaise and prolonged increased inflammatory parameters, without a diagnosis after routine diagnostic evalua

  9. Sequential [(18)F]FDG µPET whole-brain imaging of central vestibular compensation: a model of deafferentation-induced brain plasticity.

    Zwergal, Andreas; Schlichtiger, Julia; Xiong, Guoming; Beck, Roswitha; Günther, Lisa; Schniepp, Roman; Schöberl, Florian; Jahn, Klaus; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Bartenstein, Peter; Dieterich, Marianne; Dutia, Mayank B; la Fougère, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral inner ear damage is followed by a rapid behavioural recovery due to central vestibular compensation. In this study, we utilized serial [(18)F]Fluoro-deoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG)-µPET imaging in the rat to visualize changes in brain glucose metabolism during behavioural recovery after surgical and chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy, to determine the extent and time-course of the involvement of different brain regions in vestibular compensation and test previously described hypotheses of underlying mechanisms. Systematic patterns of relative changes of glucose metabolism (rCGM) were observed during vestibular compensation. A significant asymmetry of rCGM appeared in the vestibular nuclei, vestibulocerebellum, thalamus, multisensory vestibular cortex, hippocampus and amygdala in the acute phase of vestibular imbalance (4 h). This was followed by early vestibular compensation over 1-2 days where rCGM re-balanced between the vestibular nuclei, thalami and temporoparietal cortices and bilateral rCGM increase appeared in the hippocampus and amygdala. Subsequently over 2-7 days, rCGM increased in the ipsilesional spinal trigeminal nucleus and later (7-9 days) rCGM increased in the vestibulocerebellum bilaterally and the hypothalamus and persisted in the hippocampus. These systematic dynamic rCGM patterns during vestibular compensation, were confirmed in a second rat model of chemical unilateral labyrinthectomy by serial [(18)F]FDG-µPET. These findings show that deafferentation-induced plasticity after unilateral labyrinthectomy involves early mechanisms of re-balancing predominantly in the brainstem vestibular nuclei but also in thalamo-cortical and limbic areas, and indicate the contribution of spinocerebellar sensory inputs and vestibulocerebellar adaptation at the later stages of behavioural recovery. PMID:25269833

  10. Can 18F-FDG PET improve the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on MRI?

    Highlights: • Prone 18F-FDG PET can improve the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on MRI. • 18F-FDG PET's results were better for mass lesions higher than 10 mm. • 18F-FDG PET has the potential to identify more aggressive breast tumors. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the impact of adding 18F-fluorine-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Sixty patients with suspicious breast lesions on MRI were selected to perform a PET–CT in prone position, dedicated to the evaluation of the breasts. The areas with increased 18F-FDG concentration relative to normal parenchyma were considered positive on PET–CT. Fusion of PET and MRI images (PET–MRI) was performed on a dedicated workstation to better locate corresponding lesions, and its findings were compared with histological results. Results: 76 lesions were evaluated, including 64 mass lesions (84.2%) and 12 non-mass lesions (15.8%). Lesions’ mean diameter on MRI was 29.6 ± 19.2 mm (range 6–94 mm). PET–CT showed increased metabolically activity on 57 lesions (75.0%), with mean maximum SUV of 5.7 ± 5.0 (range 0.8–23.1). On histopathology, there were 17 (22.4%) benign and 59 (79.7%) malignant lesions. Considering all lesions, PET–MRI fusion provided 89.8% sensitivity, 76.5% specificity and 86.8% accuracy. Considering only mass lesions higher than 10 mm, PET–MRI fusion provided 95.8% sensitivity, 83.3% specificity and 93.3% accuracy. Conclusion: The inclusion of 18F-FDG PET on the evaluation of suspicious breast lesions on MRI helped to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions, especially for mass lesions with a diameter higher than 10 mm

  11. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Multiple Myeloma

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18F-FDG PET to evaluate multiple myeloma. 18F-FDG PET is useful for diagnosis, staging of multiple myeloma and differential diagnosis of myeloma related disease such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or plasmacytoma. For therapy response, 18F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy for multiple myeloma and radiotherapy for plasmacytoma

  12. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Testicular Cancer

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET has a higher diagnostic accuracy than CT in initial staging of testicular cancer. In seminoma, it can discriminate residual tumor from necrosis/fibrosis or mature teratoma. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is also useful for the response evaluation of chemotherapy. However, there's no clinical evidence for the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of testicular cancer.

  13. Lista de recomendações do Exame PET/CT com 18F-FDG em Oncologia: consenso entre a Sociedade Brasileira de Cancerologia e a Sociedade Brasileira de Biologia, Medicina Nuclear e Imagem Molecular Recommendations on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Oncology: consensus between the Brazilian Society of Cancerology and the Brazilian Society of Biology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    José Soares Junior

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma lista de recomendações sobre a utilização de 18F-FDG PET em oncologia, no diagnóstico, estadiamento e detecção de recorrência ou progressão do câncer. Foi realizada pesquisa para identificar estudos controlados e revisões sistemáticas de literatura composta por estudos retrospectivos e prospectivos. As consequências e o impacto da 18F-FDG PET no manejo de pacientes oncológicos também foram avaliados. A 18F-FDG PET deve ser utilizada como ferramenta adicional aos métodos de imagem convencionais como tomografia computadorizada e ressonância magnética. Resultados positivos que sugiram alteração no manejo clínico devem ser confirmados por exame histopatológico. A 18F-FDG PET deve ser utilizada no manejo clínico apropriado para o diagnóstico de cânceres do sistema respiratório, cabeça e pescoço, sistema digestivo, mama, melanoma, órgão genitais, tireoide, sistema nervoso central, linfoma e tumor primário oculto.The authors present a list of recommendations on the utilization of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology for the diagnosis, staging and detection of cancer, as well as in the follow-up of the disease progression and possible recurrence. The recommendations were based on the analysis of controlled studies and a systematic review of the literature including both retrospective and prospective studies regarding the clinical usefulness and the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on the management of cancer patients. 18F-FDG PET/CT should be utilized as a supplement to other conventional imaging methods such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Positive results suggesting changes in the clinical management should be confirmed by histopathological studies. 18F-FDG PET should be utilized in the diagnosis and appropriate clinical management of cancer involving the respiratory system, head and neck, digestive system, breast, genital organs, thyroid, central nervous system, besides melanomas, lymphomas and

  14. Recommendations on the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in oncology: consensus between the Brazilian Society of Cancerology and the Brazilian Society of Biology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    Soares Junior, Jose, E-mail: sbbmn@sbbmn.org.b [Sociedade Brasileira de Biologia, Medicina Nuclear e Imagem Molecular (SBBMN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Roberto Porto [Sociedade Brasileira de Cancerologia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Cerci, Juliano Julio [Quanta Diagnostico Nuclear, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Cunha, Marcelo Livorsi da [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia. Servico de Medicina Nuclear e PET/CT; Mamed, Marcelo [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Sergio Altino de [Clinica Felippe Mattoso, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    The authors present a list of recommendations on the utilization of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in oncology for the diagnosis, staging and detection of cancer, as well as in the follow-up of the disease progression and possible recurrence. The recommendations were based on the analysis of controlled studies and a systematic review of the literature including both retrospective and prospective studies regarding the clinical usefulness and the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT on the management of cancer patients. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT should be utilized as a supplement to other conventional imaging methods such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Positive results suggesting changes in the clinical management should be confirmed by histopathological studies. {sup 18}F-FDG PET should be utilized in the diagnosis and appropriate clinical management of cancer involving the respiratory system, head and neck, digestive system, breast, genital organs, thyroid, central nervous system, besides melanomas, lymphomas and occult primary tumors (author)

  15. Recommendations on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology: consensus between the Brazilian Society of Cancerology and the Brazilian Society of Biology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    The authors present a list of recommendations on the utilization of 18F-FDG PET/CT in oncology for the diagnosis, staging and detection of cancer, as well as in the follow-up of the disease progression and possible recurrence. The recommendations were based on the analysis of controlled studies and a systematic review of the literature including both retrospective and prospective studies regarding the clinical usefulness and the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on the management of cancer patients. 18F-FDG PET/CT should be utilized as a supplement to other conventional imaging methods such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Positive results suggesting changes in the clinical management should be confirmed by histopathological studies. 18F-FDG PET should be utilized in the diagnosis and appropriate clinical management of cancer involving the respiratory system, head and neck, digestive system, breast, genital organs, thyroid, central nervous system, besides melanomas, lymphomas and occult primary tumors (author)

  16. {sup 18}F-FDG PET, genotype-corrected ACE and sIL-2R in newly diagnosed sarcoidosis

    Keijsers, Ruth G.; Verzijlbergen, Fred J. [St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 2500, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bosch, Jules M. van den; Grutters, Jan C. [St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Pulmonology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ruven, Henk J. [St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Velzen-Blad, Heleen van [St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) are serological markers, widely used for determining sarcoidosis activity. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has proven to be a sensitive technique in the imaging of sarcoidosis. The aim of this study was to determine sensitivity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, genotype-corrected ACE and sIL-2R in active sarcoidosis as well as their correlation. This retrospective study included 36 newly diagnosed, symptomatic sarcoidosis patients. ACE and sIL-2R levels were simultaneously obtained within 4 weeks of {sup 18}F-FDG PET. ACE was corrected for genotype and expressed as Z-score. {sup 18}F-FDG PET was visually evaluated and scored as positive or negative. Maximum and average standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}) were compared with ACE and sIL-2R. {sup 18}F-FDG PET was found positive in 34 of 36 patients (94%). Thirteen patients (36%) showed an increased ACE with the highest sensitivity found in patients with the I/I genotype (67%). Seventeen patients (47%) showed an increased sIL-2R. No correlation was found between SUV and ACE or sIL-2R. Increased ACE and sIL-2R correlated with a positive {sup 18}F-FDG PET in 12 patients (92%) and 16 patients (94%), respectively. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is a very sensitive technique to assess active sarcoidosis, in contrast with ACE and sIL-2R, suggesting a pivotal role for {sup 18}F-FDG PET in future sarcoidosis assessment. (orig.)

  17. Study on radiation dose caused by 18F-FDG in PET/CT examination

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose caused by 18F-flu- orodeoxyglucose (FDG) in PET/CT examination and to optimize the concerned radiation protection. Methods: Thirty patients from our conventional PET/CT examination were simple randomly selected, and they all underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. The radioactive dose of injected 18F-FDG was recorded. The internal radiation dose was calculated and the external radiation dose from patients was measured with the 451P-DE-SI ion chamber survey meter. The staff's dose was recorded with thermoluminescent detector (TLD). All dosimetry data were processed and analyzed statistically with Excel 2003. Results: The injected radioactive dose of 18F-FDG was (432.9 ± 51.8) MBq, and effective dose equivalent received per patient was (8.23 ± 0.99) mSv. The correlation coefficient (r) of the dose equivalent rate and distance was -0.994 by power function curve fitting, and that of dose equivalent rate and time was -0.988 by exponential curve fitting. The staff's dose was lower than the annual dose limit. Conclusions: The patient's internal radiation dose caused by 18F-FDG in PET/CT examination is low, nonetheless, the clinician should always consider optimizing and minimizing the necessary radiation received by the patients. The patients having been injected with 18F-FDG should stay in one place to decrease their radiation to the public. From the medical point of view in optimizing radiation exposure, there may still be a potential to lower the injected 18F-FDG activity. (authors)

  18. Bilateral Tubo Ovarian Abscess Mimics Ovarian Cancer on MRI and 18F FDG PET/CT

    A 20 year old woman, who presented with a several week history of abdominal pain, was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) after an ultrasound showed complex cystic masses arising from both ovaries. The MRI and 18F FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics of the ovarian masses were strongly suspicious for malignancy, and the masses were surgically removed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a bilateral tuboovarian abscess, with no evidence of malignancy. This case highlights a potentially serious pitfall in the evaluation of suspicious pelvic masses by 18F FDG PET/CT, Whereby a complex bilateral tuboovarian abscess may mimic the PET/CT imaging characteristics of an ovarian or pelvic malignancy.

  19. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [18F]FDG-PET

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with 1H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [18F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among 1H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [Ktrans]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [ve]; and redistribution rate constant [kep]), and [18F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG (ρ = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(ve) (ρ = −0.691; p = 0.004) and std(kep) (ρ = −0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume (ρ = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(Ktrans) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p 1H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [18F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [18F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  20. Effect of Toxoplasma gondii infection on glucose metabolism in the brain of pregnant rats by [18F]FDG microPET imaging

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a pathogenic protozoan parasite, infection of which in early pregnancy increases the risk of serious sequelae in fetus. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of T. gondii infection on glucose metabolism in the brain of pregnant rats by microPET using 18F-fluorodeoxygulcose (18F-FDG) as the tracer. Thirty female SD rats were divided into the T. gondii infection and control group. After set for pregnancy, the body weight was assessed, T. gondii infection was identified by PCR, ELISA technology and immunohistochemistry, and glucose metabolism in brain of rats was monitored by microPET scan. Our results showed that brain glucose metabolism was significantly increased in T. gondii-infected group comparing to the control, indicating microPET scan is more sensitive to detect the abnormality than traditional measurements. In addition, bio-distribution of 18F-FDG in T. gondii-infected rats was assessed by using another twenty female SD rats, which has higher uptake of 18F-FDG at 30 min after injection in whole brain. Furthermore, the expression profile of GLUT1 was also higher in the brain of pregnant rats of the infected group. Therefore, microPET can be effectively applied to in vivo assessment of small animals and contributes to early diagnosis of T. gondii infection, which also assists in understanding birth defects caused by T. gondii infection. (author)

  1. Combined {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT imaging of the head and neck. An approach to metal artifact correction

    Schaefers, K.P. [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Raupach, R. [Univ. Hospital Essen (Germany); Beyer, T. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany); Timaq medical imaging Inc, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    PET/CT imaging is particularly promising for head/neck malignancies, but dental implants lead to biased CT attenuation and PET activity values following CT-based attenuation correction (CT-AC). Objective: Here, we implement a metal artifact correction procedure (MAR) as part of the CT-AC for PET/CT imaging. Results: Phantom studies indicate a maximum quantitative bias in CT and PET of 1000 HU and 30%, which is reduced to 230 HU and 6%, respectively following MAR. These results were verified in selected patients. Conclusion: Artifacts and biases from dental implants can be reduced in PET/CT imaging by applying a simple MAR as part of the CT-AC. (orig.)

  2. High-risk plaque features can be detected in non-stenotic carotid plaques of patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic using combined {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging

    Hyafil, Fabien [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Bichat University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Schindler, Andreas; Obenhuber, Tilman; Saam, Tobias [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sepp, Dominik; Hoehn, Sabine; Poppert, Holger [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Bayer-Karpinska, Anna [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Nekolla, Stephan G. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Dichgans, Martin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Munich Cluster of Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich (Germany); Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate in 18 patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic and presenting non-stenotic carotid atherosclerotic plaques the morphological and biological aspects of these plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) imaging. Carotid arteries were imaged 150 min after injection of {sup 18}F-FDG with a combined PET/MRI system. American Heart Association (AHA) lesion type and plaque composition were determined on consecutive MRI axial sections (n = 460) in both carotid arteries. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in carotid arteries was quantified using tissue to background ratio (TBR) on corresponding PET sections. The prevalence of complicated atherosclerotic plaques (AHA lesion type VI) detected with high-resolution MRI was significantly higher in the carotid artery ipsilateral to the ischaemic stroke as compared to the contralateral side (39 vs 0 %; p = 0.001). For all other AHA lesion types, no significant differences were found between ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In addition, atherosclerotic plaques classified as high-risk lesions with MRI (AHA lesion type VI) were associated with higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in comparison with other AHA lesions (TBR = 3.43 ± 1.13 vs 2.41 ± 0.84, respectively; p < 0.001). Furthermore, patients presenting at least one complicated lesion (AHA lesion type VI) with MRI showed significantly higher {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in both carotid arteries (ipsilateral and contralateral to the stroke) in comparison with carotid arteries of patients showing no complicated lesion with MRI (mean TBR = 3.18 ± 1.26 and 2.80 ± 0.94 vs 2.19 ± 0.57, respectively; p < 0.05) in favour of a diffuse inflammatory process along both carotid arteries associated with complicated plaques. Morphological and biological features of high-risk plaques can be detected with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in non-stenotic atherosclerotic plaques ipsilateral

  3. High-risk plaque features can be detected in non-stenotic carotid plaques of patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic using combined 18F-FDG PET/MR imaging

    The aim of this study was to investigate in 18 patients with ischaemic stroke classified as cryptogenic and presenting non-stenotic carotid atherosclerotic plaques the morphological and biological aspects of these plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) imaging. Carotid arteries were imaged 150 min after injection of 18F-FDG with a combined PET/MRI system. American Heart Association (AHA) lesion type and plaque composition were determined on consecutive MRI axial sections (n = 460) in both carotid arteries. 18F-FDG uptake in carotid arteries was quantified using tissue to background ratio (TBR) on corresponding PET sections. The prevalence of complicated atherosclerotic plaques (AHA lesion type VI) detected with high-resolution MRI was significantly higher in the carotid artery ipsilateral to the ischaemic stroke as compared to the contralateral side (39 vs 0 %; p = 0.001). For all other AHA lesion types, no significant differences were found between ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In addition, atherosclerotic plaques classified as high-risk lesions with MRI (AHA lesion type VI) were associated with higher 18F-FDG uptake in comparison with other AHA lesions (TBR = 3.43 ± 1.13 vs 2.41 ± 0.84, respectively; p < 0.001). Furthermore, patients presenting at least one complicated lesion (AHA lesion type VI) with MRI showed significantly higher 18F-FDG uptake in both carotid arteries (ipsilateral and contralateral to the stroke) in comparison with carotid arteries of patients showing no complicated lesion with MRI (mean TBR = 3.18 ± 1.26 and 2.80 ± 0.94 vs 2.19 ± 0.57, respectively; p < 0.05) in favour of a diffuse inflammatory process along both carotid arteries associated with complicated plaques. Morphological and biological features of high-risk plaques can be detected with 18F-FDG PET/MRI in non-stenotic atherosclerotic plaques ipsilateral to the stroke, suggesting a causal role

  4. The value of delayed {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging for differentiating axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    Ji, Young Sik; Son, Ju Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Cheol Woo [Dept. of Radiological Technology Dong-Eui Institute of Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) have been used as a powerful fusion modality in nuclear medicine not only for detecting cancer but also for staging and therapy monitoring. Nevertheless, there are various causes of FDG uptake in normal and/or benign tissues. The purpose of present study was to investigate whether additional delayed imaging can improve the diagnosis to differentiate the rates of FDG uptake at axillary lymph nodes (ALN) between malignant and benign in breast cancer patients. 180 PET/CT images were obtained for 27 patients with ALN uptake. The patients who had radiotherapy and chemotherapy were excluded from the study. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan at 50 min (early phase) and 90 min (delayed phase) after {sup 18}F-FDG injection were included in this retrospective study. The staging of cancers was confirmed by final clinical according to radiologic follow-up and pathologic findings. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of ALN was measured at the Syngo Acquisition Workplace by Siemens. The 27 patients included 18 malignant and 9 ALN benign groups and the 18 malignant groups were classified into the 3 groups according to number of metastatic ALN in each patient. ALNs were categorized less than or equal 3 as N1, between 4 to 9 as N2 and more than 10 as N3 group. Results are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (S.D.) and statistically analyzed by SPSS. As a result, Retention index (RI-SUV max) in metastasis was significantly higher than that in non-metastasis about 5 fold increased. On the other hand, RI-SUV max in N group tended to decrease gradually from N1 to N3. However, we could not prove significance statistically in malignant group with ANOVA. As a consequence, RI-SUV max was good indicator for differentiating ALN positive group from node negative group in breast cancer patients. These results show that dual-time-point scan appears to be useful in distinguishing malignant from benign.

  5. 18F-FDG PET imaging on the neuronal network of Parkinson's disease patients following deep brain stimulation of bilateral subthalamic nucleus

    Objective: There is evidence that the cause and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be attributed to subthalamic nucleus (STN) dysfunction and that external electrical stimulation of the STN may improve the underlying neuronal network. This study aimed at using 18F-FDG PET to monitor the functional status of the neuronal network of advanced PD patients following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of bilateral STN. Methods: Five PD patients in advanced stage, rated according to unified PD rat- ing scale (UPDRS) motion score, underwent bilateral STN DBS implantation. Six months after the implantation, each patient was studied with 18F-FDG PET scans under stimulation turned 'on' and 'off' conditions. Statistical parametric mapping 2 (SPM2) was applied for data analyses. Results: Bilateral STN DBS reduced glucose utilization in lentiform nucleus (globus pallidus), bilateral thalamus, cerebellum, as well as the distal parietal cortex. However, glucose utilization in midbrain and pons was increased. The PD-related pattern (PDRP) scores were significantly different during the 'on' status (2.12 ± 15.24) and 'off' status (4.93 ± 13.01), which corresponded to the clinical improvement of PD symptoms as PDRP scores decreased. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET may be useful in monitoring and mapping the metabolism of the neuronal network during bilateral STN DBS, thus supporting its therapeutic impact on PD patients. (authors)

  6. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component ...

  7. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for cancer pain of peripheral nerves

    Lei FANG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the characteristics of cancer pain of the peripheral nerves on 18F-FDG PET/CT images, and explore the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for cancer pain of the peripheral nerves. Methods Imaging data of 18F-FDG PET/CT of 10 patients with cancer pain of the peripheral nerves confirmed by histopathology or long-term follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. The similarities and differences in PET/CT manifestations between the diseased side peripheral nerves and contralateral normal peripheral nerves were observed, and the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax were compared by paired t test with SPSS 17.0 software. Results Seventeen secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions were found in 10 cases. On PET images, the lesions were found to spread along the plexus, nerve bundle or intervertebral foramen, and manifested as bundle-, root-hair- or nodule-like high 18F-FDG metabolic tissue, with the SUVmax as high as 6.67±3.24. The lesions on CT images manifested as bundle-, root-hair- or nodule-like soft tissue density shadows spreading along the nerve bundle or nerve root canal, and there was no clear border between the lesions and the surrounding soft and fat tissues. The contralateral normal peripheral nerves showed no abnormal images on 18F-FDG PET or CT, and the SUVmax was 1.19±0.48, which was significantly different from that of nerves on disease side (t=9.389, P<0.001. Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT can accurately show invasion and metastasis to the peripheral nerve of tumor, and it also can display the size, shape, distribution and tumor activity of the lesions, thus it is valuable for the diagnosis of cancer pain of the peripheral nerves. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.11.009

  8. Value of surveillance {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT in colorectal cancer:comparison with conventional imaging studies

    Choi, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Park, Hye Lim; Choi, Hyun Su; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Soo Kyo; O, Joo Hyun [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To assess the value of PET/CT for detecting local or distant recurrence in patients who undergo surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC)and to compare the accuracy of PET/CT to that of conventional imaging studies (CIS). Tumor surveillance PET/CT scans done between March 2005 and December 2009 of disease free patients after surgery with or without adjuvant chemotherapy for CRC were retrospectively studied. CIS (serial enhanced CT from lung base to pelvis and plain chest radiograph)were performed within 1 month of PET/CT. We excluded patients with distant metastasis on initial staging, a known recurrent tumor, and a lack of follow up imaging. The final diagnosis was based on at least 6 months of follow up with colonoscopy, biopsy, and serial imaging studies in combination with carcinoembryonic antigen levels. A total of 262 PET/CT scans of 245 patients were included. Local and distant recurrences were detected in 27 cases (10.3%). On case based analysis, the overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100, 97.0, and 97.3% for PET/CT and 85.1, 97.0, and 95.8% for CIS, respectively. On lesion based analysis, PET/CT detected more lesions compared to CIS in local recurrence and lung metastasis. PET/CT and CIS detected the same number of lesions in abdominal lymph nodes, hepatic metastasis, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. PET/CT detected two more metachronous tumors than did CIS in the lung and thyroid gland. PET/CT detected more recurrences in patients who underwent surgery for CRC than did CIS and had the additional advantage of evaluating the entire body during a single scan.

  9. Value of surveillance 18F FDG PET/CT in colorectal cancer:comparison with conventional imaging studies

    To assess the value of PET/CT for detecting local or distant recurrence in patients who undergo surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC)and to compare the accuracy of PET/CT to that of conventional imaging studies (CIS). Tumor surveillance PET/CT scans done between March 2005 and December 2009 of disease free patients after surgery with or without adjuvant chemotherapy for CRC were retrospectively studied. CIS (serial enhanced CT from lung base to pelvis and plain chest radiograph)were performed within 1 month of PET/CT. We excluded patients with distant metastasis on initial staging, a known recurrent tumor, and a lack of follow up imaging. The final diagnosis was based on at least 6 months of follow up with colonoscopy, biopsy, and serial imaging studies in combination with carcinoembryonic antigen levels. A total of 262 PET/CT scans of 245 patients were included. Local and distant recurrences were detected in 27 cases (10.3%). On case based analysis, the overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100, 97.0, and 97.3% for PET/CT and 85.1, 97.0, and 95.8% for CIS, respectively. On lesion based analysis, PET/CT detected more lesions compared to CIS in local recurrence and lung metastasis. PET/CT and CIS detected the same number of lesions in abdominal lymph nodes, hepatic metastasis, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. PET/CT detected two more metachronous tumors than did CIS in the lung and thyroid gland. PET/CT detected more recurrences in patients who underwent surgery for CRC than did CIS and had the additional advantage of evaluating the entire body during a single scan

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT compared to conventional imaging modalities in pediatric primary bone tumors

    F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is useful in adults with primary bone tumors. Limited published data exist in children. To compare hybrid FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with conventional imaging (CI) modalities in detecting malignant lesions, predicting response to chemotherapy and diagnosing physeal involvement in pediatric primary bone tumors. Retrospective analysis of PET/CT and CI reports with histopathology or follow-up > 6 months as reference standard. Response parameters and physeal involvement at diagnosis were compared to histopathology. A total of 314 lesions were detected in 86 scans. Excluding lung lesions, PET/CT had higher sensitivity and specificity than CI (83%, 98% and 78%, 97%, respectively). In lung lesions, PET/CT had higher specificity than CI (96% compared to 87%) but lower sensitivity (80% compared to 93%). Higher initial SUVmax and greater SUVmax reduction on PET/CT after chemotherapy predicted a good response. Change in tumor size on MRI did not predict response. Both PET/CT and MRI were very sensitive but of low specificity in predicting physeal tumor involvement. PET/CT appears more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood primary bone tumors, excluding lung lesions. It seems better than MRI at predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. (orig.)

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared to conventional imaging modalities in pediatric primary bone tumors

    London, Kevin [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Stege, Claudia; Kaspers, Gertjan [VU Medical Centre, Divisions of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cross, Siobhan; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Oncology, Sydney (Australia); Onikul, Ella [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Medical Imaging, Sydney (Australia); Graf, Nicole [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Pathology, Sydney (Australia); Howman-Giles, Robert [The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Discipline of Imaging, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-04-15

    F-Fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is useful in adults with primary bone tumors. Limited published data exist in children. To compare hybrid FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with conventional imaging (CI) modalities in detecting malignant lesions, predicting response to chemotherapy and diagnosing physeal involvement in pediatric primary bone tumors. Retrospective analysis of PET/CT and CI reports with histopathology or follow-up > 6 months as reference standard. Response parameters and physeal involvement at diagnosis were compared to histopathology. A total of 314 lesions were detected in 86 scans. Excluding lung lesions, PET/CT had higher sensitivity and specificity than CI (83%, 98% and 78%, 97%, respectively). In lung lesions, PET/CT had higher specificity than CI (96% compared to 87%) but lower sensitivity (80% compared to 93%). Higher initial SUV{sub max} and greater SUV{sub max} reduction on PET/CT after chemotherapy predicted a good response. Change in tumor size on MRI did not predict response. Both PET/CT and MRI were very sensitive but of low specificity in predicting physeal tumor involvement. PET/CT appears more accurate than CI in detecting malignant lesions in childhood primary bone tumors, excluding lung lesions. It seems better than MRI at predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. (orig.)

  12. SU-E-J-124: 18F-FDG PET Imaging to Improve RT Treatment Outcome for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Sharp, G; Choi, N [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate spatial correlation between high uptake regions of pre- and 10-days-post therapy{sup 1} {sup 8}F-FDG PET in recurrent lung cancer and to evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation boosting only regions with high FDG uptake identified on baseline PET. Methods: Nineteen patients with stages II– IV inoperable lung cancer were selected. Volumes of interest (VOI) on pre-therapy FDG-PET were defined using an isocontour at ≥50% of SUVmax. VOI of pre- and post-therapy PET images were correlated for the extent of overlap. A highly optimized IMRT plan to 60 Gy prescribed to PTV defined on the planning CT was designed using clinical dose constraints for the organs at risk. A boost of 18 Gy was prescribed to the VOI defined on baseline PET. A composite plan of the total 78 Gy was compared with the base 60 Gy plan. Increases in dose to the lungs, spinal cord and heart were evaluated. IMRT boost plan was compared with proton RT and SBRT boost plans. Results: Overlap fraction of baseline PET VOI with the VOI on 10 days-post therapy PET was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7 – 0.9). Using baseline VOI as a boosting volume, dose could be escalated to 78 Gy for 15 patients without compromising the dose constraints. For 4 patients, the dose limiting factors were V20Gy and Dmean for the total lung, and Dmax for the spinal cord. An increase of the dose to OARs correlated significantly with the relative size of the boost volume. Conclusion: VOI defined on baseline 18F-FDG PET by the SUVmax-≥50% isocontour may be a biological target volume for escalated radiation dose. Dose escalation to this volume may provide improved tumor control without breaching predefined dose constraints for OARs. The best treatment outcome may be achieved with proton RT for large targets and with SBRT for small targets.

  13. SU-E-J-124: 18F-FDG PET Imaging to Improve RT Treatment Outcome for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Purpose: To investigate spatial correlation between high uptake regions of pre- and 10-days-post therapy1 8F-FDG PET in recurrent lung cancer and to evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation boosting only regions with high FDG uptake identified on baseline PET. Methods: Nineteen patients with stages II– IV inoperable lung cancer were selected. Volumes of interest (VOI) on pre-therapy FDG-PET were defined using an isocontour at ≥50% of SUVmax. VOI of pre- and post-therapy PET images were correlated for the extent of overlap. A highly optimized IMRT plan to 60 Gy prescribed to PTV defined on the planning CT was designed using clinical dose constraints for the organs at risk. A boost of 18 Gy was prescribed to the VOI defined on baseline PET. A composite plan of the total 78 Gy was compared with the base 60 Gy plan. Increases in dose to the lungs, spinal cord and heart were evaluated. IMRT boost plan was compared with proton RT and SBRT boost plans. Results: Overlap fraction of baseline PET VOI with the VOI on 10 days-post therapy PET was 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7 – 0.9). Using baseline VOI as a boosting volume, dose could be escalated to 78 Gy for 15 patients without compromising the dose constraints. For 4 patients, the dose limiting factors were V20Gy and Dmean for the total lung, and Dmax for the spinal cord. An increase of the dose to OARs correlated significantly with the relative size of the boost volume. Conclusion: VOI defined on baseline 18F-FDG PET by the SUVmax-≥50% isocontour may be a biological target volume for escalated radiation dose. Dose escalation to this volume may provide improved tumor control without breaching predefined dose constraints for OARs. The best treatment outcome may be achieved with proton RT for large targets and with SBRT for small targets

  14. Assessment of the usefulness of the standardized uptake values and the radioactivity levels for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer measured by using 18F-FDG PET/CT dual-time-point imaging

    Lee, Hyeon-Guck; Hong, Seong-Jong; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Han, Man-Seok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Ik-Han

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the SUV (standardized uptake value), the 18F-FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) uptake pattern, and the radioactivity level for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer via dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT (positron emission tomographycomputed tomography) imaging. Moreover, the study aimed to verify the usefulness and significance of SUV values and radioactivity levels to discriminate tumor malignancy. A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients who received 18F-FDG PET/CT for thyroid cancer as a primary tumor. To set the background, we compared changes in values by calculating the dispersion of scattered rays in the neck area and the lung apex, and by comparing the mean and SD (standard deviation) values of the maxSUV and the radioactivity levels. According to the statistical analysis of the changes in 18F-FDG uptake for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, a high similarity was observed with the coefficient of determination being R2 = 0.939, in the SUVs and the radioactivity levels. Moreover, similar results were observed in the assessment of tumor malignancy using dual-time-point. The quantitative analysis method for assessing tumor malignancy using radioactivity levels was neither specific nor discriminative compared to the semi-quantitative analysis method.

  15. Simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET)

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E.; Henriksen, Sarah T.;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and 18F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We ha...

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT features of pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma

    Background: Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH) has been reported to show increased FDG uptake and be potential false-positives on 18F-FDG PET/CT examination. However, it is still unclear whether the previously-reported high FDG uptake is a universal characteristic of PSH, and furthermore, there have been no investigations on what kind of radiologic or histologic features may have been related with its FDG uptake values. Purpose: To investigate the 18F-FDG PET/CT features of pulmonary sclerosing hemangiomas (PSHs), and to evaluate the relating factors with their FDG uptake values. Material and Methods: We identified 10 PSHs in eight patients who had a pathologic diagnosis and available antecedent 18F-FDG PET/CT images. 18F-FDG PET/CT images were investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively, along with their histopathologic features. Correlation between 18F-FDG PET features and radiologic as well as histopathologic features were also evaluated. Results: Mean diameter of the 10 PSHs in our study was 16.9 mm ± 6.26 (range 5 - 25 mm). Four tumors showed intense uptake, and four tumors showed moderate uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. In the remaining two tumors, there were no significant FDG uptakes. The SUVmax of tumors ranged from 0.60 - 4.7 (median 2.30; 2.51 ± 1.42), and was significantly correlated with the tumor size (r = 0.754, P = 0.012) and three out of four tumors ≥2 cm (75%) showed intense FDG uptake and their SUVmax values were greater than 2.5. Immunohistochemical results for GLUT-1, GLUT-4, and Ki-67 and other pathologic features were not correlated with the tumors' FDG uptake. Conclusion: The majority of PSHs show increased FDG uptakes, and their SUVmax values are significantly correlated with their tumor size. PSH ≥2 cm can frequently be falsely interpreted as malignancy in FDG-PET/CT. Further studies with large study population are warranted to confirm our observations

  17. Regional nodal staging with {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer: Additional diagnostic value of CT attenuation and dual-time-point imaging

    Li, Meng, E-mail: caseylimeng@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Wu, Ning, E-mail: cjr.wuning@vip.163.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Liu, Ying, E-mail: liuyinggqw@sina.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Zheng, Rong, E-mail: zhengrong_2004@yahoo.com.cn [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Liang, Ying, E-mail: liangy_2000@sina.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhang, Wenjie, E-mail: winjiezh@163.com [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhao, Ping, E-mail: dr.zhaoping@263.net [PET-CT Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Background: [Fluorine-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT) is widely performed in the regional nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG by tubercular granulomatous tissues may lead to false-positive diagnosis. This is of special concern in China, where tubercular granulomatous disease is epidemic. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of an additional CT attenuation and a dual-time-point scan in determining the status of lymph nodes. Methods: Eighty NSCLC patients underwent curative surgical resection after {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT and separate breath-hold CT examinations. The initial images were analyzed by two methods. In method 1, nodal status was determined by {sup 18}F-FDG uptake only. In Method 2, nodal status was determined by {sup 18}F-FDG uptake associated with CT attenuation. For dual-time-point imaging, the retention index (RI) of benign and malignant nodal groups with positive uptake in the initial scan was examined. Results: A total of 265 nodal groups were documented. On a per-nodal-group basis, the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Method 1 were 66.7%, 89.7%, and 85.3%, respectively, whereas those of Method 2 were 64.7%, 96.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. The improvement in diagnostic specificity and accuracy associated with the addition of CT attenuation in Method 2 as compared to Method 1 was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Thirty-nine nodal groups with positive uptake in the initial scan underwent dual-time-point imaging and the difference in the RI between benign and malignant groups showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). Conclusion: {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT has high diagnostic value for preoperative lymph-node (N) staging of NSCLC patients. We show that {sup 18}F-FDG uptake combined with CT attenuation improves the diagnostic specificity and accuracy of nodal diagnosis in NSCLC. For the lymph nodes with positive uptake in

  18. Value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of ovarian malignancy

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of gynecologic malignancy. As symptoms of ovarian cancer are nonspecific, only 20 % of ovarian cancers are diagnosed while they are still limited to the ovaries. Thus, early and accurate detection of disease is important for an improved prognosis. For the accurate and effective diagnosis of ovarian malignancy on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F--FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), we analyzed several parameters, including visual assessment. A total of 51 peritoneal lesions in 19 patients who showed ovarian masses with diffuse peritoneal infiltration were enrolled. Twelve patients were confirmed to have ovarian malignancy and seven patients with benign disease by pathologic examination. All patients were examined by 18F--FDG PET/CT, and an additional 2-h delayed 18F--FDG PET/CT was also performed for 15 patients with 42 peritoneal lesions. We measured semiquantitative parameters including maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) on a 1-h initial 18F--FDG PET/CT image (Parameter1) and on a 2-h delayed image (Parameter2). Additionally, retention indices of each parameter were calculated, and each parameter among the malignant and benign lesions was compared by Mann-Whitney U test. We also assessed the visual characteristics of each peritoneal lesion, including metabolic extent, intensity, shape, heterogeneity, and total visual score. Associations between visual grades and malignancy were analyzed using linear by linear association methods. Moreover, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was analyzed to compare the effectiveness of significant parameters. In a comparison between the malignant and benign groups in the analysis of 51 total peritoneal lesions, SUVmax1, SUVmean1, and TLG1 showed significant differences. Also, in the analysis of 42 peritoneal lesions that underwent an additional 2-h 18F--FDG PET

  19. Diagnostic value of combining 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT in hepatocellular carcinoma

    In this prospective study, our goal was to emphasize the diagnostic value of combining 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic liver disease. Thirty-three consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients were suspected to have HCC based on CT and/or MRI imaging. A final diagnosis was obtained by histopathological examination or by imaging alone according to American Association for the Study of Liver Disease criteria. All patients underwent PET/CT with both tracers within a median of 5 days. All lesions showing higher tracer uptake than normal liver were considered positive for HCC. We examined how tracer uptake was related to biological (serum α-fetoprotein levels) and pathological (differentiation status, peritumoral capsule and vascular invasion) prognostic markers of HCC, as well as clinical observations at 6 months (recurrence and death). Twenty-eight HCC, four cholangiocarcinomas and one adenoma were diagnosed. In the HCC patients, the sensitivity of 11C-choline, 18F-FDG and combined 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of HCC was 75 %, 36 % and 93 %, respectively. Serum α-fetoprotein levels >200 ng/ml were more frequent among patients with 18F-FDG-positive lesions than those with 18F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). Early recurrence (n=2) or early death (n=5) occurred more frequently in patients with 18F-FDG-positive lesions than in those with 18F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). The combined use of 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT detected HCC with high sensitivity. This approach appears to be of potential prognostic value and may facilitate the selection of patients for surgical resection or liver transplantation. (orig.)

  20. Quantitative carotid PET/MR imaging: clinical evaluation of MR-Attenuation correction versus CT-Attenuation correction in (18)F-FDG PET/MR emission data and comparison to PET/CT.

    Bini, Jason; Robson, Philip M; Calcagno, Claudia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-01-01

    Current PET/MR systems employ segmentation of MR images and subsequent assignment of empirical attenuation coefficients for quantitative PET reconstruction. In this study we examine the differences in the quantification of (18)F-FDG uptake in the carotid arteries between PET/MR and PET/CT scanners. Five comparisons were performed to asses differences in PET quantification: i) PET/MR MR-based AC (MRAC) versus PET/MR CTAC, ii) PET/MR MRAC versus PET/CT, iii) PET/MR MRAC with carotid coil versus PET/MR MRAC without coil, iv) PET/MR MRAC scan 2 versus PET/MR MRAC scan 1, and v) PET/MR CTAC versus PET/CT. Standardized uptakes values (SUV) mean and SUV maximum were calculated for six regions-of-interests: left and right carotid arteries, left and right lungs, spine and muscle. Pearson's Correlation and Bland-Altman plots were used to compare SUV mean and maximum within each ROI of each patient. PET/MR emission data reconstructed with MRAC versus PET/MR emission data reconstructed with CTAC had percent differences of SUV mean ranging from -2.0% (Absolute Difference, -0.02) to 7.4% (absolute difference, 0.06). Percent differences within the carotid arteries proved to correlate well with differences of SUV mean of 5.4% (Absolute Difference, 0.07) in the left carotid and 2.7% (Absolute Difference, 0.03) in the right carotid. Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman of PET/MR with MRAC versus PET/MR with CTAC showed high correlation between SUV mean (R(2)=0.80, mean difference 0.03 ± 0.18 SUV, p=0.3382), demonstrating excellent correlation within ROIs analyzed. The results of this study support the use of (18)F-FDG PET/MR for quantitative measure of inflammation in the carotid arteries. PMID:26069863

  1. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET make sense?

    Hoepfner, S. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg, Standort Giessen (Germany); Krolak, C. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kessler, S. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Tiling, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  2. Bone marrow and thymic suppression and rebound secondary to interferon alpha therapy characterised by [18-F] FDG PET imaging

    Full text: Interferon alpha (INF) is a therapy for treatment of melanoma known to cause bone marrow suppression. We report a longitudinal case study of a woman with melanoma who demonstrates thymic and bone marrow suppression during INF therapy, followed by rebound after therapy, characterised by FDG PET. Methods: Patient with melanoma metastatic to lymph node imaged over 19 months (6 FDG PET scans); Began 12 month course of high dose INF following initial PET scan which terminated prior to her last 2 PET scans; Standardised uptake value lean (SUL) estimations obtained on thymus and thoracic vertebral bone marrow; 2 sample t-test performed on pooled thymic and bone marrow SUL estimations during and after INF; Mean changes in hemoglobin, white cell count and platelet count obtained and results compared to changes seen in SUL. Results: Visual analysis of PET scans: mild, persistent reduction in thymic and bone marrow FDG uptake during INF. Post-INF PET scans: marked increase in FDG uptake in thymus and bone marrow. Statistical analysis: 109% increase in thymic SUL (p=0.003), 36% increase in bone marrow SUL (p=0.02). On INF: reduction in hemoglobin (mean 9%), white cell count (mean 15%) and platelet count (mean 73%). Post-INF: increase in hemoglobin (mean 16%), white cell count (mean 94%) and platelet count (mean 44%). FDG PET demonstrated physiological reduction in thymic and bone marrow glucose metabolism during INF therapy with significant rebound post-therapy. These findings correlated with changes in blood parameters. The cytokine related effects of INF on glucose metabolism warrant further investigation. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  3. Non-invasive estimation of hepatic glucose uptake from [{sup 18}F]FDG PET images using tissue-derived input functions

    Kudomi, N.; Jaervisalo, M.J.; Borra, R.; Viljanen, A.; Viljanen, T.; Knuuti, J. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); Kiss, J.; Savunen, T. [University of Turku, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland); Iida, H. [National Cardiovascular Center-Research Institute, Department of Investigative Radiology, Advanced Medical Engineering Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nuutila, P. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Turku (Finland); Iozzo, P. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); National Research Council, Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    The liver is perfused through the portal vein and hepatic artery. Quantification of hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) using PET requires the use of an input function for both the hepatic artery and portal vein. The former can be generally obtained invasively, but blood withdrawal from the portal vein is not practical in humans. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new technique to obtain quantitative HGU by estimating the input function from PET images. Normal pigs (n = 12) were studied with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, in which arterial and portal blood time-activity curves (TAC) were determined invasively to serve as reference measurements. The present technique consisted of two characteristics, i.e. using a model input function and simultaneously fitting multiple liver tissue TACs from images by minimizing the residual sum of square between the tissue TACs and fitted curves. The input function was obtained from the parameters determined from the fitting. The HGU values were computed by the estimated and measured input functions and compared between the methods. The estimated input functions were well reproduced. The HGU values, ranging from 0.005 to 0.02 ml/min per ml, were not significantly different between the two methods (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). A Bland-Altman plot demonstrated a small overestimation by the image-derived method with a bias of 0.00052 ml/min per g for HGU. The results presented demonstrate that the input function can be estimated directly from the PET image, supporting the fully non-invasive assessment of liver glucose metabolism in human studies. (orig.)

  4. Imaging of neurolymphomatosis with 18F-FDG PET/CT: A case report and review of literature

    Guo-zheng WU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the value of FDG PET-CT in the diagnosis of neurolymphomatosis (NL. Methods  The clinical manifestation and FDG PET/CT imaging results in a patient with diffuse large B cell lymphoma accompanying peripheral neuropathy, which was confirmed by pathological examination, were introduced. The images as shown by PET/CT were compared with the findings of traditional imaging including MRI and CT. Relevant literature was reviewed. Results  A 38year female patient complaining of left chest-back pain for 2 months came to hospital for treatment. An enhanced MRI of thoracic vertebrae showed osseous destruction on the left side of 4th thoracic vertebra and left posterior segment of 5th rib, and it was primarily diagnosed as a tumor. FDG PET/CT revealed a massively increased radioactive uptake in intervertebral foramen of left 4th, 5th thoracic vertebrae. The lesion was shown as an increase in uptake of radio-active substance along the left 5th intercostal nerve in the form of bundle or threads. A round-like nodule with increased radioactive uptake was observed in the left parasternal 2nd intercostal space. A CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the nodule revealed a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (A type. The lesion was shown to involve 4th, 5th thoracic vertebrae and left 5th intercostal nerve. It was diagnosed as NL. Repeated FDG PET imaging after chemotherapy showed normal radioactive distribution in the site of primary lesion area. Conclusions  PET/CT is effective and sensitive in the diagnosis of NL, especially in patient with a history of malignant hematologic disease with clinical symptoms concerning peripheral nerve, accompanied by negative results with other examinations. Comparing with MRI, PET/CT can reveal involvement of peripheral nerve earlier, better reflect the degree of pathological condition, and reveal the number of nerves involved, as well as size and morphology of the lesion. It can reveal the active

  5. Grading of Cerebral Glioma with Multiparametric MR Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG-PET: Concordance and Accuracy

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Choi, Seung Hong; Yun, Tae Jin; Song, Yong Sub [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Jun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Yong [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Kee-Hyun [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate concordance rates and predictive values in concordant cases among multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET to grade cerebral gliomas. Multiparametric MR imaging and FDG-PET were performed in 60 consecutive patients with cerebral gliomas (12 low-grade and 48 high-grade gliomas). As the dichotomic variables, conventional MRI, minimum apparent diffusion coefficient in diffusion-weighted imaging, maximum relative cerebral blood volume ratio in perfusion-weighted imaging, choline/creatine ratio and (lipid and lactate)/creatine ratio in MR spectroscopy, and maximum standardised uptake value ratio in FDG-PET in low- and high-grade gliomas were compared. Their concordance rates and positive/negative predictive values (PPV/NPV) in concordant cases were obtained for the various combinations of multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET. There were significant differences between low- and high-grade gliomas in all techniques. Combinations of two, three, four, and five out of the five techniques showed concordance rates of 77.0 ± 4.8 %, 65.5 ± 4.0 %, 58.3 ± 2.6 % and 53.3 %, PPV in high-grade concordant cases of 97.3 ± 1.7 %, 99.1 ± 1.4 %, 100.0 ± 0 % and 100.0 % and NPV in low-grade concordant cases of 70.2 ± 7.5 %, 78.0 ± 6.0 %, 80.3 ± 3.4 % and 80.0 %, respectively. Multiparametric MR techniques and FDG-PET have a concordant tendency in a two-tiered classification for the grading of cerebral glioma. If at least two examinations concordantly indicated high-grade gliomas, the PPV was about 95 %. (orig.)

  6. Comparisons of [{sup 18}F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol with [{sup 18}F]-FDG for PET imaging of inflammation, breast and brain cancer xenografts in athymic mice

    McLarty, Kristin; Moran, Matthew D. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Scollard, Deborah A.; Chan, Conrad [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Sabha, Nesrin; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Guha, Abhijit [Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); McLaurin, JoAnne [Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H2 (Canada); Nitz, Mark [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M., E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3M2 (Canada); Vasdev, Neil, E-mail: neil.vasdev@utoronto.ca [Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of [{sup 18}F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol ([{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol) in human breast cancer (BC) and glioma xenografts, as well as in inflammatory tissue, in immunocompromised mice. Studies of [{sup 18}F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]-FDG) under the same conditions were also performed. Methods: Radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was automated using a commercial synthesis module. Tumour, inflammation and normal tissue uptakes were evaluated by biodistribution studies and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol and [{sup 18}F]-FDG in mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 human BC xenografts, intracranial U-87 MG glioma xenografts and turpentine-induced inflammation. Results: The radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was automated with good radiochemical yields (24.6%{+-}3.3%, uncorrected for decay, 65{+-}2 min, n=5) and high specific activities ({>=}195 GBq/{mu}mol at end of synthesis). Uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was greatest in MDA-MB-231 BC tumours and was comparable to that of [{sup 18}F]-FDG (4.6{+-}0.5 vs. 5.5{+-}2.1 %ID/g, respectively; P=.40), but was marginally lower in MDA-MB-361 and MCF-7 xenografts. Uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol in inflammation was lower than [{sup 18}F]-FDG. While uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol in intracranial U-87 MG xenografts was significantly lower than [{sup 18}F]-FDG, the tumour-to-brain ratio was significantly higher (10.6{+-}2.5 vs. 2.1{+-}0.6; P=.001). Conclusions: Consistent with biodistribution studies, uptake of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was successfully visualized by PET imaging in human BC and glioma xenografts, with lower accumulation in inflammatory tissue than [{sup 18}F]-FDG. The tumour-to-brain ratio of [{sup 18}F]-scyllo-inositol was also significantly higher than that of [{sup 18}F]-FDG for visualizing intracranial glioma xenografts in

  7. Comparisons of [18F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol with [18F]-FDG for PET imaging of inflammation, breast and brain cancer xenografts in athymic mice

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of [18F]-1-deoxy-1-fluoro-scyllo-inositol ([18F]-scyllo-inositol) in human breast cancer (BC) and glioma xenografts, as well as in inflammatory tissue, in immunocompromised mice. Studies of [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) under the same conditions were also performed. Methods: Radiosynthesis of [18F]-scyllo-inositol was automated using a commercial synthesis module. Tumour, inflammation and normal tissue uptakes were evaluated by biodistribution studies and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [18F]-scyllo-inositol and [18F]-FDG in mice bearing subcutaneous MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 human BC xenografts, intracranial U-87 MG glioma xenografts and turpentine-induced inflammation. Results: The radiosynthesis of [18F]-scyllo-inositol was automated with good radiochemical yields (24.6%±3.3%, uncorrected for decay, 65±2 min, n=5) and high specific activities (≥195 GBq/μmol at end of synthesis). Uptake of [18F]-scyllo-inositol was greatest in MDA-MB-231 BC tumours and was comparable to that of [18F]-FDG (4.6±0.5 vs. 5.5±2.1 %ID/g, respectively; P=.40), but was marginally lower in MDA-MB-361 and MCF-7 xenografts. Uptake of [18F]-scyllo-inositol in inflammation was lower than [18F]-FDG. While uptake of [18F]-scyllo-inositol in intracranial U-87 MG xenografts was significantly lower than [18F]-FDG, the tumour-to-brain ratio was significantly higher (10.6±2.5 vs. 2.1±0.6; P=.001). Conclusions: Consistent with biodistribution studies, uptake of [18F]-scyllo-inositol was successfully visualized by PET imaging in human BC and glioma xenografts, with lower accumulation in inflammatory tissue than [18F]-FDG. The tumour-to-brain ratio of [18F]-scyllo-inositol was also significantly higher than that of [18F]-FDG for visualizing intracranial glioma xenografts in NOD SCID mice, giving a better contrast. -- Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  8. Quantification of 18F-FDG PET images using probabilistic brain atlas: clinical application in temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    A probabilistic atlas of the human brain (Statistical Probability Anatomical Maps: SPAM) was developed by the international consortium for brain mapping (ICBM). After calculating the counts in volume of interest (VOI) using the product of probability of SPAM images and counts in FDG images, asymmetric indexes(AI) were calculated and used for finding epileptogenic zones in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). FDG PET images from 28 surgically confirmed TLE patients and 12 age-matched controls were spatially normalized to the averaged brain MRI atlas of ICBM. The counts from normalized PET images were multiplied with the probability of 12 VOIs (superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdala in each hemisphere) of SPAM images of Montreal Neurological Institute. Finally AI was calculated on each pair of VOI, and compared with visual assessment. If AI was deviated more than 2 standard deviation of normal controls, we considered epileptogenic zones were found successfully. The counts of VOIs in normal controls were symmetric (AI 0.05) except those of inferior temporal gyrus (p<0.01). AIs in 5 pairs of VOI excluding inferior temporal gyrus were deviated to one side in TLE (p<0.05). Lateralization was correct in 23/28 of patients by AI, but all of 28 were consistent with visual inspection. In 3 patients with normal AI was symmetric on visual inspection. In 2 patients falsely lateralized using AI, metabolism was also decreased visually on contra-lateral side. Asymmetric index obtained by the product of statistical probability anatomical map and FDG PET correlated well with visual assessment in TLE patients. SPAM is useful for quantification of VOIs in functional images

  9. The impact of 18F-FDG PET on the management of patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis

    We aimed to assess the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) on the management of patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis. An international expert panel determined diagnoses and clinical management in patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis, with and without the results of 18F-FDG PET, respectively. The accuracy of the clinical diagnosis and the resulting clinical management with and without the 18F-FDG PET results were compared using logistic regression models. The analysis included 30 patients referred to a tertiary care centre with large vessel vasculitis and 31 controls. 18F-FDG PET had an overall sensitivity of 73.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 54.1-87.7%], a specificity of 83.9% (95% CI 66.3-94.5%), a positive predictive value of 81.5% (95% CI 61.9-93.7%) and a negative predictive value of 76.5% (95% CI 58.8-89.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET was higher in patients not receiving immunosuppressive drugs (93.3 vs 64.5%, p = 0.006). Taken in context with other available diagnostic modalities, the addition of 18F-FDG PET increased the clinical diagnostic accuracy from 54.1 to 70.5% (p = 0.04). The addition of 18F-FDG PET increased the number of indicated biopsies from 22 of 61 patients (36.1%) to 25 of 61 patients (41.0%) and changed the treatment recommendation in 8 of 30 patients (26.7%) not receiving immunosuppressive medication and in 7 of 31 patients (22.6%) receiving immunosuppressive medication. 18F-FDG PET is a sensitive and specific imaging tool for large vessel vasculitis, especially when performed in patients not receiving immunosuppressive drugs. It increases the overall diagnostic accuracy and has an impact on the clinical management in a significant proportion of patients. (orig.)

  10. Early Tumor Response to Hsp90 Therapy Using HER2 PET: Comparison with 18F-FDG PET

    Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Solit, David; Afroze, Farzana; Rosen, Neal; Larson, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    We compared 68Ga-DOTA-F(ab′)2-herceptin (DOTA is 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid [HER2 PET]) and 18F-FDG PET for imaging of tumor response to the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG).

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Neurolymphomatosis: Report of 3 Cases

    Nguyen Xuan Canh; Ngo Van Tan; Tran Thanh Tung; Nguyen Truong Son; Simone Maurea

    2014-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by infiltration of peripheral nerves, nerve roots, plexus and cranial nerves by malignant lymphocytes. This report presents positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)imaging with 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) in 3 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with nerve infiltration, including one newly diagnosed lymphoma, one recurrent lymphoma in previous nerve lesions and one newly recurrent lymphoma...

  12. Role of 18F FDG PET scan to localize tumor in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia

    Full text: Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome of renal phosphate wasting which is usually caused by phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors. Conventional radiologic techniques usually fail to detect these small, slow growing neoplasms located at unusual sites. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of 18F FDG PET imaging in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females) (mean age: 38.5 ± 12.2 years) with clinical and biochemical evidence of oncogenic osteomalacia were subjected to 'total' whole body 18F FDG PET scan including both limbs and skull views. The images were reconstructed and the final output was displayed as per the standard institution protocol. Results: 18F FDG PET imaging localized suspicious hypermetabolic foci of SUVmax ranging from 1.4 to 3.8 (Mean ± S.D.: 2.39 ± 0.63) suggesting presence of occult tumor in 11 of 15 patients. The suspected foci were localized in lower limbs in ten patients and in the petrous temporal region of skull in 1 patient. FDG localized tumors were histopathologically correlated in 6 patients who underwent surgical biopsy/excision after correlative radiological investigations. Four of these patients were cured after surgical excision while partial surgical excision/biopsy was performed in two patients. Conclusions: 18F FDG PET imaging is a promising technique for detection of occult tumors in patients of oncogenic osteomalacia. It is mandatory to include limbs in the field as these tumors are common in limbs and may be easily missed. Preoperative localization increases odds for cure after surgical removal of tumor

  13. Value of 18F-FDG PET in differentiating Alzheimer's disease with frontotemporal dementia

    Rui-xue CUI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To delineate the pattern of reduction of cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD and investigate the value of 18F-FDG PET in the differential diagnosis. Methods Twenty patients with FTD (behavioral variant and 20 AD patients underwent 18F-FDG PET scanning. All the images were compared with that from 20 healthy age-matched control subjects on a voxel-based analysis (VBA using SPM5. Visual analyses of 18F-FDG PET were performed by 2 independent nuclear medicine specialists who were blinded to the clinical background. Results 1 The PET scans of all the patients in 2 groups presented impairment of cortical metabolism. 2 Subjects with AD showed hypometabolism in the bilateral temporoparietal association cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, and hypometabolim in part of bilateral frontal lobes was observed in patients with progression. The metabolic activity was relatively kept in the primary motor-sensor cortex, occipital lobes and subcortical structures (basal ganglia and thalamus. The asymmetric hemispheric hypometabolic involvement was rare and observed in only 2 of 20 cases. 3 Subjects with FTD showed a significant hypometabolism of the frontal lobes and anterior temporal lobes, accompanied by mild to moderate reductions in glucose metabolism in parietal cortices and subcortical structures. The asymmetric hemispheric hypometabolic involvement was commonly observed in 16 of 20 cases with right-dominant type in 4 of 16 cases and left-dominant type in 12 cases. Conclusions 18F-FDG PET is a reliable diagnostic test in distinguishing FTD from AD due to the sharp contrast pattern of cerebral glucose hypometabolism.

  14. The precision of textural analysis in 18F-FDG-PET scans of oesophageal cancer

    Measuring tumour heterogeneity by textural analysis in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) provides predictive and prognostic information but technical aspects of image processing can influence parameter measurements. We therefore tested effects of image smoothing, segmentation and quantisation on the precision of heterogeneity measurements. Sixty-four 18F-FDG PET/CT images of oesophageal cancer were processed using different Gaussian smoothing levels (2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 mm), maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) segmentation thresholds (45 %, 50 %, 55 %, 60 %) and quantisation (8, 16, 32, 64, 128 bin widths). Heterogeneity parameters included grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), grey-level run length matrix (GLRL), neighbourhood grey-tone difference matrix (NGTDM), grey-level size zone matrix (GLSZM) and fractal analysis methods. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for the three processing variables was calculated for each heterogeneity parameter. Most parameters showed poor agreement between different bin widths (CCC median 0.08, range 0.004-0.99). Segmentation and smoothing showed smaller effects on precision (segmentation: CCC median 0.82, range 0.33-0.97; smoothing: CCC median 0.99, range 0.58-0.99). Smoothing and segmentation have only a small effect on the precision of heterogeneity measurements in 18F-FDG PET data. However, quantisation often has larger effects, highlighting a need for further evaluation and standardisation of parameters for multicentre studies. (orig.)

  15. Detection of histologically proven peritoneal carcinomatosis with fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT

    Dirisamer, Albert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: albert.dirisamer@meduniwien.ac.at; Schima, Wolfgang [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Heinisch, Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Lehner, Hans Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Krankenhaus, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse 30, 1140 Vienna (Austria); Langsteger, Werner [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Vincent' s Hospital, Seilerstaette 4, 4010 Linz (Austria)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies and to assess the diagnostic role for 18-FDG-PET and MDCT alone in comparison to the diagnostic accuracy of fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT by using surgical and histopathological findings as the standard of reference. Methods and subjects: Sixty-two patients (13 males, 49 females; age range 43-81; mean age, 62 years with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis were reviewed for the presence of peritoneal lesions on 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT scans (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems). The results were compared with the histological findings at laparatomy. Thirty-one patients had peritoneal metastases, while 31 patients had negative histological findings at laparotomy. Results: CT detected peritoneal seeding in 26/31 patients, 18F-FDG-PET in 25/31 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT in 30/31 patients, for a sensitivity of 88%, 88%, and 100%, respectively. False-positive findings were seen in MDCT in one patient, in 18F-FDG-PET in two patients, and in 18F-MDCT-PET/MDCT in one patient, for a specificity of 97%, 94%, and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT is superior to MDCT and 18F-FDG-PET alone for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis especially in small lesions and it offers exact anatomic information for surgical treatment.

  16. Detection of histologically proven peritoneal carcinomatosis with fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT

    Objective: To evaluate peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies and to assess the diagnostic role for 18-FDG-PET and MDCT alone in comparison to the diagnostic accuracy of fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT by using surgical and histopathological findings as the standard of reference. Methods and subjects: Sixty-two patients (13 males, 49 females; age range 43-81; mean age, 62 years with suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis were reviewed for the presence of peritoneal lesions on 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT scans (Discovery LS, GE Medical Systems). The results were compared with the histological findings at laparatomy. Thirty-one patients had peritoneal metastases, while 31 patients had negative histological findings at laparotomy. Results: CT detected peritoneal seeding in 26/31 patients, 18F-FDG-PET in 25/31 patients, and 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT in 30/31 patients, for a sensitivity of 88%, 88%, and 100%, respectively. False-positive findings were seen in MDCT in one patient, in 18F-FDG-PET in two patients, and in 18F-MDCT-PET/MDCT in one patient, for a specificity of 97%, 94%, and 97%, respectively. Conclusion: Fused 18F-FDG-PET/MDCT is superior to MDCT and 18F-FDG-PET alone for the detection of peritoneal carcinomatosis especially in small lesions and it offers exact anatomic information for surgical treatment.

  17. Indeterminate pulmonary nodules on CT images in breast cancer patient: the additional value of 18F-FDG PET/CT

    To assess the potential role of 18F-Fluorodeoxiglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in characterizing indeterminate lung nodules detected at CT scan in patients previously treated for a breast cancer (BC). wenty-nine consecutive BC patients (28 females, mean age 65 ± 12 years) with evidence of indeterminate lung nodules at contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) scan (lesions with axial diameter ≥8 mm) were retrospectively analysed: all patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT within a mean 2 ± 1 months from CECT imaging. PET/CT was considered positive in the presence of abnormal FDG uptake in the pulmonary nodules and/or in other organs. The nature of lung nodules was defined at histopathology and/or imaging follow-up. Fourteen (48%) patients showed negative and 15 (52%) positive PET/CT scan in the lungs: of these 15 patients, 7 (47%) had pathologic FDG-uptake in lungs only, whereas 8 (53%) showed abnormal FDG-uptake also in sites different from lungs. At histology and/or imaging follow-up, five (17%) patients were considered positive for BC lung metastases while in seven (24%) a second cancer was diagnosed. In this subset of patients, the sensitivity and specificity for FDG PET/CT in revealing lung lesions were 17% and 100%, respectively, for nodules <8 mm in diameter, and 77% and 85%, respectively, for nodules with diameter ≥8 mm. The therapeutic planning was changed to surgery in seven patients, chemotherapy in one patient and continued hormonal therapy in five. The inclusion of PET/CT in the diagnostic algorithm of the evaluated patients helped avoid unnecessary over-treatment in 12 of 29 patients. FDG PET/CT appears useful in characterizing indeterminate lung nodules found at CECT scan in BC patients, with a sensitivity that is proportional to nodule size. In addition, PET/CT helped in avoiding over-treatment in a significant proportion of patients.

  18. 18F-FDG PET/CT显像对心肌“缺血记忆”的分子机制研究%Experimental Study of the Molecular Mechnisms of Myocardial Ischemic Memory With 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging

    谢博洽; 杨敏福; 叶珏; 杨子鹤; 窦克非; 韩春雷; 田毅

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to explore whether the changes of mRNA and the existence and duration of ischemic 18F-FDG uptake correlate with the extent of myocardial ischemia inischemia-reperfusion canine model. The 20-minute (77= 4) and 40-minute (n= 4) coronary artery occlusion followed by 24 h of open-artery reperfusion in canine model were performed. All dogs underwent fasting (>12 h) dynamic 18F-FDG PET/CT and 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT imaging at baseline, 1 h and 24 h after reperfusion. When all imaging were completed, myocardial samples from the ischemic and nonischemic region were obtained, and the mRNA expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), and heart-fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) were estimated by Real Time PCR. There was no difference in the ratio of hypoperfused region/nomoperfused region of 18F-FDG uptake between the 20-minute group and 40-minute group at baseline. When examined at 1 h, increased 18F-FDG uptake was observed in the 40-minute group. When estimated at 24 h, only the 40-minute group showed slightly higher 18F-FDG uptake than baseline, whereas no such difference was demonstrated in the 20-minute group. Similar mRNA expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-4 and H-FABP were demonstrated in the nonischemic regions between the 2 groups, whereas increased expressions of GLUT-1 and GLUT-4, and decreased H-FABP mRNA were demonstrated in the ischemic regions. The changes of mRNA expression were more obvious in the 40 minute group than in the 20-minute group. The results showed that the existence and persistent period of ischemic 18F-FDG uptake (ischemic memory) was correlated with the extent of myocardial ischemia.%建立了不同程度的犬急性心肌缺血-再灌注模型.利用18F-FDG PET/CT动态心肌显像和实时定量PCR方法探讨了缺血心肌葡萄糖代谢改变(缺血记忆)和缺血程度的关系.将8只杂种犬随机分为球囊封堵20 min组(4只)和40 min组(4只),在空腹状态下(禁食>12 h

  19. Different metabolic patterns analysis of Parkinsonism on the 18F-FDG PET

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are the most common movement disorders associated with neurodegenerative disease. A clinical differential diagnosis of IPD and atypical Parkinsonian disorders, such as MSA and PSP, is often complicated by the presence of symptoms common to both groups. Since Parkinsonism has a different pathophysiology in the cortical and subcortical brain structures, assessing the regional cerebral glucose metabolism may assist in making a differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. The 18F-FDG PET images of IPD, MSA and PSP were assessed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in order to determine the useful metabolic patterns. Twenty-four patients with Parkinsonism: eight patients (mean age 67.9±10.7 years; M/F: 3/5) with IPD, nine patients (57.9±9.2 years; M/F: 4/5) with MSA and seven patients (67.6±4.8 years; M/F: 3/4) with PSP were enrolled in this study. All patients with Parkinsonism and 22 age-matched normal controls underwent 18F-FDG PET, (after 370 MBq 18F-FDG). The three groups and the individual IPD, MSA and PSP patients were compared with a normal control group using a two-sided t-test of SPM (uncorrected P100 voxel). The IPD, MSA and PSP groups showed significant hypometabolism in the cerebral neocortex compared to the normal control group. The MSA group showed significant hypometabolism in the putamen, pons and cerebellum compared to the normal controls and IPD groups. In addition, PSP showed significant hypometabolism in the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, midbrain and the cingulate gyrus compared to the normal controls, the IPD and the MSA groups. In conclusion, an assessment of the 18F-FDG PET images using SPM may be a useful adjunct to a clinical examination when making a differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism

  20. Different metabolic patterns analysis of Parkinsonism on the {sup 18}F-FDG PET

    Juh, Rahyeong; Kim, Jaesung; Moon, Daehyuk; Choe, Boyoung; Suh, Tasuk E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr

    2004-09-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are the most common movement disorders associated with neurodegenerative disease. A clinical differential diagnosis of IPD and atypical Parkinsonian disorders, such as MSA and PSP, is often complicated by the presence of symptoms common to both groups. Since Parkinsonism has a different pathophysiology in the cortical and subcortical brain structures, assessing the regional cerebral glucose metabolism may assist in making a differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET images of IPD, MSA and PSP were assessed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in order to determine the useful metabolic patterns. Twenty-four patients with Parkinsonism: eight patients (mean age 67.9{+-}10.7 years; M/F: 3/5) with IPD, nine patients (57.9{+-}9.2 years; M/F: 4/5) with MSA and seven patients (67.6{+-}4.8 years; M/F: 3/4) with PSP were enrolled in this study. All patients with Parkinsonism and 22 age-matched normal controls underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET, (after 370 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG). The three groups and the individual IPD, MSA and PSP patients were compared with a normal control group using a two-sided t-test of SPM (uncorrected P<0.01, extent threshold >100 voxel). The IPD, MSA and PSP groups showed significant hypometabolism in the cerebral neocortex compared to the normal control group. The MSA group showed significant hypometabolism in the putamen, pons and cerebellum compared to the normal controls and IPD groups. In addition, PSP showed significant hypometabolism in the caudate nucleus, the thalamus, midbrain and the cingulate gyrus compared to the normal controls, the IPD and the MSA groups. In conclusion, an assessment of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET images using SPM may be a useful adjunct to a clinical examination when making a differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism.

  1. Depiction and characterization of liver lesions in whole body [18F]-FDG PET/MRI

    Objectives: To assess the value of PET/MRI with [18F]-FDG using a whole body protocol for the depiction and characterization of liver lesions in comparison to PET/CT. Methods: 70 patients (31 women, 39 men) with solid tumors underwent [18F]-FDG PET/CT and followed by an additional PET/MRI using an integrated scanner. Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding conspicuity of hepatic lesions (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (5-point ordinal scale). Median scores for lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Prior examinations, histopathology and clinical follow-up (116 ± 54 days) served as standard of reference. Results: 36 of 70 (51%) patients showed liver lesions. Using PET/CT and PET/MRI all patients with liver metastases could correctly be identified. A total of 97 lesions were found (malignant n = 26; benign n = 71). For lesion conspicuity significantly higher scores were obtained for PET/MRI in comparison to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Significantly better performance for diagnostic confidence was observed in PET/MRI, both for malignant as for benign lesions (p < 0.001). Conclusions: PET/MRI, even in the setting of a whole body approach, provides higher lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence compared to PET/CT and may therefore evolve as an attractive alternative in oncologic imaging

  2. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in staging, restaging, and treatment response assessment of male breast cancer

    Groheux, David, E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hindié, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, CHU Bordeaux, University Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Marty, Michel [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Centre for Therapeutic Innovation, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espié, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria della Misericordia, Rovigo Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Vercellino, Laetitia [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Bousquet, Guilhem [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); INSERM U728, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Ohnona, Jessica; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Merlet, Pascal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Male breast cancer (BC) is a rare disease, with patterns different from those found in women. Most tumors are detected at more advanced stages than in women. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) in staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis in the database of Saint-Louis Hospital to identify male patients with BC referred for PET/CT. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT findings considered suspicious for malignancy were compared to biopsy results, further work-up and/or patient follow-up of at least 6 months. Performances of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT were compared to that of conventional imaging (CI) using the McNemar test. The impact of PET/CT on management was evaluated. Results: During 6 consecutive years, among 12,692 {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT oncology studies, 30 were performed in 15 men with BC: 7 examinations for initial staging, 11 for restaging, and 12 for response assessment. Tumors profile was ER+ and one had HER2 overexpression. PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy to detect distant metastases were 100%, 67%, 86%, 100% and 89%, respectively. PET/CT was more informative than CI in 40% of studies (p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval: 3.26 – 40%). Findings from {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT led to modification in the planned treatment in 13/30 cases (43%). Conclusion: Although all the tumors were ER+, primary lesions and metastases were diagnosed with high sensitivity. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT seems to be a powerful imaging method to perform staging, restaging and treatment response assessment in male patients with BC.

  3. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging, restaging, and treatment response assessment of male breast cancer

    Purpose: Male breast cancer (BC) is a rare disease, with patterns different from those found in women. Most tumors are detected at more advanced stages than in women. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) in staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis in the database of Saint-Louis Hospital to identify male patients with BC referred for PET/CT. 18F-FDG-PET/CT findings considered suspicious for malignancy were compared to biopsy results, further work-up and/or patient follow-up of at least 6 months. Performances of 18F-FDG-PET/CT were compared to that of conventional imaging (CI) using the McNemar test. The impact of PET/CT on management was evaluated. Results: During 6 consecutive years, among 12,692 18F-FDG-PET/CT oncology studies, 30 were performed in 15 men with BC: 7 examinations for initial staging, 11 for restaging, and 12 for response assessment. Tumors profile was ER+ and one had HER2 overexpression. PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy to detect distant metastases were 100%, 67%, 86%, 100% and 89%, respectively. PET/CT was more informative than CI in 40% of studies (p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval: 3.26 – 40%). Findings from 18F-FDG-PET/CT led to modification in the planned treatment in 13/30 cases (43%). Conclusion: Although all the tumors were ER+, primary lesions and metastases were diagnosed with high sensitivity. 18F-FDG-PET/CT seems to be a powerful imaging method to perform staging, restaging and treatment response assessment in male patients with BC

  4. A Cochrane review on brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in dementia: limitations and future perspectives

    Morbelli, Silvia [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine Unit, IRCCS San Martino - IST, Department of Health Sciences, Genoa (Italy); Garibotto, Valentina [Geneva University and Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Medical Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Giessen, Elsmarieke van de [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arbizu, Javier [University of Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Chetelat, Gael [Inserm, U1077, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, UMR-S1077, Caen (France); Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, U1077, Caen (France); Drezgza, Alexander [Universitaet zu Koeln, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln (Germany); Hesse, Swen [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Law, Ian [Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Pappata' , Sabina [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, CNR, Naples (Italy); Payoux, Pierre [INSERM UMR 825 Toulouse Univ., Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques (France); Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    2015-09-15

    Based on a large body of evidence on its diagnostic sensitivity for the identification of AD, in 2004 [18F]FDG PET imaging was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS, USA) as a routine examination tool for early and differential diagnosis of AD. Since then, large amounts of additional [18F]FDG PET data have become available showing that the addition of [18F]FDG PET to clinical examinations increases diagnostic accuracy in identifying AD patients even in the predementia stage. Of course, new opportunities and new challenges are coming up, which require the definition of the specific role of [18F]FDG PET in the era of AD biomarkers (i.e. relationship with other biomarkers and role as a marker of progression in AD [46, 48]). Meanwhile, in daily clinical practice, nuclear medicine experts should continue to perform high-quality [18F]FDG PET scans, constantly improving the standard through continuous education and the use of appropriate tools, knowing that it is one of the most informative biomarkers currently available for the prediction of dementia at the MCI stage.

  5. Comparative PET/CT study with 11C-MET and 18F-FDG for diagnosing Glioma

    In this paper, we investigate the diagnostic value of 11C-methionine (MET) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for brain gliomas, and compare the results to 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Forty-four patients with suspected gliomas were examined with 11C-MET and 18F-FDG PET/CT. 18F-FDG and 11C-MET PET/CT images were compared and evaluated by visual and semiquantitative analysis. The accuracy of 11C-MET and 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting gliomas were 88.6% and 65.9%, respectively. Semiquantitative analysis showed that the 26 gliomas had higher mean ± SD T/NGmax ratio on 11C-MET PET/CT than on 18F-FDG PET/CT(1.95±0.52 vs. 0.90±0.27, t=9.101, P11C-MET had a higher sensitivity than 18F-FDG (83.3% vs.33.3%, χ2 =4.16, P18F-FDG in the sensitivity for high-grade gliomas(100% vs. 64.3%, χ2=3.20, P>0.05). The difference was no significant, too, between high-and low-grade gliomas, compared by 11C-MET T/NGmax ratio (2.07±0.51 vs. 1.81±0.52, t=1.302, P=0.205). 18F-FDG T/NGmax ratio in high-grade gliomas was significantly higher than that in low-grade gliomas (1.03±0.30 vs. 0.75±0.11, t=3.198, P=0.004). It is concluded that 11C-MET PET/CT is more accurate than 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting and delineating gliomas, especially for low-grade gliomas, and it can play a complement role to 18F-FDG in tumor grading. (authors)

  6. Adrenergic pathway activation enhances brown adipose tissue metabolism: A [18 F]FDG PET/CT study in mice

    Objective: Pharmacologic approaches to study brown adipocyte activation in vivo with a potential of being translational to humans are desired. The aim of this study was to examine pre- and postsynaptic targeting of adrenergic system for enhancing brown adipose tissue (BAT) metabolism quantifiable by [18 F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18 F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in mice. Methods: A β3-adrenoreceptor selective agonist (CL 316243), an adenylyl cyclase enzyme activator (forskolin) and a potent blocker of presynaptic norepinephrine transporter (atomoxetine), were injected through the tail vein of Swiss Webster mice 30 minutes before intravenous (iv) administration of [18 F]FDG. The mice were placed on the PET/CT bed for 30 min PET acquisition followed by 10 min CT acquisition for attenuation correction and anatomical delineation of PET images. Results: Activated interscapular (IBAT), cervical, periaortic and intercostal BAT were observed in 3-dimentional analysis of [18 F]FDG PET images. CL 316243 increased the total [18 F]FDG standard uptake value (SUV) of IBAT 5-fold greater compared to that in placebo-treated mice. It also increased the [18 F]FDG SUV of white adipose tissue (2.4-fold), and muscle (2.7-fold), as compared to the control. There was no significant difference in heart, brain, spleen and liver uptakes between groups. Forskolin increased [18 F]FDG SUV of IBAT 1.9-fold greater than that in placebo-treated mice. It also increased the [18 F]FDG SUV of white adipose tissue (2.2-fold) and heart (5.4-fold) compared to control. There was no significant difference in muscle, brain, spleen, and liver uptakes between groups. Atomoxetine increased [18 F]FDG SUV of IBAT 1.7-fold greater than that in placebo-treated mice. There were no significant differences in all other organs compared to placebo-treated mice except liver (1.6 fold increase). A positive correlation between SUV levels of IBAT and CT Hounsfield unit (HU) (R2 = 0

  7. Early prediction of histopathological response of rectal tumors after one week of preoperative radiochemotherapy using 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective clinical study

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) is standard in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Initial data suggest that the tumor’s metabolic response, i.e. reduction of its 18 F-FDG uptake compared with the baseline, observed after two weeks of RCT, may correlate with histopathological response. This prospective study evaluated the ability of a very early metabolic response, seen after only one week of RCT, to predict the histopathological response to treatment. Twenty patients with LARC who received standard RCT regimen followed by radical surgery participated in this study. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV-MAX), measured by PET-CT imaging at baseline and on day 8 of RCT, and the changes in FDG uptake (ΔSUV-MAX), were compared with the histopathological response at surgery. Response was classified by tumor regression grade (TRG) and by achievement of pathological complete response (pCR). Absolute SUV-MAX values at both time points did not correlate with histopathological response. However, patients with pCR had a larger drop in SUV-MAX after one week of RCT (median: -35.31% vs −18.42%, p = 0.046). In contrast, TRG did not correlate with ΔSUV-MAX. The changes in FGD-uptake predicted accurately the achievement of pCR: only patients with a decrease of more than 32% in SUV-MAX had pCR while none of those whose tumors did not show any decrease in SUV-MAX had pCR. A decrease in ΔSUV-MAX after only one week of RCT for LARC may be able to predict the achievement of pCR in the post-RCT surgical specimen. Validation in a larger independent cohort is planned

  8. The value of 18F-FDG PET imaging in the differential diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders using statistical parametric mapping method

    cortical hypometabolism in bilateral parietal, temporal and/or frontal lobes, however these changes can also be seen in PDD and DLB. Greater hypometabolism was observed in parietal-temporal association cortex in AD group as compared with PDD group. The occipital hypometabolism can be used to differentiate the DLB group from AD and PDD groups. Conclusions: Assessment of the 18F-FDG PET images using SPM-supported reading may be a useful adjunct to a clinical examination when making a differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  9. Comparison between 18F-FDG PET and CT in evaluating the activity of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Objective: To compare the difference between 18F-FDG PET and CT for evaluating the activity of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: 18F-FDG PET-CT was performed in 31 pulmonary tuberculosis patients,the activity of the tuberculosis lesions was evaluated by PET and CT images, the results of the two imaging methods were compared separately. Results: The results obtained with the two imaging methods were consistent in 26 cases and inconsistent in 5 cases.6 eases which CT diagnosed as inactive tuberculosis (healed lesions) were also judged as inactive lesions by PET imaging. In 16 cases, CT displayed that most of the lesions were calcified and associated with little streaks and diagnosed as inactive tuberculosis (obsolete lesions), among them PET judged 5 cases as active lesions, of which 3 cases with partly calcified lesion associated with mild radioactive uptake, 2 eases with streaks associated with mild radioactive uptake. 9 cases which CT diagnosed as active pulmonary tuberculosis, PET judged as active lesions too. Conclusions: 18FFDG PET and CT have the same judgment in diagnosing healed and active tuberculosis lesions, while 18FFDG PET is superior to CT in evaluating the active lesions residue in obsolete lesions. (authors)

  10. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. 18F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, 18F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers 18F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of 18F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases

  11. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    Ryu, Young Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, {sup 18}F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Usefulness of 18F-FDG PET in the brain mass survey

    The aim of this study is to determine the clinical significance of 18F-FDG PET in the brain mass survey studies. Thirty-two (58%) out of 55 patients examined showed regional decreases in the cerebrum and cerebellum, which were caused by ischemia, macroangiopathy of diabetes mellitus, crossed cerebellar diaschisis and Alzheimer's disease. Two patients with suspicious Alzheimer's disease (early stage) and one with cerebrovascular dementia were observed. One patient showed high uptake of 18F-FDG in the pituitary gland with pituitary adenoma. 18F-FDG PET is very useful not only to pick up early stage of dementia but also to examine several pathological conditions. (author)

  13. 18F FDG PET/CT in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders

    Full text: Differential diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders can be challenging in the early phase of disease course. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with 18F Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been used to identify characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) as well as variant forms of Parkinsonism such as Multisystem Atrophy (MSA), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and cortico basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). In this study we assessed the utility of 18F FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis Parkinsonian syndromes. 66 Parkinsonian patients with a mean age of 59.6 ± 11.50 years, male: female ratio of 3.12:1, age range of 35-84 years with a disease duration of 2.6 ± .68 years were referred for FDG PET to determine whether their scan patterns could distinguish idiopathic Parkinsons from the Parkinson plus syndromes. Approximately 60 minutes following intravenous injection of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG, PET/CT scan of the brain was acquired in a whole-body Full Ring PET/CT scanner (Discovery STE16 camera). A low dose CT was obtained on the same area without IV contrast for attenuation correction and coregistration. Images were reconstructed using a 3D VUE algorithm and slices were reformatted into transaxial, coronal and sagittal views. Subsequently the images were processed and visually analyzed on Xeleris workstation. Images were classified by visual analysis into the various subgroups, those with normal to increased basal ganglia uptake were classified into Idiopathic Parkinson's (40/45) and when basal ganglia uptake was decreased they were Parkinsons Plus (19/21). The study demonstrates that 18F FDG PET performed at the time of initial referral for parkinsonism could accurately classify patients into Parkinson's disease and Parkinson plus subtypes

  14. Targeting post-infarct inflammation by PET imaging: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-citrate and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE with {sup 18}F-FDG in a mouse model

    Thackeray, James T. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Division of Molecular and Translational Cardiology, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover (Germany); Bankstahl, Jens P.; Walte, Almut; Wittneben, Alexander; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Wang, Yong; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Wollert, Kai C. [Hannover Medical School, Division of Molecular and Translational Cardiology, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-12

    Imaging of inflammation early after myocardial infarction (MI) is a promising approach to the guidance of novel molecular interventions that support endogenous healing processes. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been used, but may be complicated by physiological myocyte uptake. We evaluated the potential of two alternative imaging targets: lactoferrin binding by {sup 68}Ga-citrate and somatostatin receptor binding by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE. C57Bl/6 mice underwent permanent coronary artery ligation. Serial PET imaging was performed 3 - 7 days after MI using {sup 68}Ga-citrate, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, or {sup 18}F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of myocyte glucose uptake. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by {sup 13}N-ammonia PET and cardiac geometry by contrast-enhanced ECG-gated CT. Mice exhibited a perfusion defect of 30 - 40 % (of the total left ventricle) with apical anterolateral wall akinesia and thinning on day 7 after MI. {sup 18}F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression demonstrated distinct uptake in the infarct region, as well as in the border zone and remote myocardium. The myocardial standardized uptake value in MI mice was significantly higher than in healthy mice under ketamine/xylazine anaesthesia (1.9 ± 0.4 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1). {sup 68}Ga images exhibited high blood pool activity with no specific myocardial uptake up to 90 min after injection (tissue-to-blood contrast 0.9). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE was rapidly cleared from the blood, but myocardial SUV was very low (0.10 ± 0.03). Neither {sup 68}Ga nor {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE is a useful alternative to {sup 18}F-FDG for PET imaging of myocardial inflammation after MI in mice. Among the three tested approaches, {sup 18}F-FDG with ketamine/xylazine suppression of cardiomyocyte uptake remains the most practical imaging marker of post-infarct inflammation. (orig.)

  15. 18F-FDG PET/CT显像中的棕色脂肪组织摄取%Uptake in brown adipose tissue in 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging

    刘斌; 匡安仁

    2008-01-01

    近年来,国内外曾报道在18F-脱氧葡萄糖(FDG)PET/CT全身显像中,一些位于颈背部、肩胛区、纵隔、肋椎关节旁、肾周等区域的生理性显影是相应区域的棕色脂肪组织(Brown adipose tissue,BAT)摄取了18F-FDG所致。本文就18F-FDGPET/CT显像中BAT摄取18F-FDG的现象做一综述。

  16. Analysis of glucose metabolism in patients with diabetes mellitus by using functional images derived from 18F-FDG PET

    Functional images of K complex (KC) and regional myocardial glucose utilization rates (rMGU), derived from F-18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (F-18-FDG) positron emission computed tomography, were prepared. Using functional images obtained, myocardial glucose metabolism was examined in the fasting state, oral glucose loading (OG), and insulin clamp (IC) condition. The subjects were 10 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), consisting of 8 with non-insulin dependent DM and 2 with insulin dependent DM, and 4 normal persons. Image quality, derived from both OG and IC approaches, was favorable in the normal group. In the groups of non-insulin dependent DM and insulin dependent DM patients, however, image quality was good with IC method but not with OG method. In the group of non-insulin dependent DM, rMGU derived by IC method was relatively high, but was significantly lower than that in the control group, suggesting a decreased function in glucose transporter. When using OG method, rMGU was even more decreased due to high blood sugar and low insulin. In the group of insulin dependent DM, both IC and OG approaches achieved the same rMGU as that in the control group, with the exception of KC derived by OG method that was decreased due to high blood sugar. In moderate or severe DM, myocardial viability seems to be difficult to evaluate because F-18-FDG uptake is decreased in the ischemic area associated with fasting high blood sugar. Mismatching between blood flow and metabolism is also difficult to detect due to high insulin or glucose load. Thus, myocardial viability should be evaluated in the condition of slightly loaded insulin by decreasing blood sugar. (N.K.)

  17. Comparison of {sup 131}I whole-body imaging, {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of metastatic thyroid cancer

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Chong, Ari; Kim, Jahae; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Song, Ho-Chun; Bom, Hee-Seung [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Sun-Pyo; Yoo, Su-Woong [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Hwasun, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Yeon [Dongguk University, Department of Chemistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung-Joon [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Hwasun, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Center for Biomedical Human Resources at Chonnam National University, Brain Korea 21 Project, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to compare {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), WBS with {sup 131}I single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). A total of 140 patients with 258 foci of suspected distant metastases were evaluated. {sup 131}I WBS, {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images were interpreted separately. The final diagnosis was obtained from histopathologic study, serum thyroglobulin level, other imaging modalities, and/or clinical follow-up. Of the 140 patients with 258 foci, 46 patients with 166 foci were diagnosed as positive for distant metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each imaging modality were 65, 55, and 59%, respectively, for {sup 131}I WBS; 65, 95, and 85% for {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, respectively; and 61, 98, and 86%, respectively, for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patient-based analyses. Lesion-based analyses demonstrated that both SPECT/CT and PET/CT were superior to WBS (p<0.001) in all patient groups. SPECT/CT was superior to WBS and PET/CT (p<0.001) in patients who received a single challenge of radioiodine therapy, whereas PET/CT was superior to WBS (p=0.005) and SPECT/CT (p=0.013) in patients who received multiple challenges. Both SPECT/CT and PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic performance in detecting metastatic thyroid cancer. SPECT/CT was highly accurate in patients who underwent a single challenge of radioiodine therapy. In contrast, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT presented the highest diagnostic performance in patients who underwent multiple challenges of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  18. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a rare case of Stewart-Treves syndrome

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Friberg, Lars; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to illustrate the possible applications of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in chronic extremity lymphedema and its complications.......The aim of this article is to illustrate the possible applications of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in chronic extremity lymphedema and its complications....

  19. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Nonmelanomatous Skin Cancer

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Nonmelanomatous skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, merkel cell carcinoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance. So far, there have been a few reports that {sup 18}F-FDG PET was useful in the evaluation of metastasis and therapeutic response in nonmelanomatous skin cancer, however, those are very weak evidences. Therefore, further studies on the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in nonmelanomatous skin cancer are required.

  20. Routine use of dual time 18F-FDG PET for staging of preoperative lung cancer. Does it affect clinical management?

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to single-time-point 18F-FDG PET for staging of preoperative lung cancer. Between November 2008 and December 2009, 107 patients who were diagnosed as having lung cancer or strongly suspected of having lung cancer were enrolled. They underwent dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET following conventional imaging. Dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET imaging (whole body) was performed at 1-h (early) post-FDG injection and repeated (2 h delayed) after injection. The diagnostic accuracy of pre-PET staging and post-PET staging was retrospectively evaluated, and the diagnostic accuracy of dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET was compared to that of single-time-point 18F-FDG PET. In 100 patients, the early 18F-FDG PET scan resulted in upstaging of the tumor in ten (10%) and down-staging of the tumor in five (5%) compared to the conventional scan. The delayed phase of 18F-FDG PET provided no additional information on staging for lung cancer patients. The remaining seven patients were diagnosed as not having lung cancer. This study confirmed that dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET is useful for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant lesions, but has no major impact on staging and therapeutic management of patients with pathologically proven lung cancer. (author)

  1. Low carbohydrate diet before 18F-FDG tumor imaging contributes to reduce myocardial 18F-FDG uptake

    Objective: To evaluate whether low carbohydrate diet before 18F-FDG tumor imaging could reduce myocardial 18F-FDG uptake. Methods: From April 2011 to January 2012, 70 patients were enrolled in this study.They were randomly divided into control group (34 cases) and test group (36 cases). Patients in control group were on regular diet, while those in test group had low carbohydrate diet in the evening before imaging. Blood samples were taken before injection of 18F-FDG for the measurement of serum glucose, free fatty acid,insulin and ketone body. Whole body 18F-FDG tomography was performed with dual-head coincidence SPECT. The myocardial uptake of FDG was assessed visually and scored as 0 for no uptake, 1 for uptake lower than liver, 2 for uptake similar to liver, 3 for uptake higher than liver, and 4 for remarkable uptake.The ratio of myocardium to liver (H/L) was calculated. Two-sample t test, Wilcoxon rank sum test and linear correlation analysis were performed. Results: The myocardial uptake in test group was significantly lower than that in control group with H/L ratios of 0.94±0.57 and 1.50±1.04, respectively (t=-2.75, P<0.05). The concentrations of serum free fatty acid and ketone body in test group were significantly higher than those in control group: (0.671±0.229) mmol/L vs (0.547±0.207) mmol/L and (0.88±0.60) mmol/L vs (0.57±0.32) mmol/L, t=2.38 and 2.67, both P<0.05. The concentrations of glucose and insulin were (5.28±1.06) mmol/L and (35.16±33.70) pmol/L in test group, which showed no significant difference with those in control group ((5.19±0.78) mmol/L and (41.64±35.13) pmol/L, t=0.39 and-0.79, both P>0.05). A negative correlation was found between the myocardial uptake of 18F-FDG and serum free fatty acid/ketone body concentration (r=-0.40, -0.33, both P<0.01), respectively. There was no correlation between the myocardial uptake of 18F-FDG and glucose/insulin (r=-0.02, 0.13, both P>0.05), respectively. Conclusion: Low carbohydrate diet

  2. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET monitoring of tumour response to chemotherapy: does [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake correlate with the viable tumour cell fraction?

    Spaepen, Karoline; Stroobants, Sigrid; Dupont, Patrick; Bormans, Guy; Mortelmans, Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Balzarini, Jan [Rega Institute, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven (Belgium); Verhoef, Gregor; Vandenberghe, Peter [Department of Hematology, UZ Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium); De Wolf-Peeters, Christine [Department of Pathology, UZ Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium)

    2003-05-01

    Because metabolic changes induced by chemotherapy precede the morphological changes, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) is thought to predict response to therapy earlier and more accurately than other modalities. To be a reliable predictor of response, changes in tumour [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake should reflect changes in viable cell fraction, but little is known about the contribution of apoptotic and necrotic cancer cells and inflammatory tissue to the [{sup 18}F]FDG signal. In a tumour mouse model we investigated the relation between chemotherapy-induced changes in various tumoral components and tumour uptake and size. SCID mice were subcutaneously inoculated in the right thigh with 5 x 10{sup 6} Daudi cells. When the tumour measured 15-20 mm, Endoxan was given intravenously. At different time points [1-15 days (d1-d15) after the injection of Endoxan], ex vivo autoradiography and histopathology were performed in two mice and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in the tumour and tumour size were correlated with the different cell fractions measured with flow cytometry in five mice. At d1/d3, similar reductions in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake and viable tumoral cell fraction were observed and these reductions preceded changes in tumour size. By d8/d10, [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake had stabilised despite a further reduction in viable tumoral cell fraction. At these time points a major inflammatory response was observed. At d15, an increase in viable tumour cells was again observed and this was accurately predicted by an increase in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake, while the tumour volume remained unchanged. In contrast with variations in tumour volume, [{sup 18}F]FDG is a good marker for chemotherapy response monitoring. However, optimal timing seems crucial since a transient increase in stromal reaction may result in overestimation of the fraction of viable cells. (orig.)

  3. Increased brain metabolism after acute administration of the synthetic cannabinoid HU210: a small animal PET imaging study with 18F-FDG.

    Nguyen, Vu H; Verdurand, Mathieu; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Wang, Hongqin; Zahra, David; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2012-02-10

    Cannabis use has been shown to alter brain metabolism in both rat models and humans although the observations between both species are conflicting. In the present study, we examined the short term effects of a single-dose injection of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU210 on glucose metabolism in the rat brain using small animal (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) 15 min (Day 1) and 24h (Day 2) post-injection of the agonist in the same animal. Young adult male Wistar rats received an intra-peritoneal injection of HU210 (100 μg/kg, n=7) or vehicle (n=5) on Day 1. Approximately 1mCi of (18)F-FDG was injected intravenously into each animal at 15 min (Day 1) and 24h (Day 2) post-injection of HU210. A 5-min Computer Tomography (CT) scan followed by a 20-min PET scan was performed 40 min after each (18)F-FDG injection. Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) were calculated for 10 brain regions of interest (ROIs). Global increased SUVs in the whole brain, hence global brain metabolism, were observed following HU210 treatment on Day 1 compared to the controls (21%, PHU210 treated group returned to control levels (21-30% decrease compared to Day 1), in all ROIs investigated (PHU210 increases brain glucose metabolism in the rat brain shortly after administration, in line with normalised human in vivo studies, an effect that was no longer apparent 24 h later. PMID:22155282

  4. Optimizing 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Vessel Wall Inflammation –The Impact of 18F-FDG Circulation Time, Injected Dose, Uptake Parameters, and Fasting Blood Glucose Levels

    Bucerius, Jan; Mani, Venkatesh; Moncrieff, Colin; Machac, Josef; Fuster, Valentin; Farkouh, Michael E.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Rudd, James H. F.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data is available regarding the impact of methodological variables, i. e. patient’s pre-scan fasting glucose, the FDG circulation time, the injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG-PET imaging. Methods 195 patients underwent vascular FDG-PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standard uptake values (meanSUVmax) as well as target-to-background-ratios (meanTBRmax) and the FDG blood pool activity in the superior vein cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake classified according to tertiles of patient’s pre-scan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose was compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood pool FDG uptake. Results Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l showing favorable relations between the arterial and blood pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with the aortic meanSUVmax values as well as SVC- and JV FDG blood pool activity but a positive correlation with the aortic- and carotid meanTBRmax values. Pre-scan glucose was negatively associated with aortic- and carotid meanTBRmax and carotid meanSUVmax values, but correlated positively with the SVC blood pool uptake. Injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with the vascular FDG uptake. Conclusion FDG circulation times and pre-scan blood glucose levels significantly impact FDG uptake within the aortic and carotid wall and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG-PET/CT. FDG dose injected was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and pre-scan glucose levels

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PET in primary mediastinal non-thymic neoplasm: A clinicopathological study

    Kaira, Kyoichi, E-mail: kkaira1970@yahoo.co.jp [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Abe, Masato [Division of Pathology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuo; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Okumura, Takehiro [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiaki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Hayashi, Isamu [Division of Pathology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Oriuchi, Noboru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear medicine, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-machi, Maebashi 371-8511, Gunma (Japan); Endo, Masahiro [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Kondo, Haruhiko [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Nakajima, Takashi [Division of Pathology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Background: The usefulness of 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been investigated in thymic epithelial tumors. However, little is known about PET imaging of {sup 18}F-FDG in primary non-thymic mediastinal neoplasms. The aim of this study is to explore the clinicopathological significance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in primary mediastinal (non-thymic) neoplasms. Methods: Twenty-one patients with mediastinal neoplasms who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET before treatment were included in this study. Tumor sections were stained by immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter 1 (Glut1); glucose transporter 3 (Glut3); hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α); hexokinase I; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); microvessels (CD34); epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); Akt/mTOR signaling pathway (p-Akt and p-mTOR); cell cycle control (p53). Results: Seventeen of 21 patients were imaged on PET system using {sup 18}F-FDG, but 4 patients with a histology of cyst showed nothing abnormal in PET scans. The histology of the resected tumors was as follows: 6 schwannoma, 3 teratoma, 4 cyst, 3 sarcoma, 1 undifferentiated carcinoma, 1 seminoma, 1 mediastinal goiter, 1 ganglioneuroma, and 1 Hodgkin lymphoma. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was significantly correlated with Glut1, HIF-1α, EGFR, p-Akt and p-S6K. These biomarkers were highly expressed in schwannoma, teratoma and high grade malignancies, whereas all patients with cyst and ganglioneuroma had no positive expression of these biomarkers. High uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was significant associated with Glut1, VEGF, EGFR, p-Akt, p-S6K and tumor maximal size. Conclusion: The amount of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in primary mediastinal non-thymic neoplasms is determined by the presence of glucose metabolism (Glut1), hypoxia (HIF-1α) and upstream components of HIF-1α (EGFR, p-Akt and p-S6K)

  6. 胰岛素瘤动态三期增强CT和18F-FDG PET/CT影像分析%Triple-phase contrast-enhanced multi-spiral CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging features of insulinoma

    刘恩涛; 王淑侠; 谢淑飞; 邵丹

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨胰岛素瘤MSCT动态三期增强及18F-FDG PET/CT显像的影像学特点.方法 回顾性分析我院6例经手术病理证实的胰岛素瘤的临床资料和18F-FDG PET/CT及同机MSCT动态三期增强影像资料.结果 6例患者均有不同程度低血糖发作病史和典型的惠普尔三联征,其中2例以精神症状首诊.全部病例空腹或发作时血糖均<2.8 mmol/L,胰岛素释放指数均>0.3.6例胰岛素瘤均为单发,1例位于胰尾,2例位于胰体,3例位于胰头,肿瘤直径0.8 cm×0.9 cm~3.0 cm×3.8 cm,平均1.6 cm×1.6 cm.CT平扫肿瘤呈均匀等或稍低密度,边界不清;增强扫描动脉期呈明显均匀强化,静脉期及延迟期强化程度逐渐减低,动脉期强化最为显著.6例患者中,5例肿瘤局部18F-FDG摄取未见增高,1例多发性内分泌肿瘤1型(MEN 1)相关胰岛素瘤局部18F-FDG摄取增高,SUVmax=4.8.结论 MSCT动态三期增强扫描可清晰显示肿瘤的形态和位置,18F-FDGPET/CT对本病诊断价值有限.%Objective To observe triple-phase contrast-enhanced multi-spiral CT (MSCT) and 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging features of insulinoma. Methods Clinical data and image data (whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT and triple-phase contrast-enhanced MSCT in the same unit) of 6 patients with insulinoma confirmed by postoperative pathology were analyzed retrospectively. Results All patients had history of hypoglycemia attack and typical Whipple triad, and two of them complained of mental symptoms at the first visit. The fasting blood glucose or blood glucose concentration in clinical attack time of all the cases were lower than 2. 8 mmol/L. The insulin release index was greater than 0. 3 in all patients. The tumor in all patients was single, located in pancreatic head in 3 cases, pancreatic body in 2 cases, pancreatic tail in 1 case. The mean size of the tumor was 1. 6 cmX 1. 6 cm (0. 8 cmX0. 9 cm-3. 0 cmX 3. 8 cm). The tumor presented as ill-defined lesion, with homogeneous slightly low

  7. The Clinical Role of Dual-Time-Point 18F-FDG PET/CT in Differential Diagnosis of the Thyroid Incidentaloma

    Lee, Sinae; Park, Taegyu; Park, Soyeon; Pahk, Kisoo; Rhee, Seunghong; Cho, Jaehyuk; Jeong, Eugene; Kim, Sungeun; CHOE, JAE GOL

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid incidentalomas are common findings during imaging studies including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for cancer evaluation. Although the overall incidence of incidental thyroid uptake detected on PET imaging is low, clinical attention should be warranted owing to the high incidence of harboring primary thyroid malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed 2,368 dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT cases that were undertaken for cancer eval...

  8. Detection of recurrence of head and neck cancer with 18F-FDG PET

    Objective: To evaluate 18F-FDG PET in detection of suspected recurrence of head and neck cancer after treatment, in comparison with CT imaging. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with clinically suspected recurrence of head and neck cancer underwent 18F-FDG PET, twenty-eight of them also underwent CT imaging. The images were interpreted visually and semiquantitatively as tumor-to-normal (T/N). The accumulation of radioactivity in tumor was graded as follows: grade 0 (no FDG uptake), grade I (slight uptake), grade II (moderate uptake), grade III (intensive uptake). The accumulation of grade II or grade III was defined as recurrence, the final diagnoses of recurrence were based on histological examine or clinical follow up. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of visual interpretation of PET for recurrence were 90.6% (29/32), 83.3%(5/6), respectively; and those of CT were 63,6% (14/22), 50% (3/6), respectively. The ratio of T/N of recurrent tumors was much higher than that of benign ones. Conclusions: Compared with CT imaging, PET has a higher accuracy in detection of recurrent head and neck cancer after treatment

  9. The precision of textural analysis in {sup 18}F-FDG-PET scans of oesophageal cancer

    Doumou, Georgia; Siddique, Musib [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, The Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The PET Centre, London (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, The Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Clinical PET Centre, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Kings College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Measuring tumour heterogeneity by textural analysis in {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) provides predictive and prognostic information but technical aspects of image processing can influence parameter measurements. We therefore tested effects of image smoothing, segmentation and quantisation on the precision of heterogeneity measurements. Sixty-four {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images of oesophageal cancer were processed using different Gaussian smoothing levels (2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 mm), maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub max}) segmentation thresholds (45 %, 50 %, 55 %, 60 %) and quantisation (8, 16, 32, 64, 128 bin widths). Heterogeneity parameters included grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), grey-level run length matrix (GLRL), neighbourhood grey-tone difference matrix (NGTDM), grey-level size zone matrix (GLSZM) and fractal analysis methods. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for the three processing variables was calculated for each heterogeneity parameter. Most parameters showed poor agreement between different bin widths (CCC median 0.08, range 0.004-0.99). Segmentation and smoothing showed smaller effects on precision (segmentation: CCC median 0.82, range 0.33-0.97; smoothing: CCC median 0.99, range 0.58-0.99). Smoothing and segmentation have only a small effect on the precision of heterogeneity measurements in {sup 18}F-FDG PET data. However, quantisation often has larger effects, highlighting a need for further evaluation and standardisation of parameters for multicentre studies. (orig.)

  10. The application of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in evaluating the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib%18F-FDG PET/CT显像在索拉非尼治疗肝细胞癌预后评估中的应用

    李金鹏; 石丛丛; 宋金龙; 陈华; 李蕾

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical feasibility of using 18F - FDG PET/CT imaging to evaluate the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that is treated with sorafenib. Methods A total of 40 patients with advanced HCC, who were admitted to authors' hospital during the period from June 2005 to July 2011, were enrolled in this study. All the patients received orally administered sorafenib therapy. Before and after the treatment 18F - FDG PET/CT imaging was performed, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the hepatic lesion was determined, and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. The factors affecting the overall survival (OS) time and progress - free survival (PFS) time were analyzed by using multivariable analysis method. Results All the patients were followed up for 2 - 18 months with a median of 9 months. Of the 40 patients, partial response was obtained in 3 and stable disease was seen in 22, and the overall effective rate was 62.5%. The median OS and PFS were 6.1 months (95% CI: 0.0 - 12.0) and 4.8 months (95% CI: 1.4 — 7.2) respectively. The multivariate analysis of OS showed that the following four indices were the independent factors that affected the prognosis: eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG) performance status, α-fetoprotein concentration, portal vein thrombosis and SUVmax. AFP level and SUVmax were the independent prognostic factors affecting PFS. Based on the optimal critical value of SUVmax (= 5.5), the patients were divided into low SUVmax group (n = 14) and high SUVmax group (n = 26). The values of OS and PFS of the low SUVmax group were significantly higher than those of the high SUVmax group (P = 0.009 and P = 0.003). Conclusion SUVmax determined by 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging is an useful independent prognostic factor for the evaluation of advanced HCC that is treated with orally administered sorafenib therapy.%目的 探讨18F-FDG PET/CT显像评价索拉非尼治疗肝细胞癌预后的可行性.方法 分析2005年6

  11. Accuracy of [18F]FDG PET/MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastases.

    Karsten Beiderwellen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of [18F]FDG-PET/MRI with PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.32 patients with solid malignancies underwent [18F]FDG-PET/CT and subsequent PET/MRI of the liver. Two readers assessed both datasets regarding lesion characterization (benign, indeterminate, malignant, conspicuity and diagnostic confidence. An imaging follow-up (mean interval: 185±92 days and/-or histopathological specimen served as standards of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated for both modalities. Accuracy was determined by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Values of conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon-signed-rank test.The standard of reference revealed 113 liver lesions in 26 patients (malignant: n = 45; benign: n = 68. For PET/MRI a higher accuracy (PET/CT: 82.4%; PET/MRI: 96.1%; p<0.001 as well as sensitivity (67.8% vs. 92.2%, p<0.01 and NPV (82.0% vs. 95.1%, p<0.05 were observed. PET/MRI offered higher lesion conspicuity (PET/CT: 2.0±1.1 [median: 2; range 0-3]; PET/MRI: 2.8±0.5 [median: 3; range 0-3]; p<0.001 and diagnostic confidence (PET/CT: 2.0±0.8 [median: 2; range: 1-3]; PET/MRI 2.6±0.6 [median: 3; range: 1-3]; p<0.001. Furthermore, PET/MRI enabled the detection of additional PET-negative metastases (reader 1: 10; reader 2: 12.PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic accuracy compared to PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.

  12. Value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of ovarian malignancy

    Park, Tae Gyu; Lee, Si Nae; Park, So Yeon [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-03-15

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of gynecologic malignancy. As symptoms of ovarian cancer are nonspecific, only 20 % of ovarian cancers are diagnosed while they are still limited to the ovaries. Thus, early and accurate detection of disease is important for an improved prognosis. For the accurate and effective diagnosis of ovarian malignancy on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F--FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), we analyzed several parameters, including visual assessment. A total of 51 peritoneal lesions in 19 patients who showed ovarian masses with diffuse peritoneal infiltration were enrolled. Twelve patients were confirmed to have ovarian malignancy and seven patients with benign disease by pathologic examination. All patients were examined by {sup 18}F--FDG PET/CT, and an additional 2-h delayed {sup 18}F--FDG PET/CT was also performed for 15 patients with 42 peritoneal lesions. We measured semiquantitative parameters including maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) on a 1-h initial {sup 18}F--FDG PET/CT image (Parameter1) and on a 2-h delayed image (Parameter2). Additionally, retention indices of each parameter were calculated, and each parameter among the malignant and benign lesions was compared by Mann-Whitney U test. We also assessed the visual characteristics of each peritoneal lesion, including metabolic extent, intensity, shape, heterogeneity, and total visual score. Associations between visual grades and malignancy were analyzed using linear by linear association methods. Moreover, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was analyzed to compare the effectiveness of significant parameters. In a comparison between the malignant and benign groups in the analysis of 51 total peritoneal lesions, SUV{sub max1}, SUV{sub mean1}, and TLG1 showed significant differences. Also, in the analysis of 42 peritoneal lesions

  13. Comparison of tumor volumes derived from glucose metabolic rate maps and SUV maps in dynamic 18F-FDG PET.

    Visser, E.P.; Philippens, M.E.P.; Kienhorst, L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Tumor delineation using noninvasive medical imaging modalities is important to determine the target volume in radiation treatment planning and to evaluate treatment response. It is expected that combined use of CT and functional information from 18F-FDG PET will improve tumor delineation. However, u

  14. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of active idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis

    The different stages in idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) are generally assessed by assay of inflammatory markers and analysis of contrast-enhanced CT images of the retroperitoneal mass. We investigated the potential role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in this clinical setting. 18F-FDG uptake was assessed visually and semiquantitatively (using maximum standardized uptake values, SUVmax) in images of the abdominal mass in 22 patients prospectively enrolled from June 2008 to December 2010 who underwent a total of 33 PET/CT studies. The accuracy in discriminating active from inactive disease was calculated assuming as reference a biochemical instrumental evaluation of patients with IRF mostly based on the level of inflammatory indices and contrast enhancement (CE) of the mass at the time of each PET study. In particular, the relationship between SUVmax and CE, the latter calculated from the change in radiodensity (Hounsfield units) between the basal and postcontrast venous portal phases, was evaluated on a three-point scale (0 18F-FDG uptake, and CE score. A significant correlation (p 18F-FDG PET/CT may be considered an alternative imaging method for the assessment of different stages of IRF. (orig.)

  15. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesion

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics and diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in patients with secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT studies of 8 cases of secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions confirmed by histopathology or follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of infiltrating peripheral nerves and contralateral normal peripheral nerves was measured and compared with their morphological appearances on CT. Paired student t-test was performed by SPSS 10.0. Results: Twelve secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions with high 18F-FDG metabolism were found in 8 cases. On PET imaging, the lesions distributed along the neurovascular tissues or intervertebral foramina with appearances resembling those of fibre bundles, radices or nodes on PET but no density differences with the surrounding soft tissue or fat planes on CT. The SUVmax was 6.86 ± 3.87. The contralateral normal peripheral nerves showed no abnormal 18F-FDG uptake with a SUVmax of 1.10 ±0.46, which was significantly different from that of the secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions (t = 9.231, P18F-FDG PET/CT may be useful in locating the secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions and in assessing its regional infiltration. (authors)

  16. Critical considerations on the combined use of {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-fluoride for PET assessment of metastatic bone disease

    Cheng, Gang [Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Basu, Sandip [Tata Memorial Hospital Annexe, Radiation Medicine Centre (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre), Parel, Bombay (India); Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-08-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is a reliable imaging tool in the detection of osseous metastasis in most cases. Adedicated bone scan (including {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT) may not be indicated in many cancers for the evaluation of osseous metastasis, especially at early stages. Combined use of dual tracers may compromise the imaging quality of both studies, especially for 1sF-FDG PET with respect to its ability to detect lesions in the bone marrow. The authors have no doubt that {sup 18}F-fluoride PET may be valuable and provide some additional value in some selected cases and selected cancers, where {sup 18}F-FDG is of limited value. However, the value of using the combined approach is limited in most situations. The logical notion, is that for {sup 18}F-FDG-avid tumors, there is no evidence in the literature that {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT detects more osseous lesions than {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, while for non-t8F-FDc-avid tumors, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is not indicated. Both the rare occasions (when both {sup 18}F-FDG PET and {sup 18}F-fluoride PET are indicated) and the advantages of performing a dual tracer PET remain to be defined.

  17. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in detection of single spinal metastasis

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacies and advantages of 18F-FDG PET/CT in detection of single spinal metastasis. Methods: A total of 67 patients (41 males, 26 females, with age range of 40-83 years,mean (61.5 ± 10.2) years) with history of primary cancer and suspected single spinal metastasis by CT and/or MRI were enrolled into this retrospective study. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT. The final diagnosis was confirmed by pathological results or follow-up (≥6 months). The efficacies of PET/CT imaging in detection of single spinal metastasis were compared with PET, CT and MRI. χ2 test was used to analyze data. Results: The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for PET/CT imaging were 96.3% (52/54), 84.6% (11/13), 96.3 % (52/54), 84.6% (11/13) and 94.0% (63/67), respectively. The sensitivity,negative predictive value and accuracy of PET/CT imaging were better than those of PET (81.5 % (44/54), 44.4% (8/18), 77.6% (52/67); χ2=6.000, 5.134, 7.421, all P<0.05) or CT (79.6% (43/54), 38.9% (7/18), 74.6% (50/67) ; χ2=7.083, 6.482, 9.543, all P<0.05), and the specificity of PET/CT was also higher than that of CT(53.8% (7/13); χ2=4.248, P<0.05). The accuracy of PET/CT imaging was higher than that of MRI (80.6% (54/67); χ2=5.457, P<0.05). Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging has high efficacies and advantages in detection of single spinal metastasis, and it could be considered as a useful diagnostic method when MRI imaging findings are equivocal. (authors)

  18. Conversion of arterial input functions for dual pharmacokinetic modeling using Gd-DTPA/MRI and 18F-FDG/PET.

    Poulin, Eric; Lebel, Réjean; Croteau, Etienne; Blanchette, Marie; Tremblay, Luc; Lecomte, Roger; Bentourkia, M'hamed; Lepage, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Reaching the full potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-positron emission tomography (PET) dual modality systems requires new methodologies in quantitative image analyses. In this study, methods are proposed to convert an arterial input function (AIF) derived from gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in MRI, into a (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) AIF in PET, and vice versa. The AIFs from both modalities were obtained from manual blood sampling in a F98-Fisher glioblastoma rat model. They were well fitted by a convolution of a rectangular function with a biexponential clearance function. The parameters of the biexponential AIF model were found statistically different between MRI and PET. Pharmacokinetic MRI parameters such as the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the extravascular-extracellular volume fraction (ν(e)), and the blood volume fraction (ν(p)) calculated with the Gd-DTPA AIF and the Gd-DTPA AIF converted from (18)F-FDG AIF normalized with or without blood sample were not statistically different. Similarly, the tumor metabolic rates of glucose (TMRGlc) calculated with (18) F-FDG AIF and with (18) F-FDG AIF obtained from Gd-DTPA AIF were also found not statistically different. In conclusion, only one accurate AIF would be needed for dual MRI-PET pharmacokinetic modeling in small animal models. PMID:22570280

  19. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of primary tumours of unknown origin; experience of the Hospital Angeles del Pedregal

    It was in 1994 when published studies appear that evaluate the utility of the 18F-FDG PET in the patients with primary tumors of unknown origin (TOD); starting from then diverse studies that support the clinical utility of the study arise with 18F-FDG PET in the detection of the primary tumor. It is as well as it has been calculated that the study with 18F-FDG PET is able to detect the primary tumor in around 40% of the patients with negative results in the conventional diagnostic procedures. Until the moment, most of the studies published in relation to the primary tumors of unknown origin only evaluate the paper of the study with 18F-FDG PET, without including the image fusion technique PET/CT, which has demonstrated in diverse studies; in oncological scenarios different from the TOD, a superior diagnosis certainty. (Author)

  20. The diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI in paediatric histiocytosis

    Mueller, Wolfgang Peter; Melzer, Henriette Ingrid; Bartenstein, Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schmid, Irene [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    To analyse the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI for the evaluation of active lesions in paediatric Langerhans cell histiocytosis. We compared 21 {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans with 21 MRI scans (mean time interval 17 days) in 15 patients (11 male, 4 female, age range 4 months to 19 years) with biopsy-proven histiocytosis. Primary criteria for the lesion-based analysis were signs of vital histiocyte infiltrates (bone marrow oedema and contrast enhancement for MRI; SUV greater than the mean SUV of the right liver lobe for PET). PET and MR images were analysed separately and side-by-side. The results were validated by biopsy or follow-up scans after more than 6 months. Of 53 lesions evaluated, 13 were confirmed by histology and 40 on follow-up investigations. The sensitivity and specificity of PET were 67 % and 76 % and of MRI were 81 % and 47 %, respectively. MRI showed seven false-positive bone lesions after successful chemotherapy. PET showed five false-negative small bone lesions, one false-negative lesion of the skull and three false-negative findings for intracerebral involvement. PET showed one false-positive lesion in the lymphoid tissue of the head and neck region and two false-positive bone lesions after treatment. Combined PET/MR analysis decreased the number of false-negative findings on primary staging, whereas no advantage over PET alone was seen in terms of false-positive or false-negative results on follow-up. Our retrospective analysis suggests a pivotal role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in lesion follow-up due to a lower number of false-positive findings after chemotherapy. MRI showed a higher sensitivity and is indispensable for primary staging, evaluation of brain involvement and biopsy planning. Combined MRI/PET analysis improved sensitivity by decreasing the false-negative rate during primary staging indicating a future role of simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI for primary investigation of paediatric histiocytosis. (orig.)

  1. The diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET and MRI in paediatric histiocytosis

    To analyse the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET and MRI for the evaluation of active lesions in paediatric Langerhans cell histiocytosis. We compared 21 18F-FDG PET scans with 21 MRI scans (mean time interval 17 days) in 15 patients (11 male, 4 female, age range 4 months to 19 years) with biopsy-proven histiocytosis. Primary criteria for the lesion-based analysis were signs of vital histiocyte infiltrates (bone marrow oedema and contrast enhancement for MRI; SUV greater than the mean SUV of the right liver lobe for PET). PET and MR images were analysed separately and side-by-side. The results were validated by biopsy or follow-up scans after more than 6 months. Of 53 lesions evaluated, 13 were confirmed by histology and 40 on follow-up investigations. The sensitivity and specificity of PET were 67 % and 76 % and of MRI were 81 % and 47 %, respectively. MRI showed seven false-positive bone lesions after successful chemotherapy. PET showed five false-negative small bone lesions, one false-negative lesion of the skull and three false-negative findings for intracerebral involvement. PET showed one false-positive lesion in the lymphoid tissue of the head and neck region and two false-positive bone lesions after treatment. Combined PET/MR analysis decreased the number of false-negative findings on primary staging, whereas no advantage over PET alone was seen in terms of false-positive or false-negative results on follow-up. Our retrospective analysis suggests a pivotal role of 18F-FDG PET in lesion follow-up due to a lower number of false-positive findings after chemotherapy. MRI showed a higher sensitivity and is indispensable for primary staging, evaluation of brain involvement and biopsy planning. Combined MRI/PET analysis improved sensitivity by decreasing the false-negative rate during primary staging indicating a future role of simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI for primary investigation of paediatric histiocytosis. (orig.)

  2. Evolving role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT for the body tumor and metastases in pediatrics

    18F-FDG-positron emission tomography-computerized tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) scan is an important imaging tool which may provide both functional and anatomical information in a single diagnostic test. It has the potential to be a valuable tool in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of pediatric tumors including the metastases because 18fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is a glucose analogue that concentrates in areas of active metabolic activity. This review provides an update on functional and metabolic imaging approaches for assessment and management of the body tumor and metastases in pediatrics using a combined whole body 18F-FDG-PET/CT scanners. We discuss the benefits include improved pediatric patients' outcome facilitated by staging and monitoring of disease and better treatment planning. It is worth to concern the preparation of children undergoing PET studies and radiation dosimetry and its implications for family and caregivers. It is important to consider the normal distribution of 18FDG in children, common variations of the normal distribution. We show some of our cases that most tumors in children accumulate and retain FDG, allowing high-quality images of their distribution and pathophysiology either at the primary site as well as in the areas of metastatic disease.

  3. Evolving role of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for the body tumor and metastases in pediatrics

    Chen Zhengguang, E-mail: guangchen1@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, No. 5 Hai Yun Cang Beijing 100700 (China); Li Xiaozhen, E-mail: lixiaozhen79@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, No. 1 Shui Fu Yuan, Wang Fu Jing Da Jie, Beijing 100730 (China); Li Fang, E-mail: lifang@gmail.co [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, No. 1 Shui Fu Yuan, Wang Fu Jing Da Jie, Beijing 100730 (China); Ouyang Qiaohong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Yu Tong [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University. 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)

    2010-09-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG-positron emission tomography-computerized tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) scan is an important imaging tool which may provide both functional and anatomical information in a single diagnostic test. It has the potential to be a valuable tool in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of pediatric tumors including the metastases because {sup 18}fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) is a glucose analogue that concentrates in areas of active metabolic activity. This review provides an update on functional and metabolic imaging approaches for assessment and management of the body tumor and metastases in pediatrics using a combined whole body {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT scanners. We discuss the benefits include improved pediatric patients' outcome facilitated by staging and monitoring of disease and better treatment planning. It is worth to concern the preparation of children undergoing PET studies and radiation dosimetry and its implications for family and caregivers. It is important to consider the normal distribution of {sup 18}FDG in children, common variations of the normal distribution. We show some of our cases that most tumors in children accumulate and retain FDG, allowing high-quality images of their distribution and pathophysiology either at the primary site as well as in the areas of metastatic disease.

  4. 18F-FDG PET/CT impact on testicular tumours clinical management

    Testicular tumour is the most common malignancy in young men. The diagnostic work-up is mainly based on morphological imaging. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with testicular tumour. We retrospectively evaluated all patients studied by 18F-FDG PET/CT at our centre. Inclusion criteria were: pathological confirmation of testicular tumour, contrast-enhanced CT scan performed within a month of the PET/CT scan, and clinical/imaging follow-up performed at the Oncology Unit of our hospital. Overall, 56 patients were enrolled and 121 PET/CT scans were evaluated. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed following standard procedures and the results were compared with clinical, imaging and follow-up data. Clinicians were contacted to enquire whether the PET/CT scan influenced the patient's management. Answers were scored as follows: start/continue chemotherapy or radiotherapy, indication for surgery of secondary lesions, and clinical surveillance. On a scan basis, 51 seminoma and 70 nonseminoma (NS) cases were reviewed. Of the 121 cases. 32 were found to be true-positive, 74 true-negative, 8 false-positive and 6 false-negative by PET/CT. PET/CT showed good sensitivity and specificity for seminoma lesion detection (92 % and 84 %, respectively), but its sensitivity was lower for NS forms (sensitivity and specificity 77 % and 95 %, respectively). The PET/CT scan influenced the clinical management of 47 of 51 seminomas (in 6 chemotherapy was started/continued, in 3 radiotherapy was started/continued, in 2 surgery of secondary lesions was performed, and in 36 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate), and 59 of 70 NS (in 18 therapy/surgery was started/continued, and in 41 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate). Our preliminary data demonstrate the potential usefulness of PET/CT for the assessment of patients with testicular tumour. It provides valuable information for the clinical management, particularly for clinical

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT impact on testicular tumours clinical management

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Nicolini, Silvia; Nanni, Cristina; Allegri, Vincenzo; Fanti, Stefano [S.Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zucchini, Giorgia; Berselli, Annalisa; Martoni, Andrea; Cricca, Antonia [S.Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Oncology, Bologna (Italy); Domenico, Rubello [S.Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Testicular tumour is the most common malignancy in young men. The diagnostic work-up is mainly based on morphological imaging. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with testicular tumour. We retrospectively evaluated all patients studied by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at our centre. Inclusion criteria were: pathological confirmation of testicular tumour, contrast-enhanced CT scan performed within a month of the PET/CT scan, and clinical/imaging follow-up performed at the Oncology Unit of our hospital. Overall, 56 patients were enrolled and 121 PET/CT scans were evaluated. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was performed following standard procedures and the results were compared with clinical, imaging and follow-up data. Clinicians were contacted to enquire whether the PET/CT scan influenced the patient's management. Answers were scored as follows: start/continue chemotherapy or radiotherapy, indication for surgery of secondary lesions, and clinical surveillance. On a scan basis, 51 seminoma and 70 nonseminoma (NS) cases were reviewed. Of the 121 cases. 32 were found to be true-positive, 74 true-negative, 8 false-positive and 6 false-negative by PET/CT. PET/CT showed good sensitivity and specificity for seminoma lesion detection (92 % and 84 %, respectively), but its sensitivity was lower for NS forms (sensitivity and specificity 77 % and 95 %, respectively). The PET/CT scan influenced the clinical management of 47 of 51 seminomas (in 6 chemotherapy was started/continued, in 3 radiotherapy was started/continued, in 2 surgery of secondary lesions was performed, and in 36 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate), and 59 of 70 NS (in 18 therapy/surgery was started/continued, and in 41 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate). Our preliminary data demonstrate the potential usefulness of PET/CT for the assessment of patients with testicular tumour. It provides valuable information for the clinical management

  6. The impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET on the management of patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis

    Fuchs, Martin; Rasch, Helmut; Berg, Scott; Ng, Quinn K.T.; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Walter, Martin A. [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Briel, Matthias [University Hospital Basel, Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Basel (Switzerland); McMaster University, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Daikeler, Thomas; Tyndall, Alan [University Hospital Basel, Department of Rheumatology, Basel (Switzerland); Walker, Ulrich A. [Felix Platter Spital, Department of Rheumatology of Basle University, Basel (Switzerland); Raatz, Heike [University Hospital Basel, Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Basel (Switzerland); Jayne, David [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Vasculitis and Lupus Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Koetter, Ina [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Internal Medicine II, Tuebingen (Germany); Blockmans, Daniel [University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Department of General Internal Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Cid, Maria C.; Prieto-Gonzalez, Sergio [Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Department of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, 08036-Barcelona (Spain); Lamprecht, Peter [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Rheumatology, Luebeck (Germany); Salvarani, Carlo [Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Department of Rheumatology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Karageorgaki, Zaharenia [Agios Dimitrios General Hospital, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, Thessaloniki (Greece); Watts, Richard [University of East Anglia, Norwich Medical School, Norwich (United Kingdom); Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, Ipswich (United Kingdom); Luqmani, Raashid [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    We aimed to assess the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) on the management of patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis. An international expert panel determined diagnoses and clinical management in patients with suspected large vessel vasculitis, with and without the results of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, respectively. The accuracy of the clinical diagnosis and the resulting clinical management with and without the {sup 18}F-FDG PET results were compared using logistic regression models. The analysis included 30 patients referred to a tertiary care centre with large vessel vasculitis and 31 controls. {sup 18}F-FDG PET had an overall sensitivity of 73.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 54.1-87.7%], a specificity of 83.9% (95% CI 66.3-94.5%), a positive predictive value of 81.5% (95% CI 61.9-93.7%) and a negative predictive value of 76.5% (95% CI 58.8-89.3%). The diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET was higher in patients not receiving immunosuppressive drugs (93.3 vs 64.5%, p = 0.006). Taken in context with other available diagnostic modalities, the addition of {sup 18}F-FDG PET increased the clinical diagnostic accuracy from 54.1 to 70.5% (p = 0.04). The addition of {sup 18}F-FDG PET increased the number of indicated biopsies from 22 of 61 patients (36.1%) to 25 of 61 patients (41.0%) and changed the treatment recommendation in 8 of 30 patients (26.7%) not receiving immunosuppressive medication and in 7 of 31 patients (22.6%) receiving immunosuppressive medication. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is a sensitive and specific imaging tool for large vessel vasculitis, especially when performed in patients not receiving immunosuppressive drugs. It increases the overall diagnostic accuracy and has an impact on the clinical management in a significant proportion of patients. (orig.)

  7. Paediatric dosimetry of 18F-FDG whole body PET/CT scans

    A combined 18F-FDG (18F-2-deoxy-D-glucose) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan provides both the metabolic information from FDG-PET and anatomic information from CT in a single examination. The use of PET/CT for management of malignancies in children has increased over the past few years. This raises an important consideration of radiation exposure in children since they are relatively more radiosensitive than adults and also have a potential for a longer life thereby increasing the probability of manifestation of late radiation effects; particularly cancer. Unfortunately, the data regarding the doses received by children from undergoing such examinations is scarce. The present study aims at estimating the effective doses to paediatric patients from whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT studies. The purpose of the study is to estimate the radiation doses to children from undergoing whole body PET/CT scans using 18F-FDG

  8. Usefulness of {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with high grade non Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Lee, Yukyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Hong, Jun Shik; Park, Jinny; Lee, Jae Hoon; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hae Jun; Kim, Seog Gyun; Shin, Ji Young [Gachon Univ. Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To assess the usefulness of {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in the detection of bone marrow (BM) involvement of high grade non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). One hundred twenty patients with newly diagnosed nosed diffuse large b cell lymphoma or peripheral t cell lymphoma between January 2007 and dune 2011, who re received bw trephine biopsy and {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT images and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) results. After reviewing the images, we reviewed the medical records and radiological findings of interesting patients. There were 23 {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT scans in which the marrow was considered to be abnormal (either positive or equivocal), and 97 {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT scans were regarded as having negative FDG uptake. Of 120 patients, 100 (83.3%) had a concordant result of BM interpretation between {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT and BMB, and the remaining 20 patients had discordant results. Among 23 patients with either positive or equivocal {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT scans, 1 of 12 patients with 'positive' {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT had a lymphomatous involvement on BMB. In contrast, 10 of 11 patients with 'equivocal' BM hypermetabolism were reported as having positive involvement on BMB. Patients with abnormal {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT had significantly higher mSUV{sup highestt}han those with normal FDG PET/CT. {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT and BMB are complementary techniques in assessing the presence of BM involvement in patients with high grade NHL. the increasing availability of {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT will raise the need for additional biopsy for FDG avid lesions, especially in patients with negative standard BMBs {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT can be useful as a decision as an initial staging procedure. a direct bone biopsy for FDG avid lesion as an initial staging procedure. a direct bone biopsy for FDG positive bone lesions should be included in staging guidelines in future. In {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT negative cases, BMB is still a powerful procedure, but BMB alone is insufficient

  9. Usefulness of 18F FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with high grade non Hodgkin's lymphoma

    To assess the usefulness of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in the detection of bone marrow (BM) involvement of high grade non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). One hundred twenty patients with newly diagnosed nosed diffuse large b cell lymphoma or peripheral t cell lymphoma between January 2007 and dune 2011, who re received bw trephine biopsy and 18F FDG PET/CT images and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) results. After reviewing the images, we reviewed the medical records and radiological findings of interesting patients. There were 23 18F FDG PET/CT scans in which the marrow was considered to be abnormal (either positive or equivocal), and 97 18F FDG PET/CT scans were regarded as having negative FDG uptake. Of 120 patients, 100 (83.3%) had a concordant result of BM interpretation between 18F FDG PET/CT and BMB, and the remaining 20 patients had discordant results. Among 23 patients with either positive or equivocal 18F FDG PET/CT scans, 1 of 12 patients with 'positive' 18F FDG PET/CT had a lymphomatous involvement on BMB. In contrast, 10 of 11 patients with 'equivocal' BM hypermetabolism were reported as having positive involvement on BMB. Patients with abnormal 18F FDG PET/CT had significantly higher mSUVhighestthan those with normal FDG PET/CT. 18F FDG PET/CT and BMB are complementary techniques in assessing the presence of BM involvement in patients with high grade NHL. the increasing availability of 18F FDG PET/CT will raise the need for additional biopsy for FDG avid lesions, especially in patients with negative standard BMBs 18F FDG PET/CT can be useful as a decision as an initial staging procedure. a direct bone biopsy for FDG avid lesion as an initial staging procedure. a direct bone biopsy for FDG positive bone lesions should be included in staging guidelines in future. In 18F FDG PET/CT negative cases, BMB is still a powerful procedure, but BMB alone is insufficient for full evaluation of BM

  10. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of bronchus in a pediatric patient: {sup 18}F-FDG PET findings

    Lee, Edward Y. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Pulmonary Division, Boston, MA (United States); Vargas, Sara O. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Sawicki, Gregory S.; Boyer, Debra [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Division of Respiratory Diseases, Boston, MA (United States); Grant, Frederick D.; Voss, Stephan D. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    In children, primary neoplasms of the tracheobronchial tree and lungs are rare; most are malignant. Of the primary malignant pulmonary neoplasms arising in childhood, mucoepidermoid carcinoma accounts for approximately 10%. Due to its well-confined local growth within the airway, mucoepidermoid carcinoma commonly produces respiratory symptoms from progressive tracheal or bronchial obstruction. Mucoepidermoid tumor has minimal metastatic potential in children, and local resection alone is the current treatment of choice. Early detection, diagnosis, and surgical resection of mucoepidermoid tumor are especially important in pediatric patients since the bulk of the remaining pulmonary parenchyma can be preserved, thereby decreasing the thoracic deformity and pulmonary functional morbidity. Radiographic and CT imaging findings of bronchial mucoepidermoid carcinoma in children have been described in several case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, imaging findings of 2-({sup 18}F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the bronchus in pediatric patients have not been well established. We report a mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from the right upper lobe bronchus in a 15-year-old girl with an emphasis on the {sup 18}F-FDG PET findings. (orig.)

  11. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma of bronchus in a pediatric patient: 18F-FDG PET findings

    In children, primary neoplasms of the tracheobronchial tree and lungs are rare; most are malignant. Of the primary malignant pulmonary neoplasms arising in childhood, mucoepidermoid carcinoma accounts for approximately 10%. Due to its well-confined local growth within the airway, mucoepidermoid carcinoma commonly produces respiratory symptoms from progressive tracheal or bronchial obstruction. Mucoepidermoid tumor has minimal metastatic potential in children, and local resection alone is the current treatment of choice. Early detection, diagnosis, and surgical resection of mucoepidermoid tumor are especially important in pediatric patients since the bulk of the remaining pulmonary parenchyma can be preserved, thereby decreasing the thoracic deformity and pulmonary functional morbidity. Radiographic and CT imaging findings of bronchial mucoepidermoid carcinoma in children have been described in several case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, imaging findings of 2-(18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the bronchus in pediatric patients have not been well established. We report a mucoepidermoid carcinoma arising from the right upper lobe bronchus in a 15-year-old girl with an emphasis on the 18F-FDG PET findings. (orig.)

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT bone/bone marrow findings in Hodgkin's lymphoma may circumvent the use of bone marrow trephine biopsy at diagnosis staging

    Accurate staging of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is necessary in selecting appropriate treatment. Bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMB) is the standard procedure for depicting bone marrow involvement. BMB is invasive and explores a limited part of the bone marrow. 18F-FDG PET/CT is now widely used for assessing response to therapy in HL and a baseline study is obtained to improve accuracy. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to assess whether routine BMB remains necessary with concomitant 18F-FDG PET/CT. Data from 83 patients (newly diagnosed HL) were reviewed. All patients had received contrast-enhanced CT, BMB and 18F-FDG PET/CT. Results of BMB were not available at the time of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Seven patients had lymphomatous involvement on BMB. Four patients had bone involvement on conventional CT (two with negative BMB). All patients with bone marrow and/or bone lesions at conventional staging were also diagnosed on 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. PET/CT depicted FDG-avid bone/bone marrow foci in nine additional patients. Four of them had only one or two foci, while the other had multiple foci. However, the iliac crest, site of the BMB, was not involved on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Osteolytic/sclerotic lesions matching FDG-avid foci were visible on the CT part of PET/CT in three patients. MRI ordered in three other patients suggested bone marrow involvement. Interim and/or end-therapy 18F-FDG PET/CT documented response of FDG-avid bone/bone marrow foci to chemotherapy in every patient. 18F-FDG PET/CT highly improves sensitivity for diagnosis of bone/bone marrow lesions in HL compared to conventional staging. (orig.)

  13. Characterizing IgG4-related disease with 18F-FDG PET/CT: a prospective cohort study

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an increasingly recognized clinicopathological disorder with immune-mediated inflammatory lesions mimicking malignancies. A cohort study was prospectively designed to investigate the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in characterizing IgG4-RD. Thirty-five patients diagnosed with IgG4-RD according to the consensus criteria were enrolled with informed consent. All patients underwent baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation. Among them, 29 patients underwent a second 18F-FDG PET/CT scan after 2 to 4 weeks of steroid-based therapy. All 35 patients were found with 18F-FDG-avid hypermetabolic lesion(s); 97.1 % (34/35) of these patients showed multi-organ involvement. Among the 35 patients, 71.4 % (25/35) patients were found with more organ involvement on 18F-FDG PET/CT than conventional evaluations including physical examination, ultrasonography, and computed tomography (CT). 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated specific image characteristics and pattern of IgG4-RD, including diffusely elevated 18F-FDG uptake in the pancreas and salivary glands, patchy lesions in the retroperitoneal region and vascular wall, and multi-organ involvement that cannot be interpreted as metastasis. Comprehensive understanding of all involvement aided the biopsy-site selection in seven patients and the recanalization of ureteral obstruction in five patients. After 2 to 4 weeks of steroid-based therapy at 40 mg to 50 mg prednisone per day, 72.4 % (21/29) of the patients showed complete remission, whereas the others exhibited > 81.8 % decrease in 18F-FDG uptake. F-FDG PET/CT is a useful tool for assessing organ involvement, monitoring therapeutic response, and guiding interventional treatment of IgG4-RD. The image pattern is suggested to be updated into the consensus diagnostic criteria for IgG4-RD. (orig.)

  14. Characterizing IgG4-related disease with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT: a prospective cohort study

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ma, Yanru; Niu, Na; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Fang; Zhu, Zhaohui [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China); Chen, Hua; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Fengchun; Zhang, Wen [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Rheumatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China); Xiao, Yu; Liang, Zhiyong [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-08-15

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an increasingly recognized clinicopathological disorder with immune-mediated inflammatory lesions mimicking malignancies. A cohort study was prospectively designed to investigate the value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in characterizing IgG4-RD. Thirty-five patients diagnosed with IgG4-RD according to the consensus criteria were enrolled with informed consent. All patients underwent baseline {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation. Among them, 29 patients underwent a second {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan after 2 to 4 weeks of steroid-based therapy. All 35 patients were found with {sup 18}F-FDG-avid hypermetabolic lesion(s); 97.1 % (34/35) of these patients showed multi-organ involvement. Among the 35 patients, 71.4 % (25/35) patients were found with more organ involvement on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT than conventional evaluations including physical examination, ultrasonography, and computed tomography (CT). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated specific image characteristics and pattern of IgG4-RD, including diffusely elevated {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the pancreas and salivary glands, patchy lesions in the retroperitoneal region and vascular wall, and multi-organ involvement that cannot be interpreted as metastasis. Comprehensive understanding of all involvement aided the biopsy-site selection in seven patients and the recanalization of ureteral obstruction in five patients. After 2 to 4 weeks of steroid-based therapy at 40 mg to 50 mg prednisone per day, 72.4 % (21/29) of the patients showed complete remission, whereas the others exhibited > 81.8 % decrease in {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. F-FDG PET/CT is a useful tool for assessing organ involvement, monitoring therapeutic response, and guiding interventional treatment of IgG4-RD. The image pattern is suggested to be updated into the consensus diagnostic criteria for IgG4-RD. (orig.)

  15. The evolving role of 18F-FDG PET scans in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Hosein, Peter J.; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional imaging by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) is being increasingly incorporated into the evaluation of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Its use for the initial staging in combination with computed tomography has now become standard. PET has recently been included in consensus criteria for response after therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive NHL. At the end of therapy, PET has a high positive and negative predictive value (PP...

  16. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT changes therapy management in high-risk DTC after first radioiodine therapy

    Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra J.; Goerges, Rainer; Bockisch, Andreas; Binse, Ina [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Advanced tumour stage and initial metastases are associated with reduced general and tumour-free survival in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Optimal initial therapy is mandatory for a positive patient outcome, but can only be performed if all non-iodine-avid tumour lesions are known before planning treatment. We analysed the benefit of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma and determined whether the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT results led to a deviation from the standard procedure, which consists of two consecutive radioiodine treatments with thyroid hormone suppression in between and no additional imaging, with individual patient management. The study group comprised 90 consecutive patients with either extensive or metastasized high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma who received {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT after the first radioiodine treatment approximately 4 weeks after thyroidectomy under endogenous TSH stimulation. We carried out PET/CT imaging with low-dose CT without contrast medium, which we only used for attenuation correction of PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 26 patients (29%) and negative in 64 patients (71%). Compared to the results of posttherapeutic {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy, the same lesions were PET-positive in 7 of the 26 patients, different lesions were PET-positive in 15 patients, and some PET-positive lesions were the same and some were different in 4 patients. TNM staging was changed due to the PET results in 8 patients. Management was changed in 19 of the 90 patients (21%), including all patients with only FDG-positive lesions and all patients with both FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions. Age was not a predictive factor for the presence of FDG-positive lesions. FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions were associated with high serum thyroglobulin. However, at low serum thyroglobulin values, tumour lesions (iodine- and/or FDG-avid) were also

  17. 18F-FDG PET/CT changes therapy management in high-risk DTC after first radioiodine therapy

    Advanced tumour stage and initial metastases are associated with reduced general and tumour-free survival in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Optimal initial therapy is mandatory for a positive patient outcome, but can only be performed if all non-iodine-avid tumour lesions are known before planning treatment. We analysed the benefit of 18F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma and determined whether the 18F-FDG PET/CT results led to a deviation from the standard procedure, which consists of two consecutive radioiodine treatments with thyroid hormone suppression in between and no additional imaging, with individual patient management. The study group comprised 90 consecutive patients with either extensive or metastasized high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma who received 18F-FDG PET/CT after the first radioiodine treatment approximately 4 weeks after thyroidectomy under endogenous TSH stimulation. We carried out PET/CT imaging with low-dose CT without contrast medium, which we only used for attenuation correction of PET images. 18F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 26 patients (29%) and negative in 64 patients (71%). Compared to the results of posttherapeutic 131I whole-body scintigraphy, the same lesions were PET-positive in 7 of the 26 patients, different lesions were PET-positive in 15 patients, and some PET-positive lesions were the same and some were different in 4 patients. TNM staging was changed due to the PET results in 8 patients. Management was changed in 19 of the 90 patients (21%), including all patients with only FDG-positive lesions and all patients with both FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions. Age was not a predictive factor for the presence of FDG-positive lesions. FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions were associated with high serum thyroglobulin. However, at low serum thyroglobulin values, tumour lesions (iodine- and/or FDG-avid) were also diagnosed. Thus, the serum

  18. The Value of 18F-FDG PET in Predicting the Prognosis of NSCLC

    Wang, Yuzhou; Lin ZHAO; Cheng, Xin; Ning, Xiaohong; Yajuan SHAO

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective 18F-FDG PET has been widely applied in the diagnosis, treatment evaluation and following up of NSCLC. But the usefulness of PET in the prognosis predicting of NSCLC is uncertain.The purpose of the study is to investigate the value of 18F-FDG PET in the prognosis of NSCLC. Methods The value of SUV of primary and metastasis lesions to the prognosis of NSCLC were analyzed. Results SUV of primary lesions, all the metastasis lesions and hilar and/or mediastinal metastatic ...

  19. The role of 18F FDG-PET/CT in diagnosis of pulmonary nodules

    We reviewed the role of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT in differentiation between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. By evaluating pulmonary nodules using both spiculation in CT and FDG standardized uptake value (SUV) max in 18F FDG-PET/CT, the sensitivity for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodule enhanced compared to diagnosing either the method alone. The combination of 18F FDG-PET/CT with thin slice CT might be useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules. (author)

  20. Biological 18[F]-FDG-PET image-guided dose painting by numbers for painful uncomplicated bone metastases: A 3-arm randomized phase II trial

    Background: Antalgic radiotherapy for bone metastases might be improved by implementing biological information in the radiotherapy planning using 18F-FDG-PET-CT based dose painting by numbers (DPBN). Materials and methods: Patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases were randomized (1:1:1) and blinded to receive either 8 Gy in a single fraction with conventionally planned radiotherapy (arm A) or 8 Gy in a single fraction with DPBN (dose range between 610 Gy and 10 Gy) (arm B) or 16 Gy in a single fraction with DPBN (dose range between 1410 Gy and 18 Gy) (arm C). The primary endpoint was overall pain response at 1 month. The phase II trial was designed to select the experimental arm with sufficient promise of efficacy to continue to a phase III trial. Results: Forty-five patients were randomized. Eight (53%), 12 (80%) and 9 patients (60%) had an overall response to treatment in arm A, B and C, respectively. The estimated odds ratio of overall response for arm B vs. A is 3.5 (95% CI: 0.44–17.71, p = 0.12). The estimated odds ratio of arm C vs. A is 1.31 (95% CI: 0.31–5.58, p = 0.71). Conclusion: A single fraction of 8 Gy with DPBN will be further evaluated in a phase III-trial

  1. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  2. Role of 18F- FDG PET-CT in detection of primary tumors in carcinoma of unknown primary site: an Indian experience

    Full text: The management of the patients with carcinoma of an unknown primary represents a difficult challenge in oncology. Metastatic cancers of unknown primary origin are characterised by a poor prognosis. Conventional radiological imaging allows only detection of 20%-27% of primary cancers. To evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in detection of primary tumors in carcinoma of unknown primary site. Methods: In the present study, a total of 31 patients (22 males, 9 females; mean age 53.1 years) with biopsy or cytopathology proven metastatic carcinoma and negative conventional diagnostic procedures (CT, MRI or Panendoscopy) were included. All patients underwent whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT study. Patient data was retrospectively analysed. Histopathological diagnosis is kept as the gold standard. Hypermetabolic areas at the site of CT changes were considered as positive and rate of detection of primary site is evaluated. Among 31 patients, 18F-FDG PET/CT detected primary site in 14 patients. 18F-FDG PET/CT was negative in remaining 17 patients and could not localise primary. Among the 14 positive PET-CT patients, the results of 2 patients became false positive. The detection rate of 18F-FDG PET/CT in localising primary site was 38%. It is concluded that 18F-FDG PET/CT was found to be useful diagnostic procedure for the evaluation of patients with metastatic carcinoma and primary of unknown origin

  3. Comparison of 18F-DOPA, 18F-FDG and 68Ga-somatostatin analogue PET/CT in patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma

    To retrospectively evaluate and compare 18F-FDG, 18F-DOPA and 68Ga-somatostatin analogues for PET/CT in patients with residual/recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) suspected on the basis of elevated serum calcitonin levels. Included in the study were 18 patients with recurrent MTC in whom functional imaging with the three tracers was performed. The PET/CT results were compared on a per-patient basis and on a per-lesion-basis. At least one focus of abnormal uptake was observed on PET/CT in 13 patients with 18F-DOPA (72.2% sensitivity), in 6 patients with 68Ga-somatostatin analogues (33.3%) and in 3 patients with 18F-FDG (16.7%) (p 18F-DOPA and 18F-FDG PET/CT (p 18F-DOPA and 68Ga-somatostatin analogue PET/CT (p = 0.04). Overall, 72 lesions were identified on PET/CT with the three tracers. 18F-DOPA PET/CT detected 85% of lesions (61 of 72), 68Ga-somatostatin analogue PET/CT 20% (14 of 72) and 18F-FDG PET/CT 28% (20 of 72). There was a statistically significant difference in the number of lymph node, liver and bone lesions detected with the three tracers (p 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT (p 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-somatostatin analogue PET/CT (p 18F-DOPA PET/CT seems to be the most useful imaging method for detecting recurrent MTC lesions in patients with elevated serum calcitonin levels, performing better than 18F-FDG and 68Ga-somatostatin analogue PET/CT. 18F-FDG may complement 18F-DOPA in patients with an aggressive tumour. (orig.)

  4. Simultaneous Hyperpolarized 13C-Pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG PET (HyperPET) in 10 Dogs with Cancer

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Larsen, Majbrit M E;

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of combined PET/MR spectroscopic (MRS) imaging, it is now possible to directly and indirectly image the Warburg effect with hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate and (18)F-FDG PET imaging, respectively, via a technique we have named hyperPET. The main purpose of this present study was...

  5. Reproducibility of (18)F-FDG PET uptake measurements in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on both PET/CT and PET/MR

    Rasmussen, J H; Fischer, B M; Aznar, M C;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate reproducibility of fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR scans in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). METHODS: 30 patients with HNSCC were included in this prospecti...

  6. 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in the Localization and Characterization of Lesions in Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    Caprio, Maria Grazia; Capacchione, Daniela; Mainolfi, Ciro; Spera, Anna Maria; Salvatore, Barbara; Cella, Laura; Salvatore, Marco; Pace, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the imaging findings of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET and integrated PET/CT in patients with primary, recurrent or metastatic ovarian cancer. Materials and methods. 21 women with ovarian cancer were evaluated. All patients had a integrated PET/CT scan. Localization, infiltration and uptake intensity of [18F]FDG were evaluated on PET and PET/CT. The certainty of localisation and characterisation was scored on a 3 point scale (L1 definite localisation; L2 p...

  7. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's Disease

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It is slowly progressive disease that affects a small area of cells in the mid brain known as the substantia nigra. Gradual degeneration of these cells causes a reduction in a vital chemical known as dopamine. In the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, it has difficulty in biopsy and limits in radiologic modalities. 18F-FDG PET shows various findings from normal to diffuse decrement of FDG uptake. 18F-FDG PET is expected to be a evaluation tool in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  8. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing infectious endocarditis

    Kouijzer, Ilse J.E. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vos, Fidel J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssen, Marcel J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Dijk, Arie P.J. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Early detection of infectious endocarditis is challenging. For diagnosing infectious endocarditis, the revised Duke criteria are the gold standard. Evidence of endocardial involvement on echocardiography is a major criterion, but sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography are not optimal. Here we investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) to diagnose infectious endocarditis in patients with gram-positive bacteraemia. Seventy-two patients with gram-positive bacteraemia were prospectively included. Patients with a positive blood culture growing Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus species or Enterococcus species were eligible when a risk factor for developing metastatic infectious foci was present. Infectious endocarditis was defined according to the revised Duke criteria. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was evaluated independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Sensitivity for diagnosing infectious endocarditis with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 39 % and specificity was 93 %. The positive predictive value was 64 % and negative predictive value was 82 %. The mortality rate in patients without infectious endocarditis and without increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves was 18 %, and in patients without infectious endocarditis but with high {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in or around the heart valves the mortality rate was 50 % (p = 0.181). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is currently not sufficiently adequate for the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis because of its low sensitivity. Improvements such as patient preparation with low carbohydrate-fat allowed diet and technical advances in the newest PET/CT scanners may increase sensitivity in future studies. (orig.)

  9. The preliminary study of 18F-FDG brain PET in diagnosis of alzheimer's disease

    Objective: To investigate the imaging characteristics and diagnostic criteria of 18F-FDG brain PET in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: The sutdy included 12 normal subjects, 12 patients with AD and 11 patients with non-AD dementia. 40 min after intravenous administration of 18F-FDG, brain scan was performed using Siemens ECAT47 scanner. The transaxial, coronal and sagittal images were then reconstructed by computer. At the same time, semiquantitative analysis was also applied to help evaluation using the ratio of mean radioactivity of cerebral lobe to cerebellum (Rcl/cb). Results: In normal subjects PET scan showed clear images of cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum with symmetrical distribution of radioactivity. PET images from Alzheimer's disease patients were classified into 3 patterns: bilateral parietal hypometabolism in 5 cases, bilateral temporo-parietal hypometabolism in 4 cases and unilateral temporo-parietal hypometabolism in 3 cases. The Rcl/cb of AD patients in parietal and temporal lobe was significantly decreased than normal subjects (Pcl/cb was also reflecting thedementia degree. Compared with MRI imaging , 12 patients with AD had cerebral hypometabolism but only 10 had hippocampus atrophy. 10 patients with non-AD dementia had local structural foci seen in MRI, including old hemorrhage, infarction and encephalomalacia, but these lesions were not found in AD. Conclusions: Based on excluding cerebral structural lesions which are better detected by MRI, bilateral or unilateral parietal or temporo-parietal hypometabolism found in FDG PET can be considered indicative of Alzheimer's disease. Semiquantitative analysis of the images yielded can help to evaluate the dementia degree

  10. Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the brain mass survey

    Odano, Ikuo [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine and Dental Sciences; Uno, Kimiichi; Tomemori, Takashi [Nishidai Clinic Diagnostic Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the clinical significance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the brain mass survey studies. Thirty-two (58%) out of 55 patients examined showed regional decreases in the cerebrum and cerebellum, which were caused by ischemia, macroangiopathy of diabetes mellitus, crossed cerebellar diaschisis and Alzheimer's disease. Two patients with suspicious Alzheimer's disease (early stage) and one with cerebrovascular dementia were observed. One patient showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the pituitary gland with pituitary adenoma. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is very useful not only to pick up early stage of dementia but also to examine several pathological conditions. (author)

  11. Multiple 18F-FDG, PET-CT for Postoperative Monitoring of Breast Cancer Patients

    Background: Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) may be useful in the post-treatment follow-up of breast cancer patients. Purpose: To assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT (PET-CT) for postoperative monitoring of breast cancer patients. Material and Methods: One hundred twenty-nine PET-CT studies performed on 55 female postoperative breast cancer patients (median age 56 years, range 36-86 years) were analyzed. The median interval between the PET-CT studies was 6 months (range 1-15 months). In order to determine the usefulness of serial PET-CT examinations in the postoperative follow-up of breast cancer patients, the PET-CT findings were compared with the physical findings, findings obtained by other imaging modalities, and the 18F-FDG-PET (PET) findings. Results: The PET findings were negative in 4 metastatic bone lesions with a positive bone scan. The PET findings were also negative in 6 of 9 osteogenic bone metastases and one of 64 osteolytic bone lesions. There were 5 cases with false-positive of PET, which were determined to be areas of soft-tissue hyperactivity. All false-positive/-negative findings were corrected by the addition of CT. Conclusion: The results of this study lend support to the clinical role of PET-CT in the postoperative follow-up/monitoring of breast cancer patients

  12. Multiple 18F-FDG, PET-CT for Postoperative Monitoring of Breast Cancer Patients

    Kurata, A.; Murata, Y.; Kubota, K.; Shibuya, H. (Dept. of Radioloy, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)); Osanai, T. (Dept. of Breast Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    2009-11-15

    Background: Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) may be useful in the post-treatment follow-up of breast cancer patients. Purpose: To assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT (PET-CT) for postoperative monitoring of breast cancer patients. Material and Methods: One hundred twenty-nine PET-CT studies performed on 55 female postoperative breast cancer patients (median age 56 years, range 36-86 years) were analyzed. The median interval between the PET-CT studies was 6 months (range 1-15 months). In order to determine the usefulness of serial PET-CT examinations in the postoperative follow-up of breast cancer patients, the PET-CT findings were compared with the physical findings, findings obtained by other imaging modalities, and the 18F-FDG-PET (PET) findings. Results: The PET findings were negative in 4 metastatic bone lesions with a positive bone scan. The PET findings were also negative in 6 of 9 osteogenic bone metastases and one of 64 osteolytic bone lesions. There were 5 cases with false-positive of PET, which were determined to be areas of soft-tissue hyperactivity. All false-positive/-negative findings were corrected by the addition of CT. Conclusion: The results of this study lend support to the clinical role of PET-CT in the postoperative follow-up/monitoring of breast cancer patients

  13. Clinical significance of patterns of incidental thyroid uptake at 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Incidental uptake of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) in the thyroid gland is not uncommonly encountered in day-to-day practice of oncological 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). These are often felt to be “nuisance lesions” by referring clinicians and radiologists alike. However, recognition of the importance of different patterns of FDG uptake in the thyroid gland and knowledge of the possible underlying aetiologies are crucial in ensuring that patients are managed appropriately in the clinical context of their primary diagnosis, as the underlying pathological condition may be clinically important in a significant minority of such cases. This review describes the various patterns of 18F-FDG uptake within the thyroid and discusses the clinical significance and possible impact on patient management. Incidental low-grade homogeneous diffuse increased thyroid 18F-FDG uptake is usually seen in the patients with chronic thyroiditis, Grave's disease, and hypothyroidism. Thyroid function tests and antibody profiling are advised in these patients. Incidental focal 18F-FDG thyroid uptake should raise the possibility of underlying malignancy. Ultrasound with or without fine-needle aspiration cytology is usually recommended for the evaluation of these lesions. Heterogeneous uptake with prominent focal uptake in the thyroid should be further evaluated to exclude malignancy

  14. The evaluation of breast cancer curative effect and prognosis in 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Objective: To evaluate the value of using 18F-Fluro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in followup studies of breast cancer patients which have been given to comprehensive treatment. Methods: Measuring the standardized uptake value (SUV) of 18F-FDG PET/CT by a retrospective research breast cancer patients in PET Center during November, 2003 to December, 2010 and following up. And analyzing the prognosis of the patients. Results: 114 patients of breast cancer which was confirmed by pathology have been screened out. In which 64 patients showed negative results when having 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, while in other 50 cases of recurrence, residual or metastasis, showed positive results. Average standardized uptake value (SUVave) of the positive results was ranging from 1.0∼11.2 (3.9±1.9), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was from 1.1∼ 16.2 (5.0±2.8). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 96.0%, 100% and 98.5% in diagnosis of breast cancer, while in traditional imaging were 81.8%, 77.6% and 72.9%. By the time of following up, 33 out of 50 positive patients had undergone certain therapies of breast cancer. 17 positive patients were without any therapy. Spearman rank correlation analysis results showed the positive patients in PET/CT scanning with higher maximum standardized uptake value the worse the prognosis. Fisher exact test showed the positive patients with or without treatment prognosis had significant difference. Other 43 patients had no evidence of disease/recurrence or new metastases of breast cancer. 28 of them had undergone certain therapies of breast cancer, while 36 hadn't. Fisher exact test showed the positive patients with or without treatment prognosis hadn't significant difference. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT scan can find recurrence or metastases of breast cancer at the early stage. It will be a valid way to project prognosis of the patient. And 18F-FDG PET/CT scan can

  15. Value of retrospective image fusion of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI for preoperative staging of head and neck cancer: Comparison with PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI

    Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Konishi, Jyunya [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Morimoto, Koichi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of retrospective image fusion of neck MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET for locoregional extension and nodal staging of neck cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity or hypopharynx underwent PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI for initial staging before surgery including primary tumor resection and neck dissection. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT, MRI, and retrospective image fusion of PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessment of the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N stage) was evaluated. Results: Accuracy for T status was 87% for fused PET/MRI and 90% for MRI, thus proving significantly superior to PET/CT, which had an accuracy of 67% (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023, respectively). Accuracy for N status was 77% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, being superior to MRI, which had an accuracy of 63%, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.13). On a per-level basis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of nodal metastasis were 77%, 96% and 93% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, compared with 49%, 99% and 91% for MRI, respectively. The differences for sensitivity (p = 0.0026) and accuracy (p = 0.041) were significant. Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI combining the individual advantages of MRI and PET is a valuable technique for assessment of staging neck cancer.

  16. Diagnostic value of combining {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Castilla-Lievre, Maria-Angela [University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hopital Antoine Beclere, Clamart (France); IMIV - UMR 1023 Inserm/CEA/Universite Paris Sud - ERL 9218 CNRS, Orsay (France); Franco, Dominique [Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Surgery, Hopital Antoine Beclere, University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Clamart (France); Gervais, Philippe; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Desarnaud, Serge; Helal, Badia-Ourkia [IMIV - UMR 1023 Inserm/CEA/Universite Paris Sud - ERL 9218 CNRS, Orsay (France); CEA, DSV, I2BM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Agostini, Helene [University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Clinical Research Unit of Hopitaux universitaires Paris-Sud, Hopital Kremlin Bicetre (France); Marthey, Lysiane [Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Antoine Beclere, University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Clamart (France)

    2016-05-15

    In this prospective study, our goal was to emphasize the diagnostic value of combining {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic liver disease. Thirty-three consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients were suspected to have HCC based on CT and/or MRI imaging. A final diagnosis was obtained by histopathological examination or by imaging alone according to American Association for the Study of Liver Disease criteria. All patients underwent PET/CT with both tracers within a median of 5 days. All lesions showing higher tracer uptake than normal liver were considered positive for HCC. We examined how tracer uptake was related to biological (serum α-fetoprotein levels) and pathological (differentiation status, peritumoral capsule and vascular invasion) prognostic markers of HCC, as well as clinical observations at 6 months (recurrence and death). Twenty-eight HCC, four cholangiocarcinomas and one adenoma were diagnosed. In the HCC patients, the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-choline, {sup 18}F-FDG and combined {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of HCC was 75 %, 36 % and 93 %, respectively. Serum α-fetoprotein levels >200 ng/ml were more frequent among patients with {sup 18}F-FDG-positive lesions than those with {sup 18}F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). Early recurrence (n=2) or early death (n=5) occurred more frequently in patients with {sup 18}F-FDG-positive lesions than in those with {sup 18}F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). The combined use of {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT detected HCC with high sensitivity. This approach appears to be of potential prognostic value and may facilitate the selection of patients for surgical resection or liver transplantation. (orig.)

  17. An Unusual Case of Plasmablastic Lymphoma Presenting as Paravertebral Mass Evaluated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Treglia, Giorgio; Paone, Gaetano; Stathis, Anastasios; Ceriani, Luca; Giovanella, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    A 60-year-old man underwent radiological investigations due to the onset of back pain. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the presence of a paravertebral mass located ahead the body of the third thoracic vertebra. Based on these findings the patient underwent biopsy of the paravertebral mass, which showed the presence of a plasmablastic lymphoma. Therefore, the patient underwent fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) for staging. Before {sup 18}F-FDG injection, the patient had fasted for at least 6 h; at the time of the radiopharmaceutical injection he presented glucose blood levels corresponding to 98 mg/dl. Images were acquired 1 h after intravenous injection of 280 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG according to the body mass index. PET images were interpreted visually and semiquantitatively by using the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed moderate radiopharmaceutical uptake corresponding to the paravertebral lesion (SUVmax 3.3) and diffuse uptake in the skeleton suspicious for bone marrow neoplastic involvement, with more evident hypermetabolic areas in the left scapula (SUVmax 3.7), right sixth rib (SUVmax 3.5), and left iliac bone (SUVmax 3.4) (Fig. 1). Subsequent bone marrow biopsy confirmed the bone marrow infiltration by plasmablastic cells. Based on these findings, a final diagnosis of plasmablastic lymphoma with bone marrow involvement was performed and the patient was addressed to chemotherapy. Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare CD20-negative large-cell lymphoma with plasmablastic features occurring primarily in HIV or Epstein-Barr virus positive individuals. Distinguishing this tumor from myeloma could be challenging. The most frequent site of presentation is the oral cavity, whereas extraoral localizations of plasmablastic lymphoma are considered to be very rare and they should be differentiated from extraosseous localization of

  18. Role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the evaluation of primary tumours of unknown origin; experience of the Hospital Angeles del Pedregal; Papel del 18F-FDG PET/CT en la evaluacion de tumores primarios de origen desconocido; experiencia del Hospital Angeles del Pedregal

    Sanchez, N.; Serna, J.A.; Quiroz, O.; Valenzuela, J.; Romo, C.; Ramirez, J.L. [Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    It was in 1994 when published studies appear that evaluate the utility of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the patients with primary tumors of unknown origin (TOD); starting from then diverse studies that support the clinical utility of the study arise with {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the detection of the primary tumor. It is as well as it has been calculated that the study with {sup 18}F-FDG PET is able to detect the primary tumor in around 40% of the patients with negative results in the conventional diagnostic procedures. Until the moment, most of the studies published in relation to the primary tumors of unknown origin only evaluate the paper of the study with {sup 18}F-FDG PET, without including the image fusion technique PET/CT, which has demonstrated in diverse studies; in oncological scenarios different from the TOD, a superior diagnosis certainty. (Author)

  19. 18F-FDG PET and biomarkers for tumour angiogenesis in early breast cancer

    Tumour angiogenesis is an independent and strong prognostic factor in early breast carcinoma. We performed this study to investigate the ability of 18F-FDG to detect angiogenesis in early breast carcinoma using PET/CT. Twenty consecutive patients with early (T1-T2) breast carcinoma were recruited prospectively for 18F-FDG PET/CT. The PET/CT data were used to calculate whole tumour maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean). All patients underwent subsequent surgery without prior chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The excised tumour underwent immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD105 and glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT1). The SUVmax showed the following correlation with tumour histology: CD105: r = 0.60, p = 0.005; GLUT1: r = 0.21, p = 0.373; VEGF: r = -0.16, p = 0.496. The SUVmean showed the following correlation with tumour histology: CD105: r = 0.65, p = 0.002; GLUT1: r = 0.34, p = 0.144; VEGF: r = -0.18, p = 0.443 18F-FDG uptake is highly significantly associated with angiogenesis as measured by the immunohistochemistry with CD105 for new vessel formation. Given that tumour angiogenesis is an important prognostic indicator and a predictor of treatment response, 18F-FDG PET may have a role in the management of primary breast cancer patients even in early-stage disease. (orig.)

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT compared with that of contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast at 3 T

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of prone 18F-FDG PET/CT with that of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) at 3 T in suspicious breast lesions. To evaluate the influence of tumour size on diagnostic accuracy and the use of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVMAX) thresholds to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions. A total of 172 consecutive patients with an imaging abnormality were included in this IRB-approved prospective study. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI of the breast at 3 T in the prone position. Two reader teams independently evaluated the likelihood of malignancy as determined by 18F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI independently. 18F-FDG PET/CT data were qualitatively evaluated by visual interpretation. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculation of SUVMAX. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, area under the curve and interreader agreement were calculated for all lesions and for lesions <10 mm. Histopathology was used as the standard of reference. There were 132 malignant and 40 benign lesions; 23 lesions (13.4 %) were <10 mm. Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI achieved an overall diagnostic accuracy of 93 %. There were no significant differences in sensitivity (p = 0.125), specificity (p = 0.344) or diagnostic accuracy (p = 1). For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated to 91 % with both 18F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI. Although no significant difference was found for lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed to be more sensitive but less specific than 18F-FDG PET/CT. Interreader agreement was excellent (κ = 0.85 and κ = 0.92). SUVMAX threshold was not helpful in differentiating benign from malignant lesions. 18F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T showed equal diagnostic accuracies in breast cancer diagnosis. For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated, but was equal for 18F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T. For lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed to be more sensitive but less specific than 18F-FDG PET/CT. Quantitative

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared with that of contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast at 3 T

    Magometschnigg, Heinrich F.; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Fueger, Barbara; Helbich, Thomas H.; Weber, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Dubsky, Peter [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of prone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with that of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) at 3 T in suspicious breast lesions. To evaluate the influence of tumour size on diagnostic accuracy and the use of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub MAX}) thresholds to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions. A total of 172 consecutive patients with an imaging abnormality were included in this IRB-approved prospective study. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI of the breast at 3 T in the prone position. Two reader teams independently evaluated the likelihood of malignancy as determined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI independently. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT data were qualitatively evaluated by visual interpretation. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculation of SUV{sub MAX}. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, area under the curve and interreader agreement were calculated for all lesions and for lesions <10 mm. Histopathology was used as the standard of reference. There were 132 malignant and 40 benign lesions; 23 lesions (13.4 %) were <10 mm. Both {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI achieved an overall diagnostic accuracy of 93 %. There were no significant differences in sensitivity (p = 0.125), specificity (p = 0.344) or diagnostic accuracy (p = 1). For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated to 91 % with both {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI. Although no significant difference was found for lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed to be more sensitive but less specific than {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Interreader agreement was excellent (κ = 0.85 and κ = 0.92). SUV{sub MAX} threshold was not helpful in differentiating benign from malignant lesions. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T showed equal diagnostic accuracies in breast cancer diagnosis. For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated, but was equal for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T. For lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed

  2. Usefulness of dynamic 18F-FDG PET scan in lung cancer and inflammation disease

    The diagnostic utility of fluorine-18 2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) for the non-invasive differentiation of focal lung lesions originated from cancer or inflammation disease by combined visual image interpretation and semi-quantitative uptake value analysis has been documented. In general, Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) is used to diagnose lung disease. But SUV dose not contain dynamic information of lung tissue for the glucose. Therefore, this study was undertaken to hypothesis that analysis of dynamic kinetics of focal lung lesions base on 18F-FDG PET may more accurately determine the lung disease. So we compared Time Activity Curve (TAC), Standardized Uptake Value-Dynamic Curve (SUV-DC) graph pattern with Glucose Metabolic Rate (MRGlu) from Patlak analysis. With lung disease, 17 patients were examined. They were injected with 18F-FDG over 30-s into peripheral vein while acquisition of the serial transaxial tomographic images were started. For acquisition protocol, we used twelve 10-s, four 30-s, sixteen 60-s, five 300-s and one 900-s frame for 60 mins. Its images were analyzed by visual interpretation TAC, SUV-DC and a kinetic analysis (Patlak analysis). The latter was based on region of interest (ROIs) which were drawn with the lung disease shape. Each optimized patterns were compared with itself. In TAC patterns, it hard to observe cancer type with inflammation disease in early pool blood area but over the time cancer type slope more remarkably increased than inflammation disease. SUV-DC was similar to TAC pattern. In the result of Patlak analysis, In time activity curve of aorta, even though inflammation disease showed higher blood activity than cancer, at first as time went by, blood activity of inflammation disease became the lowest. However, in time activity curve of tissue, cancer had the highest uptake and inflammation disease was in the middle. Through the examination, TAC and SUV-DC could approached the results that lung

  3. Initial clinical results of simultaneous {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in comparison to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with head and neck cancer

    Kubiessa, K.; Gawlitza, M.; Kuehn, A.; Fuchs, J.; Kahn, T.; Stumpp, P. [University Hospital of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Purz, S.; Steinhoff, K.G.; Sabri, O.; Kluge, R. [University Hospital of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Boehm, A. [University Hospital of Leipzig, ENT Department, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of simultaneous {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as well as their single components in head and neck cancer patients. In a prospective study 17 patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for staging or follow-up and an additional {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI scan with whole-body imaging and dedicated examination of the neck. MRI, CT and PET images as well as PET/MRI and PET/CT examinations were evaluated independently and in a blinded fashion by two reader groups. Results were compared with the reference standard (final diagnosis determined in consensus using all available data including histology and follow-up). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. A total of 23 malignant tumours were found with the reference standard. PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 82.7 %, a specificity of 87.3 %, a PPV of 73.2 % and a NPV of 92.4 %. Corresponding values for PET/MRI were 80.5, 88.2, 75.6 and 92.5 %. No statistically significant difference in diagnostic capability could be found between PET/CT and PET/MRI. Evaluation of the PET part from PET/CT revealed highest sensitivity of 95.7 %, and MRI showed best specificity of 96.4 %. There was a high inter-rater agreement in all modalities (Cohen's kappa 0.61-0.82). PET/MRI of patients with head and neck cancer yielded good diagnostic capability, similar to PET/CT. Further studies on larger cohorts to prove these first results seem justified. (orig.)

  4. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5) or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT) and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT). In addition, the GTV was delineated using the signal-to-background (SBR) ratio-based adaptive thresholding technique (GTVSBR). Overlap analysis were conducted to assess geographic mismatches between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Inter- and intra-observer variability were also assessed. The mean GTVCT (43.65 cm3) was larger than the mean GTVPET/CT (33.06 cm3), p = 0.02. In 6 patients, GTVPET/CT added substantial tumor extension outside the GTVCT even though 90.4% of the GTVPET/CT was included in the GTVCT and 30.2% of the GTVCT was found outside the GTVPET/CT. The inter- and intra-observer variability was not significantly reduced with the inclusion of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.23 and p = 0.18, respectively). The GTVSBR was smaller than GTVCT p ≤ 0.005 and GTVPET/CT p ≤ 0.005. The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT images for target volume delineation of recurrent or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer alters the GTV in the majority of patients compared to standard CT-definition. The use of SBR-based auto-delineation showed significantly smaller GTVs. The use of PET/CT based target volume delineation may improve the accuracy of RT treatment planning in gynaecologic cancer

  5. Brain (18)F-FDG, (18)F-Florbetaben PET/CT, (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT and Cardiac (123)I-MIBG Imaging for Diagnosis of a "Cerebral Type" of Lewy Body Disease.

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corentin; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal (18)F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as "cerebral type" of Lewy body disease. PMID:27540431

  6. Usefulness of 11C-methionine PET in evaluation of brain lesions with hypo- or isometabolism on 18F-FDG PET

    Because some brain tumors show iso-or hypometabolism on 18F-FDG PET, there have been problems in detection of primary or recurrent tumor and in differentiation from benign lesion with 18F-FDG PET. We investigated the usefulness of 11C-methionine PET in characterizing brain lesions in these conditions. In 34 patients with brain lesions (27 for initial diagnosis, 7 for detecting recurrence ) who showed hypo- or isometabolism compared to normal brain tissue on 18F-FDG PET, we performed 11C-methionine PET. Five minutes after injection of 550 MBq 11C-methionine, attenuation corrected brain images were obtained with a dedicated PET scanner. Brain lesions were 18 gliomas, 4 metastatic brain tumors, 2 meningiomas, 1 mixed germ cell tumor and 3 benign tumors and 6 non-tumorous lesions (3 neurocysticercosis, 2 meningiomas, 1 mixed germ cell tumor and 3 benign tumors and 6 non-tumorous lesions (3 neurocysticercosis, 2 tumor necrosis, 1 granuloma). To find the correlation between methione uptake and proliferation activity, Ki 67 proliferation Index in 8 patients or Proliferation index (P1=G2+M+S/total cycle) using DNA flow cytometry in 10 patients were obtained. Of 25 tumorous lesions without definitive hypermetabolism on 18F-FDG PET, all except two glioma (92%) showed moderate to high uptake in entire or thick peripheral tumor uptake in 11C-methionine PET. The uptake ratio of tumor to normal brain in 18F-FDG and 11C-methionine PET were 0.96 ±0.32 and 2.43 ± 1.26, respectively. Nine benign lesions with hypo- or isometabolism on 18F-FDG PET were also no significantly increased 11C-methionine uptake. 11C-methionine uptake and proliferation activity were correlated with Ki 67 index or PI (r=0.6). Two glioma shown no increased 11C-methionine uptake had low proliferative activity (Ki 67 11C-methionin PET could detect brain tumors and differentiate brain lesions with high sensitivity and good contrast, which showed iso- or hypometabolism on 18F-FDG PET. In evaluation of these

  7. Usefulness of {sup 11}C-methionine PET in evaluation of brain lesions with hypo- or isometabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET

    Kim, Y. K.; Chung, J. K.; Yeo, J. S.; Lee, D. S.; Jeong, H. W.; Lee, M. C. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    Because some brain tumors show iso-or hypometabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET, there have been problems in detection of primary or recurrent tumor and in differentiation from benign lesion with {sup 18}F-FDG PET. We investigated the usefulness of {sup 11}C-methionine PET in characterizing brain lesions in these conditions. In 34 patients with brain lesions (27 for initial diagnosis, 7 for detecting recurrence ) who showed hypo- or isometabolism compared to normal brain tissue on {sup 18}F-FDG PET, we performed {sup 11}C-methionine PET. Five minutes after injection of 550 MBq {sup 11}C-methionine, attenuation corrected brain images were obtained with a dedicated PET scanner. Brain lesions were 18 gliomas, 4 metastatic brain tumors, 2 meningiomas, 1 mixed germ cell tumor and 3 benign tumors and 6 non-tumorous lesions (3 neurocysticercosis, 2 meningiomas, 1 mixed germ cell tumor and 3 benign tumors and 6 non-tumorous lesions (3 neurocysticercosis, 2 tumor necrosis, 1 granuloma). To find the correlation between methione uptake and proliferation activity, Ki 67 proliferation Index in 8 patients or Proliferation index (P1=G2+M+S/total cycle) using DNA flow cytometry in 10 patients were obtained. Of 25 tumorous lesions without definitive hypermetabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET, all except two glioma (92%) showed moderate to high uptake in entire or thick peripheral tumor uptake in {sup 11}C-methionine PET. The uptake ratio of tumor to normal brain in {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-methionine PET were 0.96 {+-}0.32 and 2.43 {+-} 1.26, respectively. Nine benign lesions with hypo- or isometabolism on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were also no significantly increased {sup 11}C-methionine uptake. {sup 11}C-methionine uptake and proliferation activity were correlated with Ki 67 index or PI (r=0.6). Two glioma shown no increased {sup 11}C-methionine uptake had low proliferative activity (Ki 67 < 1%). {sup 11}C-methionin PET could detect brain tumors and differentiate brain lesions with high

  8. Can Initial 18F-FDG PET-CT Imaging Give Information on Metastasis in Patients with Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma?

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of primary renal cancers with and without metastatic lesions, if any. We also studied the relationship between the size of primary renal cancers and their SUVmax, and tried to find a clinical value of 18F-FDG PET-CT for the initial evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The cases of 23 patients, 16 men and 7 women, who underwent PET-CT examination before operation were retrospectively reviewed. We measured the SUVmax of the primary renal cancers and those of any existing metastatic lesions, and the size of the primary renal cancers. We compared the SUVmax of primary RCCs with metastases and those without metastases, SUVmax of primary RCC and those of metastases, and studied the correlation between the size and SUVmax of primary RCCs. The SUVmax of primary RCC of the 16 patients without metastasis ranged from 1.1 to 5.6 with a median value of 2.6. Those of the patients with metastasis ranged from 2.9 to 7.6 with a median of 5.0. The size of the all 23 primary renal cancers ranged from 1.7 cm to 13.5 cm, with a median of 4.5 cm, and their SUVmax ranged from 1.1 to 7.6, with a median of 2.9. There was a statistically significant difference between the SUVmax of the primary RCC with metastasis (5.3 ±1.7) and those without metastasis (2.9±1.0). There was a moderate positive correlation between the sizes and SUVmax of all 23 primary RCCs. However, there was no statistically significant correlation between the sizes and SUVmax of primary RCCs with metastatic lesions and the same for RCCs without metastasis. The cutoff value of SUVmax for predicting extra-renal lesion was 4.4 and that for size was 5.8 cm according to the receiver operating characteristic curves. Those who have primary RCC with high SUVmax are suggested to have a likelihood of metastasis. Also, there was a moderate trend of increasing value of SUVmax of primary RCC as their size increases

  9. Usefulness of 18F-FDG PET in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Surgical resection is the only curative treatment strategy for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Therefore, accurate staging is essential for appropriate management of patients with CC. We assessed the usefulness of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in the staging of CC. We undertook a retrospective review of FDG PET images in 21 patients (10 female, 11 male; mean age 57 years) diagnosed with CC. Ten patients had hilar CC and 11, peripheral CC. Patients underwent abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n=20) and computed tomography (CT) (n=12) for the evaluation of primary tumours, and chest radiography and whole-body bone scintigraphy for work-up of distant metastases. For semi-quantitative analysis, the maximum voxel standardised uptake value (SUVmax) was obtained from the primary tumour. All peripheral CCs showed intensely increased FDG uptake, and some demonstrated ring-shaped uptake corresponding to peripheral rim enhancement on CT and/or MRI. In nine of the ten patients, hilar CCs demonstrated increased FDG uptake of a focal nodular or linear branching appearance. The remaining case was false negative on FDG PET. One patient with a false negative result on MRI demonstrated increased uptake on FDG PET. Among the ten hilar CCs, FDG uptake was intense in only two patients and was slightly higher than that of the hepatic parenchyma in the remaining patients. For the detection of lymph node metastasis, FDG PET and CT/MRI were concordant in 16 patients, and discordant in five (FDG PET was positive in three, and CT and MRI in two). FDG PET identified unsuspected distant metastases in four of the 21 patients; all of these patients had peripheral CC. FDG PET is useful in detecting the primary lesion in both hilar and peripheral CC and is of value in discovering unsuspected distant metastases in patients with peripheral CC. FDG PET could be useful in cases of suspected hilar CC with non-confirmatory biopsy and radiological

  10. 18F-DG PET and RCBF SPECT in epilepsy

    Functional imaging of cortical metabolism and perfusion is of growing importance in the presurgical evaluation of patients suffering from intractable epilepsy. PET and SPECT are of proven value in functional imaging prior to epilepsy surgery. To date the best clinical experience was gained by using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose for PET and tracers for measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) like 99mTc-HMPO or 99mTc-ECD for SPECT respectively. Their relative contribution towards detection of a probable focus site in epilepsy is still controversial. To determine the relative value of both procedures the literature has been reviewed with special respect to ictal SPECT studies. With regard to different standards used for correlation a relative sensitivity of 62.4% was found for interictal rCBF SPECT. 71% for 18-FDG-PET and 87% for ictal rCBF SPECT studies. In conclusion, earlier reported advantages of PET over SPECT seem to closely reflect the better spatial resolution of PET. Modern SPECT systems, dedicated for brain SPECT, provide appropriate and almost equal sensitivity. Regarding the limited specificity of interictal studies, both rCBF SPECT and FDG-PET need precise indications. However, further to detection of a probable focus site, metabolism and rCBF studies seem to be of value to predicit the post-surgical patients outcome as to seizure frequency and mental functions secondarily affected by epilepsy surgery such as memory impairment. Ictal rCBF SPECT provides higher sensitivity and specificity and virtually allows the detection lateralisation in almost every case. This means that a relatively precise anatomical localisation of an epileptogenic focus is being found in a rising number of patients. (orig.)

  11. Response evaluation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors treated with imatinib using 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Full text: Several studies have demonstrated the effective use of adjuvant treatment with Imatinib mesylate for unresectable, metastatic or recurrent Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST). We retrospectively evaluated the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT scanning in assessing the response of GIST patients to imatinib mesylate therapy. Materials and Methods: Thirteen consecutive patients with GIST confirmed by surgery (5 stomach, 6 small bowel, 1 small bowel and peritoneum, and 1 rectum) underwent 60 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging before and after beginning imatinib mesylate therapy (400 mg/day or greater if disease progression). PET/CT scan was acquired 60 minutes after the intravenous injection of 333-707 MBq of 18F-FDG. Visual and semiquantitative (standardized uptake value (SUV)) analysis of images was performed. A decrease in SUV of more than 50% was considered as significant response, decrease in SUV of more than 25% was considered as partial response. Increase in SUV of more than 25% or appearance of new lesion (s) was considered as progression of disease. Response to therapy was assessed according to EORTC recommendations for PET. Results were confirmed by clinical follow-up, CECT findings or histological analysis (when available). Results: Complete response to imatinib mesylate was observed in 5 patients. Partial response and stable disease was noted in two each. Four patient demonstrated progression of disease, two developed liver metastasis, one developed abdominal lymphnode pathology and one had increase in size and uptake of tumor. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT scan identified the degree of GIST response to imatinib therapy. Patients who responded to therapy showed normalisation of FDG uptake or a decrease in the SUV of lesions. Patients with progression of disease demonstrated increase in uptake value or development of new lesion

  12. 18F-DG PET and RCBF SPECT in epilepsy

    Menzel, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Bonn (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Bonn (Germany); Shih, W.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Div., Kentucky Univ., KY (United States); Biersack, H.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Functional imaging of cortical metabolism and perfusion is of growing importance in the presurgical evaluation of patients suffering from intractable epilepsy. PET and SPECT are of proven value in functional imaging prior to epilepsy surgery. To date the best clinical experience was gained by using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose for PET and tracers for measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) like 99mTc-HMPO or 99mTc-ECD for SPECT respectively. Their relative contribution towards detection of a probable focus site in epilepsy is still controversial. To determine the relative value of both procedures the literature has been reviewed with special respect to ictal SPECT studies. With regard to different standards used for correlation a relative sensitivity of 62.4% was found for interictal rCBF SPECT. 71% for 18-FDG-PET and 87% for ictal rCBF SPECT studies. In conclusion, earlier reported advantages of PET over SPECT seem to closely reflect the better spatial resolution of PET. Modern SPECT systems, dedicated for brain SPECT, provide appropriate and almost equal sensitivity. Regarding the limited specificity of interictal studies, both rCBF SPECT and FDG-PET need precise indications. However, further to detection of a probable focus site, metabolism and rCBF studies seem to be of value to predicit the post-surgical patients outcome as to seizure frequency and mental functions secondarily affected by epilepsy surgery such as memory impairment. Ictal rCBF SPECT provides higher sensitivity and specificity and virtually allows the detection lateralisation in almost every case. This means that a relatively precise anatomical localisation of an epileptogenic focus is being found in a rising number of patients. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Bedeutung der funktionellen Bildgebung unter Verwendung der PET und der SPECT zum Nachweis einer gestoerten regionalen Durchblutung oder eines Zerebralen Hyopmetabolismus von Glukose hat heute einen festen Platz in der praechirurgischen

  13. Positron emission tomography with [18F]FDOPA and [18F]FDG in the imaging of small cell lung carcinoma: preliminary results

    Small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) express neuroendocrine markers, and dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) is known to accumulate in neuroendocrine tumours. This study was performed with the aim of evaluating the uptake of 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine ([18F]FDOPA) by SCLC, based on comparison with the results of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and standard imaging procedures. [18F]FDG PET and [18F]FDOPA PET were performed on four patients with newly diagnosed SCLC. There was agreement between the results of [18F]FDOPA PET and [18F]FDG PET in four tumoural sites out of 11, whereas [18F]FDG PET and standard imaging procedures were in full agreement. A semi-quantitative analysis based on standardised uptake values (SUVs) was performed in order to compare [18F]FDG and [18F]FDOPA tumour uptake. The median [18F]FDG SUVmax was 5.9 (with a 95% confidence interval from 4.4 to 9.2), while the median [18F]FDOPA SUVmax was 1.9 (with a 95% confidence interval from 1.6 to 3.8). The difference between [18F]FDG SUVmax and [18F]FDOPA SUVmax was significant (P18F]FDOPA PET appeared less sensitive than [18F]FDG PET and standard imaging procedures in the staging of SCLC. No clear relation between [18F]FDOPA uptake and positivity of neuroendocrine markers on immunohistochemistry emerged from these preliminary results; however, since [18F]FDOPA uptake may reflect better differentiation of the tumour, and possibly a better prognosis, this point warrants clarification in a larger study. (orig.)

  14. The preliminary study of 18F-FDG PET in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    To investigate the imaging characteristic and diagnostic criteria of 18F-FDG brain PET in detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD). The study included in 12 normal subject, 12 patients with AD, 6 patients with vascular dementia, 3 patients with Lewy body disease (LBD) and 2 patients with mixed dementia. The dementia severity was measured by ESD and MMSE. 12 cases had mild, 7 moderate and 4 severe dementia. 23 patients and 6 normal subjects underwent MR imaging of the brain. All participants fasted for at least 6 hours. 40 minutes after intravenous administration of 185-370 MBq 18F-FDG, 2D brain scan in 25 cases and 3D scan in 10 cases were performed using SIEMENS ECAT 47 scanner. The transaxial, coronal and sagittal images were then reconstructed by computer. At the same time, semiquantitative analysis was also applied to help evaluation using the ratio of mean radioactivity between cerebral lobe to cerebellum (Rcl/cb). In normal subjects PET scan showed clear images of cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum with symmetrical distribution of radioactivity. 22 of 23 patients were found to have decreased uptake of FDG in the brain. 20 patients had cerebral atrophy and it also appeared in 6 normal elder people. PET images for Alzheimer's disease were classified in 6 normal elder people. PET image for Alzheimer's 3 patterns: bilateral parietal hypo metabolism in 5 cases, bilateral temporo-parietal hypo metabolism in 4 cases and unilateral temporo-parietal hypo metabolism in 3 cases. The Rcl/cb of AD patents in parietal and temporal was significantly decreased than normal subjects (p<0.05). PET images for non-AD dementia were also classified 3 patterns: multiple and asymmetrical patch foci with decreased radioactivity in 8 cases, bilateral temporo-parietal with diffuse cortical hypo metabolism in 2 cases, and normal imaging in 1 case. The hypo metabolic involvement was accorded with severity of dementia. The more dementia had, the bigger hypometabloic region

  15. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET)

    Gutte Borgwardt, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and (18)F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We...... have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization...... local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of...

  16. Using {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT to Detect an occult Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Oncogenic Osteomalacia

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate excretion, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. This syndrome is often caused by tumors of mesenchymal origin. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia have abnormal bone mineralization, resulting in a high frequency of fractures. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice, as it will often correct the metabolic imbalance. Although oncogenic osteomalacia is a potentially curable disease, diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because of the small size and sporadic location of the tumor. Bone scintigraphy and radiography best characterize osteoma lacia; magnetic resonance imaging findings are nonspecific. Here, we report a case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor that was successfully detected by {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18F} FDG PET/CT). This case illustrates the advantages of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in detecting the occult mesenchymal tumor that causes oncogenic osteomalacia.

  17. Toxoplasmic Lymphadenitis Mimicking a Metastatic Thyroid Carcinoma at 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    A 28-year-old woman underwent total thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right thyroid lobe (pTx, pN1b). Subsequently a 131I-ablation (4.4 GBq) was performed. Four years later the patient presented increased thyroglobulin (Tg) serum levels (8.4 μg/l) during thyroxine treatment. Furthermore, enlarged hypoechoic and round-shaped bilateral cervical lymph nodes were detected at cervical ultrasonography (US). Based on laboratory and US findings suspicious for lymph nodal recurrence of thyroid carcinoma, the patient underwent an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) to check for distant metastases (Fig. 1). The patient underwent a US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology on an 18F-FDG-avid cervical lymph-node. The smears were hypercellulated and consisted of numerous small- to medium-sized lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and tingible body macrophages. The cytological diagnosis was consistent with that of reactive lymphadenitis. Serological test revealed elevated IgM and IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies with a very low IgG-avidity, indicating an acute toxoplasmosis. Serum Tg was then measured by using heterophilic antibody blocking tubes, as previously reported, and serum value dropped to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in oncological patients. Few reports have described toxoplasmic infection mimicking malignancy at 18F-FDG-PET/CT; these findings were found mainly in immunodepressive patients or with history of lymphoma. Conversely, we described here a case of toxoplasmosis inducing false-positive Tg measurement, neck US and 18F-FDG-PET/CT findings in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma

  18. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staffs during 18F-FDG PET/CT procedures at Ramathibodi Hospital

    Donmoon, T.; Chamroonrat, W.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the whole body and finger radiation doses per study received by nuclear medicine staff involved in dispensing, administration of 18F-FDG and interacting with radioactive patients during PET/CT imaging procedures in a PET/CT facility. The whole-body doses received by radiopharmacists, technologists and nurses were measured by electronic dosimeter and the finger doses by ring dosimeter during a period of 4 months. In 70 PET/CT studies, the mean whole-body dose per study to radiopharmacist, technologist, and nurse were 1.07±0.09, 1.77±0.46, μSv, and not detectable respectively. The mean finger doses per study received by radiopharmacist, technologist, and nurse were 265.65±107.55, 4.84±1.08 and 19.22±2.59 μSv, respectively. The average time in contact with 18F-FDG was 5.88±0.03, 39.06±1.89 and 1.21±0.02 minutes per study for radiopharmacist, technologist and nurse respectively. Technologists received highest mean effective whole- body dose per study and radiopharmacist received the highest finger dose per study. When compared with the ICRP dose limit, each individual worker can work with many more 18F- FDG PET/CT studies for a whole year without exceeding the occupational dose limits. This study confirmed that low levels of radiation does are received by our medical personnel involved in 18F-FDG PET/CT procedures.

  19. Lista de recomendações do Exame PET/CT com 18F-FDG em Oncologia: consenso entre a Sociedade Brasileira de Cancerologia e a Sociedade Brasileira de Biologia, Medicina Nuclear e Imagem Molecular Recommendations on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Oncology: consensus between the Brazilian Society of Cancerology and the Brazilian Society of Biology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    José Soares Junior; Roberto Porto Fonseca; Juliano Julio Cerci; Carlos Alberto Buchpiguel; Marcelo Livorsi da Cunha; Marcelo Mamed; Sérgio Altino de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Apresentamos uma lista de recomendações sobre a utilização de 18F-FDG PET em oncologia, no diagnóstico, estadiamento e detecção de recorrência ou progressão do câncer. Foi realizada pesquisa para identificar estudos controlados e revisões sistemáticas de literatura composta por estudos retrospectivos e prospectivos. As consequências e o impacto da 18F-FDG PET no manejo de pacientes oncológicos também foram avaliados. A 18F-FDG PET deve ser utilizada como ferramenta adicional aos métodos de im...

  20. Double-phase 18F-FDG PET-CT for determination of pulmonary tuberculoma activity

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential role of double phase acquisition of 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for the differentiation of active pulmonary tuberculoma. A total of 25 consecutive patients with pulmonary tuberculoma were enrolled. PET/CT imaging was performed 60 (range 53-71) and 120 min (range 109-131) after injection of 18F-FDG. The intensity of 18F-FDG uptake by pulmonary lesions was assessed visually, and the intensity was scored with a four-point scale (grade 1: absent, grade 2: faint, grade 3: moderate, grade 4: intense). Active tuberculoma shows statistically significant higher values in maximal standardized uptake values SUVmaxE (active = 2.3 ± 0.75, inactive 0.79 ± 0.15), SUVmaxD (active = 2.48 ± 0.79, inactive = 0.75 ± 0.13), and %ΔSUVmax (active = 8.07 ± 7.77%, inactive = -3.83 ± 6.59) than those of inactive tuberculoma. When greater than or equal to visual grade 2 was used as the cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 81.8%. When SUVmaxE 1.05 was used as the cutoff point, the sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 100%. When SUVmaxD 0.97 was used as the cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity were 92.8 and 100%. When %ΔSUVmax 6.59 was used as the cutoff value, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.4 and 100%. The %ΔSUVmax was the potent predictor by logistic regression analysis. The ΔSUVmax is a potential predictor for activity of pulmonary tuberculoma. However, the diagnostic performances were similar between visual and quantitative analyses. The visual assessment may be sufficient for determination of pulmonary tuberculoma activity. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and improve statistical accuracy. (orig.)

  1. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Malignant Mesothelioma

    Lee, Eun Jeong [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has a poor prognosis and a strong association with exposure to asbestos. Although there are not generally accepted guidelines for treatment of MPM, recent reports suggest that multimodality therapy combining chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery can improve the survival of patients with MPM. Therefore exact staging is required to decide the best treatment option. However, it is well known that there are many difficulties in determining precise preoperative stage, predicting prognosis, and monitoring response to therapy with conventional imaging modalities such as CT and MRI in MPM. Recently PET with {sup 18}F-FDG comes into the spotlight as an important staging method. There is increasing evidence that PET is superior to other conventional imaging modalities in diagnosis and staging of MPM. Particularly PET/CT improves the diagnostic and staging accuracy over PET or CT alone in MPM because it provides anatomic imaging data as well as functional information. PET and PET/CT are also useful for monitoring response to therapy and SUV is reported as a prognostic factor in MPM.

  2. Prognostic value of tumour blood flow, [{sup 18}F]EF5 and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiochemotherapy

    Komar, Gaber; Eskola, Olli; Sipilae, Hannu; Solin, Olof [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Lehtioe, Kaisa; Levola, Helena; Lindholm, Paula; Seppaelae, Jan [Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku (Finland); Seppaenen, Marko [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland); Grenman, Reidar [Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Turku (Finland); Minn, Heikki [Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku (Finland)

    2014-11-15

    In order to improve the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, precise information on the treated tumour's biology is required and the prognostic importance of different biological parameters needs to be determined. The aim of our study was to determine the predictive value of pretreatment PET/CT imaging using [{sup 18}F]FDG, a new hypoxia tracer [{sup 18}F]EF5 and the perfusion tracer [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck treated with radiochemotherapy. The study group comprised 22 patients with confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent a PET/CT scan using the above tracers before any treatment. Patients were later treated with a combination of radiochemotherapy and surgery. Parametric blood flow was calculated from dynamic [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O PET images using a one-tissue compartment model. [{sup 18}F]FDG images were analysed by calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) and metabolically active tumour volumes (MATV). [{sup 18}F]EF5 images were analysed by calculating tumour-to-muscle uptake ratios (T/M ratio). A T/M ratio of 1.5 was considered a significant threshold and used to determine tumour hypoxic subvolumes (HS) and hypoxic fraction area. The findings were finally correlated with the pretreatment clinical findings (overall stage and TNM stage) as well as the outcome following radiochemotherapy in terms of local control and overall patient survival. Tumour stage and T-classification did not show any significant differences in comparison to the patients' metabolic and functional characteristics measured on PET. Using the Cox proportional hazards model, a shorter overall survival was associated with MATV (p = 0.008, HR = 1.108), maximum [{sup 18}F]EF5 T/M ratio (p = 0.0145, HR = 4.084) and tumour HS (p = 0.0047, HR = 1.112). None of the PET parameters showed a significant effect on patient survival in the log-rank test, although [{sup 18}F]EF5 maximum T

  3. Assessing the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of soft tissue musculoskeletal malignancies: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Etchebehere, Elba C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Sirio Libanes Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hobbs, Brian P.; Milton, Denai R. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Malawi, Osama [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Houston, TX (United States); Patel, Shreyaskumar; Benjamin, Robert S. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Sarcoma Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Macapinlac, Homer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Twelve years ago a meta-analysis evaluated the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing musculoskeletal soft tissue lesions (MsSTL). Currently, PET/CT has substituted PET imaging; however, there has not been any published meta-analysis on the use of PET/CT or a comparison of PET/CT with PET in the diagnosis of MsSTL. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to identify the current diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and determine if there is added value when compared to PET. A systematic review of English articles was conducted, and MEDLINE PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Embase were searched from 1996 to March 2015. Studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (or dedicated PET) compared to histopathology in patients with MsSTL undergoing investigation for malignancy were included. Our meta-analysis included 14 articles composed of 755 patients with 757 soft tissue lesions. There were 451 (60 %) malignant tumors and 306 benign lesions. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (and dedicated PET) mean sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for diagnosing MsSTL were 0.96 (0.90, 1.00), 0.77 (0.67, 0.86), 0.88 (0.85, 0.91), 0.86 (0.78, 0.94), and 0.91 (0.83, 0.99), respectively. The posterior mean (95 % highest posterior density interval) for the AUC was 0.92 (0.88, 0.96). PET/CT had higher specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value when compared to a dedicated PET (0.85, 0.89, and 0.91 vs 0.71, 0.85, and 0.82, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and dedicated PET are both highly accurate in the diagnosis of MsSTL. PET/CT is more accurate and specific and has a higher positive predictive value than PET. (orig.)

  4. Assessing the role of 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of soft tissue musculoskeletal malignancies: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Twelve years ago a meta-analysis evaluated the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing musculoskeletal soft tissue lesions (MsSTL). Currently, PET/CT has substituted PET imaging; however, there has not been any published meta-analysis on the use of PET/CT or a comparison of PET/CT with PET in the diagnosis of MsSTL. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to identify the current diagnostic performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT and determine if there is added value when compared to PET. A systematic review of English articles was conducted, and MEDLINE PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Embase were searched from 1996 to March 2015. Studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT (or dedicated PET) compared to histopathology in patients with MsSTL undergoing investigation for malignancy were included. Our meta-analysis included 14 articles composed of 755 patients with 757 soft tissue lesions. There were 451 (60 %) malignant tumors and 306 benign lesions. The 18F-FDG PET/CT (and dedicated PET) mean sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for diagnosing MsSTL were 0.96 (0.90, 1.00), 0.77 (0.67, 0.86), 0.88 (0.85, 0.91), 0.86 (0.78, 0.94), and 0.91 (0.83, 0.99), respectively. The posterior mean (95 % highest posterior density interval) for the AUC was 0.92 (0.88, 0.96). PET/CT had higher specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value when compared to a dedicated PET (0.85, 0.89, and 0.91 vs 0.71, 0.85, and 0.82, respectively). 18F-FDG PET/CT and dedicated PET are both highly accurate in the diagnosis of MsSTL. PET/CT is more accurate and specific and has a higher positive predictive value than PET. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET and 201 thallium chloride SPECT in the evaluation of cerebral glioma prior to surgery

    Full text: The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET and 201Tl SPECT in detecting and grading primary cerebral glioma through comparison to surgical pathology. A total of 33 patients with primary cerebral glioma had 35 18F-FDG PET/201Tl SPECT scans prior to surgery. Pre-operative 18F -FDG PET and 201Tl SPECT studies were reviewed and compared with histologic tumour grade. Radiological comparisons were also performed when pre-operative studies were available. 17/18 patients with glioblastoma multiforme demonstrated hypermetabolic lesions on 18F-FDG PET scan and increased thallium uptake on SPECT scan. Increased 18F -FDG and thallium uptake were also demonstrated in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, gemistocytic astrocytoma, and one biopsy which was difficult to grade because of small biopsy sample and co-existing radiation necrosis. In general, low grade gliomas had reduced 18F -FDG uptake and normal thallium uptake (6/7, where two patients had tumour with hypermetabolic and hypometabolic regions). MRI correctly identified 4/7 patients with low to intermediate grade glioma. Pilocytic astrocytoma, protoplastic astrocytoma and oligoastrocytoma all demonstrated hypometabolic PET activity and normal thallium uptake. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET and 201Tl SPECT are very sensitive in pre-operative prediction of high grade glioma. In low grade tumour, 201Tl SPECT appeared to be less useful in the absence of breakdown of the blood brain barrier. MR imaging accurately identified the presence of tumour but was less accurate in determining the grade of tumour. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  6. 11C-choline vs. 18F-FDG PET/CT in assessing bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    Ambrosini Valentina

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Myeloma (MM is a B cell neoplasm causing lytic or osteopenic bone abnormalities. Whole body skeletal survey (WBSS, Magnetic resonance (MR and 18F-FDG PET/CT are imaging techniques routinely used for the evaluation of bone involvement in MM patients. Aim As MM bone lesions may present low 18F-FDG uptake; the aim of this study was to assess the possible added value and limitations of 11C-Choline to that of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients affected with MM. Methods Ten patients affected with MM underwent a standard 11C-Choline PET/CT and an 18F-FDG PET/CT within one week. The results of the two scans were compared in terms of number, sites and SUVmax of lesions. Results Four patients (40% had a negative concordant 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two patients (20% had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans that identified the same number and sites of bone lesions. The remaining four patients (40% had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, but the two exams identified different number of lesions. Choline showed a mean SUVmax of 5 while FDG showed a mean SUVmax of 3.8 (P = 0.042. Overall, 11C-Choline PET/CT scans detected 37 bone lesions and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans detected 22 bone lesions but the difference was not significant (P = 0.8. Conclusion According to these preliminary data, 11C-Choline PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of bony myelomatous lesions. If these data are confirmed in larger series of patients, 11C-Choline may be considered a more appropriate functional imaging in association with MRI for MM bone staging.

  7. Cerebral metabolism and perfusion in MR-negative individuals with refractory focal epilepsy assessed by simultaneous acquisition of (18)F-FDG PET and arterial spin labeling.

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; De Vita, Enrico; Barnes, Anna; Duncan, John S; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Golay, Xavier; Bomanji, Jamshed B; Koepp, Matthias; Groves, Ashley M; Fraioli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge in pre-surgical epileptic patient evaluation is the correct identification of the seizure onset area, especially in MR-negative patients. In this study, we aimed to: (1) assess the concordance between perfusion, from ASL, and metabolism, from (18)F-FDG, acquired simultaneously on PET/MR; (2) verify the utility of a statistical approach as supportive diagnostic tool for clinical readers. Secondarily, we compared (18)F-FDG PET data from the hybrid PET/MR system with those acquired with PET/CT, with the purpose of validate the reliability of (18)F-FDG PET/MR data. Twenty patients with refractory focal epilepsy, negative MR and a defined electro-clinical diagnosis underwent PET/MR, immediately followed by PET/CT. Standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were calculated for PET/CT-PET/MR and ASL, respectively. For all techniques, z-score of the asymmetry index (zAI) was applied for depicting significant Right/Left differences. SUVr and CBF images were firstly visually assessed by two neuroimaging readers, who then re-assessed them considering zAI for reaching a final diagnosis. High agreement between (18)F-FDG PET/MR and ASL was found, showing hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the same hemisphere in 18/20 patients, while the remaining were normal. They were completely concordant in 14/18, concordant in at least one lobe in the remaining. zAI maps improved readers' confidence in 12/20 and 15/20 patients for (18)F-FDG PET/MR and ASL, respectively. (18)F-FDG PET/CT-PET/MR showed high agreement, especially when zAI was considered. The simultaneous metabolism-perfusion acquisition provides excellent concordance on focus lateralisation and good concordance on localisation, determining useful complementary information. PMID:27222796

  8. The role of 18F-FDG PET in the differentiation between lung metastases and synchronous second primary lung tumours

    In lung cancer patients with multiple lesions, the differentiation between metastases and second primary tumours has significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the potential of 18F-FDG PET to discriminate metastatic disease from second primary lung tumours. Of 1,396 patients evaluated by the thoracic oncology group between January 2004 and April 2009 at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, patients with a synchronous second primary lung cancer were selected. Patients with metastatic disease involving the lungs served as the control group. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) measured with 18F-FDG PET were determined for two tumours in each patient. The relative difference between the SUVs of these tumours (∇SUV) was determined and compared between the second primary group and metastatic disease group. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the ∇SUV for an optimal cut-off value. A total of 37 patients (21 metastatic disease, 16 second primary cancer) were included for analysis. The ∇SUV was significantly higher in patients with second primary cancer than in those with metastatic disease (58 vs 28%, respectively, p 18F-FDG PET images can be helpful in differentiating metastatic disease from second primary tumours in patients with synchronous pulmonary lesions. Further studies are warranted to confirm the consistency of these results. (orig.)

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults: Contribution of PET-CT with 18F-FDG

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease whose clinical presentation is highly variable, and with unpredictable outcome. Once the diagnosis is established, evaluation of the extent of the disease is required for therapeutic purposes and prognosis. PET-CT with 18F-FDG can detect multi systemic involvement, demonstrating metabolically active lesions. We present a case report showing the utility of PET-CT in staging and therapy response evaluation

  10. Depiction and characterization of liver lesions in whole body [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/MRI

    Beiderwellen, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.beiderwellen@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt, E-mail: Benedikt.gomez@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: Christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Dusseldorf, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Hartung, Verena, E-mail: Verena.hartung@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Poeppel, Thorsten D., E-mail: Thorsten.Poeppel@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Nensa, Felix, E-mail: felix.nensa@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Kuehl, Hilmar, E-mail: Hilmar.Kuehl@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.bockisch@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C., E-mail: Thomas.Lauenstein@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]-FDG using a whole body protocol for the depiction and characterization of liver lesions in comparison to PET/CT. Methods: 70 patients (31 women, 39 men) with solid tumors underwent [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/CT and followed by an additional PET/MRI using an integrated scanner. Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding conspicuity of hepatic lesions (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (5-point ordinal scale). Median scores for lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Prior examinations, histopathology and clinical follow-up (116 ± 54 days) served as standard of reference. Results: 36 of 70 (51%) patients showed liver lesions. Using PET/CT and PET/MRI all patients with liver metastases could correctly be identified. A total of 97 lesions were found (malignant n = 26; benign n = 71). For lesion conspicuity significantly higher scores were obtained for PET/MRI in comparison to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Significantly better performance for diagnostic confidence was observed in PET/MRI, both for malignant as for benign lesions (p < 0.001). Conclusions: PET/MRI, even in the setting of a whole body approach, provides higher lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence compared to PET/CT and may therefore evolve as an attractive alternative in oncologic imaging.

  11. The Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET as a Cancer Screening Test

    Ko, Doo Heun; Choi, Joon Young; Song, Yun Mi; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Lee, Moon Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects. The subjects were 1,762 men and 259 women who voluntarily underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET for cancer screening as a part of a routine health examination. Final diagnosis was decided by other diagnostic studies, pathological results or clinical follow-up for 1 year. Of 2,021 subjects, 40 (2.0%) were finally proved to have cancer. Abnormal focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake suggesting malignancy was found in 102 subjects (5.0%). Among them, 21 subjects (1.0%) were proved to have cancer. Other tests in the routine health examination could not find 9 of 21 cancers (42.9%) detected by PET. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PET for cancer screening were 52.5%, 95.9%, 20.6%, and 99.0%, respectively. Pathologies of cancers missed on PET were adenocarcinoma (n=9; 3 colon cancers, 3 prostate cancers, 2 stomach cancers, and 1 rectal cancer), differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n=6), bronchioalveolar cell carcinoma (n=2), urinary bladder cancer (n=1), and melanoma (n=1). More than half of cancers which were not detected by PET were smaller than 1 cm in diameter. {sup 18}F-FDG PET might be useful for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects due to its high specificity and negative predictive value and play a supplementary role to the conventional health check-up, but it could not replace due to limited sensitivity for urological cancers, small-sized tumors and some hypometaboic cancers.

  12. The Usefulness of 18F-FDG PET as a Cancer Screening Test

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects. The subjects were 1,762 men and 259 women who voluntarily underwent 18F-FDG PET for cancer screening as a part of a routine health examination. Final diagnosis was decided by other diagnostic studies, pathological results or clinical follow-up for 1 year. Of 2,021 subjects, 40 (2.0%) were finally proved to have cancer. Abnormal focal 18F-FDG uptake suggesting malignancy was found in 102 subjects (5.0%). Among them, 21 subjects (1.0%) were proved to have cancer. Other tests in the routine health examination could not find 9 of 21 cancers (42.9%) detected by PET. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PET for cancer screening were 52.5%, 95.9%, 20.6%, and 99.0%, respectively. Pathologies of cancers missed on PET were adenocarcinoma (n=9; 3 colon cancers, 3 prostate cancers, 2 stomach cancers, and 1 rectal cancer), differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n=6), bronchioalveolar cell carcinoma (n=2), urinary bladder cancer (n=1), and melanoma (n=1). More than half of cancers which were not detected by PET were smaller than 1 cm in diameter. 18F-FDG PET might be useful for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects due to its high specificity and negative predictive value and play a supplementary role to the conventional health check-up, but it could not replace due to limited sensitivity for urological cancers, small-sized tumors and some hypometaboic cancers

  13. Restaging in patients with preoperative breast cancer using 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT) in the assessment of patients with preoperative breast cancer. During April 2006 to February 2008, 294 patients (age 34-73 years) with biopsy proven breast cancer were enrolled in this preoperative staging study. Distant metastases such as bone, extraaxiall lymphnode, lung, liver, were disclosed by 18F-FDG-PET/CT in 4.6% cases of clinical Stage II and in 17% cases of clinical Stage III, and in 7.2% cases of clinical Stage II and III. Otherwise, 80% of them had not been demonstrated. 18F-FDG-PET/CT has the usefulness in restaging the patients with clinical Stage II and III of preoperative breast cancer. (author)

  14. Effect of subcutaneous injection of insulin on 18F-FDG myocardial imaging in diabetics

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of subcutaneous injection of insulin on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) myocardial imaging in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: Fifty-seven patients with coronary artery disease complicated with diabetes mellitus [mean age (60 +- 8) years] underwent 18F-FDG PET and dual isotope simultaneous acquisition SPECT with 99Tcm-MIBI/18F-FDG. Thirty minutes before FDG injection, blood glucose was measured with an automatic glucose analyzer and insulin was subcutaneously used, the dose was adjusted according to the level of blood glucose. Results: Regression analysis showed that the insulin was positively associated with blood glucose. The linear regression analysis showed that the correlation between dose of insulin (y) and blood glucose (x) was good, r 0.8172; the linear regression equation was y = -5.4 + 1.2x. 52 of 57 images were of good quality with 91% success rate. Conclusion: Subcutaneous injection of insulin is an effective and simple method for obtaining cardiac FDG images of good quality in patients with diabetes mellitus

  15. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients

  16. Preliminary PET/CT Study of 18F-FDG Uptake in Cervical and Supraclavicular Brown Adipose Tissue

    Na Fang; Wei Ding; Yanli Wang; Xinjian Cui; Lei Zeng; Lili Ma; Xiumei Zhao; Wei Zhao; Qing Wang; Shan Gao

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical use of PET/CT in oncology has led to the realization that 18F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT)can be a common cause of potentially misleading false-positive PET scans.The goal of this study was to study 18F-FDG uptake in cervical and supraclavicular regions and its characteristics with PET/CT.METHODS All the PET/CT scans obtained at our institution from July 2007 to January 2008 were retrospectively reviewed for increased 18F-FDG uptake in BAT.The cases in which increased 18F-FDG in cervical and supraclavicular regions was not localized to a soft-tissue mass or lymph node or muscle on the CT images,were included in this study.The following features were recorded:body weight,body mass index (BMI) and maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax).In these selected patients,the BAT uptake in other area of the body was also recorded.RESULTS PET/CT scans were obtained in 457 patients (259 males and 198 females).In all of the scans,cervical and supraclavicular BAT uptake was observed in 12 patients (2 males and 10 females) and was typically bilateral,symmetric and intense.The range of the SUVmax was 3.6~12.82 (mean 6.9 ± 2.6).BAT uptake was more common in females than in males,showing a significant difference (P = 0.004).Although 18F-FDG uptake in BAT occurred more often in underweight patients with low BMI,there was no difference in the body weight (P = 0.607) or BMI (P =0.491) of these patients with hypermetabolic BAT compared with controls.CONCLUSION Hypermetabolic BAT uptake can be localized in cervical and supraclavicular regions with it occurring more commonly in females compared to males.Knowledge of this potential pitfall with PET/CT is important in improving diagnostic interpretation and accurate staging.

  17. 18F-FDG PET/CT in staging patients with locally advanced or inflammatory breast cancer: comparison to conventional staging

    The prognosis of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) remains poor. We prospectively investigated the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT at initial staging in this clinical setting and compared PET/CT performance with that of conventional distant work-up. During 60 mo, consecutive patients with LABC (clinical T4 or N2-N3 disease) underwent 18F-FDG PET/ CT. The yield was assessed in the whole group and separately for non-inflammatory and inflammatory cancer. The performance of PET/CT was compared with that of a conventional staging approach including bone scanning, chest radiography, or dedicated CT and abdomino-pelvic sonography or contrast-enhanced CT. 117 patients with inflammatory (n = 35) or non-inflammatory (n = 82) LABC were included. 18F-FDG PET/CT confirmed N3 nodal involvement in stage IIIC patients and revealed unsuspected N3 nodes (infra-clavicular, supraclavicular, or internal mammary) in 32 additional patients. Distant metastases were visualized on PET/CT in 43 patients (46% of patients with inflammatory carcinoma and 33% of those with non-inflammatory LABC). Overall, 18F-FDG PET/CT changed the clinical stage in 61 patients (52%). Unguided conventional imaging detected metastases in only 28 of the 43 patients classified M1 with PET/CT (65%). 18F-FDG PET/CT outperformed conventional imaging for bone metastases, distant lymph nodes, and liver metastases, whereas CT was more sensitive for lung metastases. The accuracy in diagnosing bone lesions was 89.7% for planar bone scanning versus 98.3% for 18F-FDG PET/CT. The accuracy in diagnosing lung metastases was 98.3% for dedicated CT versus 97.4% for 18F-FDG PET/CT. 18F-FDG PET/CT had the advantage of allowing chest, abdomen and bone to be examined in a single session. Almost all distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were depicted with PET/CT, which also showed additional lesions. (authors)

  18. Serial 18F-FDG-PET/CT during radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective clinical study

    Objective: The primary aim of this prospective study was to use serial 18F-FDG PET/CT to evaluate the trend of the tumor's maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) during radiotherapy (RT) on patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 60 patients with primary biopsy-proven NPC were prospectively enrolled into the study, approved by the institutional review board of our hospital. All patients underwent four /18F-FDG PET/CT scans: one initial scan before RT/ cisplatin based concurrent chemo radiotherapy, at the point of 50 Gy during RT, the end of RT, and one month after RT, respectively. Results: There was a significant difference (Pmax of primary site among pre treatment and post treatment at the dose of 50 Gy, at the end of RT and one month after RT. There was also significant difference (Pmax of neck nodes site. However, there was significant difference of the SUVmax between histological WHO type Ⅱ B and type Ⅱ A in the primary site (P=0.044) (67% reduction at dose 50 Gy for type Ⅱ B vs. 55% for type Ⅱ A) but not in the lymph nodes. Conclusions: Serial 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan demonstrates significant decreasing values of the tumor's SUVmax during and after radiotherapy in NPC. The most significant reduction was at the point 50 Gy and SUV is reduced to basal level (≤2.5) at one month after RT both in primary site and lymph nodes. WHO type Ⅱ B has more dramatic response than type Ⅱ A at the primary site but not in lymph node. The study indicates that inflammation caused by RT do not significantly influence the uptake on 18F-FDG PET in NPC. Therefore, early PET scan during or right after RT instead of conventional 3 months interval after RT is indicated to evaluate tumor response and develop individualized adaptive radiotherapy in NPC. (authors)

  19. The utility of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for suspected recurrent breast cancer: impact and prognostic stratification

    Cochet, Alexandre; David, Steven; Moodie, Kate; Drummond, Elizabeth; Dutu, Gaelle; MacManus, Michael; Chua, Boon; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incremental value of 18FDG PET/CT in patients with breast cancer (BC) compared to conventional imaging (CI) in clinical practice is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the management impact and prognostic value of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in this setting. Methods Sixty-three patients who were referred to our institution for suspicion of BC relapse were retrospectively enrolled. All patients had been evaluated with CI and underwent PET/CT. At a median follow-up of 61 months, s...

  20. One-pot production of 18F-biotin by conjugation with 18F-FDG for pre-targeted imaging: Synthesis and radio-labelling of a PEGylated precursor

    The biotin-avidin affinity system is exploited in pre-targeted imaging using avidin-conjugated antibodies. 18F-FDG is available at all PET centres. 18F-FDG forms oximes by reaction with oxyamine. Herein we describe the synthesis of oxyamine-funtionalised biotin, its 18F-labelling by conjugation with 18F-FDG and confirm its ability to interact with avidin.

  1. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a rare case of Stewart-Treves syndrome

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Friberg, Lars; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this article is to illustrate the possible applications of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in chronic extremity lymphedema and its complications. METHODS AND RESULTS: (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings in a rare case of...... Stewart-Treves Syndrome (STS), angiosarcoma secondary to chronic extremity lymphedema, are presented. Lymphedema of the extremities is a debilitating disease characterized by chronic swelling due to interstitial edema caused by insufficient lymphatic drainage capacity. Progression with skin thickening......, subcutaneous fibrosis, and increased adipose tissue volume is common. Chronic inflammation has been suggested as a key pathophysiologic component. STS is a rare complication with a very poor prognosis; however, early diagnosis and radical treatment is associated with increased survival. Thus, accurate...

  2. Soft tissue metastases from differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed by {sup 18}F FDG PET-CT

    Califano, Ines; Quildrian, Sergio; Otero, Jose; Coduti, Martin; Califano, Leonardo; Rojas Bilbao, Erica, E-mail: ines.m.califano@gmail.com [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    Distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer are unusual; lung and bones are the most frequently affected sites. Soft tissue metastases (STM) are extremely rare. We describe two cases of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer metastasizing to soft tissues. Both patients had widespread metastatic disease; clinically asymptomatic soft tissue metastases were found by 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F FDG PET-CT), and confirmed by cytological and/or histopathological studies. These findings underscore the ability of {sup 18}F FDG PET-CT in accurately assessing the extent of the disease, as well as the utility of the method to evaluate regions of the body that are not routinely explored. (author)

  3. Response assessment of colorectal liver metastases with contrast enhanced CT/18F-FDG PET

    Purpose: Evaluate the diagnostic performance of contrast enhanced CT/PET (ceCT/PET) in the response assessment of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases. Methods: 33 ce CT/PET studies of 19 patients with colorectal liver metastases were prospectively evaluated. All of them, 13 (68.4%) were males and 6 (31.6%) females. Mean age and range were 63 [42–78]. All patients were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In all cases post-therapy diagnostic confirmation of liver lesions was obtained. A ce CT PET/was obtained 1 h after the injection of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG. Metabolic and morphologic studies were evaluated by two blinded nuclear physicians and radiologists respectively to assess the location, size and suspected diagnosis of lesions (benign or malignant). A combined assessment of both techniques was performed. The final diagnosis was established by histopathology or clinical/radiological follow-up greater than 6 months. Results: A total of 120 liver lesions were identified, 115 were malignant and 5 benign. From the malignant lesions, 105 were identified with the ceCT, 44 with the PET and 109 with ceCT/PET. All of the benign lesions were correctly classified with any of the three imaging techniques. The sensitivity of PET, ceCT and ceCT/PET were of 38%, 91% and 95% respectively and the specificity was 100% in all three of the diagnostic studies. Conclusion: Administration of intravenous contrast in the PET/CT is mandatory to evaluate treatment response rate of liver metastases due to the limitations of isolated metabolic images in these cases

  4. A dual tracer (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT pilot study for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis

    Gormsen, Lars C; Haraldsen, Ate; Kramer, Stine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a potentially fatal condition lacking a single test with acceptable diagnostic accuracy. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has emerged as a promising imaging modality, but is challenged by physiological myocardial glucose uptake. An alternative tracer, (68)Ga-DOTANOC, binds...

  5. 18F-FDG PET in neuro-degenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Introduction: The so called 'neuro-degenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis' (ND-LCH) is a rare and severe complication of LCH presenting as a progressive cerebellar ataxia associated with pyramidal tract signs, and cognitive impairment. MRI is the gold standard to investigate CNS lesions of ND-LCH but little is known about functional changes observed in this disease. Objectives: To search for CNS metabolic changes in NDLCH. Methods: Seven patients suffering from ND-LCH were investigated by 18F-FDG PET in this prospective study and compared with 21 healthy controls. Results: ND-LCH patients demonstrated recurrent abnormalities including bilateral hypo-metabolism in the cerebellum, the basal ganglia (caudate nuclei), frontal cortex and, bilateral, a relatively increased metabolism in the amygdalae (p ≤ 0.001). Functional changes in these anatomical regions may be detected in the absence of any apparent lesion on MRI. Conclusions: ND-LCH demonstrates a recurrent 18F-FDG PET metabolic signature. Our results suggest that 18F-FDG PET might be a useful tool for an early diagnosis of ND-LCH before neuro-radiologic abnormalities appear. (authors)

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG PET in neuro-degenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Ribeiro, M.Jo. [CEA, DSV, DRM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91406 Orsay (France); Idbaih, A.; Hoang-Xuan, K. [UPMC, Grp Hosp Pitie Salpetriere, ServNeurol Mazarin, AP-HP, Paris (France); Thomas, C. [CHU Nantes, Unite Hematol et Oncol Pediat, F-44035 Nantes 01 (France); Remy, P. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, CNRS, URA 2210, F-91406 Orsay (France); Remy, P. [CHU Henri Mondor, Fac Med Paris 12, Dept Neurosci, AP-HP, F-94010 Creteil (France)

    2008-07-01

    Introduction: The so called 'neuro-degenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis' (ND-LCH) is a rare and severe complication of LCH presenting as a progressive cerebellar ataxia associated with pyramidal tract signs, and cognitive impairment. MRI is the gold standard to investigate CNS lesions of ND-LCH but little is known about functional changes observed in this disease. Objectives: To search for CNS metabolic changes in NDLCH. Methods: Seven patients suffering from ND-LCH were investigated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET in this prospective study and compared with 21 healthy controls. Results: ND-LCH patients demonstrated recurrent abnormalities including bilateral hypo-metabolism in the cerebellum, the basal ganglia (caudate nuclei), frontal cortex and, bilateral, a relatively increased metabolism in the amygdalae (p {<=} 0.001). Functional changes in these anatomical regions may be detected in the absence of any apparent lesion on MRI. Conclusions: ND-LCH demonstrates a recurrent {sup 18}F-FDG PET metabolic signature. Our results suggest that {sup 18}F-FDG PET might be a useful tool for an early diagnosis of ND-LCH before neuro-radiologic abnormalities appear. (authors)

  7. [18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of liver cyst infection in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and fever of unknown origin].

    Banzo, J; Ubieto, M A; Gil, D; Prats, E; Razola, P; Tardín, L; Andrés, A; Rambalde, E F; Ayala, S M; Cáncer, L; Velilla, J

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, localization and treatment of infected cysts in the kidney or liver of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) remain a clinical challenge. We report the findings of (18)F-FDG PET-CT in an ADPKD diagnosed patient who required renal transplantation five years before and in his follow up presented repeated episodes of bacteriemia without known focus on radiological tests performed. The (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan showed numerous hypermetabolic images with focal or ring-shaped morphology related to the content and the wall of some hepatic cysts. The increased metabolic activity was localized on segments VI and VII. We proceeded to drainage of one cyst in segment VI, removing 110 cc of purulent fluid which grew E. Coli BLEE. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan should be included in the diagnostic algorithm for detecting infected liver cysts in patients with ADPKD and fever of unknown origin. PMID:23153986

  8. The study of 18F-FDG DHC imaging used for diagnosing breast cancer

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) dual-head coincidence (DHC) imaging for detecting breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastases. Methods: Thirty-one female patients were studied by 18F-FDG DHC imaging, and 21 of them received fine needle aspiration biopsy after 18F-FDG DHC imaging. The results of 18F-FDG DHC imaging and fine needle aspiration biopsy were compared with those of histopathology. Results: 1) Among the 26 cases of breast carcinoma by 18F-FDG DHC imaging, the FDG uptake of 21 cases showed positive. The lesion diameters ranged from 1.7-8 (mean 3.2 ±1.6) cm, the lesion/background (L/B) ratio range was 1.4-7.3 (mean 2.4 ±1.3). The other 5 malignancies were negative, their diameter range was 0.8-3.3 (mean 1.9) cm. 2) Ten cases of the malignancies were confirmed with axillary lymph node metastases. Three cases by 18F-FDG DHC imaging were positive. Those lymph node diameters were 1.4, 1.8 and 5.2 cm, respectively. The L/B ratios were 1.3, 1.5 and 6.2, respectively. The other 7 cases were negative. The lymph node diameter range was 0.2-1.8 cm. 3) Twenty-one cases received fine needle aspiration biopsy. Tumor cells were found in 13 cases. 4) The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18F-FDG DHC imaging for diagnosing primary breast carcinoma were 80.8%, 5/5 and 83.9%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 18F-FDG DHC imaging for diagnosing lymph node metastases were 30.0%, 100% and 77.4%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of fine needle aspiration biopsy for diagnosing primary breast carcinoma were 72.2%, 3/3 and 76.2%, respectively. 5) There was no significant difference between the sensitivity of 18F-FDG DHC imaging and fine needle aspiration biopsy (P>0.05). Conclusion: 18F-FDG DHC imaging possesses higher sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It can be used as a noninvasive modality for evaluating breast cancer

  9. Relationship between pSUV of 18F-FDG PET/CT and pathological diagnosis in breast cancer

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Pathological Diagnosis associated with pSUV uptake of 18F-FDG PET/CT. We had enrolled 39 women that underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT before operative. We evaluated whether there was correlation between the pSUV of 18F-FDG PET/CT and prognostic factors. As a results, pSUV level increase according to tumor size but pSUV had no significant association with tumor size. pSUV of high histologic grade was higher than low histologic grade, and pSUV showed positive correlations with histologic grade. The ER and PR showed significant negative correlations with the pSUV of 18F-FDG PET/CT. Therefore, our results demonstrated that an correlation exists between pSUV and prognostic factors such as histologic grade, ER and PR

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT-Negative Recurrent High-Grade Anaplastic Astrocytoma Detected by 18F-FDOPA PET-CT

    A 37-year-old woman with grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) of the left frontal lobe, underwent surgical excision, chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy in 2004. After being in remission for 5 years, recurrence was suspected clinically when she presented with seizures. The result of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was equivocal for recurrence and radiation necrosis (not available ). The patient was then referred for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), as the initial primary tumour was high grade in nature. 18F-FDG PET-CT was negative for recurrence and demonstrated only post-operative changes in the left frontal region (Fig. 1a, b, arrow). Due to strong clinical suspicion, 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phenylalanine (18F-FDOPA) PET-CT was done, 5 days after 18F-FDG PET-CT. The study revealed an 18F-FDOPA-avid mass lesion in the left frontal region (Fig. 1c, d, arrow), thereby confirming the presence of recurrent disease. The patient underwent surgical resection of the mass, and it was confirmed by histopathology as grade 3 AA. However, after a short asymptomatic period of 4 months the patient became symptomatic again. Follow-up MRI after 6 months of surgery revealed presence of ipsilateral and contralateral multifocal contrast enhancing recurrent mass lesions (Fig. 1e, f, arrow), suggesting the progression of disease. The patient was started on temozolamide but she died after 8 months' follow-up. Though MRI is routinely used in assessment of brain tumours, its ability to differentiate between treatment-induced changes and residual or recurrent tumour is limited. 18F-FDG PET was the first tracer used for assessment of brain tumours; however, it has a low tumour-to-background ratio in brain, limiting its utility. 18F-FDG uptake correlates with tumour grade, with high-grade gliomas (grades III and IV) showing higher uptake than low-grade gliomas. Therefore, in spite of its

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT-Negative Recurrent High-Grade Anaplastic Astrocytoma Detected by {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET-CT

    Karunanithi, Sellam; Singh, Harmandeep; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2013-12-15

    A 37-year-old woman with grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) of the left frontal lobe, underwent surgical excision, chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy in 2004. After being in remission for 5 years, recurrence was suspected clinically when she presented with seizures. The result of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was equivocal for recurrence and radiation necrosis (not available ). The patient was then referred for {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), as the initial primary tumour was high grade in nature. {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT was negative for recurrence and demonstrated only post-operative changes in the left frontal region (Fig. 1a, b, arrow). Due to strong clinical suspicion, 3,4-dihydroxy-6-{sup 18}F-fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) PET-CT was done, 5 days after {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. The study revealed an {sup 18}F-FDOPA-avid mass lesion in the left frontal region (Fig. 1c, d, arrow), thereby confirming the presence of recurrent disease. The patient underwent surgical resection of the mass, and it was confirmed by histopathology as grade 3 AA. However, after a short asymptomatic period of 4 months the patient became symptomatic again. Follow-up MRI after 6 months of surgery revealed presence of ipsilateral and contralateral multifocal contrast enhancing recurrent mass lesions (Fig. 1e, f, arrow), suggesting the progression of disease. The patient was started on temozolamide but she died after 8 months' follow-up. Though MRI is routinely used in assessment of brain tumours, its ability to differentiate between treatment-induced changes and residual or recurrent tumour is limited. {sup 18}F-FDG PET was the first tracer used for assessment of brain tumours; however, it has a low tumour-to-background ratio in brain, limiting its utility. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake correlates with tumour grade, with high-grade gliomas (grades III and IV) showing higher uptake

  12. A standardized [18F]-FDG-PET template for spatial normalization in statistical parametric mapping of dementia.

    Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Cerami, Chiara; Gallivanone, Francesca; Prestia, Annapaola; Caroli, Anna; Castiglioni, Isabella; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Frisoni, Giovanni; Friston, Karl; Ashburner, John; Perani, Daniela

    2014-10-01

    [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a widely used diagnostic tool that can detect and quantify pathophysiology, as assessed through changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. [18F]-FDG PET scans can be analyzed using voxel-based statistical methods such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) that provide statistical maps of brain abnormalities in single patients. In order to perform SPM, a "spatial normalization" of an individual's PET scan is required to match a reference PET template. The PET template currently used for SPM normalization is based on [15O]-H2O images and does not resemble either the specific metabolic features of [18F]-FDG brain scans or the specific morphological characteristics of individual brains affected by neurodegeneration. Thus, our aim was to create a new [18F]-FDG PET aging and dementia-specific template for spatial normalization, based on images derived from both age-matched controls and patients. We hypothesized that this template would increase spatial normalization accuracy and thereby preserve crucial information for research and diagnostic purposes. We investigated the statistical sensitivity and registration accuracy of normalization procedures based on the standard and new template-at the single-subject and group level-independently for subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We found a significant statistical effect of the population-specific FDG template-based normalisation in key anatomical regions for each dementia subtype, suggesting that spatial normalization with the new template provides more accurate estimates of metabolic abnormalities for single-subject and group analysis, and therefore, a more effective diagnostic measure. PMID:24952892

  13. Sequential {sup 123}I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging)

    Mohamed, Armin [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Comprehensive Epilepsy Service, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eberl, Stefan; Henderson, David; Beveridge, Scott; Constable, Chris [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Fulham, Michael J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, Michael [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney, Department of Pharmacology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Zaman, Aysha [University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lo, Sing Kai [University of Sydney, Institute of International Health, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2005-02-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 123}I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; {kappa}=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; {kappa}=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; {kappa}=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; {kappa}=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  14. Sequential 123I-iododexetimide scans in temporal lobe epilepsy: comparison with neuroimaging scans (MR imaging and 18F-FDG PET imaging)

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play an important role in the generation of seizures. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123I-iododexetimide (IDEX) depicts tracer uptake by mAChRs. Our aims were to: (a) determine the optimum time for interictal IDEX SPECT imaging; (b) determine the accuracy of IDEX scans in the localisation of seizure foci when compared with video EEG and MR imaging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE); (c) characterise the distribution of IDEX binding in the temporal lobes and (d) compare IDEX SPECT and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in identifying seizure foci. We performed sequential scans using IDEX SPECT imaging at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h in 12 consecutive patients with refractory TLE undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery. Visual and region of interest analyses of the mesial, lateral and polar regions of the temporal lobes were used to compare IDEX SPECT, FDG PET and MR imaging in seizure onset localisation. The 6-h IDEX scan (92%; κ=0.83, p=0.003) was superior to the 0-h (36%; κ=0.01, p>0.05), 3-h (55%; κ=0.13, p>0.05) and 24-h IDEX scans in identifying the temporal lobe of seizure origin. The 6-h IDEX scan correctly predicted the temporal lobe of seizure origin in two patients who required intracranial EEG recordings to define the seizure onset. Reduced ligand binding was most marked at the temporal pole and mesial temporal structures. IDEX SPECT was superior to interictal FDG PET (75%; κ=0.66, p=0.023) in seizure onset localisation. MR imaging was non-localising in two patients in whom it was normal and in another patient in whom there was bilateral symmetrical hippocampal atrophy. The 6-h IDEX SPECT scan is a viable alternative to FDG PET imaging in seizure onset localisation in TLE. (orig.)

  15. Skin Manifestation of Unsuspecting Prostate Cancer Detected by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Performed To Assess Underlying Multiple Myeloma

    AbAziz, Aini; Mahaletchumy, Thanuja; Chung, Junekey [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-12-15

    Skin metastases from either prostate adenocarcinoma or multiple myeloma rarely occur. We report the case of a 73-year-old man with multiple myeloma who presented with multiple subcutaneous nodules 3 years after his initial diagnosis. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was suggestive of a concomitant second primary from the prostate. This case highlights not only a rare initial manifestation of prostate cancer, but also the role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in detecting a clinically unsuspected second malignancy. It potentially corroborates the possible association of both diseases, as has been reported before.

  16. The influence of tumor oxygenation on 18F-FDG (Fluorine-18 Deoxyglucose) uptake: A mouse study using positron emission tomography (PET)

    This study investigated whether changing a tumor's oxygenation would alter tumor metabolism, and thus uptake of 18F-FDG (fluorine-18 deoxyglucose), a marker for glucose metabolism using positron emission tomography (PET). Tumor-bearing mice (squamous cell carcinoma) maintained at 37°C were studied while breathing either normal air or carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2), known to significantly oxygenate tumors. Tumor activity was measured within an automatically determined volume of interest (VOI). Activity was corrected for the arterial input function as estimated from image and blood-derived data. Tumor FDG uptake was initially evaluated for tumor-bearing animals breathing only air (2 animals) or only carbogen (2 animals). Subsequently, 5 animals were studied using two sequential 18F-FDG injections administered to the same tumor-bearing mouse, 60 min apart; the first injection on one gas (air or carbogen) and the second on the other gas. When examining the entire tumor VOI, there was no significant difference of 18F-FDG uptake between mice breathing either air or carbogen (i.e. air/carbogen ratio near unity). However, when only the highest 18F-FDG uptake regions of the tumor were considered (small VOIs), there was a modest (21%), but significant increase in the air/carbogen ratio suggesting that in these potentially most hypoxic regions of the tumor, 18F-FDG uptake and hence glucose metabolism, may be reduced by increasing tumor oxygenation. Tumor 18F-FDG uptake may be reduced by increases in tumor oxygenation and thus may provide a means to further enhance 18F-FDG functional imaging

  17. Toxoplasmic Lymphadenitis Mimicking a Metastatic Thyroid Carcinoma at {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT

    Treglia, Giorgio; Bongiovanni, Massimo; Ceriani, Luca; Paone, Gaetano; Giovanella, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15

    A 28-year-old woman underwent total thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right thyroid lobe (pTx, pN1b). Subsequently a {sup 131}I-ablation (4.4 GBq) was performed. Four years later the patient presented increased thyroglobulin (Tg) serum levels (8.4 μg/l) during thyroxine treatment. Furthermore, enlarged hypoechoic and round-shaped bilateral cervical lymph nodes were detected at cervical ultrasonography (US). Based on laboratory and US findings suspicious for lymph nodal recurrence of thyroid carcinoma, the patient underwent an {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) to check for distant metastases (Fig. 1). The patient underwent a US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology on an {sup 18}F-FDG-avid cervical lymph-node. The smears were hypercellulated and consisted of numerous small- to medium-sized lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and tingible body macrophages. The cytological diagnosis was consistent with that of reactive lymphadenitis. Serological test revealed elevated IgM and IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies with a very low IgG-avidity, indicating an acute toxoplasmosis. Serum Tg was then measured by using heterophilic antibody blocking tubes, as previously reported, and serum value dropped to <0.2 μg/l. It is well known that antibody interference may falsely increase serum Tg; in particular, increased anti-Toxoplasma antibodies likely interfered to the Tg measurement in our case. Additionally, activated granulocytes and macrophages may display significantly increased glucose consumption, giving false-positive results at {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in oncological patients. Few reports have described toxoplasmic infection mimicking malignancy at {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT; these findings were found mainly in immunodepressive patients or with history of lymphoma. Conversely, we described here a case of toxoplasmosis inducing false-positive Tg measurement, neck US and {sup 18}F-FDG-PET

  18. 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI Perform Equally Well in Cancer: Evidence from Studies on More Than 2,300 Patients.

    Spick, Claudio; Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT has become the reference standard in oncologic imaging against which the performance of other imaging modalities is measured. The promise of PET/MRI includes multiparametric imaging to further improve diagnosis and phenotyping of cancer. Rather than focusing on these capabilities, many investigators have examined whether (18)F-FDG PET combined with mostly anatomic MRI improves cancer staging and restaging. After a description of PET/MRI scanner designs and a discussion of technical and operational issues, we review the available literature to determine whether cancer assessments are improved with PET/MRI. The available data show that PET/MRI is feasible and performs as well as PET/CT in most types of cancer. Diagnostic advantages may be achievable in prostate cancer and in bone metastases, whereas disadvantages exist in lung nodule assessments. We conclude that (18)F-FDG PET/MRI and PET/CT provide comparable diagnostic information when MRI is used simply to provide the anatomic framework. Thus, PET/MRI could be used in lieu of PET/CT if this approach becomes economically viable and if reasonable workflows can be established. Future studies should explore the multiparametric potential of MRI. PMID:26742709

  19. Role of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in the dedifferentiated thyroid cancer and comparison with 18F-FDG PET/CT: preliminary data

    Full text: Aim: To evaluate the role of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in whole body radioiodine scan negative recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer and comparison with 18F-FDG PET/CT. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study 32 patients of differentiated thyroid cancer presenting with increased Tg value and having no abnormal concentration on whole body radioiodine scan were included. Patients underwent both 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in random order within 4 weeks time interval. Patient showing lesion(s) on either of scan was considered as recurrent disease positive and substantiated by structural imaging. Tumor lesions were categorised according to four sites-local, nodal, pulmonary and skeletal for comparison of detection rate between two functional modalities. Total number of lesions was defined as sum of number of lesions detected by at least one of the two scans. The analysis is performed on the basis of patient data, and as well as lesion wise. Results: Positive recurrent disease was observed in 24/32 (75%) on either of the scans. In 13/32 (40%) of these patients both imaging modalities detected metastatic disease. In 8/32 (26%) patients disease was detected only by 18F-FDG PET/CT and in 3/32 (9%) patients only 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT diagnosed disease. 18F-FDG PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT showed moderate agreement (k=0.313, P-value=0.03) in detecting disease on patient basis which is statistically significant. Total number of positive lesions detected on either of the modality was 73. 18F-FDG PET/CT showed 64/73 (87%) lesions and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT detected 31/73 (42%) lesions. 18F-FDG PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT showed 22/73 (30%) concordant lesions. Lesions detected only by 18F-FDG PET/CT were 33/73 (45%) and only by 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT 9/73 (12%). Location-wise tumor lesion detection showed fair agreement between two modalities for local (k=0.720) and skeletal (k=0.6) disease. However, detection for nodal (k=0.32) and pulmonary (k=0

  20. Prognostic value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Zhitao Ying; Xuejuan Wang; Yuqin Song; Wen Zheng; Xiaopei Wang; Yan Xie; Ningjing Lin

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous disease.The prognostic factor currently used is not accurate enough to predict the outcomes of patients with DLBCL.The prognostic significance of interim PET/CT in DLBCL remains controversial.The aim of this study is to determine the predictive value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT after first-line treatment in patients with DLBCL.Methods:Thirty-two patients with DLBCL underwent baseline,interim and post-treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT scans.Imaging results were analyzed for the survival of patients via software SPSS 13.0,retrospectively.Results:Thirty-one of the 32 patients were treated with R-CHOP regimen,and interim 18F-FDG PET/CT of 24 patients was performed after 2 cycles of treatment.After a median follow-up period of 16.7 months,the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were significandy different between the groups above and below SUVmax cut-off value of 2.5 (P=0.039).No significant differences were found in the 2-year PFS rates if SUVmax cut-offvalues were set as 2.0 and 3.0,respectively (P=0.360; P=0.113).Conclusions:Interim PET/CT could predict the prognosis of DLBCL patients with the SUVmax cut-off value of 2.5,but more clinical data should be concluded to confirm this conclusion.

  1. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the assessment of active idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis

    Moroni, Gabriella; Longhi, Selena; Messa, Piergiorgio [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Division of Nephrology, Milan (Italy); Castellani, Massimo; Martinelli, Isabella; Gerundini, Paolo [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Balzani, Aurora; Bonelli, Nicola [Fondazione IRCCS Ca Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Dore, Roberto [University of Pavia, Institute of Radiology, IRCCS Foundation, San Matteo Medical Center, Pavia (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    The different stages in idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis (IRF) are generally assessed by assay of inflammatory markers and analysis of contrast-enhanced CT images of the retroperitoneal mass. We investigated the potential role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in this clinical setting. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was assessed visually and semiquantitatively (using maximum standardized uptake values, SUVmax) in images of the abdominal mass in 22 patients prospectively enrolled from June 2008 to December 2010 who underwent a total of 33 PET/CT studies. The accuracy in discriminating active from inactive disease was calculated assuming as reference a biochemical instrumental evaluation of patients with IRF mostly based on the level of inflammatory indices and contrast enhancement (CE) of the mass at the time of each PET study. In particular, the relationship between SUVmax and CE, the latter calculated from the change in radiodensity (Hounsfield units) between the basal and postcontrast venous portal phases, was evaluated on a three-point scale (0 <20 HU, 1 20-30 HU, 2 {>=}30 HU). SUVmax and CE scores were correlated with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The value of PET/CT in assessing the variation of disease activity over time was also investigated by analysing the changes in metabolic volume (MV) of the retroperitoneal lesion between repeat patient studies. PET/CT accurately discriminated (93.9 %) active from inactive disease. Significant agreement (p < 0.01) was observed between visual and semiquantitative analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, and CE score. A significant correlation (p < 0.01) was found among SUVmax, CRP levels (rho = 0.54) and ESR (rho = 0.55). Corresponding variations in MV and CE score were observed in patients with multiple studies (p < 0.01; rho = 0.68). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may be considered an alternative imaging method for the assessment of different stages of IRF. (orig.)

  2. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnostic evaluation of secondary bone dissemination

    The tendency of modern diagnostic imaging of oncological diseases is aimed at reducing the number of different diagnostic procedures and single-step obtaining a large amount of information from one modality. This requirement is met by the hybrid imaging modalities and the benefit from their implementation in daily oncological practice is corroborated by the increasing number of this type of diagnostic centers. Cancer diseases are among the first with social significance of mortality and one of the ways to reduce this statistic, after prevention, is early diagnosis, accurate staging, reliable monitoring of the chosen therapy and follow-up. 18F-FDG PET/CT is a hybrid system that covers many of the shortcomings of each of its constituent parts and by monitoring the metabolism and accumulation of the glucose isotopic analogue it gives sufficiently precise information about the morphology and metabolism of the primary malignancy, loco-regional distribution and secondary deposits. The ability of hybrid technology to characterize bone metastases regardless of their morphological characteristics gives it a priority over the choice of several other complementary methods for obtaining comprehensive diagnostic information. Application of the method has already yielded results by the choice of the best treatment according to the oncological stage and the change, if necessary, of the unsuitable therapeutic scheme. (authors)

  3. 18F-FDG PET/CT is Useful for pretreatment Assessment of the Histopathologic Type of Thymic Epithelial Tumors

    This study was performed to assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) of PET/computed tomography (CT) for distinguishing thymic epithelial tumors according to World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. We analyzed a total of 45 patients (range, 29-75 years of age; mean, 55 years) with pathologically confirmed thymic epithelial tumors who underwent pretreatment 18F-FDG PET or PET/CT between November 2003 and October 2009. The size, visual grading of uptake value, peak standardized uptake value (SUVpeak), uptake pattern, and contour of each tumor, and associated findings on PET or PET/CT, were analyzed relative to the three simplified WHO subgroups: lee-invasive thymomas (types A and AB), more-invasive thymomas (types B1, B2, and B3) and thymic carcinomas. We statistically assessed the relationship of 18F-FDG PET or PET/CT findings with these simplified subgroups. Of the 45 patients, ten had less-invasive thymomas, 23 had more-invasive thymomas, and 12 had thymic carcinomas. The SUVpeak of the less- and more-invasive thymomas were significantly lower than those of thymic carcinomas (p18F-FDG PET or PET/CT differed significantly by histologic subgroups. Pretreatment evaluation with 18F-FDG PET or PET/CT might be helpful in differentiating subgroups of thymic epithelial tumors.

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in Primary AL Hepatic Amyloidosis Associated with Multiple Myeloma

    Son, Youn Mi; Bak, Cheol Hee [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Young; Cheon, Mi Ju; Kim, Young Eun; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    We report here on a rare case of primary AL hepatic amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma in a 64-year-old woman. The patient was referred for evaluating her progressive jaundice and right upper quadrant pain. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) showed diffusely and markedly increased {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the liver. Although there have been several case studies showing positive {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in pulmonary amyloidosis, to the best of our knowledge, the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT findings of hepatic amyloidosis or primary hepatic amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma have not been reported previously.

  5. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    Vees Hansjörg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. Methods F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5 or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5. The gross tumor volume (GTV was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT. In addition, the GTV was delineated using the signal-to-background (SBR ratio-based adaptive thresholding technique (GTVSBR. Overlap analysis were conducted to assess geographic mismatches between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Inter- and intra-observer variability were also assessed. Results The mean GTVCT (43.65 cm3 was larger than the mean GTVPET/CT (33.06 cm3, p = 0.02. In 6 patients, GTVPET/CT added substantial tumor extension outside the GTVCT even though 90.4% of the GTVPET/CT was included in the GTVCT and 30.2% of the GTVCT was found outside the GTVPET/CT. The inter- and intra-observer variability was not significantly reduced with the inclusion of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.23 and p = 0.18, respectively. The GTVSBR was smaller than GTVCT p ≤ 0.005 and GTVPET/CT p ≤ 0.005. Conclusions The use of 18F-FDG PET/CT images for target volume delineation of recurrent or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer alters the GTV in the majority of patients compared to standard CT-definition. The use of SBR-based auto-delineation showed significantly smaller GTVs. The use of PET/CT based target volume delineation may improve the accuracy of RT treatment planning in gynaecologic cancer.

  6. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the patients with cancer of unknown primary

    Objective :The prognosis of the patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is poor. Detection of the primary tumor could determine the treatment strategy, improve the prognosis and the survival rate. The study was to assess the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the patients with CUP. Methods:Seventy patients with CUP underwent a whole-body PET/CT imaging study. All the images were blindly interpreted by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. The final diagnosis was based on pathology and follow-up for more than 3 months. Results :The primary tumor site was correctly identified by PET/CT in 35 patients (35/70, 50%), 1 false negative and 1 false positive cases were encountered. In 33 patients (33/70, 47.1%), the primary tumor site was not localized. In addition, PET/CT scan identified further unexpected metastases in 36 patients, patient management was changed in 39 patients (39/70, 55.7%). Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT is a useful tool in the assessment and initial stages of the management process. (authors)

  7. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of unexpected extracardiac septic embolisms in patients with suspected cardiac endocarditis

    Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Nanni, Cristina; Morigi, Joshua James; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Cardiology, Bologna (Italy); Trapani, Filippo; Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Viale, Pier Luigi [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Infective Diseases, Bologna (Italy); Ferretti, Alice; Rubello, Domenico [Azienda Ospedaliera S. Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, Neuroradiology, Medical Physics, Rovigo (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Acute infective endocarditis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Its outcome strongly depends on systemic embolization and extracardiac infections. When present, these conditions usually lead to a more aggressive therapeutic approach. However, the diagnosis of peripheral septic embolism is very challenging. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has proven to be accurate for the detection of inflammatory diseases and occult infections. The aim of this study was to assess the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of extracardiac embolisms in the evaluation of patients with suspected valvular endocarditis (VE). Seventy-one patients with suspected infective endocarditis, enrolled between June 2010 and December 2012, underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with the standard procedure on a dedicated PET/CT scanner. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. Of the 71 patients with suspicion of infective endocarditis, we found unexpected extracardiac findings in 17 patients (24 %) without any clinical suspicion. Extracardiac findings were subsequently evaluated with other imaging procedures. PET/CT detected unexpected extra sites of infection in 24 % of cases, leading to changes in therapeutic management in a very relevant percentage of patients. These findings may have important therapeutic implications. (orig.)

  8. Molecular Imaging of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT: Comparison With 18F-FDG.

    Derlin, Thorsten; Jonigk, Danny; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT for characterization of postinfarct myocardial inflammation. Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT incidentally demonstrated marked CXCR4 expression in a space-occupying lesion in the right upper lobe. Corresponding F-FDG PET/CT showed increased metabolism, and subsequent biopsy revealed non-small cell lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CXCR4 was highly expressed on tumor cells. Ga-Pentixafor is a novel CXCR4-targeted probe for PET imaging of CXCR4-positive tumors and holds promise for tumor staging and prognostic stratification. CXCR4-targeted radionuclide therapy represents a therapy option in metastasized diseases. PMID:26756098

  9. The Value of Extra-lung Lesions on 18F-FDG PET/CT 
in Improving Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

    Baoming MI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective 18F-FDG PET/CT has several shortcomings in discriminating between lung carcinoma and pulmonary benign lesions. The aims of the present study is to explore the value of extra-lung lesions on 18F-FDG PET/CT image in the diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods A total of 126 suspected lung cancer patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. Preliminary diagnoses were based on the PET characteristics, SUVmean value, and CT characteristics of the lesions in the lung, and the diagnoses were modified based on the detected extra-lung lesions. The difference between the two methods and their disparity were calculated. Results Extra-lung lesions were identified on the PET/CT image in 81 patients; extra-lung metastasis modified 13 probable malignancies to affirmative malignancy and 1 probable malignancy to benign lesion. Non-metastasis modified 2 probable malignancies to affirmative malignancy and 1 probable malignancy to benign lesion. Fifteen were correct, whereas 2 were misdiagnosed. The diagnoses modification rate was 13.5% (17/126, and the modified diagnoses accuracy is 88.2% (15/17. Conclusion Extra-lung lesions demonstrated on 18F-FDG PET/CT improved the diagnostic accuracy of lung cancer. Tuberculosis was identified as the most important reason for false positive diagnoses after modification by extra-lung lesions.

  10. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in thyroid nodules

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for thyroid nodules. Methods: From January 2008 to May 2012, 34 patients (13 males, 21 females; age range: 21-73 years, mean (53.00± 12.57) years) with thyroid nodules on 18F-FDG PET/CT and with histopathological results were retrospectively analyzed. From January 2011 to December 2011, 20 cases (9 males, 11 females; age range: 40-55 years, mean (45.00±4.72) years) were selected as control group. Wilcoxon rank sum test and ROC analysis (AUC ≥0.7 was considered the standard of medium-high accuracy) were used. PET/CT features taken to suggest malignant thyroid nodules were: focally high uptake on PET, indistinct boundary or heterogeneous density on CT with punctuate, round or curved calcifications, or with hypermetabolic cervical lymph nodes as ancillary supportive findings of metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of PET/CT for diagnosing thyroid nodules were calculated. Results: (1) There were 18 patients with malignant and 16 with benign thyroid nodules. The SUVmax of benign, malignant nodules and normal controls were 7.59±8.69, 5.75±4.48 and 1.38±0.57, respectively. The differences between malignant thyroid nodules and controls, between benign nodules and controls were significant (u=3.553, 3.408, both P<0.01). There was no significant difference between benign and malignant thyroid nodules (u =0.207, P>0.05). (2) The AUC for the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules by ROC analysis was 0.557 (<0.70). (3) The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value,negative predictive value and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules were 72.2% (13/18), 75.0% (12/16), 76.5% (13/17), 70.6% (12/17) and 73.5% (25/34), respectively. Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET/CT has limited value for the differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules based alone on the

  11. Is screening 18F FDG PET/CT scan appropriate in unknown primary with rising tumour marker and normal conventional imaging?

    Introduction: Present-day medical practice generally assumes that early detection of cancer offers the best chance of a good outcome. Tumor markers are used in oncology to help determine the presence of cancer. An elevated level of a tumor marker can indicate cancer, however there can often also be other causes of the elevation. Generally serum tumor markers are not recommended as a screening tool for the presence of malignancy, especially in an asymptomatic population. This is related to the lack of desired specificity of tumor markers in general as well as the low prevalence of cancer in the general population. With few exceptions, the measurement of serum tumor marker in condition of high incidence of cancer in population or with clinical and physical examination are of benefit. A lot of patients who have a high level of a screening tumor marker become anxious about being affected by cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether PET/ CT scan is of advantage to detect a primary cancer in this condition. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a database of 257 patients who underwent PET/CT between July 2006 and February 2007 at the National cyclotron and PET center at Chulabhorn Cancer Centre. Patients referred for rising tumor marker levels and unknown primary cancer are included in this study. Seven patients matched the inclusion criteria and were reviewed for age, gender, tumor marker levels, anatomical imaging finding (CT and MRI) and PET finding. Result: The result showed that PET/CT was normal in 5 cases and show that PET/CT did not provide additional information over CT. In two cases PET was positive: case no. 6 and Case no. 7. Case no. 6 was still normal after a clinical follow up of 6 months. In case no. 7, PET showed the presence of a glucose avid lesion in the right lung. Contrast CT confirmed the presence of a blood clot and the patient was treated with warfarin and claxane. The clinical follow up showed improvement. The high levels of serum Ca

  12. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in restaging of patients with recurrent malignant melanoma

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has increased in recent years. Patients with familial melanoma and a personal history of melanoma have a very high risk for the development of recurrence at other sites even after adequate treatment which demands a non invasive imaging modality for the early and accurate restaging of the recurrence of melanoma. We evaluated the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in restaging of patients with recurrent malignant melanoma. It is found to be an sensitive tool for restaging recurrent malignant melanoma

  13. 3D tumour spheroids as a model to assess the suitability of [18F]FDG-PET as an early indicator of response to PI3K inhibition

    Background: [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) is widely used to monitor response to therapy in the clinic and has, more recently, been proposed as an early marker of long term response. This relies on the assumption that a change in glucose consumption parallels a reduction in viability and long term growth potential. However, cells may utilise substrates other than glucose and as many therapeutics interfere with glucose metabolism directly, it is entirely plausible that a positive [18F]FDG-PET response may be unrelated to long term growth. Furthermore, changes in metabolism and proliferation may take place on different temporal scales, thus restricting the time window in which [18F]FDG-PET is predictive. The PI3K oncogenic signalling pathway is a master regulator of multiple cellular processes including glucose metabolism, proliferation and cell survival. Inhibition of PI3K has been shown to reduce [18F]FDG uptake in several tumour types but the relative influence of this pathway on glucose metabolism and proliferation is not fully established. Aim: We proposed to (i) assess the suitability of [18F]FDG as a tracer for measuring response to PI3K inhibition and (ii) determine the optimum imaging schedule, in vitro. We used multicellular tumour spheroids, an excellent 3D in vitro model of avascular tumours, to investigate the effects of the PI3K inhibitors, NVP-BKM120 and NVP-BEZ235, on [18F]FDG uptake and its relation to 3D growth. Methods: Spheroids were prepared from two cell lines with a constitutively active PI3K/Akt pathway, EMT6 (highly proliferative mouse mammary) and FaDu (moderately proliferate human nasopharyngeal). Treatment consisted of a 24 h exposure to either inhibitor, and growth was monitored over the following 7 days. To mimic potential imaging regimens with [18F]FDG-PET, average [18F]FDG uptake per viable cell was measured (a) directly following the 24 h exposure, (b) following an additional 24 h recovery period

  14. The value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for T and N staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    Objective: It has long been recognized that clinical and pathological stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was related to the prognosis of the patients. The current study was designed to compare the diagnostic values of 18F-FDG PET/CT versus CT alone in assessing the T and N staging of NSCLC. Methods: Thirty cases of pathological proven NSCLC underwent both 18F-FDG PET/CT and chest CT before surgical operation. The diagnostic value of PET/CT versus CT in T and N staging was compared according to the findings in post-surgical pathology. Results: In T staging, the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/ CT and CT were 86.7% and 73.3%. In a total of 115 intra-thoracic nodal stations, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/CT and CT were 68.8%, 95.2%, 87.8% and 43.8%, 88.0%, 75.7% respectively, the accuracy of the two methods had significant difference (P0.05). Conclusion: Compared with CT, 18F-FDG PET/CT fused imaging was proved better in assessing the T and N staging of NSCLC, particularly in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes involvement. (authors)

  15. Fibrous dysplasia mimicking bone metastasis on both bone scintigraphy and 18F FDG PET CT: Diagnostic dilemma in a patient with breast cancer

    Bone is the most common distant site to which breast cancer metastasizes. Commonly used imaging modalities for imaging bone metastasis are bone scintigraphy, plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Although bone scintigraphy gas high sensitivity for detecting bone metastasis, its specificity is low. This is because of the fact that bone scintigraphy images secondary changes in bone rather than just tumor cells 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG) PET CT, on the other hand, directly images the tumor cells' glucose metabolism. Unfortunately, similar to bone scintigraphy, benign bone conditions can also show increased 18F FDG uptake on PET CT, and PET positive asymptomatic fibrous dysplasia can be misinterpreted as a metastasis. Fibrous dysplasia of bone has wide skeletal distribution, with variability of 18F FDG uptake and CT appearance. It is therefore important to recognize the characteristics of this skeletal dysplasia, to allow differentiation from skeletal metastasis. Bone lesions with 18F FDG uptake need to be carefully interpreted when evaluating patients with known malignancy. In doubtful cases, fibrous dysplasia should be given as a differential diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis may be warranted, as highlighted in the present case

  16. Fibrous dysplasia mimicking bone metastasis on both bone scintigraphy and {sup 18}F FDG PET CT: Diagnostic dilemma in a patient with breast cancer

    KC, Sud Hir Suman; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Har Man Deep; Bal, Chand Rasekhar; Kumar, Rake Sh [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2012-12-15

    Bone is the most common distant site to which breast cancer metastasizes. Commonly used imaging modalities for imaging bone metastasis are bone scintigraphy, plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Although bone scintigraphy gas high sensitivity for detecting bone metastasis, its specificity is low. This is because of the fact that bone scintigraphy images secondary changes in bone rather than just tumor cells {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F FDG) PET CT, on the other hand, directly images the tumor cells' glucose metabolism. Unfortunately, similar to bone scintigraphy, benign bone conditions can also show increased {sup 18}F FDG uptake on PET CT, and PET positive asymptomatic fibrous dysplasia can be misinterpreted as a metastasis. Fibrous dysplasia of bone has wide skeletal distribution, with variability of {sup 18}F FDG uptake and CT appearance. It is therefore important to recognize the characteristics of this skeletal dysplasia, to allow differentiation from skeletal metastasis. Bone lesions with {sup 18}F FDG uptake need to be carefully interpreted when evaluating patients with known malignancy. In doubtful cases, fibrous dysplasia should be given as a differential diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis may be warranted, as highlighted in the present case.

  17. The role of '18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting small intestine adenocarcinoma

    Objective: To evaluate the value of whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIA). Methods: A retrospective study of 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed on 29 cases (male 17,female 12) of SIA, 21 cases of small intestine lymphoma (SIL) (male 15, female 6) and 10 cases of small intestine tuberculosis (SIT) (male 4, female 6). Visual and semi-quantitative methods (SUVmax) were used to summarize and analyse the 18F-FDG PET/CT results. One-way analysis of variance and χ2 test were used to analyze the data. Results: (1) 18F-FDG PET/CT for SIA showed a partially conglomerate pattern of hypermetabolic small bowel masses with nodular configurations. A typical SIL showed a partially annular abnormal growth with aggregated foci of radioactivity. SIT lesions were usually in form of stripes and/or nodules with high metabolic foci or lesions with 'skipped' distribution. The SUVmax of SIA (8.44±3.82) was significantly lower than that of SIL (11.54±4.02; F=86.96, t=2.77, both P<0.01), but not significantly different when compared with SIT (8.61±2.99; t=0.11, P>0.05). (2) The incidence rates of peri-lesion lymph node enlargement in SIA, SIL and SIT were 72.41% (21/29), 85.71% (18/21) and 70.00% (7/10), respectively (χ2=1.50, P>0.05). The SUVmax of peri-lesion lymph nodes in SIA (5.59±2.86) was significantly lower than that of SIL (11.10±5.72; F=56.56, t=3.85, both P<0.01), but was not significantly different when compared with SIT (5.63± 3.36; t=0.30, P>0.05). The detection rate of PET/CT on peri-lesion lymph node enlargement of SIA was higher than CT (41.38%, 12/29; χ2=5.69, P<0.05). (3) The incidence rate of extra-intestinal metastases was 55.17% (16/29) in SIA, and the most common metastatic sites were liver,bone and adrenal gland. The incidence rate of extra-intestinal lesions was 66.67% (14/21) in SIL, most commonly presented as widespread multifocal nodal permeation. Extra abdominal tuberculous loci were found in 80.00% (8/10) of SIT

  18. 18F FDG Uptake of Human Testis on PET/CT: Correlation with Age, Sex Hormones, and Vasectomy

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate glucose metabolism of normal human testis on 18F FDG PET/CT and to assess possible correlation among age, the serum levels of sex hormones, and vasectomy. 18F FDG PET/CT was performed in 66 normal healthy men (50.8±13.6 years, range 22-81), and mean standard uptake values (SUV) of 18F FDG in testis and adductor muscle were measured. Testis muscle SUV ratios (T/M ratios) were calculated. Serum levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estradiol, and of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured. We searched for correlations between T/M ratios and age and the serum concentrations of sex hormones. 18F FDG PET/CT was also performed in 32 vasectomized men (55.7±7.8 years, range 38-71) and 52 nonvasectomized men (55.4±11.6 years, range 37-72). Mean SUVs of testis and adductor muscle were measured, and T/M ratios were calculated. A significant age related decline was found in T/M ratio (r=-0.509, p18F FDG uptake may have attributed to testicular function and testicular histology. Our findings may have important implications for the interpretation of testicular 18F FDG uptake in the normal adult population.

  19. Non-malignant 18F-FDG uptake in the thorax by positron emission tomography computed tomography fusion imaging

    Fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been used exclusively to diagnose malignancies. However, increased FDG uptake is not always limited to malignant tissue. Many false positive findings for PET have been reported. Moreover, the use of PET/CT may allow the reassessment of previously recognized patterns of physiological bio-distribution of a tracer. In this report we demonstrate the physiological FDG uptake of normal structures in the thorax using PET/CT imaging and illustrate many benign pathological conditions with standardized uptake values greater than 2.5

  20. Detection and quantification of focal uptake in head and neck tumours: 18F-FDG PET/MR versus PET/CT

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Rager, Olivier; Poncet, Antoine; Delattre, Bénédicte M. A.; Ratib, Osman; Becker, Christoph D.; Dulguerov, Pavel; Dulguerov, Nicolas; Zaidi, Habib; Becker, Minerva

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our objectives were to assess the quality of PET images and coregistered anatomic images obtained with PET/MR, to evaluate the detection of focal uptake and SUV, and to compare these findings with those of PET/CT in patients with head and neck tumours. Methods The study group comprised 32 consecutive patients with malignant head and neck tumours who underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MR and PET/CT. PET images were reconstructed using the attenuation correction sequence for PET/MR and CT...

  1. Dose-response relationship in cyclophosphamide-treated B-cell lymphoma xenografts monitored with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET

    Brepoels, Lieselot; Saint-Hubert, Marijke de; Mortelmans, Luc [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, Sigrid [University Hospital Antwerpen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Edegem (Belgium); Verhoef, Gregor [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Hematology, Leuven (Belgium); Balzarini, Jan [KU Leuven, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Leuven (Belgium); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Although [{sup 18}F]FDG PET can measure therapy response sooner and more accurately than morphological imaging techniques, there is still some debate as to whether [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake really reflects changes in the viable cell fraction. In this study changes in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were investigated in a lymphoma model at several time-points after treatment and with different doses of chemotherapy. Data were analysed in terms of several parameters. SCID mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 5 x 10{sup 6} Daudi cells in the right thigh. One group was not treated (control group). The other groups received cyclophosphamide 75 mg/kg (low-dose group), 125 mg/kg (medium-dose group) and 175 mg/kg (high-dose group) on day 0. Sequential [{sup 18}F]FDG small-animal PET ({mu}PET) scans were performed on days 0, 2, 6, 9, 13 and 16 after treatment. The mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumour volume (Vol{sub metab}) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were calculated. A significant decrease in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was observed on day 2 in the medium-dose and high-dose groups and on day 6 in the low-dose group, all preceding morphological changes. SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} formed a plateau from day 6 to day 9, corresponding to the known influx of inflammatory cells. No obvious plateau was observed with TLG which was found to be the most sensitive parameter clearly differentiating the low-dose group from the medium- and high-dose groups early after therapy. [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was able to reflect the dose-response relationship for cyclophosphamide. TLG was the best parameter for dose-related response assessment in this tumour model. (orig.)

  2. Value of the dual phase 18F-FDG PET/CT with oral diuretic in the diagnosis of bladder cancer before therapy

    Background: PET with 18F-FDG has been considered of limited value for the detection of bladder cancer because of the urinary excretion of the tracer. Purpose: To investigate the clinical value of dual phase 18F-FDG PET/CT with oral diuretic in the diagnosis of bladder cancer. Methods: 107 patients with suspected bladder cancer were enrolled in the present study from May, 2003 to May, 2012. Each patient underwent the whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT scans routinely. After that, all patients received the forced diuresis by orally administration of furosemide (40 mg) and drinking a lot of water. Two hours later, after several times of urination, the patients underwent an additional delayed pelvic PET/CT scans. The intravesical radioactivity was compared between the routine and delayed the scans and the visualization of the tumor was evaluated. The diagnostic efficacy was determined based on the pathological examinations and the clinical following-up. Results: With the forced diuresis, intravesical 18F-FDG activity decreased significantly in 96.3% of the patients. The lesions on the wall of urinary bladder were visualized clearly in the delayed PET images, which weren't seen in the rout/ne PET images. 18F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 75 patients who all then received the operation. 69 patients were diagnosed pathologically to have the bladder cancer and 6 patients to have benign diseases. 18F-FDG PET/CT was negative in another 32 patients. Four patients of them were then diagnosed to be bladder cancer. Another 28 patients were clinically followed up more than 6 months and none of them was found to have bladder cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the dual phase PET/CT imaging for diagnosing the bladder cancer were 94.5%(69/73), 82.4%(28/34) and 90.7%(97/107), respectively. Conclusion: The forced diuresis using oral furosemide can significantly reduce the intravesical radioactivity and improve the detectability of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the bladder cancer

  3. The method and efficacy of support vector machine classifiers based on texture features and multi-resolution histogram from {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT images for the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer

    Gao, Xuan [Center of PET/CT, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, The Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Chu, Chunyu [HIT–INSA Sino French Research Centre for Biomedical Imaging, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Li, Yingci; Lu, Peiou; Wang, Wenzhi [Center of PET/CT, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, The Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Liu, Wanyu [HIT–INSA Sino French Research Centre for Biomedical Imaging, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Yu, Lijuan, E-mail: yulijuan2003@126.com [Center of PET/CT, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, The Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Three support vector machine classifiers were constructed from PET-CT images. • The areas under the ROC curve for SVM1, SVM2, and SVM3 were 0.689, 0.579, and 0.685, respectively. • The areas under curves for maximum short diameter and SUV{sub max} were 0.684 and 0.652, respectively. • The algorithm based on SVM was potential in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. - Abstract: Objectives: In clinical practice, image analysis is dependent on simply visual perception and the diagnostic efficacy of this analysis pattern is limited for mediastinal lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer. In order to improve diagnostic efficacy, we developed a new computer-based algorithm and tested its diagnostic efficacy. Methods: 132 consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT examination before treatment. After all data were imported into the database of an on-line medical image analysis platform, the diagnostic efficacy of visual analysis was first evaluated without knowing pathological results, and the maximum short diameter and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were measured. Then lymph nodes were segmented manually. Three classifiers based on support vector machine (SVM) were constructed from CT, PET, and combined PET-CT images, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of SVM classifiers was obtained and evaluated. Results: According to ROC curves, the areas under curves for maximum short diameter and SUV{sub max} were 0.684 and 0.652, respectively. The areas under the ROC curve for SVM1, SVM2, and SVM3 were 0.689, 0.579, and 0.685, respectively. Conclusion: The algorithm based on SVM was potential in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes.

  4. The method and efficacy of support vector machine classifiers based on texture features and multi-resolution histogram from 18F-FDG PET-CT images for the evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer

    Highlights: • Three support vector machine classifiers were constructed from PET-CT images. • The areas under the ROC curve for SVM1, SVM2, and SVM3 were 0.689, 0.579, and 0.685, respectively. • The areas under curves for maximum short diameter and SUVmax were 0.684 and 0.652, respectively. • The algorithm based on SVM was potential in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. - Abstract: Objectives: In clinical practice, image analysis is dependent on simply visual perception and the diagnostic efficacy of this analysis pattern is limited for mediastinal lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer. In order to improve diagnostic efficacy, we developed a new computer-based algorithm and tested its diagnostic efficacy. Methods: 132 consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination before treatment. After all data were imported into the database of an on-line medical image analysis platform, the diagnostic efficacy of visual analysis was first evaluated without knowing pathological results, and the maximum short diameter and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured. Then lymph nodes were segmented manually. Three classifiers based on support vector machine (SVM) were constructed from CT, PET, and combined PET-CT images, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of SVM classifiers was obtained and evaluated. Results: According to ROC curves, the areas under curves for maximum short diameter and SUVmax were 0.684 and 0.652, respectively. The areas under the ROC curve for SVM1, SVM2, and SVM3 were 0.689, 0.579, and 0.685, respectively. Conclusion: The algorithm based on SVM was potential in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymph nodes

  5. The Clinical Value of Whole-Body MR Imaging Combined with Whole Body Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Background Body Signal Suppression (DWIBS)for Detecting Metastasis Lesions: Compared with 18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT%全身扩散加权成像联合全身MR成像与18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT对恶性肿瘤转移灶诊断价值的对比研究

    张秀莉; 李绍东; 胡春峰; 程广军; 路欣; 徐凯

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过与18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT作对比,评估全身扩散加权成像(DWIBS)联合全身MRI在恶性肿瘤转移灶中的诊断价值.方法 对71例经病理学证实为恶性肿瘤患者行DWIBS和全身MRI,并于3周内行18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT检查.分4组进行研究,即A组:DWIBS;B组:全身MRI;C组:DWIBS联合全身MRI;D组:18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT.分别计算4组检查方法对病灶显示的敏感性、特异性、准确性、阳性预测值及阴性预测值,并对C组与D组作一致性检验.按部位分别计数C组和D组的全身转移病灶数.结果 C组与D组的诊断准确性较A组与B组高(P<0.05),且C组与D组的符合率较高(P=0.688,K值=0.827).对肝脏转移灶,C组较D组的检出率高(分别为96%、72%;P <0.05);对肺转移灶,D组较C组的检出率高(分别为82.6%、94.2%;P<0.05);对骨骼转移灶,C组与D组的检出率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).C组对脊柱的成骨性转移、脑内转移灶较D组更具优势.结论 DWIBS与全身MRI联合应用技术在恶性肿瘤转移灶显示方面具有较高的准确性,尤其在脊柱成骨性、头颅、肝转移方面较18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT有优势,而在肺转移方面不如18F-FDG SPECT-PET/CT.

  6. Low-order non-spatial effects dominate second-order spatial effects in the texture quantifier analysis of 18F-FDG-PET images.

    Frank J Brooks

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in applying image texture quantifiers to assess the intra-tumor heterogeneity observed in FDG-PET images of various cancers. Use of these quantifiers as prognostic indicators of disease outcome and/or treatment response has yielded inconsistent results. We study the general applicability of some well-established texture quantifiers to the image data unique to FDG-PET.We first created computer-simulated test images with statistical properties consistent with clinical image data for cancers of the uterine cervix. We specifically isolated second-order statistical effects from low-order effects and analyzed the resulting variation in common texture quantifiers in response to contrived image variations. We then analyzed the quantifiers computed for FIGOIIb cervical cancers via receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves and via contingency table analysis of detrended quantifier values.We found that image texture quantifiers depend strongly on low-effects such as tumor volume and SUV distribution. When low-order effects are controlled, the image texture quantifiers tested were not able to discern only the second-order effects. Furthermore, the results of clinical tumor heterogeneity studies might be tunable via choice of patient population analyzed.Some image texture quantifiers are strongly affected by factors distinct from the second-order effects researchers ostensibly seek to assess via those quantifiers.

  7. (18)F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications.

    Manca, Gianpiero; Vanzi, Eleonora; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco; Grassetto, Gaia; Wong, Ka Kit; Perkins, Alan C; Colletti, Patrick M; Volterrani, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. (18)F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited "quantification" to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of "true" quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical (18)F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and "personalized" quantification techniques. PMID:26780912

  8. 18F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications

    18F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. 18F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of 18F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited ''quantification'' to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of ''true'' quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical 18F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and ''personalized'' quantification techniques. (orig.)

  9. Clinical significance of dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET imaging in resectable non-small cell lung cancer

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of pulmonary lesions on dual-time-point (DTP) fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has been shown to be useful for differentiation between malignant and non-malignant pulmonary lesions, and also to be of value for intrathoracic nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, a few NSCLC lesions have been found to show decreased FDG uptake on delayed images, and the significance of this finding remains ...

  10. Thoracic staging of non-small-cell lung cancer using integrated 18F-FDG PET/MR imaging: diagnostic value of different MR sequences

    To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences in simultaneous PET/MR imaging for T staging in non-small-cell lung cancer in relation to histopathology. The study included 28 patients who underwent dedicated thoracic PET/MR imaging before tumour resection. Local tumour staging was performed separately by three readers with each of the following MR sequences together with PET: transverse T2 BLADE, transverse non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, coronal T2 HASTE, and coronal TrueFISP. The staging results were compared with histopathology after resection as the reference standard. Differences in the accuracy of T staging among the MR sequences were evaluated using McNemar's test. Due to multiple testing, Bonferroni correction was applied to prevent accumulation of α errors; p < 0.0024 was considered statistically significant. Compared with histopathology, T-staging accuracy was 69 % with T2 BLADE, 68 % with T2 HASTE, 59 % with contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, 57 % with TrueFISP, 50 % with non-enhanced T1 FLASH, and 45 % and 48 % with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, respectively. Staging accuracy with T2 BLADE was significantly higher than with non-enhanced T1 FLASH and with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientations (p < 0.0024). T2 HASTE had a significantly higher T-staging accuracy than transverse T1 3D-Dixon-VIBE (p < 0.0024). Transverse T2 BLADE images provide the highest accuracy for local tumour staging and should therefore be included in dedicated thoracic PET/MR protocols. As T1 3D Dixon VIBE images acquired for attenuation correction performed significantly worse, this sequence cannot be considered sufficiently accurate for local tumour staging in the thorax. (orig.)

  11. Thoracic staging of non-small-cell lung cancer using integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging: diagnostic value of different MR sequences

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Buchbender, Christian; Rubbert, Christian; Hild, Florian; Antoch, Gerald; Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt; Ruhlmann, Verena [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Koehler, Jens [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Medical Oncology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes; Wetter, Axel [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Reis, Henning [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Pathology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences in simultaneous PET/MR imaging for T staging in non-small-cell lung cancer in relation to histopathology. The study included 28 patients who underwent dedicated thoracic PET/MR imaging before tumour resection. Local tumour staging was performed separately by three readers with each of the following MR sequences together with PET: transverse T2 BLADE, transverse non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, coronal T2 HASTE, and coronal TrueFISP. The staging results were compared with histopathology after resection as the reference standard. Differences in the accuracy of T staging among the MR sequences were evaluated using McNemar's test. Due to multiple testing, Bonferroni correction was applied to prevent accumulation of α errors; p < 0.0024 was considered statistically significant. Compared with histopathology, T-staging accuracy was 69 % with T2 BLADE, 68 % with T2 HASTE, 59 % with contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, 57 % with TrueFISP, 50 % with non-enhanced T1 FLASH, and 45 % and 48 % with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, respectively. Staging accuracy with T2 BLADE was significantly higher than with non-enhanced T1 FLASH and with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientations (p < 0.0024). T2 HASTE had a significantly higher T-staging accuracy than transverse T1 3D-Dixon-VIBE (p < 0.0024). Transverse T2 BLADE images provide the highest accuracy for local tumour staging and should therefore be included in dedicated thoracic PET/MR protocols. As T1 3D Dixon VIBE images acquired for attenuation correction performed significantly worse, this sequence cannot be considered sufficiently accurate for local tumour staging in the thorax. (orig.)

  12. Retroperitoneal Bronchogenic Cyst Presenting Paraadrenal Tumor Incidentally Detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Yoon, Ye Ri; Choi, Jiyoun; Lee, Sang Mi; Kim, Yeo Joo; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Lee, Jeong Won; Jeon, Youn Soo

    2014-01-01

    A follow-up 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT scan of a 57-year-old asymptomatic male who had undergone total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer revealed a 5.0 × 4.0-cm, well-defined, ovoid-shaped mass around the left adrenal gland without definite FDG uptake. On the adrenal CT scan, the left paraadrenal tumor showed high attenuation on the precontrast scan without enhancement. The average Hounsfield unit (HU) was 58.1 on the precontrast scan and 58.4 on the postcontrast scan. The patient...

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in inflammation of unknown origin: a cost-effectiveness pilot-study

    Balink, H. [Medical Center Leeuwarden, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Tan, S.S. [Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Veeger, N.J.G.M. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Holleman, F. [Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eck-Smit, B.L.F. van; Bennink, R.J.; Verberne, H.J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Patients with increased inflammatory parameters, nonspecific signs and symptoms without fever and without a diagnosis after a variety of diagnostic procedures are a diagnostic dilemma and are referred to as having inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). The objective of this pilot study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of a diagnostic work-up/strategy with and without {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with IUO using a published dataset as a reference. IUO patients without {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (group A, 46 patients) and IUO patients referred for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (group B, 46 patients) were selected. IUO was defined as the combination of nonspecific signs and symptoms and a prolonged erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), defined as ≥age/2 in men and ≥(age + 10)/2 in women (ESR in millimetres per hour and age in years), and/or C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥15 mg/l. The costs of all tests and procedures and the number of hospitalization days in each patient to reach a diagnosis were calculated using current Dutch tariffs. In group A a diagnosis was reached in 14 of the 46 patients. The mean cost per patient of all the diagnostic procedures was EUR2,051, and including the cost of hospitalization was EUR12,614. In group B a diagnosis was reached in 32 of the 46 patients. The mean cost per patient of all the diagnostic procedures was EUR1,821, significantly lower than in group A (p < 0.0002), and including the cost of hospitalization was EUR5,298. In IUO {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has the potential to become a cost-effective routine imaging technique indicating the direction for further diagnostic decisions thereby allowing unnecessary, invasive and expensive diagnostic investigations to be avoided and possibly the duration of hospitalization to be reduced. However, a prospective multicentre ''bottom-up microcosting'' cost-effectiveness study is warranted before these preliminary data can be extrapolated to clinical practice. (orig.)

  14. Metabolic and anatomic characteristics of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Objective: The aims were to investigate the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in the diagnosis of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and its metabolic and anatomic features in differentiating from non-BAC adenocarcinoma (non-BAC AC ). Methods: This was a retrospective 18F-FDG PET/CT study on a consecutive series of 87 patients (32 BAC, 55 non-BAC AC) with 110 pathology-proven lesions. The maximum standardized uptake value ( SUVmax) was calculated for all lesions. Tumor's location, morphology and margins, internal structures were analyzed on CT. Statistical analysis compared the mean SUVmax between the two groups, analysed the relationship between tumor subtype and features on CT and compared the diagnostic accuracies with PET alone, CT alone and PET/CT. The t-test, McNemar test, Fisher exact test were used to analyze the data using SPSS 12.0. Results: Significant differences were found between mean SUVmax in a total of 47 lesions with BAC and 63 lesions with non-BAC AC (1.51 ± 0.17 vs 6.28 ± 3.04, t=-10.374, P 18F-FDG activity. (authors)

  15. Correlation of breast cancer subtypes, based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2, with functional imaging parameters from {sup 68}Ga-RGD PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook; Jeong, Jae Min; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, In Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-Do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sunjoo [Dankook University, Department of Molecular Biology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    /PR-,Her2- subgroup versus the other subgroups. There was no correlation between FDG and RGD PET parameters in the overall group. Only the ER/PR-,Her2- subgroup showed a significant positive correlation between FDG and RGD PET parameters (r = 0.59, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub max}). {sup 68}Ga-RGD and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT are promising functional imaging modalities for predicting biomarkers and molecular phenotypes in breast cancer patients. (orig.)

  16. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Wartski, Myriam [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Cherel, Pascal [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Radiologie, Saint-Cloud (France); Bellet, Dominique [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de medecine, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2013-08-15

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 {+-} 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 {+-} 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 {+-} 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  17. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 ± 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 ± 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 ± 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  18. The clinical value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of the pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of the pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis. Methods: A total of 37 patients with pleural effusion or ascites of unknown origin were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent whole body 18F-FDG PET-CT. The 18F-FDG distributional pattern and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of lesions were analyzed. The final diagnosis of all cases were established based on the results of catamnestic analysis,tumor markers assay, histopathology or clinical follow-up. Results: Of all the 37 cases, 29 had positive findings on 18F-FDG PET-CT,of which 26 were pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis and 3 were pleural or peritoneal tuberculosis; 8 patients had negative findings on 18F-FDG PET-CT, of which 6 were pleural or peritoneal benign lesions and 2 were peritoneal carcinomatosis. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of peritoneal carcinomatosis were 92.9%, 66.7%, 86.5%, 89.7% and 75.0% respectively. The SUVmax between the ring-form and strip-type lesions were significantly different (5.97±3.39 vs. 2.89±0.92, t=2.93, P<0.05). Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET-CT is simple,noninvasive and high sensitive in detecting pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis, and may be an ideal technique of highly clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of the pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis. (authors)

  19. 18F-FDG PET/CT makes a significant contribution to diagnosis of malignancy in patients with cervical lymphadenopathy: a study using optimal scale regression tests

    OUYANG Lin; SHI Zhao-yin; LIN Zhi-gang

    2013-01-01

    Background The specificity and precision of lymphadenopathy assessment using US,CT and MRI are generally unsatisfactory,while fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) can support this process by providing additional information about the lymph node features.However,which image features of 18F-FDG PET/CT play the key role in the diagnosis and cutoffs of malignant cervical lymphadenopathy still needs to be determined by further studies.Our study aimed to identify 18F-FDG PET/CT abnormalities that would assist in making a reliable diagnosis of malignant cervical lymphadenopathy in enlarged cervical lymph nodes of patients with unknown primary diseases.Methods One hundred and ninety-one consecutive patients of cervical lymphadenopathy with unknown primary causes were examined by 18F-FDG PET/CT from May 2007 to October 2011 and a definite diagnosis was established by pathologic biopsy.18F-FDG PET/CT images were evaluated to identify the relevant abnormalities.All image features were analyzed by optimal scale regression tests to determine the important factors that were predictive for the diagnosis of malignant cervical lymphadenopathy and the cutoffs.Results The factors studied in 18F-FDG PET/CT images for predicting malignant cervical lymphadenopathy were sex,age,node location,size,shape,margins,maximum standard uptake value (SUV),mean SUV,FDG uptake pattern and number of nodes.It was found that mean SUV,maximum SUV,FDG uptake pattern,location,size and margins were the important risk factors of cervical lymph nodes that could predict malignant cervical lymphadenopathy.Signs of mean SUV≥2.5 (or maximum SUV≥3.5),nodular FDG uptake pattern,location of ⅡA,Ⅲ,Ⅳ,ⅤB,Ⅵ and Ⅶ regions,size≥1.5 cm and vague margins had their optimal diagnostic accuracy (Ac) and Youden index (YI),further,combination of any three factors of these six important risk factors would led to the best diagnosticAc of 96% and YI of 0

  20. {sup 18}F-FDG PET response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma are different

    Gaston, Louie L. [Philippine General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Manila (Philippines); Di Bella, Claudia [Saint Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma Service, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Slavin, John [Saint Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [The Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Translational Research Group, Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapeutics Laboratory, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Choong, Peter F.M. [Saint Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma Service, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Surgery, Melbourne (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) and osteosarcoma (OS) have different biological characteristics and respond differently to chemotherapy. We reviewed {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging characteristics of ES and OS patients at baseline and following treatment to determine whether this biological variation is reflected in their imaging phenotype. A retrospective review of ES and OS patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery was done, correlating PET results with histologic response to chemotherapy. Change in the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) between baseline and post-treatment scanning was not significantly associated with histologic response for either ES or OS. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the percentage of injected {sup 18}F-FDG dose (%ID) in the primary tumor were found to be different for ES and OS response subgroups. A 50% reduction in MTV (MTV2:1 < 0.5) was found to be significantly associated with favorable histologic response in OS. Using the same criteria for ES incorrectly predicted good responders. Increasing the cut-off values for ES to a 90% reduction in MTV (MTV2:1 < 0.1) resulted in association with favorable histologic response. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy as reflected by changes in PET characteristics should be interpreted differently for ES and OS. (orig.)

  1. Hybrid [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/MRI including non-Gaussian diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI): Preliminary results in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Heusch, Philipp [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Köhler, Jens [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Medical Oncology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Wittsack, Hans-Joerg [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Heusner, Till A., E-mail: Heusner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Buchbender, Christian [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Poeppel, Thorsten D. [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Nensa, Felix; Wetter, Axel [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Gauler, Thomas [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Medical Oncology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Hartung, Verena [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Lanzman, Rotem S. [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of non-Gaussian DWI as part of a FDG-PET/MRI protocol in patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer. Material and methods: 15 consecutive patients with histologically proven NSCLC (mean age 61 ± 11 years) were included in this study and underwent whole-body FDG-PET/MRI following whole-body FDG-PET/CT. As part of the whole-body FDG-PET/MRI protocol, an EPI-sequence with 5 b-values (0, 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 s/mm{sup 2}) was acquired for DWI of the thorax during free-breathing. Volume of interest (VOI) measurements were performed to determine the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}). A region of interest (ROI) was manually drawn around the tumor on b = 0 images and then transferred to the corresponding parameter maps to assess ADC{sub mono}, D{sub app} and K{sub app}. To assess the goodness of the mathematical fit R{sup 2} was calculated for monoexponential and non-Gaussian analysis. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to compare SUV values and diffusion coefficients. A Student's t-test was performed to compare the monoexponential and non-Gaussian diffusion fitting (R{sup 2}). Results: T staging was equal between FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MRI in 12 of 15 patients. For NSCLC, mean ADC{sub mono} was 2.11 ± 1.24 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, D{sub app} was 2.46 ± 1.29 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and mean K{sub app} was 0.70 ± 0.21. The non-Gaussian diffusion analysis (R{sup 2} = 0.98) provided a significantly better mathematical fitting to the DWI signal decay than the monoexponetial analysis (R{sup 2} = 0.96) (p < 0.001). SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} of NSCLC was 13.5 ± 7.6 and 7.9 ± 4.3 for FDG-PET/MRI. ADC{sub mono} as well as D{sub app} exhibited a significant inverse correlation with the SUV{sub max} (ADC{sub mono}: R = −0.67; p < 0.01; D{sub app}: R = −0.69; p < 0.01) as well as with SUV{sub mean} assessed by FDG-PET/MRI (ADC{sub mono}: R

  2. Hybrid [18F]-FDG PET/MRI including non-Gaussian diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI): Preliminary results in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of non-Gaussian DWI as part of a FDG-PET/MRI protocol in patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer. Material and methods: 15 consecutive patients with histologically proven NSCLC (mean age 61 ± 11 years) were included in this study and underwent whole-body FDG-PET/MRI following whole-body FDG-PET/CT. As part of the whole-body FDG-PET/MRI protocol, an EPI-sequence with 5 b-values (0, 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 s/mm2) was acquired for DWI of the thorax during free-breathing. Volume of interest (VOI) measurements were performed to determine the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax; SUVmean). A region of interest (ROI) was manually drawn around the tumor on b = 0 images and then transferred to the corresponding parameter maps to assess ADCmono, Dapp and Kapp. To assess the goodness of the mathematical fit R2 was calculated for monoexponential and non-Gaussian analysis. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to compare SUV values and diffusion coefficients. A Student's t-test was performed to compare the monoexponential and non-Gaussian diffusion fitting (R2). Results: T staging was equal between FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MRI in 12 of 15 patients. For NSCLC, mean ADCmono was 2.11 ± 1.24 × 10−3 mm2/s, Dapp was 2.46 ± 1.29 × 10−3 mm2/s and mean Kapp was 0.70 ± 0.21. The non-Gaussian diffusion analysis (R2 = 0.98) provided a significantly better mathematical fitting to the DWI signal decay than the monoexponetial analysis (R2 = 0.96) (p < 0.001). SUVmax and SUVmean of NSCLC was 13.5 ± 7.6 and 7.9 ± 4.3 for FDG-PET/MRI. ADCmono as well as Dapp exhibited a significant inverse correlation with the SUVmax (ADCmono: R = −0.67; p < 0.01; Dapp: R = −0.69; p < 0.01) as well as with SUVmean assessed by FDG-PET/MRI (ADCmono: R = −0.66; p < 0.01; Dapp: R = −0.69; p < 0.01). Furthermore, Kapp exhibited a significant correlation with SUVmax (R = 0.72; p < 0.05) and SUVmean as

  3. Comparison of [18 F]FDG PET/CT and MRI in the diagnosis of active osteomyelitis

    Demirev, Anastas; Mottaghy, Felix [University Hospital of Maastricht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene [University Hospital of Maastricht, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Geurts, Jan; Walenkamp, Geert [University Hospital of Maastricht, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Brans, Boudewijn [University Hospital of Maastricht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    In diagnosing osteomyelitis (OM) both MRI and [18 F]FDG PET-CT proved to be accurate modalities. In anticipation of the advent of hybrid PET/MRI scanners we analyzed our patient group to give direction to future imaging strategies in patients with suspected OM. In this retrospective study all patients of a tertiary referral center who underwent both an MRI and a PET for the diagnosis of OM were included. The results of those scans were evaluated using patient's histology, microbiological findings, and clinical/radiological follow-up. Additionally, ROC curve analysis of the SUVmax and the SUVmax ratio on the PET scans was performed. Two imaging strategies were simulated: first MRI followed by PET, or vice versa. Twenty-seven localizations in 26 patients were included. Both MRI and PET were shown to be accurate in our patients for the qualitative detection of OM. A cut-off value for the SUVmax of 3 gave optimal results (a specificity of 90 % with a sensitivity of 88 %). The SUVmax ratio gave a worse performance. The two simulated imaging strategies showed no difference in the final diagnosis in 20 out of 27 cases. Remarkably, 6 equivocal cases were all correctly diagnosed by the second modality, i.e., PET or MRI. Both MRI and [18 F]FDG PET were accurate in diagnosing OM in a tertiary referral hospital population. Simulation of imaging strategies showed that a combined sequential strategy was optimal. It seems preferable to use MRI as a primary imaging tool for uncomplicated unifocal cases, whereas in cases with (possible) multifocal disease or a contraindication for MRI, PET is preferred. This combined sequential strategy looks promising, but needs to be confirmed in a larger prospective study. (orig.)

  4. The study of automatic brain extraction of basal ganglia based on atlas of Talairach in 18F-FDG PET images

    Objective: To establish a method which can extract functional areas of the brain basal ganglia automatically. Methods: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images were spatial normalized to Talairach atlas space through two steps, image registration and image deformation. The functional areas were extracted from three dimension PET images based on the coordinate obtained from atlas; caudate and putamen were extracted and rendered, the grey value of the area was normalized by whole brain. Results: The normal ratio of left caudate head, body and tail were 1.02 ± 0.04, 0.92 ± 0.07 and 0.71 ± 0.03, the right were 0.98 ± 0.03, 0.87 ± 0.04 and 0.71 ± 0.01 respectively. The normal ratio of left and right putamen were 1.20 ± 0.06 and 1.20 ± 0.04. The mean grey value between left and right basal ganglia had no significant difference (P>0.05). Conclusion: The automatic functional area extracting method based on atlas of Talairach is feasible. (authors)

  5. Clinical value of 18F-FDG coincidence imaging for patients with fever of unknown origin

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) coincidence imaging in the diagnosis of fever of unknown origin (FUO). Methods: Fifty-eight patients with FUO (temperature>38.3 degree C, fever more than 3 weeks) underwent SPECT imaging with 18F-FDG. Region of interest (ROI) was drawn over the lesions (L) and contralateral or adjacent normal tissue (B). The radioactivity ratio L/B was calculated for both benign and malignant pathologies and compared by t test. Results In 48 patients(83%), at least one site of abnormal 18F-FDG accumulation on SPECT was found, which led to the final diagnosis of malignant disease in 20 patients, and infectious or other benign disease in 23 patients. Five patients remained unknown.Four in 10 (17%) cases with negative 18F-FDG SPECT were later proven as infectious disease (2 with urinary tract infection, 2 with lymphadenitis); 3 were found to have connective tissue and collagen disease (1 with rheumatism, 1 with adult onset still's disease. 1 with systemic lupus erythematosus); while the last 3 remained unknown. The L/B ratio of benign foci was 1.93 ± 0.39, and that of malignant foci was 3.58 ± 1.01 (statistically significant difference with t=6.955. P18F-FDG coincidence imaging is valuable in the diagnosis for FUO. (authors)

  6. [18F]FMISO and [18F]FDG PET imaging in soft tissue sarcomas: correlation of hypoxia, metabolism and VEGF expression

    Hypoxia imparts resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and also promotes a variety of changes in tumor biology through inducible promoters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in soft tissue sarcomas (STS) as a measure of hypoxia and to compare the results with those obtained using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and other known biologic correlates. FDG evaluates energy metabolism in tumors while FMISO uptake is proportional to tissue hypoxia. FMISO uptake was compared with FDG uptake. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was also compared with FMISO uptake. Nineteen patients with STS underwent PET scanning with quantitative determination of FMISO and FDG uptake prior to therapy (neo-adjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone). Ten patients receiving neo-adjuvant chemotherapy were also imaged after chemotherapy but prior to surgical resection. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was used to describe FDG uptake; regional tissue to blood ratio (≥1.2 was considered significant) was used for FMISO uptake. Significant hypoxia was found in 76% of tumors imaged prior to therapy. No correlation was identified between pretherapy hypoxic volume (HV) and tumor grade (r=0.15) or tumor volume (r=0.03). The correlation of HV with VEGF expression was 0.39. Individual tumors showed marked heterogeneity in regional VEGF expression. The mean pixel-by-pixel correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake was 0.49 (range 0.09-0.79) pretreatment and 0.32 (range -0.46-0.72) after treatment. Most tumors showed evidence of reduced uptake of both FMISO and FDG following chemotherapy. FMISO PET demonstrates areas of significant and heterogeneous hypoxia in soft tissue sarcomas. The significant discrepancy between FDG and FMISO uptake seen in this study indicates that regional hypoxia and glucose metabolism do not always correlate. Similarly, we did not find any relationship between

  7. Prognostic significance of mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake in PET/CT in advanced ovarian cancer

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of increased mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake in PET/CT for the staging of advanced ovarian cancer. We retrospectively evaluated patients managed for FIGO stage III/IV ovarian cancer between 1 January 2006 and 1 June 2009. Patients were included if they had undergone 18F-FDG PET/CT and surgery for initial staging. Exclusion criteria were age younger than 18 years, inability to undergo general anaesthesia, recurrent ovarian cancer, and borderline or nonepithelial malignancy. Whole-body PET/CT was performed after intravenous 18F-FDG injection. The location of abnormal hot spots and 18F-FDG maximal standard uptake values (SUVmax) were recorded. We compared the complete cytoreduction and survival rates in groups defined based on mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake and SUVmax values. Kaplan-Meier curves of overall survival and disease-free survival were compared using the log-rank test. Hazard ratios with their 95% confidence intervals were computed. Adjusted hazard ratios were obtained using a multivariate Cox model. We included 53 patients, of whom 17 (32%) had increased mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake. Complete cytoreduction was achieved in 14 (87.5%) of the 16 patients managed with primary surgery and in 21 (75%) of the 28 patients managed with interval surgery. Complete cytoreduction was achieved significantly more often among patients without increased mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake (80.6% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.001). Disease-free survival was comparable between the two groups. By univariate analysis, overall mortality was significantly higher among patients with increased mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake (hazard ratio 5.70, 95% confidence interval 1.74-18.6). The only factor significantly associated with overall survival by multivariate analysis was complete cytoreduction (adjusted hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.89). Increased mediastinal 18F-FDG uptake was common in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. However, complete cytoreduction

  8. Prognostic significance of mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PET/CT in advanced ovarian cancer

    Bats, Anne-Sophie; Lecuru, Fabrice [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Chirurgie Gynecologique et Cancerologique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM UMR-S 747, Paris (France); Hugonnet, Florent; Faraggi, Marc [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France); Huchon, Cyrille [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Chirurgie Gynecologique et Cancerologique, Paris (France); Bensaid, Cherazade [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Chirurgie Gynecologique et Cancerologique, Paris (France); Pierquet-Ghazzar, Nadia [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Paris (France)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in PET/CT for the staging of advanced ovarian cancer. We retrospectively evaluated patients managed for FIGO stage III/IV ovarian cancer between 1 January 2006 and 1 June 2009. Patients were included if they had undergone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and surgery for initial staging. Exclusion criteria were age younger than 18 years, inability to undergo general anaesthesia, recurrent ovarian cancer, and borderline or nonepithelial malignancy. Whole-body PET/CT was performed after intravenous {sup 18}F-FDG injection. The location of abnormal hot spots and {sup 18}F-FDG maximal standard uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were recorded. We compared the complete cytoreduction and survival rates in groups defined based on mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake and SUV{sub max} values. Kaplan-Meier curves of overall survival and disease-free survival were compared using the log-rank test. Hazard ratios with their 95% confidence intervals were computed. Adjusted hazard ratios were obtained using a multivariate Cox model. We included 53 patients, of whom 17 (32%) had increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Complete cytoreduction was achieved in 14 (87.5%) of the 16 patients managed with primary surgery and in 21 (75%) of the 28 patients managed with interval surgery. Complete cytoreduction was achieved significantly more often among patients without increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake (80.6% vs. 35.3%; p = 0.001). Disease-free survival was comparable between the two groups. By univariate analysis, overall mortality was significantly higher among patients with increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake (hazard ratio 5.70, 95% confidence interval 1.74-18.6). The only factor significantly associated with overall survival by multivariate analysis was complete cytoreduction (adjusted hazard ratio 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.89). Increased mediastinal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was common in patients

  9. Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst presenting paraadrenal tumor incidentally detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    A follow-up 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT scan of a 57-year-old asymptomatic male who had undergone total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer revealed a 5.0 x 4.0-cm, well-defined, ovoid-shaped mass around the left adrenal gland without definite FDG uptake. On the adrenal CT scan, the left paraadrenal tumor showed high attenuation on the precontrast scan without enhancement. The average Hounsfield unit (HU) was 58.1 on the precontrast scan and 58.4 on the postcontrast scan. The patient underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy for resection of the left paraadrenal tumor. The final histopathologic examination revealed a bronchogenic cyst. Although retroperitoneal bronchogenic cysts are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic tumors. The preoperative diagnosis is difficult, but a contrast-enhanced CT scan or 18F-FDG PET/CT scan may be useful for differentiating hyperattenuated cysts from other soft tissue masses

  10. Simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET-MRI in primary staging of breast cancer: A pilot study

    Highlights: • Initial staging of breast cancer important in treatment planning and prognostication. • We assessed role of simultaneous 18F-FDG PET-MRI in initial staging of breast cancer. • Primary, nodes and metastases on PET, MRI and PET-MRI for count and diagnostic confidence. • High diagnostic accuracy and confidence in detecting index and satellite lesions. • Comprehensive nodal and distant metastases staging with altered management (12 cases). - Abstract: Purpose: Accurate initial staging in breast carcinoma is important for treatment planning and for establishing the likely prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of whole body simultaneous 18F-FDG PET-MRI in initial staging of breast carcinoma. Methods: 36 patients with histologically confirmed invasive ductal carcinoma underwent simultaneous whole body 18F-FDG PET-MRI on integrated 3 T PET-MR scanner (Siemens Biograph mMR) for primary staging. Primary lesion, nodes and metastases were evaluated on PET, MRI and PET-MRI for lesion count and diagnostic confidence (DC). Kappa co relation analysis was done to assess agreement between the satellite, nodal and metastatic lesions detected by PET and MRI. Histopathology, clinical/imaging follow-up served as the reference standard. Results: 36 patients with 37 histopathologically proven index breast cancer were retrospectively studied. Of 36 patients, 25 patients underwent surgery and 11 patients received systemic therapy. All index cancers were seen on PET and MR. Fused PET-MRI showed highest diagnostic confidence score of 5 as compared to PET (median 4; range 3–5) and MRI (median 4; range 4–5) alone. 2/36 (5.5%) patients were detected to have unsuspected contralateral synchronous cancer. 47 satellite lesions were detected on DCE MRI of which 23 were FDG avid with multifocality and multicentricity in 21 (58%) patients. Kappa co relation analysis revealed fair agreement for satellite lesion detection by the two modalities (κ = 0

  11. Prospective comparison of whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI of the spine in the diagnosis of haematogenous spondylodiscitis

    To prospectively compare 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in the diagnosis of haematogenous spondylodiscitis The study included 26 patients (12 women, 14 men; mean age 59 ± 17 years) with clinical symptoms of infection of the spine. Patients who had had prior spinal surgery or any type of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months were excluded from the study. Whole-body PET/CT 60 min after injection of 4.07 MBq/kg of 18F-FDG and an MRI scan of the spine was performed in all patients. SUVmax in an area surrounding the lesions with the suspicion of infection as well as a background SUVmean in a preserved area of the spine were calculated for quantification. Infection was diagnosed by microbiological documentation in cultures of image-guided spinal puncture fluid or blood. Infection was excluded if symptoms were absent without antimicrobial therapy during a follow-up of at least 6 months. Spondylodiscitis was confirmed in 18 of the 26 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was found in 8 patients, Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 4, Escherichia coli in 2 and other pathogens in 4. Of the remaining 8 patients, the diagnoses were degenerative spondyloarthropathy in 5 and vertebral fracture in 3. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were 83 %, 88 %, 94 % and 70 % for 18F-FDG PET/CT, and 94 %, 38 %, 77 % and 75 % for MRI, respectively. The accuracies of 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI were similar (84 % and 81 %, respectively). The combination of 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI detected the infection in 100 % of the patients with spondylodiscitis. 18F-FDG uptake, quantified in terms of SUVmax corrected by the background SUVmean, was significantly higher in patients with spondylodiscitis than in those without infection (p 18F-FDG PET/CT should be considered as a first-line imaging procedure in the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis. Quantification of uptake in terms of SUVmax was able to discriminate infection of the spine from other processes in this series of patients. (orig.)

  12. Prospective comparison of whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI of the spine in the diagnosis of haematogenous spondylodiscitis

    Fuster, David; Mayoral, Maria; Manchon, Francisco; Granados, Ulises; Pons, Francesca [Hospital Clinic, Nuclear Medicine Department, Barcelona (Spain); Tomas, Xavier; Cardenal, Carles [Hospital Clinic, Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Soriano, Alex [Hospital Clinic, Infectious Diseases Department, Barcelona (Spain); Monegal, Anna [Hospital Clinic, Rheumatology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Sebastia [Hospital Clinic, Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Department, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-09-04

    To prospectively compare {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in the diagnosis of haematogenous spondylodiscitis The study included 26 patients (12 women, 14 men; mean age 59 ± 17 years) with clinical symptoms of infection of the spine. Patients who had had prior spinal surgery or any type of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months were excluded from the study. Whole-body PET/CT 60 min after injection of 4.07 MBq/kg of {sup 18}F-FDG and an MRI scan of the spine was performed in all patients. SUVmax in an area surrounding the lesions with the suspicion of infection as well as a background SUVmean in a preserved area of the spine were calculated for quantification. Infection was diagnosed by microbiological documentation in cultures of image-guided spinal puncture fluid or blood. Infection was excluded if symptoms were absent without antimicrobial therapy during a follow-up of at least 6 months. Spondylodiscitis was confirmed in 18 of the 26 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was found in 8 patients, Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 4, Escherichia coli in 2 and other pathogens in 4. Of the remaining 8 patients, the diagnoses were degenerative spondyloarthropathy in 5 and vertebral fracture in 3. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were 83 %, 88 %, 94 % and 70 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, and 94 %, 38 %, 77 % and 75 % for MRI, respectively. The accuracies of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI were similar (84 % and 81 %, respectively). The combination of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI detected the infection in 100 % of the patients with spondylodiscitis. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake, quantified in terms of SUVmax corrected by the background SUVmean, was significantly higher in patients with spondylodiscitis than in those without infection (p < 0.001). Due to its high specificity, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT should be considered as a first-line imaging procedure in the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis. Quantification of uptake in terms of SUVmax was able to

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET predicts survival after pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in patients with progressive metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Robin, Philippe [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Brest (France); Campion, Loic [ICO-Gauducheau Cancer Institute, Statistical Department, Nantes (France); Ansquer, Catherine; Mathieu, Cedric [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Frampas, Eric [University Hospital, Radiology Department, Nantes (France); Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); Bournaud, Claire [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Lyon (France); Vuillez, Jean-Philippe [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Grenoble (France); Taieb, David [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Marseille (France); Rousseau, Caroline [Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); ICO-Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Drui, Delphine [University Hospital, Endocrinology Department, Nantes (France); Mirallie, Eric [University Hospital, Surgery Department, Nantes (France); Borson-Chazot, Francoise [University Hospital, Endocrinology Department, Lyon (France); Goldenberg, David M. [IBC Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Garden State Cancer Center, Morris Plains, NJ (United States); Chatal, Jean-Francois [GIP ARRONAX, Saint-Herblain (France); Barbet, Jacques [Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); GIP ARRONAX, Saint-Herblain (France); Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Universite de Nantes, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, Inserm, U 892, CNRS, UMR 6299, Nantes (France); ICO-Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France); Hotel Dieu University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Nantes (France)

    2014-08-15

    PET is a powerful tool for assessing targeted therapy. Since {sup 18}F-FDG shows a potential prognostic value in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), this study evaluated {sup 18}F-FDG PET alone and combined with morphological and biomarker evaluations as a surrogate marker of overall survival (OS) in patients with progressive metastatic MTC treated with pretargeted anti-CEA radioimmunotherapy (pRAIT) in a phase II clinical trial. Patients underwent PET associated with morphological imaging (CT and MRI) and biomarker evaluations, before and 3 and 6 months, and then every 6 months, after pRAIT for 36 months. A combined evaluation was performed using anatomic, metabolic and biomarker methods. The prognostic value of the PET response was compared with demographic parameters at inclusion including age, sex, RET mutation, time from initial diagnosis, calcitonin and CEA concentrations and doubling times (DT), SUV{sub max}, location of disease and bone marrow involvement, and with response using RECIST, biomarker concentration variation, impact on DT, and combined methods. Enrolled in the study were 25 men and 17 women with disease progression. The median OS from pRAIT was 3.7 years (0.2 to 6.5 years) and from MTC diagnosis 10.9 years (1.7 to 31.5 years). After pRAIT, PET/CT showed 1 patient with a complete response, 4 with a partial response and 24 with disease stabilization. The combined evaluation showed 20 responses. For OS from pRAIT, univariate analysis showed the prognostic value of biomarker DT (P = 0.011) and SUV{sub max} (P = 0.038) calculated before pRAIT and impact on DT (P = 0.034), RECIST (P = 0.009), PET (P = 0.009), and combined response (P = 0.004) measured after pRAIT. PET had the highest predictive value with the lowest Akaike information criterion (AIC 74.26) as compared to RECIST (AIC 78.06), biomarker variation (AIC 81.94) and impact on DT (AIC 79.22). No benefit was obtained by combining the methods (AIC 78.75). This result was confirmed by the

  14. Usefulness of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in Evaluating a Brainstem Glioma in an Adult Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    We describe a case of a brainstem glioma (BSG) occurred in an adult patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and evaluated by Flourine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT). A 32-year-old male patient with NF1 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the onset of diplopia, facial paresis and cerebellar signs and symptoms. MRI showed a brainstem lesion compatible with BSG. Biopsy was not performed. 18F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated intense 18F-FDG uptake in the brainstem lesion, suggesting an aggressive neoplasm. The patient was referred to radiotherapy but he developed rapid disease progression. In this case, 18F-FDG-PET/CT provided useful information about this rare NF1-associated tumor. Subsequently, the patient was referred to radiotherapy, but he developed rapid disease progression and died 3 months later. NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple cafe-au-lait spots, axillary and inguinal freckling, multiple cutaneous neurofibromas, and iris Lisch nodules. NF-1 is also characterized by low-grade tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. There is also an increased risk of developing malignant tumors such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors or central nervous system high-grade gliomas. NF1-associated BSGs are less common than NF1-associated optic gliomas (OGs) and seem to represent a particular entity which tend, as a whole, to have a more favorable prognosis and a more indolent course than BSGs in patients without NF1; nevertheless, some NF1-associted BSG may rapidly progress. 18F-FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated to provide useful information to the surveillance of OGs in children with NF1, particularly to identify progressive, symptomatic tumors. To the best of our knowledge, there are no data about the usefulness of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in adult patients with NF1-associated BSG. In our case, 18F-FDG-PET/CT has been useful in evaluating this rare NF1-associated tumor

  15. Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in Evaluating a Brainstem Glioma in an Adult Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Treglia, Giorgio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Muoio, Barbara; Del Ciello, Annemilia [Univ. of the Sacred, Rome (Italy); Bertagna, Francesco [Univ. of Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    We describe a case of a brainstem glioma (BSG) occurred in an adult patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and evaluated by Flourine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT). A 32-year-old male patient with NF1 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the onset of diplopia, facial paresis and cerebellar signs and symptoms. MRI showed a brainstem lesion compatible with BSG. Biopsy was not performed. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated intense {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in the brainstem lesion, suggesting an aggressive neoplasm. The patient was referred to radiotherapy but he developed rapid disease progression. In this case, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT provided useful information about this rare NF1-associated tumor. Subsequently, the patient was referred to radiotherapy, but he developed rapid disease progression and died 3 months later. NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple cafe-au-lait spots, axillary and inguinal freckling, multiple cutaneous neurofibromas, and iris Lisch nodules. NF-1 is also characterized by low-grade tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. There is also an increased risk of developing malignant tumors such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors or central nervous system high-grade gliomas. NF1-associated BSGs are less common than NF1-associated optic gliomas (OGs) and seem to represent a particular entity which tend, as a whole, to have a more favorable prognosis and a more indolent course than BSGs in patients without NF1; nevertheless, some NF1-associted BSG may rapidly progress. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated to provide useful information to the surveillance of OGs in children with NF1, particularly to identify progressive, symptomatic tumors. To the best of our knowledge, there are no data about the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in adult patients with NF1-associated BSG. In our case, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT has been useful in

  16. Value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary gastric cancer via stomach distension

    Objective: To clarify the usefulness of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting primary gastric cancer via gastric distention using a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine. Materials and methods: A total of 68 patients (male: 47, female: 21; age: 41–87 years) suspected of gastric carcinoma underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging. After whole-body PET/CT imaging in a fasting state, the patients drank a measured amount of milk with Diatrizoate Meglumine. Local gastric district PET/CT imaging was performed 30 min later. The imaging was analyzed by semi-quantitative analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor was measured in a region of interest. The diagnosis results were confirmed by gastroscopy, pathology, and follow-up results. Results: Of the 68 patients, 56 malignant gastric neoplasm patients (male: 37, female: 19) were conformed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of fasting whole-body PET/CT imaging for a primary malignant tumor were 92.9%, 75.0%, 94.5%, and 69.0%, respectively. The values for distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine were 91.1%, 91.7%, 98.1%, and 68.8%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.919 ± 0.033 and 0.883 ± 0.066 for the diagnosis of gastric cancer with SUVmax in a fasting state and after intake of mixture respectively, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.359). Using gastric distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine, the mean ratio of the lesion's SUVmax to the adjacent gastric wall SUVmax increased significantly from 3.30 ± 3.05 to 13.50 ± 15.05, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging is highly accurate for the diagnosis of primary gastric carcinoma. Gastric distention can display the lesions more clearly, however, it cannot significantly improve diagnostic accuracy

  17. Value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary gastric cancer via stomach distension

    Ma, Quanmei, E-mail: 444656285@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xin, Jun, E-mail: xinj@sj-hospital.org [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhao, Zhoushe, E-mail: zhoushe.zhao@ge.com [GE, Shenyang 110004 (China); Guo, Qiyong, E-mail: guoqy@vip.sina.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yu, Shupeng, E-mail: drizzleyu@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xu, Weina, E-mail: xuwn@sj-hospital.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Changping, E-mail: liucp1698@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhai, Wei, E-mail: zhw69@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detecting primary gastric cancer via gastric distention using a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine. Materials and methods: A total of 68 patients (male: 47, female: 21; age: 41–87 years) suspected of gastric carcinoma underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging. After whole-body PET/CT imaging in a fasting state, the patients drank a measured amount of milk with Diatrizoate Meglumine. Local gastric district PET/CT imaging was performed 30 min later. The imaging was analyzed by semi-quantitative analysis, standardized uptake value (SUV) of the primary tumor was measured in a region of interest. The diagnosis results were confirmed by gastroscopy, pathology, and follow-up results. Results: Of the 68 patients, 56 malignant gastric neoplasm patients (male: 37, female: 19) were conformed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of fasting whole-body PET/CT imaging for a primary malignant tumor were 92.9%, 75.0%, 94.5%, and 69.0%, respectively. The values for distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine were 91.1%, 91.7%, 98.1%, and 68.8%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.919 ± 0.033 and 0.883 ± 0.066 for the diagnosis of gastric cancer with SUV{sub max} in a fasting state and after intake of mixture respectively, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.359). Using gastric distension with a mixture of milk and Diatrizoate Meglumine, the mean ratio of the lesion's SUV{sub max} to the adjacent gastric wall SUV{sub max} increased significantly from 3.30 ± 3.05 to 13.50 ± 15.05, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging is highly accurate for the diagnosis of primary gastric carcinoma. Gastric distention can display the lesions more clearly, however, it cannot significantly improve diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in recurrent or residual gynaecologic carcinoma

    Vees, Hansjoerg; Casanova, Nathalie; Zilli, Thomas; Imperiano, Hestia; Ratib, Osman; Popowski, Youri; Wang, Hui; Zaidi, Habib; Miralbell, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on target volume delineation in gynaecological cancer. Methods F-FDG PET/CT based RT treatment planning was performed in 10 patients with locally recurrent (n = 5) or post-surgical residual gynaecological cancer (n = 5). The gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by 4 experienced radiation oncologists first using contrast enhanced CT (GTVCT) and secondly using the fused 18F-FDG PET/CT datasets (GTVPET/CT). In addition, the GTV was delineated u...

  19. The study on glucose metabolism of the brain of patients with Parkinson's disease using 18F-FDG PET

    Objective: To study glucose metabolism of the brain of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) by PET, to investigate the imaging characteristics of 18F-FDG PET in Chinese patients with PD. Methods: 50 min after intravenous administration of 18F-FDG, brain scan was performed on 33 patients with PD and 32 age-matched healthy subjects. Semiquantitative analysis was applied to assess the metabolic function of the brain by the ratio of mean radioactivity of various cerebral lobes (substantia nigra, putamen, caudatum, thalamus, temporal lobe, frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, hippocampus) to cerebellum (Rcl/cb). PET scan was compared with MRI. Results: In healthy subjects PET scan showed clear and symmetrical distribution of radioactivity in the cerebral lobes. 96.97% of PD patients showed abnormal PET images, 30.30% of PD patients' MRI showed abnormal, but only 9.09% of that was special. The radioactivity ratio of cerebral lobes to cerebellum of PD patients in nigra-striatum dopaminergic system and cerebral lobes was significantly decreased than that in healthy subjects. The opposite nigra-striatum system and frontal lobe of the more serious sick limbs were significantly more hypo-metabolic than the same side cerebral lobes. The characteristic PET images of PD patients showed that asymmetrical substantia nigra hypometabolism in 93.94% of the PD cases, striatum, thalamus asymmetrical hypometabolism in 69.70% and 36.36% PD cases; slight asymmetrical increase of radioactivity in striatum and thalamus in 15.15% PD cases; cerebral lobes asymmetrical hypometabolism of temporal lobe in 51.52%, frontal in 39.39%, parietal in 15.15%, occipital in 9.09%, hippocampal in 45.46% PD cases; slight cerebral asymmetrical hypermetabolism in 9.09% PD cases. Conclusions: In addition to cerebral structural lesions in the brain, asymmetrical hypometabolism and slight hypermetabolism can be found in nigra-striatum dopaminergic system accompany with cerebral hypometabolism or slight

  20. Brown Adipose Tissue Can Be Activated or Inhibited within an Hour before 18F-FDG Injection: A Preliminary Study with MicroPET

    Chenxi Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT is emerging as a potential target for treating human obesity. It has been indicated that BAT is rich in innervations of sympathetic nerve control. Using 18F-FDG microPET imaging, this study aims at evaluating how factors related to sympathetic activation/inhibition changed BAT metabolism of mice. BAT 18F-FDG uptake were semiquantitatively evaluated in different groups of mice under temperature (cold or warm stimulus or pharmacological interventions (norepinephrine, epinephrine, isoprenaline, or propranolol and were compared with the corresponding controls. It was found that BAT activation can be stimulated by cold exposure (P=1.96×10−4, norepinephrine (P=.002, or both (P=2.19×10−6 within an hour before 18F-FDG injection and can also be alleviated by warming up (P=.001 or propranolol lavage (P=.027. This preliminary study indicated that BAT function could be evaluated by 18F-FDG PET imaging through short-term interventions, which paved the way for further investigation of the relationship between human obesity and BAT dysfunction.

  1. Clinical value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of primary peritoneal papillary serous carcinoma

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in primary peritoneal papillary serous carcinoma (PPPSC). Methods: Ten postmenopausal female cases of pathologically diagnosed PPPSC from March 2009 to October 2011 were retrospectively reviewed (age range: 61-81 years, mean: (69.4±6.2) years). All cases underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT.The CT characteristics and SUVmax of lesions on PET images were analyzed. Serum CA125 levels were measured before or after PET/CT within one week. The patterns of PPPSC on PET/CT were compared with histopathological results. Linear correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between the CA125 and the maximum SUVmax of lesions presented in parietal peritoneum, greater omentum or mesentery. Results: The PET/CT uptake pattern of the 10 PPPSC cases was described as floccus, multi-nodular or cake-like in greater omentum (SUVmax =6.32±2.87), and as diffuse or localized nodules,or non-uniform strip-like thickening in 9 parietal peritoneum and 8 mesentery cases (SUVmax=5.96±2.14 and 5.70± 1.69, respectively). The most commonly involved sites were pelvic wall of peritoneum and mesentery of small intestine. All 10 cases had different degrees of ascites, mainly intrapelvic and perihepatic. Hypermetabolic ovarian enlargement (all <5 cm) was bilateral in 2 patients and right-sided in 1 patient. Four patients had retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis and others were found with punctate calcifications in metastatic lymph nodes, small pleural effusions, liver metastasis,as well as portal node metastasis. CA125 concentration was elevated in all cases ((51.25±26.40) ×104 U/L), but there was no significant correlation between CA125 and the maximum SUVmax of lesions found in parietal peritoneum, greater omentum or mesentery (r=0.05, P>0.05). Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT could show the positions and metabolic status of PPPSC lesions.It may be an effective imaging modality in the diagnosis and assessment of PPPSC. (authors)

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma

    Sharma, Punit; Jain, Sachin; Karunanithi, Sellam; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Pal, Sujoy [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, New Delhi (India); Julka, Pramod Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, New Delhi (India); Thulkar, Sanjay [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma, suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. This was a retrospective study. Data from 180 patients (age 56.3 ± 10.4 years; 126 men, 54 women) with histopathologically proven oesophageal carcinoma (squamous cell 115, adenocarcinoma 59, neuroendocrine carcinoma 4, small cell 1, poorly differentiated 1) who had undergone 227 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies for suspected recurrence were analysed. Recurrence was suspected clinically or following conventional investigations. PET/CT images were revaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus. Findings were grouped into local, nodal and distant recurrence. Results were compared to those from contrast-enhanced (CE) CT when available (109 patients). Clinical/imaging follow-up (minimum 6 months) with histopathology (when available) was taken as the reference standard. Of the 227 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies,166 were positive and 61 were negative for recurrent disease. PET/CT showed local recurrence in 134, nodal recurrence in 115 and distant recurrence in 47, with more than one site of recurrence in 34. The PET/CT findings were true-positive in 153 studies, true-negative in 54, false-positive in 13 and false-negative in 7. The sensitivity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was 96 %, the specificity was 81 %, the positive and negative predictive values were 92 % and 89 %, respectively, and the accuracy was 91 %. PET/CT showed similar accuracy in patients with squamous cell carcinoma and in those with adenocarcinoma (P = 0.181).{sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was more specific than CECT (67 % vs. 21 %; P < 0.0001). PET/CT was superior to CECT for the detection of nodal recurrence (P < 0.0001), but not local recurrence (P = 0.093) or distant metastases (P = 0.441). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT shows high accuracy in the detection of suspected recurrence in patients with oesophageal carcinoma. It is more specific than

  3. Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, combined FDG-PET/CT and EUS in diagnosing primary pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    Tang Shuang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Huang Gang, E-mail: huang2802@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Liu Jianjun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Liu Tao [Department of Orthopedics, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Treven, Lyndal [Faculty of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Song Saoli; Zhang Chenpeng; Pan Lingling [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhang Ting [Department of Anesthesiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2011-04-15

    The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), combined {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in diagnosing patients with pancreatic carcinoma. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and some other databases, from January 1966 to April 2009, were searched for initial studies. All the studies published in English or Chinese relating to the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, PET/CT and EUS for patients with pancreatic cancer were collected. Methodological quality was assessed. The statistic software called 'Meta-Disc 1.4' was used for data analysis. Results: 51 studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity estimate for combined PET/CT (90.1%) was significantly higher than PET (88.4%) and EUS (81.2%). The pooled specificity estimate for EUS (93.2%) was significantly higher than PET (83.1%) and PET/CT (80.1%). The pooled DOR estimate for EUS (49.774) was significantly higher than PET (32.778) and PET/CT (27.105). SROC curves for PET/CT and EUS showed a little better diagnostic accuracy than PET alone. For PET alone, when interpreted the results with knowledge of other imaging tests, its sensitivity (89.4%) and specificity (80.1%) were closer to PET/CT. For EUS, its diagnostic value decreased in differentiating pancreatic cancer for patients with chronic pancreatitis. In conclusion, PET/CT was a high sensitive and EUS was a high specific modality in diagnosing patients with pancreatic cancer. PET/CT and EUS could play different roles during different conditions in diagnosing pancreatic carcinoma.

  4. The diagnostic value of [18F]FDG PET for the detection of chronic osteomyelitis and implant-associated infection

    The diagnosis of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections in patients with nonspecific laboratory or radiological findings is often unsatisfactory. We retrospectively evaluated the contributions of [18F]FDG PET and [18F]FDG PET/CT to the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections, enabling timely and appropriate decision-making for further therapy options. [18F]FDG PET or PET/CT was performed in 215 patients with suspected osteomyelitis or implant-associated infections between 2000 and 2013. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of both modalities together and separately with reference to intraoperative microbial findings, with a mean clinical follow-up of 69 ± 49 months. Infections were diagnosed clinically in 101 of the 215 patients. PET and PET/CT scans revealed 87 true-positive, 76 true-negative, 38 false-positive, and 14 false-negative results, indicating a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 67 %, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 70 %, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 84 % and an accuracy of 76 %. The sensitivity of PET/CT was 88 %, but specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy (76 %, 76 %, 89 % and 82 %, respectively) were higher than those of stand-alone PET. [18F]FDG PET is able to identify with high sensitivity the presence of osteomyelitis in orthopaedic surgery patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms of infection. (orig.)

  5. The role of 18F-FDG PET for differentiating malignant from benign lesions in the pancreas

    Objective: To investigate the role of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for differentiating malignant form benign lesions in the pancreas. Methods: 18F-FDG PET imaging was performed on 30 patients including 20 cases with pancreatic malignant tumors (15 adenocarcinoma, 1 low malignant islet cell tumor, 1 carcinosarcoma, and 3 patients with recurrent tumor after resection of primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma), and 10 cases with chronic pancreatitis (pancreatic pseudocysts were found in 3 of them). The final diagnosis was obtained by pathologic (n=22) and clinical or radiologic follow-up lasted 3-12 months (n=8). PET findings were compared with the results of abdominal CT (n=25) and/or MRI(n=8) done within 2 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels were controlled in 3.9-5.9 mmol/L in all patients at first, then 222-296 MBq of 18F-FDG was intravenously injected, the transmission and emission scan were performed 1 h after injection. The images of FDG PET were analyzed visually and semiquantitatively using standard uptake value (SUV). Results: Nineteen of twenty patients with malignant tumors (95.0%) showed increased FDG uptake with a SUV of 4.91 ± 3.65, and 9 of 10 patients with chronic pancreatitis (90%) showed low FDG uptake with a SUV of 1.70 ± 1.12 (t=2.69, P=0.012 5 cm, of SUV of 5.46 ± 2.29 (n=10, χ2=9.02, P=0.011). Using a cut-off value of > 2.5 for the SUV, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing pancreatic malignant tumors using FDG PET were higher than that of abdominal CT (95.0%, 90.0% and 93.3% versus 75.0%, 55.6% and 68.0%, respectively, χ2=5.89, P=0.015). Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET is a sensitive and specific noninvasive technique for diagnosing pancreatic disorders

  6. Administered activities of 18F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 ± 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of 18F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine

  7. Localized Airspace Consolidation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Mimicking Malignant Lesions in 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging: One Case Report.

    Wang, Yan-Li; Fang, Na; Zeng, Lei; Wu, Zeng-jie; Cui, Xin-Jian

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease caused by diffuse, abnormal intra-alveolar surfactant accumulation. Here, we report a case of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with heterogeneous accumulation of F-FDG in both lungs shown on the combined F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:26252337

  8. Multiple primary malignant tumors of upper gastrointestinal tract:A novel role of ~(18)F-FDG PET/CT

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the capacity of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) for detecting multiple primary cancer of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract. METHODS: Fifteen patients (12 without cancer histories and 3 with histories of upper GI tract cancer) were investigated due to the suspicion of primary cancer of UGI tract on X-ray barium meal and CT scan. Subsequent whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was carried out for initial staging or restaging. All the patient...

  9. Screening in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers: added value of 18F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis and 1-year follow-up

    Specific recommendations on screening modalities for paraganglioma (PGL) and phaeochromocytoma (PCC) in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers (relatives) are still lacking. We evaluated the added value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in comparison with morphological imaging at initial diagnosis and 1 year of follow-up in this population. The study included 30 consecutive relatives with a proven SDHx mutation who were investigated by 18F-FDG PET/CT, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck, thoracic/abdominal/pelvic (TAP) contrast-enhanced CT and/or TAP MRI. 123I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 20 subjects and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in 20 subjects. The gold standard was based on pathology or a composite endpoint as defined by any other positive imaging method and persistent tumour on follow-up. Images were considered as false-positive when the lesions were not detected by another imaging method or not confirmed at 1 year. At initial work-up, an imaging abnormality was found in eight subjects (27 %). The final diagnosis was true-positive in five subjects (two with abdominal PGL, one with PCC and two with neck PGL) and false-positives in the other three subjects (detected with 18F-FDG PET/CT in two and TAP MRI in one). At 1 year, an imaging abnormality was found in three subjects of which one was an 8-mm carotid body PGL in a patient with SDHD mutation and two were considered false-positive. The tumour detection rate was 100 % for 18F-FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging, 80 % for SRS and 60 % for 123I-MIBG scintigraphy. Overall, disease was detected in 4 % of the subjects at the 1-year follow-up. 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated excellent sensitivity but intermediate specificity justifying combined modality imaging in these patients. Given the slow progression of the disease, if 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI are normal at baseline, the second imaging work-up should be delayed and an examination that does not expose the patient to radiation

  10. Screening in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers: added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis and 1-year follow-up

    Lepoutre-Lussey, C.; Deandreis, D.; Berdelou, A.; Nascimento, C.; Lumbroso, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Baudin, E.; Leboulleux, S. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif (France); Caramella, C.; Bidault, F.; Deschamps, F. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Al Ghuzlan, A. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Medical Biology and Pathology, Villejuif (France); Hartl, D.; Dumont, F. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Surgery, Villejuif (France); Borget, I. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Biostatistic and Epidemiology, Villejuif (France); Paris-Sud University, Villejuif (France); Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Department of Genetics, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Faculty of Medicine, Paris (France); Guillaud Bataille, M. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Genetics, Villejuif (France)

    2015-05-01

    Specific recommendations on screening modalities for paraganglioma (PGL) and phaeochromocytoma (PCC) in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers (relatives) are still lacking. We evaluated the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in comparison with morphological imaging at initial diagnosis and 1 year of follow-up in this population. The study included 30 consecutive relatives with a proven SDHx mutation who were investigated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck, thoracic/abdominal/pelvic (TAP) contrast-enhanced CT and/or TAP MRI. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 20 subjects and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in 20 subjects. The gold standard was based on pathology or a composite endpoint as defined by any other positive imaging method and persistent tumour on follow-up. Images were considered as false-positive when the lesions were not detected by another imaging method or not confirmed at 1 year. At initial work-up, an imaging abnormality was found in eight subjects (27 %). The final diagnosis was true-positive in five subjects (two with abdominal PGL, one with PCC and two with neck PGL) and false-positives in the other three subjects (detected with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in two and TAP MRI in one). At 1 year, an imaging abnormality was found in three subjects of which one was an 8-mm carotid body PGL in a patient with SDHD mutation and two were considered false-positive. The tumour detection rate was 100 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging, 80 % for SRS and 60 % for {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy. Overall, disease was detected in 4 % of the subjects at the 1-year follow-up. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated excellent sensitivity but intermediate specificity justifying combined modality imaging in these patients. Given the slow progression of the disease, if {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI are normal at baseline, the second imaging work-up should be delayed and an examination

  11. 18F-FDG PET/MRI fusion in characterizing pancreatic tumors. Comparison to PET/CT

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion was feasible in characterizing pancreatic tumors (PTs), comparing MRI and computed tomography (CT) as mapping images for fusion with PET as well as fused PET/MRI and PET/CT. We retrospectively reviewed 47 sets of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and MRI examinations to evaluate suspected or known pancreatic cancer. To assess the ability of mapping images for fusion with PET, CT (of PET/CT), T1- and T2-weighted (w) MR images (all non-contrast) were graded regarding the visibility of PT (5-point confidence scale). Fused PET/CT, PET/T1-w or T2-w MR images of the upper abdomen were evaluated to determine whether mapping images provided additional diagnostic information to PET alone (3-point scale). The overall quality of PET/CT or PET/MRI sets in diagnosis was also assessed (3-point scale). These PET/MRI-related scores were compared to PET/CT-related scores and the accuracy in characterizing PTs was compared. Forty-three PTs were visualized on CT or MRI, including 30 with abnormal FDG uptake and 13 without. The confidence score for the visibility of PT was significantly higher on T1-w MRI than CT. The scores for additional diagnostic information to PET and overall quality of each image set in diagnosis were significantly higher on the PET/T1-w MRI set than the PET/CT set. The diagnostic accuracy was higher on PET/T1-w or PET/T2-w MRI (93.0 and 90.7%, respectively) than PET/CT (88.4%), but statistical significance was not obtained. PET/MRI fusion, especially PET with T1-w MRI, was demonstrated to be superior to PET/CT in characterizing PTs, offering better mapping and fusion image quality. (author)

  12. Comparison of first pass bolus AIFs extracted from sequential 18F-FDG PET and DSC-MRI of mice

    Accurate kinetic modelling of in vivo physiological function using positron emission tomography (PET) requires determination of the tracer time–activity curve in plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). The AIF is usually determined by invasive blood sampling methods, which are prohibitive in murine studies due to low total blood volumes. Extracting AIFs from PET images is also challenging due to large partial volume effects (PVE). We hypothesise that in combined PET with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR), a co-injected bolus of MR contrast agent and PET ligand can be tracked using fast MR acquisitions. This protocol would allow extraction of a MR AIF from MR contrast agent concentration–time curves, at higher spatial and temporal resolution than an image-derived PET AIF. A conversion factor could then be applied to the MR AIF for use in PET kinetic analysis. This work has compared AIFs obtained from sequential DSC-MRI and PET with separate injections of gadolinium contrast agent and 18F-FDG respectively to ascertain the technique′s validity. An automated voxel selection algorithm was employed to improve MR AIF reproducibility. We found that MR and PET AIFs displayed similar character in the first pass, confirmed by gamma variate fits (p<0.02). MR AIFs displayed reduced PVE compared to PET AIFs, indicating their potential use in PET/MR studies

  13. In vivo monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections and antimicrobial therapy by 18F-FDG-MicroPET in a mouse model

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena Zabalza, Beatriz; Grilló, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose–MicroPET ([18F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found i...

  14. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in trauma patients with suspected chronic osteomyelitis

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in trauma patients with suspected chronic osteomyelitis. Thirty-three partial body 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 33 patients with trauma suspected of having chronic osteomyelitis. In 10 and 23 patients, infection was suspected in the axial and appendicular skeleton, respectively. In 18 patients, PET/CT was performed in the presence of metallic implants. Histopathology or bacteriological culture was used as the standard of reference. For statistical analysis, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated in relation to findings of the reference standard. Of 33 PET/CT scans, 17 were true positive, 13 true negative, two false positive and one false negative. Eighteen patients had chronic osteomyelitis and 15 had no osseous infection according to the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for 18F-FDG PET/CT was 94%, 87% and 91% for the whole group, 88%, 100% and 90% for the axial skeleton and 100%, 85% and 91% for the appendicular skeleton, respectively. 18F-FDG PET/CT is a highly sensitive and specific method for the evaluation of chronic infection in the axial and appendicular skeleton in patients with trauma. PET/CT allows precise anatomical localisation and characterisation of the infectious focus and demonstrates the extent of chronic osteomyelitis with a high degree of accuracy. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 and Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Arlinghaus, Lori R. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Lee, Tzu-Cheng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Kang, Hakmook [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 and Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Linden, Hannah M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone